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Old Haberdashers’ Association Founded 1888

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e-Newsletter Issue 6 – January 2013 Please REGISTER on the OHA Website to ensure you hear about news and events – www.oldhabs.com Contents: Page 1 Matthew Bishop OBE & President Colin Blessley Page 2 Recent Events Page 4 Forthcoming Events Page 5 Where Are They Now? Page 7 Personal News & Memories Page 9 Sports Club Updates Page 11 School News Page 12 Obituaries Page 16 The Headmasters Page 18 Lodge News Page 19 Advertising

Matthew Bishop (1987, Meadows) awarded an OBE Matthew provided the School with the following explanation for the award and a brief summary of his career since leaving Habs.

The OBE was awarded for Services to the Protection of Children Online, and was a result of the work I’ve done as a non-executive on the board of the CEOP police unit. CEOP is the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre, and as well providing technology advice and services to the unit, I was able to help them protect children online through establishing the “Click CEOP” red button solution on MSN Messenger, Internet Explorer and our Online web sites. This approach meant that many thousands of children were able to report their concerns very easily, and directly led to many children being rescued from abuse. Since leaving Habs I studied at Southampton University and got a degree in Mechanical Engineering, eventually becoming a Chartered Mechanical Engineer with the Ministry of Defence. I was never going to be a great Engineer, and changed direction to become a civil servant in the Cabinet Office, giving advice to Ministers on how IT could be used to transform Government services. It was a great to be there at the change of Government in 1997 when Tony Blair arrived in office and added energy and purpose to what we were trying to do, and that led to creating many new electronic services that we still all use today. In 1998, I left the Cabinet Office, and joined Microsoft in the UK as a consultant. Over the last thirteen years, I’ve run Microsoft’s services sales business in the UK, led the Government sales teams across Europe, Middle East and Africa, been the Chief Marketing Officer and the COO of the Microsoft UK subsidiary, and now I am responsible for Microsoft’s worldwide Sales and Marketing Strategy, based in our Seattle HQ.

Colin Blessley (1965) appointed as new President of the Old Haberdashers’ Association Colin Blessley, son of OH stalwart Ken Blessley, was elected as the new OHA President at the recent OHA AGM. Colin takes over from former Senior Master, Jon Corrall, who presided for two years and who gave the OHA great leadership and vision at a challenging time in its history. Our congratulations and best wishes to Colin for an enjoyable tenure and our great thanks to Jon. Colin attended Haberdashers' Aske's Preparatory and Senior Schools, leaving in 1965 to read Spanish and Portugese at the University of Bristol. Currently, he is Finance & Commercial Director of London 2012 Ceremonies Limited, the subsidiary of LOCOG which delivered the Opening and Closing ceremonies for the Olympic and Paralympic Games. Colin has more than 35 years of restructuring experience in Europe and Latin America and has led a considerable number of successful advisory restructuring and turnaround assignments over recent years for corporates and lenders alike, involving corporate debt in excess of US$50 billion. He has advised many multinational and domestic clients in the UK, Continental Europe and North and Latin America on business restructuring, turnarounds, acquisitions, alliances, disposals, funding, valuations and strategic planning, as well as forensic investigations and litigation support. Until mid-2011, Colin led the Spanish Corporate Finance Practice of FTI Consulting, which he set up in 2009, creating a significant player in the local market competing head-on with larger, more established firms. Prior to joining FTI, Colin was an adviser to the UK Financial Services Authority and previously led PricewaterhouseCoopers' mainland European restructuring business. For ten years he led PwC's Spanish Corporate Finance and restructuring activities and for five years was co-leader of their restructuring practice in Latin America. Colin is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England & Wales and a Spanish Certified Accountant. He speaks fluent Spanish, French and Portuguese and has a good command of Italian. Reunion of Geographers – Harry Hyman (1974), John Rolfe and Ashley Kent are keen to organise a reunion of OH Geography graduates in 2013. If you studied Geography at university and are interested in attending then please send an email to secretary@oldhabs.com and you will receive more details in due course. Leavers from the 1990’s – The OHA (with help from Hartej Singh, 1998) is organising a Reunion for you, to be held on Thursday 21st February 2013 from 6pm in a private room at The Bishop’s Finger PH located adjacent to Haberdashers’ Hall in the City at West Smithfield EC1A 9JR. We would like to welcome as many of you as possible, so please encourage your old friends to come along. If you are someone who left the School in the 1990s then please contact hbsingh@gmail.com for more details.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

Recent Events

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1948 Joiners Reunion – Thursday 4th October The Plough, Crews Hill, Hertfordshire

West of England Dinner – 15th September 2012

In the “wilds” of North Devon, just off the Exeter to Barnstaple main road, near Burrington, is a delightful Country House hotel – Northcote Manor. This was the venue for the OHA’s latest West of England dinner and a very successful and pleasant occasion it turned out to be – lovely location, excellent hospitality and fine company for an enjoyable and relaxing time. The pre-drinks and canapés, along with a four course dinner, were of high star quality. The previous West of England dinner was back in June 2007 and held in an old inn, the Duke of York, at Iddesley, some miles further west towards Exeter. Robert Crabb was our host for both occasions, knowing the area well as he lives nearby. On each occasion he has been able to recommend local accommodation for long distance travellers to the events and from my point of view they have added to the enjoyment of the experience.

The attendance this time was only twenty two, with a considerable portion of those attending from the London area. Amongst our company were three former members of staff (an Headmaster, Senior Master and Librarian) and ten former pupils. Nine partners made up our company. Our President, Jon Corrall, was with us and in a few words towards the end of the dinner said how pleased he was to join the occasion in his second year of office. One of the joys of such a gathering is the renewing of acquaintances, and meeting others that you have not previously known or some, perhaps that you have not seen for a long time. The relaxing evening together on September 15th was no exception for all of us and we are grateful to Robert Crabb and Rodney Jakeman for its conception and organisation. A provisional date, 14th October 2014, has been booked at the same venue, and we hope more will come, particularly from those who live in the region.

Organiser Brian Willcocks raising a toast to those present On October 4th, 17 OH who joined the school in 1948 (double intake year: first and second forms) gathered at the Plough Inn, Crews Hill, Enfield, for what is now an established annual natterfest. The plan for these is simple: Arrive 11ish for tea/coffee, natter, sit down to a roast beef and apple pie lunch, natter, and intermediately sup a beer or two. The bonhomie generated at these events surprises me more each year, firm friendships developing with folk I only knew by sight at school. Perhaps distance is lending enchantment! This year we stayed at the tables after dining and had a round robin session, during which the recollections ranged from the whimsical to the incredulous... who would have thought Mousie had been a cross-country blue? The teaching, punishment and inspirational styles of many staff were recalled anecdotally, and the ‘things were different then’ theme at times bore close resemblance to the Yorkshiremen sketch (John Cleese et al.). The School, being common to us all, stayed as the dominant theme, rather than individuals’ biographies. The moment for dispersal arrived gently at about 3.30 pm, with the reminder ringing in everyone’s ears that next year’s event is to be on October 10. Same place, same menu, same price: £11.00. If any other 1948ers (or close) are interested to attend, they are invited to send an email to jb.rookery@virgin.net and he will ensure that they are included in the ongoing reminders and pestering to set the date aside. Or they can telephone Brian on 01635 248564.

Lunch and “In Conversation with Frank Hanbidge” – Sunday 14th October, OHA Clubhouse, Croxdale Road Jon Corrall As with the writer W. H. Hudson the story started Far Away and Long Ago in Argentina. The birth certificate does not record the reassuring Frank Henry Hanbidge but Enrique Francisco. His father, however, was an Irishman, a protestant from the South. Such surprises emerged at the start of my interview with Frank which followed a typically English Sunday lunch in the clubhouse with thirty-five or so Old Haberdashers. It was a great pleasure to enjoy the company of former pupils. It is difficult to believe that we taught Toby Mitchell and Dave Ashley more than 25 years ago. The Scrimgeour twins are of a more recent vintage, but even then the Berlin Wall had only been down for four years.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

Frank Hanbidge, who spent all of his teaching career teaching English at Habs. had a number of other responsibilities, the highlight being his role as Head of Sixth Form. His 35 years at Habs, qualified him for membership of the very exclusive Termites – something which I was denied having spent a mere ninety-three terms at Habs. They have very strict rules. How did Frank’s education compare to Habs.? Once the family had returned to England, it was a very traditional Prep and Public school education, before going up to Oxford. Frank reminded us of the joys and sorrows that such a privileged education brings, but also how such an education led many Oxbridge graduates in those days to join the teaching profession. Frank spoke amusingly and affectionately of colleagues who made a particular impact on him at Habs. He recalled how the English department contained three published writers. In those early days Simon Stuart, the son and brother of an Earl, who had won all the glittering prizes that life had to offer, had brought his rare gifts to the English Department, teaching in a very progressive and adventurous way. Michael Fitch was by general agreement an outstanding teacher. We remembered Perry Keenlyside – who could forget Perry? – with his sense of style, profound cultural interests and incisive mind, and yet down to earth nature, snatched from us at far too young an age. All this time it was the boys who kept Frank amused. Amongst the Haberdasher characteristics he numbered humour, confidence, argumentativeness, and along with all these the special respect for learning which particularly the Jewish pupils brought to the school. He also recalled with the glow of hindsight the great chicken theft from Aldenham Country Park, taken we heard to release at a Friday night party. It is a good and not entirely untypical example of boys’ ingenuity and initiative, and complete lack of judgment. Fortunately the chicken survived for it was a rare breed, and all ended well as the miscreants spent two days restoring an overgrown hedge, surely one of the longest hedges in the county. Another story involved the boy who had taken the day off school to go to Wimbledon. Rather misguidedly he had positioned himself next to the scoreboard, and despite all his denials his presence at the centre court match was plain for all to see on the television broadcast. One of Frank’s greatest contributions to the School were his 6th form assembly talks which rank by general consent amongst the finest pieces of oratory witnessed at Habs. They could be about matters of great moment or quirky incidents or people. But they always brought home some important lesson. Once heard, never forgotten. It is not surprising that Frank revealed that an alternative profession might have been that of a barrister. In between the hard facts were amusing anecdotes, including his legendary ‘citizen’s arrest’ armed only with a le Creuset saucepan, for which he received a letter of commendation from the Metropolitan Police, all told with great wit and perfect timing. Frank had one final treat for the rapt audience as he recited a poem, the dramatic and macabre ‘Ballad of William Bloat’, told in a broad Ulster accent, suffused with the blackest humour. Do listen to it on Youtube. As with all good acts, Frank left us wanting more, but it had already lasted well over an hour, and young and old declared the lunch and the interview to have been a great success. We are very grateful to Frank both for his memorable speech at the OHA dinner this year and, of course, for this splendid episode of ‘This is Your Life.’ The interview is available on YouTube via the OHA website under "Conversation with Frank Hanbidge", or via this link.

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Remembrance Day Service and Parade – Friday 9th November, The School The Annual Remembrance Day Service, Parade and Wreath Laying at the OHA War Memorial took place on 9th November with the OH President, Colin Blessley, laying a wreath in memory of all OH lost in conflict over the years.

Quiz Night and Supper – Friday 9th November OHA Clubhouse, Croxdale Road What is the largest country, by population, never to win an Olympic medal? Which shipping line operated the Titanic? And which London postcode reaches furthest north? These and dozens of other head-scratchers had to be dealt with by the gluttons for punishment who kindly came to the Clubhouse on 9th November for the second OHA quiz night. Jim Tarpey was again our very own Bamber Gascoigne and led a family affair, roping in wife Lynda and son Andrew to the marking and scoring duties. Over fifty quizzers filled the Clubhouse and enjoyed some much-needed brain food, ably supplied by Pauline and Natalie Howard, in the middle of nine fiendish rounds of teasers. Rodney Jakeman did sterling work in all the organisation of the evening, including a handsome raffle, yet even his considerable influence could not prevent his table of "Elcs" from winning the wooden spoon! Once again the spoils were taken by Keith Weyman's "WYSIWYG" team with an impressive total of 125 out of a possible 160 points. Hats off to all those quizzers who came to flex their intellectual muscles for making such a good evening. Oh, and the answers? Bangladesh, White Star and E4. See you at the next one!

President’s Evening – The Mikado, Grim’s Dyke Hotel Sunday 9th December 2012 A sophisticated group of Old Haberdashers’ joined the President, Jon Corrall and his wife, for an evening of fine food and Gilbert & Sullivan Opera at the Grim’s Dyke Hotel in Old Redding, Harrow Weald.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

Retired Members Christmas Lunch – OH Clubhouse Tuesday 11th December 2012

Bob Cattle and Geoff Strange catch up after the lunch Seventy-five Old Haberdashers attended the Retired Members Christmas lunch at the Clubhouse. They enjoyed a fine three-course meal, wine and the opportunity to catch up with old friends and reminisce. The lunches are held quarterly and all OH are welcome. If you are interested in attending in the future please contact petervacher@onetel.com.

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Bucking the trend of price inflation, this handsome fourcourse meal, including wine and port, has again been held at just £25 per head (£30 if not a member of the OHA), representing remarkable value for money. The dinner is a relaxed affair and in fact the "rules" are reassuringly loose too: we've had grandfathers, nephews, godsons – you name it, there's a warm welcome assured. Non-OH are more than welcome too. If there are other father & son teams whom you know, but who are not on this mailing list, please feel free to extend the invitation to them. The dress is lounge suits or jackets & ties. The dinner is well attended by all ages – leavers from fiftyplus years ago to the current sixth form are regular features – and is surely a perfect opportunity for a bit of father-son bonding… and perhaps fence-mending after the strains of Christmas! If you are interested in attending (with or without your father / son) then please contact Andrew Tarpey on mail@atarpey.com.

Leavers from the 1990’s – Reunion Thursday 21st February 2013. In the City at The Bishops Finger PH, West Smithfield, EC1A 9JR The OHA (with kind help from Hartej Singh, 1998) is organising a Reunion for you in the City. The pub is adjacent to Haberdashers’ Hall in West Smithfield. We would like to welcome as many of you as possible, so please encourage your old friends to come along. If you are someone who left the School in the 1990s then please contact hbsingh@gmail.com for more details.

1970’s Reunion at the School – Wednesday 13th March 2013 from 3pm Ian Powell and Peter Vacher enter into the festive spirit

Forthcoming Events For the latest information please check www.oldhabs.com Retired Members Luncheons Regular and very popular lunches are organised by Peter Vacher if you would like to join the 75 plus people who regularly attend these events please email petervacher@onetel.com. The next lunches take place on 26th February 2013 and 16th April 2013.

OHA Ladies Luncheon Are organised by Patricia Vacher and enjoyed by a number of ladies with links to the OHA, including Margaret Taylor and Pat McGowan. To book your place, please email petervacher@onetel.com. The next lunches take place on 28th February and 18th April 2013.

OHRFC Annual Dinner – Thistle Hotel, Marble Arch, Saturday 26th January 2013 For more information contact simon.gresswell@imgworld.com.

The School are organising a reunion for all those who left during the 1970’s. Tours of the School will be on offer from 3pm with the opportunity to hear some of the School’s top musicians. There will be a dinner in the early evening followed by a drinks reception hosted by the Headmaster, Peter Hamilton. Further details will be announced in mid-January. For enquiries, please email Dr Georgina Chapman (event1@habsboys.org.uk).

OHRFC Past Players Lunches – OHA Sports Ground

OHA Annual Dinner – Haberdashers Hall, City of London, Thursday 16th May 2013

Held prior to a 1st XV home match. Next few dates: Saturdays – 12th January, 9th March and 20th April 2013. For more information contact imccarth@cisco.com.

For more information contact Andrew Tarpey mail@atarpey.com.

Fathers and Sons Dinner – OHA Clubhouse Friday 1st February 2013

1948 Joiners Luncheon – The Plough, Crews Hill, Herts 10th October 2013 For more information contact Brian Willcocks jb.rookery@virgin.net.

This highly popular dinner will be held at 7:30 for 8pm at the OHA Clubhouse, Croxdale Road, Borehamwood WD6 4PY, timed perfectly to coincide with (or perhaps cause) the abandonment of the diet after the New Year.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

Where are they now? We invited a number of OH to let us know what they have been doing since leaving school. You can see that there is no such thing as a typical Haberdasher! Please send your own personal biography to the Editor via martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com for future publication.

The Reverend Dr Robert Reiss, Canon of Westminster (1961) Canon Reiss featured prominently in the recent three-part BBC Two documentary which gives an insight into the inner workings of Westminster Abbey. Canon Reiss has been Canon Treasurer and Almoner since 2005 and Sub-Dean since 2011. He was previously Archdeacon of Surrey in the Diocese of Guildford. While at the Abbey he has completed a PhD in ecclesiastical history, which has just been published as ‘The Testing of Vocation: a Twentieth Century History’. Prior to moving to Surrey he was for ten years Team Rector of Grantham, then a team with seven churches and five Team Vicars, a curate and several Non-Stipendiary Ministers. He therefore has extensive experience of parochial ministry and managing clergy. While at Grantham he was elected a member of the General Synod and remained on it while archdeacon, so he had almost fifteen years on the Synod. Earlier he was Selection Secretary and then Senior Selection Secretary of the General Synod's Advisory Council for the Church's Ministry (now the Ministry Division of the Archbishop's Council) and before that was Chaplain of Trinity College, Cambridge. Photo: The Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, awarding the first Lambeth PhD to Revd Canon Bob Reiss during a service of Choral Evensong in Lambeth Palace Chapel

Daniel Taub (1980, Russells) Daniel is an Israeli diplomat, currently Ambassador of Israel to the Court of St James's. With over two decades of experience in Israel's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Daniel has played a key role in a wide range of diplomatic, legal and political arenas. Ambassador Taub is an expert in international law, with specializations in counterterrorism and the laws of war. As Principal Deputy Legal Advisor of Israel's Ministry of Foreign Affairs, he served as legal adviser to Israel's missions to the United Nations in New York and Geneva, and represented Israel in many multilateral fora.

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Daniel was extensively involved in the Israeli-Palestinian peace process, helping negotiate most of the agreements reached between the two sides, and heading the Israeli side of the Culture of Peace track of negotiations. He was also an active member of Israel's negotiation team in the Israel-Syrian negotiations. Within Israel's foreign ministry he developed and taught training programs for Israeli diplomats in negotiation strategies and communications skills. In his army service, Daniel served as a combat medic and as a reserve officer in the IDF's international law division. Daniel Taub visited the school on Thursday, November 8th. The event, which was organised by the HABS Jewish Society. During a speech at lunchtime, He reminisced briefly about his time at Habs, and his military service as a combat medic in the Israeli Defence Force. He talked at length about his involvement in the IsraeliPalestinian peace process. He also discussed peace as a “series of small miracles” and described how he and his Palestinian counterparts took inspiration and learnt lessons from the peace process in Northern Ireland.

Toby Mitchell (1986)

How I ended up running an internationally touring theatre company (despite the best efforts of my dad and my Habs careers advisor). I always wanted to work in theatre. But both my dad (who’d been a jazz musician before going into business) and my Habs careers advisor (‘Why don’t you do theatre as a hobby?’) persuaded me to do a ‘proper degree’ first. It turns out they were right. Sort of. After studying modern languages at Cambridge (and writing/directing/acting in numerous student productions) and teaching French in a nearby independent school for a year after graduation (1991-92), I ended up back in London, in my parents’ house, wondering what to do next. I wrote to the artistic director of Soho Theatre Company (she’d run workshops during my last year at Cambridge), and she invited me to do work experience there. So I did – and learnt a lot about professional theatre production. At the end of my time at Soho, I applied for various other jobs, and I vividly remember ending up with a choice of two – assistant director of a pub theatre on virtually no money (the office was in the pub cellar) or editor of French textbooks, with a salary that would enable me to move out of my parents’ house – and get a mortgage... After a good deal of soul-searching, I chose the editing job – much to the disgust of one colleague at Soho theatre, who said, ‘Well, that’s it, you’ll never work in theatre now.’ But I continued making theatre part-time while enjoying editing textbooks – then the opportunity came to move to Macmillan to edit children’s books. While there, I co-founded Tall Stories theatre company, and we began to gain a reputation for

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

quality theatre for family audiences – just when Macmillan published ‘The Gruffalo’ (1999). We read the story, loved it, and bought the theatrical rights – just before it won several awards and became a multi-million bestseller. Our adaptation became such a success that we were able to start working full-time at Tall Stories. ‘The Gruffalo’ and two other shows adapted from Julia Donaldson books now tour on the large scale, supporting our smaller scale work. (‘The Gruffalo’ even ended up playing at Soho Theatre!) Our shows now tour nationally and internationally. We’ve played in London’s West End, on Broadway and in Sydney Opera House. And all because of the advice from my dad and my Habs careers advisor. Well, sort of...

Ben Aumônier (1993) After several years living near and occasionally visiting Portsmouth University I stopped kidding myself and did what I’d always felt driven to do: joined the Army. I commissioned in 1998 into the Royal Logistic Corps and deployed to Bosnia and Kosovo before training as an Ammunition Technical Officer, a speciality I’ve remained with since qualifying in 2002. I commanded an Explosive Ordnance Disposal troop and have since been involved in procuring anything that goes bang, training people who stop things going bang and spying on people we’d rather didn’t make things go bang. Rashly in 2009, I volunteered to return to active ‘bomb disposal’ duties to help the Army meet a sudden unexpected need in Afghanistan; who after all could have foreseen that our enemies may attempt to blow us up? As a result I spent a busy period in Helmand Province dismantling many of the notorious ‘IEDs’ using string and a pair of B&Q snips while being shot at by angry men in pyjamas. In 2010 I was privileged to be given command of 621 Explosive Ordnance Disposal Squadron. This band of 130 bright and eager (albeit a bit odd) soldiers is based across south-east England and provides ‘bomb disposal’ support for the Police outside central London. Surprisingly this amounts to about 20 to 25 jobs each week and I am pleased to say that, so far, we haven’t done too much damage. I married Alice in 2010 and between us we have two dogs, one cat, four chickens and two sort of gerbil things; I stubbornly refuse to believe her zookleptia is any sort of ‘family’ hint. After fourteen years in the Army my understanding of the common phrases ‘relatively safe’ and ‘like a military operation’ has changed considerably but I am still having fun and wouldn’t change anything. Mostly.

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Captain James Grant (2002) I was a pupil at the School from 1995 until 2002. Having read Mechanical Engineering at Bristol University I worked for a large Engineering firm in London. I joined the Army and started at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in May 2008, a year later I commissioned into the Royal Engineers. Having completed a further six months of training I posted to 33 Engineer Regiment (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) as a Bomb Disposal Officer and Troop Commander. After thirty months, including a tour of Afghanistan, I was posted to 35 Engineer Regiment in Germany. Within two weeks of moving I returned to the UK for the Olympics. The London 2012 Olympic Games were, by every measure, a success. G4S got a lot of bad press in the build-up to it, but I for one was genuinely grateful for their minor miscalculation. It meant that I, along with 101 other officers and soldiers from 35 Engineer Regiment, were able to spend the entire games right at the heart of it; the Athletes’ Village. To say that the Olympic deployment came at an inconvenient time is certainly an understatement; the Regiment had returned from Afghanistan in April and was a few weeks away from its summer leave period. Without wanting to appear to trivialise the issues we had deploying so many people at such short notice, the phrase I used a lot during the games, when explaining our situation, was “as long as the soldiers do not get a divorce because of coming here, then very soon all of those issues will have been replaced with happier memories of the Olympics”. I am pleased to say that since we have returned to our barracks in Germany there have been no divorces, break-up or other personal problems as a result of us going. A typical day would start with the Tobacco Docks’ “dawn chorus”; thirty different alarms going off within a few minutes of each other at approximately 5am. In 1990 the Docks were converted into a boutique shopping centre but it is currently used as an exhibition centre and corporate party venue. The 2500 soldiers that lived there called it “home”.

The photo above shows one of the thirty-man “bedrooms”, yes those are glass walls and yes the ceiling is one enormous skylight (Virgin were kind enough to donate 2500 eye masks to the residents of the Docks). Once we had all washed, shaved, eaten and travelled by coach to Stratford it was time for our twelve-hour shift to begin; from 7am until 7pm we were responsible for all the vehicle and personnel search area around the Athletes’ Village. As the Squadron Second in Command, my job was to plan the day to day running of our deployment and ensure the Squadron Commander’s orders were carried out. This unfortunately and very unglamorously meant that a lot of my day revolved around spreadsheets and long meetings (please do not feel too sorry for me, I was very successful at finding reasons to escape from behind my laptop). The soldiers, those turning the plans into reality, were outstanding and, quite rightly, received praise from almost every

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

quarter. Irrespective of their feeings about being in London rather than on leave with their loved ones, they all worked tirelessly to ensure that our little part of the Olympics ran without incident. Fortunately the work wasn’t all bad, being at the Athletes’ Village meant the soldiers met almost all of the famous (and in some cases, soon to be famous) athletes. To mention a few of the highlights from our time at the search lanes: one Lance Corporal, a very gregarious Jamaican, came away with one of their team tracksuits; the Squadron Commander had his picture taken with the entire female gymnastic GB team; whilst their car was being searched the Williams sisters spent time having photos taken; Andy Murray was positively chatty; The Duchess of Cambridge waved as she entered through the VIP gate, everyone who was there has told me that she was waving exclusively at them and almost everyone now has a photo of themselves with an Olympic Torch. For me the Olympics was a once-in-a-lifetime experience, both professionally and personally. Of the many highlights from the Games, the one that will stick with me for the longest will be the public’s reaction to the military’s presence. I lost count of the number of people who thanked me for helping at the Olympics, for going to Afghanistan, who wanted a picture or who just wanted to chat about life in the Army. The kindness that was extended to the military was truly staggering, it is not very often that I am lost for words but most of the time all I could do to show my appreciation was mumble a heartfelt thank you. Hopefully in this article I have managed a more eloquent and more public “Thank you” to both my Squadron for their hard work and to everyone who was so kind and generous toward us this summer.

Personal News and Memories A large number of people responded to the request for Personal News and Information and here is what we received – in order of the date of leaving the School (oldest first). If any of you would like to contact any of our contributors please email me and I will pass your email on. Anyone who would like to contribute some personal news – please send an email to secretary@oldhabs.com.

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Due to my father being moved to a managerial post within The Midland Bank in Fakenham, Norfolk I was obliged to continue my education at Paston Grammar School, North Walsham, Norfolk. Strangely the seat of Lord Nelson’s education, the tie being Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square. I am now well retired (75) and have escaped the hurly-burly of contemporary living and am residing in the far south, at Porthleven, Cornwall.

Peter Vacher (1955) Peter’s new book, titled “Mixed Messages” was published recently. The book contains detailed interviews with twenty-one American jazz musicians – on music, mostly, but the world intrudes, as it does with the best of jazz music. Peter has been interviewing musicians since the 1950s. This is his second collection of interviews, and is lavishly illustrated with rare and original photographs. The musicians range from the trombonist Louis Nelson, who was born in 1902, through the New Orleans pianist Ellis Marsalis, who is still playing and on to Byron Stripling, who plays trumpet with his Columbus Jazz Orchestra. Other musicians interviewed are: Norman ‘Dewey’ Keenan, Gerald Wilson, Fip Ricard, Ruby Braff, George ‘Buster’ Cooper, Bill Berry, Benny Powell, Plas Johnson Jr., Carl ‘Ace’ Carter, Herman Riley, Lanny Morgan, Houston Person Jr., Tom Artin, John Eckert, Rufus Reid, John Stubblefield IV, Judy Carmichael and Tardo Hammer. If you would like a copy please contact Peter on petervacher@onetel.com.

Richard (Dick) Handscombe (1955) Dear Old Haberdashers, By chance came across the Association’s website. Rather better than last time seen... and good to see that my old headmaster is still revered. Remember him stopping in his tiny car on the Elstree Bypass in 1948 to chat to me and other members of the 2a

John Simpson (1952)

I imagine the Carol Service to be held at OH Clubhouse, Croxdale Road, Borehamwood, will no doubt be a warming occasion and it elicits memories I have of serving in the School Choir back in the early fifties. We had some quite memorable festivals at that time and I have poignant memories singing in both St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square and at Eton Chapel under the critical guidance and tutoring of Dr. Mclellan our Music Teacher. I thought fellow OH might be interested to see a picture of Laurie Hendon, Lower School Head, taken at Westbere Road in the early 1950s.

cycling club. Have lived in Spain since 1994; now author of sixteen books including nine about Spanish/Mediterranean gardening...would be glad to meet up with ex-Habs as I am now 75 and the early days are becoming more important. Anyone who wants recent info can search www.gardenspain.com. Yes this is Dick of athletics and rugby for school and the Old Boys Clubs. Cheers to the school and OHA and all it meant!

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

Paul Foster (1979)

I got married on June 24th of this year to an old NY flame Winsome McDermott, from my time at New York University in 1984...we got married on a rooftop in New York while the Gay Pride march sashayed by below... Brother Dave was also there (plus Mum who did great for 80 years of age), plus Jeremy Bergman (1972-79 I believe). The photo shows our combined families of my boys, Winsome's son and our daughter from 1984.

Ashley Havens (1983) Ashley writes from his home near Aberdeen where he works for Shell. Crime & Punishment and other recollections My only recollection of being formally punished during my time at Habs, occurred back in the Summer of ’79. It was for a heinous crime, worthy of the re-telling... Whilst I cannot remember all of the details leading up to it, suffice it to say that I was one of a group of boys who enjoyed the company of the opposite sex, rather than just staying within the confines of an all boys school through the day. With the Habs Boys and Girls schools next door to each other, there were opportunities for fraternising before and after school, but particularly at lunch time! As I recall, there were two main meeting places at lunch time – the “Gate” between the two schools (generally “tolerated”) and the Tennis Courts, next to the Prep School soccer pitch (much more “risky”). One fine day, a group of boys, including myself and possibly Neil Walker, Simon Chamberlain, Mark Farman, Simon Marchant and some others (I may be doing some of those named a disservice) managed to arrange an impromptu football match against some of the girls and what fun we had! Blazers on the ground forming goalposts, lots of running around, etc. Unfortunately, we had not reckoned on the fact that the pitch was somewhat overlooked by the Headmaster’s House. Either the Headmaster, Bruce McGowan, or his wife Pat had happening to look out and see blue and green uniforms intermingling, and so I expect a call to the Prefect’s Room was forthcoming. Some may have escaped the clutches of the Prefects – I certainly wasn’t one of them. My punishment? A strong dressing down and an imposition. Several hundred words on the Iranian Revolution! I actually rather enjoyed doing it and learned something into the bargain. The football match was much talked about for some time afterwards and went into the annals of Habs pupils’ memories, only to surface again some thirty-three years later! Where does the time go?”

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Other memories of visitors to Habs – Rowan Atkinson sitting cross-legged on the Headmaster’s table in the Assembly Hall, fiddling with the microphone and Richard Briers speaking when suddenly the sun came out, shafts of sunlight coming through the window, and he turned and said “thank you”. As far discipline, TEC (Mr Carrington) making Benjamin Brown stand on tiptoe so that his nose touched a cross on the blackboard after some misdemeanour and Mr Broderick hurling various tools, clay, etc across the Art Room at boys talking or misbehaving. Mr Crane reminding one particular pupil that throwing snowballs at teachers, even accidently, is a bad idea. I think the returned snowball was rather painful! And finally, Dai Barling “mellowing out” towards the end of his career, going from references to “odious youths” to reading out various poems and then his own poem, I seem to recall, with references to activities behind the bike sheds...”

Nadeem Lalani (2006) My brother Jameel (2004) and I (2006) founded Lalani & Company, tea traders and curation house in London in 2010. There is a small but influential group of alumni in the industry and we are keen to arrange an OHA dinner. Any alumni in the Food and Beverage interested in an OHA dinner please get in touch at NL@lalaniandco.com. Information about Lalani & Company Lalani & Company is the first British tea trading and curation house, founded by three brothers Jameel, Nadeem and AK. Lalani & Co has pioneered garden–to-glass tea curating; expertly selecting limited production microlots by season and even day of picking from the world’s leading family-owned, natural & organic, boutique tea gardens. The company created the first seasonal tea libraries with some of the leading chefs and establishments in the UK and counts eight Michelin Stars and three Royal Warrants among their clients. Lalani & Co are also involved in pioneering partnerships with renowned glassware maker Riedel and British ceramic artists to find the perfect glass shapes for tea drinking and perfect ceramic design. They were the first tea company to be certified by the SRA, are Fairtrade, Organic certified and are supporters of Slow Food. www.lalaniandco.com.

Udayan Tripat (2008, Hendersons) Udayan reports that he is a Junior Professional Associate of The World Bank in Washington, D.C. where he works on climate change, finance, and sustainable development.

Sports Club Updates OH Rugby Football Club Old Haberdashers’ RFC September Team of the Month in Rugby World magazine

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

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OH Second Row James Warner securing line out possession This is a transcript of the article in Rugby World. How many players are lost to the game because they’re loath to commit to training? Sweden back-row Seb Taylor had doubts himself when first arriving in London, but he now captains a side, Old Haberdashers, that sidesteps the issue neatly. “Our USP is not having to train in midweek,” he says. “So many good players can’t afford to give up two nights in the week, or even one night, because of work or family commitments. “Everyone is responsible for their fitness and if they don’t do it they won’t be picked. As for unit training, we practise ahead of matches – we’re out there 90 minutes before kick-off doing lineouts or backs moves. It helps that the core of the pack have played together for a while.” The no-coach approach isn’t hindering results – far from it. Four London North wins in September continued a remarkable run that’s seen OH promoted four years in a row. Defeat by Luton (32-22) was their first for 11 months, but even here there was a positive. “I think we were in awe at first – their facilities are unbelievable. We were 19-0 down and being pummelled but we re-grouped and led at half-time. Impressive!” Tighthead Andrew Sanderson is the rock of the team in which lock James Warner and wing/full back Scott Chatterton are key figures. Playing out of Borehamwood, OH are packed with lawyers and don’t lack for conviction. “We have a winning mentality and a confidence,” says Taylor, a solicitor. “Our president, Ian McCarthy, has put a structure in place, like recruitment and sponsorship committees, and we have a few new players. We’ve got momentum.”

2012/13 Season So Far Some 4 seasons ago, Seb Taylor and his men had set themselves the objective of playing their rugby in the London One league. After four successive promotions, that is exactly where they found themselves on the first day of the season in September, facing Basildon in their inaugural game in London One North. Welcoming illustrious and established clubs like Luton, Bury St Edmunds, Letchworth and Colchester to Croxdale Road was an enticing prospect for players and supporters alike. But Habs were not content with just being there, going about winning their first 3 games in a row and making their new league counterparts sit up and take notice and picking up the Rugby World magazine team of the month award in the process. Basildon, Beaconsfield and Chingford were dispatched, but Habs suffered their first loss in a long time against Luton, despite a valiant fightback from 19 v 0 down, eventually losing 32 v 22. October proved a testing month for the Habs faithful, with a fixture list involving each of the top 4 teams and a spate of injuries leaving Habs winless in October. However, even in defeat there were some excellent performances and perhaps Bury St Edmunds, cruising along unbeaten at the top of the league, would testify that Habs provided the sternest test of their season so far with Habs winning comfortably at half time, only to lose out in the second half. Narrow defeats against Eton Manor, Romford and Brentwood, combined with good wins against Ruislip and Chingford saw Habs reach the halfway stage of the season having played 15, won 7, lost 8 and sitting mid table. There is no doubt that the second half of the season will provide some fantastic rugby, and as the ground hardens up the dynamic Habs team will be looking to win those games that they so narrowly lost in the first half of the season. The quality of the opposition, facilities and the rugby being played by Habs, and as always the enjoyment that they take from it, leaves them in no doubt that they have found their new home in London One. The progress of the 2nd XV continues under the indomitable Simon Wallis. Despite being regularly plundered by requests for players from the 1st XV, Simon has used his unique leadership qualities to lead the 2XV to second place in Herts/Middlesex Merit Table One, having played 11 games, winning 7, losing 3 and drawing 1 and beating old rivals St Albans, Fullerians and Welwyn along the way. The players from the 2nd XV that have stepped into the 1st XV have done so seamlessly and the importance of this to the success of the club, both this season and in previous seasons, cannot be underestimated. Arguably even more importantly, the 2nd XV have fostered a strong team spirit and are generally to be found in the bar after the game enjoying the social element that continues to thrive at the club. They will look to continue their progress in the second half of the season.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

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OHRFC Doddery International side

The visiting Irish Wolfhounds – led by housewives favourite Craig Doyle It seemed impossible. It seemed implausible – surely the moons would not align again and allow the combined organisational skills of Brian Barrett and Craig Doyle to produce a second doddery spectacular. But amazingly they did and a damp Saturday morning saw Croxdale Road host the second doddery international between the Irish Wolfhounds (led by the Housewives', though not Natalie & Kelly's, favourite) and the OH Lions (confusingly led by Irish Brian). OH's hopes of victory were dealt a major blow early in the morning – not because of Simon Gresswell's late pullout with a shocking chipped nail, but through the arrival of the opposition and their new accessory of tag-shorts. Beechy faces a busy winter scouring the catalogues. Despite such challenges OH kicked off with a team packed with skill, experience and rugby nous and Paddy Hughes. We also contained five Irishmen as we felt there was not enough Gaelic influence at the club. If only we had known a wandering band of stomping Swedes would be at lunch. Luckily one of these was Mike Scott (this is getting confusing I know) as he seemed to posses more fitness, and better still less hair, than the core doddery squad. Even more fortunately the team was assisted by two speedy youngsters making their doddery debuts: Arturo, son of Tin and Irish Brian's Irish Brother's Irish Son (though he could not make the lunch as he had to see Irish Brian's Irish Brother's Irish Son's Irish Mother). With this combination OH simply could not fail – especially as this was supplemented by youth of Rolfe, the ballskills of Hill, pace of Davies, handling of Hughes, height of Corbett, core strength of Barrett, Logan-ness of Alexander, linesman's skills of Beech, name of the day in Aeneas and Jon Crossfield not leaving his kit on the train. Oh yes it also helped that the opposition had been drinking since 6am - not really surprising given that such legends as Kugene, Keith, the hairy one and Doctor Fish had made the trip to picturesque Borehamwood. The final score was 19-2, showing how the level of the game has risen in Ireland following last year's 19-1 drubbing. All that remained was for a limping Irish Brian to pick up the Barrett-Doyle trophy in the clubhouse, Craig to try and flog double glazing and the combined drinking talents from both sides of the Irish Sea to raise the GDP of Chalfont seven-fold in the evening, as we discussed plans for next year's rematch in Eniskerry.

The OH Lions and the Irish Wolfhounds in Dublin 2012

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

OH Cricket Club The cricket season ended with the Old Habs 1st XI in the bottom four of Herts League Division Five, with 197 points and destined for cricket in Division Six in 2013. As was experienced by many cricket clubs throughout the country, the volume of rain during the summer of 2012 led to many games being cancelled (six in our case) and the conclusion that this was probably the worst conditions for a cricket season that people can remember. (The annual matches against the School were also cancelled due to rain / saturated pitches.) Despite player availability not being what we had hoped, partly affected by the lack of a proper summer, the side is looking forward to a new challenge in Division Six. A new Captain is taking on the task and generating impetus for some good performances in 2013. In between the events of the League season, the Club enjoyed the annual Tour to Devon towards the end of August, with new fixtures against Bovey Tracey and Chudleigh, as well as the longer running fixtures against Kilmington, Exeter and Sidmouth, plus the relatively recent addition of Heathcoat. The tour could not escape the weather either, with the Sidmouth match at the end of the week being cancelled and Heathcoat pulling out all the stops to mop up the water, so we could play a 20/20.

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performed. A further victory over Lancing Old Boys, who had beaten us 6-0 at the start of the season, moved us further up the table. We now have a strong, well balanced team and go into the second half of the season with confidence. A good run of results in both league and cup could see a very successful end to the season for Old Haberdashers FC. Anyone interested in playing for the OH Football club should contact eoinbroderick@hotmail.com.

OH Golf Society A full programme of twelve fixtures was enjoyed by the Old Haberdashers’ Golfing Society during 2012 – examples of these include triangular matches against Old Millhillians / Old Lyonians and versus UCS Old Boys / Old Merchant Taylors. The spring meeting at Harpenden was a success and there was a re-vamped summer event at Hendon, which it’s planned to continue to develop. After the Habs School Golf Day at Aldwickbury towards the end of the summer, the OHGS met for the autumn meeting at Gerrards Cross at the beginning of October, the event again being popular, with a few new faces trying their best on this challenging course. Similar fixtures will be in place for 2013 and new participants are welcome - please contact Peter Mackie (psmackie@tiscali.co.uk) or Robert Clarke (robertc.clarke@btopenworld.com) for further details.

Cricket on tour at Heathcoat C.C., Devon In November the Club Annual Dinner was again held in the impressive surroundings of the Committee Dining Room, at Lord’s cricket ground. It’s always a great venue and some new attendees were welcomed, then the catering team provided us with very good food and we ended with the awarding of the prizes for the season. It was again an evening enjoyed by all. Pre-season cricket nets will begin in early February at the School Sports centre on a Monday evening. We are always looking to get new people involved in the cricket club, so if you are interested, please contact Robert Clarke on robertc.clarke@btopenworld.com.

OH Football Club Skipper Eoin Broderick reports that the season started slowly for Old Haberdashers FC with key players missing and the results that followed reflected that. Without a settled team and with constant availability problems the defeats racked up. Into November and the duck was finally broken for the season in fine style. After a four goal burst in the opening half hour, the eventual 9-3 victory over Old Wellingtonians did wonders for the team's confidence and kick started our season. This was then followed by a home game against Old Chigwellians in which we were forced to play the whole 90 minutes with only 9 men. Leading 2-1 with 5 minutes to go we eventually had to settle for a draw but the disappointment displayed by the team showed how well we had

The Old Haberdashers’ Golfing Society welcomes golfers of all standards, whether members of a golf club with an official handicap or occasional social players. Currently we have fifty members with handicaps ranging from 3 to 36 and we are keen to increase this substantially over the next twelve months. If you are interested in joining please follow this link to the OHGS Section and Fixture List 2013 on the OHA website.

OH Rifle Club The dinner held on P.S.Vets and Ashburton day will be at 7.30 pm Thursday 11th July at London and Middlesex R.C. Bisley. The captain of the Great Britain Rifle Team to Canada in 2013 will be Chris Fitzpatrick – a prestigious appointment. Chris will be making a major contribution to running teams representing Ireland during the coming year, for example selection for ‘The Mackinnon’, and ‘The National’ where the home countries compete. We wish him well.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

School News Staff News Doug Whittaker – Head of Maths and CCF It is with much sorrow that we advise you of the death of Douglas Whittaker, who passed away last Monday night 10th December. He had been suffering from bowel cancer. A Christ Church, Oxford Scholar - Doug taught at Habs from 1964 until 1968 and then from 1970 until 2000. During his time here he was Head of the Mathematics department as well as Contingent Commander of the CCF. As generations of boys will testify, Doug was an inspiring teacher, certainly a one-off, possessed of great skill in the techniques of Mathematics – what made Doug so special was his ability to challenge the boys, to provoke them into thinking in new ways, to give them the desire and the confidence to get stuck into problems the like of which they had never seen before. The annual Prefect’s Training day, owes much to his ideas of CCF cadet leadership training and he even introduced computing here in the 1960’s. Michael Cook commented that “Doug had an extraordinary ability to anticipate educational change. He established a Maths department that is second to none in the country and his energies and enthusiasms re-vitalised the CCF”. The funeral took place on Thursday 20th December at Garston West Herts Crematorium. Letters of condolence can be sent to Mrs Valerie Miller (his sister) care of External Relations, Haberdashers’ Aske’s Boys’ School, Butterfly Lane, Elstree, Hertfordshire, WD6 3AF. See p16 for appreciations of Doug – Ed.

School Captains and Year Lists The list of School Captains on the website has been added to and brought up to date. It is now almost complete for the years between 1940 and 2012. We are missing the names for 1941 and 1958, so if you can provide the names, please email me – secretary@oldhabs.com. To get to the list – follow this link. Lists of people per year are now available on the website in spreadsheet form. To get to the list follow this link.

Ampthill's night time walking had recently seemed to provide less thorough training in navigation than was fully suitable for the extreme weather conditions occasionally encountered at Otterburn, so it was replaced by an evening walk from School to an overnight camp in Bricket Wood, a new route that certainly challenged some of the Lower Sixth Group Leaders' sense of direction, but all the Cadets eventually reached the campsite and even found their way back to School the next day. The Remembrance Service was held in School on 9 November when Colin Blessley, the OHA's new President, laid a wreath in memory of the Old Haberdashers who had died in the two world wars. Nick Saddington, the Contingent Commander, reminded us that 2012 was the thirtieth anniversary of the death of Nicholas Taylor O.H., shot down over Goose Green, the first fatality of the Falklands War. On 14 December the CCF held a minute's silence in honour of Doug Whittaker, a former Contingent Commander, who had sadly died earlier in the week. As I write this on the last day of the Autumn Term I recall that the CCF's Annual Reunion Dinner is usually held in the last week of the Summer Term. As soon as we have set a date we will issue an invitation to all former members of the CCF and hope to see a large number at what is always a very good event.

Obituaries Sadly there are a number of deaths of distinguished Old Haberdashers and former teachers to report, with regret.

If you are aware of any other recent deaths please inform the OHA Secretary, Martin Baker, via martin.s.baker768@btinternet.com so that the information can be communicated to fellow Old Haberdashers. John H Feltham (d.2012) John left the School in 1942. He was a great supporter of the Old Haberdashers’ Association attending many events whilst he was able to. He was a generous benefactor of the Association and of the Cricket & Rugby clubs. He was one of the founders of British Car Auctions.

Staff News on the OHA website The Staff News section of the website has been brought up to date and lots of new entries have been added with information taken from Skylark. Follow this link for news of retirements Follow this link for news of leavers Follow this link for news of deaths

School CCF News John Wigley, pp. Major Nick Saddington

During July 2012 the CCF held its annual Tri-Service Camp, this year at Gareloch Head north west of Glasgow, a fitting preparation for a strenuous Autumn Term that has seen a mixture of continuity and change in a CCF that is now the largest voluntary unit in an English day school! In October each Section held its own Field Day as usual. The Army returned to Thetford and benefited from the experienced Fusiliers' Training Team, who led a night exercise that ended just before torrential rain swept the training area. Fortunately, the sodden ground did not inhibit the next day's section attacks, close quarter combat and stalking.

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Richard Goldman (1947 – 2012) Provided by Jill Goldman Richard Michael Goldman was born in London on the 4th December, 1947. He grew up in Cricklewood with his parents and older brother, Gordon (also a Haberdashers pupil). He attended Haberdashers school and gained A-levels in science subjects. However, he was not quite sure of his future path, so on Gordon’s recommendation, their parents took Richard to a careers advisor. The advice given, after all sorts of tests and interviews was intriguing. The conclusion was that Richard would either make a very good accountant – or a religious leader! As it happened, Richard managed to shine in both of these areas.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

From the start it was a very disciplined training as regards accountancy. The exams are not easy and Richard often rose early to study before his working day at Malvern & Co. in Great Portland Street, where he eventually rose up the ranks to become a junior partner. In 1975 he met Jill, a secretary/PA, who also sang and wrote songs. They met on a blind date and were married a year or so later, setting up home in Wembley. Around six years later, Richard and another accountant started their own company and worked from an office in Queen’s Park. Jill and Richard’s son, David was born in 1983. Not long afterwards, Jill became a part time arts journalist and Richard was most supportive – a real hands-on father. David is now 28 and works in sales and marketing. As regards Richard’s abilities, he was (perhaps because of the scientific study he undertook at Haberdashers) excellent at predicting the weather! He also was looked upon by his many clients, as not just their accountant, but also, as their friend to whom they could speak freely – and not be judged. The amount of glowing letters Jill has received after his passing, are testimony to this fact. He was very quick to take new technology on board – even though this happened relatively late in life. He also remembered and used his French and Spanish from school. This ability was most helpful on European holidays! In 1987, Richard followed Jill into the Buddhist faith; practising Nichiren Buddhism – based on the chanting of Nam Myoho Renge Kyo to bring out Buddhahood, or the most positive state of life – and was much loved by his friends in the lay organisation, Soka Gakkai (a non-Governmental organisation of the UN). He was also active in the local community and played a leading role in working for the welfare of residents in Wembley. Richard died suddenly of heart failure on the 30th of May 2012. Jill and David have lost their best friend and supporter, whose sense of humour, common sense, and kind, cheerful personality kept them afloat through life’s ups and downs. He is sadly missed.

David Maconachie (1934 – 2012) David Maconachie (OH 1945–53 – School Captain) passed away on Saturday 29th October 2012. This is particularly sad as David was the brother-in-law of Ray Kipps, who also died recently. Their wives, Gill and Anne, are sisters. David was school captain in 1952, a talented cricketer and played many games for the OH rugby club. He lived in Sussex and was an officer in the Sussex Society of Rugby Referees. He was a well-respected referee in Sussex in the 1970s and ’80s and continued right up to the age of 75 when he was appointing referees at all levels throughout the week over the last 15 years and still covering for referees in mid-week doing 30 to 40 games a season. A great supporter of the Sussex Referees Society and could be seen supporting new referees on a Saturday or just enjoying Sussex rugby. The Sussex rugby clubs view of David was that he was “a true gentleman, a person who made a real difference to our game, a genuine loss”. David had been refereeing for 38 seasons for Sussex and in the Middle East, the United States and various venues in Europe. He worked on the principle of 'I have kit with me so I am available to referee wherever we are'. David was known to referee three games in a day rather than say that there was no-one available. On many occasions over the years the Sussex County and Schools Union have recognised his contribution.

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In 2009 David was presented with an International referees shirt donated and signed by Wayne Barnes plus a 'reward the volunteer' certificate and tie awarded by the English Rugby Football Union. An Appreciation of David Maconachie Peter Shiells, with extracts from David’s children’s and David Sainsbury’s tributes at the memorial service held in Bognor David was born in North London where his mother looked after the two boys (Ian, also a Haberdasher, was a couple of years older than David). He started at HAHS in Westbere Road in September 1945. He was a well-liked School Captain before he left in 1953. He was also Sgt Major in the School Corps and captain of the 1st XI. All in all a glittering school career which led to a commission during National Service. He left the army with one idea in mind, which was to travel. As he’d have to finance this passion, he joined the airline business, working for Pan Am in London, Teheran and Manchester. He subsequently moved to Philippine Airways and eventually to Gulf Air. This latter appointment took him to Bahrain with his family until he came back to England in the mid ’90s. David died suddenly after injuring his head in a fall. He leaves his wife Anne and three children (Mark, Kirsty and Ross), two of whom are married with children of their own. Understandably the family were devastated and each of his children gave passionate tributes at the memorial service on the themes of Organised Sport, Adventure and Caring-Kindness which portrayed their father. As a young schoolboy he was a passionate Lancashire supporter and he became a very effective medium fast bowler for the OH before he moved to Cheshire where he managed one or two games of cricket for Lancashire Club & Ground. He also played some rugby in the lower sides, where he is remembered as a successful goal kicker. As a bachelor in Cheshire he kept contact with some of his contemporaries and entertained them in Goostrey, roaring around Manchester in his TR sports car in his hounds-tooth checked trousers and jaunty cap. He was, in his words, “a bit schmoo” (according to his son Ross he was famous for making up words!). This car first made its appearance in Teheran where it was loaned by David to compete in the Teheran GP where it finished second. Anne was less impressed and the sports car was sold to buy furniture. Noone knows what happened to the hounds-tooth trousers. For his children, David was a fountain of knowledge about the world. Whichever country was discussed, he’d been there and knew the best places to go, and, most importantly because the “getting there” was much more important than the arrival, what the best route was. He turned every trip into a learning experience telling them all about the geography, the peoples and cultures. Daughter Kirsty said that ‘Dad would do anything for us children and for anyone who he felt needed support, especially elderly relatives. He never acted out of self-interest and didn’t talk about what he did, he just quietly went out of his way to make people feel valued and looked after. He was full of old-fashioned virtues; honesty, integrity and loyalty. Dad was kind. You can’t spend too long in their house without being handed a piece of chocolate cake by mum and a glass of wine by

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

Dad’. (I certainly experienced this hospitality when working in alcohol-free Saudi Arabia and being invited to stay in Bahrain with the family back in the early eighties.) Once he had stopped playing rugby, David devoted himself to refereeing and it is in this field that he became a legend in Sussex. He joined the Sussex referees society in the early 70s and really made a mark there. The current secretary of the Sussex referees spoke at the memorial service to David and I quote: ‘He was a highly respected referee who the players were always glad to see. They knew that David would give them every opportunity to play and enjoy a good game. He was calm, polite and undemonstrative on the field as well as off it, and the players warmed to him. If somebody conceded a penalty they were left with the feeling that they had rather let David down.’ He further stated that after one particularly feisty game: “A few days later the match report appeared in the Bognor Observer and the referee got his mention. Now the gentlemen of the press, and others, I have since found out, can call referees certain things, a number of which I couldn’t possibly mention here. I still have the press cutting, and the report said, “A word for the referee, David Maconachie, who controlled the game like a perfect gentleman.” Incredible, referees are called many things, but “gentlemen”? Never since and probably never before. And that was David.” When he moved to Bahrain with Gulf Air he took the refereeing to a higher level and took charge of matches up and down the Gulf from Kuwait to Muscat and later co-ordinated the refs for all the interstate matches. He also officiated in the early days of the Dubai Sevens (now a venue in the International Sevens series). On his return to UK he rapidly became the organiser for Sussex referees at all levels and it is calculated that he appointed refs for 25,042 games. Organisation is what it is called and this included dealing with the last minute hitches – examples of which are legion: the venue’s moved; we’re not playing at our usual ground; it’s too wet; we’re playing behind the pub, please tell the ref (who was probably well on the way to the original ground by now). And from the schools: the Under 14s have a cup match tomorrow, the Under 13s on Wednesday and the Under 12s on Thursday – okay for referees for all of those? Oh and by the way, we’ve got a local derby with St Saviour’s 1st XV on Wednesday as well – that will need a strong referee please. The referees themselves didn’t make life easy either: I’ve just remembered it’s my birthday; hamstrings gone – it’s an age thing; they don’t like me at that club – I can’t go there. The one that really was guaranteed to upset David, “I’ve injured myself training,” to which David’s response was to get on the phone to the training officer, Phil Bowers, and say, “I’ve told them not to train, they won’t take any notice of me, will you please tell your referees to stop training, it’s doing them no good!” One rearrangement would often take half a dozen phone calls and many Friday nights David was up long into the night trying to get the following day’s fixtures and appointments finalised. Anne, Mark, Kirsty and Ross know only too well the hours in the week Dad spent trying to complete the jigsaw. Volunteers in all walks of life are a bit taken for granted. This was certainly not the case with David. His devotion to the cause went far beyond any call of duty, and was appreciated by clubs and schools and referees throughout the county. The esteem in which he was held went beyond great respect and admiration, and he became much loved by the rugby fraternity. He was honoured both by Sussex and by the RFU and the framed shirt, presented to him by the RFU and signed by international referee Wayne Barnes, fittingly sits on the wall in the referees’ changing room at Bognor Rugby Club. David remained a great friend of Bognor Rugby for forty-odd

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years and their President has said how proud the club was when David agreed to become a life member. Moving moments of silence to remember David were held all over the county on news of his death. From Crowborough in the east, to Crawley in the north, to Bognor in the west and at many clubs in between, the players stood in silent respect for David.

John M Gibson (1934 – 2012) Provided by Richard Rowlinson John died aged 78 after a period of ill health. Born in Wimbledon in 1934, he was evacuated to the Lake District during the war years. He started school there but then moved to Kenton and finished his education at Westbere Road. He was a member of the rowing club and coxed the 1st VIII. After leaving school in 1951, John was called up for National Service and two years later he began a career with the Midland Bank. John married in 1959 and set up home in Chesham, where his two children were born. In the seventies he was appointed manager at the Leigh-on-Sea branch in Essex and as a result the family moved house to Little Baddow, a village near Chelmsford. John was heavily involved in local community work throughout his life. While living in Chesham he was appointed chairman of the local Parish Council and often found himself treasurer of various committees. He became a church Elder in Little Baddow. With retirement from the Bank coming a little early for John’s liking, he spent a few years working for M&G, the unit trust group, in Chelmsford. In retirement John and his wife, Shirley, travelled extensively but still found time to play bridge regularly and to bowl throughout the year. John is survived by his wife, a son and a daughter.

Peter J Stevenson (1928 – 2012) Peter died on Friday 5th October 2012 at 4.55am. Peter made a huge contribution to the Old Haberdashers - especially to the Rugby Club: he made 406 appearances for the 1st XV, the fourth highest number achieved by any Old Haberdasher, behind Randal Whittaker, Nigel Fuller and his son Alun. Peter was President of the OHA and of the Rugby Club, he also served the OHA in many roles and was a great supporter of our events and events at the School. Eulogy by Rev. Roger Dunlop Peter was born on 26th April 1928 to Frederick & Edith Stevenson. He had an older brother, Ron, and their first home was 6, St. Leonards Street, in Westminster. Sadly his father died whilst he was on military service. He was baptised on June 3rd 1928 in St John's Church in south west London.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

In 1935 the family moved to Hendon and Peter’s reports from Colindale Junior School show that he made 'steady improvement' in maths and languages in particular – he became 1st in his class of 48 pupils. He moved on to Haberdashers' Aske's, in Hampstead where he was to become a School prefect, Rugby captain, and also enjoyed cricket and boxing. He began his National Service in 1947 in the Middlesex Regiment but was transferred to the Royal Horseguards in Germany primarily to play for their rugby team! He met Gwyneth at a rugby match at Twickenham and they married here in June 1952, Peter moving to Northwood. We give especial thanks today for their four children: Alun (1955), Hugh (1957), Jackie (1958) and Jane (1960) and for his eight grandchildren: Gordon, Andrew, Helena; Rachel, William; Filippo, Daniella & Marco. He loved his family and was very proud of them all and what they achieved over the years. He was always interested in the grandchildren and how their lives were developing. Following his sadness at Gwyneth’s departure he subsequently met and fell in love with Janet whom he met through this church and in December 1993 they were married here. With marriage to Janet his immediate family grew with her two sons, Paul & Gary and their two children (Ben & Madeleine). He found much love and happiness with Janet, and was able to continue his travels with a companion much to his delight. Then of course was the Scouts: always an important part of his life from his time with the 24th Hendon during the war, and including joining a German Scout group at the 1st opportunity during his National Service. He was an Assistant Scout Master before coming to Northwood and on moving here he was a Senior Scout Leader, an Instructor, Assistant Group Leader, Group Scout Leader, and an Executive Committee member for many years. He was awarded the Silver Acorn (for 25 years’ service) and the Long Service bar. Peter obviously loved sports – all sports – and was good at many of them; he swam in scout swimming galas and was great at butterfly. Peter of course loved rugby and passed that love onto Alun & Huw. Peter threw himself into charitable work: he was devoted to generating aid and support to many charities around the world. The chosen charity for donations is Sudbury Neighbourhood Centre where Peter was a stalwart and driver. In September 1986 he was taking passengers home when flames leapt from the engine into the bus. Peter stopped and immediately jumped out to free his frail passengers – all confined by seatbelts or wheelchairs. He managed to free all ten passengers and received several awards including The Royal Humane Society’s Silver Medal and The Home Office Commendation for Brave Conduct. Despite his own failing health the wellbeing of others was usually uppermost in his mind with never any complaint about his own condition. Peter & Janet (& Jane) were very regular visitors to the Dunstable area (no short round trip from Eastcote) to care for his older brother Ron who was suffering with Alzheimer’s. Indeed throughout his life he had always made the effort to keep in touch with friends and relations and visited people all round the country – always dropping in for a cup of tea. Of course that was especially true of his children with visits to Jackie in Holland or Somerset and so forth. He made a point of taking time to go and watch whatever their activities were: Jackie playing handball, Alun & Huw’s rugby etc etc. He never said no when he was asked for lifts, including a 3am trip to Heathrow for one of Jane’s friends, and he frequently took Jane to work. He was so very proud of the fact that she was a nurse, and much to her embarrassment would often introduce her to everyone including doctors as, ‘my daughter Jane, she’s a nurse’. He was always so polite to nurses and doctors, even

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though he often didn’t hear or understand them and you knew things were bad if any negative comments were made about anyone. He would be shy of being publicly remembered for anything but his belief was that someone who contributes something, in any area, should be thanked and not taken for granted, and your presence today shows your love and gratitude for Peter. This gentle, caring, polite man who displayed strength of mind, humility and consistency without arrogance or malice. With his jolly, bubbly personality, his wonderful smile and his deep interest in you and the friends and family you shared in common. A tremendous role model who will be very much missed by us all. Tribute to Peter Stevenson given at Peter's funeral by Peter Vacher I feel very honoured to have been asked to say a few words about Peter’s life-long involvement with the Old Haberdashers and I do this on behalf of all OH friends, many of them here today. For those not in the know, we are the former pupils of Haberdashers’ Aske’s school, once located in Hampstead and now in Elstree. Peter attended the school when it was in Hampstead and left in 1946 after what must have been a pretty eventful period in the school’s history. Having already proved his worth as a rugby player at school, it was only natural that he should make for the old boys rugby club soon after leaving, making his 1st XV debut in the second row against Weston-Super-Mare on the 1946 Easter tour. And they lost! With National Service out of the way, Peter consolidated his place in the club first team in the 1948-49 season with thirty-one appearances, becoming a powerful presence in an excellent 1st XV, travelling the country and playing some of the best clubs around. He eventually made a breath-taking total of 406 appearances for the 1st XV over a 25-year period, his final call to the colours coming in March 1971. Only three other OH players have overtaken him, namely the late Nigel Fuller, the still-active Randal Whittaker and rather significantly, Peter’s son Alun. In his final playing years, Peter turned out for lower sides too including our second or A team when I was the acting captain. I should add that in the few games we played together, I was usually hooking (that for the uninitiated is the position in the middle of the front row of the scrum) and I can tell you that binding onto his substantial frame was quite a challenge in itself.

OHRFC XV 1962-63 – Peter is in the centre of the back row Peter was made President of the Rugby Club in 1985, having already served as President of our parent Association in 1979 and retained an unswerving devotion to the old boys to the end of his life, becoming a cheerful presence on the touchline, keen to follow his beloved OH rugby club’s progress, and regularly fund-raising for us while participating in our many and varied activities including the regular lunches we hold for retired members.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

1st XV 1985 – President Peter Stevenson Above all it was rugby at its free-flowing best that delighted him, whether at club or international level and he remained a rugby man through and through, enjoying the company of other rugby people, passing on the special rugby gene to his two sons, both of whom had distinguished playing careers themselves, Huw in gaining a rugby blue at Cambridge, a feat repeated by his son Andrew, and Alun with the OH and later as captain of CLOB, again much supported by his father. I gather the three of them even played in the same team on one very special occasion in 1971. How to sum up Peter? Another OH contemporary Tony White, said of him, “There was nothing he wouldn’t do for you. He was the kindest of men.” And so he was, but he was also one heck of rugby player, a gentle giant as the cliché has it, powerful but benign, a firm friend to many and a marvellous adornment to our club and Association. I count it a privilege to have known him. Rest in Peace, Peter.

Douglas Whittaker (28th April 1940 – 11th December 2012) Doug’s funeral took place on Thursday 20th December at West Herts Crematorium. It was conducted by the school chaplain, Jan Goodair to a packed congregation of his family from Liverpool plus Habs Staff and Old Boys. Jan provided some lovely memories of Doug’s younger days from the family. Notably that Doug walked himself home halfway through his first day at primary school declaring that “it wasn’t very interesting so I’ve come home”. Jim Tarpey gave a summary of Doug’s career from a pupil at Liverpool Institute for Boys (the year behind Paul McCartney and George Harrison), to Christ Church College, Oxford. Then to teaching at Habs, Bedford and Atlantic College before returning to Habs in 1968 where he spent the remainder of his teaching career. Doug became Head of Maths in 1973, Section Commander of the Navy Section in 1976 and Contingent Commander in 1985; building the CCF up from 180 members when he joined to some 300 when he left. Doug’s belief was that to help run the CCF you needed leaders but that you can’t promote leadership unless you give students the chance to lead, so he was willing to trust his students and take the chance. This was high risk, sometimes too high, but the policy was vindicated by the future leaders he generated though the CCF. Doug’s lessons were always interesting. They may have appeared disorganised at times but pupils got very excited in his lessons. Calculations on the minimum amount of foil needed to wrap a KitKat may not have been wholly on the syllabus but they

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attracted pupils to his practical and challenging style of maths teaching. Doug ran a morning briefing session for the staff in his large department. Some of what he said in those meetings was indiscreet but he got the message across and the briefings were very much part of Doug’s character. John Wigley reminded of us Doug’s travels across the world from one polar ice cap to another and to every continent in between. Doug was not only an expert at getting to exotic places in the quickest way, but even more of an expert in getting there the cheapest way. It became tempting to use Doug as an unofficial travel agent because he was so knowledgeable. In the UK, Doug would visit the Tate Modern, Tate Britain, Royal Academy and Victoria and Albert Museums to see special exhibitions, all of which gave his conversation an energy and vivacity that we all recognized. His knowledge made it very difficult to argue with him; John described such discussions as akin to skating on thin ice on boiling water, you were always in danger of sinking beneath the counter argument. Finally, John reminded us of how very brave Doug was. All through his school life he followed a brave line, taking risks in his stride – and as he came towards his own death he was equally brave. As Jan Goodair had said at the beginning of the service Doug led a full and fulfilled life woven into the lives of so many others. Appropriately the hymns Doug chose were those sung on the first and last day of each term at Habs: “He Who Would Valiant Be” and “Jerusalem” and Doug had asked for donations in his memory to be used to develop Adventurous Training for pupils at Habs. Cheques should be made payable to “HABS Foundation” and sent to Phillips Funeral Services, 68 Alma Road, St Albans, Herts AL1 3BL. All donations will be spent on Adventure Training.

William Leonard Denny (1938 - 1945) William passed away after a short illness on 29th September 2012 aged 85 years.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

The Headmasters The third in a series of articles by John Wigley, first published in the OHA Magazine, 1999.

B.H. McGOWAN, 1973–1987

Bruce McGowan opening the Sports Centre bearing his name in 1986 Although Mr. McGowan told Skylark that "a headmaster is not an autocrat with total power" a headmaster and his staff often behave as if he is. When an old headmaster leaves and a new head arrives most teachers want to get "in" with the new man. To do so some tell him what they think he wants to hear, others identify their own interests with those of the school, and advise him accordingly. Confused by these courtiers a head, particularly one confident in his own judgement and firm in his principles, can take decisions which make or marr any pupil's education and any teacher's career. Born in 1924, Bruce McGowan attended King Edward VI's School, Birmingham, where his zeal as school captain earned him the nickname "Nimrod" (the mighty hunter). Between 1945 and 1946 he was with the Royal Artillery in India and Burma, and in 1947 took his B.A. at Jesus College, Cambridge. From 1949 he taught History and Latin at King's School, Rochester, and in 1953 became head of History at Wallasey Grammar School. In 1957 he was promoted to be headmaster of De Aston School, Market Rasen, and in 1964 moved on to be head of Solihull School. From 1968 to 1970 he was also a member of the Public Schools Commission. Thus when Mr. McGowan left Solihull and arrived at Haberdashers' in September 1975 he had a wealth of experience at his disposal, but faced a peculiarly complex institution. Most heads of department were younger men who had been appointed by Dr. Taylor and they were slow to accept his successor. Only two left in Mr. McGowan's time, so he found it difficult to exercise his full authority over departments. Most housemasters and the head of lower school were of a slightly older generation, but their position had been eroded by Dai Barling, the forceful Second Master, who had gathered disciplinary and pastoral responsibility into his own hands. Here Mr. McGowan had more success: little by little he appointed younger housemasters, and when Dai Barling retired in 1982 some of the Second Master's many duties were devolved to the new post of Head of Middle School, which was intended to coordinate and support the efforts of hard-pressed form teachers. Mr. McGowan enjoyed patronage. Clever Solihull old boys were appointed to teach English, History, and Religious Studies. Able Jesus men were promoted to be head of careers, and of Lower and Middle Schools. At least three of his other appointees have

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eventually become headmasters themselves, one at Adams' Grammar School – another Haberdashers' school – against which the Elstree School has competed at rugby since the highly successful annual Fraser Bird Rugby VII Tournament was inaugurated in 1974. The Haberdashers' staff changed in character and style. Seventeen new teachers arrived at the same time as Mr. McGowan, and neither their ideas nor their personalities were easily absorbed. David Scott, the charismatic new chaplain, alarmed some established teachers but achieved distinction by winning the Sunday Times national poetry competition. The School lost a unique fund of ability and wisdom as men who had fought in the Second World War retired – "TEC" Carrington, Nick Clarke-Lowes, Tommy Sanderson, Frank Smith, and "Auntie" Willatt. The number of women teachers in the main school (one in 1973) slowly rose. The boys changed too. The cultural upheavals of the late 1960s had run their course by the late 1970s: long hair and loud music had been assimilated into conventional suburban life. As Mrs. Thatcher rallied the Conservative Party and led it to victory in 1979 the few sixth form radicals were overwhelmed by the hard-headed values of Grantham and Finchley. Continuity remained in the form of a deceptively casual attitude to work, and the presence of many boys of outstanding academic ability. It is no coincidence that the admissions tutors of at least four Oxford Colleges are Old Haberdashers. School drama, music and sport flourished more strongly than ever before. Under Stephen Wilkins' direction school plays rivalled West End productions in quality. After the T.W. Taylor Music School was opened in 1976 Alan Taylor rapidly extended his musical repertoire, an achievement acknowledged in 1982 when he was appointed M.B.E. As head of P.E. David Davies coached the 1st XV to sixty-five unbeaten matches from October 1973 to December 1977, a record which will surely never be equalled, let alone overtaken. Mr. McGowan gave his full support. Teachers recall that he attended almost every play and concert. And afterwards entertained convivially and generously, enthusiastically assisted by his wife Pat, in the seemingly ever-open Headmaster's House. Old boys remember that in Monday assemblies he paid close attention to the games announcements and copied the results into his fixture card. A number of rugby players reminisce about his participation in one of Doug Yeabsley's memorable sports tours to the Far East. Amidst all this activity, Mr. McGowan knew that the foundation of Haberdashers' local and national reputation was its academic success. After the Girls' School moved to Elstree in 1974 time-tabled co-operation was confined to sixth form General Studies. When the Labour government ended the direct grant system in 1976 Haberdashers reverted to full independence and the two schools organised a joint appeal which raised £420,000 to provide bursaries. In 1981 Mr. McGowan welcomed the Conservative government's Assisted Places Scheme, and in the same year Haberdashers topped the only schools' league table which existed at that time, the one for exhibitions and scholarships to Oxford and Cambridge Universities. Mr. McGowan believed that one of the foundations of continued academic success was good administration and organisation. He issued a new prospectus to attract more applicants, ensured that reports were printed on both sides (to allow teachers to give fuller advice), separated the 6B from the 6A Parents' Evening (to the same effect), and put the master in charge of General Studies in charge of Subsidiary Subjects as well - to improve attendance. After appointing John Carleton to succeed Dai Barling as Second Master, Mr. McGowan supported John's policy of clarifying the pattern of assemblies to reduce early morning confusion, and producing a staff handbook to establish basic professional requirements and standards.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

Mr. McGowan's years as headmaster coincided with those of the anonymous donor's extraordinary generosity to the School. In 1977 two squash courts were opened, and in 1978 the little-used fives court was replaced by a climbing wall, partly financed by a parent. During 1979 the Sixth form Common Room was equipped with a cafeteria, and in 1980 Princess Margaret opened the Bates Dining Hall (which ended the practice of serving lunch in the House Rooms). The anonymous donor's generosity continued as he provided the resources for the Sime Preparatory Department, which the Princess opened in 1985, allowing the former Prep Block to be reconstructed as the Design Centre, which was opened by Sir Monty Finniston in 1984. The anonymous donor also made a major contribution to the Sports Centre, which was opened in 1986 and named after Mr. McGowan. Thus although the boarding house had succumbed to Mrs. Thatcher's recession in 1983, Haberdashers' facilities had been greatly enriched, to the benefit of pupils and teachers alike. During 1985 Mr. McGowan was Chairman of the Headmasters' Conference, a prestigious position which marked the peak of his career. Early in 1986 he announced that he had decided to retire during 1987, and that he had nominated a former Haberdashers' teacher to the new post of Head of Sixth Form. He had not advertised in any way, so neither any other outside, nor any serving Haberdashers' teachers, had been able to apply. The latter were outraged. All the staff's frustrations and suspicions rose to the surface. Was it true that Mr. McGowan tape-recorded private conversations held in his study? Why did he oppose teacher representation on the governing body? Why did he want to introduce appraisal? The incident strained relations between Mr. McGowan and his staff, relations which had not been fully restored when he retired in July 1987. With grim humour he presented the Common Room with a new Suggestions Book and a bookmark in the shape of a dagger, as he said "For stabbing people in the back." One suspects that Mr. McGowan was happier at Market Rasen in the 1950s and 1960s than at Haberdashers' in the 1970s and 1980s, yet there is no doubt that his commitment and hard work had enabled Haberdashers not only to survive threatening political and economic circumstances, but to emerge stronger and more successful than before. Those of us who remember him know that he deserves our gratitude and thanks for that.

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The Haberdashers’ Aske’s Lodge No.3362 By Reuben Ayres With the festive season approaching, the Haberdashers’ Aske’s Lodge finds itself in good health with continued interest in membership being expressed by OH of all ages. The Haberdashers’ Aske’s School and Freemasonry have enjoyed a long and distinguished association over many years. The Haberdashers’ Aske’s Lodge is now in its 104th year. The Lodge has a very special, friendly, Haberdashers’ feel with the significant majority of the Brethren of the Lodge being Old Boys. As our current Master, Clive Waterman (OH) approaches the completion of his year in the chair we look back on a very successful twelve months in anticipation of matching last year’s charitable donations of £2000, this year being shared between Alzheimer Research UK and The National Autistic Society. We meet four times a year on a Saturday at the prestigious Freemasons' Hall in London and enjoy friendship and goodwill in a delightfully relaxed 'Habs' style. We would welcome enquiries from any Old Boys over the age of 18 years. The Lodge secretary is Paul Youngman who can be contacted on 07768 255283 or via email on paul.youngman@harleyd.co.uk. The Lodge website is at www.haberdashersaskeslodge.com where further details of our activities including background, dates and further contact information can be found.

OHA Membership Any Old Boy who isn’t a member of the Old Haberdashers’ Association would be welcome to join and help to keep the Association running. In particular funds are needed for the ongoing development of the website and to ensure that regular communications such as this Newsletter are sent to all the Old Haberdashers’ we are in contact with. If you aren’t a member then please take the time to download the membership forms from the OHA website, complete them and send them to Dr Wigley – the OHA Treasurer. Follow this link to find the How to Join page on the OHA website.

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OHA 125 Anniversary Celebrations The OHA was founded in 1888 and so we th celebrate our 125 anniversary in 2013. A series of events around the country are planned to mark this notable milestone and they will be advertised in due course.

Old Haberdashers’ Association Executive Committee All organisations like the OHA depend on volunteers to keep them running. If you would like to get involved with the OHA Committee in any way then please contact secretary@oldhabs.com We will be delighted to hear from you and all offers of help are very welcome.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA e-Newsletter Issue 6

January 2013

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Advertising in the Annual OHA Magazine The Annual OHA Magazine, sent out each year to all members, contains a wide range of articles, reviews and information about the Old Haberdashers’ Association and its various component parts. We welcome advertising from a cross section of companies and if you are interested in your advert being seen by over 3,000 Old Haberdashers and their families please contact the OHA Secretary on secretary@oldhabs.com. Full, half or quarter page advertising space is available at a very reasonable price with an appropriate discount for Old Haberdashers.

Compiled and published by Martin Baker, OHA Secretary – secretary@oldhabs.com


OHA Newsletter January 2013