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momaha.com

VOLUME 9 · ISSUE 4 APRIL

2018

best buds

TIPS FOR FINDING THE RIGHT FURRY FRIEND

Silly spring garden starters

GET ORGANIZED End the clutter cycle


ae t

N E E GR

KAL E

Large, wrinkly leaves have an earthy flavor. Use in soups and sauces, or sauté as a side dish. Bake kale chips or stir cooked kale into farro.

SPINACH

DANDEL ION GREENS Bitter, earthy leaves

Tender leaves have a mild, delicately sweet flavor. Use fresh for salads, smoothies, or stuffed chicken. Cook with garlic for a quick side dish.

have jagged edges and a delicate texture. Toss with sweeter greens for a salad mix and top with bacon and goat cheese. Blanch in salted water or sauté and wilt down.

BUTTERHEAD LAsETTUC E the name suggests, this lettuce is buttery soft in texture. It has large leaves and a mild flavor. Use for lettuce wraps, lettuce cups, sandwiches, or salads.

ARUGUL A

Tangy and peppery arugula adds a spicy edge. Mix with milder greens for salads or use it to top pizzas or make pesto.

www.freshthyme.com #FreshThymeFinds

RED L EAF L ETTUC E This tender, delicate

lettuce is mild in flavor. Use it to add color to mixed green salads or layer it on sandwiches.

GRAYHAWK 14949 Evans Plaza Omaha, NE 68116

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THE BEST PLACE FOR KIDS.

Levi & Dylan, age 4 Pulmonary Atresia

Visit ChildrensOmaha.org for more information on how we can help your child. For a pediatrician, family physician or pediatric specialist, call 1.800.833.3100.

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SUMMER CAMPS ENROLLING NOW MAKE THEIR SUMMERS ELECTRIFYING 402-691-8875 Omaha@SchoolofRock.com www.schoolofrock.com 2076603-01

Competition and Performance Team Informational Parent Meetings on

April, 15th

1:00-2:30pm - Competition Team parent meeting for dancers going into Third Grade & Under 2:30-4:00pm - Performance Team parent meeting for dancers going into First Grade & Up 4:00-5:30pm - Competition Team parent meeting for dancers going into Fourth Grade & Up Director/Instructor Jennifer Wollmann DanceDynamicsNE.com

E-mail: DanceDynamicsNE@yahoo.com 1238 Royal Dr. Papillion 402-932-9805 3


SEMI-ANNUAL 19TH YEAR

Consignment Sale 4 DAYS ONLY! April 11th - 14th 9:30am - 7:00pm

1/2 Price Day Sat 9:30 - 4:00

West Omaha’s Premier Sale! Everything for Kidz! Consign, Volunteer, Shop.

Spring/Summer Clothing - Swimsuits - Outdoor Toys - Play Sets - Bikes -Dancewear Sports Gear - Jr. Clothing - Furniture - Cribs - Highchairs - Strollers - Gaming Systems Omaha Sports Complex | 14706 Giles Rd. kidzshoppeomaha.com | 402-370-8150

   

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Performing arts camps & classes

       Many performance opportunities One-week & multi-week camps available Camps for ages 4-18, beginners to advanced

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Saturday, March 31st ws 2 sho

2:00pm and 6:00pm ORPHEUM O RPHEUM T THEATER HEATER danieltigerlive.com

Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood © 2017 The Fred Rogers Company. All rights reserved. The PBS KIDS logo is a registered trademark of the Public Broadcasting Service and is used with permission.

2076552-02

TicketOmaha.com • 402-345-0606

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FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!

momaha where moms connect INSTRUMENT PETTING ZOO & ACTIVITIES BEGIN AT 1:15 PM!

VOLUME 9 . ISSUE 4 . APRIL 2018 editor in chief CHRIS CHRISTEN chris.christen@owh.com 402-444-1094

creative director + designer HEIDI THORSON hthorson@owh.com 402-444-1351

copy editor SHELLEY LARSEN shelley.larsen@owh.com 402-444-1143

Enlist in Symphonic Starfleet, board the Sonic Spaceship, and engage in intergalactic adventure! Set a course for maximum fun with music from Star Wars, The Planets, and more!

Sunday, April 15  2 pm  Holland Center Enrico Lopez-Yañez, conductor Tickets $15

assistant editor MARJIE DUCEY marjie.ducey@owh.com 402-444-1034

momaha.com editor

402.345.0606 • OMAHASYMPHONY.ORG 2022075 0075 7521 75 1111-01 2075211-01 2111211211 01

ASHLEE COFFEY ashlee.coffey@owh.com 402-444-1075

production coordinator PAT R I C I A “ M U R P H Y ” B E N O I T

content contributors

Join us for a summer of

EXPLORE and G R O W

OUTDOOR E ADVENTUR

EXPLORE

THE MORE YOU

SAVE

• Buy one week of camp at regular price, get 10% off the second week • Buy two weeks of camp at regular price, get 50% off the third week

FUN THEMES • FLEXIBLE SCHEDULING OPPORTUNITIES FOR DISCOVERY

EVER ROSS, PHOTO BY ASHLEY ROSS

account manager L AURE N KRUGE R lauren.kruger@owh.com 402-444-1261 G AY L I D D E L L gay.liddell@owh.com 402-444-1489

account executive E M I LY M A R T I N emily.martin@owh.com 402-444-1411

account executive MICHAEL MEDRANO michael.medrano@owh.com 402-444-1209 Momaha Magazine is a monthly publication of the Omaha World-Herald, 1314 Douglas St., Suite 700, Omaha, NE 68102. Momaha is a registered trademark, and all content is copyright 2018 by the Omaha World-Herald. All rights reserved. The opinions and perspectives published herein are those of the authors and should not be construed as those of Momaha Magazine.

100 Bancroft Street, Omaha (402) 346-4002, ext. 253

www.lauritzengardens.org 2074821-01

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cover photo

account executive

Summer Adventure Camps at Lauritzen Gardens provide exciting opportunities for children ages 4-12 to connect to nature and foster an appreciation for the environment through direct experiences with the natural world. Visit lauritzengardens.org for details.

THE MORE YOU

D AV I D C O D R AMY TOKOS

CORRECTION: A photo of Fontenelle Forest day campers playing in a stream was incorrectly credited in our March issue. Explore this year’s summer day camps for ages 4 to 17 at fontenelleforest.org.


CONTENTS MEET THE COVER BUNNY: ZOEY

PHOTO BY ASHLEY ROSS

Bunny Zoey has over 18,500 followers on the Facebook page @DaisyandJasper. Life wasn't always so good for the Lionhead rabbit. She and nine other bunnies weren't up to show standards and were nearly killed by their breeder. Instead, they were rescued by Omaha Wags to Riches. All were adopted with Zoey taken in by Suneetha Garige and her family. Garige's first two bunnies were Daisy and Jasper, hence the name of the Facebook page. Garige said many people acquire rabbits this time of year and then don't want to keep them. Garige wants to remind everyone that they are a lifetime commitment and not just a fun Easter gift. "I don't want people dumping bunnies,'' she says. "It really breaks my heart.'' The family has had Zoey for nearly a year. She isn't caged and is more like a dog than a rabbit. Garige's husband, Chandra Boosani, says the bunny rules their home. "She's a little kid in the house,'' Garige says. "She's part of the family.''

REAL MOMS + ADVICE

SEASONAL

8 Editor’s Column 10 On Our Radar 12 Momaha Bookshelf 24 Be Well 26 Dog Gone Problems 30 Get Organized

16 DIY Clay Bunny Planters 17 Egghead Planters 18 Baby Love 20 Junkstock 32 Eggs in a Basket

SPONSORED FEATURES 14 YMCA: Youth Sports 22 Fontenelle Forest 28 Marian High School

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MOMAHA.COM EDITOR // ASHLEE COFFEY Wife to Kevin Coffey, music critic for the Omaha World-Herald. Mom to Sam and Elliott. Follow her on Twitter: @AshleeCoffeyOWH

Sam and Nellie

A CHERISHED NIGHTTIME RITUAL

E

very night at bedtime, 4-year-old Sam picks out two books to read. We hop in bed, pull up the covers and launch into the books. And every night, our 10-year-old cat, Nellie, is right there with us — seemingly listening to the story. When we’re finished reading, I put the books away, tuck Sam in, turn off the light, tell him I love him and leave the room. Most nights, Nellie stays behind, curls up in Sam’s bed and goes to sleep. When she doesn’t, Sam gets out of bed and tries to coax her back into his room. I can’t count the number of times Sam has said: “Mommy? Nellie is my best friend.” She is always following him around and bugs him constantly for affection. She’s even patient with our 18-monthold, Elliott. It is adorable.

Growing up, we always had dogs and cats around our house. They were always so tolerant of us dressing them up and cuddling with them in bed. I am so thankful for the many lessons my childhood pets taught me. And I am happy my children will experience the same thing. Pets teach kids how to be responsible (we’ve just recently started having Sam feed our two cats every day), give them comfort and show them how to be kind and nurturing. In this issue, you’ll find lots of pet-themed articles, including one about pet health, as well as advice from dog behaviorist David Codr, author of “Dog Gone Problems.” We’ve also put together five animal books for kids and five great products with animal themes. Happy spring!

GET SOCIAL FACEBOOK /momahacom

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TWITTER @momaha_owh PINTEREST /momahaowh INSTAGRAM /momaha_owh


SUMMER CAMP OPPORTUNITIES on Brownell Talbot School’s campus!

More than 30 camp offerings including French language immersion, robotics, pottery, theatre, service learning, and more! Camps available for preschool through grade 8 students!

brownell.edu/camps

Learn how to code, animate, design websites, create movies and video games, and more! Camps are available for techies ages 6 to 17!

youthtechinc.com

400 N. Happy Hollow Blvd. • 402.556.3772 2082134-01

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ON OUR RADAR // EDITOR’S PICKS New and Momaha-tested too!

DECORATE YOUR SPACE

THINGS TO TRY THIS MONTH

CARRY ON Tired of being clawed, pawed or bitten when you are trying to medicate, groom or carry your cat or dog? Then try the Pet Pita. It works well for carrying or medicating your pet, as long as you have a second person to give your baby its pills. Our reviewer, a groomer, pointed out that it covers much of your pet’s body, so it doesn’t work well for grooming. It does the job for nail trimming, as long as you have a helper. $24.99, petpita.com

Eighteen-month-old Elliott oohed and aahed when he saw the hedgehog print hanging in his room. Mom likes the beautiful colors of the watercolor print and the attention to detail by local artist Kathy Jurek. Elliott just likes the hedgehog, which he thinks is a puppy. Jurek does puppies, too, as well as trucks, trains and all types of adorable wild animals. $35 with mat, littlesplashesofcolor.com

CREATE SHAPES Bella, 8, enjoys playing with slime and Play-Doh, so she loved her Playfoam Pals, a lion and a bear. She made all sorts of items, and the squashy pods of Playfoam weren’t crumbly and held their shape. Small stencils on the bottom of the container didn’t really work well. Older brother Samuel, 12, liked them, too, but wasn’t as engrossed as his sister. Collect all 12. $7.99 for two, amazon.com

CHANGE IT UP Chickens are becoming more and more popular in urban settings. So, of course, you want all the chicken paraphernalia you can find. Zipit’s mini pouch is perfect for holding keys to the chicken coop or change from the sale of your eggs. Fill it with candy and tuck it into an Easter basket. Frog and bunny versions, too. $5.99, just-zipit.com

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MAKE A STATEMENT Have the most stylish dog at the park with a matching Coast Apparel dog leash and collar with crab logo. Its human can have a matching belt as well. We love the sturdy construction, with its heavy-duty stitching and strong clasp. You’ll never have to worry about your dog getting excited and breaking free. If you really want to make a statement, there’s a matching banana in six colors, for man or beast. Leash $24.50, collar $24.50, belt $35. “CrabDanas” are $4.50, coastapparel.com


*with the purchase of any adult meal, 12 and under

west omaha - 17520 wright St.

papillion - 248 olson drive www.spinpizza.com 2082915-01 11


Hot off the presses and worthy of your home library COMPILED by Momaha Magazine

WHEN YOUR LLAMA NEEDS A HAIRCUT

Susanna Leonard Hill It’s picture day and you realize your llama needs a haircut. After a hilarious shampoo, it’s time to decide which style would be best. A mohawk? Layers? Or how about a brand-new fur color? This charming book appeals to both kids and adults. You might even remember how you hated your first haircut! Ages 2-4.

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MY PET WANTS A PET

Elise Broach A little boy wants something to take care of, so he begs his mother for a puppy. The two have so much fun that one day the dog asks for something of his own, too. So the dog gets a cat, then the cat gets a bird and the bird gets a worm. Soon chaos ensues and mom isn’t happy. So the little boy has to find a solution for her, too. Ages 4-7.

OODLES OF KITTENS

Jane O’Connor and Robin Preiss Glasser It’s raining, and Nancy hears a strange sound coming from outside. After investigating, she and Bree find oodles of adorable kittens. They each keep one and find the others good homes. But what happens when Nancy’s new kitty meets her dog, Frenchy? Will they ever get along? Will Nancy love them both the same? Ages 4-7.

HAZY BLOOM AND THE PET PROJECT

Jennifer Hamburg Hazel “Hazy” Bloom has a secret power: She can see what will happen tomorrow. The third-grader can’t control her visions, but they’re nearly always right, and one day she has a vision of receiving something she wants more than anything else in the world: a pet iguana. But as Hazel tries to prove to her parents how responsible she would be, all sorts of mishaps occur. Ages 7-11.

THE MURDERER’S APE

Jakob Wegelius Sally Jones is not only a loyal friend, she’s also an extraordinary individual. In overalls or in a maharaja’s turban, this unique gorilla moves among humans without speaking but understanding everything. When Chief, her devoted comrade, is falsely convicted of murder, Sally Jones must clear Chief’s name. Ages 12 and older.


MIND SPIRIT ACADEMICS ATHLETICS OMAHA CHRISTIAN ACADEMY OFFERS : ✢ Christian learning environment ✢ High academic achievement ✢ Excellent fine art programs ✢ Before & after school care ✢ Multi-denominational ✢ Preschool -12th grade OMAHACHRISTIANACADEMY.ORG

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THE NEXT BEST THING

SPONSORED FEATURE // YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

Parents share bond coaching their children through YMCA programs TEXT Mike Watkins

F

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA

or Scott Pockett, being called "coach" is the next best thing to being called "dad" by his kids. As a YMCA of Greater Omaha coach to four daughters over the past 22 years, Pockett knows the positive impact and personal fulfillment that comes from a parent's involvement on and off the field or court. “There are so many things I enjoy about coaching in general and coaching my own children in particular,” says Pockett, who excelled in sports himself. He has coached daughters Carly, 27, and Rebecca, 25, and still coaches Madison, 16, and Abby, 12, in a variety of sports at the YMCA, including softball, basketball and flag football. “I love watching players gain confidence in learning, and actually doing, the sport. Making that first catch. Hitting that first pitch. Getting that first serve over the net. The genuine smile of ‘I can do anything!’ You just cannot replace it.” And while the rewards are plentiful – spending time with your children, having the opportunity to bond outside the home, talking strategies and exchanging ideas – the lines between son/daughter and athlete sometimes can become blurred for a parent-coach. Jeff Ernst has been coaching his sons, Charlie, 13, and Sam, 7, in basketball and flag football (as well as soccer with

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Sam) for the past three years. One of the biggest challenges he and other parentcoaches face, he says, is separating your child’s abilities and limitations from your own athletic expectations. Because he believes in their abilities (and knows when they aren’t giving their all in practices and games), he sometimes crosses the line and expects too much. “I have to stay cognizant to not be harder on them or expect more out of them than the other players,” Ernst admits. “It is also hard to not be able to just sit and watch them play, but to have to coach and monitor the entire game. It's harder, too, as they get older. Much like parenting, they try to become more independent.” Elissa Booth has coached her 9-year-old daughter, Corinne, in soccer, basketball, volleyball and softball since first grade. Her biggest challenge, she says, involves letting go of what she wants from her daughter athletically and coaching her at her current ability while letting her improve at her own pace. “As parents, I think we come into sports with this inflated vision of what we want and what we need instead of coaching them where they are and meeting their needs,” says Booth, a three-sport athlete in high school who played in college and has a coaching endorsement. “It definitely gets harder as they get

older. I have to remind myself constantly that she is not me.” Ernst adds that he thoroughly enjoys watching kids – including his own – improve and learn. “The most rewarding and surprising thing for me comes from watching my Charlie, a seventh-grader, help me coach Sam’s teams,” Ernst says. “The kids really respond to him. Oftentimes they listen to him better than they do me. It has also really helped Charlie by showing him how much he has to offer others.” All three coaches cited the fundamental purpose behind the YMCA's sports programs as reasons they stay involved. “I enjoy coaching for the Y because they push the importance of the team as a whole and individual improvement regardless of the score,” Booth says. “We always make sure that everyone gets equal playing time because of the emphasis on that improvement for every kid. “Their focus on getting all kids into sports regardless of their ability to pay shows how invested they are in just helping kids learn sports and get better," Booth adds. "For anyone unsure about starting a child in a sport: just do it. It gives your child such a unique and valuable experience. It also lets you see another side of them. I love that.” Learn more at metroymca.org


O pen to m em bers & N on m em bers!

Move & Groove at a

Trolls Themed

June - August • Weekly • K-8TH GRADES

SUMMER

Mini Camp

camps

Baton, Pom, Dance & Tumbling

JUNE 4TH - 7TH 8:30 AM - 12 PM

Day Camps            

COST IS $125

Premiere Camps          

sport Camps          

Register today at www.jccomaha.org REGISTER ONLINE AT:

sstepperettestudios.com SPACE IS LIMITED

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BATTER UP! YMCA SUMMER YOUTH SPORTS

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SUMMER FUN WITH BASEBALL, SOFTBALL & T-BALL

Teams for ages 3 years-8th grade

REGISTRATION: APRIL 9-28

The season begins June 2.

Register online or at any Y location.

YMCA OF GREATER OMAHA • www.metroymca.org 2082120-01

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DIY CLAY BUNNY PLANTER PHOTOGRAPHY + STYLING Heidi Thorson

INSTRUCTIONS White clay (bake or air dry) Circle cookie cutter X-Acto knife Dirt Small house plant

1. On a hard surface, roll out your clay to ½-inch thickness with a rolling pin. 2. Use a circle cookie cutter to cut out the base. 3. With an X-Acto knife, cut out a 2- to 3-inch wide band with ears. This should be long enough to fully wrap around the base. 4. Position band around the base and smooth the inside seam to connect the base and wall. 5. Cut out a small triangle of white clay for the nose and gently place on the outside. Use an X-Acto knife to draw whiskers. 6. Let clay harden if using air dry clay, or if using oven-bake clay, bake for 15-20 minutes. 7. Add dirt and your plant of choice.

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INSTRUCTIONS

EGG HEAD PLANTERS These eggshell planters are everything they're cracked up to be. Fun. Silly. And super easy. Start several different plants from seed and see which one grows the wildest head of "hair."

PHOTOGRAPHY + STYLING Heidi Thorson

1 egg Dirt to fill half an eggshell Grass seed (or preferred plant seed) Googly eyes Glue dots (or quick-dry glue)

1. Gently crack an egg to break off the top one-third of the shell. 2. Put the contents of the egg in a bowl and save for breakfast (see recipe, page 32). Rinse the shell. 3. Add dirt to the bottom two-thirds of the shell and place seeds in the dirt. 4. Adhere googly eyes to shell using glue dots. 5. Place shell in a sunny spot and watch the seeds sprout. 6. As the grass grows, trim the eggperson's "hair." Optional (if using garden plant seeds): Transfer to your outdoor garden when the weather warms up.

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STORY Ashlee Coffey

BABY LOVE, OMAHA'S ONLY BABY FAIR A daylong baby fair with programs, entertainment and vendor displays (momaha.com will be there!) aimed at parents, grandparents, caregivers and others. April 8, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Baxter Arena 2425 S. 67th St. Admission: $8 in advance; $12 at the door. Children ages 12 and younger, free. For more information: omahababyfair.com

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M

ama. Mommy. Mom. Mother. There's nothing better than hearing your child speak those sweet words for the first time. And while motherhood is full of precious, amazing, unforgettable moments, it’s also full of frustrations, trials and tribulations. Blowouts, tantrums, tons and tons of messes, exhaustion ... oh, the exhaustion. This mama of two has never been more tired in her life! Motherhood is one giant “how to” lesson — how to breastfeed; how to tell if your kid is seriously sick; how to get your child to sleep more; how to survive parenthood. And while you’re learning all these new things, motherhood can become a very lonely place. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but many new moms don’t have that. That’s why Kristi Wilson, an Omaha mom of five and retired childbirth educator and doula, decided to start Baby Love, Omaha’s Only Baby Fair, in July 2011. “As a stay-at-home mama, I started dreaming about an event that would help moms like me not only survive the daily trials, but also learn to enjoy them,” she says. Baby Love brings vendors and professionals together to help

ADOBE STOCK

ONE BLISSFUL BABY LOVE DAY

make parenthood a little bit easier. Demonstrations and mini seminars teach parents how to calm a fussy newborn, massage an achy tummy, secure a child safety seat, childproof a home, even perform CPR. Children’s Physicians will have seminars on “Preparing for Your Newborn,” “Baby’s First Year” and “Healthy Nutrition for Toddlers.” Admission to Baby Love is free to parents who preregister for the seminars at www.childrensphysiciansomaha.org Moms will be overjoyed to find a nursing tent complete with nursing pillows, breast-friend pillows, a changing area and toys for toddlers. There will be plenty of fun, too, in a belly bump photo booth, a “Baby’s First Cake War” courtesy of Hy-Vee stores, and swag bags filled with baby items, product samples and gift cards, including a 30-minute massage from Essentials Natural Family Health in Omaha for the first 50 expecting moms to come through the door. Additionally, 100 swag bags for new moms will be given away at 12:30 p.m. “This isn't an expo,” Wilson says. “Every single vendor ... is here to make the pregnancy and parenting journey easier.”


Learn about animal behaviors and nutrition. Explore a day in the life of a veterinarian. Perform a simulated exploratory surgery. Interact with live animals each day.

SAVE $25

METAMORPHOSIS

ENTER THIS CODE AT CHECKOUT:

MOMB18

SCULPTURE EXHIBIT ON DISPLAY THROUGH MAY 13

Bring your family to explore the garden, change your perspective on plastic, and play the ultimate game of “I—SPY” 100 Bancroft St., Omaha | (402) 346-4002 For a full schedule of events, visit lauritzengardens.org

Junior Vet Camp

Intermediate Vet Camp

Students completing 2nd - 5th grade Mon. - Thurs. 8:00 am - 4:00 pm • June & July

Students completing 6th - 8th grade Mon. - Fri. 8:00 am - 4:00 pm • June & July

For registration and information, visit:

www.oxbowvetcamp.com

2083882-01

2074822-01

2083164-01

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Rusty, Dusty & Yummy You never know where a hobby might lead you TEXT + PHOTOGRAPHY Chris Christen

S

ara Alexander turned her personal passion for picking into one of the top flea market festivals in the country. The first Junkstock, founded in June 2012 as a one-day event, featured 24 vendors. Sara and her family and friends as helpers expected a few hundred people to turn out. But, surprise! An estimated 5,000 showed up. Today, Junkstock has mushroomed into a three-day celebration with seven times as many vendors and several thousand guests celebrating all things rusty, dusty and timeless. “When we started, Sara and I said, ‘Let’s see how it goes,'" recalls Danelle Schlegelmilch, public relations director. Midwest Living magazine calls it a “can’t-miss flea market whether you’re a browser, a buyer or a bargainer – or all three.” Junkstock Spring Edition – "Lucky 7" – is just ahead, April 6-8, at Sycamore Farms in Waterloo. It’s the second full season at the more spacious century-old former horse farm, having left the old dairy farm location at 192nd Street and West Dodge Road in June 2016. “It’s like a little reunion with every show,” observes Danelle. The Junkstock team promises more than 170 vendors, 25 food trucks, eight bands and a free kids play area. Organizers continue to welcome local makers selling honey, clothing, soaps, chocolates, jewelry, hand-lettered signage and more. Festivalgoers also will notice more indoor vendor space. “We'll have eight buildings with more than 40,000 square feet total, which means convenient

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shopping rain or shine,” Danelle says. Several participating vendors got their start at Junkstock and now do the flea market circuit regionally and-or nationally, according to Danelle. "We've been told that Junkstock is even on some vendors’ bucket lists.” Local vendor Stacy Novak Worlie of Stella Maris Designs tested the market at the very first Junkstock. "I choose to invest my time on the local scene" rather than take her wares on the road. “This show is by far the leading one in the Midwest, so why travel?” she explains. Stacy’s business is named in honor of her late mother, Mary. In Latin, Stella Maris means Star of the Sea. Stacy was only 4 years old when her mom died, but memories of her knack for making a comfortable home linger. “I assume I’ve gotten this from her,” Stacy says of her love for thrifting and repurposing. “I was a junker before a vendor.” She playfully adds, “To leave my little bubble and spend three days here … it just fills my love tank." It’s a family affair with sister Trisha Crafton often helping to set up and tear down her vendor space at Sycamore Farms. Husband Drew usually can be found behind the counter, ringing up purchases. Stacy is constantly on the hunt for treasures, going to auctions and thrift stores and sometimes rummaging through her own home for items customers might like. As for her personal decorating style: “I like clean, crisp things with old items.” Danelle encourages festivalgoers to make it a family affair. A number of activities are planned for kids like 3-year-

old Sloane, Danelle’s “little junker.” Admission is free for kids ages 12 and younger. “It’s a full, fun day,” Danelle says. Junkstock will feature bounce houses, kite flying, giant bubble blowing, live music, mini donuts, fresh-squeezed lemonade, pony rides (for a nominal fee), petting zoo, and fresh air and room to roam. Pets on leash are welcome, too!

JUNKSTOCK SPRING EDITION A three-day curated vintage, junk and artisan festival that celebrates all things rusty, dusty and timeless; 170+ vendors, 25+ food trucks, live music, kids play area. April 6-8, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Early bird hours with special ticket Friday, 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Sycamore Farms, 1150 River Road Drive, Waterloo Admission: general admission, $10 daily; three-day pass, $20; three-day early bird pass, $30; season pass, $50 (fall edition, Sept. 28-30) For more information: junkstock.com


8 FLEA MARKET MAKEOVERS: NEW USES FOR A HARDBACK SUITCASE 1. Stacked three high as an end table. 2. Standing vertically as a dollhouse with multiple levels. 3. Resting flat on the floor, as a chest for accent pillows, blankets or throws. 4. Mounted vertically to a wall as a cabinet. 5. Sitting atop a luggage rack as a nightstand. 6. Fitted with four peg legs as a coffee table. 7. Upholstered as a bench. 8. Sawed in half as a wall-mounted shelf.

STACY NOVAK WORLIE

DANELLE SCHLEGELMILCH

This room setting (left), styled by Stacy Novak Worlie of Stella Maris Designs, features items acquired at flea markets, auctions and thrift stores. Everything here has a story, she says. Asking vendors about pieces is half the fun of a festival like Junkstock. • Down-filled sofa, for stressfree use • Ottoman frame, as kids’ table • Wooden wheel, for sculptural interest • Metal “office” sign, for novelty • Vintage seltzer bottle, ceramic bust and 1960s lamp with freshly-painted base, because “not everybody likes ‘old chippy,’ décor,” Stacie says. • Wool-blend area rug, wicker basket, for texture • 1950s leather suitcase, for corralling toys and books Danelle Schlegelmilch’s daughter, Sloane, was born days before Junkstock 2014. Danelle recalls being at Methodist Women’s Hospital, watching the activity at the original event location at 192nd and Dodge Streets. “I was doing press interviews from my hospital bed holding Sloane. She's my little Junkstock baby and has been part of the fun since she was born. This spring will be her 11th Junkstock.”

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KIDS & PETS: BOTH NEED TO BE READY FOR EACH OTHER STORY Marjie Ducey

Y

our second-grader has been begging for a puppy for weeks. But how do you know your child is ready? How do you know you’re ready? Most dogs and cats have a life expectancy of 10 years or more, so it’s important to think carefully before taking on the responsibility of a new member of the family, says Tammy Conroy, director of humane education for the Nebraska Humane Society.

START SMALL A fish is a good starter pet, she says. Its tank can sit anywhere in the house, and there isn’t a lot of enrichment involved. So, no long walks in the cold or rain. It’s a good way for your child to learn how to clean out the tank and to be responsible for feeding Dory every day. If you are thinking of a guinea pig or a hamster, make sure that you feel comfortable cleaning out the cage. And remember, even they can live for years.

ONE BABY AT A TIME There’s no hard and fast rule about when your child is ready for a pet. But a baby and a puppy or kitty are probably going to be too much for mom and dad. A toddler isn’t going to understand why the dog doesn’t like fingers in its face. But if your child is of school age and understands boundaries, then it could be time to start thinking about a bigger pet.

TALK FIRST, THEN VISIT

             

PERSONALITY PLUS

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Don’t add a pet without talking first as a family. Make sure everyone is on board; you don't want to risk the stress of readoption if a pet doesn't work out. Discuss what each family member might be worried about and who is going to be responsible for each chore. If your children are a little hesitant about getting a pet, enroll them in a camp at the Humane Society where they’ll get a chance to interact with all kinds of animals. They’ll feel much more comfortable when a pet joins your household.





Golden retrievers are often mentioned as a popular choice for a family dog. But Conroy discourages picking a pet by its breed. Look more at personality. “I have two Pomeranian


SWIM

Tammy Conroy, director of humane education for the Nebraska Humane Society

mixes, and they are completely different," she says. If you have young children, you want a cat that is patient and can handle a hug or two. With active older kids, aim for a dog that likes a lot of exercise and is willing to play. On the other hand, if your child is responsible for walking the dog, you don’t want one that tugs him into the street.

IT’S NOT A JOB, IT'S A JOY Even if your child promises to take care of the new pet, as parents you are responsible for its well-being. But there’s no reason the kids can’t help. “A daily small task is easier for a child to remember and accomplish,’’ Conroy says. “That routine for a child as well as a pet is huge.’’ Make it a privilege instead of a chore to help with the pet’s care. That makes it more fun, Conroy explains.

NO DINNER FOR ROVER If your child is forgetting to take care of his or her new buddy, it’s time for a chat, Conroy says. Ask your child to imagine how the animal might feel about not having any food. Remind your child that pets can get bored just like people; that's why a good walk or playtime is important. Your goal is to build empathy between the two.

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LIFELONG BUDDY An animal will provide love and companionship for your child for years. But remember when Johnny goes off to college, someone will still need to care for it. "This is going to be a pet for life,'' Conroy says.

SUPPORT ANIMAL Pets show us empathy, responsibility, love and compassion, Conroy says. Pets sense our emotions, and they show us compassion right back. "Many times, a dog will snuggle up to a child who is having a tough day or even to an adult who seems stressed,'' Conroy says. "My favorite part of my day is the love I receive from my pets.''

HELP IS AT HAND If you need help, call the Humane Society's behavior helpline at 402-905-3421 or contact via email: bhelp@nehumanesociety.org.

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DOG GONE PROBLEMS 7 tips to help kids behave better with the dog

The Omaha World-Herald’s home and lifestyle magazine.

TEXT David Codr PHOTOGRAPHY Heidi Thorson

To start your Sunday subscription, call 402-348-3363 or email circulationcustomerservice@owh.com

A

s a dog behaviorist, I have worked with hundreds of families with young children who do all kinds of things that cause problems with their dog. Pulling its tail, playing too rough, teasing and hitting are among the most common irritations. I also have read many case studies of dogs that were considered by everyone to be friendly, with no bite history, who “suddenly changed and bit the child for no reason.” But upon investigation, it turns out there were warnings and a good reason. Often the dog was overtired and tried to move away, only to have the child follow it and pull it back to play or continue to engage it. In these scenarios, the dog communicates in several ways that it wants to be left alone. Signs include yawning, tongue flicking, dry panting, frantic sniffing, refusal to follow or move forward, wrinkling its forehead, deliberately looking away, etc. When the child ignores the cues and continues, the dog moves toward more aggressive ways to get the child to back off. Bearing teeth, growling, barking, nipping and eventually biting are commom. This is when people take notice, often labeling the dog as mean or aggressive. But this isn’t a case of a bad dog. It's an example of parents who didn’t establish good boundaries or teach the kids how to behave with the dog. As dog guardians, it's our job to look out for our furry friends so they don’t have to protect themselves.

inspiredlivingomaha.com

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DAVID CODR David Codr is a dog behavior expert based in Omaha. He answers dog behavior questions in an occasional blog on Momaha.com.

1

Explain to the kids that petting a dog is our way of saying thank you. I often ask children if they would say thank you before or after I give them a piece of candy. When they say after, I confirm they are right and hand them the piece of candy.

2

Help the kids decorate a mug or jar with their name on it.

3

Tell the kids that each time they pet the dog to thank them and then tell you they did so, you will place an M&M (or whatever candy they prefer) into their jar.

4

You can add in other dog-related things to the M&M acquisition such as asking the dog to sit before letting it out a door, washing the dog, picking up poop, etc. Just be sure the

kids earn M&Ms only for dog-related tasks. Every one of my clients who tried to add non-dog related tasks has said it ruined the whole thing.

5

6

If you catch the child doing something against the rules, take the child and the dog to the jar, take a piece of candy out and say, “Oh no, I have to take a piece away for that. Would you like to do something to earn this back?” Bringing the dog and child back to the jar allows the child to ask for a quick sit so you don’t have to actually take any candy away. At dinner or the end of the day, have the kids sit and empty their jar’s contents onto a plate. Count the candy pieces and the child with the most gets a special piece of cake, doesn’t have to do chores or gets a special

privilege such as sleeping with the dog that night. Then let them have the candy pieces for dessert or at lunch the following day.

7

Take this to the next level and chart the kids' progress, then offer a more prestigious reward at the end of the week and an even bigger reward at the end of the month (a movie night, a pizza party sleepover for the child and three friends). If you have kids ages 13 and older, candy isn’t quite as motivating as it is to younger kids. But you can simply tell them they need to earn a certain number of M&Ms to sleep at a friend's house or go on a ski trip. By providing an incentive to engage with the dog in a positive way, kids help train your dog while also helping it develop respect for the kids. Everyone wins.

Remember: Everything you do trains your dog. Only sometimes you mean it. 27


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GET ORGANIZED // AMY TOKOS Amy Tokos is a Certified Professional Organizer and the owner of Freshly Organized. You can find more organizing tips at freshlyorganized.com.

TOP FIVE ORGANIZING CHALLENGES FOR A FAMILY

O

ne of the biggest reasons for disorganization in a home is delayed decisions. We can’t decide what to do with a piece of paper, so we set it on a pile. We can’t decide what to fix for dinner, so we go to the grocery store and over-buy or miss items. Delayed decisions can create clutter and chaos in a family. Creating simple systems and routines will help minimize the decisions needed to have an organized family. The following are the biggest organizing challenges families face and strategies to help.

1

CLOTHES

Piles of laundry everywhere! QUANTITY The more we have, the more we have to maintain. Kids need just enough to get them from one laundry cycle to the next. If they have less, the value of each item increases. For example, if we have only enough socks to wear for a week we will be sure to get socks into the laundry. QUALITY Kids will wear their favorite items over and over again. Buy them what they want because the other stuff will never get worn.

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2

COMMUNICATION

One family member is the keeper of all the information. ACTIVITIES Empower your family with knowledge. Having a way to communicate activities to partners and children can help spread the responsibility. If you have one keeper of all the info, then that one person carries all the weight. A communication wall or a shared phone app are both great ways to communicate with the whole family. SCHOOLWORK A Sunday evening informal family meeting can be a great way to collect information on what’s on your child and spouse's radar for the week and minimize surprises or conflicts. Big projects or tests, requests for dinner and supplies can all be discussed and planned.

3

PAPER

It's never-ending and comes from all directions. PLACEMENT Have designated spots for papers to land. Sort trash and recycling before you set down the mail. Do the same with school papers. Take 5 minutes each day to handle papers and act, if necessary. MEMORABILIA As school papers come into the home, you will have to decide which are the keepers. To help with the decision, ask yourself what the piece of paper will look like in 10 years, then 20 years. If it looks like a funny story or something to show off at a graduation party, keep it. If not, recycle it.

4

TOYS/STUFF

They're multiplying! QUANTITY Kids play with 20 percent of their toys 80 percent of the time. Minimize the toys by giving experiences as gifts. PLACEMENT Pick an area where all or most of the toys can be kept. Small kids will want to play near their parents, so be mindful of that. Open shelving is easiest for kids to maintain. PICKUP Daily pickup is best. Doing a family 10-minute tidy each evening gives you a good start to the next day.

5

FOOD

What's for dinner, and why don't we have any snacks? MEAL PLANNING Sunday family meetings are a good time for meal planning. What sounds good on the nights you have time to cook? Having a few (or more) meals planned is a good start to the week. GROCERIES Have an active grocery list going at all times and have everyone add to it through the week. If a favorite snack runs out, a child can put it on the list. This keeps the grocery shopper from having to guess what’s needed and prevents the missed items or the overpurchased items. CUPBOARDS Group like items together in general categories; dinner prep, breakfast, snacks, baking, drinks. This will make it easier to find what you’re seeking.


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Butter 3 slices bread 3 eggs 1/4 cup diced ham 1/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese Fresh ground pepper, basil to taste

1. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Lightly grease a baking tray. 2. Butter bread slices on both sides. Using a cookie cutter or top of a glass, cut a 2½-inch circle in the center of each slice. 3. Place the cutout rounds and slices on the tray. Bake for 4-6 minutes or until the bottoms are golden brown. 4. Flip bread when browned. Crack an egg into the hole in each slice. Top with ham and cheese. 5. Bake 8-10 minutes or until the egg whites are set but the yolks are slightly runny. 6. Season with fresh ground pepper and basil, to taste. Serve with toasted rounds. Recipe adapted from ChocolateMoosey.com


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Based on the real-life ffe Newsboy N b Strike St Strrike ik off 1899, 1899 rebellio ory of a rebellious ous newsboy Newsies tells the story who dreams of a lifee away from the th he big city. When publishing giant Joseph raises seph Pulitzer ra aises newspaper prices at the newsboys’ the oys’ expense, th he newsies take action, and New York rk City soon recognizes reccognizes the power of young people. ople. From the award winning nning minds of Alan Menken and four-time our-time Tony® A ward winner Harvey y Fierstein, you’ll be singing along ong to the hit songs “King of New ew York,” “Seize the Day,” and d “Santa Fe”.

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Profile for Omaha World-Herald

Momaha Magazine - April 2018  

Monthly magazine for parents published by the Omaha World-Herald in conjunction with its blog Momaha.com

Momaha Magazine - April 2018  

Monthly magazine for parents published by the Omaha World-Herald in conjunction with its blog Momaha.com