Leaving School issue 8

Page 1

A free guide to study and career options for secondary school students   Years 10-13        October 2016      |    ISSUE # 8

The only way to do great work is to love what you do. – Steve Jobs CAITLIN HOLLINGS | LAW – JUDGES’ CLERK

MORGAN LOUGHNAN | QUANTITY SURVEYOR

Look up at the stars and not down at your feet. – Stephen Hawking ALLEN GREGORY | FARM TECHNICIAN

OLIVIA HILL | AGRISCIENCE (EQUINE)

It always seems impossible until it’s done. – Nelson Mandela ELLIE McKNIGHT | EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

ALEX SMITH | AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN APPRENTICE

LEAVINGSCHOOLNZ WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ


Study business in a collaborative, knowledge-rich, state-of-the-art environment at New Zealand’s leading university. www.business.auckland.ac.nz


LEAVING SCHOOL Issue #8 / OctOber 2016

05 FOREWORD:

28 ADVENTURE TOURISM:

06 AGRISCIENCE (EQUINE):

30 SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT:

08 BUSINESS AND SCIENCE STUDENT:

32 DIGITAL MEDIA:

10 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION STUDENT:

33 QUANTITY SURVEYOR:

12 POLICY ANALYST:

35 WASTEWATER RETICULATION:

14 ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN:

36 CV PREPARATION:

15 APPRENTICE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN:

37 ELECTRICIAN:

16 LAW – JUDGES’ CLERK:

38 FACILITIES SERVICES MANAGER:

18 COPING STRATEGIES:

40 TOURISM MANAGEMENT:

20 PLUMBER:

41 FARM TECHNICIAN:

22 MUSICIAN:

42 EMPLOYMENT ADVICE:

24 NOTICEBOARD:

44 JOBS IN FOCUS:

Traditional jobs are falling to the way side.

1WNZ16_LS

Box 331-667, Takapuna, Auckland 0740, New Zealand T: +64-9-486 6966 E: oliver@oliverlee.co.nz W: oliverlee.co.nz W: LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ ISSN 2463-3380 (Print) ISSN 2463-3399 (Online)

Following what you love and making it into a career. Speak up, share, have attitude – get into the world of advertising.

Making a statement with a conjoint degree.

Industry booming, demand is huge and the call is going out.

Eager to provide children with positive opportunities.

Taking advantage of programmes on offer and upskilling.

Focussed on the issues facing New Zealand’s primary industries. It adds up to a great job, driven by a love of maths and numbers. Making use of Gateway programmes to jump start your career. Inspired by a love of arguing to a life of law. How to ensure you are caring for yourself at exam time. Introduction to Trades course leads to discovery of enjoyment of plumbing. From growing up in a musical family to touring New Zealand and Australia in a band. Key dates, websites and stats you need to know, plus an update on a past profilee.

26 STUDY TIPS:

Practical and simple tips to help you ace your exams.

3

Pushing past comfort zones and taking the leap.

Rehabilitating and caring for horses.

MANAGING EDITOR Oliver Lee CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jennifer Beckett, Campbell Burnes, Sara Carbery, Diana Clement, Janet Tuck, Frances Valintine, Peter White. SUB-EDITOR Elise McDowell PAGINATION & LAYOUT HNZL 2014 Limited PRINTER PMP Limited, Auckland PHOTOGRAPHY Fairfax Media, Megan Graham, Blair Hillyard, Peter McDermott, Marty Melville, Steve Selwood, Alan Stevens. PUBLISHER

CONTENTS

Tips on what to include and how to structure your CV. Experience a lot of diversity, where no job site is the same. Looking after some of our most iconic buildings and venues. Are you fascinated with travel, different cultures and digital marketing?

Shepherding and keeping an eye on the land, animals, environment and more. Discover everything you should know when you want to land your first job. From acupuncturist to medical physicist to zoologist, a wide cross-section of jobs across the science, and health and community industries are examined. You could discover your future career!

Throughout this magazine, each case study has been colour coded to its Vocational Pathway. In some instances, multiple colours are used to show that the skills you learn can be applied across multiple careers and pathways, throughout your lifetime. Visit www.youthguarantee.net.nz/vocational-pathways to learn more about Vocational Pathways.

CHOOSE SUCCESS CHOOSE WHITIREIA

ENROL NOW FOR 2017

>> MASTERS, POSTGRADUATE, DEGREES, DIPLOMAS, CERTIFICATES >>

>> PORIRUA, KAPITI, WELLINGTON, AUCKLAND, ONLINE/DISTANCE >

Strategic partners delivering more choice to students


STUDY AT VICTORIA APPLY NOW victoria.ac.nz/apply


written by FRANCES VALINTINE

image courtesy FAIRFAX MEDIA

NEW THINKERS AND CREATORS

HOW DID YOU GET HERE? OR MORE IMPORTANTLY, HOW DID YOU GET HERE SO QUICKLY? YEAR NINE SEEMS LIKE YESTERDAY, AND NOW YOU HAVE TO FACE THE FIRST OF THE BIG QUESTIONS OF YOUR FUTURE LIFE. WHAT DO I DO NEXT?

You are one of the world’s cross-century students. You were born in the last period of the 20th century or the initial years of the 21st century. Either way, you are part of a transitional student collective who have grown up in an analogue school system but are entering a digital world. Don’t underestimate how tricky juggling these two worlds are. On one hand, there are many new and exciting careers emerging and racing ahead of traditional fields. While your well-meaning parents and friends may be encouraging you to pursue traditional careers, such as business, accountancy and law, there are many new career options. The coming decade will see new careers dominate the job vacancy boards and existing professions experience a rapid decline. This is a numbers game.

WHETHER YOU SIGN UP AS AN APPRENTICE, HEAD TO UNIVERSITY OR TAKE ON YOUR FIRST JOB, YOUR CHOICE IS MERELY ONE STEP IN THE RICH AND VARIED JOURNEY YOU WILL HAVE THROUGHOUT YOUR LIFE.

The majority of students who studied for traditional roles will find themselves with a qualification but no related job to go to. Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand stated in their recent report, future[inc], that 46 per cent of Kiwi jobs will disappear due to technological advances. That is all while you are still in your 30s. This translates to over 860,000 New Zealanders who will be trained for jobs that no longer exist. Professions that involve science, technology, engineering and maths are providing exciting, well-paid options that are in global demand. These careers also present an ideal choice for entrepreneurial students or those who like the idea of working on projects, rather than being committed to one organisation. New areas include data analytics, cybersecurity, nano technology and computer system analysis. Creative students’ options include food technology, 3D modelling, User Interface design and VR/AR (Virtual Reality/Augmented Reality) development. There are a number of new industries that will redefine traditional industries and will require new thinkers and creators who can navigate the new world. This includes autonomous vehicle developers and engineers, robotics and artificial intelligence specialists, business process engineers and IoT (internet of things) system analysts. A key aspect of your decision-making process should be arming yourself with contemporary knowledge and 2016 employment facts. The options that served your parents well may be the worst choice for you to make as you head towards the 17th year of the 21st century. While it may feel like the decisions you have to make are numerous and life defining, you will have many different careers over your lifetime. If you are unsure on which subjects or programmes to pursue, keep your subjects broad and include English, science and maths. These subjects will enable you to retain maximum flexibility to move to different programmes and change career path. Whether you sign up as an apprentice, head to university or take on your first job, your choice is merely one step in the rich and varied journey you will have throughout your life. This is not a race but a wonderful journey. Each decision you make will help inform who you are, what you stand for and the kind of person you want to be. Listen to advice, assess the options and then do what you feel is right. It is better to follow what you love, rather than to pursue something others have decided would be good for you – only to spend the rest of your life wondering, ‘what if?’ FRANCES VALINTINE Education Futurist and founder Contributor’s Name of The Mind Lab by Unitec and Position, Employer, Region Tech Futures Lab

LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

FOREWORD TEXT

REDEFINING THE TRADITIONAL CAREER PATH

5


AGRISCIENCE (EQUINE)

“I get to work with horses, play vet nurse when they are hurt or sick and then test my mind with the office work. I find it a really good balance.” — Olivia Hill

6

TURNING A HOBBY INTO A CAREER

A PASSION FOR EQUINE QUADRUPEDS

written by SARA CARBERY photograph by PETER McDERMOTT      HORSE-MAD OLIVIA HILL SET OUT TO PROVE THE NAYSAYERS WRONG. “WHEN I WAS YOUNGER, SOME PEOPLE TOLD ME I WOULDN’T BE ABLE TO MAKE A CAREER WORKING WITH HORSES AND THAT IT WAS ONLY A HOBBY. I PROVED THEM WRONG.” Olivia completed a three-year Bachelor of AgriScience (Equine) at Massey University in 2014, and is now working at Kamada Park, where she had a part-time job while studying. Although her title is Office Manager, only 20 per cent of her time is spent behind a desk, with the other 80 per cent spent outside taking care of the horses; a role she loves. “I get to work with horses, play vet nurse when they are hurt or sick and then test my mind with the office work. I find it a really good balance.” After leaving school with NCEA Level 2, Olivia went to Kyrewood Equestrian Centre in Palmerston North to study the NZQA courses Sport Horse Competitor – Level 4, and Preliminary Coach – Level 3. This led to a job leading yearling thoroughbreds all over New Zealand and Australia, work Olivia continued to do during and after her studies at Massey. She was 20 when she enrolled at university as a mature student. “I got into my degree because I was an older student and also because I showed

a clear passion and commitment to equine and studying and understanding it.” She chose Massey because of the university’s “top of the line” courses and working equine hospital. “It turned out that in quite a few of our equine papers we learned the same stuff as vet or pre-vet students, which has helped a lot in my current job as we rehabilitate horses and aid in their recovery.” Another drawcard was the fact she could bring her horse with her to university and keep him on campus. “It was very handy to have him so close for feeding and riding, I could go straight from the library to see him.” While she acknowledges that having a degree makes her more employable, Olivia (24) is passionate about hands-on learning. “I think it is essential to have some sort of experience as there is only so much you can be taught at uni.

A lot is about working with the animal and getting a real feel for them.” Olivia took accounting, statistics, equine studies and textiles in her final year at Sacred Heart Girls’ College in New Plymouth – all useful subjects, but she wishes she had chosen science papers “to make life easier at uni”. If you love horses, but aren’t sure you want to devote your life to working with them, Olivia is quick to point out that the Bachelor of AgriScience (Equine) doesn’t limit you to working with horses. “You study all the papers with the regular Ag students; you just get to follow your passion as well. “I would also say that it is okay to go into the degree not knowing what you want out of it, and if you think you do know what job you want, keep an open mind as many doors will open before you get that expensive piece of paper! “I think I changed my mind 100 times and the right job was in front of me the whole time.”

KEY FACTS ■ OLIVIA HILL HAS A BACHELOR OF AGRISCIENCE (EQUINE) FROM MASSEY UNIVERSITY. ■ HER CURRENT ROLE IS OFFICE MANAGER AT KAMADA PARK, WHERE 20 PER CENT OF HER TIME IS SPENT BEHIND A DESK, AND THE OTHER 80 PER CENT SPENT OUTSIDE TAKING CARE OF THE HORSES.

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on studying AgriScience (Equine) through Massey University, visit www.massey.ac.nz


ACCOUNTING TECHNICIANS CAN WORK IN A VARIETY OF INDUSTRIES AND ROLES Taking the AT pathway is your opportunity to have a positive impact on business and the community. We offer flexible training options to fit your lifestyle. Free text ‘Next’ to 590 to find out how to build your career with AT.

charteredaccountantsanz.com/at

The information in this document is provided for general guidance only and is not, and is not intended to be, advice. Before making any decision or taking any action in connection with your career, you should consult with an appropriate specialist careers advisor. No warranty is given as to the correctness of the information contained in this publication, or of its suitability for use by you. To the fullest extent permitted by law, Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CA ANZ) is not liable for any statement or opinion, or for any error or omission contained in this publication and disclaims all warranties with regard to the information contained in it, including, without limitation, all implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. CA ANZ is not liable for any direct, indirect, special or consequential losses or damages of any kind, or loss of profit, loss or corruption of data, business interruption or indirect costs, arising out of or in connection with the use of this publication or the information contained in it, whether such loss or damage arises in contract, negligence, tort, under statute, or otherwise.


STUDENT: BUSINESS & SCIENCE 8

written by SARA CARBERY

photograph by ALAN STEVENS

STANDING OUT FROM THE CROWD SUCCESS CREATED FROM ATTITUDE

JACK KEEYS RECKONS THAT WHEN IT COMES TO SUCCESS, IT IS ATTITUDE THAT MATTERS. “DESPITE COMING FROM A TINY RURAL COLLEGE, I’VE BEEN ABLE TO ACHIEVE MY GOALS AND GAIN VARIOUS SUCCESSES SIMPLY BY GIVING EVERYTHING A GO. ” A former head boy and proxime accessit of Paeroa College, Jack believes focusing on studying and getting high marks isn’t enough – at school or at university. “Most of my success, and the success of other high-achieving

JACK’S TOP TIPS FOR APPLYING FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Put aside some quality time and properly focus on applications, rather than putting them in the too-hard basket. ■ It’s rare that scholarship panels are looking simply for A+ students. ■ It is important to gain experience in leadership, community involvement, sports/arts and also maintain reasonable grades. ■ High-achievers in numerous areas are more likely to be successful than very high achievers in a single area. ■

students, comes from working part-time jobs, volunteering and getting engaged with plenty of extracurricular activity, while balancing studies . ” Although challenging at times, this balancing act has paid-off for Jack. He has received over $50,000 in scholarships, completed summer research projects and work placements and received several job offers ahead of his graduation in June. “I’ve been able to travel to the Amazon rainforest and Galapagos Islands for volunteering, and to Europe over two different summers. I’ve been able to purchase my first house and travel around New Zealand for various conferences and events – and much, much more. And that has not been through getting the best grades, but by working hard across lots of different areas. ” Case in point: This year Jack created the Waikato University Science Students Association to increase professional development and students’ networking opportunities with institutions in the Waikato. This busy 21-year-old is in his final year of a conjoint science and business degree at the University of Waikato. As well as having a passion for both fields of study, Jack wanted to set himself apart from other students by having two degrees. “In my first-year classes, there were 400-plus students doing a business degree, 350-plus doing a science degree, and two students doing both. “Originally I believed studying both would give me two separate career paths to choose from. However, after my first year I realised that the combination gives me a unique career path. ” Jack says the university has offered him “invaluable flexibility” with his studies. By maintaining reasonable grades, he has been able to speed-track a four year and a three year degree into a total of four-and-a-half years, without too much extra work. Once he graduates in June, Jack will take on a fulltime position at Farmax Ltd, an agricultural computer software company he is currently working for part-time. “I will be leading some national and international projects, which will offer a great stepping stone between university and the next part of my career. ” Jack’s dream is to one day run his own business that “combines science, business, food and community good ”. In his final year at Paeroa College, Jack studied statistics, calculus, physical education, English, biology and accounting. While biology, accounting, statistics and calculus have given him a head start in his studies, Jack says none of them have been absolutely essential. “Unless there are specific degree requirements in an area of interest, I don’t believe you should feel limited by your classes at high school. ”

KEY FACTS ■ J ACK KEEYS IS STUDYING A CONJOINT BACHELOR OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE THROUGH THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO. ■ HE SAYS BIOLOGY, ACCOUNTING, STATISTICS AND CALCULUS HAVE GIVEN HIM A HEAD START IN HIS STUDIES, BUT HAVE NOT BEEN ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL. WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on studying Management Studies and Science at the University of Waikato , visit www.waikato.ac.nz


YOUR REAL-LIFE

ADVENTURE

STARTS HERE...

EARN AS YOU LEARN,

QUALIFY, TRAVEL

DOING WHAT

YOU LOVE

Discover exciting career opportunities in one of our vibrant sectors: travel; tourism; aviation; accommodation; quick-service restaurants; museums; retail; wholesale; cafĂŠs, bars & restaurants; clubs; catering. The great news for you is that many businesses offer ServiceIQ on-job training programmes, so you can earn as you learn, get a nationally recognised qualification, and a solid career to set you up for more adventure.

ServiceIQ is the Industry Training Organisation (ITO) for the service industry. We develop on-job training programmes for businesses keen to provide their staff with relevant skills, training and qualifications, knowing that it’s great people who make a great business.

CHECK US OUT AT:

www.ServiceIQ.org.nz


STUDENT: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 10

written by SARA CARBERY

photograph by STEVE SELWOOD

PROVIDING POSITIVITY

FOCUSING ON OUR LITTLEST LEARNERS IF YOU LOVE WHAT YOU’RE STUDYING, YOU WILL DO WELL, SAYS ELLIE McKNIGHT – EVEN IF YOUR GRADES WEREN’T THAT GREAT AT SCHOOL. “LOOK AT ME – 25 AND BACK STUDYING, GETTING THE BEST MARKS I HAVE EVER RECEIVED, WHICH I PUT DOWN TO PURE PASSION, INTEREST AND THE DRIVE TO SUCCEED.” For Ellie, it’s her passion for teaching and inspiring pre-schoolers that is driving her success. She is one year into a three-year Bachelor of Teaching (ECE) with Te Rito Maioha Early Childhood New Zealand, managing to combine her studies with working fulltime in an early childhood education (ECE) centre in North Canterbury. “To sit and observe children and know how they are learning, why they are doing something in a certain way, and have the opportunity to document and become part of their early learning is something quite special and rewarding.” Ellie has wanted to be a teacher for as long as she can remember. “I have always been drawn towards how children learn and develop and what might impact these two factors. I also had an amazing

teacher in Year 8 who I remember thinking I wanted to be like!”

KEY FACTS

■ ELLIE McKNIGHT IS STUDYING TOWARD A BACHELOR OF TEACHING (ECE) THROUGH TE RITO MAIOHA EARLY CHILDHOOD NEW ZEALAND. ■ AS WELL AS STUDYING, SHE WORKS FULLTIME IN AN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CENTRE IN NORTH CANTERBURY. ■ ELLIE BELIEVES ENGLISH AND MEDIA STUDIES HAVE BEEN EXTREMELY USEFUL IN HER STUDIES.

After leaving Rangiora High School with NCEA Level 2, Ellie attended Rangi Ruru Early Childhood College and gained the Rangi Ruru Certificate in Early Childhood Education and Care, which incorporates the New Zealand Certificate in Nanny Education – Level 5. This helped her secure positions as a nanny in England and all over New Zealand; this experience gave Ellie an insight into different parenting styles, behaviours, environments and educational opportunities. “It developed my thinking around how these influence children and how parenting styles ‘create children’. It made me eager to provide children with positive opportunities.” Working as a nanny was a natural lead into a job in ECE, and after a couple of years Ellie decided to

Children are our future, is teaching them yours? Now be based anywhere in New Zealand with our Flexi-learn model! Teaching our youngest citizens and setting them up for life-long learning is an incredibly rewarding career. The Bachelor of Teaching (ECE) will prepare you for teacher registration and postgraduate study. No day will be the same when you work in a role that couples knowledge with nurturing. Learn, teach and earn! ECNZ’s centre-based degree allows you to study and work at the same time. What you learn in class or in online discussion one day, you can apply the very next day in your ECE working environment. Applications close 1 December 2016 for study beginning February 2017. GO TO Piki mai ki runga i tō mātou waka. Tukua mai tō tono.

ecnz.ac.nz TO FIND OUT MORE

E enrol@ecnz.ac.nz P 0800 244 532


11

For more information on studying Early Childhood Education through Te Rito Maioha, visit ecnz.ac.nz

WANT AN AWESOM E CARE EERRING? IN E NGIN E

GET THE SKILLS TO GET THE JOB Get qualified and start earning in no time with an NZMA qualification. FREE study options available, contact NZMA to find out more.

ATNZ have 50 engineering apprenticeships available now!

If this sounds like you, contact us on 0800 002 485 or visit atnzhiring.co.nz

STUDENT: EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

return to study. “The main push for this was basically feeling as though I did everything the same as qualified teachers but was getting half the money. Also I love responsibility and doing well at what I do – and to climb the ladder, a degree is necessary.” Te Rito Maioha’s Flexi-learn programme suits Ellie perfectly. “I am very good at working independently and am self-disciplined, so I liked the thought of working at my own pace. “Also, after being in the workforce for seven years, I didn’t want to return to being a poor student, so liked the idea of keeping my job while getting qualified at the same time!” As far as school subjects go, Ellie says English has been the most useful subject for her studies. “Media studies has also helped me to think outside the square and look past the obvious.” Ellie’s dream is to one day run her own centre. “Everything I have learnt [and] am still learning and the experiences I have gained – I would love to express that in my own centre philosophy and environment. “To have the responsibility to teach, provide care for and support the future generations I feel is one of the most valuable positions to be in.”

“To sit and observe children and know how they are learning, why they are doing something in a certain way, and have the opportunity to document and become part of their early learning is something quite special and rewarding.” — Ellie McKnight

Hospitality | Cookery | Construction | Business Electrical Engineering | Contact Centre | Retail

ENROL TODAY

0800 222 081 NZMA.AC.NZ


POLICY ANALYST

written by SARA CARBERY

12

photograph by MARTY MELVILLE

SHAPING AND INVESTIGATING POLICY

NZ’s PRIMARY INDUSTRIES NICK JOLLY HAS CRAMMED A HUGE AMOUNT INTO HIS 26 YEARS, WITH HIS CV DEFINITELY TICKING THE ALL-ROUNDER BOX.

His achievements at Mt Aspiring College include a language immersion award, being house captain, on the student council, playing for the First XV, being part of the winning team in the Otago–Southland Snowboarding Competition and a member of the interschool debating team. On the academic front, Nick achieved NCEA Level 3 in economics, history, English, Spanish and outdoor pursuits, and participated in the Young Enterprise programme. He also completed an exchange to Edinburgh University, which saw him working for a law firm in London, as well as studying in Scotland. “I would highly recommend doing an exchange. It is essentially like a mini OE, is fun and gives you a unique perspective that you may not otherwise get in New Zealand.” Nick went on to study at the University of Otago, graduating with a conjoint Bachelor of Laws and a Bachelor of Arts (majoring in Politics and a minor in Spanish). In his final year at uni, Nick applied for the Graduate Development programme

at the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), where he had three six-month placements working on rotation through various departments.

Now, he works for MPI as a Policy Analyst on the Animal Sector Policy team in Wellington. This is like coming full circle for Nick, who grew

“WHILE I AM BIASED, I THINK NEW ZEALAND’S PRODUCE, WHETHER IT BE WOOL, FRUIT, VEGETABLES OR MEAT IS THE BEST IN THE WORLD AND I WOULD ENJOY THE OPPORTUNITY TO SHOW THIS TO OTHER PEOPLE.” — Nick Jolly

Of his time spent there, he says, “It seemed like an area where I could combine my agricultural background and interests with my studies in Law, Politics and Spanish.”

up on Ardgour Station near Wanaka and spent many of his school holidays working on the family farm. “My job is a combination of corresponding with various heads

of industry on issues as they arise, replying to the public’s questions on topics and looking at industries in depth to see whether there are any legislative changes that the New Zealand Government can make that can help those industries. “I find the work really interesting and at the same time I feel like what I am doing has the potential to help people working in the primary industries.” Nick says many of the subjects he studied at school have been helpful. “A basic understanding of economics has proved useful both at university and in my current job, while history gave me experience in understanding the value of different sources when conducting research. English is important for learning how to structure essays and for making them easier for other people to understand. Spanish is useful for travelling and gives you a perspective into another culture. It also provides a point of difference on your CV. ” Long term, Nick would like to work overseas one day, possibly for an agency such as the United Nations. Another area that interests him is working for a company that promotes New Zealand products overseas. “While I am biased, I think New Zealand’s produce, whether it be wool, fruit, vegetables or meat is the best in the world and I would enjoy the opportunity to show this to other people.”

KEY FACTS ■ NICK JOLLY WORKS FOR THE MINISTRY OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES AS A POLICY ANALYST. ■ HE ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY OF OTAGO, GRADUATING WITH A CONJOINT BACHELOR OF LAWS AND A BACHELOR OF ARTS, AND ALSO COMPLETED THE MPI GRADUATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME. ■ IN HIS UNIVERSITY STUDIES AND JOB, NICK BELIEVES THAT ECONOMICS, HISTORY, ENGLISH AND SPANISH HAVE BEEN PARTICULARLY USEFUL. WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on MPI’s Graduate Development programme,  visit www.mpi.govt.nz or www.facebook.com/MPIgrads


Well our advice is to look at what really interests you first and take it from there. So, have you thought about a career in the Plumbing trades? There’s going to be a lot of tradesmen retiring soon and the reality is New Zealand will need more tradespeople on the ground to get the work done. Did you know that Plumbing is one of the most lucrative trades out there – once you’re qualified there’s nothing stopping you from starting your own business and really going for it. Sound interesting? Well Plumbing World have the industry contacts to get the ball rolling on an apprenticeship right away! So if the Plumbing, Gasfitting, Drainlaying or associated trades floats your boat come and see ‘your team in black’ and who knows… you could have the career of your dreams kick off before you know it! Keep in the know by joining our Club go to... Facebook.com/YPCNZ

Branches Nationwide. Freephone 0800 800 686 plumbingworld.co.nz Kieran Read, Plumbing World Brand Ambassador


ACCOUNTANT

Caitlyn has been promoted to Assistant Accountant and continues to study part-time to reach her goal of becoming a Chartered Accountant. “I still have a long way to go, but I am very happy with how things have worked out.” — Caitlyn DeSanges

14

FOR THE LOVE OF MATHS AND NUMBERS

COUNTING ON ACCOUNTING

written by SARA CARBERY photograph by ALAN STEVENS      FOR SOMEONE WHO DIDN’T WANT TO PICK UP A TEXTBOOK OR SIT ANOTHER EXAM EVER AGAIN, CAITLYN DESANGES HAS ACHIEVED AN EXTRAORDINARY AMOUNT SINCE SHE WALKED OUT THE GATES OF WESTERN HEIGHTS HIGH SCHOOL FOR THE LAST TIME. “I NEVER THOUGHT I WOULD START STUDYING AGAIN ONCE SCHOOL WAS FINISHED, ” SHE SAYS.

Caitlyn had her sights set on moving to Australia to become a flight attendant, but when the time came, she found she wasn’t ready to pack up and leave. She struggled, though, to find a job in her hometown of Rotorua, despite having NCEA Level 3. “It was a bit of an eye opener that I wasn’t able to gain employment as I had no tertiary qualifications. ” Caitlyn came across an ad for the Diploma in Accounting at Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology (formerly Waiariki Institute of Technology) and realised it was an opportunity. “I saw that it was only a one year course and thought, why not, at least then I would be doing something. ” Although she didn’t study accounting at school (she took geography, tourism, maths, classical studies and English in Year 13), a career in accounting was something Caitlyn had considered because of her love of maths and numbers.

During her time at Toi Ohomai, which confirmed accounting was what she really wanted to do, Caitlyn spotted a job advert for a financial services officer at a local Maori Trust on Toi Ohomai’s website. She applied for the job, secured it and began working part-time while she finished her studies, transitioning into fulltime employment when she graduated in 2012. To her surprise, she discovered she missed studying, so she talked to her boss about continuing with her studies part-time. “I think working while studying is the way to go. Although it may take more years to finish papers, you get real-world experiences and earn money, ” says Caitlyn, who was able to purchase her first house at the age of 22.

“Working and studying has also really helped with learning, as I have been able to apply my real-life skills to my papers, and vice versa. ” It took Caitlyn four years of part-time study to get her New Zealand Diploma in Business, and earlier this year she sat yet another exam to qualify as an Accounting Technician (AT). “It was a very special moment for me when I finally got to walk the stage and receive my AT certificate. After four years of hard work, and giving up my weekends to do assignments, I just thought, ‘Wow I have made it!’ Especially after being someone who didn’t want to pick up any books again, or to have to sit another exam. ” Now 23, Caitlyn has been promoted to Assistant Accountant and continues to study part-time to reach her goal of becoming a Chartered Accountant. “I still have a long way to go, but I am very happy with how things have worked out. ”

KEY FACTS ■ CAITLYN DESANGES HAS A DIPLOMA IN ACCOUNTING FROM TOI OHOMAI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, A NEW ZEALAND DIPLOMA IN BUSINESS AND IS A QUALIFIED ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN. ■ SHE WORKS AS AN ASSISTANT ACCOUNTANT AND IS STUDYING TOWARD BECOMING A CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT. WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

To discover more about studying Accounting, visit www.charteredaccountantsanz.com/at


FULL THROTTLE TOWARD A GREAT CAREER

written by PETER WHITE photograph by ALAN STEVENS        ALEX SMITH JUST LOVES WORKING ON CARS, IN FACT MOST OF HIS SPARE TIME IS SPENT AT HOME TINKERING WITH HIS TWO VEHICLES. HIS PASSION FOR MECHANICS IS PROVING HUGELY BENEFICIAL FOR HIM, AS HE IS WELL INTO THE FIRST YEAR OF AN APPRENTICESHIP TO BECOME A FULLY QUALIFIED AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN. Alex (19) is from West Auckland and attended Massey High School, where he spent his last two schooling years in the automotive academy. He was also in the MITO StartUp® Gateway programme doing work experience for West City Holden one day a week. “In the automotive academy we studied for two hours a day and I was in that for two years,”  he says. “The academy gave me credits towards my apprenticeship as well – some units are already ticked off so I don’t have to do them again. ” Alex encourages school students to consider getting into a Gateway course. “It is a good way to get out there and actually experience the job for yourself and see if you like it or not. ” He says some school subjects are really helpful if you want a career as a mechanic. “I would say science and maths are important, plus having knowledge of physics is helpful in this trade. ” This year Alex was awarded a monetary grant from the Fellowship of the Motor Industry and a MITO Kick Start scholarship worth $1000 towards his first year of a National Certificate in Motor Industry (Light Vehicle) – Level 3 and 4. MITO awards the Kick Start scholarships annually to trainees who have worked for less than 12 months in the automotive, transport, logistics, extractive or textile fabrication industries. “I wrote to MITO explaining why I should get a scholarship and how I was going to balance my time between work and study. I couldn’t believe they actually gave it to me. It was a bit of a shock, ” says Alex.

“It has basically paid my fees for the year. I am very happy to get it. ” Alex loves working fulltime and says his job at Auckland Vehicles in West Auckland is going well. “Mainly it is just confidence building, getting you to get in there and do the job, not being so scared of mucking things up and being able to do bigger jobs.” His advice to school students interested in the automotive industry is to get in there and give it a go. “Read up on it on the internet, try getting into the Gateway programme and try getting work

APPRENTICE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN

GATEWAY TO AN APPRENTICESHIP

15

experience in the industry. Any job in the industry, try and go for it because I started out as a car groomer and worked my way up from there. ” Auckland Vehicles’ After-Sales Manager Trisha Stewart is pleased with the progress Alex has made. “When we hire someone in that sort of role we want to see how they work, that they are going to show up to work and take things seriously. “In some ways it was a bit of a test to make sure Alex is someone we really wanted to take on board. It’s been good. ”

“I would say science and maths are important, plus having knowledge of physics is helpful in this trade.” — Alex Smith

KEY FACTS For more information on automotive technician apprenticeships through MITO, visit www.mito.org.nz

ALEX SMITH IS CURRENTLY DOING AN AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN ■ APPRENTICESHIP THROUGH MITO. HE WORKS AT AUCKLAND VEHICLES IN WEST AUCKLAND. AT MASSEY HIGH SCHOOL HE WAS IN THE AUTOMOTIVE ACADEMY, ■ AND THE MITO STARTUP® GATEWAY PROGRAMME. LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ


LAW — JUDGES’ CLERK 16

written by SARA CARBERY

photograph by ALAN STEVENS

A PASSION FOR MOOTING

DRAMA OF THE COURTROOM

CAITLIN HOLLINGS ADMITS THAT DECIDING TO DO A LAW DEGREE WAS A LEAP OF FAITH. “IF I AM REALLY HONEST, I CHOSE TO STUDY LAW ALMOST BY DEFAULT – AND IT WASN’T UNTIL ABOUT MY SECOND YEAR OF UNIVERSITY THAT I FELT I HAD MADE A GOOD DECISION!”

“As a 17-year-old, I was mostly focused on what I would enjoy at university, and I had no idea whether law school was for me. I was interested in debating, and arguing with my parents.” Caitlin also enjoyed conceptual thinking, one of the reasons chemistry was her favourite subject at school. As well as chemistry, she took history and English at Higher Level, and Standard Level maths, physics and Spanish in her final year at Diocesan School for Girls, where she completed the International Baccalaureate (IB). Caitlin chose to do a law and arts conjoint degree at the University of Auckland. Her Bachelor of Arts major was Philosophy but along the way she also enjoyed history, sociology, psychology, fine arts and politics. “The philosophy department is outstanding at Auckland Uni and I loved being part of it.” Law school took a bit longer to get into, admits Caitlin. “It’s an intimidating start, with a large number of students competing to get into second-year law. I think it’s common to feel overwhelmed by that when you first start uni – if anyone else feels like that, my advice is to keep going because it does get better!”  In fact, Caitlin loved her time at law school, highlighting the close-knit community of law students and the commercial strengths of the faculty. What really sparked Caitlin’s interest in the law was getting involved in mooting. “Mooting is basically mock lawyering – you get a set of facts and present the best legal argument you can for your fictional client to a judge. Mooting is competitive, requires written and oral advocacy and is basically professional arguing – I loved it.”

“Don’t discount a law degree just because your best subject isn’t English or history. I certainly wasn’t an English whizz and I have still loved my law degree.” — Caitlin Hollings

Caitlin did a lot of mooting at Auckland Law School, competing nationally and internationally. She also set up a mooting society with some other students (“It’s as nerdy as it sounds”), which now has over 700 members. Now 25, Caitlin is working as a Judges’ Clerk at the Auckland High Court. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to work closely with the judges at the High Court, and be involved in everything from jury trials and judgment writing to extra-judicial functions like speeches.” The job has inspired Caitlin towards becoming a barrister – “The drama of the courtroom appeals!”

Caitlin loves the intellectual challenge that law provides, alongside the practical ability to solve problems and help clients and the community. Her advice to others considering law is three-fold: “Don’t discount a law degree just because your best subject isn’t English or history. I certainly wasn’t an English whizz and I have still loved my law degree.” Caitlin’s second point of advice is to “seriously consider doing an arts degree – you will enrich your life.” And finally, “If the going gets tough in your first year of uni don’t pack it in; keep going and the hard work will be worth it.”

KEY FACTS ■ CAITLIN HOLLINGS WORKS AS JUDGES’ CLERK AT THE AUCKLAND HIGH COURT. ■ SHE HAS A CONJOINT DEGREE — BACHELOR OF ARTS (MAJORING IN PHILOSOPHY) AND A BACHELOR OF LAWS — FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND. WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on studying Law through the University of Auckland visit www.law.auckland.ac.nz



COPING STRATEGIES

Get the Whitecliffe Edge

18

written by JENNIFER BECKETT

MINDFUL SELF-CARE

A GUIDE FOR COPING AT EXAM TIME

IN MY ROLE AS PSYCHOLOGIST AT MASSEY UNIVERSITY, I SEE A LOT OF STUDENTS WHO FEEL OVERWHELMED WITH STRESS AROUND EXAM TIME.

Degree Programmes in:

· · · ·

FINE ARTS PHOTO MEDIA FASHION DESIGN GRAPHIC DESIGN

Certificate Programmes in:

· ARTS AND DESIGN · DIGITAL MEDIA AND DESIGN (no portfolio required for entry)

APPLICATIONS FOR 2017 ACCEPTED NOW PROSPECTUS whitecliffe.ac.nz ENQUIRIES enquiries@whitecliffe.ac.nz

TANYA MARTUSHEFF

Whitecliffe graduates are articulate, innovative creative thinkers with broad skills and a high level of industry standard technical proficiency. They create powerful and compelling visual expressions of their ideas, are leaders in the creative industries, and shape contemporary culture.

My advice for coping during this stressful time, and even to enhance exam performance, is to increase self-care. By self-care I mean looking after your physical, mental and emotional health. Self-care often goes out the window around exam time, as students feel they don’t have the time to exercise, eat good food, get enough sleep, spend time with friends and so on. However, it is essential you make time, no matter how busy you are, as good self-care reduces stress and anxiety and increases energy and concentration. Self-care is not something to do once and tick off your list. It is the constant repetition of many tiny habits that will keep you at your optimum – emotionally, physically and mentally. WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8


illustration by STUDIOSTOKS

Mindfulness – the practice of being in the present – is an important part of self-care. Let’s imagine you are sitting studying. How many times does your mind drift off into the future or the past, even if only for a second? Mindfulness is the ability to recognise when you are drifting, and to bring your attention back to what you are doing, over and over again. You can anchor yourself in the present by tuning into your five senses.

SENSE OF SOUND

COPING STRATEGIES

There are a number of apps that can help remind you to be in the present. ‘Mind bell’ has a Tibetan Bell that sounds randomly throughout 19 the day. Each time the bell rings, notice what you are doing in the moment, relax your shoulders and take a deep breath. Listening to a sound recording of waves on a beach may help with sleep, focus on the soothing waves rather than the thoughts that go around and around.

SENSE OF SMELL You can use pleasant smells to ground you into the present moment and practice self-care. A mindfulness group exercise I often do starts with passing around lemons. I have people notice the weight and feel of the lemon, then scratch the skin and notice the strong uplifting aroma. For people feeling overwhelmed or panicky, it might help to bite into a lemon and use this as a way to anchor into the present moment.

SENSE OF TOUCH Different textures can be soothing to touch, and most $2 shops sell stress balls with a variety of textures – from jelly to spikes. Research indicates that stroking a dog or cat can be particularly soothing and can calm anxiety and boost mood.

SENSE OF TASTE Eat a good variety of healthy food that will provide energy. If you have a treat, enjoy it, be in the moment with the taste and texture. If you have ever seen a toddler eat a piece of cake you will notice how very present they are with it!

New Zealand’s only law faculty in the world’s top 35.* Our tradition of excellence, is your foundation for success. • Offers the largest range of undergraduate courses • Has the highest entry standards for second year law meaning our graduates are highly sought after • Has outstanding facilities including the Davis Law Library, New Zealand’s leading legal research library • Offers an extensive study abroad programme with % of our students spending a semester overseas • Provides a wealth of opportunities for students to participate in national and international competitions, community placements and the Equal Justice Project • Has very active and supportive Māori and Pacific law student societies and programmes

For more information visit www.law.auckland.ac.nz Phone: 0800 61 62 63 Email: undergradlaw@auckland.ac.nz Facebook: www.facebook.com/akllawschool

SENSE OF SIGHT Break up long periods of study by going for a walk. It is great for sore muscles and will give your eyes a break from the screen or book. A mindful walk involves paying attention to all that you can see around you. You can incorporate the other senses into this by noticing the things you can smell around you, the feel of the sun or wind against your skin, the feel of your breath, the sound of your steps and anything you can taste in your mouth. Exam time can be stressful and anxiety inducing, but there are ways to take care of yourself. And the best part is that once you’ve figured out the techniques that work for you, you’ll be able to use them in the future, whenever you’re in a stressful situation.

Jennifer Beckett is a registered psychologist who works for Massey University’s Health and Counselling Centre (Albany) and is the owner of Albany Psychology Clinic. LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

*QS World University Rankings by Faculty 2016


written by CAMPBELL BURNES

photograph by ALAN STEVENS

PLUMBER

PLUMBING HITS THE MARK

20

FLOODED WITH VARIETY AND OPTIONS

PLUMBING IS A TRADE THAT WILL NEVER GO OUT OF FASHION, AND IT SUITS SAM HIEATT DOWN TO THE GROUND. THE VARIETY OF THE WORK IS WHAT 23-YEAR-OLD SAM LIKES MOST ABOUT PLUMBING, AND IN TWO YEARS HE WILL BE FULLY CERTIFIED AND ABLE TO EXERCISE HIS OPTIONS, SUCH AS STARTING HIS OWN BUSINESS AND HAVING THE FLEXIBILITY TO EARN MORE. He did not always have his heart set on becoming a plumber. At Hillcrest High School, Sam did not have a clear idea of his career path, and he left school in Year 12. “I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do. I left in Year 12 because I found out about a course at Wintec called Introduction to Trades. That was free if you did that before you turned 18, so I thought I may as well do that instead of my last year at school, ” he says. Five different trades were covered in the first six months. “Plumbing was the one I enjoyed the most, so I did plumbing for the last six months of the course. ” This led to an ATT apprenticeship and work experience with well-established Hamilton plumbing company F.B. Hall & Co. He has been there for the last four years and enjoys his work,

having also learned about drainlaying and gasfitting, two subsidiary areas of plumbing. “I went straight into it, digging holes. You don’t know much when you start, but you’ve got to experience it, ” says Sam. “The key for school leavers is just getting experience, even if you’re not getting paid. You’ve just got to learn. Even if you take a day off school a week and go off and do work experience. It’s for you to see if you want to do it. ” A core subject like maths is key for students thinking about a career in plumbing. Crunching numbers and dealing with angles is a part of the job, especially if you are looking to fit a pipe into a narrow space. At Hillcrest High School, Sam took woodwork too. “Most schools have a trade course, like woodwork or metalwork. Aim for those, ” he says.

Sam’s short-term aim is to get certified, and he will need to sit and pass two exams to do that. He is fully registered at the moment, but the certification will mean he is fully qualified. “I like plumbing because it’s got such a range of work. There’s a variety. You are not stuck doing the same thing, ” he adds. While self-employed plumbers are often free for callouts on weekends and public holidays, at extra cost, Sam is happy working five days a week for about 45 hours. Things get quieter in summer when there is less chance of roof leaks. But, of course, when he branches out one day, perhaps on his own, he will have the flexibility of doing jobs outside work hours and on weekends. Once qualified, the world can most definitely be the plumber’s oyster.

“THE KEY FOR SCHOOL LEAVERS IS JUST GETTING EXPERIENCE, EVEN IF YOU’RE NOT GETTING PAID. YOU’VE JUST GOT TO LEARN. EVEN IF YOU TAKE A DAY OFF SCHOOL A WEEK AND GO OFF AND DO WORK EXPERIENCE. IT’S FOR YOU TO SEE IF YOU WANT TO DO IT.” — Sam Hieatt KEY FACTS ■ SAM HIEATT COMPLETED AN INTRODUCTION TO TRADES COURSE THROUGH WINTEC. THIS LED TO AN ATT APPRENTICESHIP, AND WORK EXPERIENCE WITH PLUMBING COMPANY F.B. HALL & CO. ■ HE IS A FULLY REGISTERED PLUMBER AND NEEDS TO PASS TWO FURTHER EXAMINATIONS TO BECOME FULLY CERTIFIED.

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on career opportunities with Plumbing World, visit contact.plumbingworld.co.nz/ Careers/Pages/welcome.aspx To discover more about trades courses with Wintec, visit www.wintec.ac.nz and for further details on plumbing apprenticeships with ATT, visit www.att.org.nz



INSPIRED BY MUSICAL FAMILY

MUSICIAN

DRUMMING AND TOURING

22

written by SARA CARBERY photograph by MARTY MELVILLE        MUSICIAN, SINGER AND SONGWRITER DANIEL SUGRUE IS RIGHT WHERE HE WANTS TO BE – PLAYING DRUMS WITH THE REGGAE BAND TOMORROW PEOPLE.  “IT’S A HUGE PRIVILEGE TO BE A PART OF A BAND THAT HAS AN OUTSTANDING LIST OF ACHIEVEMENTS – SUCH AS NUMBER ONE ALBUMS AND SINGLES, A GOLD CERTIFIED FIRST ALBUM AND INTERNATIONAL SHOWS AND TOURS.” Since joining the band, Daniel (23) has toured New Zealand and Australia, played in Rarotonga, has written and played on Tomorrow People’s number one charting album Bass and Bassinets, has featured in videos, and heard the band’s music played on radio and TV. “Not to mention meeting some huge names in music, along with a lot of my own idols. I love it.” Daniel grew up in a musical family, and has played on stage since he was nine. By the time he was 13, he knew that he wanted a career in music. Halfway through Year 12 he felt high school had exhausted his interests, so he spent what would have been Year 13 at high school completing the

Certificate of Contemporary Music at the Southern Institute of Technology (SIT) instead. Daniel used this as a stepping stone to see if he wanted to commit to the Bachelor of Contemporary Music. The answer was obviously yes because Daniel happily spent another three years at SIT, majoring in Performance and studying papers in ensemble, industry studies, music theory, arrangement and history of contemporary music studies. “I thoroughly enjoyed the four years I spent at SIT,” says Daniel. “The tutors were incredibly helpful and personable and I met some of the best people I could ever meet in Invercargill. I still work with some of my fellow SIT students to this day which is hugely satisfying.”

At Cromwell College in Central Otago, Daniel took music throughout his high school years, along with “all the usual subjects”, including English, maths and geography. “Maths was a big help as far as understanding beat division in music theory,” he says. Having first learnt basic guitar chords from his grandmother when he was eight, Daniel progressed quickly, even forming a band in Year 7 with some friends. They were playing gigs every weekend by the time they were 14, and Daniel also played guitar, bass and drums regularly with his dad’s band. If you’re considering taking up music as a profession, Daniel has this advice to share: “Firstly, be confident

START YOUR JOURNEY TODAY With SIT and the Zero Fees Scheme Animation Architectural Technology Art Audio Production Automotive Engineering Beauty Therapy Business Business Administration Carpentry Civil Engineering Collision Repair Cookery Electrical Engineering

Environmental Management Fashion Film Floristry Food & Beverage Hairdressing Hotel Management Human Resources Information Technology Joinery Massage Therapy Management Mechanical Engineering

*Direct material costs apply

Mental Health Support Work Music Nanny Education Nursing Photography Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Quantity Surveying Screen Arts Social Services Sport and Exercise Travel Veterinary Nursing

Say YES to success with SIT Zero Fees


“MATHS WAS A BIG HELP AS FAR AS UNDERSTANDING BEAT DIVISION IN MUSIC

in your abilities, but never complacent. Always strive to learn more from everyone and everything around you. “And be humble! No one wants to work with people they don’t like and a lot of the industry is really not what you know but who you know. So always be friendly, practice, work hard and take any opportunity that arises, be it big or small.” Looking ahead, Daniel’s plan is to “keep practicing and working within the band and as an artist/ musician and to keep myself in a position where I can continue to meet great people, travel and play music. That’s the dream!” KEY FACTS ■ DANIEL SUGRUE HAS A CERTIFICATE OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC AND A BACHELOR OF CONTEMPORARY MUSIC MAJORING IN PERFORMANCE FROM THE SOUTHERN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY. ■ HE IS A MUSICIAN, SINGER AND SONGWRITER, AND PLAYS DRUMS WITH THE REGGAE BAND TOMORROW PEOPLE. ■ DANIEL FOUND TAKING MATHS AT HIGH SCHOOL TO BE REALLY HELPFUL FOR HIS STUDIES AT SIT, PARTICULARLY IN “UNDERSTANDING BEAT DIVISION IN MUSIC THEORY”.

Call today or email info@sit.ac.nz

For more information on studying Music through SIT, visit www.sit.ac.nz

0800 4 0 FEES www.sit.ac.nz

MUSICIAN

THEORY” — Daniel Sugrue

23


IMPORTANT NOTICES 24

UNIVERSITIES IN NEW ZEALAND

NOTICEBOARD

KEEPING TRACK OF WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

There are eight universities in New Zealand, offering a wide range of tertiary education. Visit www.universitiesnz.ac.nz to find out the 2017 semester dates and other important information if you plan to attend university in 2017.

SECONDARY SCHOOL HOLIDAYS 2016 /2017

INSTITUTES OF TECHNOLOGY

Summer holiday: 16 Dec–30 Jan/ 7 Feb 2017 (earliest/latest) Term 1 holiday: 14 April–1 May 2017 Term 2 holiday: 7 July–24 July 2017 Term 3 holiday: 29 Sept–16 Oct 2017 Term 4 holiday: 14 Dec–29 Jan/ 7 Feb 2018 (earliest/latest)

There are 16 Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics situated throughout New Zealand offering a wide range of tertiary education. Visit www.nzqa.govt.nz/providerspartners/about-educationorganisations/itps-in-new-zealand

Information sourced from Ministry of Education, visit www.education.govt.nz

for more information on courses and semester dates for 2017.

SCHOLARSHIPS

STUDENT LOANS

Scholarships are a great way of covering or assisting with your study fees. There are over 4000 scholarships available nationwide. Scholarships are offered on a range of criteria; e.g. school marks, intended area of study, ethnicity, community service, sporting talents. Talk to your careers advisor or visit www.generosity.org.nz/giv-me

If you are about to leave school and you’re looking at tertiary study, there’s going to be a lot to think about. If it’s anything to do with financial support while you’re studying, StudyLink can help and you need to apply by Friday 16 December 2016. www.studylink.govt.nz

CAREERS NEW ZEALAND

A fantastic resource providing expert advice and confidential, free information on all things education and employment – including choosing school subjects, enrolling in study or training and applying for jobs. Call their free advice line on 0800 222 733, free text CAREER to 434 or chat online by visiting their website at www.careers.govt.nz WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

JOB HUNTING

These websites will help you find a job! Allied Work Force – www.awf.co.nz Trade Me Jobs – www.trademe.co.nz/jobs MyJobSpace – www.myjobspace.co.nz Student Job Search – www.sjs.co.nz Workpool – www.workpool.co.nz Work and Income – www.job-bank.workandincome.govt.nz Seek – www.seek.co.nz

ACCOMMODATION Study providers have useful information about student accommodation on their websites, including how to apply, application due dates, location and cost. This often covers university accommodation, such as halls of residence, student flatting and private rentals. Halls of residence application due dates vary, so it’s best to check this out online.

Ab ipis as dolorest quatiam illent elia quidi to conseque as exces et alis dolorest, vid quia quia veles aut volupta esecupt aecupidenis.

Action is the foundational key to all success. – Pablo Picasso


Labour Day Monday 24 October NCEA Examinations Wednesday 9 November to Friday 2 December StudyLink Applications Close Friday 16 December Christmas Day Sunday 25 December Boxing Day Monday 26 December

MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT

It’s always important to make sure that you are on the electoral roll and ready to take part in national and local elections. How else can you be sure that you are ready to have your say on the big issues affecting you and your family? www.elections.org.nz/voters

2017

New Year’s Day Sunday 1 January Waitangi Day Monday 6 February Good Friday Friday 14 April Easter Monday Monday 17 April Anzac Day Tuesday 25 April British & Irish Lions Tour to New Zealand 2017 Saturday 3 June to Saturday 8 July

IMPORTANT NOTICES

Ab ipis as dolorest quatiam illent elia quidi to conseque as exces et alis dolorest, vid quia quia veles aut volupta esecupt aecupidenis.

KEY DATES

If you dream it,you can do it. – Walt Disney

Queen’s Birthday Monday 5 June

VOLUNTEERING

FEELING DOWN?

Volunteering can provide you with opportunities to develop your skills in new and interesting ways as well as providing valuable real-world experiences – all important attributes to your CV when applying for your first job! For more information, visit: www.volunteeringnz.org.nz/ volunteers/finding-volunteer-roles/

Leaving school is one of the most major transitions we undertake in our lives, and it’s a time when anxiety, worry and depression can surface. www.thelowdown.co.nz is full of ideas and people who can help you get unstuck and get to a better place. Need to talk? Free text to 5626

INTERNATIONAL YOUNG BUTCHER OF THE YEAR

Congratulations to Alana Empson who was profiled in Leaving School in July, she has won International Young Butcher of the Year, at the World Butchers Challenge on the Gold Coast on Saturday 10 September 2016. Alana was up against young butchers from New Zealand, Australia, France and Great Britain.

These magazines and past issues can be read online at www.leavingschool.co.nz

VOCATIONAL GET SET FOR NZ CAREERS EXPO 2017 PATHWAYS CHRISTCHURCH Horncastle Area AUCKLAND ASB Showgrounds, Greenlane HAMILTON Claudelands Event Centre WELLINGTON TSB Arena, Queens Wharf

11 to 13 MAY 25 to 27 MAY 11 to 12 JUNE 16 to 17 JUNE

Admission to the Expo is free for all visitors. Visit their website www.careersexpo.org.nz

Throughout this magazine, each case study has been colour coded to its Vocational Pathway. In some instances, multiple colours are used to show that the skills you learn can be applied across multiple careers and pathways, throughout your lifetime. Visit www.youthguarantee.net.nz/ vocational-pathways to learn more.

LEAVINGSCHOOLNZ

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

25


TIPS FOR STUDY

written by SARA CARBERY

illustration by STUDIOSTOKS

SIMPLE, PRACTICAL STUDY TIPS

EXAM TIME IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER

YES, IT’S NEARING THAT TIME OF THE YEAR AGAIN. JUST AS THE DAYS START TO STRETCH OUT AND GET WARMER, AND THE BEACH BEGINS TO BECKON, SO DO YOUR BOOKS. WELCOME TO EXAM TIME!

26

To help you make the most of your study leave, we’ve pulled together some study tips: A FEW WEEKS OUT MIXING IT UP IS GOOD. FROM YOUR EXAMS, draw up a study If you stick to one subject for too long your timetable that lists what you’re going to brain can start to switch off, so schedule study and when. Be as specific as possible some algebra after novel studies, for example. by breaking each subject up into topics you If possible, also mix up where you study to need to study. This helps you to get straight keep things interesting. Have a number of into study each day knowing what you’re quiet, distraction-free spots and move going to do. between them.

DON’T SPEND TIME REVISING STUFF YOU ALREADY KNOW. If you don’t understand something, ask someone for help, or go online and see if you can find the answers. THERE ARE MANY WAYS TO REVISE, including drawing mind maps or diagrams, making notes, answering past papers, writing cue cards, asking someone to test you, highlighting important words or ideas, putting key word posters on your bedroom wall or ceiling, or writing skeleton essays. Find a combination that works best for you. MAKING NOTES IS A GREAT WAY TO MEMORISE a lot of information (the aim is to move information out of our short-term memory and into our long-term memory). You’ll recall the information easier if you write your notes out by hand, rather than typing them. Reading your study notes aloud can help the information stick as you’re processing your notes audibly as well as visually. TAKE SHORT FREQUENT BREAKS. Research shows that shorter 25 to 30 minute study sessions work best because your concentration levels are higher. At the

PASSION FOR FASHION? STUDY TO BECOME A FASHION DESIGNER IN 2017 • Create your own clothing line • Free trials - experience our difference! • Student loans and allowances available • Campuses in East Tamaki and New Lynn

www.sewtec.ac.nz

0508 327 872


LOOK OVER YOUR NOTES, but not for too long. Don’t cram at the last minute as this will only confuse your memory. PUT EVERYTHING YOU NEED in a clear plastic bag the night before. You can bring water in a clear plastic drink bottle. GET A GOOD NIGHT’S SLEEP (a warm milky drink might help). EAT HEALTHILY before your exam. AVOID PEOPLE who make you nervous. STAY CALM and confident. Breathe deeply.

IN THE EXAM

TIPS FOR STUDY

EXAM TIPS BEFORE THE EXAM

27 SPEND A FEW MINUTES reading the instructions and questions carefully. Make a rough plan of how long you are going to spend on each section, and what you plan to cover, and stick to it. If you have extra time at the end, return to the questions you didn’t finish. READ THE QUESTIONS TWICE and circle or highlight key terms. WATCH OUT FOR PLURALS IN QUESTIONS. For example, ‘Name features of graphs’ means that you are required to write at least two features. START WITH THE QUESTION you think you can answer best. IF YOU START TO FEEL PANICKY, breathe slowly and deeply. IF YOU HAVE TO WRITE AN ESSAY, scribble down a short essay plan (e.g. paragraph headings) and cross it out as you go. DON’T BULK UP an answer – keep to the point! IF YOU HAVE TIME, proofread your answers at the end. Ask yourself, ‘Have I answered the question that was asked?’

AFTER THE EXAM

Don’t get sucked into endless discussions about the exam with your classmates or you could end up worrying (often unnecessarily) for weeks.

very least, aim to break every 50 minutes for 10 minutes. LOOK AT PLENTY OF PAST EXAMS AND EXEMPLARS. These are available at www.nzqa.govt.nz/ qualifications-standards/qualifications/ ncea/subjects/ STUDYING IN THE MORNING WHEN YOU’RE FEELING FRESH is a good idea. This is the time for note taking. Before bed is a good time to look over your notes and commit them to memory because your brain processes new memories while you’re asleep. MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR STUDY TIME by minimising distractions. Leave your phone in another room and banish all social media. Ideally switch off the wifi if you don’t need it for study. DRINK PLENTY OF WATER and eat healthy snacks to keep your brain humming.

MAKE SURE YOUR FOCUS IS NOT ALL WORK and no play. People who find the right balance between study and leisure are the ones who get the top marks. Exercise in particular is really important as it increases your heart rate and makes your blood circulate faster. This supplies more oxygen to your brain increasing productivity and reducing tiredness and stress. Fresh air helps too.

Thanks to Rosmini College, BBC Radio and www.studyit.org.nz for these tips. Studyit is a Ministry of Education website with stacks of study and exam advice for NCEA students. Also worth checking out is www.studytime.co.nz

LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ


ADVENTURE TOURISM TEXT 28

written by CAMPBELL BURNES

photo credit BLAIR HILLYARD

MAKE THE LEAP

PUSHING PAST THE COMFORT ZONE AFTER A MINOR FALSE START IN HIS CAREER, JESSE ROYS NOW LOVES WHAT HE DOES AND IS IDEALLY SUITED TO IT. THE 20-YEAR-OLD HAS WORKED AT TAUPO BUNGY FOR OVER A YEAR NOW AND THOROUGHLY ENJOYS HIS INTERACTIONS WITH CUSTOMERS, ESPECIALLY SEEING THEIR SMILES AFTER THEY HAVE PUSHED THROUGH THEIR COMFORT ZONES AND COMPLETED A JUMP AT THE COUNTRY’S HIGHEST WATER TOUCH BUNGY. But working at the coal face of adventure tourism was not what he had his heart set on at Napier Boys’ High School. After school, he worked as a plastics engineer and soon found it wasn’t for him. “I didn’t enjoy it, so I thought I would get into something a bit different. That’s how I found bungy,” Jesse says. Jesse started from square one working in the frontline office, then he became an office supervisor. In regards to future progression, he has been cleared to work on the boat that picks up the customer after they have jumped. The next step is swing operator, then swing master and lastly jump master. Being a people person is vital in this fun line of work. “It’s definitely not the field to be in if you can’t deal with people,” says Jesse. “You need to be really confident. You can’t be shy or passive when talking to customers. If you do that in adventure tourism, the customer starts reading off that, thinking you are dodgy and don’t know what you are doing.” The highlight of his work is seeing the customers after a jump. “Seeing people’s reaction after doing something they didn’t think they could do… they are often good in the office when they are signing up, but then the nerves come into play,” he says. There are certain perks to the job too – such as being able to bungy jump “whenever he feels like”. His skills do not go unnoticed in other adventure tourism areas – places like Sky Dive know who is doing what at Taupo Bungy. Jesse is now doing a New Zealand Certificate in Tourism (Visitor Experience) – Level 3 through

ServiceIQ. While it is not a pre-requisite for his current job, it will open doors if he decides to branch out one day. The qualification is a mix of theory and practical on-the-job training and covers areas like health and safety, and Maori language and culture. Jesse is clear about his advice for school leavers seeking to enter tourism. “It’s always handy to have another language behind you. That’s a regret for me that I didn’t do that at school. That would make you a huge asset to the tourism industry.”

So be thinking about, in particular, German, French, Cantonese, Mandarin and Japanese. English and hospitality (if offered) are other useful subjects. “I should have been more broad with my subjects. Always have a couple of options after the ones you want to do,” he advises. “It’s also how you present yourself, how you speak, how you dress. Always be on the lookout. Tourism is my place and where I need to be. I love it. I love meeting new people and giving them the experience of what we do.”

“You need to be really confident. You can’t be shy or passive when talking to customers. If you do that in adventure tourism, the customer starts reading off that, thinking you are dodgy and don’t know what you are doing.” — Jesse Roys

KEY FACTS For more information on studying Tourism through ServiceIQ , visit www.ServiceIQ.co.nz

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

■ JESSE ROYS WORKS FOR TAUPO BUNGY AND IS UNDERTAKING A NEW on ZEALAND For more information career CERTIFICATE IN TOURISM (VISITOR EXPERIENCE) —opportunities LEVEL 3 THROUGH SERVICEIQ. with Plumbing World visit www.plumbingworld.ac.nz/careers ■ FOR THOSE INTERESTED IN WORKING IN THE ADVENTURE TOURISM INDUSTRY, with for further details on plumbing JESSE RECOMMENDS LEARNING ANOTHER LANGUAGE, SUCH AS GERMAN, FRENCH, CANTONESE, MANDARIN AND JAPANESE. apprenticeships with ATT,  visit www.att.org.nz ■ NCEA SUBJECTS ENGLISH AND HOSPITALITY ARE ALSO USEFUL SUBJECTS TO HAVE STUDIED.

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8


LAB 1

?


SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT 30

FOLLOW WHAT YOU LOVE

DREAMING OF SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

written by SARA CARBERY photograph by MARTY MELVILLE        MARIANA ISHAK’S LOVE OF GAMING IS WHAT STEERED HER INTO SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT. “THE JOY I GOT FROM GAMING MADE ME WANT TO CREATE SOMETHING FOR PEOPLE TO USE AND ENJOY.” In Year 12 at St Catherine’s College in Wellington, Mariana took English, maths, chemistry and other “mainstream” subjects, just in case she decided to go to university. By Year 13, she knew she wanted to do an IT course and opted for a variety of subjects based on personal interest and relevance to a career in IT, including digital design, photography, media studies, religious education (which was compulsory) and Gateway. “People tend to dismiss Gateway as an easy option but it was really useful for me as I wanted an insight into the working world.” After a summer spent working as a cashier at New World, Mariana started

studying at Computer Power Plus in Wellington. She graduated after 17 months with two diplomas: Diploma in Software Development – Level 5 and Diploma in Advanced Software Development – Level 6. These diplomas are described as “ideal for those who want to enter the IT industry with the broadest career options.” During her time at Computer Power Plus, Mariana studied all aspects of the IT business system cycle, including analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation of systems to increase business efficiencies. In addition, she learnt to design, create, document and implement computer programs

in a range of different languages – something which she loves. Now 20, Mariana has recently started working as a customer services representative at Kitomba, a salon and spa software company. Her job is to support the stylists and therapists who contact the company for assistance. She loves her new job and is looking to move up in the company eventually, but ultimately Mariana’s dream is to become a game developer. “It would be cool if I ended up working creatively in a studio that would totally be a dream come true.” While she was studying, Mariana helped out at the ITX conference in

Wellington. In return for helping with packing and sorting out the conference bags, running mics, and so forth, she got to attend some of the lectures. “That was a really cool experience. It was so inspirational to meet people who are successful in the industry, to learn what kind of work they do and how they got there.” If you want to forge a career in IT, Mariana’s advice is to find something that interests you and do your own research. “Be proactive and follow what you love doing.” Start with things you use every day, such as your phone. Research how certain features work, or watch videos on how people make things


■ MARIANA ISHAK HAS TWO DIPLOMAS: A DIPLOMA IN SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT – LEVEL 5 AND DIPLOMA IN ADVANCED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT – LEVEL 6 FROM COMPUTER POWER PLUS IN WELLINGTON. ■ IN YEAR 13, KNOWING SHE WANTED TO GET INTO THE IT INDUSTRY, SHE STUDIED DIGITAL DESIGN, PHOTOGRAPHY, MEDIA STUDIES, RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND GATEWAY.

SHE LEARNT TO DESIGN, CREATE, DOCUMENT AND IMPLEMENT COMPUTER PROGRAMS IN A RANGE OF DIFFERENT LANGUAGES – SOMETHING WHICH SHE LOVES.

on YouTube. Also talk to people in the industry, starting with your IT teacher. “I guarantee you’ll learn something from everyone.” Her other piece of advice is to not overlook core subjects such as

maths and English. “I was one of those people who thought ‘I’ll never use this’, but I’ve learnt that you really do use what you learn … even algebra!”

For more information on studying Software Development at Computer Power Plus , visit www.computerpowerplus.ac.nz

SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

KEY FACTS

31


DIGITAL MEDIA

Advertising is an industry which values ambition, enthusiasm and ultimately ideas. Whether it’s a new way to sell a product, or a new way to do something, don’t be afraid to speak up and share it. It’s that attitude which gets you noticed, and first in line for the biggest and brightest opportunities.”— Joanne Palmgren

32

written by SARA CARBERY

photograph by ALAN STEVENS

DEVELOPING DIGITAL MEDIA STRATEGIES

SPEAK UP AND SHARE

JOANNE PALMGREN (27) IS WORKING AS A SENIOR DIGITAL ACCOUNT MANAGER – A JOB SHE NEVER KNEW EVEN EXISTED WHEN SHE LEFT SCHOOL. “I KNEW WHAT AN ADVERTISING AGENCY WAS, BUT I’D NEVER HEARD OF A MEDIA AGENCY. IT NEVER OCCURRED TO ME THAT THE PEOPLE WHO BOUGHT THE ADS WEREN’T THE SAME PEOPLE WHO MADE THEM.”

Joanne’s job is to guide clients and develop their digital media strategy, work buying, she was offered her current job at Dynamo. “It was a tough decision with publishers and suppliers to bring that strategy to life, and then track and to leave but ultimately the right one as it’s enabled me to keep learning optimise once the activity is live. Increasingly her job involves finding smart and progressing my skill-set, which is so important in the early stages of ways to leverage data to better target people with more relevant messages. your career.” “I think of myself as weaving together the right digital technologies to talk Joanne grew up on Auckland’s North Shore, where she attended Northcote to the right people, and ultimately get them to do something.” College. In Year 13 she took accounting, economics, statistics, English literature As an example, Joanne led the development of the award-winning campaign and she also took a digital subject that involved working in Dreamweaver and “Smirnoff Instagram Your Fridge,” where people were invited to Instagram the Adobe Flash, enabling her to delve into the world of web design. inside of their fridge and then Smirnoff sent a drink recipe of what they could For Joanne she felt getting involved in web design “would have to have been make from the available ingredients. the most useful subject, as my career has ended up heavily skewed towards Joanne’s interests in advertising, marketing and digital media were sparked digital media. It was also an enjoyable class, as we were able to test new at the age of 14, when she created and marketed her first website. Given technologies and bring our ideas to life.” this online entrepreneurial streak, studying Commerce at the University of Accounting, economics and statistics were also good to have, as they were Auckland was a natural degree choice. required courses in the first year of the BCom. “It was great to have a Following the completion of her undergraduate business degree with majors in background understanding of these before going into the degree.“ Marketing and Information Management, Joanne went on to complete a If you’re considering a career in advertising, Joanne has this advice to offer: Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) with a specialisation in Marketing at the “Advertising is an industry which values ambition, enthusiasm and ultimately University of Auckland Business School. ideas. Whether it’s a new way to sell a product, or a new way to do something, Joanne completion the Honours part of her degree while working part-time don’t be afraid to speak up and share it. It’s that attitude which gets you at digital agency Young & Shand. “It was tough juggling both priorities, but noticed, and first in line for the biggest and brightest opportunities.“ the experience was invaluable.” KEY FACTS After five years at Young & Shand, where she took on a newly created role focussed on centralising ■ JOANNE PALMGREN WORKS AS A SENIOR DIGITAL ACCOUNT MANAGER the agency’s digital media planning and AT DYNAMO. For more information on studying Commerce through the University of Auckland, visit www.business.auckland.ac.nz WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

■ SHE HAS A BACHELOR OF BUSINESS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT WITH MAJORS IN MARKETING AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT, AND A BACHELOR OF COMMERCE (HONOURS) FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF AUCKLAND BUSINESS SCHOOL. ■ JOANNE FOUND ACCOUNTING, ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS USEFUL IN HER TERTIARY STUDIES.

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8


STRONG DEMAND – NO SLOWING DOWN

written by SARA CARBERY photograph by ALAN STEVENS        THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY IN NEW ZEALAND IS BOOMING, DRIVEN BY THE POST-QUAKE REBUILD IN CANTERBURY AND AUCKLAND’S RAPIDLY GROWING POPULATION. Quantity surveyor 23-year-old Morgan Loughnan is loving being part of this thriving industry. The list of things Morgan enjoys about working in construction is long, and includes the speed of the work – “It’s a very fast paced industry with challenges that pop up every day.”  He also loves the people (“There are so many different personalities on each job”), the teamwork (“Knowing that the guys you’ve got on site have got your back and will happily muck in and help you out where needed”), and the diversity. Morgan points out that the opportunities for quantity surveyors within the construction industry are endless, both within New Zealand and abroad.

“There is definitely no shortage of work and this is showing no signs of slowing down. The demand for construction professionals at the moment is huge; you get calls and emails from different recruitment agencies weekly, if not daily. “There are so many different niches to specialise in with quantity surveying and a lot of transferable skills throughout.” Morgan is currently based on site at the Wynyard East 2 Job in Auckland, where his employer LT McGuinness is building four standalone apartment buildings separated by a communal lane, which provides access to car parking and commercial buildings.

“There is definitely no shortage of work and this is showing no signs of slowing down. The demand for construction professionals at the moment is huge; you get calls and emails from different recruitment agencies weekly, if not daily.” — Morgan Loughnan KEY FACTS ■ MORGAN LOUGHNAN WORKS AS A QUANTITY SURVEYOR WITH LT McGUINNESS. ■ HE COMPLETED A BACHELOR OF CONSTRUCTION, MAJORING IN QUANTITY SURVEYING, THROUGH MASSEY UNIVERSITY. ■ MORGAN TOOK MATHS, PHYSICS, PE AND BUSINESS STUDIES IN YEAR 13. HE ALSO FOUND HIS YEAR 12 SUBJECTS GRAPHICS AND ENGLISH TO BE USEFUL FOR HIS UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES.

The main apartment block is 11 storeys high and made up of 80 apartments. According to the New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveyors, “Quantity surveyors are the construction cost professionals who measure and estimate the cost of resources for construction projects. They aim to keep projects on budget, among many other roles.” “It’s quite hard to explain what a typical day is like as things are always changing and no two days are the same,” says Morgan, but his job includes material procurement, liaising and negotiating with sub-contractors, pricing variations and tracking spending. “Supplementary to that, my day could include anything from cooking a barbecue for the boys to placing concrete. Everyone mucks in where needed.” The satisfaction Morgan gets from his job is obvious. “I enjoy problem solving and striving to find better, more efficient ways of doing things.” Growing up on Auckland’s North Shore “keen on sports, the outdoors, building and fixing things”, Morgan went to Westlake Boys’ High School where he took maths, physics, PE and business studies in Year 13. Other subjects he found useful included graphics and English, which he took to Year 12. After school Morgan enrolled in the Bachelor of Construction at Massey University, intending to major in Construction Management. During his final year there he changed his major to Quantity Surveying – prompted by conversations he had with industry professionals while working part-time for a door hardware firm – and he’s never looked back. Morgan’s advice to school leavers is to consider quantity surveying as a career option. “You’re not stuck in an office all day, you progress quickly and there is definitely good money to be made.”

LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on training to be a Quantity Surveyor, visit www.nziqs.co.nz/Become-a-QS

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

QUANTITY SURVEYOR

CALLING ALL QUANTITY SURVEYORS

33



written by ROBYN YOUSEF

photograph by ALAN STEVENS

GRAB THE OPPORTUNITY

UPSKILLING AND FIXING FAULTS

LEONORA MARSH-NGATAI GAINED HER NEW ZEALAND CERTIFICATE IN INFRASTRUCTURE WORKS – LEVEL 2 BY STUDYING FULLTIME AT THE SOLOMON GROUP, BASED IN PANMURE. UPON COMPLETION OF HER TRAINING THROUGH THE SOUTHERN INITIATIVE’S MAORI AND PASIFIKA TRADES TRAINING SHE HAS SUCCESSFULLY SECURED FULLTIME EMPLOYMENT WITH WATERCARE. Leonora (known as Leo) works as a drainage serviceperson, a role that involves maintaining Watercare’s network of wastewater pipes and pump stations. She is now engaged in further study towards the New Zealand Certificate in Water Reticulation – Wastewater – Level 3. She says, “I had been employed in seasonal work or a combination of casual jobs and I really wanted a steady job for a 40-hour week. I read the advertisement about the Infrastructure programme on offer at Solomon Group and immediately knew that this could be a possibility for me. ” Leo, a mother of three, was raised by her paternal grandparents in Pukekohe. She attended Puni Primary School and then Pukekohe Intermediate and Pukekohe High School. She really struggled with literacy during her schooling, but was determined to get help. “I got great help from my tutor, Singa Falanitule, at the Solomon Group where I completed my trades training in Infrastructure Works, and I continue to get on-going support from her when needed. Now my reading and writing is not an issue and I have heaps of confidence – I am not shy and will give it a go. ” The Solomon Group is a Maori Private Training Establishment (PTE) that offers

fee-free trades training opportunities through the Southern Initiative for those aged 16–40 years and who are Maori or Pasifika descent. The programme Leo completed is 12-weeks long and focuses on the infrastructure sector, helping to address the skills shortage in Auckland. They empower people through training programmes in trade skills, leading to apprenticeships and sustainable employment. Watercare is among a number of Auckland organisations that have committed their support to graduates from Maori and Pasifika Trades Training

programmes. Leo is one of six Southern Initiative graduates that have been employed by Watercare since April. Dale Williams from the Southern Initiative, responsible for recruitment co-ordination and quality control, is delighted with the progress Leo has made during her time with the Solomon Group and also in her six months (to date) at Watercare, where she has been employed fulltime since completing her 12-week course. Leo initially started in Watercare’s maintenance services reinstatement team where she quickly learned how

to clean up wastewater faults throughout Watercare’s network. Since completing her immunisations and special drainage training, Leo has moved into the drainage team where she identifies, locates and repairs faults in the wastewater network pipes and pump stations. Watercare’s Infrastructure Delivery General Manager, Steve Webster, says, “We are proud to have Leonora as a Watercare team member. She has enthusiastically learned the requirements of the role and continues to expand her knowledge in her role and through further study. ” Dale says, “She really is an inspiration to other mothers who stem from similar backgrounds. She has completely turned her life around through trades and we hope to share her testimonial to inspire and encourage the participation of more females into trades. ” Leo says her next goal is to complete her current studies, enabling her to continue her career advancement at Watercare. “The team at Watercare is so supportive and I enjoy working in wastewater reticulation, it’s awesome knowing that I play a role in helping Watercare deliver Auckland’s wastewater safely to the treatment plants. ”

KEY FACTS ■ LEO MARSH-NGATAI WORKS AS A DRAINAGE SERVICEPERSON FOR WATERCARE, WHERE SHE IDENTIFIES, LOCATES AND REPAIRS FAULTS. ■ SHE HAS A NEW ZEALAND CERTIFICATE IN INFRASTRUCTURE WORKS – LEVEL 2 THROUGH THE MAORI PTE THE SOLOMON GROUP AND THE SOUTHERN INITIATIVE’S MAORI AND PASIFIKA TRADES TRAINING PROGRAMME, AND IS CURRENTLY WORKING TOWARD THE NEW ZEALAND CERTIFICATE IN WATER RETICULATION – WASTEWATER – LEVEL 3. LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on Maori and Pacific Trades Training Programmes, visit www.mptt.co.nz

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

WASTEWATER RETICULATION

35


CV PREPARATION

36

written by JANET TUCK

illustration by SHUTTERSTOCK

TIPS ON CV PREPARATION

CONTENT AND STRUCTURE OF CVs

WHEN YOU WANT TO LAND A JOB, YOU ARE GOING TO NEED A CURRICULUM VITAE (CV). A CV IS IMPORTANT BECAUSE IT GIVES AN EMPLOYER INFORMATION TO HELP THEM CHOOSE THE BEST PERSON FOR A JOB, AND IT HELPS YOU STAND OUT FROM OTHER APPLICANTS. Your CV needs to include your contact details, a short summary of your skills, any work experience you’ve had, and where you are up to with your education. It is also helpful to include a short profile summary.

TIPS FOR THE CONTENT OF YOUR CV ■ Put your name and contact details clearly at the top, and include a residential address. ■ Add a short profile – two to three sentences in length – explaining a bit about yourself and what you are aiming for in terms of study or career aspirations. ■ List your skills as bullet points and explain where you have used each skill. Include things like written and oral communication, team work, responsibility, time management, money handling, customer service and computer skills. These are what employers are looking for in younger employees. You can use experience from being in clubs and teams, as well as any paid or unpaid work you have done. Don’t forget to include the skills that are mentioned in the job advertisement. ■ List any previous jobs you have had along with the name of who you worked for and what you did. ■ Include an Education section. Give the year you are in and list the subjects you are studying. ■ List your outside interests. ■ List the names and contact details of people who will be referees for you. These can be teachers, sports coaches, family friends, and so on. You need people who know you and have worked with you in some way.

A WORD ABOUT LAYOUT Use a computer to format your CV clearly, leaving plenty of white space so it doesn’t look WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

cluttered. Choose a font that is easy to read. Use headings for each section and make sure all headings line up and that line spacing is the same throughout. When you have finished, ask someone else to proofread it for you before you send it off.

SOME QUESTIONS Q: Is it a good idea to get someone else to write my CV for me? A: No. It is easy to tell when someone else has written a CV because the language is generally more formal and sometimes a bit too sophisticated. Sure you can get someone to help you if you are not sure how to say something, but putting your CV together yourself will mean that you know what is in it and you will answer interview questions using the same style and language.

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

Q: Should I include a photo? A: As a rule, I generally advise not to. We all like to think that our picture might get us a job, but I think it can introduce the possibility of bias, for whatever reason. Q: Should I use colour or make it look more attractive in some way? A: The content of your CV is the most important thing. Using a lot of colour and design features can be distracting.

Janet Tuck is a Careers Specialist and works at Career Clinic, visit www.careerclinic.co.nz


written by PETER WHITE

photograph by ALAN STEVENS

THE MATHS ADD UP

ELECTRICIAN – A JOB OF DIVERSITY “THERE IS LOTS OF DIVERSITY BEING AN ELECTRICIAN. YOU CAN

ELECTRICIAN

37

DO HOUSES, BIG COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS OR INDUSTRIAL.” — Henno Claassen

WHEN HENNO CLAASSEN LEFT ERMELO HIGH SCHOOL IN HIS NATIVE SOUTH AFRICA, HE WAS NOT SURE WHAT HE WANTED TO DO FOR A CAREER. HE HAD DONE WELL AT SCHOOL IN THE CORE SUBJECTS OF MATHS, SCIENCE AND HISTORY PARTICULARLY, BUT HE HAD ALSO NOT PLANNED ON BECOMING AN ELECTRICIAN. So what sparked his interest? “It was when I moved to New Zealand and my brother was doing a course at Waiariki Polytechnic in Rotorua [now called Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology] and I thought that it looked interesting,” Henno says. “So I kind of had a go and it went on from there.” Henno enrolled in the one-year Certificate in Electrical and Related Trades (Pre-Employment), which covers the first level of qualifications to be an electrician (or other associated trades). Students then study towards becoming trade qualified via an industry apprenticeship. “The tutors were great and were pretty much hands-on and very meticulous, so they always kept us on our toes. The course was exactly what I hoped for and a lot more. “It was really good and showed you exactly what you were getting into, what to expect and where to start. It taught us a lot of the basics and what we had to look forward to. It is a great place to start and to

learn what you may be doing for the rest of your working life, if you enjoy it.” After his one year at Toi Ohomai, Henno did two more years of study with etco, an electrical apprenticeships and training provider. “You do your night-time study there while you are working towards your apprenticeship during the day. I did one night a week at etco and they put you through the rest of your apprenticeship. “It was pretty full-on because if you don’t study and work hard there it becomes quite hard.” After qualifying, Henno joined Hepburn Electrical in Rotorua and worked there while studying at etco. “They are a good group of people and you have to trust the people you work with. We all get our heads down and get the job done at the end of the day.” Henno’s advice to school leavers considering a career as an electrician is quite straight forward.

“Maths, work hard, listen and do what you’re told. Maths helps a lot working out basic calculations, measurements, working out how many amps and voltage calculations. “There is lots of diversity being an electrician. You can do houses, big commercial buildings or industrial.” His boss Tony Feek says Henno had the advantage of having done the Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology course. “It is a good grounding because guys like Henno come with a good base understanding and are not green, straight out of school. That puts them in a better position for us to employ them. “That is definitely helpful as they have some understanding of what they are meant to be doing straight away. Henno has fitted in fantastically well and has a really good work ethic. “He is a very valued employee who puts his full effort into everything he does on the job.”

KEY FACTS ■ HENNO CLAASSEN COMPLETED A ONE-YEAR CERTIFICATE IN ELECTRICAL AND RELATED TRADES (PRE-EMPLOYMENT) THROUGH TOI OHOMAI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (FORMERLY WAIARIKI INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY). ■ HE THEN COMPLETED TWO MORE YEARS OF STUDY WITH ETCO, AN ELECTRICAL APPRENTICESHIPS AND TRAINING PROVIDER. ■ HENNO WORKS FOR HEPBURN ELECTRICAL IN ROTORUA. LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on electrical apprenticeships through etco,  visit www.etco.co.nz  And for more information on studying electrical courses through Toi Ohomai Institute of Technology (formerly Waiariki Institute of Technology),  visit www.toiohomai.ac.nz

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ


FACILITIES SERVICES MANAGER

38

written by SARA CARBERY

photograph by ALAN STEVENS

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT LOOKING AFTER ICONIC BUILDINGS

WE ALL KNOW WHAT ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS DO, BUT WHO LOOKS AFTER THE BUILDINGS ONCE THEY’RE CONSTRUCTED – WHO ENSURES THEY’RE SAFE, HEALTHY, SUSTAINABLE AND PRODUCTIVE SPACES TO WORK IN AND VISIT? THE PEOPLE WHO PERFORM THIS ROLE ARE FACILITIES MANAGERS, AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT (OR FM, FOR SHORT) IS BECOMING AN INCREASINGLY RECOGNISED AND VALUED PROFESSION. Every major building you can think of will have a facilities manager, along with an FM team – museums, universities, theatres, shopping centres, banks, airports … the list goes on! Stuart Bryant is Facilities Services Manager for SKYCITY Auckland, and his domain includes the Sky Tower, one of the city’s most iconic buildings His job requires building engineering, maintenance and management skills as he runs SKYCITY’s operational teams; the teams include in-house electricians, plumbers, carpenters, electrical engineers, mechanical technicians, upholsters and more. He also looks after opex (day-to-day operational expenditure) and capex (capital expenditure for

HIGHER LEVEL EDUCATION Bachelor of Musical Arts A Bachelor of Audio Engineering and Production Graduate Dip. in Business and Enterprise A Bachelor of Business and Enterprise G

A Faculty of Tai Poutini Polytechnic

A

APPLY NOW FOR 2017 A

= Auckland

C

= Christchurch

G

= Greymouth

0800 TPP INFO | TPP.AC.NZ

C


When asked to sum up FM in one sentence, Stuart says, “I see FM as allowing the built environment to operate at optimal performance while considering costs and sustainability. ” When Stuart left Auckland’s Glendowie College with Sixth Form Certificate (the equivalent of NCEA Level 2), he had no idea what he wanted to do. But a couple of part-time jobs, a stint working as a snowboard instructor, and a number of years working in operations at a large law-firm led Stuart to an industry he loves. “Being the person who can make things happen is what really excites me. ” While the bulk of Stuart’s learning has been on-the-job, he has sought out opportunities to

formally upskill in FM. “Knowledge is everything. The more you can expose yourself to, the better. ” A board member of the Facilities Management Association of New Zealand (FMANZ), which supports education, networking and knowledge sharing for FM professionals, Stuart (33) is excited about AUT’s new Asset and Facilities Management qualification offered through the university’s Bachelor of Engineering Technology programme. “An FM qualification will be instrumental in taking this profession to the next level,” he says. Involving three years of fulltime study and 600 hours of work experience, this is the first degree-level FM qualification to be offered in New Zealand. “This Building Engineering programme based in Manukau campus offers the skills that we know companies have been after for years. Having a

qualification that trains students as both engineers and FMs will make them especially sought after once they graduate,”  explains Professor John Tookey from AUT. “Students can also pick options in safety engineering and surveying. All around this gives the skills that lead to jobs. ” As well as University Entrance, NCEA entry requirements to the Bachelor of Engineering Technology (BEngTech) include 14 credits at Level 3 in any one of mathematics, calculus or statistics and a minimum of 14 Level 2 credits in physics. Other helpful school subjects include English, computing and technology. BEngTech students can choose from seven majors – Building Engineering, Building Services Engineering, Computer and Mobile Systems Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Network and Communication Engineering.

KEY FACTS ■ STUART BRYANT IS FACILITIES SERVICES MANAGER FOR SKYCITY AUCKLAND. ■ HE IS A BOARD MEMBER ON THE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF NEW ZEALAND AND IS EXCITED THAT AUT IS NOW OFFERING THE FIRST DEGREE-LEVEL FM QUALIFICATION IN THE COUNTRY.

For more information on studying Engineering Technology through AUT, visit www.aut.ac.nz/ study-at-aut/study-areas/engineering/ undergraduate/bachelor-of-engineeringtechnology---overview and for further details on facilities management, visit www.fmanz.org

STUDY ENGINEERING Brody Radford

Bachelor of Engineering (Honours) in Electrical and Electronic Engineering When you study engineering at AUT, you’ll not only preview the technology soon to fill our homes and work places – you’ll have the opportunity to create it. “The most gratifying thing is the variety of problems I get to work on. There’s just no shortage, and they’re the kind you can really sink your teeth into.”

MAKE AN EDUCATED DECISION aut.ac.nz/engineering aut.ac.nz/startnow 0800 AUT UNI (0800 288 864)

From 2017 you can study the Bachelor of Engineering Technology at our AUT South Campus. Majors offered: • Building Engineering • Building Services Engineering

FACILITIES TEXT SERVICES MANAGER

larger project) budgets for SKYCITY and provides input into new developments to ensure future maintenance can take place while still providing an exciting location for visitors to enjoy 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

39


TOURISM MANAGEMENT 40

written by SARA CARBERY

photograph by MARTY MELVILLE

TOURISM MANAGEMENT

INTRIGUED BY TRAVEL AND DIFFERENT CULTURES JESSICA TAYLOR GREW UP IN THE BAY OF PLENTY, AND ATTENDED MOUNT MAUNGANUI COLLEGE. SHE MOVED SOUTH TO ATTEND VICTORIA UNIVERSITY, AND GRADUATED WITH A BACHELOR OF TOURISM MANAGEMENT WITH FIRST CLASS HONOURS, AND A GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN COMMERCE – MARKETING. “The decision to study for four years at honours level derived from wanting to have the strongest knowledge and skill-set when entering the workforce, ” says Jessica. She has been fascinated with travel, international relations, different cultures and sustainability for as long as she can remember. “The Bachelor of Tourism Management is taught within Victoria Business School, so I knew I would be developing a range of commercial skills and critical thinking that could be applied within both a national and globalised setting. ” Although she found the workload a big (but manageable) jump from high school, Jessica thoroughly enjoyed her time at Victoria. “University was a great experience and I met amazing people through studying, living in the halls of residence in first year and through extra-curricular activities. “Currently I contribute to the Tourism Management Advisory Group at Victoria University and I am also a member of the Young Tourism Export Council of New Zealand, which offers networking and leadership development, so the opportunities keep giving even after graduation. ” Three years on from completing her final paper, Jessica (24) works as a Marketing and Communications Executive at the James Cook Hotel Grand Chancellor in Wellington. She is responsible for digital and social media marketing, public relations and media co-ordination, content writing, design of collateral and maintaining relationships with stakeholders. Her short-term career goal is to continue in the area of tourism marketing, progressing to a management position within the hotel, airline or destination marketing sectors. “In the long-term, I aspire to transition into either a policy or destination management position, ensuring tourism is developed sustainably in New Zealand and globally. ” Jessica left school with NCEA Level 3 and University Entrance, having studied Year 13 English, statistics, biology, science and dance. “Having a solid foundation of English and maths really sets you up for a business-related degree, ”she says. “These skills are advanced further at university, and Victoria also offers a range of assistance to support the transition from high school. ” For a Bachelor of Tourism Management, Jessica believes that economics, geography and a language would be beneficial NCEA subjects to have studied;

“The Bachelor of Tourism Management is taught within Victoria Business School, so I knew I would be developing a range of commercial skills and critical thinking that could be applied within both a national and globalised setting.” — Jessica Taylor although this knowledge can be gained in the degree – Jessica studied Spanish as an elective at university, starting with an introduction paper. Her advice to anyone considering a similar career is to gain work experience through holiday jobs, volunteering or casual positions while you study. “Studying in a city like Wellington means there are plenty of opportunities to gain real-world experience, which will help set you up for fulltime work after graduation. For example, I was able to work part-time as a Research Assistant at Te Papa, volunteer at events such as the Rugby World Cup and tutor papers in third and fourth year. ”

KEY FACTS ■ JESSICA TAYLOR HAS A BACHELOR OF TOURISM MANAGEMENT WITH FIRST CLASS HONOURS, AND A GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN COMMERCE – MARKETING FROM VICTORIA UNIVERSITY. ■ SHE WORKS AS A MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS EXECUTIVE AT THE JAMES COOK HOTEL GRAND CHANCELLOR IN WELLINGTON. ■ FOR PROSPECTIVE TOURISM MANAGEMENT STUDENTS, JESSICA BELIEVES THAT ECONOMICS, GEOGRAPHY AND A LANGUAGE WOULD BE BENEFICIAL NCEA SUBJECTS TO HAVE STUDIED. WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on studying Tourism Management through Victoria University of Wellington,  visit www.victoria.ac.nz


FARM TECHNICIAN 41

MONITORING AND MEASURING

WORKING MOUNT LINTON STATION

written by SARA CARBERY photograph by MEGAN GRAHAM        GROWING UP ON A LIFESTYLE BLOCK NEAR GORE, ALLEN GREGORY ALWAYS KNEW HE WANTED TO BE INVOLVED IN THE AGRICULTURE SECTOR, “WHETHER THAT WAS ON A FARM OR IN SUPPORTING INDUSTRIES” . In his final year at St Peter’s College, Allen took chemistry, biology, agriculture (by correspondence), statistics, economics and accounting, to gain NCEA Level 3. “I made sure that I took a wide range of subjects that would set me up well for university,” he says. “The mix of commerce and science was key for me and is something that I would recommend to all students interested in agriculture.” He then went on to study for a Bachelor of Agricultural Science at Lincoln University, focussing his final years of study on farm management and animal science. “Basically I was setting myself up so that I had a strong theory background to go into farm management,” he says.

Allen’s time at Lincoln was greatly assisted by a Beef + Lamb New Zealand undergraduate scholarship, which he was awarded for each of his four years of study. This Beef + Lamb New Zealand scholarship covers full annual tuition fees (up to $5000 a year) and is renewed if recipients secure a B+ grade average for the year. “These scholarships were a great help and an awesome way to meet people in the industry,” says Allen. As well as studying a wide range of papers at Lincoln, including animal science, research and analytical skills, plant science, soil science, sustainable futures, livestock production sciences, farm management, crop science, and farm development and investment,

Allen was required to undertake 28 weeks of practical work. Now 23, he is putting the knowledge he has gained to good use working on Mount Linton Station, which carries 3000 breeding cows and 40,000 breeding ewes. Allen worked on the station on a casual basis while studying, and completed part of his practicum there. Since finishing at Lincoln, he has been employed fulltime at the station as a Farm Technician. Alongside some general shepherd work, Allen says his principal job is to “monitor and measure”. For example, once a month he measures ‘feed covers’ to determine how much grass the station is growing, which in turn determines

how many animals it can sustain. Working with the station’s stock manager, Allen also monitors animal weight, condition and performance, as well as soil conditions and crops. Farm technicians also monitor environmental effects, such as sustainability around water quality. One of 16 fulltime employees living on Mount Linton Station, Allen says he enjoys the technical side of farming, being outdoors, working with animals and the responsibility of his job. “I like the big picture. And while what I do is only a small part of the big picture, it’s an important part. If you’re not measuring and monitoring, you don’t know what’s happening.”

KEY FACTS ■ ALLEN GREGORY WORKS AS A FARM TECHNICIAN ON MOUNT LINTON STATION, WHICH CARRIES 3000 BREEDING COWS AND 40,000 BREEDING EWES. ■ HE HAS A BACHELOR OF AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE FROM LINCOLN UNIVERSITY. ■ ALLEN SECURED A BEEF + LAMB NEW ZEALAND SCHOLARSHIP THAT COVERED HIS FULL ANNUAL TUITION FEES (UP TO $5000 A YEAR).

To learn more about the variety of careers available in Agriculture, go to www.getahead.co.nz To find out more about the scholarships offered by Beef+Lamb New Zealand,  go to www.beeflambnz.com/scholarships

LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ


EMPLOYMENT ADVICE 42

DISCOVER THE POSITIVES BENEFITS OF YOUR FIRST JOB

written by DIANA CLEMENT illustration by STUDIOSTOKS        YOUR FIRST JOB IS A RITE OF PASSAGE. WHETHER IT’S A SHORT-TERM JOB, OR YOU’RE LUCKY ENOUGH TO LAND A JOB THAT WILL PROVIDE VALUABLE EXPERIENCE TOWARDS ANOTHER CAREER, YOUR FIRST JOB COMES WITH LOTS OF PLUS POINTS. You’ll not only earn money (yay!), you will have something valuable to put on your CV, and develop a bunch of new skills. To secure a job, you’ll need to put a CV together and learn to interact with employers says Yvonne Godfrey, founder of MIOMO (which offers courses to unlock teens’ potential) and author of Parenting Yadults. In your first job, you will learn to manage your time, space and energy, Yvonne says. These are valuable  ‘transferable’  skills to go on your CV. Managing time involves turning up a few minutes early so you are ready to work when your shift starts. In terms of  ‘space’  you’ll learn that you can’t work in a mess. The third key skill, managing your energy, is often hard for busy teenagers like you to learn, says Yvonne. “You can’t just bring the crumbs of your energy to the employer’s table,” she says. It is important to get more sleep and have the energy to work. “If someone is paying you, you have to contribute.” Get all of this right and you will start to build a reputation and references, which will help you get better jobs in the future. Finding your first job can be a hurdle. In reality, potential jobs are all around you. Big chains, such as The Warehouse and McDonald’s, cinemas and sports stadiums have careers sections on their websites with all the information you need to apply, says Yvonne. You could also print out your CV and physically deliver it to local employers. MIOMO presenter Sarah Mayes teaches work readiness, and points out that teenage workers have employment rights. For example, if you’re

over the age of 16 you have to be paid the adult minimum wage, which currently in 2016 is $15.25. Under that age and you may be paid a  ‘starting out’ or  ‘training minimum’ wage of $12.20 per hour. Holiday pay is over and above, but if you’re a casual worker it will usually be included in your regular pay and not as a lump sum when you go on holiday, says Sarah. Other rights include rest and meal breaks. Be aware that New Zealand employers can employ you on a trial period for up to 90 days, providing this is in your employment agreement (contract). This means unfortunately that if you don’t shape up quickly your employer can dismiss you within that time without giving a reason.

You’ll need to pay tax on your earnings. Don’t ever accept an  ‘under the table’  job. It’s not worth the risk. Ensure when you start that your employer hands you an IR330 tax form to fill in and make sure you do so correctly, says Sarah. If you’re not sure, ask a family member or school teacher to read both your completed IR330 and your contract, so that you understand what you’re agreeing to. The final thing to think about is KiwiSaver. You’ll be auto-enrolled when you start your first job and this is a good thing. It means you’re contributing a little of each pay towards either your first home or retirement. You’ll be very glad you did this when you come to need those savings. Your employer will match the three per cent you pay.

KEY FACTS ■ IN YOUR FIRST JOB, YOU WILL LEARN TO MANAGE YOUR TIME, SPACE AND ENERGY. ■ HAVE A TRUSTED FAMILY MEMBER OR TEACHER CHECK OVER YOUR COMPLETED IR330 AND READ YOUR EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT. ■ IT WOULD BE PERTINENT TO MAKE SURE YOU’RE AWARE OF YOUR RIGHTS AS AN EMPLOYEE. WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

For more information on your rights as a worker, visit www.employment.govt.nz/startingemployment/rights-and-responsibilities/ minimum-rights-of-employees You can also find details on the minimum wage and the employment trial period at www.employment.govt.nz


. s l l i k s l Rea tages Real advan

ew in 2017? n g in th e m o s o d Looking to hool? Are you leaving sc s. Get hands-on. n o ti p o 0 15 s er ff o WelTec rs need. We offer ye lo p em at th s ill sk Gain elp you succeed. h to rt o p p su f o ty n ple r your career. Take the first step fo 0800 WELTEC weltec.ac.nz

c facebook.com/welte tecnz instagram.com/wel

e It starts. Right her

WelTec and Whitireia are strategic partners delivering more choice to students.


A CLOSER LOOK AT SOME FASCINATING OCCUPATIONS THERE ARE SO MANY THINGS TO CONSIDER WHEN LOOKING AT WHICH PATH TO TAKE AFTER SCHOOL. IT’S EASY TO LOSE SIGHT OF THE BIGGER PICTURE – WHAT’S YOUR PASSION? WHAT JOB WILL HAVE YOU WAKING UP EACH MORNING AND LOOKING FORWARD TO DOING IT?

LOW POO R

LOW POO R

AVERAGE

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME AVERAGE

POO R

AGRICULTURAL PERSONAL CARE TECHNICIAN ASSISTANT

INCOME

D GOO

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

MEDIUM

H HIG

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

LENGTH OF STUDY

D GOO

Please note: The occupations listed have been colour coded to their predominant industry sector colours using the Vocational Pathway colour chart.

JOB PROSPECTS

H HIG

food and beverage attendant, restaurant worker Also known as: Bioengineer, biotronics engineer. Waiters serve food anddesign drink to they set tables and hand lists. They answer questions aboutdrugs, the menu and take orders. Biomedical engineers andcustomers, develop biotechnical products, suchout asmenus/wine medical scanning devices, artificial body parts, computer models Clearing tables,They cleaning the restaurant, polishing and glass, as well asstaff restocking food drinksand areprovide also tasks they perform. and software. test products with patients or cutlery volunteers, train medical in how to useand devices, technical support when devices are in use. There are no specific entry requirements for this position, but skills and training are gained on-the-job. Working toward a New Zealand Certificate in Hospitality andundergraduate Beverage) Level 3 caninbebiomedical done on-the-job, also. or engineering (for example, mechanical To become a biomedical engineer, you(Food need an degree engineering engineering with life sciencehave components). To work need a doctorate. Waiters needortoelectronics, work well under pressure, great people skills in andresearch, be quickyou andusually efficient. Being reliable, punctual and able to workengineers well in a team expected.logical, Friendliness, and helpfulness are at personal Biomedical need istoalso be practical, creativepoliteness and innovative. Being skilled problem solving, accurate, and with an eye for detail attributes needed in this role. are also attributes required in this role. gaining aemployment in this role are good, as staffdue turnover is high.of workers. Chances of getting job as a biomedical engineer are good to a shortage 18,215 Zealanders prospects: Good. Length of training: Statistics: In 2014, 100 NewNew Zealanders diddid thisthis job.job. JobJob prospects: Good. Length of study: 4 years.Varies. per hour.engineers with a bachelor degree, $45,000. For those with a doctorate, $70,000. Pay scale: B $15 iomedical Senior biomedical engineers with 10 years’ experience, $70,000–$120,000.

AVERAGE

D GOO

Also known as: Agronomist, farming scientist/researcher, horticulturist. Agricultural/horticultural scientists work to develop farming methods to protect animal welfare and the environment. They also find ways to improve the quality and value of animal or crop production, and develop vaccines to improve animal health and productivity. To become an agricultural/horticultural scientist, you usually need a PhD in science, in an area such as agricultural science, microbiology or biochemistry. NCEA Level 3 biology, chemistry, maths, computer studies and English are preferred school subjects. They need to be patient and motivated, as many projects are long-term, and enquiring and observant – especially when recording results. Being accurate, skilled at writing and maths, and good at problem solving and communicating are also skills required in this role. Chances of getting a job as an agricultural/horticultural scientist are good for scientists working on ways to increase agricultural productivity and sustainability. Statistics: In 2014, 762 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 5–9 years. Pay scale: PhD graduates earn $55,000–$67,000. With three to five years’ experience, $70,000–$85,000. With 10 years’ experience, $85,000–$100,000

INCOME

H HIG

Also known as: Artificial breeding technician, dairy technician, field crop technical officer, herd tester, horticultural technician, poultry technician. Agricultural technicians analyse produce and livestock, set and maintain standards of quality, arrange the supply of drugs and vaccines for livestock to farmers, and assist in controlled breeding and artificial insemination to develop improved crop and livestock strains. While there are no specific requirements for this role, most employers prefer agricultural technicians to have a tertiary qualification such as a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Science (Technology), majoring in the specific area of agriculture you wish to work in. Hands-on work experience in agriculture or horticulture is valued. NCEA Level 2 science and maths is recommended. Useful work experience includes farming, agriculture or horticulture work with plants or animals, work at a research facility, and other science or laboratory work. Chances of getting a job as an agricultural technician are average due to good demand for their services, but high competition for jobs. Statistics: In 2014, 1669 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: A gricultural technicians with one to five years’ experience, $45,000–$65,000. Those with five or more years’ experience, $55,000–$85,000.

MEDIUM

D GOO

Also known as: Traditional Chinese medicine practitioner. Acupuncturists examine patients and diagnose health problems using the principles of traditional Chinese medicine. They locate acupuncture points and insert acupuncture needles, use and prescribe herbal medicines. They also give dietary advice, tuina (massage), moxibustion (heat), cupping (suction), exercise therapy and laser therapy. To become an acupuncturist you need to complete a Bachelor of Health Science and specialise in acupuncture or Chinese medicine; this can be undertaken at New Zealand School of Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine, and New Zealand College of Chinese Medicine. Acupuncturists need to be accurate, patient, observant and responsible. Being well organised, able to inspire confidence in others and skilled in problem solving are attributes required in this role. Chances of getting fulltime work as a newly qualified acupuncturist are average, but demand is strong for experienced acupuncturists. Statistics: In 2014, 471 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 3–4 years. Pay scale: N ew acupuncture graduates employed by a clinic can earn a salary of about $40,000. Self-employed acupuncturists charge between $60–$120 an hour, depending on their experience and the region they work in.

H HIG

ACUPUNCTURIST

Here you’ll find profiles of varied and interesting jobs with a foundation in science or medicine – from agricultural technician to physiotherapist to zoologist – which are found across the science, and health and community industries. Each job profile includes detailed descriptors, job prospects and some insightful statistics.

AGRICULTURAL/ PERSONAL CARE HORTICULTURAL ASSISTANT SCIENTIST

44

JOBS IN FOCUS

BIOMEDICAL ENGINEER

JOBS IN FOCUS

Job data has been sourced from CAREERS NEW ZEALAND, visit careers.govt.nz

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY


LOW

LENGTH OF STUDY

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME AVERAGE D GOO

JOB PROSPECTS

LOW POO R

AVERAGE

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

LOW

MEDIUM H HIG

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

FORESTRY SCIENTIST

INCOME

D GOO

Also known as: Forestry researcher, plant breeder (forestry). Forestry scientists develop timber products and forestry technology, measure and analyse tree and forest growth, and investigate new species of tree and develop ways to breed them. They investigate damage to trees caused by diseases or animals and study the impact of forestry on communities and vice versa. To become a forestry scientist you need to have a degree in forestry science or engineering, or a related subject such as molecular biology, botany or plant physiology. Increasingly, employers are preferring a postgraduate qualification, such as a Master’s in Science (or Engineering), majoring in Forestry Science. At high school, NCEA subjects maths, English, biology, chemistry and physics are important. Chances of getting a job as a forestry scientist are good due to a shortage of workers. Statistics: In 2014, 816 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 3–4 years. Pay scale: F or forestry scientists at research institutions, those with a bachelor degree earn $35,000–$75,000. Those with postgraduate degrees earn $56,000–$98,000. With experience and responsibility, $110,000–$150,000.

MEDIUM H HIG

FOOD TECHNOLOGIST CHEF

LENGTH OF STUDY

Also known as: Food scientist, packaging technologist, product development technologist, research and development technologist, research scientist. Food technologists develop new food and drinks or improve existing products, make test samples of food products and conduct trials, and source and select ingredients for products. They ensure products meet specifications and standards, and investigate the sensory and nutritional properties of foods. To become a food technologist, most employers require you to have a bachelor degree in food technology, food science or food engineering. Food technologists are often required to complete on-the-job training programmes specific to the products and processes they are working with. Food technologists need to be patient, accurate and persistent. Being able to work well under pressure, be skilled at problem solving, planning and organising are also skills required in this role. Chances of getting a job as a food technologist are good due to growing demand and a shortage of workers. Statistics: In 2014, 829 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 3–5 years. Pay scale: G raduates earn $50,000. Those with two to three years’ experience earn $60,000–$70,000. Senior food technologists earn $75,000–$95,000.

JOB PROSPECTS

LOW

MEDIUM H HIG

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE D GOO

GENERAL PRACTITIONER

LENGTH OF STUDY

Also known as: Doctor, GP. General practitioners consult with, examine and diagnose patients. They advise on health care and prevention of illness, perform minor surgery, prescribe and administer medication and keep medical records. To become a GP, you must complete the first year of the Health Sciences programme at Otago University, or the first year of either the Bachelor of Health Sciences or Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science at Auckland University. Then a five year Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery at Otago or Auckland, work for two years as a house officer in a hospital, and complete another three years of specialist training and examinations to become a Fellow of the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners. Necessary skills include remaining calm in emergencies, working well under pressure, and being patient and understanding of other cultures’ attitudes to medical treatment. Chances of getting a job as a general practitioner are good due to a shortage of workers. Statistics: In 2011, 3141 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 11 years. Pay scale: Registrars working for DHBs earn $75,000–$175,000. Qualified GPs working for DHBs earn $113,000–$212,000.

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8

JOBS IN FOCUS

POO R

JOB PROSPECTS

POO R

CHEMIST

AVERAGE

H HIG

DENTIST

INCOME

D GOO

Also known as: Periodontist, orthodontist, oral medicine specialist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, paediatric dentist. Dentists examine patients’ teeth, mouth, gums and jaw. They diagnose and treat diseased teeth and gums, replace missing teeth and improve the appearance of teeth and advise patients on disease prevention, and refer patients on, as necessary. To become a dentist, you must complete the first year of the Health Sciences programme and then a four-year Bachelor of Dental Surgery at Otago, which is the only university to offer this qualification. Useful NCEA Level 3 subjects include maths with calculus and/or statistics, chemistry, physics, biology and English. Dentists need to be accurate, have an eye for detail and be able to work well under pressure. It is also advantageous to be skilled at problem solving, able to make good decisions, and have the ability to relate to a wide range of people. Newly qualified dentists may find it takes time to get fulltime work, but there is strong demand for experienced dentists. Statistics: In 2014, 2570 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 5 years. Pay scale: With one to two years’ experience $65,000–$80,000. With three to five years’ experience, $80,000–$120,000. With five years’ plus experience, $150,000. Dental specialists working for DHBs, $150,000–$212,000.

MEDIUM H HIG

Also known as: Physical chemist, organic chemist, materials chemist, research chemist, analytical chemist, inorganic chemist. Chemists work to develop chemical processes, and develop methods and equipment to study chemical compounds, as well as think of new ways to make compounds. They test chemical samples to determine their make-up and properties. Chemists carry out experiments, write up their results and publish in scientific journals. To become a chemist you usually need to have a master’s degree in chemistry, biochemistry or a related science. Many skills, such as planning experiments, are gained on the job and in the final stages of study. A PhD and further postdoctoral study is often required. Essential attributes for this role include being enquiring, accurate and motivated. Creative thinking about new research methods and new uses for chemicals, as well as being able to problem solve are skills that also required. Chances of getting a job are good for analytical chemists working in industry, but average for research chemists. Statistics: In 2014, 482 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 5 years. Pay scale: C hemists with a bachelor degree earn $40,000–$55,000. For those with a master’s, $55,000–$75,000. Chemists who have PhDs earn $70,000–$110,000. With a management position and responsibilities, $140,000.

| WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

45


LOW LOW LOW POO R LOW

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME

POO R

AVERAGE

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

H HIG

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME

D GOO

POO R

AVERAGE

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

H HIG

LOW

MEDIUM

INCOME

AVERAGE D GOO

POO R

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENTIST PERSONAL CARE MEDICAL PHYSICIST ASSISTANT PATHOLOGIST

MEDIUM

D GOO

PHYSIOTHERAPIST

LENGTH OF STUDY LENGTH OF STUDY

H HIG

ZOOLOGIST

JOBS IN FOCUS

JOB PROSPECTS JOB PROSPECTS

D GOO

Also known as: Animal scientist, biologist (zoology), ecological researcher, wildlife conservationist. Zoologists study the make-up, growth, diseases and origins of animals. They also study the relationship between animals and their environment, and the genetics and molecular biology of animals. Research into conservation and pest control is also an element of the role. To enter this line of work, you need to have a Bachelor of Science, majoring in Zoology, Ecology, Microbiology, Biotechnology or Molecular Biology. A post-graduate qualification, such as a master’s or PhD, are recommended for those after research-based positions. NCEA Level 3 biology, chemistry, and maths with statistics are necessary. Geography and English are useful subjects. Zoologists need to be observant, enquiring, logical and skilled at problem solving. Other attributes valued in this profession are being well organised, having good planning skills and research skills. Chances of getting a job as a zoologist are average, due to high demand in some areas of employment, but limited opportunities in others. Statistics: In 2014, 44 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: For those with a master’s, $55,000–$75,000. Senior zoologists, who usually have PhDs, $76,000–$94,000. With responsibility and experience, up to $130,000.

AVERAGE

MEDIUM

H HIG

Also known as: Physical therapist, physio. Physiotherapists assess and diagnose patients’ injuries or functional problems, and help rehabilitate people who have suffered from strokes and accidents. They use a range of treatments to reduce pain and improve movement and plan exercises for patients to improve their strength and fitness. To become a physiotherapist, you need to have either a Bachelor of Health Science majoring in Physiotherapy from Auckland University of Technology, or a Bachelor of Physiotherapy from the University of Otago. Physiotherapists must be registered with the Physiotherapy Board of New Zealand and hold a current annual practising certificate. Physiotherapists need to be supportive, positive, be able to gain people’s trust and skilled listeners. Chances of getting a job as a physiotherapist are good due to a strong demand for their services. Statistics: In 2012, 4202 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 4 years. Pay scale: F or those working at DHBs, new physiotherapists earn $46,000 and can progress to $66,000. With responsibilities and experience, physiotherapists earn $69,000–$95,000.

INCOME INCOME

D GOO IGH H

Also known as: Anatomical pathologist, chemical pathologist, clinical pathologist, forensic pathologist, general pathologist, genetic pathologist, haematologist, immunopathologist. Pathologists study diseases, and diagnose a range of conditions (such as cancer, infectious diseases and diabetes). They investigate deaths, perform autopsies, carry out research, and take samples of body tissue and fluids to test for infectious agents that cause disease. To become a pathologist, you must complete the first year of the Health Sciences programme at Otago University, or the first year of either the Bachelor of Health Sciences or Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science at Auckland University. Then a five year Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery at Otago or Auckland, work for two years as a house officer in a hospital, and complete another five years of specialist training and examinations to become a Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. Pathologists need to be accurate and have an eye for detail. They also need to be analytical, have problem-solving skills, be able to work well under pressure, and have excellent data analysis and interpretation skills. Chances of getting a job as a pathologist are good due to a shortage of workers. Statistics: In 2011, 195 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 13 years. Pay scale: Registrars working for a DHB earn $70,000–$175,000. Qualified pathologists working for a DHB earn $151,000–$212,000.

H HIG

Medical physicists commission high-tech medical equipment, monitor and test radiation equipment to ensure it is providing the correct doses, research new developments in equipment and techniques, and contribute to the design of new medical facilities. To become a medical physicist, you need a relevant undergraduate degree – such as a Bachelor of Science, majoring in Physics; Bachelor of Engineering, focussed on maths and physics; Bachelor of Technology, majoring in Medical Physics and Imaging Technology. Then a Master of Science (MSc) in Medical Physics completed in conjunction with a five-year clinical training, education and accreditation programme. Finally, you need to have accreditation with the Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM). Medical physicists should be skilled at research, and analysing and interpreting research results. It is also essential to be accurate, have an eye for detail, organised and skilled at communicating and problem solving. Chances of getting a job as a medical physicist are good due to a shortage of skilled workers. Statistics: It is not known how many people are in this profession in New Zealand. Job prospects: Good. Length of study: 8 years. Pay scale: Trainee medical physicists, $54,000–$72,000. Qualified medical physicists, $83,000–$100,000. Senior medical physicists, $131,000.

MEDIUM MEDIUM

H HIG

46

Also known as: Clinical biochemist, clinical immunologist, cytogeneticist, haematologist, histologist, medical cytologist, medical microbiologist, transfusion scientist. Medical laboratory scientists test and study blood, tissue and fluid samples. They evaluate test results, communicate results, test and set up medical equipment and prepare samples for examination by a pathologist. To become a medical laboratory scientist, you need a Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science (offered by Massey University, AUT and Otago University) or another qualification recognised by the Medical Sciences Council of New Zealand, be registered with the Council, work for at least six months under supervision and have a current annual practising certificate. Medical laboratory scientists need to be methodical, accurate, enquiring, adaptable and good communicators. It is also essential to be responsible, reliable and safety conscious. Chances of getting a job as a medical laboratory scientist are average due to increasing job numbers but high competition for positions. Statistics: In 2014, 1713 New Zealanders did this job. Job prospects: Average. Length of study: 3 years. Pay scale: N ewly registered medical laboratory scientists earn $50,000. With five years’ experience, $64,000. Senior scientists with management responsibilities earn $92,000.

JOB PROSPECTS

LENGTH OF STUDY

WWW.LEAVINGSCHOOL.CO.NZ

| LEAVING SCHOOL issue #8


AVAILABLE FREE ONLINE www.leavingschool.co.nz

Scan me with your smartphone


PALMERSTON NORTH CAMPUS

AUCKLAND CAMPUS

WELLINGTON CAMPUS

FIND YOUR HUNGER AT MASSEY ENQUIRE ABOUT CAMPUS ACCOMMODATION ACROSS OUR THREE LOCATIONS

Apply now for 2017 massey.ac.nz