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E R U T U F R U O Y F O D L O H B A R

Are you r e f o r w h a t a dy ’s ahead ?

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LEAVING SCHOOL Issue #5 / OctOber 2015

04 FOREWORD

Principal of Auckland’s Rangitoto College, David Hodge.

07 SOFTWARE DEVELOPER Working on the Sniper team.

08 MIDWIFERY STUDENT

Supporting mothers and babies.

10 ARCHITECT

Inspired by New York’s Empire State Building.

Will it be your design gracing the cover of the next issue of Leaving School magazine?

40 CIVIL ENGINEER

Hundreds of graduates needed in the industry.

41 COLLISION REPAIR TECHNICIAN

Panel beater competes on global stage.

42 DIGGER OPERATOR

14 JOB HUNTERS

44 APPRENTICE SIGN MAKER

16 APPRENTICE HAIRDRESSER

45 APPRENTICE REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING

Tips for your first job interview. Vying for HITO Apprentice of the Year.

18 FINANCIAL FALSEHOODS

How to wise up and be money savvy.

20 ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN

Are you passionate and good with numbers?

Applying graphics and wrapping cars.

Three trades in one.

46 EDUCATION

Studying to be a teacher through a Bachelor of Arts.

47 COMPOSITES MANAGER

24 FISHING INDUSTRY

48 SPORT & EXERCISE STUDENT

26 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

49 SCIENCE STUDENT

28 LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

50 MUSIC STUDENT

29 CULINARY ART

51 FASHION DESIGN STUDENT

30 SHEPHERD

52 FRUGAL LIVING

32 NOTICEBOARD

54 SPORT & BUSINESS STUDENT

34 SPECIALIST ARCHAEOLOGIST

55 VETERINARIAN

35 TOUR GUIDE

56 DEBT FACTS

Steadily advancing through the ranks. Guiding the next generation.

Designing resorts, golf courses, wineries... A career in food and hospitality. Animals, pastures, vehicles and more. Key dates and timetables for 2016. Maintaining and celebrating our heritage. Swimming with wild Dusky dolphins.

36 STUDY AND EXAM TIPS

Study effectively and nail your exams.

38 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Huge scope in the realm of marketing.

20

Companies on the hunt for skilled operators.

22 COPING STRATEGIES

Maintaining perspective in times of change.

Versatility in composites.

28

A career that keeps you moving.

Applying science to our everyday lives. Contributing to NZ’s classical music scene. Aspiring to be on the global stage.

41

Tips that will keep your money in your wallet. Combining two passions into a career. Focusing on the health of animals. An exposé on the hidden dangers of going into debt.

59 JOBS IN FOCUS

A closer look at a wonderful array of occupations.

46

Throughout this magazine, each case study has been colour coded to its Vocational Pathway. In some instances, multiple colours are used to show that the skills you learn can be applied across multiple careers and pathways, throughout your lifetime. Visit www.youthguarantee.net.nz/vocational-pathways to learn more about Vocational Pathways. PUBLISHER

Box 331-667, Takapuna, Auckland 0740, New Zealand T: +64-9-486 6966 E: oliver@oliverlee.co.nz W: oliverlee.co.nz W: LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ ISSN 2463-3380 (Print) ISSN 2463-3399 (Online)

3

39 DESIGN THE COVER COMPETITION

12 AGRIBUSINESS PARTNER

Taking the banking business to the farm.

CONTENTS & CREDITS

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Sara Carbery, Diana Clement, David Hodge, Stu Hunt, Kim Taylor, Dr Melanie Wrightman and Robyn Yousef. SUB-EDITOR Elise McDowell COVER DESIGN / PRODUCTION Rob Glen, OnTime Associates Ltd PRINTER PMP Limited, Auckland

PHOTOGRAPHY Daniel Allen, Eva Bradley, Dennis Buurman, Tegan Clark, Gabrielle Drummond, Martin Hunter, Dianne Manson, Peter McDermott, Marty Melville, Izaiah Painting Photography, Darrren Simmonds, Alan Stevens, Brennan Thomas, Holly Wallace and Photo New Zealand.

MANAGING EDITOR Oliver Lee, Oliver Lee Publications Ltd

COPYRIGHT Reproduction in whole or part by any means is prohibited. DISCLAIMER The opinions expressed in this magazine do not necessarily reflect the opinions of LEAVING SCHOOL / issue #4 the publisher. Although material is checked for accuracy, no liability is assumed 2015 by the publisher for any loss|duewww.leavingschool.co.nz to use of material in this magazine.


written by DAVID HODGE

photographed by ALAN STEVENS

FOREWORD

WHEN YOU WORK, YOU LEARN

INSIGHTS TO A WONDERFUL CAREER

4

MY FIRST JOB OUT OF SCHOOL WAS AS A BRICKLAYERS’ LABOURER. IT WASN’T THE MOST GLAMOUROUS JOB, BUT IT WAS THE BEST INTRODUCTION TO THE WORLD OF WORK THAT I COULD HAVE GOT. I learnt some fundamental truths about what happens at work that have been critical to the enjoyment and success I have had in my career.

I quickly discovered that at work you are judged on how well you provide that service. Your hair style, taste in music, or the car you drive is immaterial. If the bricks were in place and the mortar mixed it enabled them to get on with their work. This made me a valued member of the team. Respect is earnt.

As time went on I found out there is a real satisfaction that you get from doing a good job. I still drive past some of the houses ‘we’ built and remember the pride that came from looking down a perfect straight wall of bricks or perfectly formed arch. We worked on some hilly sites where blocks had to be barrowed up steep hills. We worked on multi storied buildings when the bricks had to be thrown up the scaffold. We worked in mud and clay that gripped onto everything. But this taught me that the camaraderie that you share with the people you work with can be a special type of friendship and that it strengthens and sustains you when the going gets tough. I was a labourer but because I was keen to learn, I learnt how to lay bricks. I learnt about building from the carpenters and how to get a perfect finish on a floor from the concrete layers. My bricklaying bosses were self-employed and they taught me about the fundamentals of running a business. All these skills have been very useful in my life. However, the most valuable insight I gained from my first job was the realisation that when you start work you start learning. In a job you are surrounded by great teachers. If you are humble and prepared to watch, listen and try, they will help you immeasurably. Wherever you begin, and throughout your career, be open to advice and guidance, work hard and you will have a wonderful career.

I found out, on the very first morning, that if you don’t get things right someone is going to tell you. It will probably be blunt and nowhere nearly as nice as the harshest teacher at school. Mortar has to be the right consistency and my first batch was too wet. I was quickly advised about how much of it I would be drinking if it happened again.

David Hodge Principal, Rangitoto College, Auckland

I had to stack up the bricks and blocks around the building site ready for the two bricklayers to lay them. I had to mix the concrete mortar and deliver it to their boards. I had to clean up. They did not care that my back ached and my hands were raw. When you are employed you are serving someone. It’s about them and their needs – it’s not about you.

In a job you are surrounded by great teachers. If you are humble and prepared to watch, listen and try, they will help you immeasurably.

www.leavingschool.co.nz

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5


APPLY NOW TO STUDY IN 2016 Know you’ve made the right choice

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Apply now victoria.ac.nz 0800 VICTORIA


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written by SARA CARBERY

 photographed by MARTY MELVILLE

ON THE SNIPER TEAM

DECODING YOUR CAREER IN IT

WHEN YOU HEAR OF SOMEONE WORKING IN A SNIPER TEAM YOU DON’T INSTANTLY THINK OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (IT), DO YOU? THE ARMY, MAYBE… BUT IT’S WITHIN XERO’S SNIPER TEAM IN WELLINGTON THAT 24-YEAR-OLD JOSHUA CANDISH WORKS AS A SOFTWARE DEVELOPER, A.K.A COMPUTER PROGRAMMER. 7

SOFTWARE DEVELOPER

7

“WE’RE ON THE FRONTLINES OF DIAGNOSING AND SOLVING THE PROBLEM AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. THIS MEANS I GET TO SHIP CODE FAST AND SHIP CODE OFTEN.”   – Joshua Candish Working on Xero’s main web application, a cloud-based accounting software solution for small to medium businesses, he gets to work with a huge range of technologies while building features for the system.  “We also look after a large portion of support across the product, so KEY FACTS

■ J OSHUA CANDISH IS A SOFTWARE DEVELOPER ON XERO’S SNIPER TEAM IN WELLINGTON. ■ HE HAS A CERTIFICATE IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND A BACHELOR IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FROM WHITIREIA POLYTECHNIC. ■ JOSHUA BELIEVES BEING STRONG IN MATHS, ENGLISH AND HAVING A DECENT UNDERSTANDING OF COMPUTERS ARE HELPFUL IN THIS FIELD.

if customers are having issues often we’re on the frontlines of diagnosing and solving the problem as soon as possible. This means I get to ship code fast and ship code often.” A six-month Certificate in Information Technology (“really useful as a taster”), followed by a three-year Bachelor in Information Technology from Whitireia Polytechnic, have set Joshua up well for this work. But the road to IT wasn’t a direct one, despite a lifelong interest in computers and a reputation as the go-to guy for all things technical. While figuring out what he wanted to do, Joshua worked fulltime in an abattoir for a year after leaving Wanganui High School, before setting his sights on IT. “I sort of forgot what my calling was.” Embarking on study at Whitireia, Joshua immediately fell in love with computer programming,  “The problem solving and the logic one can use to create and build a

piece of software as a means to virtually any end got me hooked.” While Joshua’s favourite subject at school was computer studies, this wasn’t a prerequisite for his course. “However I would say being fairly strong in maths, English and having a decent understanding of computers would make you feel more at home starting-off in this field.” He admits certain aspects of tertiary study were hard. “I won’t lie, there were a few near sleepless nights spent coding or writing reports or wiring networks together or configuring servers ... but it is all part of the fun! I think with any degree-level course, not just IT, you need to be willing to put in the hard yards to succeed. “It was definitely an enjoyable experience overall and I acquired a wealth of knowledge as well as kick-started my career. But I was certainly ecstatic when I laid down my pen after my final exam. There were ups and downs, financially,

LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

emotionally, but such is life. It’s a small investment, relative to the rest of your life, which has massive positive impacts on your future.” When asked what his ideal job would be, Joshua replies, “I’m already doing it!” One day, perhaps, he might create his own software product, possibly something to do with music or fitness. “But ultimately, building software with intelligent people is what I love doing and I get to do it every day.” His advice to students considering IT is to do your research and take your time deciding, but most importantly, make sure you have a passion for it. “Don’t just do it because you heard the money is good.”

To find out more on studying Information Technology at Whitireia, visit www.whitireia.ac.nz


STUDENT: MIDWIFERY 8

THE MAGIC OF MIDWIFERY SEEING NEW LIFE ENTER THE WORLD

photographed by ALAN STEVENS written by ROBYN YOUSEF   THE JOY OF ASSISTING A NEW LIFE ENTER THE WORLD AND SEEING THE IMPACT CHILDBIRTH CAN HAVE ON A WOMAN’S LIFE LED RUBY MELSOM TO CHOOSE MIDWIFERY AS A CAREER. HER INTEREST IN HEALTH, CARING FOR PEOPLE AND WITNESSING THE EMPOWERMENT OF WOMEN AND FAMILIES REINFORCED THAT DECISION. Ruby (22) is currently in her final year of a Bachelor of Health Science (Midwifery) through AUT. She grew up in Wellington, attending Otari School, Raroa Intermediate and Onslow College.  “During high school, I really enjoyed the sciences and developed a strong interest in working in the health field. Leaving high school, I was still unsure of which area of health I wanted a career in. While doing volunteer work in Israel, midwifery was suggested to me. I decided this was a career where I could combine my interests. ” When Ruby returned home, she read the book Half the Sky by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn and it confirmed for her that her career choice was the right one.  “It brought to light the human right issues around women and girls, and the impact that childbirth has on a woman’s life. ”

She suggests students interested in a midwifery career should concentrate on science subjects in school, in particular chemistry and biology. English and mathematics are also useful subjects.

“Knowing the part that you play in the woman’s experience is very rewarding. Seeing new life come into this world and the birth of mothers and families is pretty incredible to witness.”   –   Ruby Melsom Her current studies include completion of 2400 practice hours in a nine-semester degree with a minimum of 40 ‘hands-on’ births. This entails blocks of theory combined with blocks of clinical practice. “It is a ‘hands-on’ degree. We begin clinical placements in second semester of year one, where we are either working in a hospital/birthing unit or are with a self-employed midwife. Working with a midwife, we follow her caseload of women, and this involves being on call 24-hours a day/seven days a week. “We are also required to complete a number of complicated births, hours in the neonatal intensive unit and get experience in different areas of women’s health. We are placed in hospitals across Auckland where we experience more complex cases, also at smaller primary birthing units and attend home births.” Ruby is really enjoying her course, complete with all its challenges – being on-call, working around a hectic schedule, being at births at all sorts of hours and for an unknown amount of hours while also having assignments due. “But, knowing the part that you play in the woman’s experience is very rewarding. Seeing new life come into this world and the birth of mothers and families is pretty incredible to witness . ” Ruby will travel to the Solomon Islands in November for a four-week placement at the main hospital in Honiara, as part of her degree. She will graduate in March 2016, and wishes to join a midwifery practice. In the future, she hopes to serve her community by assisting women to achieve empowering birth experiences. Ruby also hopes to do further volunteer work overseas. www.leavingschool.co.nz

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

KEY FACTS ■ RUBY MELSOM IS IN HER FINAL YEAR OF A BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE (MIDWIFERY) THROUGH AUT. ■ SHE SUGGESTS A FOCUS ON SCIENCE SUBJECTS IN SCHOOL, IN PARTICULAR CHEMISTRY AND BIOLOGY, AND ENGLISH AND MATHEMATICS FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN MIDWIFERY AS A CAREER.

For more information on studying Midwifery at AUT, visit aut.ac.nz/start2016


YOUR REAL-LIFE

ADVENTURE

STARTS HERE...

EARN AS YOU LEARN,

QUALIFY, TRAVEL

DOING WHAT

YOU LOVE

Discover exciting career opportunities in one of our vibrant sectors: travel; tourism; aviation; accommodation; quick-service restaurants; museums; retail; wholesale; cafĂŠs, bars & restaurants; clubs; catering. The great news for you is that many businesses offer ServiceIQ on-job training programmes, so you can earn as you learn, get a nationally recognised qualification, and a solid career to set you up for more adventure.

ServiceIQ is the Industry Training Organisation (ITO) for the service industry. We develop on-job training programmes for businesses keen to provide their staff with relevant skills, training and qualifications, knowing that it’s great people who make a great business.

CHECK US OUT AT:

www.ServiceIQ.org.nz


AN EMPIRE STATE OF MIND ARCHITECT

CREATING THE HOUSES OF TOMORROW

written by KIM TAYLOR  photographed by ALAN STEVENS    INSPIRED BY ICONIC STRUCTURES SUCH AS NEW YORK’S EMPIRE STATE BUILDING, LIAM McROBERTS HAD A CAREER AS AN ARCHITECT IN MIND FROM A YOUNG AGE. WITH HIS FATHER IN CONSTRUCTION AND HIS GRANDFATHER A BUILDER AND CARPENTER, IT WAS INEVITABLE THAT HE WOULD FOLLOW A CAREER ALONG THE SAME LINES.

10

Liam has always had a fascination with skyscrapers and opted for subjects at Tauranga Boys’ College that would eventually lead him to Wellington’s Victoria University’s School of Architecture. For 26-year-old Liam, graphics, technical drawing, product development (woodwork and metalwork),

along with maths and physics were his high school subjects of choice. “I didn’t take art as a subject but I would highly recommend it,” he says. “The first year of the Bachelor of Architecture Studies degree is basically a playground for showing off and KEY FACTS

■ LIAM McROBERTS IS AN ARCHITECT AT JASMAX — ONE OF NEW ZEALAND’S LARGEST ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICES. ■ HE HAS A BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE STUDIES AND MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE FROM VICTORIA UNIVERSITY. ■ LIAM’S YEAR 13 SUBJECTS WERE GRAPHICS, TECHNICAL DRAWING, PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT (WOODWORK AND METALWORK), MATHS AND PHYSICS. HE WOULD RECOMMEND ALSO TAKING ART.

• •

being as creative as you can be. The brief is open, and not as black-and-white as NCEA. “That’s not to say it wasn’t challenging but architecture is for those interested in art and being creative, while also being technically minded. I’d just say give it a go.” The Bachelor of Architecture Studies at Victoria University is three years in length, and the master’s degree is another two. “You’ve got to be committed and prepared for a number of big nights but sometimes the best ideas come in the early hours of the morning. “Victoria has a great combination of both practical and conceptual education, merging the two really well.”


“ARCHITECTURE IS FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN ART WHILE ALSO BEING TECHNICALLY MINDED. I’D JUST SAY GIVE IT A GO.” Liam McRoberts Liam found employment within a few weeks of finishing his thesis, he is working at Jasmax – one of New Zealand’s largest architectural practices. “The work environment at Jasmax is excellent. There’s a fantastic creative atmosphere; butter paper is everywhere and the sound of design chat fills the studio.” “Everyone is treated with respect regardless of position and it’s filled with so much talent and knowledge, you’ve got to be a sponge and soak it up.” Liam is excited about his career as an architect and hopes to stay focused on the residential sector for the foreseeable future.

“I would love to work on some really dense, sustainable housing projects as I think New Zealand has a long way to catch-up in the housing sector. There are some beautiful projects in the pipeline, particularly in Wynyard Quarter in Auckland.” While living and studying in Wellington, Liam had access to world-class exhibition spaces and facilities, learning from some of New Zealand’s best. At the end of every year, he would head north to the Bay of Plenty for some sunshine and practical work to enhance his growing base of knowledge. “My advice to students wanting to get into architecture is to just go with the flow,” he says. Liam further advises students to go for it, but also to be prepared to put in the hard yards.

“I’d definitely recommend the M.Arch (Prof) – Master of Architecture degree at Victoria University, however you’ve got to be passionate and open minded and the late nights don’t stop when you’re qualified!”

For more information on studying Architecture through Victoria University, visit www.victoria.ac.nz

WHAT’S NEXT? I WISH I KNEW. Leaving school and jumping into the unknown is tough. But if it’s getting to you really bad, it could be the sign of something more serious. Whatever you’re feeling, The Lowdown is full of ideas and people who can help you get unstuck. GET STRAIGHT UP ANSWERS WHEN LIFE SUCKS THELOWDOWN.CO.NZ

ARCHITECT TEXT

AND BEING CREATIVE,

11


AGRIBUSINESS PARTNER 12

written by SARA CARBERY

photographed by TEGAN CLARKE

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE

PROVIDING A JOB TO SUIT EVERYONE

CAMERON BLACK HAD HIS SIGHTS SET ON BEING A VET WHEN HE LEFT SOUTHLAND BOYS’ HIGH SCHOOL IN INVERCARGILL. HAVING GROWN UP ON HIS FAMILY’S 566-HECTARE SHEEP AND BEEF FARM IN SOUTHLAND, HE KNEW HE WANTED TO WORK IN THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR, AND DECIDED BEING A VET WOULD ALLOW HIM TO BE INVOLVED IN FARMING AND MAKE A CONTRIBUTION.

But despite getting grades he was proud of in his first semester at Massey University, Cameron missed out on qualifying for entry to the Veterinary Science course. Proving that as one door closes another opens, Cameron enrolled in Agricultural Science, thinking he would do that for a year before applying for Veterinary Science again. “I found that I really enjoyed the Agri Science degree and haven’t looked back since. The people I have met and the opportunities that have come out of that degree have been amazing.” Cameron spent four years at Massey, including one year of postgraduate study. In 2013, he was named Massey Agriculture Student of the Year in recognition of his high academic achievement, and for the contribution he made to the wellbeing of other students. Cameron says the subjects he took in his final year at high school – English, statistics, biology, chemistry and physics – set him up well for both

For more information on studying Agricultural Science at Massey University, visit www.massey.ac.nz

Veterinary Science and Agricultural Science. “The sciences definitely helped with my university studies but if you haven’t taken them right through, you may still be fine; but check the requirements for your intended course.”

His advice to students interested in working in the agricultural sector is get in touch with people working in the industry, talk to them about the various aspects of their job and try and do work experience for a day.

He believes Agricultural Science is one of the most diverse degrees on offer in regards to the variety of careers it can lead to. “Whether you are more interested in science, numbers, people or the practical aspects of farming, there are jobs out there to suit everyone. People with agriculture degrees are sought after for all manner of occupations, and sometimes for jobs that you wouldn’t expect.”

“Above all else, give it a go. You never know what is possible until you try, and sometimes along the way you find opportunities that you never even considered.

Cameron (22) is now working for BNZ as an Agribusiness Partner (a rural banker), based in Ashburton. His clients are farmers, and live from Timaru to the Rakaia River. “My role is to be their contact point in the bank and make sure that they are looked after, as well as monitoring how their business is going and looking to help them expand and grow if they want to.” Long term, Cameron would like to farm himself one day. “It is something that I have a true passion for, but in the meantime I am enjoying the opportunity to work with some top farmers in the Canterbury region and help them with their business.” www.leavingschool.co.nz

“A saying that my father has always used and that I try to live by, is:  ‘Whether you think that you can, or you think that you cannot, you’re right!’ ” KEY FACTS

■ CAMERON BLACK HAS A BACHELOR OF AGRISCIENCE MAJORING IN AGRICULTURE FROM MASSEY UNIVERSITY, AND BELIEVES IT IS ONE OF THE MOST DIVERSE DEGREES ON OFFER. ■ HE WORKS FOR BNZ AS AN AGRIBUSINESS PARTNER (A RURAL BANKER). ■ CAMERON TOOK ENGLISH, STATISTICS, BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS IN YEAR 13.

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5


Well our advice is to look at what really interests you first and take it from there. So, have you thought about a career in the Plumbing trades? There’s going to be a lot of tradesman retiring soon and the reality is New Zealand will need more tradespeople on the ground to get the work done. Did you know that Plumbing is one of the most lucrative trades out there – once you’re qualified there’s nothing stopping you from starting your own business and really going for it. Sound interesting? Well Plumbing World have the industry contacts to get the ball rolling on an apprenticeship right away! So if the Plumbing, Gasfitting, Drainlaying or associated trades floats your boat come and see ‘your team in black’ and who knows… you could have the career of your dreams kick off before you know it!

Keep in the know by joining our Club go to... Facebook.com/YPCNZ

Te Awamutu. 670 Cambridge Road. Ph 07 872 Branches Nationwide. Freephone 0800 8000220. 686 Hamilton. 16 King Street. Ph 07 846 8120. plumbingworld.co.nz plumbingworld.co.nz Kieran Read, Plumbing World Brand Ambassador

Your team in black


READY TO START BUILDING YOUR CAREER?

FINDING THAT FIRS

SAGE ADVICE FOR JOB HUNTER written by ROBYN YOUSEF   FINDING YOUR FIRST JOB IS A HUGE STEP OUT INTO THE BIG WIDE WORLD OF EMPLOYMENT. Step out with a confident and resilient attitude, and firmly in the knowledge that your first position might not be your dream job but that it’s important to get established in the workforce. And with hard work, your dream career could be just around the corner… Peter Osborne is the head of Trade Me Jobs and has had years of experience connecting job hunters with employers. “Trade Me Jobs really is the ‘go to’ site for young people looking for their first job and we are confident they will find something suitable with us.” He has some sage advice for school leavers on the job hunt. “Don’t be too picky to begin with. Get into the workforce and learn some skills and get some real experience. It mightn’t be your Nirvana, but with hard work and effort, the right job will come.

“Don’t be too picky to begin with. Get into the workforc It mightn’t be your Nirvana, but with hard work and effo

Whether you’re looking to start in a Labour, Trades or Manufacturing & Logistics role, we have hundreds of great opportunities across NZ.

“Be positive about what you can do too. If four skills are listed as required for the job and you have three of those, you should still apply. Employers don’t expect a perfect score of skills. “Think about the things you are really good at, enjoy doing and have confidence with. Also, consider the things you like doing, but are not proficient at. Employers want you to be realistic on this score. It lets them know where you might want to be developed, but also what keeps you interested. And avoid at all costs a job with too many aspects you won’t enjoy. We all want to wake up looking forward to going to work and not dreading it.” Peter also points out the importance of getting some good advice from a family member or friend who manages staff. While they mightn’t offer you a job, they will have lots of information, helpful advice and coaching. They can often point you in a good direction – personal networks are important seeing as many jobs are filled by word of mouth. 1. BE WELL PRESENTED AND SHARPLY GROOMED. 2. DRESS ONE LEVEL UP FOR THE POSITION.

Visit our website: www.awf.co.nz

IF YOU ARE APPLYING FOR THE POSITION AS AN OFFICE CLERK, WEAR A SUIT, IRONED SHIRT AND TIE, OR A SMART CORPORATE SUIT. 3. ESTABLISH A GOOD INTERACTION WITH

KEEPING NZ WORKING.

YOUR INTERVIEWER. PEOPLE HIRE THOSE THEY LIKE. 14

| www.leavingschool.co.nz | LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5


ST JOB

Find a job you love!

ERS

CV john student page 2

We have loads of jobs and apprenticeships online now!

ce and learn some skills and get some real experience. fort, the right job will come.” – PETER OSBORNE He also stresses just how important it is to be resilient in your job search and not to allow rejection to lower your self-esteem. “Put your chin up, chest out and always maintain confidence.” The impact your self-presentation has cannot be underestimated. “Personal presentation is very important. I have interviewed thousands of people and know it is often a job-clincher, ”  Peter says. Read through further personal presentation tips at the bottom of this page. KEY FACTS ■ YOUR FIRST POSITION MIGHT NOT BE YOUR DREAM JOB BUT IT’S IMPORTANT TO GET ESTABLISHED IN THE WORKFORCE. ■ BE RESILIENT IN YOUR JOB SEARCH. ■ PERSONAL PRESENTATION IS VERY IMPORTANT AND IS OFTEN A JOB-CLINCHER.

4. DO CAREFUL RESEARCH INTO THE JOB AND COMPANY YOU ARE APPLYING WITH. THIS REALLY

Thank God It’s Monday

DEMONSTRATES YOUR KEEN INTEREST, AND HELPS YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU’D BE DOING AND THE ENVIRONMENT YOU’D BE WORKING IN. 5. PREPARE TO TALK ABOUT HOW YOU CAN ADD VALUE TO THEIR COMPANY — WHY YOU’D BE OF BENEFIT TO THEM.  LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

trademe.co.nz/tgim | www.leavingschool.co.nz | 15


HAIRDRESSER

PICK UP THE SCISSORS & FOILS 16

SATISFACTION & TRAVEL OPPORTUNITIES ON OFFER FROM THE MOMENT HANNAH OXLEY FIRST WALKED IN THE DOOR AT DO HAIR SALON IN INVERCARGILL, SHE KNEW SHE’D FOUND HER CALLING. AND NOW, IN THE FIRST YEAR OF HER APPRENTICESHIP, SHE HAS WON THE RECENT NEW ZEALAND HAIR AND BEAUTY INDUSTRY TRAINING ORGANISATION (HITO) HOT NEW TALENT COMPETITION AND BEEN ANNOUNCED AS HITO SOUTHERN-SOUTH APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR 2015.

ROBYN YOUSEF DIANNE MANSON

She competes with six other regional apprentices for the overall HITO Apprentice of the Year title at the industry awards in November.

to try it. While I enjoyed my studies by the third year I knew the career was not for me.”

The 21-year-old had always shown an interest in hairdressing, but didn’t believe it was a career path for her. “As a child, I was always playing with dolls’ hair and then as I got older I started doing my friends’ hair at lunch times and before school.”

Hannah then found her job at Do Hair, where she sees herself staying for the foreseeable future.

After much career confusion in Year 13, she decided to study primary education. “I made this decision because I enjoy children so much and others advised me “THERE ARE A LOT OF TRAVEL OPPORTUNITIES AND LIFE EXPERIENCES AVAILABLE WITH HAIRDRESSING. I PLAN TO WORK HARD AND SEE WHERE MY CAREER TAKES ME.” — Hannah Oxley

“I was seeking creativity and a hairdresser was the perfect place to find it. From the moment I walked in the door I knew I had found my calling. “I worked incredibly hard and Caren (my boss) offered me an apprenticeship. I love what I do and cannot see myself doing anything else.” Hannah attended Southland Girls’ High School between 2007 and 2009 and St Hilda’s Collegiate School in Dunedin for her final schooling years. In 2012 she started at the Otago University Teachers’ College. “My training is predominantly salon-based. My current position includes reception work, colouring, helping other stylists and assisting on editorial photo shoots. HITO also organises for me to sit my theory and practical assessments outside of work. “My qualification will take three more years. I spend most of my week in the salon, learning practical skills like cutting, colouring, perming etc. I also spend one day per week at the local polytechnic doing theory and practical assessments.” Hannah will graduate at the end of 2017 and her goal is to allow her career to take her as far as possible. “There are a lot of travel opportunities and life experiences available with hairdressing. I plan to work hard and see where my career takes me.” She advises school leavers keen on hairdressing to talk to their local salons about apprenticeships. “For students still at school, Star courses and/or after-school work in a salon provide a great way to get your foot in the door to work up to an apprenticeship. The apprenticeship is a great option because you get to work and study at the same time without a huge student loan.” KEY FACTS ■ HANNAH OXLEY IS COMPLETING AN APPRENTICESHIP IN HAIRDRESSING THROUGH THE NEW ZEALAND HAIR AND BEAUTY INDUSTRY TRAINING ORGANISATION. ■ SHE RECENTLY WON THE HITO HOT NEW TALENT COMPETITION, AND HAS BEEN ANNOUNCED AS HITO SOUTHERN-SOUTH APPRENTICE OF THE YEAR 2015.

For more information on an apprenticeship in hairdressing through HITO, visit www.hito.org.nz www.leavingschool.co.nz

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5


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FINANCIAL HEALTH 18

FINANCIAL FALSEHOODS

ARE YOU TELLING YOURSELF PORKIES? written by    DIANA CLEMENT MAKING ENDS MEET WHILE YOU’RE STUDYING IS TOUGH. BUT, THE FINANCIAL PORKIES WE TELL OURSELVES MAKE IT EVEN HARDER TO BALANCE THE BOOKS. Being honest with yourself and avoiding these lies can make your income go a whole lot further, and your life easier. The “I need this” porkie. Most of the things we think we need are really wants. You don’t need an iPhone or a coffee, or anything sold by upmarket fashion and tech retailers, or just about any online retailer. Probably half of what’s in your supermarket trolley will be wants, not needs. Your real needs are basic food, a roof over your head, tuition fees, bus fares and a change or two of clothes and shoes. If you


do need this”. The reality is that if you can learn to be honest with yourself you’ll find it easier to survive financially while studying. You’ll also learn good financial habits and putting them into action will benefit you for the rest of your life.

understand this, then it’s okay to have small treats. Just don’t fool yourself by calling them needs. The “A car is a necessity” porkie. Plenty of students live without a car. Cars are a frightening drain on your income. It’s not only the cost of petrol, oil, transmission fluid, wiper blades and other consumables. Every year you’ll pay hundreds of dollars for WoFs, registration and insurance. Cars, especially older ones, need repairs sooner or later. If you can delay the purchase of one until you’re working in a fulltime job you will come out of study thousands of dollars less in debt. Buy a bicycle instead. The  “My student loan is ‘free money’ ” porkie. Find someone 10 years old than yourself and ask

them if they still think their student loan was free money. It has to be paid back and that will hit hard in your 20s and 30s. There will be better things you want to do with your money then than pay for the sins of your student life. The  “It’s only $5” porkie. It’s really important to remember that every cent you spend now will have to be paid back later and that is going to hurt. Go back through your bank statements and add up those “only $5” or “only $20” purchases. The total will be a lot more than you think. The “Overdrafts and credit card limits are ‘my money’ ” porkie. The sooner you understand that your overdraft and credit card limits are debt that can spiral out

of control, the better. This isn’t money you have earned. You’ll be borrowing against your future and will regret it when tomorrow comes along. The “My friends are doing it, so should I” porkie. You aren’t your friends. Succumbing to peer pressure will make you poor. Just don’t do it. Take the overseas holiday or buy the iPhone when you’ve got a fulltime job and income to match the lifestyle. Finally, it’s human nature to think, “My situation is different” or  “I really do need this”. The reality is that if you can learn to be honest with yourself you’ll find it easier to survive financially while studying. You’ll also learn good financial habits and putting them into action will benefit you for the rest of your life.

RealMe makes becoming a student real easy With a RealMe verified identity you can apply for your student allowance and loan online with Studylink, without having to provide the identity paperwork! And if you want to take part in the referendums on the New Zealand Flag and you’re not yet enrolled to vote, you can use your RealMe verified identity to get enrolled and ready to vote. You can also prove who you are online with any other organisation that uses RealMe. If you like the freedom of being able to apply for your student loan wherever you are... get it now, ready for when you need it!

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FINANCIAL HEALTH

It’s human nature to think, “My situation is different” or  “I really

19


ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN 20

written by SARA CARBERY

photograph by MARTIN HUNTER   

A JOB IN DEMAND

ACCOUNTING FOR YOUR SUCCESS ‘IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED, TRY, TRY AGAIN.’ IN HIS QUEST TO BECOME AN ACCOUNTANT, SHAUN CROWLEY HAS LIVED THIS PROVERB. THE FIRST TIME HE APPLIED TO HIS LOCAL CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT FIRM FOR AN INTERNSHIP, HE DIDN’T EVEN GET AN INTERVIEW. UNFAZED, HE FOUND A “FILLER” JOB IN A PAINT SHOP UNTIL WINSTANLEY KERRIDGE IN BLENHEIM ADVERTISED FOR INTERNS AGAIN. KEY FACTS

■ SHAUN CROWLEY IS A QUALIFIED ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN AND IS WORKING HIS WAY TOWARDS BECOMING A CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT. ■ THIS WAS ACHIEVED THROUGH THE COLLEGE OF ACCOUNTING TECHNICIANS, RUN BY CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS AUSTRALIA AND NEW ZEALAND.

“IF YOU’RE PASSIONATE AND NUMBER SAVVY AND ARE INTERESTED IN ACCOUNTING, GIVE IT A TRY. IT’S AN EXCELLENT PROFESSION TO WORK IN – WELL PAID, AND THERE’S ALWAYS GOING TO BE

■ HE HAS NEARLY COMPLETED A BACHELOR OF BUSINESS STUDIES VIA DISTANCE LEARNING THROUGH MASSEY UNIVERSITY.

A NEED FOR ACCOUNTANTS.”— Shaun Crowley

Having done well in maths and accounting at Marlborough Boys’ College, Shaun knew accountancy was an area he could be successful in. Shaun left school at the end of Year 12, having studied maths, accounting, architectural drawing, English, computer studies and economics. “The second time Winstanley Kerridge called for interns, I got an interview; they took a chance, and it paid off – for them and for me. They said, ‘If you’re strong enough to be turned down and reapply, then we’ve at least got to meet you!’ ” Despite having no experience, Shaun interviewed well and got a job as Junior Account Clerk. Seven years on, Shaun is a rare 24-year-old. “I’m lucky enough to have a nice, well-paid job, I own my own home, and don’t have any student debt.” After four years with Winstanley Kerridge, Shaun worked across the Tasman for a year, in the accounts department of CBH Group, the largest grain corporation in Australia. “It was a massive organisation – 300 in their head office in Perth. Very glamorous!” www.leavingschool.co.nz

Following a stint back home working for a design company, Strategy Design and Advertising, Shaun has recently taken a more senior role with Canterbury Aluminium. He’s now managing staff and is focused less on the day-to-day accounts, and more on business strategy. “I enjoy being an in-house accountant because of the variety. Working for one business, you take a bigger picture approach; you get to see the whole project, and undertake a lot more analysis into the business.” Through the College of Accounting Technicians, run by Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand, Shaun is now a qualified accounting technician and is working his way towards becoming a chartered accountant. He says one of the major benefits of studying with Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand is the mentoring you receive from other experienced members, “I had two really great mentors who were key to my success.” As well as on-the-job training, Shaun is 80 per cent of the way through a Bachelor of Business Studies,

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

which he began at the Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology, and is completing through Massey University via distance learning. According to Careers New Zealand, accountants usually earn between $60,000 and $115,000, and job prospects are good due to a demand for experienced workers. “It’s a stable job with plenty of opportunities in small towns and big cities. I feel like I could move anywhere and get a job next week,” says Shaun, also pointing out that qualifications through Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand are recognised internationally. “My advice is, if you’re passionate and number savvy and are interested in accounting, give it a try. It’s an excellent profession to work in – well paid, and there’s always going to be a need for accountants.” For more information on becoming an accountant, visit www.charteredaccountantsanz.com/ brightfuture


At Waikato, our students are amongst the happiest in the world. The recent Student Barometer Survey found that 95% of our students are satisfied with their overall university experience. We scored highly across all aspects that make our university offering unique, including class size, campus environment, library facilities, accommodation and student support. Find out everything you need to know about Waikato by contacting one of our friendly Future Student Advisers on 0800 WAIKATO or at recruitment@waikato.ac.nz


COPING STRATEGIES 22

MAINTAINING PERSPECTIVE

SUCCESSFULLY MANAGING TIMES OF CHANGE

by DR MELANIE WOODFIELD STRESSED OUT AS YOU FINISH UP AT SCHOOL AND CONTEMPLATE THE NEXT STEP? YOU’RE NOT ALONE. LEAVING SCHOOL IS A STAGE FILLED WITH BOTH CHALLENGE AND OPPORTUNITY. CHANGE CAN BE UNSETTLING THOUGH, EVEN IF IT’S GOOD CHANGE. Here are a few tips to help you get through. ❚ Expect a honeymoon period of a few weeks or months where you feel you’re on top of the world. And then expect a dip in your mood when the novelty wears off. This is very common, and not necessarily a sign that you’ve made the wrong decision. ❚ Make use of the support that’s out there. If you’re feeling stressed or down (or both), The Lowdown (www.thelowdown.co.nz) is a New Zealand website packed with tips, techniques and support to get you back on track. ❚ SPARX is also well worth a look (www.sparx. org.nz). It’s a carefully crafted computer game where you learn skills to manage stress.

❚ Most solutions start with good self-care. When we’re stressed, the basics often go out the window; things like good sleep, eating foods that fuel us, getting a little exercise each day, and spending time doing things that brings us joy. ❚ Try some relaxation techniques. A popular technique is progressive muscle relaxation, this involves slowly and systematically tensing and relaxing each muscle group in your body. Diaphragmatic breathing is also very effective, and involves breathing deeply and slowly from your diaphragm, rather than shallow, fast breaths from your chest. Both of these techniques should be practiced over and over when you’re calm so they’re more likely to be effective when you feel the stress coming.

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❚ There’s a lot of evidence than mindfulness works to reduce stress. This means being fully present in the moment – the opposite of doing something mindlessly. There are lots of different techniques available online or through courses in your city, so try a few and find one that fits. Finally, it’s easier said than done, but try to see the bigger picture. When a situation is stressing or distressing, we’re usually so caught up in it that it’s really hard to stand back from what’s happening. It’s like Google Earth – when we’re zoomed in, we see the close-up view, but lose perspective. If we zoom out, we see the bigger picture. It may be worth trying a technique or two to start you on the journey of pulling back, seeing things more clearly and rationally, and feeling less stressed.

If you’re feeling stressed or down (or both), The Lowdown www.thelowdown.co.nz is a New Zealand website packed with tips, techniques and support to get you back on track. KEY FACTS

■ LEAVING SCHOOL IS A TIME OF CHALLENGE AND OPPORTUNITY. ■ MANY PEOPLE FIND CHANGE TO BE UNSETTLING, EVEN IF IT’S GOOD CHANGE. ■ READ THROUGH THE TIPS AND STRATEGIES PROVIDED TO HELP YOU MANAGE THIS TIME OF YOUR LIFE.

DR MELANIE WOODFIELD is a Child and Adolescent Clinical Psychologist in Auckland.

Call today or email info@sit.ac.nz

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0800 4 0 FEES www.sit.ac.nz

COPING STRATEGIES

When a situation is stressing or distressing, we’re usually so caught up in it that it’s really hard to stand back from what’s happening.

23


FISHING INDUSTRY

24

written by STU HUNT

photographed by DANIEL ALLEN

TALLYING IT UP ON THE SEAS

WHEN PERSISTENCE PAYS OFF

JASMINE DISHINGTON DOESN’T MINCE HER WORDS. SO WHEN ASKED WHY SHE JOINED THE FISHING INDUSTRY, HER REASONING FOR HER DECISION IS SIMPLY PUT, “I MAINLY WANTED TO BUY A HOUSE AND GET AHEAD IN LIFE.” In 2009, Jasmine completed her schooling at the end of Year 13, having achieved NCEA Level 3, but was unsure what her next step would be. “I looked into going to university but it was very expensive and I didn’t like the careers that would come from what I was interested in.” Jasmine worked briefly in horticulture and the hospitality industry, but in the end drew her career inspiration from her little sister who chose to enter the fishing industry straight out of school. Having seen how much money her sister was saving, Jasmine was galvanised. Now, she is 23 years old and has been with Nelson-based fishing company Talley’s on their factory trawler the Amaltal Enterprise for two years. Getting her foot in the door was down to sheer persistence, Jasmine says she phoned and registered her interest with the recruitment manager at Talley’s until she secured a place on their basic training course, and from there she got a place on Enterprise as soon as the course finished. Jasmine started out on the weigh station but within a year she was able to work her way up to a position as a machine operator – and is the only female currently performing that role. And showing her fortitude and self-belief, she resolved herself to getting the job, “That’s what I wanted to do, I kept saying I wanted to do it so they gave me a go.”

JASMINE BOILS DOWN THE KEY BENEFITS OF THE JOB TO A NEAT THREE-STEP, “PLENTY OF TIME-OFF, YOU MEET LOTS OF PEOPLE AND LEARN A LOT.” www.leavingschool.co.nz

Jasmine boils down the key benefits of the job to a neat three-step, “Plenty of time-off, you meet lots of people and learn a lot.” She has set her sights on becoming a foreman, and plans to learn as much as she can while working on the factory trawler with that goal in mind. Jasmine’s typical working day is six hours-on, six hours-off. In those six hours-off, she has to squeeze in sleep, food and socialising “to stay sane” but says you quickly get used to it.

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

KEY FACTS

■ JASMINE WORKS AS A MACHINE OPERATOR ON TALLEY’S FACTORY TRAWLER THE AMALTAL ENTERPRISE. ■ SHE ACHIEVED A NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN SEAFOOD PROCESSING LEVEL 2 THROUGH PITO WITH TALLEY’S AS THE PTE. ■ JASMINE PLANS TO STAY WITH TALLEY’S AND HAS AMBITIONS TO SECURE A PROMOTION TO FOREMAN.

The added bonus for Jasmine is that her fiancée, Stuart, works the same shifts, so they can spend their time-off together. Once their house is paid-off within the next year or so, and then renovated, Jasmine and Stuart plan to get married. Jasmine’s training began with a two-week basic training course in seafood processing and seamanship – a National Certificate in Seafood Processing Level 2 – to prepare for her first trip. The course is offered by Primary Industry Training Organisation (PITO) with Talley’s, her employer, as the Private Training Establishment (PTE). When Jasmine started at Talley’s, she was at trainee grade but within two years has worked her way up to A-Grade, enjoying steady increments in pay. “You definitely can make a future for yourself in the industry if you work hard,” she says. In typical straight-shooting fashion Jasmine sums it up thus, “Do as your told, don’t be afraid of smelly fish and work hard and you’ll go far.” To learn more about career opportunities with Talley’s, visit www.talleysdeepseacareer.co.nz


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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 26

CARING FOR AND TEACHING TOTS

ENTHUSIASM FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION written by ROBYN YOUSEF

 photographed by MARTY MELVILLE JESSICA COOPER IS THE PERFECT FIT FOR HER JOB AS HEAD TEACHER AT TUATARA KIDS, AN EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTRE IN MIRAMAR, WELLINGTON. BOTH HER PARENTS ARE TEACHERS, AND AS AN OLDER SISTER TO THREE BROTHERS, SHE HAS ALWAYS ENJOYED BEING AROUND AND NURTURING YOUNG CHILDREN. Now at 26, she manages a team of five teachers – all striving to provide high-quality care and education for 28 children, aged between six months and five years. “I very much enjoy being a teacher. I am passionate about learning, knowing and sharing about children’s natural development. I treasure the conversations that I have with children, and savour their affectionate hugs.” Jessica grew up in Karori, Wellington, attending Karori West Normal School, followed by Broadmeadows and Onslow College. Raised in a family with a real love of children, her interest in a career in early childhood education was formed early on. After some babysitting and

work at an after school care programme, she was encouraged to pursue teaching. She was initially nervous starting a Diploma in Education (now Bachelor of Teaching (Early Childhood Education)) through Te Rito Maioha Early Childhood New Zealand. But these nerves soon disappeared when she realised that her place of learning was going to be a second home, studying alongside other passionate teachers who became Jessica’s extended family. “Te Rito Maioha requires students to work or volunteer in an early childhood centre for at least 12 hours a week, as part of fulltime study. This really helps you to implement the new knowledge that you gain, and ensures you have another support network in your teaching team.”

Every year of the three-year programme, students are assigned a four-week practicum course, providing an opportunity to work in a range of early childhood settings. “This experience was invaluable as it helped me to learn about my own values and beliefs, which shape my teaching philosophy. We also attended marae visits, which were amazing cultural experiences and helped to strengthen my knowledge and understanding of Te Reo Ma-ori and tikanga Ma-ori.” Her advice to school leavers with an interest in teaching is to aim high in English as this will benefit your overall study. Jessica graduated with her diploma in June 2011 and had a son in November that year. The next year

Children are our future, is teaching them yours? Enrol for your degree in early childhood education (ECE) now! Teaching our youngest citizens and setting them up for life-long learning is an incredibly rewarding career. The Bachelor of Teaching (ECE) will prepare you for teacher registration and postgraduate study. No day will be the same when you work in a role that couples knowledge with nurturing. Learn, teach and earn! ECNZ’s centre-based degree allows you to study and work at the same time. What you learn in class or in online discussion one day, you can apply the very next day in your ECE working environment. Applications close 1 December 2015 for study beginning February 2016. GO TO Piki mai ki runga i tō mātou waka. Tukua mai tō tono.

ecnz.ac.nz TO FIND OUT MORE

E enrol@ecnz.ac.nz P 0800 244 532


■ JESSICA COOPER HAS A BACHELOR OF TEACHING (EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION) FROM TE RITO MAIOHA EARLY CHILDHOOD NEW ZEALAND. ■ SHE HAS FUTURE PLANS TO STUDY FOR THE GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN INFANT AND TODDLER WELLBEING AND LEARNING, AND THE POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN LEADERSHIP (ECE) OFFERED BY TE RITO MAIOHA.

“I TREASURE THE CONVERSATIONS THAT I HAVE WITH CHILDREN,

■ JESSICA IS HEAD TEACHER AT TUATARA KIDS, AN EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTRE IN WELLINGTON.

AND SAVOUR THEIR AFFECTIONATE HUGS.”  – Jessica Cooper she went on to complete further study at Te Rito Maioha, upgrading her diploma to a degree. And she is keen to pursue further studies for her teaching career. Te Rito Maioha will introduce a Graduate Certificate in Infant and Toddler Wellbeing and Learning in 2016, and Jessica is very interested

in focusing her practice on this age group. She is also interested in Te Rito Maioha’s Postgraduate Diploma in Leadership (ECE) to further strengthen leadership skills. And after that, Jessica says there are  “endless choices”  for further study.

For more information on studying Early Childhood Education at Te Rito Maioha, visit www.ecnz.ac.nz

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

KEY FACTS

27


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT 28

CHALLENGING AND REWARDING

A FOCUS ON LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

photographed by HOLLY WALLACE written by KIM TAYLOR   LANDING A JOB IN ONE OF THE MOST SCENIC PLACES IN NEW ZEALAND IS THE ICING ON THE CAKE FOR LINCOLN UNIVERSITY GRADUATE HALEY FARMER. Having recently completed a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, she is now based in the beautiful town of Queenstown, and often pinches herself as she can’t believe how far she’s come since growing up on Auckland’s North Shore. So what exactly is landscape architecture? “It’s a question I get asked a lot, but put simply, it’s the design of spaces that fall outside of a building.” Whether designing a resort, golf course, winery or luxury lodge, Lincoln’s Bachelor of Landscape Architecture equips students to hit the ground running once they graduate. The degree covers a wide range of topics including development planning, design and project management. Haley suggests students take art and design or graphic design at high school. Also subjects such as geography, biology, English and maths provide a pathway into this career. She attended three high schools: Diocesan School for Girls in Epsom until Year 10, ACG Senior College, where she completed the Cambridge International Examination system and was granted University Entrance by the end of Year 12, and for Year 13 she went to “Mount Hutt College for a year of outdoor pursuits before commencing university study.” “Studying at Lincoln University for me was a great experience.

For more information on studying Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University visit www.lincoln.ac.nz

KEY FACTS

■    HALEY FARMER HAS A BACHELOR OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE FROM LINCOLN UNIVERSITY, WHILE THERE SHE WAS AWARDED A FUTURE LEADERS SCHOLARSHIP AND SPENT TIME STUDYING IN CANADA. ■   SHE THOROUGHLY RECOMMENDS TAKING SCHOOL SUBJECTS ART AND DESIGN OR GRAPHIC DESIGN. ■   SUBJECTS SUCH AS GEOGRAPHY, BIOLOGY, ENGLISH AND MATHS ALSO PROVIDE A PATHWAY INTO THIS CAREER.

“A lot of time was spent in the design studio and on field trips learning the application of design. “In addition, we took papers covering ecology, planning, Ma-ori culture, earth science and sustainability.” Haley admits the scope of landscape architecture is large and relies on individuals to draw on knowledge of ecology, design, technical skills, management, problem solving and innovation. “My skillset and interests at school led me down the path of landscape architecture. Being a creative person with a passion for the outdoors, landscape architecture appeared to be a career that would apply these interests.” www.leavingschool.co.nz

“MY SKILLSET AND INTERESTS AT SCHOOL LED ME DOWN THE PATH OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE.”  – Haley Farmer “Landscape architecture is continuing to evolve. Even throughout my four years of study, I found there was more and more focus on the sustainability of cities, global interest in the environment and the quality of urban life in big cities increasing. Haley was awarded a Future Leaders Scholarship while studying at Lincoln University and spent part of her degree studying overseas in Canada. “It was an amazing opportunity for me to see firsthand renowned

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

North American landscape architecture, broadening my understanding of the profession. “I would highly recommend studying Landscape Architecture at Lincoln University. The degree sets you up well for stepping out into a job.” Haley has landed on her feet at Darby Partners in Queenstown, where she is living the dream. “My current experience working on high-end, large-scale master planning projects has been both challenging and rewarding.”


photograph by MARTY MELVILLE   

OUT OF A PASSION FOR FOOD THE DELIGHTS OF THE CULINARY ARTS

JOANNA SAFEY HAS A PASSION FOR FOOD, AND SINCE COMPLETING A BACHELOR OF CULINARY ARTS AND BUSINESS AT LE CORDON BLEU IN WELLINGTON, SHE’S EQUALLY PASSIONATE ABOUT THE ENTIRE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY.

CULINARY ARTS

written by ROBYN YOUSEF  

29

“A LARGE FOCUS DURING MY COURSE WAS ON BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, SO GAINING A FIRST-HAND PERSPECTIVE ON HOW IT ALL ACTUALLY WORKS HAS BEEN GREAT.”   – Joanna Safey

The 22-year-old finished her degree in June and graduated recently. Le Cordon Bleu is a culinary arts institute for chefs and those working toward a career in food and hospitality, and is renowned for its intensive training – it combines new world innovation and local cuisine with the principles, techniques and artistry of the French. Joanna grew up in Nelson and attended Nelson College for Girls, before moving to Wellington to study for a Bachelor of Arts majoring in Art History and French at Victoria University. Toward the end of her first year there, Joanna knew she needed a change and started looking into culinary schools in New Zealand and overseas. “By the end of the year I had made up my mind to switch to Le Cordon Bleu.” From an early age, she loved cooking but before starting at Le Cordon Bleu she was mainly interested in baking and pastry and was initially looking at enrolling in the Diplôme de Pâtisserie. “After a lot of thought I opted for the degree, knowing the broader range of subjects and focus on business development would be more valuable to me long term.” “The degree is focused on gaining a strong understanding of how hospitality operates beyond

KEY FACTS

■ JOANNA SAFEY STUDIED A BACHELOR OF CULINARY ARTS AND BUSINESS AT LE CORDON BLEU IN WELLINGTON. ■ THE DEGREE COVERED A BROAD RANGE OF SUBJECTS, WAS HANDS-ON — IN THAT SHE SPENT A LOT OF TIME IN THE KITCHEN — AND ALSO INCLUDED FRONT-OF-HOUSE MANAGEMENT.

the kitchen, and how business concepts can be applied to the industry as a whole. This meant we covered a broad range of subjects including communications, project management and marketing, in application to the hospitality industry. We also spent a large amount of time in the kitchen – both cuisine and pâtisserie – as well as front-of-house management. ” Throughout her studies, Joanna was working as a Function Manager for Ruth Pretty Catering,

LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

managing all sorts of events. Since finishing study, she has been with a small boutique ice cream company, Wooden Spoon Freezery, with a wide range of responsibilities. “A large focus during my course was on business management, so gaining a first-hand perspective on how it all actually works has been great. I am also working at the recently opened Egmont Street Eatery in front-of-house management.” “From the course, I have gained a real interest in developing businesses in the hospitality industry. This was also fuelled by my time spent completing my cooperative education project at the InterContinental Hotel in Wellington – opening my eyes up to the more corporate side of hospitality. My goal now is to work in brand development for food and hospitality businesses.” And next year Joanna plans to travel to the United Kingdom in search of exciting opportunities there. Look out London – a passionate young Kiwi with a raft of new business ideas is heading your way. For more information on studying Culinary Arts at Le Cordon Bleu, visit www.lecordonbleu.co.nz


UP FOR THE CHALLENGE SHEPHERD

EXPLORE A FUTURE IN FARMING

30

written by KIM TAYLOR photograph by GABRIELLE DRUMMOND       WHEN JAKOB FLORANCE HEARD ABOUT THE OPPORTUNITY TO EXPLORE A FUTURE IN FARMING WITH A TASTER COURSE AT TARATAHI AGRICULTURAL TRAINING CENTRE, HE DECIDED TO GIVE IT A GO. KEY FACTS

■ JAKOB FLORANCE ACHIEVED THE TARATAHI CERTIFICATE IN AGRICULTURE — LEVEL 3 AND A NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN AGRICULTURE — LEVEL 4. ■ HE WORKS AS A SHEPHERD ON PIRINOA STATION, A 3800 ACRE FINISHING FARM, NEAR MARTINBOROUGH IN THE WAIRARAPA. ■ JAKOB ADVISES SCHOOL LEAVERS INTERESTED IN AGRICULTURE TO ATTEND A TASTER COURSE AT TARATAHI AGRICULTURAL TRAINING CENTRE IN ORDER TO GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE INDUSTRY AND SEE IF IT IS THE RIGHT FIT FOR THEM.

“I didn’t grow up on a farm, but my uncle used to work on one in the Wairarapa, so I went out there every chance I could. Most weekends and holidays I would get out of town and head for his farm.”

“That’s what is so good about the taster course. My advice is go if you’re curious about farming because you’ll leave knowing some basics. Then you can decide if a career in agriculture is for you.”

The taster course, one of many held during the school holidays at numerous Taratahi campuses throughout New Zealand, gave Jakob all the information he needed to take that next step to becoming a farmer. Soon after, he made the tough decision to leave Taita College in Year 12 and study fulltime at Taratahi.

Jakob achieved the Taratahi Certificate in Agriculture – Level 3 which takes a full year, before completing a second, optional year to achieve the National Certificate in Agriculture – Level 4.

“I’m always up for a challenge and one of the reasons I wanted to go farming is because of my passion for the outdoors and animals.”

The courses taught him all the basics of farming; animal health, pasture management, how to drive the agriculture vehicles and plenty more. He is also keen on completing a Diploma in Agriculture within the next few years.

Jakob took subjects at school like science, maths and English but like a lot of high schools, Taita College didn’t have any subjects that involved agriculture.

The 21-year-old had no problem finding a job after graduating and would definitely recommend the courses at Taratahi to others.

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“Since starting at BDO, I have been exposed to a wide variety of interesting and challenging work. The variety of different clients and jobs means that you are constantly learning and never get bored in your role. The support systems within each team are amazing and ensure that you always have help when you need it. Teams very quickly become like family as you are working so closely. We are always having jokes and laughs around the office which makes coming to work so much more enjoyable. Because there is such a large group of younger people working within BDO, there is a great social environment within the firm. We are invited to lots of different social events throughout the year including work drinks, midwinter and Christmas parties, and other functions. Work has been really flexible in ensuring that I am happy in my role and am able to meet my own personal career goals – I really do feel Backed by BDO!!”

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SHEPHERD TEXT 31

“I REALLY ENJOY MY INDEPENDENCE AND RESPONSIBILITY HERE, ALWAYS GETTING CHALLENGED AND ALWAYS TRYING TO ACHIEVE THE HIGHEST GROWTH RATES IN THE CATTLE.”  – Jakob Florance “During the second year at Taratahi, everyone gets assigned to different farms around the lower North Island and I was lucky enough to be offered a job at Pirinoa Station at the end.” Pirinoa Station, near Martinborough in the Wairarapa, is a 3800 acre finishing farm where Jakob is in boots-and-all looking after 3000 Friesian bulls, 200 Wagyu, 200 beef heifers and 5500 grazing hoggets. “I really enjoy my independence and responsibility here, always getting challenged and always trying

to achieve the highest growth rates in the cattle. I also love dog work and working alongside the great team that works beside me. “Some of my basic shepherding roles are drenching, dagging and weighing and as a team, we’re all out there on the farm shifting mobs and doing general farm work.” Jakob is stoked with the decisions he’s made over the past few years in regards to farming, and there’s no doubt that with a little more

study through Taratahi, Jakob will one day fulfill his dream of becoming a farm manager.

For more information on studying Agriculture through Taratahi, visit www.taratahi.ac.nz

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IMPORTANT NOTICES

UNIVERSITIES IN NEW ZEALAND

32

There are eight universities in New Zealand, offering a wide range of tertiary education. Visit www.universitiesnz.ac.nz to find out the 2016 semester dates and other important information if you plan to attend university in 2016.

SECONDARY SCHOOL HOLIDAY DATES 2015 TERM 4: 17 Dec–1 to 4 Feb 2016 TERM 1: 16 April–30 April 2016 TERM 2: 9 July–24 July 2016 TERM 3: 24 Sept–9 Oct 2016 TERM 4: 19 Dec–27 Jan to 6 Feb Information sourced from Ministry of Education, visit www.education.govt.nz

DECEMBER 2015 **

JANUARY 2016

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STUDENT LOANS If you are about to leave school and you’re looking at tertiary study, there’s going to be a lot to think about. If it’s anything to do with financial support while you’re studying, StudyLink can help and you need to apply by 16 December 2015. www.studylink.govt.nz

www.leavingschool.co.nz

These websites will help you find a job! Allied Work Force – www.awf.co.nz Trade Me Jobs – www.trademe.co.nz/tgim MyJobSpace – www.myjobspace.co.nz Student Job Search – www.sjs.co.nz Workpool – www.workpool.co.nz Work and Income – www.job-bank.workandincome.govt.nz Seek – www.seek.co.nz

NOVEMBER 2015

SCHOLARSHIPS Scholarships are a great way of covering or assisting with your study fees. There are over 4000 scholarships available nationwide. Scholarships are offered on a range of criteria; e.g. school marks, intended area of study, ethnicity, community service, sporting talents. Talk to your careers advisor or visit http://generosity.org.nz/giv-me

JOB HUNTING

LEAVING SCHOOL 2015

Ab ipis as dolorest quatiam illent elia quidi to conseque as exces et alis dolorest, vid quia quia veles aut volupta esecupt aecupidenis.

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

Click on www.leavingschool.co.nz to read this magazine online and you’ll also find extra content, including over 100 website links that will help you plan for life after school…

*1 = Blue numerals denotes school holidays


Christmas Day: 25 December Waitangi Day: 6 February Good Friday: 25 March Easter Sunday: 27 March Easter Monday: 28 March ANZAC Day: 25 April Queen’s Birthday: 6 June Labour Day: 24 October

MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT

It’s always important to make sure that you are on the electoral roll and ready to take part in national and local elections. How else can you be sure that you are ready to have your say on the big issues affecting you and your family? www.elections.org.nz/voters

FEBRUARY 2016

MARCH 2016

APRIL 2016

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IMPORTANT DATES

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KEY 2015/16 DATES

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DESIGN THE FRONT COVER OF THE NEXT ISSUE OF LEAVING SCHOOL AND WIN $ 1000. see page 39 for more details… *1 = ORANGE numerals denotes public holidays

VOCATIONAL PATHWAYS Throughout this magazine, each case study has been colour coded to its Vocational Pathway. In some instances, multiple colours are used to show that the skills you learn can be applied across multiple careers and pathways, throughout your lifetime. Visit www.youthguarantee.net.nz/ vocational-pathways to learn more about Vocational Pathways.

ACCOMMODATION Study providers have useful information about student accommodation on their websites, including how to apply, application due dates, location and cost. This often covers university accommodation, such as halls of residence, student flatting and private rentals.Halls of residence application due dates vary, so it’s best to check this out online.

FEELING DOWN? Leaving school is one of the most major transitions we undertake in our lives, and it’s a time when anxiety, worry and de pression can surface. www.thelowdown.co.nz is full of ideas and people who can help you get unstuck and get to a better place. Need to talk? Free text to 5626

LEAVINGSCHOOLNZ

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LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

33


Specialist Archaeologist 34

written by ROBYN YOUSEF

photograph by ALAN STEVENS   

PRESERVING OUR HERITAGE

MORE TO ARCHAEOLOGY THAN INDIANA JONES THERE’S MUCH MORE TO ARCHAEOLOGY THAN THE EXCAVATION WORK AND TREASURE HUNTING PORTRAYED IN THE INDIANA JONES-STYLE TALES LACED WITH ROMANCE AND INTRIGUE. IT’S ALSO ABOUT ADVOCACY, RESEARCH AND SHARING THE RESULTING STORIES, ACCORDING TO LAURA DAWSON. The 24-year-old is a Specialist Archaeologist with the Heritage Unit of Auckland Council. Laura looks forward (“I really do”) to her job every day. “My role is primarily as an advisor and an advocate for the tens of thousands of archaeological sites in the Auckland region. I give advice to our parks’ teams, guidance to massive events, filming and land acquisitions teams, in order to preserve, maintain and celebrate our heritage.” She grew up in Tawa, Wellington, and attended local schools. In 2008, she moved to Auckland to begin her university studies. “As a child, I got endlessly excited about history and the sciences, and was strongly influenced by a desire to problem solve – kind of like forensics but with a historical backbone.” At Auckland University, Laura approached archaeology from the scientific perspective. She did a Bachelor of Science with a double major in Biological Science and Anthropological Science (archaeology being a sub-discipline of the broader study of anthropology). “I did papers in chemistry, geology and biological anthropology (like the television show Bones) as

well as the core papers in my majors. For my postgraduate study, I switched into the Arts faculty to do my master’s degree. “I kept the science background through this next stage and completed my thesis looking into Faunal analysis (animal remains at archaeological sites) and ethnobotanical analysis (macro and micro plant remains at archaeological sites).” Laura finished her undergraduate degree in 2011, and postgraduate study in 2013. Her job at the Council followed after working on dig sites as a contractor. Working in the regulatory sector, she gets to influence policy and rules around heritage, with direct input into the care and preservation of such places. She plans to work overseas at some stage and is very interested in sustainable development. “I would love to look at new cities in the future and know that I had input.” Laura suggests school leavers should watch television documentaries such as Time Team to see what day-to-day life is like as an archaeologist. “You can also see how the different

regional specialists and technical specialists interact with a dig site.” She advises that prospective archaeology students can approach their studies from many angles, “History, classics, biology and chemistry can get you into a program with archaeology as it draws so heavily on many disciplines. You can study archaeology at the University of Auckland or Otago University, and can combine it with any of these other specialties. “Take the papers that are interesting and exciting to you, and get passionate. It’s the passionate people that will make a career out of something. With your commitment and enthusiasm, in the end you will make your own prospects.”

For more information on studying Archaeology through the University of Auckland, visit www.auckland.ac.nz

KEY FACTS

■    LAURA DAWSON IS A SPECIALIST ARCHAEOLOGIST WITH THE HERITAGE UNIT OF AUCKLAND COUNCIL. ■   SHE HAS A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE WITH A DOUBLE MAJOR IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE AND ANTHROPOLOGICAL SCIENCE, AND A MASTER OF ARTS.

www.leavingschool.co.nz

“TAKE THE PAPERS THAT ARE INTERESTING AND EXCITING TO YOU, AND GET PASSIONATE. IT’S THE PASSIONATE PEOPLE THAT WILL MAKE A CAREER OUT OF SOMETHING.” –Laura Dawson


written by SARA CARBERY

photographed by DENNIS BUURMAN

ENCOUNTERING MARINE WILDLIFE

IT MUST BE PRETTY COOL TO BE 21 AND HAVE WHAT YOU – AND MANY OTHERS – CONSIDER TO BE ONE OF THE BEST JOBS IN THE WORLD. IT’S A POSITION TRAVELLERS FROM ALL AROUND THE GLOBE MUST ENVY, AS CHANTAL MACKLE WELCOMES THEM ONBOARD. HER JOB? TOUR GUIDE FOR ENCOUNTER KAIKOURA, A TOURISM COMPANY THAT TAKES PEOPLE ON BOATS TO SWIM WITH OR WATCH WILD DUSKY DOLPHINS OFF THE COAST OF KAIKOURA. KEY FACTS

Growing up in a part of New Zealand renowned for its breath-taking beauty and spectacular marine life, including whales, dolphins, albatross and fur seals, Chantal was naturally drawn to a career in tourism.   “I thought if I wanted to stay living here, I needed a good fulltime job, and tourism was the best option; plus, I enjoy being outdoors and around the ocean. ” At Kaikoura High School, Chantal studied PE, tourism, gateway tourism and outdoor education in her final year. It was through ServiceIQ’s gateway tourism that she did work experience with Encounter Kaikoura in Year 13. On the strength of her commitment to her work experience, she was offered a fulltime job when she left school. Other must-haves for her securing the job included being a people person, first aid qualifications   “and, most importantly, that I didn’t get seasick ! ” Since working for Encounter Kaikoura, Chantal has completed on-job a Certificate in Tourism (Core Skills) – Level 3 through ServiceIQ, and

■ CHANTAL MACKLE IS A TOUR GUIDE FOR ENCOUNTER KAIKOURA — NEW ZEALAND’S LEADING MARINE WILDLIFE EXPERIENCE. ■ SHE STUDIED PE, TOURISM, GATEWAY TOURISM AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION IN YEAR 13. ■ CHANTAL HAS A CERTIFICATE IN TOURISM (CORE SKILLS) — LEVEL 3 THROUGH SERVICEIQ, AND IS CURRENTLY STUDYING FOR A NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN TOUR GUIDING — LEVEL 4.

is currently studying towards achieving a National Certificate in Tour Guiding – Level 4. She fits in training around her work and has workbook tasks she has to complete, followed by final assessments.  “My assessor also does quarterly reviews and comes up regularly to see how I am getting on. ” Chantal says her study has well equipped her to deal with sightseers from all around the world. “It teaches you about different cultures and ways to deal with situations, and also things like the

fact that some things we find rude here aren’t rude in other cultures. Also, in my job we have a lot of different commentaries we have to deliver and with English being the second language of most tourists, it teaches you ways to prepare and deliver the talks so they’ll meet visitors’ needs. ” So what’s the highlight of her job? “Showing people how amazing New Zealand’s natural environment and wildlife is, and trying to educate them a bit at the same time. ”  Tourism is a boom industry in New Zealand, employing over 166,500 people in fulltime jobs and earning $10.3 billion per year, or 15.3 per cent of our foreign exchange earnings. As a $65.2 million per-day industry, job prospects in tourism are good. “The tourism industry is growing very fast, and gaining these qualifications helps me expand within it, ” says Chantal. Her advice to others looking at a career in tourism is, “Get as much knowledge about the area you’re going to be working in, and as many qualifications as you can, as new pathways could open up all around the world. ”

LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

For more information about studying through ServiceIQ, visit www.serviceiq.org.nz

TOUR GUIDE

TOURING WITH DOLPHINS 35


STUDY AND EXAM TIPS 36

PREPARING FOR STUDY AND EXAMS HINTS AND TIPS TO HELP YOU THROUGH

written by SARA CARBERY   THE SUN’S SHINING, THE DAYS ARE GETTING LONGER, THE CICADAS ARE OUT IN FORCE … BUT ALL AROUND YOU STRESS LEVELS ARE HIGH, NAILS ARE SHORT AND TEMPERS ARE FRAYED. IT’S EXAM TIME! So, how do you go into your exams prepared and calm, and not stressed and strung out? Revision is key, obviously, but study is a learned art. There’s more to it than reading over your notes a few days beforehand. Here are some steps that will help: Step one: Draw up a study timetable. Research shows that shorter 25–30 minute spells work best because your concentration levels are higher. Taking short, frequent breaks is a good idea, as is mixing the order of the subjects you study. Step two: Work out what you need to learn. Don’t spend time revising information you already know. Think, “What will I be assessed on?” Step three: Get started! There are many ways to revise, including drawing mind maps or diagrams, making notes, answering past papers, writing cue cards, asking someone to test you, highlighting important words or ideas, putting key word posters on your bedroom wall or ceiling and writing skeleton essays. Find a combination of what works best for you. Making notes is a great way to memorise a lot of information and it’s most effective if you regularly – and actively (say them, write them, read them) – review your notes. Most information is forgotten because it wasn’t moved from our short-term memory to our long-term memory. Here are some helpful tips: ❚ Get down to it in the morning – you have to make a start at some point and doing it sooner rather than later is a good idea. ❚ Do plenty of past papers – go to www.nzqa.govt.nz/qualificationsstandards/qualifications/ncea/subjects/ to look at past exams and exemplars.

❚ Reward yourself – people who find the right balance between study and leisure are the ones who get the top marks. Exercise in particular is really important as it increases your heart rate and makes your blood circulate faster; this supplies more oxygen to your brain which increases productivity and reduces tiredness and stress. Fresh air helps too. ❚ The first and last thing to do in a study session – revise your most important information first, and last, every time you study.

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Study is a learned art. There’s more to it than reading over your notes a few days beforehand.

EXAM TIPS

To look at past exams and examplars, go to www.nzqa.govt.nz/qualificationsstandards/qualifications/ ncea/subjects/

37

Before the exam

❚ Check the time of your exam and make sure you know where you’re going. ❚ Look over your notes, but not for too long. Don’t cram at the last minute as this will only confuse your memory. ❚ Put everything you need in a clear plastic bag the night before. You can bring water in a clear plastic drink bottle. ❚ Get a good night’s sleep (a warm milky drink might help). ❚ Eat healthily before your exam. ❚ Avoid people who make you nervous. ❚ Stay calm and confident. Breathe deeply. ❚ Arrive early for your exam.

In the exam

❚ Spend a few minutes reading the instructions and questions carefully. Make a rough plan of how long to spend on each section, and what you plan to cover. Stick to the plan. If you have extra time at the end, return to the questions you didn’t finish. ❚ Read questions twice and circle key terms.

❚ Watch out for plurals in questions. For example, ‘Name features of graphs’ means that you are required to write at least two features. ❚ Start with the question you think you can answer best. ❚ If you start to feel panicky, breathe slowly and deeply. ❚ Don’t use twink, pencil or red pen. ❚ Cross out mistakes with a single line. ❚ Use diagrams to support your answer. Label clearly. ❚ If you have to write an essay, scribble down a short essay plan (e.g. paragraph headings) and cross it out as you go. ❚ Don’t bulk up an answer – keep to the point! ❚ Match the length of your answer to the space provided. ❚ Label extra pages clearly and attach them to your exam booklet. ❚ If you have time, proofread your answers at the end. Ask yourself, “Have I answered the question that was asked?”

After the exam

❚ Don’t get sucked into endless discussions about the exam with your classmates or you could end up worrying (often unnecessarily) for weeks.

Thirty years of quality education Become part of our journey in 2016 + Automotive

+ Information Technology

+ Paramedic

+ Beauty & Hairdressing

+ Journalism

+ Performing Arts

+ Building Trades

+ Live Sound & Event Production

+ Photography

+ Māori Studies

+ Radio Broadcasting

+ Business + Civil Construction + Creative Writing + Early Childhood Teaching + English Language + Film + Hospitality

STUDY AND EXAM TIPS

Thanks to BBC Radio and www.studyit.org.nz for these tips. Studyit is a Ministry of Education website with stacks of study and exam advice for NCEA students.

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ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 38

DELVE INTO MARKETING BEING CREATIVE AND STRATEGIC

written by SARA CARBERY     photographed by EVA BRADLEY   WHEN ASKED ABOUT THE SCOPE OF JOBS AVAILABLE TO MARKETING GRADUATES, 24-YEAR-OLD KENDL HAMBLY READILY RATTLES OFF A LONG LIST – CONSULTANCY, STRATEGY, BRAND MANAGEMENT, MARKET RESEARCH, DIRECT MARKETING, SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING, CAMPAIGN MANAGEMENT … “THE LIST GOES ON FOREVER!” South African-born and Hawke’s Bay raised, Kendl graduated from Waikato University with a Bachelor of Management Studies (Hons), majoring in Marketing and Strategic Management. Today she works as an Account Executive for TRACTA, a communications agency in Napier that specialises in the agribusiness sector. “My role involves working with clients, our internal creative team and a myriad of suppliers – photographers, copywriters, printers etc. – in order to produce creative and strategic solutions to meet the communications needs of a range of clients. “Another key part of my role has been managing and executing our own in-house communications needs, including producing key pieces of collateral, overseeing the development of a new website, producing quarterly EDMs/DMs and so on.” This sounds like the perfect job for someone interested in  “using creativity to drive beneficial economic and social outcomes for clients ”. In fact, it was the combination of studying economics at school, alongside creative subjects, such as design, that sparked Kendl’s interest in studying business and, ultimately, marketing. In her final year at Hastings Girls’ High School, Kendl took a wide variety of subjects including economics, statistics, design and textile design. She says accounting would have been useful, but she picked this up in her first year at university. “As long as you had good results, they generally didn’t seem to mind what courses you did at high school as we covered the basics of all areas in the first year at university.” Kendl loved her time studying at Waikato, “The campus is tightly knit so it’s easy to get

around and there’s plenty of events to get involved in. In terms of the degree, the annual case competition (Strategic Management) and the student internship programme really set this degree apart from others around New Zealand. It gives students a good grounding as to what to expect in the real world of marketing.” So what does Kendl love most about her chosen profession? “I love the psychology side of marketing – analysing consumer behaviour and delving into market research to see what consumers’ drivers, emotions and feelings are, and how they connect to a particular product or service.” Kendl believes the best career prospects for marketers are in the digital and online marketing realms, “People with expertise in these areas are well paid and well sought after.” Her ultimate job would be working as a marketing/communications coordinator for a global interior brand, as she says “interior styling is my other passion”.

For more information on studying Management Studies at the University of Waikato, visit management.ac.nz/future

Her advice to others thinking of studying marketing is, “Go for it ! ” www.leavingschool.co.nz

KEY FACTS

■ KENDL HAMBLY HAS A BACHELOR OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES (HONS) FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO. ■ HER YEAR 13 SUBJECTS INCLUDED ECONOMICS, STATISTICS, DESIGN AND TEXTILE DESIGN. ■ KENDL BELIEVES THE BEST CAREER PROSPECTS FOR MARKETERS ARE IN THE DIGITAL AND ONLINE MARKETING REALMS.

“Set yourself apart and ensure that you specialise in the digital/online areas. Ensure that you study a breadth of papers so that you have a broad understanding of marketing. Support your marketing specialisation with majors that complement it – Strategy, Psychology, PR and HR are all great supporting majors.”

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5


GRAPHIC ARTIST / DESIGNER

AND ATTENDING A DESIGN THE FRONT COVERSCHOOL OF THE SECONDARY IN NZ? NEXT ISSUE OF LEAVING SCHOOL AND

SCHOOL MAGAZINE WIN $ 1000. see page 39LEAVING for more details… would like to invite you to design the cover for

YOUR GUIDE TO STUDY AND CAREER OPTIONS 2 NOVEMBER 2014 | issue 3

4 August 2013 YOUR GUIDE TO STUDY AND CAREER OPTIONS loans, hostels, courses ... enrolling for uni was getting a bit much for gina ... i don’t know.. what to do next year! someone tell me what to do!

her facebook plea is heard, but is she getting the right advice? it looks like gina’s not the only one struggling ...

you know there’s better places for help than facebook!

what are you lot talking about? are you stuck about what you’re doing after school too?!

but i don’t know what to do! so many choices ... how will i know i’ve made the right one?

AREwYOU A BUDDING hat when GRAPHIC ARTIST/DESIGNER & ATTENDING A SECONDARY SCHOOL IN NEW ZEALAND? where

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great prizes!

See page 41 for details…

To qualify to enter the competition you must be a student in Years 9-13 and be attending a secondary school in New Zealand on Monday 2 November 2015. CLOSING DATE FOR ENTRIES IS: Tuesday 1 March 2016 and your design can be emailed to coverdesign@leavingschool.co.nz A panel of judges will review all entries submitted and the winner will be notified by phone and email on or before Monday 28 March 2016. The winner will receive $1000 and this will be paid into a nominated bank account.

Are you for what’ready s ahead?

LEAVINGSCHOOLNZ WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

the NEXT ISSUE OF THE MAGAZINE which will be published in 2016 and the winning designer will receive a prize of $1000 and will also be profiled in the magazine.

it’s the end of the year. time to go their separate ways ...

that’s it then, we’re out of here!

e ic

1-36 20223 JOLLEE 2013 Leaving School Mag.indd 1

Cameraman Everard Petrie,

heaps of options to try ... as long as you know where to look.

expe ea ct r da n te s

an ied Seam Able-Bod Trainee, Naisbitt, Sheldon

Matt Easterbrook, Science Teacher

how

A young engineer is set to soar

DESIGN THE FRONT COVER

ARE YOU A BUDDING

ILS

39 FOR DETA

For more information on terms and conditions visit www.oliverlee.co.nz/coverdesign

 You must be a student in Years 9-13 and attending a secondary school in New Zealand on Monday 2 November 2015. (2) Competition entries close on Tuesday 1 March 2016. TERMS and (1)All entries to be submitted via email to coverdesign@leavingschool.co.nz and must include all your contact details including the name of the school you were attending on Monday 2 November 2015. (3) A panel of judges will review all entries submitted and the winner will be notified by phone and email on or before CONDITIONS: Monday 28 March 2016. The winner will receive $1000 and this will be paid into a nominated bank account. (4) If you have any queries or questions on this project you can email coverdesign@leavingschool.co.nz Good luck!

39


CIVIL ENGINEER

A PROFESSION IN DEMAND

40

ENGINEERING AT FULL SCALE

photographed by ALAN STEVENS written by KIM TAYLOR   IT TOOK NAT JULL THREE YEARS AFTER GRADUATING FROM BAY OF ISLANDS COLLEGE TO DECIDE ON HIS FUTURE CAREER PATH. A LENGTHY STINT AT A LOCAL FREEZING WORKS MOTIVATED NAT TO REASSESS HIS PROSPECTS AND WHAT FOLLOWED WAS A 180 DEGREE SPIN TO STUDYING CIVIL ENGINEERING AT UNITEC IN AUCKLAND. “The programme at Unitec was awesome, very hard at first, but it actually got easier over the three years. I would recommend it.” Nat covered a broad range of subjects while still at high school; maths, English, PE, graphics and carpentry, and had also studied physics until the end of Year 12. These subjects allowed him to keep all options open. “I grew up on a dairy farm just out of Moerewa in the Bay of Islands, and as a kid I always loved playing in the dirt with my toy tractors planning out my own little earthwork projects and the like.

“Instead of designing and building little things with my toys, I do it for real at full scale.”   –   Nat Jull “When having to help on the farm I always preferred helping metal the roads and installing culverts, more than milking the cows or spraying weeds. “It was a pretty easy guess that civil engineering would be something I liked.” Civil engineering is a sought after profession in New Zealand and the industry will need hundreds, if not thousands, of Civil Engineering graduates over the next 10 years, due to major new infrastructure projects being planned all the time. Nat’s advice for first year Civil Engineering students is to get extra help if you need it. “Don’t be afraid to take a foundation course in your first year if you struggle with anything, as working

For more information on studying Civil Engineering through Unitec, visit www.unitec.ac.nz www.leavingschool.co.nz

through the degree is really enjoyable if you feel ahead of the game. “There is about 30 per cent practical, in terms of being outside using equipment or in labs doing experiments; 40 per cent using computer software (e.g. modelling and drawing); and about 30 per cent theory (e.g. maths, mechanics and legislative learning).” After qualifying with a Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Civil), Nat carried on working for Chester Consultants, the firm who took him on as a student engineer in just his second year of study. In terms of his job and what he does, quite simply – he loves it! “We have a great team that are both professional and fun to work with and I really enjoy going to work. “Instead of designing and building little things with my toys, I do it for real at full scale. I get a pretty good mix between out-on-site and in the office work.

“You do have to work hard, but I like that and the money is pretty good.” Nat is pleased with the choices he’s made and knows he’ll remain challenged in a thriving industry. “During my prime I hope to make good money climbing the professional engineering ladder, one day becoming a partner or owning my own business.” KEY FACTS

■ NAT JULL HAS A BACHELOR OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (CIVIL) THROUGH UNITEC. ■ HE WORKS AS A CIVIL ENGINEER WITH CHESTER CONSULTANTS. ■ NAT’S YEAR 13 SUBJECTS WERE MATHS, ENGLISH, PE, GRAPHICS AND CARPENTRY.


RETURNING CARS TO BRAND NEW TRADING UP TO BE THE BEST IN THE WORLD

A CAREER IN PANELBEATING HAS TAKEN DAVID FOX ALL THE WAY FROM HAMILTON TO SAO PAULO IN BRAZIL. IN AUGUST, THE 22-YEAR-OLD MITO APPRENTICE COMPETED AT WORLDSKILLS INTERNATIONAL, WHERE 1600 HIGHLY SKILLED TRADESPEOPLE COMPETE TO BE THE BEST IN THE WORLD IN THEIR TRADE. “It was a crazy experience,” says David. “I had to work on a brand new VW Up, which I had never seen before.” His challenge was to cut-off and weld on a chassis rail, strut tower, engine mount, three A-pillar reinforcements and a rear quarter panel, as well as hammer and file a bonnet and roof and do an airbag diagnostic … all in 22 hours! “A near impossible task to do it that quickly, to a high standard,” he says. “I was stoked with what I achieved, and to be 12th in the world is a pretty great achievement in my eyes.” David is a Collision Repair Technician with Wade Collision Repairs in Hamilton, and is completing the National Certificate in Motor Industry (Automotive Body) (Levels 3 and 4), through MITO. He says he has always had a passion for “anything

KEY FACTS

■ DAVID FOX IS A COLLISION REPAIR TECHNICIAN WITH WADE COLLISION REPAIRS IN HAMILTON. ■ HE IS CURRENTLY COMPLETING THE NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN MOTOR INDUSTRY (AUTOMOTIVE BODY) (LEVELS 3 AND 4), THROUGH MITO.

to do with motors” and while growing up on a farm in the Waikato, rode motocross, raced cars and helped his stepfather build cars.

“I ALWAYS PRIDED MYSELF ON TAKING ON A CHALLENGE AND PANELBEATING IS A CONSTANT CHALLENGE.”  – David Fox

Realising panelbeating was the job for him, David left school at the end of Year 11 having passed Level 1 maths, English, science, metalwork, graphics and PE. He then completed a six-month panelbeating and painting pre-trade course at WINTEC, before being offered an apprenticeship. So, what does he enjoy about his job? “I always prided myself on taking on a challenge and panelbeating is a constant challenge; no two crashes are ever the same and you’re always thinking about the best way to approach a job. It is an awesome feeling when you send a car back to the customer looking brand new, when only weeks prior it looked like it would never see the light of day ever again.” David says there are plenty of opportunities for panelbeaters in New Zealand. “With more and more cars on the road every day, collisions are inevitable. There is always going to be work, and with the high level of skill needed to be a panelbeater you could cross over into many different industries.” In 10 years’ time, David would like to be managing a shop and training the next generation of panelbeaters. “I feel good knowing I can pass on what I have learnt and train up the industry leaders of the future.” His dream job would be to work in the Bugatti or Rolls Royce factory, building and repairing super cars. David’s advice to others thinking of following a similar path is, “If you have a passion for motor vehicles, then this is the job for you. Just remember you only get out what you put in; if you want to be the best at what you do, then you have to put in the hard yards.”

For more information on MITO apprenticeships and training, visit www.mito.org.nz issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

COLLISION REPAIR TECHNICIAN

written by SARA CARBERY

41


DIGGER OPERATOR 42

JUMP ON THE CONSTRUCTION BOO

THE CIVIL CONSTRUCTION, QUARRY & MINING INDUSTRIE written by KIM TAYLOR photograph by ALAN STEVENS      HUNTLY’S MITCHELL BEDDIS HAS ALWAYS HAD A PASSION FOR DIGGERS. WHETHER BIG OR SMALL, ORANGE OR YELLOW, IT’S THE ONE PIECE OF MACHINERY THAT HAS ALWAYS FASCINATED HIM. Not 100 per cent sure what career path he should follow, Mitchell got itchy feet halfway through Year 12 at St John’s College in Hamilton, and left school to start working as an electrical apprentice. Twelve months passed by quickly and Mitchell couldn’t extinguish the yearning to work with diggers – he just didn’t know how to go about it. “I got talking to a mate of mine who has a number of years’ experience in the quarrying industry, and he steered me towards the course at Tai Poutini Polytechnic (TPP). He offered me some experience in the industry, so I grasped it with both hands and never looked back!” TPP has nine campuses throughout New Zealand offering many different courses, with Mitchell electing to study towards a National Certificate in Infrastructure Works with a strand in Earthworks.

“TPP/Waikato Digger School is a hands-on style course in which we spend 13 weeks, five days a week, enhancing our skills out in the yard focusing on an 80/20 split of practical and theory. I learnt basic skills required in the civil construction, quarry and mining industries.” Mitchell recommends the course and his tutors highly and says the second 13-week work-based training phase will allow him to put his knowledge and new-found skills to the test, while earning money. “The tutors at TPP were great, my fellow students were all keen to learn and that makes for a great learning environment that most people will thrive in. “It is really easy to find work as an operator especially with the current construction boom.

“The new expressways under construction create opportunities not only on the roading side, but also quarrying and mining. “Everywhere you look all over the country, companies of all sizes are screaming out for skilled operators.” “My advice for anyone thinking of getting into the industry is to just go for it. If you’re prepared to work hard, you will get out of it what you put into it. Looking back, I took horticulture, physics, maths and PE among other subjects at school and I think the horticulture and maths have definitely helped me.” The course in Civil Construction, Quarrying and Mining prepares workers for jobs such as truck driving, bridge building, construction foreman roles, drain installation, road building, sub-division development and machine operating, to name just a few.

APPLY NOW FOR 2016 MAKE YOUR MARK A = Auckland I = Invercargill

C = Christchurch W = Wanaka

G = Greymouth

H = Hamilton

N = Nationally available

Outdoor Education G / Ski Patrol Jade & Hard Stone Carving G / Chef Non-Hydro Carbon Drilling Civil and Mining A H G Music and Audio A

W G G I C

/ / / / /

HIGHER LEVEL EDUCATION Bachelor of Business and Enterprise Bachelor of Musical Arts Graduate Dip. in Business and Enterprise Bachelor of Audio Engineering Production

N A A A

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0800 TPP INFO TPP.AC.NZ


IES

It was the quarrying aspect that Mitchell enjoyed the most, and he’s landed himself fulltime employment at Waikato Aggregates, one of the largest sand-quarrying manufacture/operators in the North Island. Gerard Burger, Waikato Lead Tutor at TPP, was impressed with Mitchell’s attitude throughout the course. “Seeing a young guy like Mitchell soak up everything that was taught to him at TPP is really encouraging. He’ll do well in the quarrying industry and it’s always fantastic to see someone working in an area of their passion.” Mitchell graduated with a TPP Certificate in Civil Plant Operations (Introductory), along with WTR endorsements, Level One Traffic Control Management and a National Certificate in Infrastructure Works with a strand in Earthworks. KEY FACTS ■ MITCHELL BEDDIS HAS A TPP CERTIFICATE IN CIVIL PLANT OPERATIONS (INTRODUCTORY), ALONG WITH WTR ENDORSEMENTS, LEVEL ONE TRAFFIC CONTROL MANAGEMENT AND A NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN INFRASTRUCTURE WORKS WITH A STRAND IN EARTHWORKS. ■ HE WORKS AS A DIGGER OPERATOR WITH WAIKATO AGGREGATES.

For more information on studying Civil Construction, Quarrying and Mining through Tai Poutini Polytechnic, visit www.tpp.ac.nz

DIGGER OPERATOR

OM

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APPRENTICE: SIGNMAKER 44

CHOOSING CREATIVITY

INTERNATIONAL WATER POLO TO SIGNMAKING written by ROBYN YOUSEF photograph by ALAN STEVENS      AT 21 YEARS OLD, NICKI BASON HAD COMPLETED A BACHELOR OF SPORT AND EXERCISE SCIENCE AND REPRESENTED NEW ZEALAND IN WATER POLO, WHEN SHE OPTED FOR A COMPLETE TURN IN HER CAREER PATH. SHE NOW WORKS AS A SIGNMAKER AND LOVES THE WORK, SAYING EVERY DAY THROWS UP DIFFERENT OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES. She’s 29 now, and last year qualified with a National Certificate in Signmaking, Computer Graphics – Level 3 and Hand Lettering – Level 4. She still calls herself a signwriter  “because I do hand lettering – the old school brushwork”, but new graduates now apply the graphics side only in this signmaking qualification. Nicki works for Green Frog Sign and Display in Hamilton where her role ranges from dealing with clients through to applying graphics, wrapping cars and installing frosting and graphics on site. Growing up in Cambridge, she attended Cambridge Primary and Intermediate, and Hamilton’s Sacred Heart Girls’ High School. “I had two passions growing up, sport and art, and I keenly pursued both.”  She enjoyed the creative part of her studies and at intermediate played soccer for her Waikato age group, going on to play water polo for the New Zealand School Girls’ side at sixteen. Nicki’s sporting interests took her to study at Wintec where she completed a Bachelor of Sport and Exercise Science. She had to take two years off water polo due to injury, but in her final year played for the New Zealand Women’s water polo team, travelling and competing around the world.

KEY FACTS

■ NICKI BASON COMPLETED AN APPRENTICESHIP IN SIGNMAKING THROUGH COMPETENZ. ■ SHE IS QUALIFIED IN TWO SPECIALTIES — COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND HAND LETTERING (OLD SCHOOL BRUSHWORK).

After finishing her degree, Nicki decided she’d try her hand at her other passion, art, and looked to signmaking as a career. “I went to see a signmaker for a part-time job so I could observe and was given a week of work experience. After the week I had enjoyed myself so much and proved myself enough that they offered me an apprenticeship.” Her suggestions for anyone wanting to get into a trade is to get out there and door knock. “Go in and meet/talk to employers. Offer to do some work experience for free. This shows you really want the job. Even if it’s just after school that you go and

sweep floors and empty rubbish bins, it’s a great way to see what the job involves.” Nicki is particularly grateful for the assistance she had from the industry training organisation Competenz. “When they stepped in it all became smooth sailing for my apprenticeship.” While she had a lengthy apprenticeship due to some issues, most apprentices gain their qualification in four or five years. Her studies included workbooks for each level. She worked through these with the help of her workmates and boss at Green Frog. “It’s really great – you’re learning as you go. Even better, you are getting paid to learn and get a qualification that you can take anywhere in the world. I’ve done study and an apprenticeship and doing a trade is really the best option.” Nicki is so content with the creativity of her career, she plans to stay where she is, with her eye on a management role eventually. For more information on signmaking apprenticeships through Competenz, visit www.competenz.org.nz


HANDS-ON AND ON THE MOVE

written by KATE THOMPSON photograph by BRENNAN THOMAS      FOR REFRIGERATION AND AIR CONDITIONING (RAC) APPRENTICE WILLIAM McCLUNE, A CAREER THAT COMBINES “THREE TRADES IN ONE” AND SEES HIM ON THE MOVE EVERY DAY OFFERS THE VARIETY AND CHALLENGE HE IS LOOKING FOR.

APPRENTICE: REFRIGERATION

DOING THREE TRADES IN ONE

45

“I really like the mix of work this career involves,” says William, who works for Gisborne-based Fenn Refrigeration and is in his third year of the four-year Refrigeration and Air Conditioning (RAC) apprenticeship through industry training organisation Competenz. “RAC covers three trades – electrical, refrigeration and air conditioning – so there’s lots of variety. “Plus, I’m out on the road every day, dealing with people and different types of businesses. I might be servicing an air conditioning system at a bank one day, fixing a freezer at a supermarket another day, or helping install a chiller at a factory that processes food. Every day is different.” William says the work of an RAC engineer is practical and an apprenticeship is “a good way to learn”. “I’m a hands-on person so I really like having a job where I’m doing something practical and working with my hands. There’s lots to learn, and doing things myself on-the-job helps me learn. I get to see the results of what I’m doing really quickly. And if I don’t get something quite right, I get to fix it immediately, so that helps me learn too.” William attended Campion College in Gisborne, from Year 7 through to Year 13. “At about Year 10, I wanted to be an avionics technician – working on planes, and electrics on planes – but then decided to work as an electrician. Going out on job sites and talking to different people I then found out about a refrigeration apprentice job, and that was it –

KEY FACTS

■ WILLIAM McCLUNE IS IN HIS THIRD YEAR OF THE FOUR-YEAR RAC APPRENTICESHIP THROUGH ITO COMPETENZ. ■ HE WAS THE 2015 TOP APPRENTICE AT THE INSTITUTE OF REFRIGERATION HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING ENGINEERS WALLIE ASKEW MEMORIAL WORKSKILLS COMPETITION. ■ SCHOOL SUBJECTS HE RECOMMENDS FOR A CAREER IN RAC ARE PHYSICS, MATHS, METAL- AND WOOD-WORK, AND ELECTRONICS.

the trade suited me and the fact that it has a broad range of different aspects made it appealing too.” William’s choice of subjects at school set him up well for a career in the RAC trade. “I did physics and maths, which are really important in the trade. Plus practical subjects like metal- and wood-working. It was a good mix. I would say those interested in this career should also do

LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

electronics at school if it’s available as this would help with reading wiring diagrams.” Williams says the long-term benefits of a trade career and the chance to gain a nationally recognised qualification also attracted him to the industry. “This career can set me up for life. Most buildings in the country have air conditioning or refrigeration systems of some sort, so there’s always going to be plenty of work. I could own my own business one day, and my skills are recognised overseas, so there’s a chance to travel if I want to.” Training on-the-job has its benefits too. “I’m earning while I learn so I’m not building up student debt. And I’m already employed – in a job I like – so I don’t need to look for work when I finish my apprenticeship.” The practical nature of the work suits William well and he’s making excellent progress in his apprenticeship. This year he was the top apprentice in the Institute of Refrigeration Heating and Air Conditioning Engineers (IRHACE) Wallie Askew Memorial Workskills Competition. William was also one of 70 leading apprentices from across the country who attended the Future Business Leaders Forum in Auckland as part of August’s national Got a Trade Week. For more information on RAC apprenticeships through Competenz, visit www.competenz.org.nz


ARTS: EDUCATION 46

EDUCATION OFFERS FLEXIBLITY TEACHING OUR FUTURE GENERATIONS

photographed by PETER McDERMOTT written by ROBYN YOUSEF   SUZY KING HAS WANTED TO BE A TEACHER FOR AS LONG AS SHE CAN REMEMBER. AND ARMED WITH A BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJORING IN EDUCATION, SHE IS CONFIDENT SHE HAS THE SKILLS TO TAKE HER ANYWHERE. She knows that choosing Education as a major or minor in your degree can lead to a wide range of careers, including ones you might have never previously considered. “Whether you want to go into teaching, or other areas like special education, counselling or human development, the course has so much variety across the sector and the opportunities are endless,” says Suzy, who will graduate from Massey University in November. Growing up in Taranaki, Suzy (23) attended Midhirst Primary School followed by New Plymouth Girls’ High School. “I have always loved being involved with children and actually used to play teachers with my little sister and whoever I could rope in to being my class – calling the roll etc. I just love seeing children learning at their full potential knowing that I had an influence on this.” It was in Year 12 that Suzy seriously started thinking about becoming a teacher.  “Then I started planning my subjects around what I needed for teaching and applied at Massey University in 2010.”  Starting at Massey the next year, she completed her degree by distance learning while working fulltime as a nanny. “It took me an extra year, but I have gained so much experience on the way.” Suzy’s decision to study a Bachelor of Arts majoring in Education at Massey was due to the straightforward nature of the programme and the added bonus of great flexibility, which allowed her to explore areas she is passionate about.

“I JUST LOVE SEEING CHILDREN LEARNING AT THEIR FULL POTENTIAL KNOWING THAT I HAD AN INFLUENCE ON THIS.” “I’ve always been interested in learning more about Ma-ori language and culture, and being able to take papers in this area was a huge bonus for me. It has really added to my skillset and I look forward to sharing my knowledge of Te Reo with my own class one day.” Suzy is a nanny for a family with six children. The youngest is two-and-a-half and the oldest is nineteen. She credits her degree with the way it has allowed her to apply what she has learnt to her job. “My degree has taught me about inclusion and treating everyone equally, that every child is different and has different learning support needs.

“I’ve learnt to be open and supportive and to consider things from diverse perspectives. “When I’m with the younger kids I’m constantly asking them open-ended questions to keep them thinking about what they’re learning. “I work with an autistic girl with a rare chromosome disorder who is profoundly deaf and a Down Syndrome boy – being able to support their developments is really rewarding.” Next year, Suzy plans to study for the Graduate Diploma in Teaching (Primary) at Massey University, and after that the world is her oyster. KEY FACTS

■ SUZY KING HAS A BACHELOR OF ARTS MAJORING IN EDUCATION FROM MASSEY UNIVERSITY, COMPLETED BY DISTANCE LEARNING.

For more information on studying Education at Massey University visit www.massey.ac.nz

www.leavingschool.co.nz

■ SHE PLANS TO STUDY FOR THE GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN TEACHING (PRIMARY) AT MASSEY NEXT YEAR. ■ SUZY BELIEVES THAT THE COURSE OFFERS VARIETY AND IS APPLICABLE FOR THOSE LOOKING AT AREAS LIKE SPECIAL EDUCATION, COUNSELLING OR HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, AS WELL AS TEACHING.

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5


written by SARA CARBERY  

photographed by MARTIN HUNTER

BE PART OF THE COMPOSITES INDUSTRY

COMPOSITES

BUILDING WITH COMPOSITES Someone who knows a whole lot about this multipurpose material is Andrew Monopoli, Factory Manager for The Composite Group, a composites component manufacturer in Christchurch. With his background in boatbuilding, Andrew specialises in constructing composite boats, but the company manufactures a wide range of other products as well. Andrew (43) first got into boatbuilding when he left Papanui High School at the end of Year 11 (then known as fifth form) and worked part-time for a company that repaired boats. He had taken woodwork, maths, science, English and PE at school, which

47

YOU PROBABLY HAVEN’T GIVEN COMPOSITES MUCH THOUGHT BUT IT IS ONE OF THE MOST VERSATILE MATERIALS EVER CREATED. IT CAN BE USED TO MAKE ALL SORTS OF THINGS, FROM CAR PARTS, BOATS AND SHOP FITTINGS THROUGH TO PLANES, POOLS AND SIGNS … EVEN CRAYFISH HOLDING TANKS AND MOBILE BARS!

KEY FACTS

■ ANDREW MONOPOLI IS FACTORY MANAGER FOR THE COMPOSITE GROUP, A COMPOSITES COMPONENT MANUFACTURER IN CHRISTCHURCH. ■ HE HAS A NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN BOATBUILDING (COMPOSITE) – LEVEL 4 AND NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN COMPOSITES – LEVEL 4. HE IS CURRENTLY WORKING TOWARD A NATIONAL CERTIFICATE IN BUSINESS (FIRST LINE MANAGEMENT). ■ ANDREW STUDIED VIA AN ADULT APPRENTICESHIP SCHEME, RUN BY THE NEW ZEALAND MARINE AND COMPOSITES INDUSTRY TRAINING ORGANISATION.

equipped him well for working in the industry. As the company diversified away from repairing wooden boats, Andrew got his first taste of working with composites materials. “The company went on to make sea kayaks, fibreglass signs and car parts, so I started to learn how versatile the material we were using was, and how many things could be made from fibreglass.” Through an adult apprenticeship scheme, run by the New Zealand Marine and Composites Industry Training Organisation, Andrew has completed a number of qualifications over the years, including National Certificates in Boatbuilding (Composite) and Composites – both Level 4. He is currently working on his National Certificate in Business (First Line Management), and these days implements the ITO’s training scheme for his company, overseeing and signing off apprentices’ work. Part of NZ Marine, the New Zealand Marine and Composites Industry Training Organisation offers state-of-the-art training programmes for the marine and composites industries. Training consists of learning in the workplace, supplemented by specialist courses at polytechnics or private training companies. Employers and the New Zealand Marine and Composites ITO Field Officers support and regularly assess apprentices/trainees to determine that their knowledge and skills (achieved via unit standards) are to industry standard. “With the composites industries continuing to impress on the world stage as a materials solution provider, it’s more important than

“GIVE IT A GO, AS THE VARIETY OF JOBS AND PLACES YOU CAN GO ARE ONLY LIMITED BY YOUR IMAGINATION.” — Andrew Monopoli

ever to take on the right people to continue growth in the industry within New Zealand,” says Susan Lake, President of CANZ (Composites Association of New Zealand). “Our ability to ensure we have the right training programmes is critical to developing the composite technicians the composites industry will need in the future.” In his role as Factory Manager, Andrew oversees 20 people, managing their workload and ensuring all the materials they need are on site. He also organises and oversees a site crew of three workers who build and install onsite.

LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

Andrew loves the variety of his job and believes career prospects are very good for people undertaking a composite qualification. “The composite field is a wide, interesting and growing industry.” His advice to school leavers thinking of working in the industry is, “Give it a go, as the variety of jobs and places you can go are only limited by your imagination.”

For more information on marine and composites training and apprenticeships, visit www.nzmarine.com


STUDENT: SPORT & EXERCISE

written by SARA CARBERY

 photographed by IZAIAH PAINTING PHOTOGRAPHY

BE ACTIVE AT WORK

MAKING SPORT & EXERCISE A CAREER “MY BIGGEST ADVICE WOULD BE TO IGNORE WHAT YOUR FRIENDS OR PEOPLE FROM YOUR YEAR ARE ALL DOING AND TO ACTUALLY REALLY CONSIDER WHAT YOU WANT TO DO, FOR YOU … BECAUSE IN THE END IT’S YOUR FUTURE, NOT YOUR CLASSMATES’ OR YOUR FRIENDS’. ” “I am someone who really struggles to sit down in an office or at a computer desk for a long time, so the biggest attraction for me is the chance to be active at work and not have to always sit behind a desk. Alongside this, I also really love helping people to be active, and love being active myself.”

For more information on studying Sport & Exercise through the Southern Institute of Technology, visit www.sit.ac.nz

“Choosing the option that you can honestly say is best for you can be scary, but it’s definitely one of the best decisions you can make when leaving school.” Twenty-year-old Levi Goodall has certainly followed his own advice. Ranked sixth on the amateur freeride mountain bike world tour, Levi has also played soccer at rep level and competed in softball and velodrome cycling. Little wonder he excelled at PE at school (his favourite subject), and gained a PE scholarship in his final year at James Hargest College in Invercargill … and chose to study sport; something he describes as a “no-brainer”. “I am someone who really struggles to sit down in an office or at a computer desk for a long time, so the biggest attraction for me is the chance to be active at work and not have to always sit behind a desk. Alongside this, I also really love helping people to be active, and love being active myself.” Canadian-born and Southland-raised for the past decade or so, Levi is in his third and final year of a Bachelor of Sport and Exercise at the Southern Institute of Technology in Invercargill. Over the past three years he has covered a range of topics, such as gym training, working with clients, body testing, business management, research skills, adventure-based sport, nutrition and many others. “Personally, my favourite subjects www.leavingschool.co.nz

have been the adventure-based sport paper in my second year, where we got to do activities, such as kayaking, caving and mountain biking, and the pedagogy and teaching paper I took this year, which involved learning the skills for classroom and behavioural management, and how to prepare and deliver lessons. I have also really enjoyed the sport science papers.” Levi’s options in Year 13 were English, biology, chemistry, statistics and PE; PE and biology set him up well for his degree, he says, but are not prerequisites. School-aged applicants have to have University Entrance, and need to demonstrate a commitment to a sporting code and/or recent experience working in a sport and exercise related capacity in a sports-related business or gym. “Personal commitment and a belief in one’s own ability to succeed are important personal traits and will always be taken into consideration in the selection process,” states SIT’s website.

“For me, passing this course hasn’t been hard but trying to get good grades has involved putting in a lot of effort and a lot of extra time.” So why did Levi decide to study at SIT? “The main reasons I chose SIT were the zero fees scheme and the hands-on, practical components of what they offered.” He estimates he saved $5000–$6000 per year in course fees and course-related costs, because of the zero fees scheme. Career options for Sport & Exercise graduates include being a school sports coordinator, personal trainer, gym owner, sports business owner, coach, community sports adviser, health promotion officer, nutritionist and rehab specialist. “I would love any job working with children or young people in sport, ” says Levi. “The ultimate job would look something like running a freestyle mountain biking coaching practice for young riders.” There’s no doubt Levi is well on his way to achieving this dream. KEY FACTS

■ L EVI GOODALL IS IN HIS FINAL YEAR OF A BACHELOR OF SPORT AND EXERCISE AT THE SOUTHERN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY IN INVERCARGILL. ■ HIS YEAR 13 SUBJECTS WERE ENGLISH, BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, STATISTICS AND PE. ■ WHILE NOT PREREQUISITES, LEVI ADVISES THAT PE AND BIOLOGY SET HIM UP WELL FOR HIS DEGREE.


photographed by DARREN SIMMONDS

BEING CREATIVE WITH SCIENCE

CHALLENGING THE NORMS WITH BIOTECHNOLOGY COMMUNICATING SCIENCE IN A WAY THAT INSPIRES AND EXCITES PEOPLE IS SOMETHING MADELEINE PARKER IS PASSIONATE ABOUT. STUDYING TOWARDS A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONS) WITH A MAJOR IN BIOTECHNOLOGY AT VICTORIA UNIVERSITY OF WELLINGTON HAS GIVEN THE 22-YEAR-OLD THE CONFIDENCE TO DISCUSS WITH OTHERS HOW SCIENCE CAN CONTRIBUTE TO PEOPLE’S LIVES IN THIS RAPIDLY CHANGING WORLD. Hailing from the Hawke’s Bay, Maddy enjoyed a taste of biotechnology in her last year at Havelock North High School. Science was at the forefront of her Year 13 subjects – biology, chemistry, physics, two maths subjects and English. As much as she loves science, she does wish she had continued with more arts subjects in her final years of school because creativity is important for good science.

KEY FACTS

set long-term goal in life, and that a lot of the best things are unpredictable.

■ MADELEINE PARKER IS STUDYING TOWARDS A BACHELOR OF SCIENCE (HONS) WITH A MAJOR IN BIOTECHNOLOGY AT VICTORIA UNIVERSITY OF WELLINGTON.

“Exciting things will happen if I have an open mind and actively pursue new experiences.

■ HER ADVICE TO PROSPECTIVE BSc STUDENTS IS TO THINK ABOUT SCIENCE OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM, BEYOND THE INTERNET OR WHITEBOARD.

“The most rewarding thing about science is sharing it with other people.”     

“During high school I was drawn to biotechnology because it applied what we learned from biology to our everyday lives. “During my studies at Victoria, I’ve become passionate about using what we learn from science to inform new and creative ways of thinking about how we can improve human health and well-being and live more sustainably.”

Madeleine Parker and sometimes intimidating situations helped me to work out what my values are, what I’m passionate about and what I’m not okay with. Challenging myself and understanding the perspectives of others have been the most important things for me.”

She is fascinated by science because scientific knowledge is constantly evolving and often involves challenging the norms.

Maddy’s advice to science-loving students at high school is to think about science outside the classroom.

“Studying science helped me to realise that it’s pretty exciting when there isn’t one right answer to a question, something I used to find frustrating. “The most rewarding thing about science is sharing it with other people. Learning about science helps to nurture respect and appreciation for the natural environment by exposing you to a whole new way of seeing the world. “Sharing this appreciation to encourage people to care for themselves, others

“It’s been a transition between working very much independently to realising the value of working more collectively. Putting myself into new

and the planet we all live on will be central to my future plans, whatever they may involve.” She finds the environment at Victoria to be really supportive and enables her to go beyond her comfort levels, “I’m now comfortable asking

questions, talking in front of people and realising that failure is not something to be scared or embarrassed by, it’s actually one of the most valuable ways to learn.” Studying at Victoria has helped Maddy realise that she doesn’t have to have a

LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

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The truly captivating science is that which you experience in your everyday life by relating what you learn on the whiteboard or internet back into the real world.

For more information on studying Science through Victoria University, visit www.victoria.ac.nz

STUDENT: SCIENCE

written by KIM TAYLOR  

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STUDENT: MUSIC 50

STEP INTO THE MUSIC SCENE A JOURNEY OF CREATIVITY AND DISCOVERY

written by ROBYN YOUSEF photograph by ALAN STEVENS      “PURSUING MUSIC-MAKING WILL BE A NEVER-ENDING JOURNEY OF CREATIVITY AND DISCOVERY – I CAN’T THINK OF A BETTER WAY TO LIVE. I HOPE TO ONE DAY SHARE MY PASSION – THROUGH TEACHING AND PERFORMING – WITH OTHER NEW ZEALANDERS.” The above words of devotion and commitment to his music studies are from 22-year-old Liam Wooding. Liam is studying for a Postgraduate Diploma in Music in Performance at the University of Waikato, after having completed a Bachelor of Music at the University of Auckland. He grew up in Wanganui, attending Westmere Primary and Wanganui High School, where he was head boy in 2010. “It was at primary school that I really became interested in music. I was involved with singing and the school choir, and my first piano tutor was also my class teacher.” He started formally learning to play the piano when he was seven, but remembers experimenting with the keyboard from a very young age. “I was interested in lots of things as a kid growing up, but have always been fascinated with music and the idea of performance. I can’t really imagine pursuing another career path, other than perhaps in Visual Art – however in lots of ways it’s very similar to being a musician.” Liam’s studies currently involve lots of piano practice and private lessons, these will culminate in two public recitals – one solo piano recital and one collaborative piano recital. “My undergraduate studies at the University of Auckland involved similar work but also included courses in music theory, musicianship skills, music history and musician’s health. I really enjoy the courses I do and am very thankful for the inspirational and world-class teaching that I’ve received.” Liam takes part in many musical competitions and in March this year placed third at the Christchurch National Concerto Competition.

For more information on studying Music through the University of Auckland, visit www.auckland.ac.nz

“I played Ravel’s Concerto and this piece will remain with me forever as a favourite.” When Liam graduates early next year, he is looking at doing further postgraduate study in Australia. But, he visualises returning to New Zealand to work. Liam believes this country has an “awesome classical music scene”. He is keen to contribute to it and help develop it further, “Long term I’d like to be working in New Zealand as a pianist and teacher.” And for keen young musicians wishing to follow a path like Liam’s, he has some sound advice. “At high school I picked subjects that I liked purely for that reason, however, looking back now I would have taken accounting. A freelance musician and private teacher is really a small business, so a basic level of financial literacy is really helpful. “Also confidently interacting with foreign language is important as a musician – so much of what we play is historical music from foreign cultures, so working ability in foreign language is necessary.”

KEY FACTS

■ LIAM WOODING IS STUDYING FOR A POSTGRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO. ■ HE HAS A BACHELOR OF MUSIC FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND. ■ LIAM RECOMMENDS ACCOUNTING AS A SCHOOL SUBJECT FOR BUDDING FREELANCE MUSICIANS AND PRIVATE MUSIC TEACHERS.

“Pursuing music-making will be a never-ending journey of creativity and discovery – I can’t think of a better way to live. I hope to one day share my passion.” – Liam Wooding


written by ROBYN YOUSEF

 photographed by ALAN STEVENS

CREATIVE FREEDOM IN FASHION

DESIGNS ON HAUTE COUTURE SUCCESS

IT’S EASY TO VISUALISE THE NAME BENJAMIN FARRY ON AN HAUTE COUTURE GARMENT OR UP IN LIGHTS ON THE EDGE OF A RUNWAY AS AN INTERNATIONAL FASHION LABEL. AND THAT’S EXACTLY WHAT THE 20-YEAR-OLD WHO “LIVES AND BREATHES FASHION” PLANS TO ACHIEVE.

KEY FACTS

■ BENJAMIN FARRY IS IN HIS FOURTH YEAR OF A BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MAJORING IN FASHION DESIGN AT WHITECLIFFE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND DESIGN. ■ HE ADVISES PROSPECTIVE FASHION DESIGN STUDENTS TO FOCUS ON A SCHOOL SUBJECT AS CLOSELY RELATED AS POSSIBLE, AND TO RESEARCH AND LEARN ABOUT THE FASHION INDUSTRY.

Benjamin is in his fourth year of study at Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design and will graduate with a Bachelor of Fine Arts majoring in Fashion Design. He is now working on his graduate collection, which will be on show at the Whitecliffe Fashion Show at the Viaduct Events Centre in November. It’s a highly anticipated annual event where students from year two, three and four all get to showcase their final collections. Benjamin grew up in Auckland and attended Rosmini and Avondale College. After completing Year 12, he went to Whitecliffe College. At school, he concentrated on English and doing all the arts subjects he could. The art department was his favourite place, and where he experimented with many different mediums (such as screen printing, wood and Perspex carving, and sculpture) – many of which he uses now. And it seems Benjamin was destined to be involved in the world of fashion – he is a member of the well-known Farry family. His Lebanese ancestors settled in Dunedin in the early 1800s and were renowned for their business acumen and involvement in the fashion and modelling world. “I have always been fascinated by different textiles and the movement and drape that fabric creates on the figure. My mother always loved design – mosaics, interiors or clothing. My father was a painter.” The theme for his graduation-year collection holds great promise, “I am designing and constructing a nine-look collection based on an examination of the sociological conditions that surround our perceptions of fame and celebrity culture.” Benjamin enjoys the creative freedom and structure that Whitecliffe offers. The Fashion Design programme provides many opportunities for students LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

to experiment with ideas, challenge traditional methods and develop an individual and innovative design style. This year Benjamin was selected as one of 10 New Zealand fashion students to participate in a design collaboration with Vietnamese students and travel to Ho Chi Minh City in Việt Nam for one week. Students are taught design research, history and theory, pattern cutting and garment construction using industry-standard methodology and have close interactions with the local fashion industry. The programme has an emphasis on sustainable fashion practices within both local and international projects. Throughout their degree, students intern with local and intervention designers, as well as assisting at New Zealand Fashion Week. And students appreciate that classes are small and provide a nurturing environment. Benjamin has always known he wanted to be in the fashion industry. “The industry is important to me because I am constantly calculating and manipulating fabrics, silhouettes, colour and texture. I breathe everything fashion.” He advises those keen on a career in fashion design to focus on a related field at school and to do their research, learning as much as they can about the fashion industry. “Know exactly where you want to position yourself in the future and constantly work towards that target. Gaining experience and networking is a huge factor for becoming successful.” As for Benjamin, he is set on having his own label and breaking into international markets. Look out Paris, New York and Milan! For more information on studying Fashion Design at Whitecliffe College of Arts and Design, visit www.whitecliffe.ac.nz

STUDENT: FASHION DESIGN

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TIPS FOR BEING PEN

LIVING ON THE SMELL OF AN OIL written by DIANA CLEMENT   YOUR LIFE IS ABOUT TO GET A WHOLE LOT MORE EXPENSIVE. IF YOU’RE LEAVING HOME TO STUDY, YOU FACE LIVING COSTS OF HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS A WEEK. EVEN IF YOU DECIDE TO LIVE AT HOME, UNIVERSITY IS EXPENSIVE THANKS TO TRAVEL, FEES, TEXTBOOKS AND A LONG LIST OF TEMPTATIONS. If you can learn to live on the smell of an oily rag, you’re more likely to make it to the end of your degree with a whole lot less debt than your friends. Try these tips:

Don’t buy it.

Most of what we buy is totally unnecessary. It is astounding what you can do without. Buying less is also kinder on the environment.

Buy it second-hand. If you really must buy something, look into the possibility of buying it second-hand. Look on Trade Me, go to garage sales, shop at school fairs, visit op shops and buy clothes at SaveMart – all major university towns have one. If you buy second-hand it’s likely you’ll pay one-tenth to one-third of its brand-new price – for just about any item. Even so, ask yourself, “Do I really need it?” before you hand over the cash. You haven’t got a bargain if you didn’t need it in the first place.

Ask for discounts. Once you’ve decided to buy something, ask for a student discount. You may be given one straight away, or the shop might suggest where you can get a voucher.

Textbook pool. Even cheaper than sourcing second-hand textbooks is pooling with other students; after all, you don’t need 24/7 access to all your textbooks.

Learn to cook. Homemade meals and lunches saves lots of money. Google  “student recipes” or take a cookbook aimed at students out of your local library. You’ll find plenty of simple-to-make, budget recipes such as pasta bake, jacket potato, pizza, noodles and rice dishes. Make meals in bulk and freeze them for nights when you can’t be bothered cooking. It’s much cheaper than buying ready-made meals or takeaways.

Skip the take-out. Eating out and drinking coffee or soda makes you poor. Make a habit of putting food to eat in your bag, even if it’s only bread and fruit. If you can’t bring food from home, stock up at the supermarket and keep a stash of cheap snacks at uni. 52

| www.leavingschool.co.nz | LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5


NNYWISE

EATING OUT AND DRINKING COFFEE OR SODA MAKES YOU POOR. MAKE A HABIT OF PUTTING FOOD TO EAT IN YOUR BAG, EVEN IF IT’S ONLY BREAD AND FRUIT.

Budget. Yes, work out how much you have to spend each week and allocate it to categories such as: rent, utilities, groceries, bus fares, entertainment and so on. Follow your weekly spending with an app, so you stop spending when the allocation for that category runs out.

Refuse credit. If you’ve made it to uni or other tertiary provider, you’re smarter than the average person. Use that intelligence wisely and avoid interest-bearing debt such as credit cards and hire purchase. Otherwise you’ll add interest to your monthly budget and that buys you nothing. Finally, even two or three of these tips will save you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars by the time you graduate, so take heed. For advice, budgeting tools and more, visit www.sorted.org.nz or www.familybudgeting.org.nz Find budgeting services in your area by searching ‘budgeting service providers’ at www.familyservices.govt.nz

LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

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FINE ARTS PHOTO MEDIA FASHION DESIGN GRAPHIC DESIGN ARTS MANAGEMENT ARTS THERAPY

L-R: Karma Scretching, Keewin Fam, Victoria Cullington, Suhee Kang

ILY RAG

Get the Whitecliffe Edge Whitecliffe graduates are articulate, innovative creative thinkers with broad skills and a high level of industry standard technical proficiency. They create powerful and compelling visual expressions of their ideas, are leaders in the creative industries, and shape contemporary culture. www.whitecliffe.ac.nz


STUDENT: SPORT & BUSINESS

MIXING BUSINESS WITH SPORT

54

“While at Epsom Girls Grammar School, I had some ideas of what I may want to do and I liked the values sport taught me about teamwork, integrity, resilience and leadership.”

The sport industry landscape has shifted over the past decade, with employers, in New Zealand and overseas, looking for skills in both the sports and business environments.

Chonaire added in the business degree to distinguish herself in the workplace and make her CV look more appealing.

Chonaire, of Ngāti Porou descent, took a broad range of subjects at high school to keep her options open; drama, PE, history, statistics and modelling, and performing arts technology in Year 13.

ACHIEVING A CONJOINT DEGREE

TALENTED SPORTSWOMAN CHONAIRE HURIWAI ALWAYS KNEW SHE WANTED TO WORK IN THE SPORTS INDUSTRY. WITH NO CLEAR IDEA OF HOW TO MAKE IT HAPPEN, A TIMELY CHAT WITH A CAREER ADVISOR WAS ALL IT TOOK TO POINT HER IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION.

“I also have a passion for management and organising things, so majoring in Management was a perfect fit for me.”

She recommends the four-year conjoint programme at AUT because it has a great balance of theoretical

KIM TAYLOR MARTY MELVILLE

and practical work, which bodes well for a successful career in the sports industry. “This degree will set you up to not only grow your love for sport but give you the skills for a successful career. ” Over four years, Chonaire has completed placements at two organisations and is nearing the end of a 400-hour placement at Counties Manukau Sport. “My key learning through placement is how powerful sport is with connecting with youth and it’s one of the key drivers to my personal involvement in sport.” With the experience she’s now had working in the sports industry, alongside her study, Chonaire has found her niche working with children – whether it’s coaching their sports teams, umpiring, organising tournaments or delivering programmes. As one of Auckland’s top netballers, Chonaire admits the last four years have been busy, but she ’s loved every minute of it. “It has been an absolute challenge managing high-performance netball, fulltime study at AUT, 400 placement hours and working part-time at Auckland Netball Centre, but it has been an incredible journey that I have loved being on. “It’s been hard but that’s ultimately what makes you a better person in the long run.” A bonus of studying at AUT is the opportunity to apply for one of 16 international scholarships, something Chonaire would love to do. “It would be such an amazing way to travel and finish-off your degree in style. ”

KEY FACTS ■ CHONAIRE HURIWAI IS COMPLETING A BACHELOR OF SPORT AND RECREATION AND A BACHELOR OF BUSINESS, BOTH WITH A MAJOR IN MANAGEMENT, AT AUT. ■ HER YEAR 13 SUBJECTS WERE DRAMA, PE, HISTORY, STATISTICS AND MODELLING, AND PERFORMING ARTS TECHNOLOGY.

www.leavingschool.co.nz

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

For more information on studying Sport and Recreation or Business through AUT visit aut.ac.nz/start2016


A JOB WHERE EVERY DAY IS DIFFERENT

written by SARA CARBERY photograph by ALAN STEVENS      AN INNATE LOVE FOR ANIMALS IS A PREREQUISITE FOR BECOMING A VET, AND 25-YEAR-OLD ERIN DOWLER CERTAINLY HAD THAT FROM A YOUNG AGE. “I WAS THE KID TRYING TO SAVE THE MOUSE THAT HAD RUN IN TO THE BATHROOM, FIND THE HEDGEHOGS THAT SNUFFLED AT NIGHT, AND TOOK A SWIM CLOTHED IN LAKE TAUPO TO HELP A DUCK.” If – like Erin – you also do well in science and maths, like solving problems, are self-motivated, enjoy meeting new people and are a good communicator, veterinary could be the career for you. Erin knew she wanted to be a vet back in primary school and, at high school, chose subjects with this in mind. In her final two years at Takapuna Grammar School, she achieved NCEA Level 3 in physics, biology, chemistry, English, statistics and music. “I was fortunate enough to be able to complete Level 3 statistics by Year 12, so I was also able to take music (my favourite subject!) in Year 13.” Massey is the only New Zealand university that offers a Bachelor of Veterinary Science (BVSc), a full-time five year (10 semester) course, with the first semester referred to as the ‘BVSc Pre-selection’. This first semester can be undertaken at the Massey campus in Auckland or the main campus in Palmerston North, where students who make the grade spend the remaining nine semesters. Veterinary is highly competitive – around 300 domestic students apply for selection each year.

From 2016 the University has been approved a yearly intake of 100 domestic students. “In order to apply, I needed to complete a high average across four science papers and a logic-based assessment,” explains Erin. If you’re interested in becoming a vet, it is highly recommended that you have completed 14–20 credits at NCEA Level 3 in biology, chemistry, physics and at least one mathematics subject; and NCEA Level 2 English to meet University Entrance requirements. Erin stayed close to home for her first semester, attending Massey’s Auckland campus, but she really enjoyed the transition to Palmerston North. “It was a great mixture of people, most of who had also just moved there, so everyone was in the same boat and I formed bonds that will last a lifetime.” Erin is now a qualified vet working at The Strand Veterinarian in Auckland. “Summarising my job is no small feat. Every day is different! We get to be a GP, surgeon, anaesthetist, dentist and much more. We’re involved in not only treating the patients, but also in supporting owners and continually learning as technology changes.

“The degree can also lead to a wide variety of other avenues, such as pharmaceuticals, biosecurity, sales, laboratory work etc.” And because the degree is internationally recognised, Kiwi vets can work in Australia, the UK, US, Singapore, Canada and many other countries. If you’re interested in becoming a vet, Erin advises spending time in a vet clinic to get a feel for the job. “Also, be prepared to be focused and put your nose in your books as it takes great dedication. And make sure that you have people in your life who are understanding and supportive of what you are trying to achieve – they will be invaluable.” KEY FACTS

■ ERIN DOWLER HAS A BACHELOR OF VETERINARY SCIENCE FROM MASSEY UNIVERSITY — THE ONLY PROVIDER OF THIS DEGREE IN NEW ZEALAND. ■ ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR THIS DEGREE ARE MEETING UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE WITH THE RECOMMENDATION THAT APPLICANTS COMPLETE 14—20 CREDITS AT NCEA LEVEL 3 IN BIOLOGY, CHEMISTRY, PHYSICS AND AT LEAST ONE MATHS SUBJECT AND LEVEL 2 ENGLISH. ■ ERIN IS A QUALIFIED VET AND WORKS AT THE STRAND VETERINARIAN IN AUCKLAND.

For more information on studying Veterinary Science through Massey University visit www.massey.ac.nz

VETERINARIAN

FOR THE LOVE OF ANIMALS 55


DEBT FACTS

THE BIG BAD WOLF

56

HIDDEN DANGERS OF DEBT

written by DIANA CLEMENT   CONGRATULATIONS. YOU’VE COME OF AGE AND GOT YOUR FIRST CREDIT CARD AND OVERDRAFT. BUT, DON’T FLATTER YOURSELF – BANKS LOVE TO SHOWER STUDENTS WITH EASY MONEY, AND IT’S NOT BECAUSE THEY VIEW YOU AS AN ADULT. The bank is the big bad wolf dressed in the red coat of credit card kindness. Giving you a credit card and an overdraft is a business decision; they know that sooner or later you’ll have a job paying higher than the average and they’ll make interest out of you. The reality is that credit cards, overdrafts, loans, hire purchases and store cards are dangerous for your long-term financial health. If you get into the habit of maxing them out now you may struggle financially for the rest of your life. Interest charges keep you drowning in debt. Whilst your student loan and overdraft might be interest free, credit cards aren’t. Credit card statements are worded in a way that it looks

like you only need to make the minimum payment each month. If that’s what you do you’ll be paying around 20 per cent interest on everything you buy. Ouch. Soon you’ll be paying interest on interest, and start to sink. Finally the balance turns into tens of thousands of dollars. It happens. You spend more on plastic than in cash. Numerous behavioural economics studies have found that it’s psychologically easier to spend on a plastic card than in cash. Chatterjee and Rose’s 2011 article Do Payment Mechanisms Change the Way Consumers Perceive Products? published in the Journal of Consumer Research found that the emotional pain of handing over cash makes you spend less than you would shopping with plastic.

Make aquaculture your career Aquaculture is one of the world’s fastest growing food-producing industries, with great prospects for qualified professionals. With full-time and study-while-you work options for diploma and degree the world is your oyster! ENROL BY 1 DECEMBER AND GET half degree 4 free*

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nmit.ac.nz 0800 422 733 *Conditions apply.


DEBT FACTS

Whilst your student loan and overdraft might be interest free, credit cards aren’t.

If you need budgeting advice or financial assistance contact Student Services, or the New Zealand Federation of Family Budgeting Services at familybudgeting.org.nz

57

Banks want you to develop bad habits. If you get used to putting things on credit in your student years you’re more likely to continue to live that way when you graduate. Banks know that. They also like the interest that students pay month in month out on their credit cards. It’s worth remembering that credit cards do help you establish a credit history. But use them sparingly and get in the habit of paying off the full balance. Not everyone carries a balance. It has become socially acceptable to have debt, but that doesn’t mean it’s good for you. Before the 1980s, credit cards were virtually unheard of in New Zealand, even then they were used to cover emergencies. Over the years Kiwis have evolved to think of their

credit limit as their own money and that carrying a balance is the norm. Normal or not, it’s an expensive way to live. They increase your limit. Banks often increase your credit limit without asking your permission – the fine print allows that to happen. The banks know that given a larger limit you’ll be tempted to spend more. Most students do and they pay for their lapses later. Now you’re an adult you’re free to do what you like without parents and teachers controlling your move. If, however, you let debt take over your life you’ll simply have a new master – the lenders. Just say no.

testimony “I was incredibly surprised by the powerful resources available on givME. As a school leaver, heading for university, I was desperately on the lookout for funding opportunities. givME is a terrific tool, offering users access to scholarships, grants and endless other benefits. No matter your background, bank balance or field of study – givME has something for everyone.” Alex Blair (Student) University of Otago

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givME offers access to more than 4,000 scholarships,Social awards and- Vector grants for individuals. Media Icons Set - Circle by @garrettgee


Push your abilities sky-high Become a SuperHuman Teaching reaches far beyond the classroom. It moulds the minds of tomorrow’s leaders, and prepares them for a world of constant change. Got what it takes to teach? Visit TeachNZ.govt.nz


JOBS IN FOCUS

A CLOSER LOOK AT SOME FASCINATING JOBS THERE ARE SO MANY THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN LOOKING AT WHICH PATH TO TAKE AFTER SCHOOL. IT’S EASY TO LOSE SIGHT OF THE BIGGER PICTURE – WHAT’S YOUR PASSION? WHAT JOB WILL YOU BE DOING THAT WILL HAVE YOU WAKING UP EACH MORNING AND LOOKING FORWARD TO DOING IT? So to help you make the choice that’s right for you, featured in the following pages is a wonderful array of occupations designated into five categories: Today’s jobs of the future, Trades in demand, Health-focused jobs, Agricultural leanings, and Jobs you’ve never heard of before.

Every category contains a variety of occupations, each with a detailed job descriptor and some insightful statistics. Information has been sourced from Careers New Zealand, visit careers.govt.nz

TODAY’S JOBS OF THE FUTURE

Geospatial specialists gather, combine, analyse and use information that has a geographic or spatial component and present this in more user-friendly formats, such as maps and 3D models. They use GPS and other technologies to establish the coordinates of field data, design data specifications and capture data from a variety of sources – such as digitising information from paper-based formats or capturing survey data, aerial photography and satellite imagery. They develop and use specialist GIS software to turn complex data into other formats, and process and analyse aerial/satellite images. You can enter the geospatial field by doing a degree in one of the following areas: surveying, applied science, geography and digital technologies – computer science.

MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT

Statistics: In 2014, 2050 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: Initially $40–$55,000. With experience $70–$100,000. Management consultants work with organisations, aiding them in solving their problems, to become more efficient, or develop and implement strategy. They may also take on short-term management themselves or carry out projects that an organisation’s staff may not have the time or skills to undertake. They need to have specialist knowledge of the relevant field, laws, business and technology systems. A management consultant’s best chance of getting work is to be willing to do a variety of work, and be flexible about the hours and lengths of contracts. While New Zealand does not have a specific qualification in management consultancy, organisations and employers do look for relevant management or project experience and/or a degree in business or accountancy. Statistics: In 2014, 16,048 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: $50–$250,000.

+ INCOME

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JOB PROSPECTS

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+ INCOME

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JOB PROSPECTS

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LENGTH OF STUDY

Statistics: In 2014, 615 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: Initially $28–$50,000. Five years’ plus experience $50–$140,000.

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LENGTH OF STUDY

The role of digital artists/animators is to meet with directors, clients or employers and agree on a brief, plan animation and design work for their team, build models and sets (using many different mediums), film models and animations, produce backdrops for animation scenes, use computer animation programs, and direct the filming of motion capture. Digital artists should have an understanding of how people and animals move and express their feelings and have the ability to create different moods and feelings in characters. Qualifications in this area include a Bachelor of Design, majoring in Visual Communication Design, or a Diploma in Character Animation. Useful school subjects include computing, graphics, visual arts, biology and technology.

LENGTH OF STUDY

GEOSPATIAL SPECIALIST

DIGITAL ARTIST

It’s quite unlikely that you’ll be working in the same profession your entire working life. In fact, throughout your career you might end up doing a job that doesn’t even exist right now. Below, there are profiles of jobs that are relatively new to the fore – professions that 20 years’ ago would have been seen as fanciful, or too niche to ever be considered a career.

3 years

3 years

3 years

Please Note: The occupations listed have been colour coded to their predominant industry sector colour using the Vocational Pathways colour chart but in some cases, these jobs can go across multiple pathways. Visit www.youthguarantee.net.nz/vocational-pathways to learn more about Vocational Pathways. LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

JOBS IN FOCUS

compiled with assistance from CAREERS NEW ZEALAND

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BRICKLAYER SCAFFOLDER

Bricklayers work outside on construction sites and at clients’ properties, and they may also work in buildings, constructing and repairing brickwork. There are no entry requirements for bricklaying, although some employers do prefer to hire someone who is undertaking or has completed an apprenticeship. Useful subjects to take at high school include woodwork, maths and technical drawing. A bricklayer’s work includes: consulting with clients; examining construction plans and following specifications; cutting and shaping bricks, blocks and tiles; making up mortar mixture; laying bricks, blocks or tiles in rows, designs or shapes; altering, repairing and restoring brickwork; designing and drawing bricklaying plans. Statistics: In 2014, 1869 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale: $30–$50,000. Scaffolders have tasks such as calculating scaffold loadings and deciding what scaffolding platform to build, fitting equipment to form the scaffolding framework, inspecting erected scaffolding for safety, among many others. There are no entry requirements to work as an unqualified scaffolder in a labouring capacity or as a trainee. To become a qualified scaffolder you must do an apprenticeship and achieve a National Certificate in Scaffolding; there are six levels of scaffolding qualifications available from a National Certificate in Scaffolding (Elementary) to a Diploma in Managing Scaffolding Operations. Statistics: In 2014, 2483 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale: Unqualified $15–$17 per hour. Qualified $17–$30 per hour.

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Welders make, join and repair metal parts for machinery and equipment using welding techniques. Welders are required to study plans and drawings; cut, bend and fit steel or metal parts; make jigs; weld parts together; repair and maintain equipment and machinery; and construct metal objects according to instructions. It is important for welders to have knowledge of metals and their properties. An understanding of different welding processes and equipment is critical, as is an ability to interpret technical drawings. To work as a fully qualified welder, a National Certificate in Welding – Level 3 or similar qualification is required. Statistics: In 2014, 4471 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 1 year. Pay scale: $47–$58,000. Heavy truck drivers drive trucks with or without trailers. They transport materials, livestock, machinery, liquids, general freight and sometimes hazardous substances. Excellent driving skills are required, as is a basic knowledge of the mechanics of their truck and how to maintain it. It is also important to have knowledge of the different methods of securing and covering loads. Heavy truck drivers weigh the truck before and after it is loaded. You need to hold a licence for the size of truck you intend to drive. If you will be carrying hazardous goods, you need to have completed unit standards in dangerous goods, which can be done as part of a National Certificate in Commercial Road Transport. Statistics: In 2014, 31,055 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 1 year. Pay scale: $16–$25 per hour; average $45,000.

www.leavingschool.co.nz

| LEAVING SCHOOL 2015 / issue #5

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GLAZIER

Glaziers install or replace flat glass (e.g. windows), glass fittings (e.g. showers) or glass fixtures (e.g. splashbacks) in buildings, and windscreens in vehicles or boats. Other tasks include removing and replacing damaged or broken glass; selecting, shaping and cutting glass or mirrors; sealing glass using sealing products; and creating decorative glass features. It is important for glaziers to have knowledge of different types of glass and how to work with them. To become a qualified glazier you must complete a four-year apprenticeship and get a National Certificate in Glazing – Level 4. Statistics: In 2014, 1625 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 2–4 years. Pay scale: $15–$30 per hour; average $42,000.

JOB PROSPECTS

WELDER

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Trades are always in demand – occupations such as plumber, electrician, carpenter and joiner are highly valued and often in short supply. Anecdotally, how regularly do we hear just how hard it is to get a plumber over when your hot water cylinder is leaking, or an electrician to install your home’s new heat pump? Immigration New Zealand has a skill shortage list particular to Canterbury, outlining occupations that are expected to be in shortage during the rebuild of Christchurch. All of the jobs featured here are on this skill shortage list.

HEAVY TRUCK DRIVER

JOBS IN FOCUS TEXT

TRADES IN DEMAND

2–4 years

Varies

Varies

1 year

1 year


BIOMEDICAL TECHNICIAN

JOB PROSPECTS

Statistics: In 2014, 1713 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: Three years. Pay scale: $50–$64,000.

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A pharmacy technician helps pharmacists to prepare and give out medicines. They receive prescriptions, prepare, mix, pack and label medicines under the supervision of a pharmacist, and issue, deliver and record completed prescriptions. They are key to the day-to-day efficiency of a pharmacy, ensuring stock levels are maintained and helping run the pharmacy. Working with hospitals, they may organise and repack bulk supplies into smaller containers and deliver these to hospital wards. To work as a pharmacy technician and do basic dispensary work, you need to have a New Zealand Certificate in Pharmacy (Technician) – Level 4; to become fully qualified you need to achieve the Level 5 certificate. Statistics: In 2012, 1500 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 2–3 years. Pay scale: $40–$52,000.

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Speech and language therapists assess and treat people who have problems with communication or swallowing; these include difficulties with speech, language and cognition (thought processes) or physical processes. They assess and diagnose communication disorders such as stuttering or lisps, and co-ordinate and plan treatments. Other tasks include leading group therapy sessions and developing and supervising physical therapy plans. To become a speech-language therapist you need to have a minimum of a Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy (or equivalent), approved by the New Zealand Speech-language Therapists’ Association. The Ministry of Education offers speech-language therapy scholarships to students who intend to work with children in the education sector. Statistics: In 2014, 839 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 4–5 years. Pay scale: $45–$75,000. Biomedical technicians maintain complex mechanical and electronic medical equipment in hospitals and other institutes. They may also make, modify or repair specialised clinical accessories, surgical instruments and surgical implants. Other aspects of the job include installing and testing medical equipment and helping to design and develop implants for use during operations, such as artificial joints. To work as a biomedical technician you must complete an electrical, electronic or mechanical engineering tertiary qualification – for example a New Zealand Diploma of Engineering or a Bachelor of Engineering Technology.

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A medical laboratory scientist undertakes laboratory tests on blood, tissues, fluids and other samples provided by patients. They need to have a good knowledge of chemistry, biology, physiology and maths and the practical skills required for operating specialised machines and scientific equipment. They prepare samples for examination by a pathologist and evaluate test results and communicate these to hospitals and doctors. To work in this job you need a Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science, to work for six months under supervision, be registered with the Medical Sciences Council of New Zealand and hold a practicing certificate.

Statistics: In 2012, 200 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 2 years. Pay scale: $32–$63,000.

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Statistics: In 2014, 371 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: Five years. Pay scale: $45–$215,000.

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SPEECH AND LANGUAGE THERAPIST

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST

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Chiropractors analyse health problems by questioning, examining and x-raying the patient, they’ll discuss methods of care and adjust patients’ spines. They advise on posture, ergonomics, diet, exercise and lifestyle – factors that affect spinal health. To become a chiropractor you must have a Bachelor of Chiropractic, be registered with the Chiropractic Board of New Zealand and hold a current practicing certificate. This degree is only offered through the New Zealand College of Chiropractic in Auckland. A one-year Diploma of Applied Science (via AUT or CPIT) is necessary before applying for the degree programme. Job opportunities are good, as there is a high demand for qualified chiropractors.

LENGTH OF STUDY

CHIROPRACTOR

Health-focused jobs can be found across both the medical and science industries. A job in health may be for you if you are interested in supporting and rehabilitating people, diagnosing and treating patients, promoting healthy lifestyles, undertaking medical research and testing, or providing technical support and equipment to healthcare professionals. Many jobs in this sector require you to do research and experimentation, analyse and interpret results and data, and write up results.

5 years

JOBS IN FOCUS

HEALTH-FOCUSED JOBS

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3 years

2–3 years

4–5 years

2 years

| www.leavingschool.co.nz


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AGRICULTURAL ENGINEER SHEARER

Agricultural engineers perform and supervise engineering work related to the use and development of agricultural land, buildings, machines and equipment. They research the use of energy sources, machinery and materials, study the environmental and safety aspects of planned work, use computer-aided design (CAD) software to design and model plans, and prepare cost estimates for jobs. A Bachelor of Engineering (including specialist agricultural engineering papers) or Bachelor of Natural Resources Engineering (available only at the University of Canterbury) is required. Useful secondary school subjects include English, maths with calculus, physics and chemistry. Statistics: In 2014, 154 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 3–4 years. Pay scale: Graduate $45–$50,000. Four years’ plus experience $70–$100,000. Using either electric or manual clippers, a shearer shears the fleece in a set pattern of blows (shearing strokes). They must also clean their combs and cutters and sharpen them using a grinder. Shearers work mainly during peak shearing times, which run from November to March and from July to September. As the work is seasonal, there are great travelling opportunities in the off-season to shear overseas in countries such as Australia, the UK and the United States. On average, they earn $145 for every 100 sheep they shear. The number of sheep they can shear depends on their experience, their level of fitness and the breed and size of the sheep. Statistics: In 2014, 4207 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale: Initially $30–$50,000. Three years’ plus experience $50–$100,000.

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AGRICULTURAL/ HORTICULTURAL SCIENTIST

JOB PROSPECTS

Agricultural/horticultural scientists study farm animals, soils, pastures and crops to improve their yield, health and quality, and to prevent pests and disease. Further, they develop farming methods to protect animal welfare and the environment, develop vaccines and other products to improve animal health and productivity, and run experiments and analyse the results. To do this job, you need a master’s degree or PhD in science, in an area like agricultural science, microbiology or biochemistry. Useful secondary school subjects include biology, chemistry, maths, computer studies and English. Statistics: In 2014, 762 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 5–9 years. Pay scale: Initially $60–$65,000. Two years’ plus experience $66–$100,000.

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STOCK AND STATION AGENT

JOB PROSPECTS

Stock and station agents advise farmers about market trends, stock prices and farm management. They arrange for the sale and purchase of agricultural equipment and goods, and also buy and sell livestock and grains on behalf of clients. They act as an auctioneer at sales, and are required to keep records of the sale of livestock/grains. While there are no specific entry requirements to become a stock and station agent, good knowledge of farm management and farming techniques is essential, and a tertiary qualification in agriculture, commerce or farm management is useful. Statistics: In 2014, 853 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 1–3 years. Pay scale: Initially $35–$45,000. Two years’ plus experience $40–$100,000.

www.leavingschool.co.nz

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Statistics: In 2014, 2426 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale: $17–$28 per hour.

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Fencers construct and repair fences, walls and gates. They discuss fencing needs with customers, and provide estimates and quote prices. Alongside physically constructing traditional fences and assembling and hanging gates, fencers build barriers, security fences, retaining walls, vineyard trellises and many other types of fences and walls. While there are no specific requirements to become a fencer, some employers prefer you to have completed a National Certificate in Fencing or a National Certificate in Agriculture – Level 2, which has a fencing component. A lot of physical and lifting work is required on the job. Useful secondary school subjects for fencers include maths, woodwork or workshop technology and English.

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This industry is synonymous with New Zealand, and is what we’re renowned for on the international stage. This is an area with many varied occupations but when most of us picture an agriculture job, we think of working with animals, working outdoors and doing physical work, driving tractors, motorbikes and heavy machinery and working with tools, machinery and equipment. But it can also encompass business management such as budgeting and accounting, science and research, and designing, building and maintaining outdoor areas – along with many, many others.

FENCER

JOBS IN FOCUS TEXT

AGRICULTURAL LEANINGS

Varies

3–4 years

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5–9 years

1–3 years


STEVEDORE

JOB PROSPECTS

Stevedores operate a variety of heavy machinery to load, unload, tally and stow the cargo of a ship, and cargo from trucks and rail transport services. They operate heavy vehicles and machinery, such as straddle carriers, fork-lifts and ships’ cranes. They position goods in the holds of ships, secure cargo, carry out safety checks on equipment, secure and release mooring lines of ships and clean out ships’ tanks and holds. There are no specific entry qualifications for working as a stevedore, however, as most jobs involve driving heavy vehicles, a Class 2 (heavy vehicle) driver’s licence with an F endorsement is a minimum requirement.

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Statistics: In 2014, 2040 New Zealanders did this job.

Job prospects: Average. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale: Initially $45–$55,000. In a supervisory role $60–$90,000.

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AQUACULTURE FARMER

JOB PROSPECTS

Aquaculture farmers manage or assist with the breeding, raising, and harvesting of fish and shellfish for commercial purposes in marine or freshwater farms. They need to have the knowledge and practical skills to tie knots and splice ropes, have boat handling and navigational skills, basic mechanical skills and diving skills are also recommended. There are no specific entry requirements for the role of aquaculture farmer, however you can do a diploma or degree in this area. Some positions require you to have an Inshore Launch Master of Competency, or a diving qualification.

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Statistics: In 2014, 1032 New Zealanders did this job.

Job prospects: Average. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale: One to three years’ experience $30–$45,000. Three year’s plus experience $40–$70,000.

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SHIP’S MASTER

VISUAL MERCHANDISER

JOB PROSPECTS

Visual merchandisers arrange goods and make displays in shops, shop windows and at events to attract the attention of customers. They discuss suggested displays with their client, research displays and make a sketch or model, purchase or make required props, assemble the display using a variety of materials, change signage and window displays regularly and take photographs of the displays and signage. Having knowledge of different art techniques and materials, and fashion trends, as well as marketing and advertising is essential. While there are no specific entry requirements to be a visual merchandiser, a tertiary qualification with subjects in visual merchandising, graphic design or fine arts is useful. Beneficial secondary school subjects include art, graphic design, woodwork and metalwork. Statistics: In 2014, 186 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Poor. Length of study: Varies. Pay scale: $15–$20 per hour. Ship's masters are in charge of a ship, its crew and any passengers or cargo it is carrying – on the water and in port. They need to have knowledge of how to run and handle a vessel and its onboard equipment, such as radio and electronics. Navigational skills, as well as an understanding of tides, waters, coastlines, marine hazards and the weather, and how these vary is critical, as well as knowledge of maritime laws, requirements and safety procedures including methods such as firefighting, rescue and collision prevention. There are a number of paths open to you to in order to become a ship’s master, but all require you to have relevant Maritime New Zealand-approved experience and qualifications. Statistics: In 2014, 892 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 1–10 years. Pay scale: Smaller vessels $31–$70,000. Larger, foreign-going vessels $125–$250,000.

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Statistics: In 2014, 734 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 2 years. Pay scale: $41–$52,000.

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PHLEBOTOMIST

Phlebotomists collect blood and other bodily samples, including skin and nails, and throat or wound swabs, from patients for laboratory testing or blood banks. You can either train on the job, or do a combination of study and on-the-job training to become a qualified phlebotomist – each option has further stipulations for qualification but both require you to be registered with the Medical Sciences Council of New Zealand. Phlebotomists may travel to collect samples from patients at home, in hospital or in a rest home. They also test for allergies, maintain equipment and look after the patient if they have an adverse reaction.

2 years

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1–10 years

| www.leavingschool.co.nz

JOBS IN FOCUS

JOBS YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF BEFORE

It’s likely that once or twice, you’ve been reading through an article and seen a profession named, or met someone and they’ve told you what they do for a job, and it’s something you’ve never even heard of before. Or, perhaps, the job title sounds familiar but you’re not really sure what someone who does that job actually does. What does it involve? Who does it? How do I enter this area? What qualifications do I need? Below we answer those questions for five jobs – jobs you might never have heard of before.

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IMPORTANT WEBSITES The following list of websites will hopefully assist you as you make plans for life after secondary school whether you plan further study at a polytechnic or university, take a Gap Year, start an apprenticeship or join the workforce.

Accountancy BDO www.bdo.co.nz/careers CPA New Zealand www.cpaaustralia.com.au Chartered Accountants Australia + New Zealand www.charteredaccountantsanz.com PWC www.pwc.co.nz

AGRICULTURE / VETERINARY Beef & Lamb New Zealand www.beeflambnz.com Dairy NZ www.dairynz.co.nz Fonterra Co-Op Group www.fonterra.com Get Ahead www.getahead.co.nz Massey University massey.ac.nz/ag New Zealand Veterinary Association www.nzva.org.nz Pathway in Agriculture www.pica.org.nz Primary ITO www.primaryito.ac.nz Young Farmers New Zealand www.youngfarmers.co.nz Ag ITO www.agito.ac.nz NZX Agri www.landyourdreamjob.co.nz Taratahi Agricultural Training Centre www.taratahi.ac.nz AgriPeople www.agripeople.co.nz

ARTS New Zealand School of Dance www.nzschoolofdance.ac.nz New Zealand School of Music www.nzsm.ac.nz NICAI www.creative.auckland.ac.nz Whitecliffe College of Arts & Design www.whitecliffe.ac.nz University of Auckland – Faculty of Arts www.arts.auckland.ac.nz SAE Creative Media Institute www.auckland.sae.edu

AVIATION

ns - Vector Set - Circle

@garrettgee

Aviation & Travel Training Group www.attg.co.nz CTC Aviation Training www.ctcaviation.com International Aviation Academy of New Zealand www.flighttraining.co.nz Massey University www.massey.ac.nz

Banks ASB www.asb.co.nz ANZ www.anz.co.nz BNZ www.bnz.co.nz Kiwibank www.kiwibank.co.nz TSB Bank www.tsbbank.co.nz Westpac www.westpac.co.nz

Career Guidance Careers New Zealand www.careers.govt.nz CDANZ www.cdanz.org.nz

Corrections / Fire Defence / Justice Department of Corrections www.corrections.govt.nz New Zealand Fire Service www.fire.org.nz New Zealand Police Recruitment www.newcops.co.nz Department of Defence www.army.mil.nz

Education New Zealand School of Education www.nzse.ac.nz Educational Organisations www.nzqa.govt.nz Vocational Pathways www.youthguarantee. net.nz/vocational-pathways

Employment Allied Work Force www.awf.co.nz MyJobSpace www.myjobspace.co.nz Student Job Search www.sjs.co.nz TradeMe www.trademe.co.nz/tgim Work and Income www.job-bank.workandincome.govt.nz

Engineering New Zealand Diploma in Engineering www.engineer.org.nz IPENZ www.ipenz.nz

Fashion - Design New Zealand Fashion Tech www.nzfashiontech.ac.nz Whitecliffe College of Arts & Design www.whitecliffe.ac.nz

Gap Year

Social Media Icons - Vector Set - Circle

Airways New Zealand www.airways.co.nz Air New Zealand Aviation Institute www.aviationinstitute.co.nz

by @garrettgee

Lattitude www.lattitude.org.nz Outward Bound www.outwardbound.co.nz Projects Abroad www.projects-abroad.org

LEAVINGSCHOOLNZ

Government Departments Ministry of Business, Innovation & Employment www.mbie.govt.nz Ministry of Justice www.justice.govt.nz Ministry of Social Development www.msd.govt.nz Ministry of Science & Innovation www.msi.govt.nz Ministry of Health www.health.govt.nz Ministry of Education www.education.govt.nz ACC www.acc.co.nz Ministry of the Environment www.mfe.govt.nz Ministry of Primary Industries www.mpi.govt.nz Ministry of Transport www.transport.govt.nz Creative New Zealand www.creativenz.govt.nz Ministry for Culture and Heritage www.mch.govt.nz Employment Relations www.dol.govt.nz/er

Hair and Beauty Hito (hairdressing) www.hito.org.nz Intueri Education Group www.intueri.co.nz Premier Hairdressing Academy www.hairdressing.org.nz Rodney Wayne New Zealand Ltd www.rodneywayne.co.nz Servilles Academy www.servilles.com/academy

Industry Training OrganiSations Apprenticeship Training Trust www.att.org.nz Boating ITO www.nzmarine.com Building and Construction Industry Training Organisation www.bcito.org.nz Careerforce www.careerforce.org.nz Connexis www.esito.org.nz ETCO www.etco.co.nz Funeral Services Training Trust www.fstt.org.nz Infrastructure ITO  www.infrastructureito.org.nz Master Link www.masterlink.co.nz Motor Industry Training Organisation (MITO) www.mito.org.nz New Zealand Industry Training Organisation www.nzito.co.nz New Zealand Marine and Composites Industry Training Organisation www.nzmarine.com Pharmacy ITO www.pito.org.nz Primary ITO www.primaryito.ac.nz ServiceIQ www.serviceiq.org.nz Skill Active www.skillsactive.org.nz The Skills Organisation www.skills.org.nz

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ


Maori Education

Te Wananga O Aotearoa www.twoa.ac.nz Te Wananga O Raukawa www.wananga.com

Mental Health

Health Promotion Agency www.depression.org.nz SPARX www.sparx.org.nz Youthline www.youthline.co.nz The Lowdown www.thelowdown.co.nz

New Zealand Universities AUT University www.aut.ac.nz Lincoln University www.lincoln.ac.nz Massey University www.massey.ac.nz The University of Auckland www.auckland.ac.nz The University of Waikato www.waikato.ac.nz University of Canterbury www.canterbury.ac.nz University of Otago www.otago.ac.nz Victoria University of Wellington www.victoria.ac.nz

PERSONAL FINANCE / BUDGETING SERVICES Commission for Financial Literacy & Retirement Income www.cflri.org.nz Kiwi Saver www.ird.govt.nz/kiwisaver Ministry of Social Development www.familyservices.govt.nz NZ Federation of Family Budgeting Services www.familybudgeting.org.nz The Kiwi Guide to Money www.sorted.co.nz

Physiotheraphy NZ College of Physiotherapy www.physiotherapy.org.nz

Polytechnics

Tai Poutini Polytechnic www.tpp.ac.nz UNITEC www.unitec.ac.nz Universal College of Learning (UCOL) www.ucol.ac.nz Waiariki Institute of Technology www.waiariki.ac.nz Waikato Institute of Technology www.wintec.ac.nz Wellington Institute of Technology www.weltec.ac.nz Western Institute of Technology at Taranaki www.witt.ac.nz Whitireia Community Polytechnic www.whitireia.ac.nz

PRIVATE TRAINING ESTABLISHMENTS Academy Group (NZ) Limited www.academy.ac.nz Auckland Hotel & Chefs Training School www.ahcts.co.nz Cornell Institute of Business & Technology (CIBT) www.cornell.ac.nz Le Cordon Bleu www.lecordonbleu.co.nz The Culinary Institute www.qegroup.co.nz

Science / Innovation Callaghan Innovation www.callaghaninnovation.govt.nz Future InTech www.futureintech.org.nz Plant & Food Research www.plantandfood.co.nz Science New Zealand Inc. www.sciencenewzealand.org The New Zealand Institute of Food Science www.nzifst.org.nz

Student Loans / Grants Study Link www.studylink.govt.nz

Teaching Aoraki Polytechnic www.aoraki.ac.nz Post Primary Teachers Association Bay of Plenty Polytechnic www.boppoly.ac.nz www.ppta.org.nz Christchurch Polytechnic Institute Teach First NZ www.teachfirstnz.org of Technology www.cpit.ac.nz Teach NZ www.teachnz.govt.nz Eastern Institute of Technology www.eit.ac.nz Early Childhood of New Zealand Manukau Institute of Technology www.ecnz.ac.nz www.manukau.ac.nz Nelson Marlborough Institute of SCHOLARSHIPS Technology www.nmit.ac.nz Careers NZ www.careers.govt.nz North Tec www.northtec.ac.nz Generosity New Zealand www.generosity.org.nz Open Polytechnic www.openpolytechnic.ac.nz GivMe http://generosity.org.nz/giv-me ns - Vector Set - Circle Social Media Icons - Vector Set -Trust Circle Maori Education Otago Polytechnic @garrettgee by @garrettgee www.maorieducation.org.nz www.op.ac.nz Te Puni Kōkiri www.tpk.govt.nz/en Southern Institute of Technology Te Tapuae o Rehua www.tetapuae.co.nz www.sit.ac.nz

LEAVINGSCHOOLNZ

Kia Ora Hauora www.kiaorahauora.co.nz Universities New Zealand www.universitiesnz.ac.nz/scholarships

OTHER WEBSITES OF INTEREST Computer Power Plus www.computerpowerplus.ac.nz Countdown www.countdown.co.nz Cromwell College www.cromwell.school.nz Downer www.downercareers.co.nz ESR www.esr.cri.nz GNS Science www.gns.cri.nz Insurance Council of New Zealand (ICNZ) www.icnz.org.nz Landcare Research www.landcareresearch.co.nz MAINZ www.mainz.ac.nz NIWA www.niwa.co.nz New Zealand School of Education (NZSE) www.nzse.ac.nz New Zealand School of Food & Wine www.foodandwine.co.nz New Zealand Society of Actuaries www.actuaries.org.nz New Zealand Tertiary College www.nztertiarycollege.ac.nz New Zealand Institute of Agriculture & Horticultural Science Inc www.agscience.org.nz New Zealand Institute of Architechs Inc www.nzia.co.nz New Zealand Institute of Education www.nzie.ac.nz New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveyors www.surveyors.org.nz New Zealand Institute of Science and Technology (NZIST) www.nzist.ac.nz New Zealand Institute of Sport www.nzis.co.nz New Zealand Management Academies (NZMA) www.nzma.ac.nz NZ Institute of Medical Laboratory Science (Inc) www.nzimrt.co.nz Pacific International Hotel Management School (PIHMS) www.pihms.ac.nz Plumbing World www.plumbingworld.co.nz Professional Bar and Restaurant School (PBRS) www.pbrs.ac.nz Queenstown Resort College www.queenstownresortcollege.com Plant & Food Research www.plantandfood.co.nz Real Me www.realme.govt.nz Studyit www.studyit.org.nz Talley’s www.talleysdeepseacareer.co.nz

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ


Profile for Oliver Lee Publications Ltd

Leaving School 2015 Issue 5  

Your Free Guide to Study and Career Options

Leaving School 2015 Issue 5  

Your Free Guide to Study and Career Options

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