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OLIVET NAZARENE UNIVERSITY, BOURBONNAIS, ILLINOIS V o l . 7 6 , No . 1

blog S u mme r 2008

We believe. You  

www. o l i vet . edu

here.

Snippets of life from the ONU Blogosphere page 10

DR. FRANK MOORE LEADS CENTER FOR FAITH AND CULTURE page 4

REMEMBERING DAN WALKER AND WILLIS SNOWBARGER Periodicals Postage Paid at Bourbonnais, Illinois 60914, and additional mailing offices

page s 15 & 18

NEWSOME NAMED ONU’S 4TH AD page 17

� SELF PORTRAIT BY ERIN (ERWIN) REXROTH ’03 WITH DAUGHTER HALEY. SEE ERIN’S BLOG ON PAGE 11.


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snapshots

THE OLIVETIAN (USPS 407-880) (ISSN 0891-9712)

relief

Editor Heather (Quimby) Day ’02

In addition to participating in the relief efforts, faculty members of Olivet’s School of Graduate and Continuing Studies program in Hong Kong are providing counseling training to hundreds of volunteers helping victims recover from the magnitude 8 earthquake in China.

Contributing Writers Caleb Benoit ’06 Katie (Cook) Brabson ’03 Seth Hurd ’06/’08 M.A. Ben Kumor ’04 Casey Manes Kate Morgan Erin (Erwin) Rexroth ’03 Bethany Sackett ’08 Stephanie Smith ’10 Designer Donnie Johnson

SUBM ITTED PHOTO

Additional Design Matthew Moore ’96 Monique (Cartier) Perry ’03

orientation

Editorial Consultant Rev. Gordon C. Wickersham ’47 Photography Image Group Photography, or as credited Sports Editor Gary Griffin ’81/’07 M.A. Class Notes Editor Martha Thompson

The Class of 2012 arrived fashionably early for the 2008–2009 school year during three summer orientation sessions.

Olivet Nazarene University

training camp

President Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div. Vice President for Academic Affairs Dr. Gregg Chenoweth ’90

Hundreds of thousands of visitors — and national media — descended on Olivet’s campus for the seventh consecutive Chicago Bears Training Camp in Bourbonnais. ONU recently signed a two-year extension with the Monsters of the Midway for this annual event which provides more than $1.5 million to the local community.

Vice President for Student Development Dr. Walter “Woody” Webb ’86/ ’89 M.A.R./’08 D.Div. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Dr. Brian Allen ’82/’05 Litt.D. Vice President for Finance Dr. Douglas E. Perry ’68/ ’95 M.B.A., Litt.D.

The Olivetian is published quarterly by the Office of Marketing Communications under the direction of the vice president for Institutional Advancement.

tee time More than $10,000 was raised for student scholarships through the Training Camp Golf Outing held in late July. Why not consider helping ONU students while escaping from the blustery weather during the Winter Golf Outing in Orlando, Fla.? Turn to page 9 for details.

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Reproduction of material without written permission is strictly prohibited. Copyright © 2008 Olivet Nazarene University One University Avenue ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Editor The Olivetian Olivet Nazarene University One University Ave. ­ ourbonnais, IL 60914-2345 B


perspectives

Summer 2008 The Olivetian

Facebook? By Dr. John C. Bowling ’71/’72 M.A./ ’06 D.Div., University President

Okay, I have a confession …

several pages of running dialogue with her Facebook friends and family. She was asking if I was the John Bowling she knew 40 years ago at Olivet.    What I think puzzled her was how did the guy she knew in 1967 become Dr. John Bowling, president of Olivet??? (I thought she believed in miracles, but perhaps this was asking too much). I wrote a quick note “on her wall” saying, I was the same person and was glad to hear about her family, but that I normally don’t do Facebook. Evidently my response satisfied her natural curiosity and that was that.

   I am having a hard time keeping up with the changes taking place (daily??) in technology; in particular things such as social networking via the computer (Facebook and MySpace, for example).    Facebook is a social networking Web site launched February 4, 2004. This free-access Web site is privately owned and operated by Facebook, Inc. Users can join networks organized by city, workplace, school and region in order to connect and interact with other people. People can also add friends and send them messages, and update their personal profile to notify friends about themselves. The Web site has more than 80 million active users worldwide.    MySpace is a similar Web site offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music and videos for teenagers and adults ­internationally.    Facebook and Myspace are okay, I am just not sure they are for me. Social networking for me is a cup of coffee with some friends at Blues Café on Station Street, face-to-face. “My space” is my office or my car or “my” chair at home. I am not against the new social networks — I am just hesitant to create an obligation to maintain a whole new set of social connections. My life is pretty heavily “peopled” as it is.    From time to time, I get e-mail notices saying that “so and so has added you as a friend on Facebook,” and I am asked to confirm that we are friends. I am sorry to say, I normally don’t respond. However, I got a Facebook notification a few days ago from an old girlfriend from my freshman year at Olivet. She is happily married with children and grandchildren and there was nothing inappropriate about the note. It simply said, “Linda added you as a friend on Facebook. We need to confirm that you know Linda in order for you to be friends on Facebook.” There was an Internet address given for a response.

“Writing on the wall” …    This recent foray into the social networking world got me thinking about the other “face books” in my life. I have decided to take more time with the flesh and blood faces I pass day in and day out here at Olivet. The campus is a living “facebook” of students, faculty and staff whose lives are deeply intertwined. What am I “writing on their walls?”    I am also aware that there is a great group of other faces (people I don’t see on a daily basis) who are part of Olivet. Our alumni and friends provide a social and spiritual network that is vital to the mission of the University. Without your prayers, encouragement and financial support, our work would be greatly diminished.

One more thing …    There is another face we ought to be thinking about, the most important One. The Bible puts it like this, “The LORD bless you and keep you; the LORD make his face shine upon you and be gracious to you; the LORD turn his face toward you and give you peace.”    This is my prayer for Olivet and for each of you, “May the face of the Lord shine on us. May His face always be turned toward each one who is part of this network of faith.” The good news is, God is faithful and seeks to stay in touch with all of us on a daily basis.    Check your inbox, maybe you have a message: “God has added you as a friend on Facebook. We need to confirm that you know God.”

Curiosity got the best of me …    I clicked on the link and was taken to her Facebook personal profile. There was information about her likes and dislikes, pictures of her husband (a fine pastor), kids and grandchildren and

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onu news

4

By

heather (quimby) day ’02

The way he asked the question, you would have thought I’d insulted his mom.    “What is it with you Nazarenes and this holiness business?” my former boss ­demanded. “You think you have to be perfect or ­something?”    I was completely caught off guard and immediately thrust into a theological discussion for which I wasn’t prepared or excited. After all, at the time I was working for a Christian boss in a parachurch organization, and hadn’t made even the slightest reference to doctrine in the moments preceding the inquisition.

Holiness

unto the Lord …    What’s more, in my 25 years of growing up in the Church of the Nazarene, I had never once considered the concept of holiness a provocative or controversial matter.    I stumbled through the encounter, citing personal experiences and a few Scriptures here and there. I also did my best to diffuse the situation, pointing out the similarities between my denomination and his.    In the end I survived, per usual. But the conversation left me changed, filled with a healthy form of discontent. What did I believe and why? Was I simply following in the footsteps of my parents, or was I planted on a firm, biblical foundation that could stand the test of time and questioning?

now and forever?

Dr. Frank Moore to lead ONU Center for Faith and Culture

   At the helm of the new center will be one of today’s most respected and sought-after theologians, Dr. Frank Moore.    Dr. Moore brings more than 20 years of teaching experience, and has published numerous books, including Breaking Free from Sin’s Grip, Coffee Shop Theology, God’s Road Map for Us, and Principles for Living the Holy Life, to name a few. Prior to coming to ONU, he served as the vice president of academic affairs and professor of theology at MidAmerica Nazarene University.    According to University President John C. Bowling, “Dr. Frank Moore is an outstanding teacher, writer, churchman and theologian. He has a unique ability to communicate complex ideas effectively to lay leaders as well as ­clergy.”

it brings up conversations about movies, dancing and jewelry.    But Leth asserts it runs much deeper than that. “Far too often, people equate holiness with legalism. If that’s the case — if we look back and decide we were simply a church based on the things you don’t do — then people are right to say that we were wrong and we need to move on. However, legalism and holiness are not the same Left without a center things.”    Apparently I’m not alone in my    Legalism, he says, could search for answers. have never sparked the spiritual    According to Dr. Carl Leth, revival and rapid growth of the dean of Olivet’s School of TheolChurch of the Nazarene from a ogy and Christian Ministry, a theosmall group of people to more logical discussion has been brewthan 1.7 million members woring, and the questions cut to the shiping in almost 21,000 local core of who we are as a Church congregations in 151 world arand ultimately as a University. eas today.    “Historically, holiness has been    “There was something exthe central voice of the Church of traordinary taking place in that Dr. Frank Moore the Nazarene. In the beginning, early movement. Something Director, Center for Faith and Culture our founders were willing to set powerful and life changing. It aside all of their other differences serves us well to reexamine for the sake of holiness doctrine. what that was, and how it can help us to build    “Today, that voice is not so easily heard. Christ’s kingdom in the 21st Century.” Sermons are seldom preached on it, and a disturbing number of Nazarenes haven’t the Back to the basics slightest clue what ‘holiness’ really means.”    And so Olivet Nazarene University is doing    The implications, Dr. Leth says, are projust that — reexamining our heritage and getfound. “To move away from holiness is to move ting back to the basics. away from who we are. We’re left without a    As one of several initiatives to engage the center.” University in meaningful theological discussions, Olivet is launching the Center for Faith “Don’t drink, don’t smoke, don’t chew.” and Culture. It will serve as another way to    For many, “holiness” brings to mind the broaden the dialogue with and between churchold mantra, “Don’t drink, don’t smoke, don’t es, and to reconnect faith to the culture and chew. Don’t run with girls who do.” For others, all ­generations.

Living it out    The intent of the Center is not to provide an answer to all the questions, but rather to make sure that the questions are asked in the first place.    “My prayer,” says Dr. Moore, “is that through this effort and the outcomes of the Center, we can address how we live our beliefs out in a rapidly changing world without losing our ­calling.    “We need to interpret holiness doctrine to a new generation — not just dispense information, but help them live it out.” To learn more about Dr. Moore and the Center for Faith and Culture, visit www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian from the Quick Links menu.

“My prayer,” says Dr. Moore, “is that through this effort and the outcomes of the Center, we can address how we live our beliefs out in a rapidly changing world without losing our calling. w

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Summer 2008 The Olivetian

Ian Arnold thinks he can

change

the world. With your help, he will.

“I see many areas of the world today in great need of adequate medical care and the saving message of Jesus Christ. “After completing my undergraduate degree, I plan to continue my studies in medical school and then to use my training in medical missions work. “I also played on the men’s varsity soccer team. This experience taught me the importance of teamwork, a quality I know will be indispensable in the fields of medicine and missions. It also required me to stay in top physical performance, and to learn to balance my time in order to be successful.

“Education is highly valued in my family. I am the sixth of seven children; two of my older siblings are in master’s degree programs, my sister is pursuing a nursing degree, one of my brothers is working on his bachelor’s, and my younger brother has been accepted to begin at ONU this fall. “Thank you for scholarship funds which help offset the cost of my education.”

­— Ian Arnold ’10, biology major

Give Today. Change Tomorrow. 815-939-5171  |  www.olivet.edu  |  development@olivet.edu

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grad school CONQUERING

THE

JUGGLE

PAMELA POLISKA ’09 PURSUING A BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN NURSING THROUGH THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE AND CONTINUING STUDIES

By Casey Manes

At midlife, knee deep in one line of

work and with three children, Pamela Poliska ’09 decided to start over. A beautician by trade, cutting hair was what she had always done. But in the middle of a divorce, she found herself with no health insurance and with little room for professional advancement.

Not finished yet Within sight of completing her degree, next November is the target date for receiving her diploma. But she’s tasted higher education and likes it.

So back to school she went. She became a surgical technician and went on to become a registered nurse in 2003.

“I’ve even toyed with getting a master’s degree. Before, I never thought I could do it, but each class I’ve taken gets me interested in the next one.”

Recently, her employer, Swedish American Hospital, in Rockford, Ill., offered to pay for employees to earn their bachelor’s degrees in nursing through Olivet Nazarene University. Pamela jumped at the chance.

Beyond professional development, Pamela has also seen the camaraderie learning together with her co-workers has formed.

“So it is when I am 50 years old that I will get my bachelor’s!” she says, a smile in her voice on her upcoming completion of the degree.

“There is such a support system — it’s been beneficial to have these learning times together. The professors have been wonderful. I called the School of Graduate and Continuing Studies so many times with questions and they were always so helpful.”

Conquering fears

“The more I learn, the more I like it. I used to say, ‘Who needs a bachelor’s?’ But now, things all seem to fit together — the history, the cultural classes. It all makes sense with my work.”

Not growing up in the computer age, Pamela initially remembers fearing the technology focus of today’s off-site university programs.

Juggling the demands of life made attending any university difficult, but thankfully, Olivet came to her.

And the SGCS is only too happy to help. “I have a lot of respect for the adult learner. It’s a big commitment to decide to go back to school. Most are busy with families and jobs,” shares Andrea Lawrence, Olivet SGCS program specialist.

“Before I would have never thought I could do it. I was nervous about the online classes. I am not a computer person, but I like it. I was surprised how much I enjoyed learning this way.”

Via the Internet and evening courses at her hospital, Pamela and her 17 coworkers joined School of Graduate and Continuing Studies professors from ONU to earn credit for a BSN. Hers is just one of several in-hospital programs around the Chicagoland area.

“On graduation day, my favorite thing to do is to hold the doors open for students as they march into McHie Arena dressed in cap and gown. It’s the culmination of a lot of hard work and perseverance for these learners and I feel honored to be a small part of their journey.”

Pamela’s story of success has been an inspiration to others as well. She mentors the surgical techs she works with to go back to school and to keep growing and learning. Within Pamela’s family, the far-reaching effects of her decision to return to school are evident.

Olivet Nazarene University now offers 23 graduate and continuing studies programs in Bourbonnais, Rolling Meadows, Joliet, downtown Chicago and approximately 70 additional locations.

For Pamela, overcoming the challenges she thought she might fail at has been richly rewarding.

“Three of us were in college at the same time. The neat thing about healthcare is you can go anywhere and still find a job. There’s everything from being on a floor to doing research. All three of my children have chosen to work in the medical field, even my son-in-law.”

“I feel so much better about myself the more confidence I get through learning. There are so many opportunities out there now — universities like Olivet who come to you and make it more convenient. If I can do all this at my age, anyone can.”

SCHOOL OF GRADUATE AND CONTINUING STUDIES

serve. lead. inspire.

877-4-OLIVET | www.olivet.edu | gradadmissions@olivet.edu

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Summer 2008 The Olivetian

Homecoming 2008

WEEKEND SCHEDULE

OCTOBER 23–26

Thursday,

Fun-filled events for the whole ONU family!

Planetarium

Coronation

Class Reunions

Taste of Olivet Tiger athletics

Hors d’oeuvres & Dessert Buffet

O.N.You! Kids

7

October 23

•Coronation, 8 p.m. Friday, October 24 •Homecoming Chapel, 11 a.m. •Shine.fm Open House, 1–4 p.m. •Engineering Department Alumni

Reception, 2–4 p.m. •Powder Puff Football, 2 p.m. •Planetarium Show, 3 p.m. •Men’s JV Basketball vs. Alumni, 3:30 p.m. •Planetarium Show, 5 p.m. •Women’s Basketball, 5:30 p.m. •Planetarium Show, 7 p.m. •Men’s Basketball, 7:30 p.m. •Women’s Basketball Reception, 7:30 p.m. •Taste of Olivet, 8:45 p.m.

Saturday,

October 25

•24 Annual Wendy Parsons 5K Run, th

7 a.m. Registration; 8 a.m. Race

•Phi Delta Lambda Reception, 8–9:15 a.m. •Military Science Department

Comedian and Contemporary Concert Pops! Concert

Prayer Breakfast

� Coronation of the 2008 Homecoming Queen and her court � Intense athletic competition � Your melodious favorites under the direction of Ovid Young during the Homecoming Pops! Concert

� A voyage through time and space in the newly renovated, all digital, Strickler Planetarium

� Class reunions for the classes of 2003, 1998, 1993, 1988, 1983, 1978, 1973, 1968, 1963, and 1958, and Golden Grads

� Games, crafts and entertainment at O.N.You! Homecoming for Kids

� Mouthwatering menus at the Taste of Olivet and the Hors d’oeuvres and Dessert Buffet

� A new Contemporary Christian Concert and Comedian, featuring acoustic rock band Beckon Q, comedian Paul Aldrich and ONU ministry team Stylus

� Prayer and reflection with Dr. John C. Bowling at the President’s Prayer Breakfast

. Country Inn & Suites, . Motel 6, Bradley, Matteson, 708-481-3960 815-933-2300 . Quality Inn, Bradley, 815- . Hampton Inn, Matteson, . Hilton Garden Inn, 1-800-HAMPTON 939-3501 Kankakee, 815-932-4444 . Super 8, Bradley, . Holiday Inn, Matteson, . Holiday Inn Express, 1-800-HOLIDAY 815-939-7888 Bradley, 815-932-4411 . Holiday Inn Express, 30 Minutes From Campus: . Howard Johnson, Monee, 1-800-HOLIDAY Manteno, 815-468-8657 . Baymont Inn, Matteson, . Super 8, Monee, 708-503-0999, . Lees Inn, Bradley, 708-534-1900 800-428-3438 815-932-8080

(within driving distance of Olivet Nazarene University)

. Country Inn & Suites, Manteno, 815-468-2600 . Fairfield Inn, Bradley, 815-935-1334 . Hampton Inn, Bradley, 815-932-8369

11 a.m.–1 p.m.

•Men’s Choir Reunion, Noon •Hospitality Tent & Introductions:

Celebrating 1998 National Runner-Up   football team, Pre-Game •Men’s Football vs. St. Ambrose, 1:30 p.m. •Newly Renovated Benner Library Open House, 1:30–4 p.m. •Planetarium Show, 3 p.m. •Music Department Concert, 4 p.m. •Missionary Reunion, 4:45 p.m. •Planetarium Show, 5 p.m. •Partner/Pacesetter/Investor Dinner, 5:30 p.m., (By invitation)

HOTELS AND MOTELS 5–10 Minutes From Campus:

Open House, 8 a.m.–1 p.m. •Undergraduate Class Reunions and Golden Grads Reunion, 9:30 a.m. •O.N.You! Homecoming for Kids Super Saturday Morning, 9 a.m. •MERC Breakfast, 9:30 a.m. •Dept. Nursing Open House, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. •Shine.fm Open House, 11 a.m.–1 p.m. •Social Work Alumni Reception,

•Planetarium Show, 7 p.m. •Homecoming Pops! Concert, 7:30 p.m. •Contemporary Christian Concert and Comedian, 7:30 p.m. •O.N.You! Homecoming for Kids Super Saturday Night, 7 p.m. •Hors d’oeuvres and Dessert Buffet, 8:45 p.m.

SUNday,

October 26

•President’s Prayer Breakfast, 8 a.m.

for ticket reservations, click www.olivet.edu, e-mail alumni@olivet.edu, or call 815-939-5258.

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wonu 89.7 fm Eyes on the Prize

BY CASEY MANES

Carol Winter teared up when she first

heard the song humming over the radio. And the Voice of Truth tells me a different story, the Voice of Truth says, ‘Do not be afraid!’    Catching the sound waves in Munster, Ind., from Olivet’s Shine.FM over the border in Illinois, Carol and her daughter Brooke received encouragement in the midst of one of the biggest life challenges they may ever have to face. Together they decided Voice of Truth would be Brooke’s running — and life — song.    A 13-year-old track star, Brooke listens to the Casting Crowns song before she races. It’s become one of her racing rituals — listen to the song, pray, then blow by other runners like they’re standing still.    “The song is just so cool, on so many levels. It’s about how you always have two voices going on and it’s a choice which one you choose to pay attention to,” shares Carol.    Evidently, the song has paid off for Brooke in more ways than one. “I win races when I’m in lane number two, it’s my lucky lane!” beams Brooke, pony tail flipping in the wind.

   Despite being diagnosed in March of 2007 with the disease, the Winter family has chosen to laugh often, help Brooke set new goals for her future, and has forged ahead in full-tilt living.    “Some people have said to me, ‘This must be so hard for you.’ I mean, it is hard, but really, we’re still living. Brooke will still keep running and we are still trusting in God. It isn’t always easy, but sometimes you just get to a point where you just say, ‘OK, use me,’” shares Carol in an upbeat tone that would encourage anyone to crave what they have.    “We’ve been through the ringer with some hard situations in our life, but this is one more chance to not allow self pity in and to make the most of what we’re given,” shares Carol.    “It may sound like we don’t care that this is happening, but we do. We’re just choosing to not let it define us and to let our faith be the most important thing here.” Test run of faith

   One of the first big reality checks came recently, when Brooke missed the cut at soccer tryouts.    “I was shocked,” shares her mom. “She is just so fast and so good, it didn’t make sense. I wanted to believe it didn’t have to do with her eyes, but it is a reality and that was a hard blow. So her dad and I said, ‘What else is there for you, Brooke?    “‘Soccer may not be it, but there’s something else then.’ She joined the track team and started winning and beating top runners out of nowhere. We said, ‘See, Brooke? God just had something better for you.’ Her dad told her she will always be able to run, even if she loses her eyesight. This is something she can always do. We know Brooke is greater than this disease and that she can rise above it.”    The tricky part of this disease is Overcoming the hurdle the “ifs.” People manifesting RP may of a lifetime lose all of their eyesight or they may Brooke Wint er with    When Brooke races, her not. And it might take years for it to her mom, Carol hands laid flat to cut the wind happen, or months. Currently, Brooke resistance, her Nikes flashing in a blur in is night blind and has lost her peripheral vision. her 100m, 200m and 400m sprints, she isn’t just    Through the Winters’ involvement with the running. She’s not just blocking out fears of losing, Foundation Fighting Blindness, they’ve found supshe’s living the way her faith and family have taught port through these unknowns and have encounher to live, giving it her all in the midst of friction. tered other runners who have overcome the odds    The friction she faces is more than just wind and maintain their sport. One man resistance on the track. You wouldn’t know it runs with a dog and relies heavily by looking at her, but she’s slowly losing on the “vision” provided by his her eye sight thanks to an impossibly rare genetic disease: retinitis pigmentosa. Both parents have to be recessive carriers in order to pass it on to a child, something no one could have predicted.    But what is noticeable about Brooke is that this news hasn’t stalled her faith, or her zest for life. And it definitely doesn’t define her.

other senses. It has given Brooke a desire to one day run a marathon herself.    “No matter what you have or don’t have, you can do it,” shares Brooke, encouraging others with struggles to trust, not fear. This mindset stems from the mantra her parents continue to pour into her. Seeing with a different set of eyes

   “We’ve [taught] Brooke to always do whatever she does to God’s glory and honor and to be an example in whatever she does — and she will be blessed — no matter the outcome,” shares Carol.    Though obviously sweet and quiet, like all teenagers, Brooke has an active social life, attests her mom, and a feisty side that actively propels her past opponents on the track. “Brooke has got a great heart, she’s always looking out for the underdog,” shares her beaming mom, watching her run with obvious pride.    This mindset and her determination will serve her well in the years ahead, whatever challenges come. Brooke hopes to work in a career someday in which she can help others who are blind, and maybe even research to find a cure for RP. Whatever her future holds, her theme song reminds her to listen attentively to the Voice of Truth, instead of the echoes of fear or looming unknowns.    When asked how Brooke feels when she loses a race she responds, “I kinda get discouraged, but I have to finish it, I just can’t give up.”    They are the words of someone not about to hang up her running shoes. And with truth pumping through her ears, Brooke has a heart firmly fixed on a vision of faith that can never be taken away from her.

POSITIVE. HIT. MUSIC. Miles from Chicago? Click Shine.fm to listen any time, any place.

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Summer 2008 The Olivetian

ALUMNI & FRIENDS UPCOMING EVENTS Mark your calendars for these additional Alumni & Friends events:

Ladies Day 2008

Prime Time at Olivet 2008

featuring

April 25,

Ladies, join us for a much needed getaway filled with great food, great inspiration, and as always, lots of great fun!

CAROL

2009

September 23, 2008 Featuring

Dr. Mark Powell and special music by the Pfeifers

KENT

6th Annual Winter Golf Outing Part of the Larry Watson Memorial Golf Series for student scholarships

Special guest Carol Kent is a gifted author and an outstanding speaker who is hilariously funny, biblically sound and culturally relevant. As a keynote speaker for Women of Faith and Extraordinary Women arena events, she has been featured with Point of Grace, Sandi Patty, Nicole C. Mullen, Mandisa, Kathy Troccoli and Nicole Nordeman.

February 26–March 1, 2009 Join us as we tee it up at three of Orlando’s most beautiful golf courses.

Plus,

Alumni & Friends Gatherings,

Watch for more information!

coming soon to a city near you! (See page 16 for more details.)

Alumni & Friends | Office of Alumni Relations | 815-932-5258 | alumni@olivet.edu

Schimmelpfennig named 2007–2008 NAIA Region VII Athletic Director of the Year

J

eff Schimmelpfennig ’86/’91 MBA has been named the 2007–2008 NAIA Region VII Athletic Director of the Year. The award recognizes an outstanding AD from a region that includes the 22 schools of the Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference and the Midwest Collegiate Conference.    During the 2007–08 season alone, seven teams advanced to postseason NAIA play: men’s and women’s basketball, men’s and women’s cross country, women’s tennis, softball and volleyball. Men’s track sent seven individuals and a relay team to the national meet, while the women’s team sent

four individuals and a relay.    Additionally, the season produced 37 NAIA ScholarAthletes, and the women’s tennis team qualified as an NAIA Scholar-Team.    The award capped Schimmelpfennig’s career as Olivet’s athletic director. He resigned earlier this year to spend more time with his family.

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The nominations are in! Visit www.olivet.edu to cast your vote for who should be named the “World’s Most Interesting Olivetian.” Winner will be announced during half-time of the Homecoming football game.

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cover story

 blog

We believe. You

Snippets of life from the ONU Blogosphere

Mother’s Day

here.

Fabulousity

Posted: October 1, 2007 Blog URL: http://wjcblog.typepad.com (The Washington Journalism Center blog) The second week of my internship at the Washington Times started, and as I strolled into the newsroom, I headed confidently towards my desk. Despite tripping over my own high heels in front of the ENTIRE newsroom, I knew this was going to be a good week.    Then, my editor approached me.    He explained that I was going to cover the Hip Hop Summit at the Washington Convention Center. This summit is to teach young people, 16–35, about financial literacy through the personal testimonies of hip hop icons. He proceeded to tell me that I had interviews already set up with Russell Simmons (the “Godfather of hip hop”), Mya, ­William Jones, the COO of Chrysler Financial, and others.    Now I was thinking he was totally out of his gourd because I’m a white, Midwestern girl with absolutely no knowledge of the hip hop culture and rap music.    Not only do I have to think of intelligent questions pertaining to financial literacy, but I have to pretend like I know what I’m doing, pretend like I know all about hip hop, and quite frankly, I have to look ghetto fabulous.    As I’m introduced to all sorts of people from New York, L.A., and even London, I’m greeted with kisses on both sides of my face. And to my surprise, I’m pretty good at faking a confident exterior.    As soon as I am introduced as ­Bethany Sackett from the Washington Times, I get handfuls of business cards thrown at me.    “Baby girl, hit me up when you’re in New York.”    “Boo, I got this project I’m workin’ on. I’ll hit you up a’ight?”    “Girl, you and me need to go shopping. Those jeans are hot. MySpace me. You know how I do.”  ��� Then, it’s time for the interviews to start. The PR lady grabs my arm and places me in the inner press circle on the red carpet.    “Don’t worry about getting the interviews. I’ll bring whoever you want to you,” she said to me. So, for the next hour and a half, I am interviewing rap artists, politicians, CEOs, and fashion icons.    Toward the end of the red carpet interviews, the sexiest and the sleekest BMW rolls up (yes, it rolled up inside the actual building), and the Godfather of hip hop steps foot upon the red carpet. R ­ ussell Simmons is crowded by TV reporters, paparazzi, and video cameras.

Posted: May 11, 2008 Blog URL: http:///brabson.blogspot.com I became a mother in Ethiopia, Africa. There was no pushing and panting that led to a climax of delivery. There was no hospital, or full round tummy, or maternity clothes. There was no ultrasound or hearing a heartbeat for the first time.    My motherhood journey began two years before I ever set my eyes on a little child sleeping in a tiny metal crib. It began with a conviction, then prayer, and paperwork. It continued with waiting and trips to Chicago and fingerprinting. The time passed slowly, and in this time, many of my friends became pregnant, carried their sweet babies and delivered them into this world. Jason and I would go and visit with them, we would rejoice in the new life, and then we would return home to wait more.    I knew that somewhere in Ethiopia a story was taking place. I knew a day would pass by in which a child would somehow and someway become without a family.    Our social worker sent me an e-mail that had two pictures of Mussie attached. I opened them, my heart beating faster than it ever has before. I cannot tell you what it feels like to receive an e-mail and have it display the face of a child you have longed for. My child. We printed off his pictures and would sleep with them next to our bed. At night we would cry together and talk to his little face. “We are coming for you,” we would proclaim.    He was asleep when I arrived at the orphanage. The years of waiting overtook me, and I scooped him up into my arms, pulled him close to me, and when he began to whimper, my voice comforted him. Imprinted in my memory, treasured, is that moment when he curiously glanced over my face, as I said to him, “I am your Mommy.” I had a son. He had a mommy.

Jason, thousands of miles away, was a father.    I have mourned, at times, for what took place in his life before we became us. Today, especially, as he is sleeping happily in his bed with Grover snuggled next to him, thoughts of his birth family are in my heart. I want them to know that he is happy, safe, and adored. I want them to know that he is intelligent and compassionate and funny. That he loves to run around naked, that he pulls the cat’s tail, and that he can count to ten. I want them to know that at night as we prepare for rest, we pray for them. I want them to know that pieces of them live on in his face, his eyes, and his features. This makes us proud and so eternally grateful for their lives.    Motherhood is the absolute hardest thing I have ever done. But, being Mussie’s mother is the best part of being me. He is my treasure, and I truly am boastfully proud that he is ours, and we are his.    Happy Mother’s Day, me. The journey, the waiting, the travel, the adventure made me the momma of a precious child whose kisses and giggles and boo-boo’s and love is mine each and every day.    Happy Mother’s Day also to a woman somewhere in Ethiopia. Thank you. If ever those words held true gratitude and emotion, they do now. Thank you. Thank you. About the blogger: Katie (Cook) ­Brabson ’03 and her husband, Jason, recently moved to Springfield, Ill., with their son, Mussie, a.k.a. “Moose.” They are in the midst of adoption processes for a second child from Ethiopia, a girl, whom they affectionately refer to as “Baby G.”

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   The PR lady guides him my way, and I’m not even paying attention, assuming it will be awhile until I get to see him. He turns to me and says, “Oh, you’re Bethany from the Times.”    Instantly, everyone crowds in around us, making a complete circle — cameras are flashing, boom mics are dancing above our heads, and people are shouting at Mr. Simmons. I scramble to turn on my digital voice recorder. I grab my pen, open the lid, and in the flusterness of it all, I somehow manage to draw a blue line from my ear to the middle of my cheek. I know, classy.

   Mr. Simmons just smiled and said, “This can be overwhelming. Don’t worry about it. It’s just you and me.”    And in the midst of all of the fabulousity (as I like to call it), there stood the Godfather of hip hop and the only white, Midwestern girl on the red carpet having a casual conversation about the financial literacy crisis in America. So – Week 1 of Internship: Got my first byline Week 2 of Internship: Interviewed one of the founding fathers of hip hop and rap Week 3 of Internship: I’m pretty sure I will collapse. About the blogger: While a student at ONU, Bethany Sackett ’08 ­completed her internship with the ­Washington Journalism Center in ­Washington, D.C. She now resides in Kalamazoo, Mich., where she works at Kalamazoo First Church of the Nazarene and is in the midst of planning a wedding with fiancé, Lee Adams ’07.


Summer 2008 The Olivetian

Rain, Rain!

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17 notes to myself about triathlon

Posted: May 9, 2008 Blog URL: http://erinjphoto. blogspot.com We’ve had a lot of rain here in D.C. lately, and today I decided rather than complaining about it to look on the bright side. I’ve been thinking a lot about making sure I continue to take pictures of what I love, of what got me into this business in the first place. One of those things is Haley. So, I asked Haley if she wanted to go puddle jumping today, and of course, being 2, she thought that was the best idea EVER!    You only live once, don’t waste your time on things that don’t matter. Make time for some fun in your life before it’s too late, and your life has passed you by!

Posted: May 18, 2008 Blog URL: http://www.xanga.com/chihookcreations 1. “Sixty degree” water is very, very cold. 2. It is possible to move your feet over the course of a mile in the water without feeling them. About the blogger: Erin (Erwin) Rexroth ’03 is the owner of Erin J. Photography in the Washington D.C. area, and resides in Alexandria, Va., with husband, Phil ’03, and daughter, Haley. They are looking forward to a new addition to the family this spring.

3. If everyone on the starting line has a long-sleeved wetsuit, and you only have a sleeveless, PANIC! 4. Flirting with cute girl/athlete #78 (according to her swim cap), may cost you 10 seconds when the gun goes off. 5. Embrace the fact that the men in your sport shave their legs and wear ­spandex. 6. Do not eat at a local restaurant the night before a race EVER!!!

It’s official

7. On second thought, when girl #78 pulls off her swim cap and goggles, she’s not really “cute girl 78,” just “girl 78.” This phenomenon shall be known as “swim goggle vision.”

Posted: July 4, 2008 Blog URL: http://benkumor.blogspot.com

8. You’re going to get kicked in the face during the swim. Accept it, do the race anyway.

I am now “Dr. Ben Kumor, MD.” Weird. Ask the 10-years-ago me or any of my family if they ever saw this coming in a million years. I mean, I used to hate school, love sleep, and was terribly lazy. Some things never change, but at least now I‘m done with school! My style has been severely cramped in the sleep and laziness departments, though, and it doesn‘t look like that‘s changing any time soon.    At any rate, a full 20 years of school (21 if you count kindergarten) has culminated in a pretty cool degree.    Do I feel any different now? Nope. Should I? I hope not! Maybe it‘s the three years of training I still have left, or that I didn‘t really pour my heart and soul into med school like some of my classmates, or because I haven‘t dreamed of being a doc my whole life. Whatever the reason, it seems a little anticlimactic.    I think one reason might be a post Papua New Guinea hangover. I finally got to see there what I got into medicine for. It wasn‘t a bunch of rich people looking for a pill to make them skinny and happy and full of energy. It wasn‘t doing every test remotely related to what is going on so you don‘t get yourself sued. And it wasn‘t even doing a good job

practicing medicine to get a nice paycheck and help a few people along the way. Medicine at Kudjip Nazarene Hospital is all about doing a ton with very little to help out needy, hurting, sick people and pointing them to the Lord while you do it. What more could a young, not-yet-jaded doctor want?    Where am I going with all this? I guess I am reminded during this graduation time that life really is a continuous process. Even though there are these milestones along the way, there‘s still a lot of work to be done in every aspect of my life before I can look at myself and be satisfied with what I see. So, even though this is a big milestone, what I really need to do is get back to the work of serving and growing so I can be prepared to serve better.

9. Yes, it hurts. But at no point, not after the mile swim, not during mile 22 on the bike with a 30 mile headwind pushing like the hand of Satan on you, not on mile 4.5 of the run when you’re going up a hill so steep that some people are on their hands and knees to summit, should you ever complain. 10. … because, you’re doing what you love. 11. Remember, the God of the heavens doesn’t care if you come in 15th or

About the blogger: Ben Kumor ’04 recently returned from a two-month rotation at Kudjip Nazarene Hospital in Papua New Guinea. He is now a resident at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Neb., where he resides with his wife, Stephanie (Quimby) ’02 and their 2½ year-old son, ­Caleb. They are expecting a second son, a.k.a. “Mo Mo the Embryo,” in October.

315th, just as long as you humbly acknowledge that it’s Him that gave you the strength to do this, and you do it with your whole heart. 12. Your family put in a lot of work to see you race. So thank them. 13. You are a very disorganized person. I cannot stress this enough. Make a checklist of what you need for a race, and check it off before you leave home. Do NOT trust yourself to “just remember.” 14. You are 25 years old, single, out of grad school, finally not broke, in shape, and you like women. Apologize for none of this. 15. Next weekend you get to do this again! 16. Introduce others to this sport whenever you can, for it has truly changed your life. 17. On these road trips to races, look around. Notice the clouds in the sky and the red on the barns and the crisp quality of the air in the mornings. Notice the faces working behind the counter at the gas station. Then turn up Springsteen’s “Thunder Road” all the way up, and just drive. This is true America. About the blogger: Seth “tower” Hurd ’06/’08 MA can be heard throughout ­Chicagoland, Michigan and the online world daily as the afternoon drive host for Shine.fm. He is a contributing writer for Shore and Relevant magazines, and recently finished in 3rd place for the Aqua-Bike portion of the Muncie, Ind., Endurathon.

Send us your blogs!

We will continue to feature alumni blogs in future issues of The Olivetian. To submit your blog for consideration, e-mail the URL to Heather Day at hday@olivet.edu. Blogs may be edited for length and/or content. * The blogs featured in this issue have been edited for length.

To view the postings in their entirety, visit the URLs referenced above.

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onu news SHINY AND Strickler Planetarium    Strickler Planetarium became Illinois’    newest all-digital planetarium with the addition of a state-of-the art digital projector, the Digistar 3 SP2 HD. The planetarium’s dome has also been cleaned and repainted, and new carpet and seating has been installed.    “Imagine the old static star field projected on the dome ceiling,” says ­S tephen Case ’05 (left), director of Strickler Planetarium. “Now imagine a star field that can actually simulate flight through space — that’s the difference a digital projector can make.”

Summer 2008 brought major renovations to ONU campus

Ludwig Center    The Judy Coomer Dining Room within Ludwig Center has been expanded to add 50 percent more seating, from approximately 600 to more than 900 seats. “With the growth we have experienced during the past years, this expansion was desperately needed. Our seating capacity had not been expanded since the opening of the cafeteria,” says Matt Whitis ’93, director of the physical plant.    The Ludwig Center project also included a renovation of the lobby area and renovation of the heating and air condition systems. Fire sprinklers were added to protect the cafeteria and kitchen.

Dining area expansion facing University Avenue Expanded dining room facing the Quad

Benner Library

library and resource center.    Other improvements include a new instructional lab on the first floor; a more prominent place for University archives; rearrangement of the collection; and a new religion and theology area. New carpet and a new air conditioning unit complete the remodel. “Much has changed since the original Memorial Library was built in 1955 and the Benner addition was constructed in 1975,” Boyens says.

     Computer workstations have been rearranged on the first floor of Benner Library into “pods” consisting of four computers, and three group booths have been added, equipped with computers. “We want to accommodate the way students study and learn in the 21st century — collaborating with other students on group projects and heavy use of technology,” says Kathy Boyens, director of the

Group booths and computer “pods”

Other projects around campus:    Parrott Hall restrooms were updated with new sinks, showers, toilets and faucets. New flooring and lighting were installed throughout the restrooms, hallways and common areas.    Dorm rooms and apartment buildings continue to be updated with sprinklers. By 2012 all dormitories will be equipped with sprinkler systems.

“Education with a Christian Purpose” is made possible for our students because of your generosity. Students featured in this issue of The Olivetian are recipients of the following scholarships: Elizabeth Agan Indianapolis Westside Church    of the Nazarene Scholarship Olivet Nazarene University    Nazarene Scholarship

Ian Arnold* Kalamazoo First Church of the    Nazarene Scholarship Olivet Nazarene University    Nazarene Scholarship

Harrison Agan Indianapolis Westside Church    of the Nazarene Scholarship Olivet Nazarene University    Nazarene Scholarship Olivet Nazarene University    Ministry Team

Sara Byrne* Olivet Nazarene University    Athletic Scholarship: Volleyball Tricia Deter* Caleb Fightmaster Olivet Nazarene University    Athletic Scholarship: Football

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Laura Kirst* Bethany Sackett* Peggy Gilliam Scholarship Ray I. and Yvonne D. Seaman    Scholarship Kalamazoo First Church of the    Nazarene Scholarship

Brooklin Soulia* Olivet Nazarene University    Admissions Ambassador Olivet Nazarene University    Resident Assistant

Stephanie Smith* Olivet Nazarene University    Nazarene Scholarship Olivet Nazarene University    Athletic Scholarship: Volleyball

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* Recipients of general Olivet Nazarene University Scholarships

To establish a student scholarship, or to contribute to an existing foundation scholarship, e-mail the Office of Development at development@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5171.

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Summer 2008 The Olivetian

It was only months ago that Nathan LaLone ’10 felt the rattle of the steel convoy, as a road side bomb blew the humvee just in front of him into a cloud of confusion, fire and black smoke. Now this veteran of the Iraq war is slowly learning how to adjust to life as an ONU college student.

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Iraq in the

What was it like? What has he learned?

rear

view

TO READ NATHAN’S STORY, click www.olivet.edu and select “The Olivetian” from the Quick Links drop-down menu.

Visit www.olivet.edu and click “News & Events” for the latest news about Olivet Nazarene University.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

RECENT STORIES

▶singin’ and diggin’:

A new school year in full swing

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SUBMITTED PHOTO

▲super scientists: ▲by the numbers: 2008 summer research projects

earns national honors

LISA PESAVENTO ’10

▲sife

Concert singers tour Europe with music and hard labor

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onu alumni

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Class Notes 19 60s

Duane and Dorothy Pierce

Duane ’61 and Dorothy (Christenson) Pierce ’63 will celebrate their 50th wedding

anniversary this summer. They were married Aug. 9, 1958, at the First Church of the Nazarene in Litchfield, Minnesota. Duane is the co-owner, with son Don, of the Pierce‑ Carter Insurance Agency and Dorothy is a retired schoolteacher. They reside at Indian Lake in Vicksburg, Michigan during the summer and in Arizona for the winter months.

Dennis Apple ’64 recently released his book Life After the Death of My Son: What I’m Learning. Dennis and his wife, Buelah, lost their oldest son, Denny, in 1991, from complications of mononucleosis. He started journaling the day after Denny’s death and continued for five years. As he was compiling the book, he was challenged to think of a bereaved parent looking for something to relieve their sorrow and to write to that person.

19 70s Connie Duke ’71 received her doctorate in ed-

ucational leadership in September 2007 with Phi Gamma Sigma honors. Her dissertation was dealing with team building and personality types. Connie is the dean of education at Keiser University, West Palm Beach, Fla. She is a certified human behavior consultant and also owns Time Out, a motivational speaking company, which does professional development. Aline J. Henerberg ’73 recently retired af-

ter many years as a registered nurse. The last 20 years of her professional life was spent as a nursing professor at Kankakee Community College.

Steven ’74 and Deborah Baker, Nazarene missionaries since 1981, recently moved to Mexico, where they will be working in church development. Their primary responsibilities will include coordinating the Mexico side of the Border Initiative, church growth, and planting American English speaking churches in Mexico. Their first American congregation is in Rosarito Beach, just outside of Tijuana. They have previously served in South America and the United States. The Bakers have three sons, Rex, Kelvin and Nelson.

19 80s Alan Nelson ’80 will be launching KidLead

at the end of 2008 after 2–3 years of development and prototyping. It is America’s only leadership training program designed for leaders while they are moldable between the ages of 10–13.

Toni (Oneal) ’86 and Larry Stephens: A girl,

Abigail Faith, Feb. 20, 2007. She joins big brothers Isaac, 15, Jacob, 13, Kyle, 4, and big sisters Sarah, 11, Rachel, 9, Rebecca, 6, and Michelle, 2. Larry is an account executive for Hallmark Office Products Inc. Toni is a homemaker and home schools the children. They reside in Hockley, Texas. Todd and Lisa (Foster) ’88 Taskerud: Adopt-

ed Alexis Joy. She was born March 21, 2008. She joins big brothers Chase, 12, and Tanner, 9. They reside in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Mark T. Fryar ’88 recently became senior pastor at New Hope Church of the Nazarene in Rogers, Ark. He was a youth pastor for nearly 18 years before sensing God’s call to take his own church. Mark and his wife, Gretchen, and their two children, Maddsion and Jackson, reside in Rogers. Mark T. Fryar Bob Ashby ’88 earned an M.B.A. in the spring of 2008 from Indiana Wesleyan University. Bob is a manager for Progressive Insurance. He and his wife, Reneé, reside in North Vernon, Ind., with their two children. Reneé is a stay-athome mom and home schools the children.

Shelly (Simon) Blankenbaker ’98 graduated with a Master of Arts in special education from the University of Phoenix-Online. She will be pursuing her certificate in learning disabilities with the intent of teaching K–8. Shelly lives in South Rockwood, Mich., with George, her husband of five years, and two stepchildren, Jordan, 16 and Mariah, 12. Carrie Lane (Williams) Wisehart ’98 received her master’s of education in theatre from The Ohio State University on June 8, 2008. Carrie is the theatre director and teaches theatre/ English at Central Crossing High School in Grove City, Ohio. Her husband, Brady Wisehart ’00, serves as connection pastor at Grove City Church of the Nazarene. Megan Bowne ’06 and Brandon McDonald

were married on May 10, 2008, in Kansas City. Megan is working as a prenatal nurse at the Health Department, and Brandon works as a teacher Megan and Brandon McDonald at Earthworks. The couple resides in Kansas City, Kan.

Mark Lingle

Mark Lingle ’89, an ordained elder in the

Church of the Nazarene, was recently promoted as director of the World Sport Stacking Association in Denver, Colo., May 2008. Through this unusual assignment, he is getting many opportunities to share Christ around the world, in a completely different venue, with this simple sport using specially designed cups.

19 90s Shawn (Smith) Lantz ’90 recently released

her first book, Congo Vignettes. The book is a collection of stories, devotional in nature, which recounts the faithfulness of God to three generations of one family, including stories from her grandparents’, parents’, and siblings’ lives. Her hope in writing down these stories, some stranger than fiction, is to bring hope to two continents. The book was released by Word Books.

Scott ’93 and Amy Curtis: A boy, Jared Ryne,

May 23, 2008. He joins brother Jack, 4, and sister Adelle, 2. Scott is the managing director of InCentric Solutions. Amy is a full-time mother. They reside in Charlotte, N.C.

Brent ’95 and Cindy Freesmeyer: A girl,

Kelsey Ann, April 4, 2008. Kelsey joins big sister Kaitlyn, 3. Brent is a project manager at Klingner & Associates in Quincy, Ill. Cindy is an accountant at Shotts, Merryman & Co. in Pittsfield, Ill. They reside in Pittsfield. Brian ’96 and Darla (Smith) ’96 Hancock:

A boy, Alex Zander, April 1, 2008. He joins his three sisters Emma Leigh, 6, Alyssa Beth, 3, and Cara Lynn, 1. Brian is the youth pastor and music minister at LifeStream Church of the Nazarene in Waldorf. Darla is an early childhood art Alex Hancock and music specials teacher for Charles County Public Schools. They reside in White Plains, Md. Renee (Woodle) ’98 and Brad Schultz: A

b o y, B e n j a m i n Dayle, April 29, 2008. Renee is an appeals validation processor at CIGNA Healthcare. They reside in Bourbonnais.

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Mark ’98/’07 M.A. and Stefanie (Rhodabarger) Hendrickson ’00: A boy, Nicholas Allen,

Nov. 14, 2007, in Kansas City. Mark and Stefanie are co-pastors of the Drexel, Mo., Church of the Nazarene. Stefanie also works in clergy development at Nazarene Nicholas Hendrickson Headquarters and is the editor of Credo, Word Action’s devotional magazine for youth.

Anthony ’98 and Laura (McBurnie) ’98 ­H udgins: A boy, Luke Anthony, March 4,

2008. He joins big sister, Hannah, 5. Anthony is a music teacher in the Bradley Elementary School System, and Laura is a stay-at-home mom. They reside in Bradley, Ill.

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Hannah and Luke Hudgins

Sarah-Jane (Miley) ’99 and Thomas Gordon: A

girl, Rebecca Janel, Aug. 22, 2007. She joins big brother Noah David, 3. Sarah-Jane is a dietitian but is currently a stayat-home mom. Thomas works at Kenyon and Associates Architects in Peoria. They reside in Metamora, Ill.

Noah and Rebecca Gordon

Amber (Corzine) ’99 and Lucas Dickson: A

son, Levi Rush, born Nov. 5, 2007. Amber is a stay-at-home mom and a part-time structural engineer with Needham and Associates. Lucas is a management engineer with HCA. They reside in Olathe, Kan.

Levi Dickson

boy, Cooper Gregory, born June 6, 2007. He joins sister Macy, 5. Claire works as a pediatrician at Northwest Dayton Pediatrics, and Jim works as Macy and Cooper McDowell a mechanical engineer. They live in Englewood, Ohio.

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girl, Mikayla Cole, Feb. 7, 2008. She joins her two sisters, Jenna, 4, and Claire, 2. Chante is currently a stay-at-home Jenna, Claire and mother, and Charlie is a Mikayla Norder property supervisor for Pekin Insurance. They reside in Rockton, Ill. Faith (Grinnell) ’00 and Hugo Lopez: A girl, Gi-

ada Fe, Jan. 19, 2008. Faith is a physical therapist for Tyler Medical Services, and Hugo is the Chicago Hispanic sales manager for a beverage company. They reside in Aurora, Ill.

Giada Lopez

Travis McEowen ’00 earned an M.B.A. with a concentration in accounting, in August 2008, from Indiana Wesleyan University. Travis is an investment manager for Wells Fargo. He and his wife Erin (Alderson) ’01 reside in Columbia City, Ind. Erin is a credit analyst with Wells Fargo. Juamona (Simpson) ’00 and Trenton Simmons: A girl, Aniyah Faith, May 5, 2008. Jua-

mona is a stay-at-home mom and Trenton is a quality assurance specialist for Klein Tools. They live in Waukegan, Ill.

Jessica (Graper) ’01 and Shawn Hilborn ’99:

A girl, Emma Grace, Dec. 10, 2007. Emma joins big brother Ethan, 3. Jessica is an ER nurse at Mercy Medical Center, and Shawn is an estimator/ project manager for Portzen ConEthan and Emma Hilborn struction. They reside in Dubuque, Iowa.

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is enrolled in the library science program at the University of Illinois and taught for seven years but will now stay home. Bobby graduated from veterinary school in May and will be pursuing an internship next Jenna Rushing year at Texas A & M. They recently relocated to College Station, Texas, this summer.

Ruth (Wehrman) ’02 and Brandon Randall ’03: A girl, Raegan Marie, June 6, 2007.She

joins sister Meegan, 3. Ruth is a fifth grade teacher at King Middle School in Kankakee, Ill. Brandon teaches history, geography, and government, as well as coaches both boys and girls soccer, at Peotone High School, Peotone, Ill.

Anna (Dunbar) ’03 and ­David Cooper: A boy, An-

Claire (Morris) ’99 and Jim McDowell: A

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Chante (LaFond) ’00 and Charlie Norder: A

Shawna (Herbert) ’01 and Robert Rushing Jr.: A girl, Jenna Anne, April 2, 2008. Shawna

Benjamin Schultz

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thony Thomas, April 9, 2007. Anna is a purchasing assistant III at State Farm Insurance Headquarters, and David is finishing his master’s in multicultural studies. They reside in Lincoln, Ill.

Anthony Cooper

Rebekah Bruining ’03 and ­Michael Wurglitz were mar-

ried on June 23, 2007, in Elmhurst, Ill. They now reside in Mount Vernon, Ill., where Beka teaches eighth grade English, and Mike works as an agronomist for Pioneer Seed Co. Rebekah and Michael Wurglitz


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Summer 2008 The Olivetian

Daughters, Addison Elizabeth, Aug. 12, 2006, and Sophie Grace, Feb. 15, 2008. Chadwick is currently a fulltime youth pastor at Moundford Free Methodist Church, in Decatur Ill., and is the head of his Addison and Sophie conference’s Youth Anderson Ministries. He also does some freelance writing on the side. Sarah keeps very busy as a stay-at-home mom and full-time youth pastor’s wife. Jessica Blake ’05 and Aaron Wainscott ’06

were married on Oct. 27, 2008, in Allen Park, Mich. Aaron works for the Anderson Country Club, and Jessica works as a social worker for the state of Indiana. They reside in Anderson, Ind. Jessica and Aaron Wainscott Emily Flowers ’05 and Derek Torres were married on July 21, 2007, in Wilmington, Ill. Derek serves in the Army National Guard and is currently pursuing a master of divinity degree at Trinity International University in Deerfield, Ill. Emily and Derek Torres Emily is a teacher. They currently reside in Grayslake, Ill. Luke Wadsworth ’05 recently was promoted to captain in the U.S. Army in ceremonies at Fort Lewis, Wash. Capt. Wadsworth, an Army Ranger, now serves as a Company Executive Officer for the 110th Technical Escort Battalion at Fort Lewis. In January 2008, he returned from a year of combat duty Luke Wadsworth based at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan. He graduated from Army Ranger School in August 2007. Kelly (Carpenter) Gibson ’05 and Rob Gibson ’04:

A girl, Leyna Grace, April 25, 2008.

Leyna Gibson

Toni Moran ’06 graduated with academic distinction, on May 19, 2008, from Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Physician Assistant Program. She received the degree of Master of Medical Science. Toni has recently accepted a position as a physician assistant in family medicine and will begin working this fall in Winston-Salem, N.C. Amber Drake ’07 and Cesar Sousa were mar-

ried on May 10, 2008, at Kankakee State Park, Kankakee, Ill. They currently live in Shawnee, Kan.

Cesar and Amber Sousa

In Memoriam

The late Willis Snowbarger played key role in Olivet growth    Daily at Olivet Nazarene University, dozens of athletes in all sorts of sports — football, baseball, soccer, softball, tennis and track — exercise at Snowbarger Athletic Park.    The park is a tribute to a man who played an instrumental role in the growth of Olivet — Willis Snowbarger. Snowbarger, 86, died Aug. 1, 2008, in Bethany, Okla.

REV. GORDON C. WICKERSHAM ’47

Chadwick ’03 and Sarah ’03 Anderson:

   He served the institution for 37 years, including 28 as an administrator. He played critical roles, as academic dean, in building the college and seeing it get national accreditation, and also helping to merge Olivet more closely into the Kankakee County community.    Snowbarger, promoted to academic dean in 1953, worked closely with the presidencies of both Harold Reed and Leslie Parrott at Olivet, during a dynamic time in the college’s history. Snowbarger played a role in the planning of several campus buildings, including the Larsen Fine Arts Center, Memorial Library, the Reed Hall of Science and the Wisner Hall for Nursing Education.    “In the history of any organization there are a handful of individuals who make a dramatic contribution to the work; Dr. Willis Snowbarger was one such person for Olivet,” said Olivet President John C. Bowling.    “He led the school to full accreditation, the reorganization of the academic program, the development of our graduate school and many fine curricular developments, and the establishment of our nursing program.”    Bowling said Snowbarger “left a lasting legacy and an inspiring example.”    Snowbarger was also part of the college’s decision to start intercollegiate athletics, hence the naming of the fields. Steps the college took to gain accreditation included the dropping of a high school and a Bible college, and recruiting more doctorates for the faculty, a personal crusade by Snowbarger, one professor at a time.    Gregg Chenoweth, an Olivet faculty member who previously wrote a weekly ­column, once described Snowbarger as a man so eager to develop the school that he said, “tell us what you want to do in your program and we’ll erect a building around it.”

Dr. Willis E. Snowbarger, vice president emeritus of academic affairs

Education for the Church of the Nazarene headquartered in Kansas City.    In 2005, he published his reminiscences in By the Way: A Farm Boy from Kansas to Berkeley to Bourbonnais.    It is one of the clearest accounts, both of the growth of the university and of the Kankakee and Bourbonnais community in the 1950s and 1960s.    In his book, he writes movingly about nursing his first wife through Alzheimer’s disease; and discusses the loneliness of retirement.    “If you do move, you invite all your friends to come see you. They do not come. They don’t use the telephone, even when the ‘old man’ could save hours of effort. Your offers to be helpful come to naught. So you build a new life. You do not expect people to come or to call. You expect the calendar to be largely blank day after day. You start to build a new circle of friends,” he wrote.    Active on church boards all his life, he was also a volunteer for Meals on Wheels and a Paul Harris Fellow for Rotary International.    “He embodied the spirit of a Nazarene University,” said longtime friend Gordon Wickersham, who headed community relations for the university for many years.    A kind and active man, he saw the world and community with great clarity. He lived history, and helped to change it for the better.    His was a life well-lived.

   Snowbarger served as an officer aboard the battleship Washington in World War II. After the war, he earned a master’s at the University of Oklahoma and a doctorate at California-Berkeley. He joined Olivet in 1949 as assistant professor of history.    From 1965 to 1970 he was the Secretary of

This column originally appeared on the editorial page of The Daily Journal of Kankakee on Aug. 4, 2008. It was written by the newspaper’s senior editor, Phil Angelo, and is reprinted with the permission of that publication.

continued, next page

Olivet Gift Annuities are a popular planned giving option.

While the gettin’s still good …

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They allow you to help students while providing a lifetime of income for you and your family.   But after October 1, 2008, CGAs will not be quite as sweet a deal.   The American Council on Gift Annuities (ACGA) recommended lowering payout rates

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for new gift annuities as of July 1, 2008. The ONU Foundation, however, is extending the current rates for another quarter.   If you’re considering a new CGA, NOW is the time to act to receive the highest payout rate! Office of Planned Giving development@olivet.edu • 815-939-5171


onu alumni

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In Memoriam 19 40s Wendell H. Arnold ’48 died Aug. 11, 2008, at his home. Mr. Arnold was born June 17, 1918, in Harold, S.D., to Urey Burke and Alice Vivian (Smith) Arnold. He married Bernina “Bernie” Rupp on Aug. 25, 1940. He was a graduate of Olivet Nazarene University with a B.A. degree in social science and Syracuse University with an M.A. degree in philosophy. His professional life was spent in the non-profit field working with Goodwill Industries, United Way, and Chicago Boys and Girls Clubs. Mr. Arnold joined Roosevelt University in 1967, being made a vice president in 1968. He held this position until he retired in 1986. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Arlington Heights. Dale R. Baldridge ’49, of Springfield died May 9, 2008.

He was born March 26, 1926, in Decatur, Ill. He married his precious wife, Lucille, on June 19, 1954, who preceded him in death.    Mr. Baldridge grew up in Decatur and is a graduate of Stephen Decatur High School. After high school, he enrolled in Gradwhol Laboratories in St. Louis studying medical technologies and X-ray techniques. At the end of a one-year internship with St. Mary’s Hospital in Decatur, Dale R. Baldridge Mr. Baldridge enlisted in the Army Medical Corps and served two years. Following his discharge, he attended Olivet Nazarene College, and Millikin University, where he graduated with dual majors in biology and chemistry, and minors in English and History.    Mr. Baldridge attended graduate school at Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville and Carbondale, Illinois, earning his master’s degree in dual sciences. He held an Ed.D. degree from the University of Illinois.    Mr. Baldridge taught biology and psychology at Springfield High School for 23 years, and influenced the lives of many students.    Mr. Baldridge was a member of the First Church of the Nazarene of Springfield, serving on the church board, and singing bass in the church choir. He taught Sunday school for many years.

19 50s Thomas Dee Moore ’51 went home to be with the Lord

on April 25, 2008, at Sun City Center, Fla. Tom was born Feb. 11, 1928, in Bluffton, Ind., to Rev. Franklin and Ethel Moore. He was a lifelong member of the Church of the Nazarene. Tom served in the U.S. Navy, where he attained the rank of third class petty officer. He received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Northern Colorado. He taught elementary school for five years, was an elementary school principal in Colorado for 22 years and in Arizona for four years. He retired in 1994. He is survived by Barbara, his wife of 58 years, and by one son, Mark. Rev. Forrest Stoll ’54 of South

Haven died on July 26, 2008, at home. He was born on Jan. 8, 1930, in ­Columbus, Ohio, to Forrest and Dorothy (Miller) Stoll. Forrest married Frances Savage on June 7, 1952, at the Fuller Ave. Church of the Nazarene in Grand Rapids, Rev. Forrest Stoll Mich. Forrest was a graduate of Olivet Nazarene University and also Nazarene Theologi-

cal Seminary. Forrest was a pastor for the Church of the Nazarene. He served churches in Pomeroy, Ohio, Clare, Vicksburg and Shaftsburg, Mich. He did pulpit supply preaching throughout Michigan and Florida and retired in 1993. He loved to read and was an avid collector of model HO trains. He was a member of the Church of the Nazarene in South Haven. Merlin Eugene Provance ’55 left this life to be at home

with the Lord on March 20, 2008, in Columbus, Ohio. He received a Bachelor of Theology degree from Olivet Nazarene University in Bourbonnais, and a master’s degree in 1987 from the West Virginia College of Graduate Studies in Charleston, W.Va. He left behind his wife of almost 56 years, Ruby, and their son, Mike. Their daughter, ­Tamara, preceded him in death. Merlin Provance    As an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene, he enjoyed 38 years of pastoral ministry with pastorates in Illinois, Tennessee and West Virginia. Merlin served as an associate pastor the last 12 years at First Church of the Nazarene in South Charleston, W. Va., where he developed a substantial ministry to the MiSMAs “the Over-50 Crowd”; and was the executive director of Healthy Connections Wellness Center. He received the Governor’s Award as a Distinguished West Virginian in 2004 for his work with the governor and the health concerns of the state of West Virginia.

alumni rings ginag ttoha ceity near you! Com

Kankakee, Ill. September 26, 2008

Kankakee First Church of the Nazarene An evening with Ovid Young and Harlow Hopkins

Seymour, Ind. September 27, 2008

Seymour First Church of the Nazarene An evening with Ovid Young and Harlow Hopkins

Indianapolis, Ind. September 28, 2008

Indianapolis First Church of the Nazarene Alumni & Friends Gathering

Quincy, Ill. october 11, 2008

19 70s Kristin A. (Haffner) Hubartt ’71 went to be with her

Lord on April 28, 2008, in Denver, Colo. She married Gary L. Hubartt ’72 in 1972 and the couple lived in Indiana, California, and Ohio before moving to Colorado, where they have lived since 1982. She worked for 35 years as a medical technologist. She is survived by her husband, two daughters, Jennifer and Kimberly, and three grandchildren. Kristin’s life was characterized by a strong faith and a generous heart and she will be missed by all who knew her.

Quincy University Tigers vs. Hawks and Tailgate Party

Lebanon, Ill. november 8, 2008

McKendree University Tigers vs. Bearcats and Tailgate Party

Register at www.olivet.edu For more information, contact the Office of Alumni Relations at alumni@ olivet.edu or call 815-939-5258.

20 00s Daniel Max Walker ’08 passed away July 23, 2008, in his sleep due to a ruptured aortic aneurism.    Dan was born Aug. 29, 1985, in Loveland, Colo. to Dean and Suzanne Walker. He graduated from Fort Collins High School in 2004, where he participated in football, lacrosse, and track. After high school, Dan attended Olivet, graduating in 2008, with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. At Olivet, Dan was a four-year member of the football team, a football captain, a member of Testament Men’s Choir, built and raced a Baja car, and was a stellar disk golfer. Daniel Walker Dan was working as an activities director at Golden Bell Camp and Conference Center in Divide, Colo. Dan was a pilot, enjoyed the outdoors, and was an excellent potter.    The Walker family requests that memorials made in Dan’s honor be made to the chapel at the Golden Bell camp and conference center in Colorado: Daniel Max Walker Memorial Fund, C/O COTN Foundation, 13795 S. Mur-Len Rd., Suite 101, Olathe, KS 66062.

Looking for qualified, enthusiastic workers with integrity? Allow us to introduce the Class of 2009. Olivet is seeking alumni and friends to host booths at our 2009 “Explore the Possibilities” job fair on March 2, 2009. Whether your organization is looking to fill part-time, full-time, or internship positions, ONU students and recent grads may be just the answer for you.

We’d love to hear FROM YOU! Send us your news and pictures. Please submit alumni news, less

Contact the Office of Alumni

than one year old, in the format printed in this section. Be sure to include all in­for­mation, including class year. Due to space constraints, not all pictures will be used, and content may be edited. Pictures will be accepted only via e-mail to TheOlivetian@olivet.edu. News should be sent via e-mail, at www.olivet.edu or through the mail to The Olivetian, Olivet Nazarene University, One University Avenue, Bourbonnais, IL 60914-2345.

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Relations at alumni@olivet.edu or call 815-939-5258.

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onu sports

Summer 2008 The Olivetian

the playmaker

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gary newsome ’74 named 4th athletic director in onu history

There has never been any question that coaching and education was what I wanted to get into, and maybe what I was made to do.”

I take Vicki, my wife, on away trips not just for companionship, but to teach our players how you’re supposed to treat young ladies. Hopefully they’ll learn that from watching us.”

C.W. Ward ’52, Larry Watson ’65 and Jeff Schimmelpfennig ’86/’91 M.B.A. absolutely modeled a Christ-like behavior. It was so easy to see how they truly cared about people and Olivet. To carry on the tradition will be difficult. I’ve got big shoes to fill.”

What’s the game plan for new athletic director Gary Newsome? He dusts off the ol’ play book to share a few of his key strategies.

Were you successful in getting your degree and then going out and changing your world? That’s a whole lot more important than winning on the scoreboard. Give me 10 years, let me see how those kids turned out, and I’ll tell you if that was a successful season.”

I’m looking forward to being able to work with all the head coaches we have here, because they’re so talented and dedicated to their sport. It’s going to be a lot of fun to be able to help them succeed.”

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onu sports

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Under the vast, pink sky

KYLE WALKER ’11

Recent Olivet grad, football player left legacy of respect and love caleb benoit ’06

M

essages of love and hope adorn the Facebook wall of Dan Walker ’08, who died [July 23]. He will be remembered for being a living example of those same messages. “He was a man who changed everyone he met,” said Marcus Stuart ’08, one of Walker’s former roommates at Olivet. “He made an impact on ­everyone.” Walker, 22, was working as an activities director at Golden Bell Camp outside of Divide, Colo., when — in the middle of the night — he suffered a ruptured aneurysm in his aorta, the main blood vessel that exits the heart. He didn’t wake up to his alarm the next morning. His father, Dean, said he showed no previous signs of health ­problems. “He was very passionate and loving,” Dean said. “He was a Christian guy who was seeking God for direction.” Walker graduated from Olivet in May with a degree in mechanical engineering. He was a member of the men’s choir and a starting linebacker on the football team. “On the football field, he always enjoyed what he was doing, and that’s how he lived his life,” Olivet assistant football coach Dustin Hada ’02 said. “He did more in 22 years than I’ll ever do.” Hada said he went numb when he heard the news. “I just sat there,” he said. He’s since received phone calls from both current and former Olivet football players. “Dan’s in a better place than we are now. It doesn’t make it easy, and we’ll never understand why, but it gives us something better to think of,” he said. “That’s my comfort for those guys.” Walker followed his two older brothers, Ted ’04 and Ryan ’06, from their home in Fort Collins, Colo., to college in Bourbonnais. All three played on Olivet’s football team, and their youngest brother, Kyle ’11, is a sophomore at Olivet. “He was always a better football player than I was, and he was probably the best out of the four of us boys,” Ryan said of his younger brother, a three-sports athlete in high school. But Dan will be remembered for more than what he did between the sidelines. “He was slow to anger and easy to laugh,” Kyle remembers. “He loved easy and was easy to love. He was sincere in his faith in Jesus Christ, and that’s what drove him.’’ Dan directed a Bible study for the football team and helped lead a group of players who went on a mission trip to Memphis, Tenn., over spring break. There they built homes and re-roofed buildings. “He was one of the best Christian examples for our age group,” said Caleb Fightmaster ’08, a teammate and classmate. Dan loved the outdoors and enjoyed flying planes and making pottery. His father and mother, Suzanne, still live in Fort Collins, about 60 miles north of Denver. Dan was dating Brook Soulia ’09, also a student at Olivet. Wrote Kyle on his brother’s Facebook wall: “Dan, I wish I would have told you more, but you’re the best and I love you. You were always there when I needed you and are the best friend I have ever had. I know that you’re in heaven and I hope you can read this. It’s not fair. You were the best of us. I love you. We love you.”

We knew the school was in the middle of the desert. Even with flying into Phoenix, it was still a three to four hour drive to the school. We all piled into two minivans to make the trip. But we didn’t expect the tree-covered mountains with breath­ taking views when we pulled in. Sun Valley Indian School, located in northern Arizona, was our destination. It is a boarding school for elementary through junior high students from the nearby Navajo reservation. My fellow volleyball players Sara Byrne ’11 and Laura Kirst ’11, athletic trainer Tricia Deter ’08 and four recent graduates from the graduate program, Lori Hoekstra ’06/’08 MOL, Deb ­Foster ’06/’08 MOL, Mark Lamie ’08 MOL and ­Megan Skinner ’01/’08 MOL also attended. Steve Williams and Lorna ­Guimond rounded out the group.

A work in progress

Beyond the euphoria

Stephanie Smith ’10

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Sometimes mission trips are a spiritual high that is lost once we re-enter our daily routine; the experiences I have been through and the relationships I have built have made that impossible. Our focus is simpler now. At a pre-trip meeting a staff person from Olivet gave us some pointers for the experience, one of which was to have no expectations. Our group went to Arizona ready to be flexible, eager to help, and expecting the presence of God; He would write the story. When all we know is a small part of our own story, it’s time to let God — who knows the entirety of every story — direct us. Only He can orchestrate the miracle of a changed life.

MEGAN SKINNER ’01/’08 MOL

We designed and painted more than a dozen signs for the exteriors of the buildings, incorporating traditional designs. Others built a corral while the rest had a variety of duties including cleaning donated jewelry for the school to sell and working in the school cafeteria. We helped with projects, but they were also an avenue to get us in touch with the kids, to hopefully have a positive influence for Christ during the last week of their school year — before they headed home to some tough ­situations. We were able to mix in with the kids for a night of ‘World Cup’ Soccer, enjoy a bonfire together, eat meals and attend chapel together. We supported the

Team members showcase their exterior signs design work.

This article originally appeared in the Daily Journal (Kankakee, Ill.) and is reprinted with the permission of that publication.

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Off-court bonding

The trip was also a time to get to know each other on a deeper level, to encourage each other on our spiritual walks. We were a small group, making it easier to become comfortable and get close, but were diverse enough in age and background — especially church background — that we learned quite a bit from each other’s experiences. The group got along so well we have been getting together regularly. It is truly a blessing to have such Christian friends at this time in my life. During this whole experience, life was simpler. We found ourselves out in the middle of the desert, a desolate area far from even medium-sized towns, but in the midst of this vastness it was easy to find God. Who else could have created such wide open spaces where, with your back to the setting sun you can still see tinges of pink wrapping themselves around the sky in front of you? We worked together, ate together and rested together. I experienced a renewed burden for the lost because of seeing kids with such potential but with so many obstacles between their present lives and lives with Christ.

By

Taken by brother, Kyle Walker ’11, after texting Dan to “turn around” during the 2008 graduation ceremony.

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kids during their end-of-the-year music showcase, at their promotion ceremony and at a baptism service, and we played pick-up games of tag in-between.

Desert brings clarity, life changes for volleyball players

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ten questions

Summer 2008 The Olivetian

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Brotherly

Love

10 Questions with Harrison ’10 and Elizabeth ’11 Agan, Danville, Ind.

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How did you end up at Olivet?

Harry: I wanted to attend a Christian university and since I am a Nazarene, Olivet just seemed to fit well. More so, Olivet holds many of the values that I hold, and the environment that the faculty, staff and students create is what I want to be a part of. Liz: Normally I just say that it’s because of my brothers. But I also realize that I wouldn’t be at Olivet if God didn’t want me here — so it’s because of an awesome God.

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You’re both musically inclined, traveling with Before Tomorrow ministry group. Do you come from a musical family?

… we were always bothering each other growing up. But since being at college, I feel like we have become really good friends.”— Harrison A gan ’10

Harry: My dad’s father was a singer and was in a men’s singing group while at Olivet. My dad’s mother plays the piano, and together, my grandparents traveled to several churches to lead music while my dad was growing up. My parents played a little in high school and have done some singing with church choir.

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Harry, this is your second year as a member of Before Tomorrow. Why did you decide to participate again? Harry: The ministry. We have the great opportunity to lead teens to Christ through music, but our ministry is much larger than music. We are able to relate to teenagers because we were recently their age and we know the struggles that they may face. More so, God uses us to be His hands and feet while He is continually growing us in new ways.

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Tell the truth: Any big brother/little sister squabbles as you’re on the road ­together? Harry: Honestly I don’t think it’s been a problem at all. Being only 20 months apart, we were always bothering each other while growing up. But since being at college, I feel like we have become really good friends. Liz: People we meet on the road ask us that same question and the answer is always the same: Nope. Even the other members in our band say that there hasn’t been any trouble … yet. (Laughs)

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Now that summer is over, what’s the best part about returning to Olivet?

Liz: I am excited to see friends from last year and to meet new people. Also, returning to my marketing job.

Harry: It will be nice not to have to live out of a suitcase!

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Liz, you’re known for your practical jokes. What is your all-time favorite prank?

Liz: Oh goodness, there are so many! I enjoy TPing and forking yards — anything that doesn’t damage property is alright by me.

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Finish this sentence: Everyone should know that my sibling …

Harry: … is a computer nerd. No matter what is broken with a computer, she always finds a way to fix the problem. Liz: (laughing) … is not that funny.

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Describe the family life of three brothers and a sister.

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Did you find it tough to play hooky from high school as home schoolers?

Harry: Yes! Our mom seemed to always know what I was doing. Liz: Well I never really tried to play hooky. However, I am not a morning person so I would always ask for five more minutes multiple times during the morning.

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Being around junior and senior high students all summer, what’s one thing you make sure to tell them about your Olivet experience? Harry: I tell them that if they are looking for a school with concrete Christian beliefs and a place to be challenged spiritually, Olivet is a great place for this. I truly believe that it is hard to miss opportunities to experience God here at Olivet. Liz: Get involved — intramural sports are the best sports league you will ever play! Olivet is the best and I love it!

Harry: Loud, fun and crazy. Liz: Daddy’s little girl, parents’ favorite girl, brothers’ favorite sister (laughs). And free self-defense lessons — it’s tough having three brothers. I had to learn to defend myself!

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If you’d like to learn more about student ministries like Before Tomorrow, visit www.olivet.edu and click on “Student Life” at the top of the page.


1.800.648.1463 www.olivet.edu

Upcoming Admissions   Events for high school juniors, seniors and their parents

Red Carpet Days

Purple and Gold Days

(high school juniors and seniors)

(high school seniors and their parents)

▶September 19–20, 2008 call 800-648-1463 for more information

▶October 3–4, 2008 ▶November 7–8, 2008 ▶November 21–22, 2008 (includes ticket to fall play; music auditions available)

▶February 6–7, 2009 (music auditions available) ▶February 20–21, 2009 (music auditions available) ▶March 20–21, 2009


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