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Old Haberdashers’ Association Founded 1888

www.oldhabs.com

e-Newsletter Issue 4 – May 2012 Please REGISTER on the OHA Website to ensure you hear about news and events – www.oldhabs.com OHA Annual Dinner, Haberdashers Hall, 17th May 2012 – Follow this link to the invitation and reply form Contents: Page 1 OHRFC League Champions Page 2 Recent Events Page 3 Forthcoming Events Page 4 OH in the News Page 5 Where Are They Now? Page 6 Sports Club Updates Page 8 In Memoriam and Obituaries Page 10 The Headmasters Page 11 Caption Comp Page 12 Advertising

Old Haberdashers’ RFC triumph! 1st XV: Champions of London NW2 – Promoted in 4 consecutive seasons 2nd XV: Winners of Herts / Middx Merit Table First Division Plate Competition

Presentation of League Winners shield by Paul Astbury (President of Middx RFU) to the season’s captains: Scott Chatterton, Francis Booth and 1st XV skipper Sebastian Taylor

2nd XV after winning the final of the Herts/Middx Merit Table First Division Knock Out Plate Cup Competition. OHRFC 32 – Fullerians 14

Old Haberdashers’ RFC has a proud history, being established in 1923 for players from the Haberdashers' Aske's School in North London, but recent years have seen mixed fortunes. Just ten seasons ago we were forced to withdraw mid-season from the Herts/Middlesex league. Dwindling availability finally meant we could not put a side out. The remaining players and members resolved that they simply could not and would not let the club, its name and its history, die. The very next season, the 1st XV achieved the club’s first ever league promotion. The decision to survive displayed the indomitable spirit that is woven into the amateur rugby community countrywide, a spirit that has been rekindled and that has become a trademark of this club ever since. In 2005/6, again teetering on the brink, a small group of old boys set about recruiting friends, relations and colleagues, opening the doors of OHRFC to anyone who shared their passion to play rugby on a Saturday afternoon. New players were attracted by the amateur ethos that is the club's foundation; there are no midweek team training sessions and there is no coach. The club is run by players for the players. The results have been impressive; built on a core of players, the 1st XV have moved up four leagues in four seasons and following promotion as champions from London North West 2 will be playing in London 1 next season. Success breeds success, and OHRFC has managed to attract more players as they have gone along, with their new 2nd XV now playing in the Herts/Middlesex Merit Table first division and winning the end of season Knock Out Plate competition and even a 3rd XV taking the field for the first time in over twenty years this season. As the 2011/12 season draws to a close, they have close to 100 playing members. With its commitment to not training and not having a coach, in the modern era of professionalism the OHRFC cuts a distinctly amateur figure, but this is something of which they are fiercely proud. Players are aware that next season in London 1 will be a challenge, but it is one they look forward to and will enjoy, as always, together. A key factor is that we attract good players whose careers or whose personal choice means they don't want to or can't play for a club which insists on their players attending the compulsory twice weekly training sessions, which have "coaches" who prescribe a certain approach to playing the game and which attempt to be more professional than they need to be. Nothing gives us more pleasure than beating such sides and playing rugby with a smile on our faces. Editor’s note: Next season OHRFC will be playing at the highest level of league rugby of any London Old Boys club – a fantastic achievement by a fantastic group of players.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

Recent Events Fathers & Sons dinner – Friday 10th February Report and pictures by organiser Andrew Tarpey

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Grand Quiz Night & Buffet – Friday 23rd March Report and pictures by organiser Rodney Jakeman The Clubhouse was the venue for another battle of the brains or for those who just wanted a good night out. Our hard working Secretary, Martin Baker, circulated the whole OHA membership at the request of the Social Committee for this function that was heralded as evening of fun and pleasure. Replies poured in from around the world! Warwick Beaman, for example, felt it was a rather long way to travel from Calgary and therefore sent his apologies. However it was good to know that so many people were taking an interest (and communicating) about the social activities of the Association arranged on their behalf.

A more paranoid man than I would think it’s all a conspiracy. Last year we were sympathising with our Steward Mel after he slipped on some ice and injured his hip and, whilst thankfully no bones were broken this year, it was still treacherously icy and would turn out to be one of the coldest nights for quite some time. This did not stop Bob Stagg arriving by motorbike though! Thankfully the roaring fire in the Clubhouse was just as warm as the welcoming cheers within, though a wooden sports pavilion’s insulation only goes so far… So thank goodness the food, wine and company were so good. Brussels pâté with melba toast made way for breast of chicken on a bed of crushed, herbed new potatoes with honey & mustard dressing and seasonal vegetables. Carrot cake (complete with little decorative carrots of icing!) and cheese & biscuits rounded off the meal, with coffee and a very moreish 2002 LBV port helping to keep the chill at bay. Once the (Jubilee) Loyal Toast was said, to call the afterdinner ramble from yours truly a “speech” would unreasonably flatter it. However given that the untimely and deeply regretted passing of Simon Boyes was so fresh in all our minds, we reflected on how just a few years ago Simon and his eldest son James sat around the very same table. The cruel loss of such an able, approachable and humane man made us all thankful for the pleasure of one another’s company. This year that company included, for the first time, Mike Jeans and John Wigley who, despite not having sons themselves were simply keen to come along – and we were delighted to welcome two such stalwart supporters of the OHA to our paternalfilial bosom. Then, with a wearisome inevitability, a selection of jokes from the bottom of the barrel was duly scraped (the most printable: next time you’re on the web, visit www.conjunctivitis.com – now there’s a site for sore eyes) and I was delighted to propose the toast from sons to fathers. President Jon Corrall raised the tone with a very witty impromptu preamble to the response toast, from fathers to sons. As the evening drew to a close, the log fire was a magnet for all; to drink, to chat, and to resolve to meet at the same time next year. If you are not on the mailing list for this dinner, and would like to be, please e-mail mail@atarpey.com.

Just short of seventy people sat down to make up nine teams for a quiz compiled by Jim Tarpey, so ably assisted by his wife Lynda and son Andrew. A huge amount of preparation as ever goes into these events and we are very grateful to Jim and his family for all their hard work in ensuring a quite outstanding result and such a successful evening. From compiling & printing answer sheets to the sound system that worked first time and all evening, a big ‘thank you’. It was particularly pleasing to welcome such a wide representation across the membership, teams from the playing membership of the Cricket Club, Association Football Club as well as past players from OHRFC. Family groups, friends and neighbours, all were welcome & their support so much appreciated. The Social Committee would like to record their sincere thanks to Pauline and Natalie for again feeding us so well and laying out the clubhouse so attractively on our arrival, as well as running the bar throughout the evening. The winning team was ‘The Wysiwigs’ captained by Keith Weyman who romped home with 113 points out of a possible 130 and as a result shared the prize of a case of wine. A raffle draw concluded the evening which, given the fun had by all, will be repeated on Friday 2nd November: if you are interested in an evening of fun quizzing then contact rodney.jakeman@tiscali.co.uk.

ATTENDEES Jon Corrall (S), Tony Alexander (’61), Tim Alexander (G), Paul Trussell (G), Philip Alterman (’49), David Alterman (’79), Peter Clarke (G), Robert Clarke (’90), David Griffiths (S), John Griffiths (’82), David Heasman (’59), Rob Heasman (G), Rodney Jakeman (’61), Richard Jakeman (G), Brian Fahy (G), Alan Morris (’55), Alex Schonfeldt (G), Alan Mushin (’55), James Mushin (’94), Michael Possener (’49), Adrian Possener (’83), Bob Stagg (’72), Tom Stagg (’01), Jim Tarpey (S), Andrew Tarpey (’97), Mike Jeans (S), John Wigley (S)

A table of “Altermen” enjoying the Quiz – not sure of the collective noun for this, maybe a suitable question for the next Quiz!

The Magnificent “Team Tarpey” who ran the evening: Andrew, Jim and Lynda

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

Past Presidents’ Luncheon – Saturday 24th March Report and pictures by organiser Rodney Jakeman

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If any readers would be interested in joining the mailing list then do please contact Tony Alexander (tonyalexander1@sky.com) or Rodney Jakeman (rodney.jakeman@tiscali.co.uk) for news of our next gathering.

L to R: Don Wells, Peter Stevenson, Philip Alterman, David James, Neil Forsyth, Graham Macfarlane (to rear) President Jon Corrall took the chair and welcomed everyone to this annual event inaugurated some years ago by Graham Macfarlane. For the first time this year, through the generosity of a Past President, invitations were extended to all the current presidents of the OH sporting clubs, of whom those able to attend were Peter Mackie (Golf Society) and Randal Whittaker (Rugby Club). It was also a great pleasure to invite Colin & Andrew, the sons of our most senior Past President, Kenneth Blessley, who had recently celebrated his 98th birthday. Colin was able to brief the gathering on the current state of Ken’s health which, whilst the years were taking their inevitable toll, physically and mentally he was being made as comfortable as possible in the circumstances. As is the custom, the chairman and others then updated everyone on absent friends, events & developments in the Association since last year’s gathering. Pauline & Natalie Howard provided us with an excellent spread, together with wine generously donated by Jon Corrall & enjoyed by all which was then followed by further chatter in front of the traditional roaring club fire, whilst the 1st XV went through their warm up training session seen from afar but soon joined by an enthusiastic following of spectators, which naturally included the majority of Past Presidents & guests. They were not disappointed; the club beat Grasshoppers 62-8 and continued their march toward promotion from London 2 North West to London 1 North, a result that Ken Blessley would surely be proud of.

Those present, L to R: Colin Jeffrey, Jonny Bell, Rodney Jakeman, Tony Kerpel, Tony Alexander, Geoff Rumble, Roger Skinner, John Ratcliffe, John Magowan

Forthcoming Events Old Haberdashers’ Annual Dinner – Thursday 17th May Haberdashers’ Hall, West Smithfield, EC1 If you would like to attend the OHA’s flagship event of the year please contact Andrew Tarpey via mail@atarpey.com, or see the links from the oldhabs.com homepage for further details.

Retired Members Luncheon – Tuesday 12th June OHA Clubhouse, Croxdale Road The next in the regular and very popular lunches organised by Peter Vacher; if you haven’t already booked your place please email petervacher@onetel.com.

OHA Ladies Luncheon – Thursday 14th June OHA Clubhouse, Croxdale Road Organised by Patricia Vacher and enjoyed by a number of ladies with links to the OHA, including Margaret Taylor and Pat Magowan. To book your place please email petervacher@onetel.com.

L to R: Mike Bovington, Peter Vacher, Alan Morris, Peter Stevenson

‘The Removal Men of 1961’ Lunch – Wednesday 4th April For some years now a small but select band of chaps have met at a suitable venue in London. ‘Small’ because we have failed to communicate to the wider OH family (sorry!) and ‘select’ because we have one main thing in common: we all attended Hampstead and Elstree. We would welcome anyone who may remember any of us and would like to join in our six-monthly reunions which revolve around a lunch somewhere in London convenient to the majority. There are those who attended the school from the Prep school, those who started in the second form, those who joined us in the fourth form from Mercers School when it closed, but above all we were all there when we moved the school to Elstree to complete our 'time'!

The OHA Ladies Christmas Luncheon 2011 L to R: Pat McGowan, Tessa Alterman, Margaret Taylor, Patricia Vacher, Pat Newton, Eileen Smith, Flora Griffiths, Jackie Yeabsley.

Other Events Planned for June (dates TBA)  Fullers Brewery Tour: contact rodney.jakeman@tiscali.co.uk  Wine Tasting: contact rodney.jakeman@tiscali.co.uk or alan.phipps@me.com.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

Haberdashers’ Alumni 7/7 Rugby Tournament – Saturday th 7 July at the School This will be the sporting event of the summer – the inaugural Haberdashers’ Alumni 7/7 Rugby Tournament, which will feature both a non-contact Tag rugby tournament and a full contact 7s rugby tournament. Old Haberdashers’ RFC (London 2 NW Champions) are hosting the tournament on Saturday 7th July from midday (KO TBC) at the excellent facilities at the school and will be opening the door to all Haberdasher Alumni, Old Haberdashers, their families and friends. There will be music, food and drink throughout the day so bring all your friends and family down, picnics welcomed. This is an opportunity to dust off the old boots, ring round and facebook message the guys you played rugby with at school and have a reunion on the hallowed turf of Elstree where so many dreams were made. Even if all your old school mates have turned their backs on rugby you can still get involved and we will find you a team. If you are interested in getting involved please email Seb Taylor on sebastian.taylor@herbertsmith.com We would love to get teams from each of the school years (there is no age limit…) as well as a team from the current 1st XV and a staff team (captained by Al Metcalfe). Just to emphasise that this will be the exact opposite of the Middlesex 7s tournament, this is about Haberdashers Alumni (and their friends and families) of all ages reuniting at the school focused loosely on 2 very social rugby tournaments. This promises to be a highlight of the summer, it will be a gorgeous day with a BBQ, drinks and flair rugby (potentially also a bouncy castle) followed by an evening of entertainment at the OHRFC club in Borehamwood (where you can boast about how you stepped the Calfe). Please forward news about this event to any Haberdashers Alumni who you think may be interested in participating in this event (as a player, team captain or spectator).

OH West of England Dinner – Saturday 15th September Northcote Manor, Burrington, Nth Devon. If you are interested in going to the West of England dinner please contact Bob Crabb on bartridge@tiscali.co.uk.

1948 Joiners Reunion – Thursday 4th October The Plough, Crews Hill, Hertfordshire This is the first of the reminders to put Oct 4th in your diary for the next 1948 joiners reunion. The event continues to foster much comradeship and the more attendees the better. The superb 2011 meal at the Plough, Crews Hill, Herts, will be the repeated next year following the rave reviews. The price will not rise much above the 2011 price of £10. For more information contact Brian Willcocks on jb.rookery@virgin.net.

Lunch and “In Conversation with...” – Sunday 14th October OHA Clubhouse, Croxdale Road Following on from the popular “Conversation with Kelvin Pike”, a second event is planned and our guest will be confirmed very soon, if you are interested in attending please contact Rodney Jakeman on rodney.jakeman@tiscali.co.uk.

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OH in the News Matt Lucas, David Baddiel and Keith Talbot An unlikely trio some might say, but watch The Matt Lucas Awards Show on May 15th and all will be revealed about Matt and David’s “Most Depressing School Subject”. The series producer is also a former Habs student - Ashley Blaker, pictured above with Matt and Keith.

Simon Collins (1978) elected KPMG UK Chairman Simon Collins will become the new UK Chairman and Senior Partner of KPMG. Simon, who is currently Global Head of KPMG’s Transactions and Restructuring group, will take over leadership of the firm on 1 October.

Adam Marks (1978) – Senior Partner, Taylor Wessing Taylor Wessing has elected real estate partner Adam Marks as the new senior partner of its UK arm. Adam recently took up a three-year term at the Anglo-German firm’s helm. Adam has been a partner at Taylor Wessing since 1999 and headed the real estate group between 2003 and 2007. He also spent four years on the top 40 firm’s executive board and previously sat on the international management board. His practice focuses on the commercial property sector, advising clients on commercial and residential developments, investments, acquisitions and disposals.

Abhishek Sachdev (1999) – Managing Director, Vedanta Hedging Abhishek was recently interviewed for a BBC TV News feature and has led the national investigations into swap mis-selling. Find the article at http://vedantahedging.com/news/. Abhishek was a School Prefect and Meadows House ViceCaptain. He graduated with the Highest First Class in Honours in Economics in his year group of 2003 from Grey College, Durham.

This is just a selection of the OHA social events, for the latest information please check the OHA website: www.oldhabs.com

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

Where are they now? We invited a number of OH to let us know what they have been doing since leaving school. You can see that there is no such thing as a typical Haberdasher! Please send your own personal biography to the Editor via martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com for future publication.

David Alterman (1979, Calverts) – Owner/Director of Market Research Company I have been living in Harpenden for the last 10 years. For the first 20 years of my life I lived in Finchley. But I didn’t take the most direct route between the two. It started with an innocent enough phone call. In 1987 I was working on the Hanger Lane Gyratory system (well, adjacent to it) for a market research company when an excolleague asked if I wanted to spend a year doing the same thing in Auckland, New Zealand. Suffice to say that I arrived with two suitcases and left 13 years later with my wife Chris, three young daughters and a distinctive kiwi uplift at the end of my sentences? As if I had just asked you a question? We spent two years in Sydney, wallowing in the aesthetic delights of the city, but finding it harder to swallow the parochial attitudes that seemed to go with it. And so to Harpenden with the curious sensation of coming home and yet being aliens once again. Years away were healthy. Working in Central London meant I now wondered on a daily basis at the iconic delights of the city with a tourist‘s eye. Having daughters at St Albans Girls High School introduced me to the intoxicating delights of their school services in the Abbey. Four years ago I became owner/director of a market research consultancy in Soho; and my work, overly vociferous netball spectating, and long hours spent in the front bunker by the 7th green at Redbourn Golf Club help to fill my days. That and the delight of staring at the prints and lithographs of NZ beach scenes that we accumulated in our time there.

Michael Méhrdàd Lessani (1993-2000, Russells) – Dentist As I'm sure is the case for many Old Haberdashers, school days seem a lifetime ago, yet at times feel like yesterday. Following on from the pinnacle of House Captain of Russells was difficult; but, I moved onto the challenge of reading Dentistry at Bristol University. I was always grateful to the school for the opportunities we had as Habs boys, which prepared us for the world outside Elstree. I threw myself into university life, being heavily involved with the Student Council, interfaith work, Wine-tasting society and founding the Persian society. My first loyalty was to my fellow dental students and they duly elected me Student President at Bristol and then the British Dental Student Association (BDSA) President after we organised a truly epic national conference. Coming from an immigrant family, welcomed in during the turmoil

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in Iran, I feel a debt to my now home country. I have been committed to providing excellent NHS care in vibrant and developing areas of London such as Hackney and Tower Hamlets; both as a general dentist and as a junior surgeon in the Oral & Maxillo-Facial Surgery team at Homerton Hospital. Indeed, my working week has varied over the past five years from simple fillings and tooth whitening to thyroid surgery and tracheostomies. Haberdashers taught me to be at the forefront and remain relevant; and so, as the world changes, I have completed my Royal College of Surgeons exams and I am branching out into independent and private dentistry in North London and in the West End. I feel honoured to hold positions at the Enfield & Haringey Local Dental Committee and at the British Dental Association, both on the Middlesex & Hertfordshire Branch Council and on the national Young Dentist Committee. Beyond dentistry, my love of languages, history and politics is alive and in rude health; studying Farsi and Hebrew currently and moving onto Arabic one day. Maybe a future in Middle East conflict resolution awaits. Until then, I have the joys of many root canal treatments, supporting the Arsenal and doing my best for family, friends and loved ones. I have been lucky to keep in touch with most of my Habs cohort; but, nonetheless, I wish you all success, happiness and a fine glass of Shiraz.

John Griffiths (1975-1982, Hendersons) – Managing Director and sometime Local Politician Habs had a reputation for producing "History Boys" in the 1980s. I had the privilege of a seventh term in the 6th form, concentrating on the one subject I was any good at whilst being coached by phenomenal teachers. I stay in touch with my A-level history set. We recently celebrated thirty years since embarking on our journey through Early Modern Europe courtesy of John Lotherington and David Griffiths. Cambridge opened doors to the States: post-graduate study on a Rotary Scholarship at the University of Alabama and the chance to do some teaching on the side, but no clearer as to a career path. A "stage" at the European Commission led to five years in Brussels in EU affairs. After a number of public-policy jobs back in London, including the London Docklands Development Corporation and setting up the London Civic Forum, I co-founded Rocket Science – an economic development consulting practice with offices also in Newcastle and Edinburgh – whilst dabbling in local politics. A former Lib Dem Councillor, I ran for Mayor of Tower Hamlets in 2010. Music and sport have remained passions. Choral singing has never been quite the same as under Alan Taylor's baton, but I found my place as a first bass in the Brussels Choral Society and then the London Docklands Singers for many years. Following several seasons turning out for Old Habs' 2nd XI, under the contrasting captaincies of Nick Gibb, Chris Bellis and Simon Gelber, I swapped Herts League Cricket for friendly matches, and an opening batting slot, with the London Saints CC. We are a collection of middle-aged, exiled Southampton fans, whose home ground is Croxdale Road, complete with Mel and Pauline's teas, playing on occasional Sundays throughout the summer. Rather more successfully, Rocket Science celebrated ten years in business last October, but who knows what the next decade holds. It's all been a lot of fun!

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

John Fernau (1987-1992, Calverts) – Head of Procurement, Olympic Delivery Authority After school I took a gap year and spent the first half working and the second travelling, mainly in South East Asia, before heading off to Edinburgh to study Geography. I greatly enjoyed my four years up there and came to the realisation that I wasn’t going to join the Army as I had planned, leaving me with some uncertainty on what to do next. My studies had given me an interest in international development, and fairly soon after I left I heard of an organisation called Crown Agents who were offering a graduate procurement scheme which I was accepted onto and a career in procurement was born. I spent seven years at Crown Agents, including a year in Johannesburg running our procurement office there and also a stint in Nairobi which was great fun. When I returned to the UK it was time for a new challenge and I joined Hedra, a management consultancy which specialises in the public sector. After two years, and a variety of assignments across the country, I was posted to the Olympic Delivery Authority, which is the organisation responsible for delivering the venues and infrastructure for the Games this summer. Unsurprisingly I found this more interesting than advising councils how to save money, and soon hopped over the fence to join the ODA, where I am now the Head of Procurement. I have a wife and three girls, aged six, four and six months, and live in Sussex in a house we have almost finished building. After my stint as School Captain I was invited to join the Haberdashers’ Company and I am now a Liveryman. I greatly enjoyed reliving my CCF days at a range day with the Company’s affiliated regiment (7 Rifles) at Sandhurst last year, albeit with automatic weapons and probably more rounds than I fired in four years at school.

Richard Coberman (1986-1997, Russells) – Registrar of Births Deaths and Marriages I still remember the last rendition of “Jerusalem” in assembly and valiantly holding back tears of sadness and excitement at leaving Habs. It saddened me to leave friends who were more like a close band of brothers, but also excited me to be released from being compelled to mix solely with the male species for an unnatural amount of my formative years. I was off to Hull to study English Literature and Language not because of a profound interest in literature, but because I could write a pretty mean essay and had no vocational inklings. University was everything it should be. With a 2:1 achieved I was still just as clueless about my career. Like so many graduates nowadays it’s a hard lesson to learn that staying on the conventional educational tightrope won’t lead to your dream job if you have no idea what that is from the outset. So after graduation and back in London I stumbled my way into the world of media and advertising. After several years of pining for the North of England I moved to Sheffield eventually working for a Housing Charity and

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meeting my wife Sophie. However, life changed shortly after having our first child Edith as I progressively succumbed to a brain condition which sadly and dramatically surfaced two weeks before having our second child Betty. After a traumatic few weeks of misdiagnosis and symptoms so severe that I had to give up a new job, I was finally diagnosed with obstructive hydrocephalus due to a malformation in my brain which had progressively worsened. The neurosurgeons performed dangerous but necessary neurosurgery at the Hallamshire Hospital in Sheffield saving my life which could have ended at any moment had they not intervened. After rebuilding shattered confidence, I joined Sheffield Register Office and am now a Registrar of Births Deaths and Marriages. I love my job and feel I’ve finally found my vocation and have been there nearly 4 years. Conducting Marriage ceremonies is a pleasurable and exciting part of my job. It’s a privilege being part of one of the most special days in a person’s life and legally uniting them in matrimony. Of course the sad side to my job is death registration but it’s a real honour to help bereaved people at a horrendous time. Habs in my opinion gave me the tools to be a good Registrar but not because of the exam success it compelled me to achieve but because of the unique atmosphere of unrelenting wit, respect, fun and the desire to be part of a community where every citizen is valued. This ethos was exemplified by my English teacher Mr Keenlyside who has sadly passed away. Thank you Mr Keenlyside, I’ll never forget the faith you had in me.

Sports Club Updates OH Rugby Football Club Report by Martin Baker The OH rugby club under the guidance of Seb Taylor (1st team captain), Si Wallis (2nd team captain), Andrew Gray (Club Captain) and Randal Whittaker (Club President) goes from strength to strength. The 1st XV won their new league, London NW2, having won 21 of their 22 league matches. This is their fourth promotion in four seasons – a quite outstanding achievement. The 2nd XV ended their first season in the First Division of the Herts/Middx Merit table in a very creditable 4th place winning 16 of their 22 league matches. The 2nd XV also won the H/M 1st Division Plate Trophy, beating Fullerians 32-14 in the final, finishing off a great first season in style by bringing silverware back to Croxdale Road. A 3rd XV was run twice in the season with a mix of veteran and younger players creating a winning formula for the team which won both matches convincingly. Thanks to Lee Rossney for being the driving force behind getting the team together. The end of season tour this year sees the club in Valencia at the end of April for some interesting rugby and cultural exchanges.

OH Cricket Club The OHCC statistics and records have been updated, this covers appearances, batting, bowling for 1st, 2nd and Sunday XI's. Records of the OH v School matches and the club's history from 2000 - 2011 have been added. The information has been provided by Simon Gelber. Follow this link to get to the cricket area of the OHA website. The Cricket Club welcomes new players and anyone interested in getting a game should contact one of the officers listed on the website.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

Cricketing Ramblings by Graham Jones (1950) I suppose I am a semi-dormant OH, living near Seaton/Lyme Regis, but I do try to keep in touch somewhat. I was pleased to see a mention in the OHA cricket notes of the start of the Devon Tour in 1960, and wondered if some expansion on this theme would be appreciated. Also I was prompted to read relevant parts of the OHCC history on the website. I was Fixture Secretary around that time; my wife's parents were still in Exeter, and we pricked up our ears when Sudbury Court (known to be of a similar standard to us) said they were not going to Devon. I picked up fixtures with their opponents, beginning with Budleigh Salterton on the Sunday – which, after the Home Counties, seemed like a cricketing paradise on a hot summer's day. Seaton on the Saturday was soon added, and I have played there since quite a bit down the years. We still delight in telling friends here that our wives were not allowed in the pavilion at Sidmouth in 1960; a year or two later they were – but only if suitably attired! (At St Luke's I had the distinction of being Brian Lobb's 50th wicket incidentally.) In 1962 I came out of industry into teaching, which ruled out touring in June apart, possibly, from week-ends; in September ’66 we moved to Allhallows School (on the cliff between Seaton and Lyme). I knew where it was from touring (!), but boarding school commitments lessened my limited ability to be involved. Running cricket at the School had a very pleasing aspect for me in that, for several years, Doug Yeabsley (who knew Allhallows from his own schooldays at Exeter School) brought Habs boys to us on tour at the end of the Summer Terms, sometimes including sons of my contemporaries. I have a high regard for cricket at Kilmington – where the OH still play it seems, and with whom we had a tradition of Allhallows Staff evening fixtures. A long while back, when I just about knew one or two, I looked in, but must try again sometime! I enjoyed browsing in the comprehensive club history notes, and reading of my contemporaries' doughty deeds. I remember Tony Pettet's 10 wkts and it was kind of someone (Nobbly Tanner?) to record that I took a hat-trick. However – on a failed 'ego trip' (!) – I searched in vain for a mention of the one I took against the OH in 1948 – my first year in the School XI. Habs 50th Anniversary Cricket Celebration 2012 The School is arranging a dinner on Wednesday 27th June from 7:30pm at the Holiday Inn, Elstree for all those involved in cricket at Habs over the past fifty years and their guests. They would be delighted if you could join them for an evening of nostalgia, reunion and celebration; a highlight in the ‘Habs Cricket Week’ calendar. There will be an auction including some fabulous memorabilia and opportunities such as signed cricket bats from Michael Vaughan and Graham Thorpe and county tickets for a box at Lords. Dinner tickets cost £50 per person and include a drinks reception and three course meal. The dress code for the evening is ‘Lounge Suit’. For more information, contact Georgina Chapman on 020 8266 1907 or chapman_g@habsboys.org.uk. From 10:30am on the same day, the Habs 1st XI will be taking on the DIY Old England XI at the school. Please email Georgina if you would like to come along and support the boys. This is a great opportunity for the Habs 1st XI but unfortunately does not come without cost. If you would like to discuss sponsoring this match, please do contact Dr Peter Spence (020 8266 1964, spence_p@habsboys.org.uk). The School looks forward to welcoming you back to Habs and celebrating fifty great years of cricket.

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OH Golf Society

The Old Haberdashers’ Golfing Society welcomes golfers of all standards, whether members of a golf club with an official handicap or occasional social players. Currently we have fifty members with handicaps ranging from 3 to 36 and we are keen to increase this substantially over the next twelve months. If you are interested in joining please check out the following links: OHGS Section and Fixture List 2012 on the OHA website here.

School CCF News Major Saddington wants you to know that the CCF is flourishing. Last July we had a very successful Camp at RAF St. Mawgan. At the start of the Autumn Term more recruits joined than ever before, and enjoyed Field Day during the hottest September week on record. In November a group of 2003 leavers organised a "minireunion" for their year, and in February we held our regular Senior NCOs Dinner in HM The Tower of London, by courtesy of the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers. On the March Field Day the weather took its revenge: the Army Section, part at Bassingbourn and part at Longmore, bore up well in icy winds. Most of our annual tri-service week at Otterburn was spent in balmy Easter temperatures, but for one day we endured a blizzard. The highlight of our year so far has been the Biennial General Inspection when Capt. Michael Evans RN subjected the CCF to a friendly but searching scrutiny. Visibly impressed by the immaculate Guard of Honour and Band, he met the Officers, dined with the Headmaster and the Master of the Haberdashers' Company, but rightly devoted himself to addressing and meeting Cadets in all three sections. He doubtless noted that rifle shooting is flourishing, with Simon Lee in particular reaching a very high standard: Simon has been selected for the England B team, after winning the full-bore competition run by the Old Habs Rifle Club at Bisley and the Army Summer Camp outdoor range competition at St. Mawgan. The CCF is looking forward to another term of Friday afternoon activities, to the CCF's own Open Afternoon on 11 May, to Summer Field Day and to Annual Camp – a return visit to Garelochhead, midges permitting. John Wigley (pp Major Nick Saddington)

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

In Memoriam Lt. Nick Taylor, RN Fleet Air Arm Pilot (1967) – died 4th May 1982 This year marks the 30th Anniversary of the tragic death of Nick Taylor, who was killed when his aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire in the early stages of the Falklands campaign. Nick Taylor joined the Royal Navy as a helicopter pilot in the early 1970's and flew Sea Kings until the end of the decade, when he crossed into the fast-jet training stream. In the spring of 1982, he had just completed Sea Harrier conversion and emerged from the pipeline to join 800 Squadron, with whom he deployed down south. On Tuesday the 4th May 1982, a three-ship attack on the Goose Green airstrip was mounted during which Nick Taylor's aircraft was hit by anti-aircraft fire as he ran in to attack. The aircraft exploded and hit the ground very close to the airstrip. Nick Taylor's body, still in its ejector seat, was recovered by the residents of Goose Green and buried under Argentine supervision with full military honours very close to where he came to rest. The site is now fenced off and marked with a proper headstone; it is lovingly tended by the residents of Goose Green who hold an annual service on the anniversary of his death. His gravestone reads: "In proud memory of a dearly loved husband, son and brother, shot down while flying for the country he loved." Farm workers from the settlement tend the grave. Follow this link to see a photograph of Nick’s grave.

Obituaries Sadly there are a number of deaths of distinguished Old Haberdashers and School Staff to report, with regret.

Ken Blessley (1932) – died 10th April 2012

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In civilian life he became Personnel Manager at Standard Telecommunications Laboratories in Harlow, retiring in 1985. He and his wife Freyda moved to Aldeburgh to enjoy the seaside and culture, but she sadly died in 1991. He continued without her for 20 years, and filled many valuable roles in the Aldeburgh community in that time. He finally died on Thursday 12th April at the Garrett House retirement home. He was appointed MBE in 1959. He is survived by a son and daughter, his oldest child Josephine having died at just 21.

Ray Kipps (1955) – died Sunday 22nd April 2012 Ray made a valuable contribution to OHRFC as both player and President and of course, also to the OHA as its President in 1995-96. Ray was diagnosed with cancer over three years ago and only given four months to live, but he showed his resilience by surviving this long. He spent his last months in Clare House Nursing Home, Hersham and during this time he received excellent care. The Home requires more exercise equipment for their patients and the family decided that, taking account of Ray’s many sporting interests, it would be a good memorial to him if some equipment could be donated. Discussions with the Home have revealed that a set of parallel bars costing about £500 would be a great help. The intention is to have the equipment marked with a plaque in his memory. If you would like to contribute please make cheques payable to ‘Clare House Amenities Fund’ and send them to Malcolm Tappin, 22 Seagrave Road, Beaconsfield, Bucks HP9 1SU.

James Wigzell (1956) – died 26th February 2012 James died peacefully at home on 26th February 2012.

David Saville (1956) – died 25th January 2012 David died on 25th January 2012 after a distinguished ministry in the Church of England. He was at one time Vicar of Christ Church Chorleywood and a Rural Dean. In 1991 he joined the staff of the London diocese as an adviser for evangelism and finally was Rector of Hackney. In 1997 he was made a Prebendary of St Pauls Cathedral. Ken Blessley at his desk in County Hall, 1976 Follow this link to a comprehensive obituary (with links to some of Ken’s articles about the history of the OHA hosted on the OHA website), kindly provided by Ken’s sons Colin and Andrew.

John Norman Burrell (1941) – died 12th April 2012 John left the school in 1941. He served in the war in Egypt 1943 (where his brother Neville, also OH, had been killed only months earlier), in India 1943-44 and in Burma 1945. The high point in his military career came in 1965-68 when he commanded the Royal Signals in Malta & Libya. That was followed by a number of Staff appointments until he retired as Colonel in 1974.

Victor Mathias (1953) – died 18th January 2012 by Michael Heppner Born in Willesden Green on 14 January 1938, Victor Mathias said that his career was decided practically from birth by the fact that both sides of his family ran timber businesses. He was one of the large post-war intake at Haberdashers’ in Westbere Road in 1948, where he soon found himself as a little fish in a big barrel. Of the thirty boys in the first form, three went on to earn entries in Who’s Who, two became world renowned professors of medicine, one became a Fellow of Christ Church, Oxford and a number of others entered teaching either as university dons or in secondary education. He left school after ‘O’ levels in 1953, but his further education continued as an evening student at

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

the City of London College, the London School of Economics and Birkbeck College. No account of Victor’s life would be complete without an emphasis on the role played in it by chess. Having played no part in the thriving chess activity at the school, he “discovered” the game in 1972 when Bobby Fischer hit the world’s headlines. From that point he took every opportunity to develop his chess skills. In 1990, after writing several successful articles for ordinary players, he took over a quarterly chess publication – Popular Chess – which he managed and edited as a one man operation for almost a quarter of a century. In 1994, he began to run a national Postal Chess Club for ordinary players which has thrived for almost 20 years. Victor married Maureen, a dentist, in 1969 and he described her as “the finest wife anyone could wish for”. They lived in Northwood for most of their married lives and had two sons, Graham, who also went to Haberdashers (1981–88) and Barry. He arranged reunions of his classmates every few years – a close circle of those with whom he had been at school at Westbere Road and not only did he keep in touch with them but, indirectly, he encouraged them to keep in touch with each other. The “gregarious loner” or as he saw himself – “He was his own man”. Victor Mathias died from leukaemia on 18 January 2012. Follow this link to the Obituaries page and click on the year of leaving (1953) to find a complete copy of Victor’s obituary.

The Reverend Canon Roger Mason (1959) – died 27th January 2012 by Clive Bender Roger attended the school when it was based at the Westbere Road campus. He would be the first to admit that his schooldays, particularly in his early years, were not to be the happiest days of his life. Nevertheless by the time he reached the sixth form he was to enjoy both extra-curricular and academic success. He was appointed Company Sergeant Major of the school Cadet Corps and at a combined schools cadet camp at Aldershot, he was awarded a tankard for being the best NCO in South East England. In fact he was so keen on things military that he seriously considered an army career but was let down by his eyesight. He obtained 5 “A” Levels, unusual for those days. He rowed for the school and was later to row for King’s College (London) at Henley. He also became a member of London Rowing Club, a membership he retained for the rest of his life. On leaving school he entered the Inland Revenue. He studied at night school and gained a degree in Economics from London University. However he realised that he was being called to the Anglican Ministry and commenced his theological studies at King’s College. During this period he met his wife Jean, sister of the former Middlesex and England fast bowler Alan Moss. At the age of 65, having overcome one brush with cancer he decided to retire. Roger and Jean moved to Melton Mowbray. Unfortunately he was diagnosed with further cancers and thus began his five year battle with that dreadful disease. Unfortunately after several setbacks he eventually succumbed to his illness and died on 27th January 2012. Follow this link to the Obituaries page and click on the year of leaving (1959) to find a complete copy of Roger’s obituary.

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Simon Boyes (School staff 1976–2011) – died 25th January 2012 Born on 11th February 1950, Simon began his 33-year career at Haberdashers' Aske's Boys' School in September 1976. He progressed through roles such as Head of General Studies and Careers until he was promoted to Senior Master under Keith Dawson and then Second Master under Jeremy Goulding. For a time he was acting Headmaster following Mr Goulding’s move to Shrewsbury. Simon will be missed by his former pupils, who will recall a first-rate teacher of Chemistry; by his former colleagues, who will grieve the loss of a man who was a model of kindness and efficiency and who was always willing to offer support. He was an outstanding Second Master and will be remembered by all those family and friends whose lives he touched. Full appreciations of Simon Boyes by John Carleton and Jon Corrall can be found on the OHA website by following this link.

Jim Beryl (School staff 1986–2012) – died 6th March 2012 Jim Beryl started teaching percussion at Habs in 1986 and recently completed his 25th year. He had been tackling cancer for some time but having bravely fought his way back to teaching Jim died of a heart attack on 6th March 2012. It was not always the best behaved of students who took to the drums and Jim had been a great stabilizing influence on some difficult boys as well as giving so much to the music of the school. He was a real enthusiast. Jim had been unwell for the latter half of 2011. He had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and had spent the autumn term receiving treatment. Jim was an inspiring teacher whom his pupils will never forget. Jim Beryl Celebration Concert – a review by Delia Meehan On May 1st the Seldon Hall was filled to capacity with at least sixty past and present pupils of Jim, together with colleagues, parents, friends and families. The programme was devised by Christopher Muhley (Director of Music), Alasdair Malloy (principal percussionist with the BBC Concert Orchestra and parent), and Jason Holling, percussion teacher at the Girls’ School. All performances were a true representation of the tremendous percussion skills that Jim instilled in his pupils. There were solos, duets and ensembles all skillfully performed. Some of the former pupils admitted that for a good many years they had not been near a drumstick, let alone a drum kit! The items were interspersed with many anecdotes about Jim’s teaching methods, particularly his encouragement and total lack of negativity with all who came in contact with him. Many spoke of his warmth and his caring concern for all his pupils, no matter what their ability. Jim’s enthusiasm for his subject shone through all the performances, which displayed superb technical control and wonderful musicianship.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

Naturally enough the evening was quite noisy, especially when timps and drum kit were involved, but none more so than the final items coordinated by Alasdair Malloy in which all performers took part. The whole evening was a huge tribute to Jim as a musician, an inspirational teacher and friend to us all. We have lost a great man.

If you are aware of any other recent deaths please inform the OHA Secretary, Martin Baker, via martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com so that the information can be communicated to fellow Old Haberdashers.

The Headmasters The second in a series of articles by John Wigley, first published in the OHA Magazine, 1997.

Dr P Abson 1940-45 The Deputy Head of a school is seldom made its headmaster. Governors suspect that a deputy has ties of friendship and loyalty to his colleagues, so will not tackle problems which have appeared in the final years of a departing head. There is one exception, when a school is in crisis. From 11am on Sunday 3rd September 1939 to V.E. day on 8th May 1945 the whole country was in crisis. For much of that time London was in the front line. The School shared its peril. During October 1940 a master and a boy, Mr W. T. Whewell and M. G. Gluss, were killed in air raids, and the Westbere Road site was severely damaged by a delayed action bomb. On 10th May 1941 two masters and four boys on fire-watch at Westbere Road experienced London's worst raid: during the night the blaze could be seen from Oxford, and next day a pall of smoke was visible from Watford; the House of Commons was burned out and 1,346 people left dead. Mr Kemp, Headmaster since 1920, had coped manfully with the problems caused by the outbreak of war, but had become seriously ill so had been absent for the second half of the Autumn Term in 1939,leaving the School in the care of Dr Abson, the Second Master. Mr Kemp returned during 1940 but had a relapse and delegated many of his duties to Dr Abson before resigning in December. The governors then wisely appointed Dr Abson to take his place. Born in 1892 and educated at London University, Dr Abson had taught Modern Languages at Haberdashers since 1921. A fine scholar, he had been form master to the Modern Sixth, had initiated Mr Kemp's policy of further increasing the School's academic standard by expanding its Library, and had earned his reputation as an effective teacher by guiding 5R (the fifth form repeaters) to success in School Certificate French. He had been second master since 1931 and his authority and experience made him the ideal man to succeed Mr Kemp. His brief was to hold the School together for the duration of the War – no easy task. The governors had considered evacuating the school to Monmouth or Bedford, but had eventually decided not to do so, apparently with the parents' full support. However, when war began

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some parents arranged to send or to take their sons out of London. Twenty boys were evacuated to Wellingborough, and hardly any of the expected new boys turned up at the start of term, so numbers in the school fell to less than 400. In fact the start of term was delayed because the government immediately took over all of the Westbere Road site except for the science block, in which the Science sixth tried to resume work as it was sand-bagged and trenches and shelters were dug in the surrounding grounds. The remaining boys moved to the School's sports ground at Chase Lodge in Mill Hill, where the house, pavilion and changing rooms were hastily turned into crowded, inadequate and make-shift class rooms. The winter of 1939-40 was one of the worst of the century, and the site soon revealed its disadvantages: coal fires struggled to resist the icy snow-bearing winds, and there were no cooking facilities to provide hot meals. The petrol shortage and the blackout made it difficult and dangerous to travel, so many boys left their homes to stay with friends and relatives in Mill Hill. Inevitably the normal school routine was disrupted. Few boys received more than three and a half days of teaching per week. Compulsory games were abandoned, house and school matches were rare events, the school play was cancelled, and most societies ceased to meet. The situation was eased a little in the spring of 1940 when the Lower School was allowed to have afternoon lessons in the nearby Copthall County Girls' High School. In August 1940 the School regained the use of most of the Westbere Road site and the Lower School moved back from Mill Hill, just as the Phoney War was followed by the Blitz. The Modern Sixth stayed at Mill Hill, whilst the Fifths and Fourths alternated between there and Westbere Road, a complex and time-consuming arrangement intended in part to give them access to science facilities and also to keep both sites fully occupied, to deter the government from another take-over. Appointed at the height of the Blitz, Dr Abson led by example. Although over the age limit he volunteered for the unpopular Saturday night fire-watch and allowed no one to deputise for him. He was helped by the spirit in the School. Never before had there been such an atmosphere of willing and cheerful cooperation between masters and boys; never before such a cheerful endurance of hardships; never before such camaraderie. Sixth Formers worried by their own interrupted education never-the-less volunteered to take junior boys to the shelters, supervise homework periods, and to give lessons themselves. At the end of the Spring Term 1942 Skylark claimed that although short-staffed (eight masters had been called up in the first year of war) the School had “returned as near as possible to its prewar normality.” In reality, the School was profoundly changed. During August 1940 the school camp was replaced by what became an annual Harvest Camp, as a party of some thirty boys and masters toiled to alleviate the nation’s food shortage. In October the O.T.C. was re-formed as the Junior Training Corps, and in January 1941 the Air Training Corps was set up. Some boys were becoming politically conscious. During 1940 Skylark carried an article attacking irresponsible plutocracy and advocating redistributive taxation to provide equal educational opportunities for all. At Easter 1943 several Sixth Formers attended an inter-school course on world affairs organised by the Ministry of Information. Skylark reported that although a talk by Konni Zilliacus (in 1945 elected a Labour MP, but in 1949 expelled from the party for being pro-Communist) “did not meet with universal agreement” a large majority of those discussing Russia “voted the Russian system of government the best yet tried.” The Old Boys were also changing. The rather precious letters written to Skylark from undergraduates at Oxford and Cambridge (“Jeremy wields a pretty hose in the Jesus Fire Brigade”)

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

were replaced by letters written by men on active service in virtually all parts of the world. They made light of danger by adopting a highly nonchalant style and tone. In 1942 Sgt. H. G. Newstead described the Nazi attack on Greece and apologised for “what my pals would call an awful line shoot.” L. Cpl. W. R. (Nobbly) Tanner dismissed his weeks, as a prisoner of war in North Africa as “an interesting and vaguely exciting yarn”. Capt. J. W. Hanunond testified from Libya that “Dr Abson taught better than he may have thought: the Free French understood my French.” During 1943 the School seemed to settle down. There was an impressive number of House and School matches. The Music Society was founded, followed in 1944 by the Philatelic and Archeological Societies, and the revival of the Chess Society. Dr Abson increased the school library stock to 4,280 volumes, and Skylark published a poem of Brian Sewell's, apologizing for an initial misattribution to B. Worms of 2c. Appearances were deceptive. Behind the scenes Dr Abson was struggling for the School's survival. Parents were tempted to withdraw their sons at 15 or 16 to allow them to do vital and well-paid war work. Revised call-up regulations issued by the Ministry of Labour and National Service in 1942 made it almost impossible for sixth formers to study arts subjects at University unless they were sponsored by the armed forces. In March 1943, the Air Ministry actually began to recruit direct from the School's Air Training Corps. The School was in a precarious financial position. Fewer boys meant less fee-income. The Blitz badly damaged the Hoxton estate, which yielded less rent income. The overdraft grew so large that Barclays Bank demanded security. The governors decided to close the School, but the Haberdashers' Company persuaded the Board of Education and the London County Council to come to its aid. 1944 brought more public perils. The Summer Term was cleverly nick-named “doodle-bug” term as the V1 flying bombs took their toll. Some parents kept their sons at home and others, as in 1939, sent or took them out of London. Those who remained often ran for the shelters several times a day, and in fine weather had lessons outside to make it easier and quicker to take cover. Lunch was served in relays, in case a bomb hit the crowded dining room

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and a large number of meals spoiled on the tables after boys and masters alike had responded to an alert. The School's own exams were cancelled, but the School Certificate exams continued in those nerve-wracking conditions. The final of the House cricket competition and at least one 1st XI match were played imperturbably at Chase Lodge as V1s sped overhead, watched by a master ready to bring the game to an abrupt but temporary end. At last relaxation began. The 1944 rugby season was the best since 1937. Early in 1945 the fire-watch ended and the blackout was eased. Even the arrival of the V2's, devastating though they were, could not postpone the end of the War. Haberdashers had come through, one of the few London schools to do so without large-scale evacuation. The buildings could be repaired. Educational deficiencies could be made good, but the human cost was high: the War Register held the names of 865 old boys and masters who had served in the armed forces, and the Roll of Honour showed that eighty old boys and one master would not return. Unfortunately, Dr Abson, whose efforts had indeed held the School together, had been very seriously injured in a traffic accident, so seriously that he retired at the end of the Summer Term 1945. Mr Oliver, who had replaced him as Second Master in 1941, and who now became acting Head, paid tribute to Dr Abson's service to the School: “From the first the good of the School was his only concern, and so it has been to the very end of his career.” When Dr Abson died suddenly on 22nd September 1952 memories of the War had dimmed a little, so Skylark concentrated on his personal and professional qualities. “All whom he taught or befriended will long remember him not only as a distinguished and sympathetic schoolmaster, one who possessed to an unusual degree the ability to arouse enthusiasm for language and literature, but also was a wise and approachable counsellor whose warm and practical interest in their welfare and activities by no means ceased when they left the School. In the minds and memories of his colleagues on the staff, “P. A.”, as he was affectionately known, lives for the scholar he was, and for the most loyal and upright, yet modest and gentle of men – liked and respected by all who knew him.”

Picture Caption Competition Name the OH people in both of these pictures. Hint: the older picture was taken at the opening of the new school in Elstree 50 years ago.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 4

May 2012

Page 12

Advertising in the Annual OHA Magazine The Annual OHA Magazine, sent out to all members in the Autumn, contains a wide range of articles, reviews and information about the Old Haberdashers’ Association and its various component parts. We welcome advertising from a cross section of companies and if you are interested in your advert being seen by over 3,000 Old Haberdashers and their families please contact the OHA Secretary on martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com. Full, half or quarter page advertising space is available at a very reasonable price with an appropriate discount for Old Haberdashers.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com

OHA May 2012 Newsletter  

OHA May 2012 Newsletter

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