Page 1

The Old Gold & Black launches a new media platform Page 5

Opinion: Obama's legacy should be cherished Page 8

Deacs fall to Tarheels 87-93 Page 9

Review: New Star Wars movie falls short of expectations Page 14

Old Gold&Black WAKE FOREST’S STUDENT NEWSPAPER SINCE 1916

VOL. 101, NO. 1

T H U R S DAY, JA N UA RY 1 2 , 2 017 “Cover s the campus like the magnolias”

www.wfuogb.com

New OGB app further launches newspaper into digital age Computer Science students helped create a newspaper app now available in the App Store BY HEATHER HARTEL Social Media Chair harthf@wfu.edu

Photo by Jordan Snow/ Old Gold & Black

Some members of the Dance Team pose for a photo after a walk along the Harbor in downtown Annapolis, MD. The dance team, cheerleading team, and members of the marching band all sacrificed part of their winter break to cheer on the Deacs'.

Sideline spirit cheers on athletes

The Dance Team, mascot and marching band add to thrill of victory at the Military Bowl game BY KELLIE SHANAGHAN Contributing Writer shanke15@wfu.edu Wake Forest football’s victory over Temple University was unexpected, thrilling and just simply incredible. Everyone will remember the experience differently, whether they were on the field, in the stands or at home watching. One truly unique bowl game experience shared by very few students is that of the Dance Team, Cheer Team, mascot and The Spirit of the Old Gold and Black marching band. “This game is probably one of my top five college experiences,” said junior Dance Team member Natalie Kerman, “I love dancing, I love what I do and I love cheering on the Deacs.” Athletes from the Spirit Program, which includes dance, cheer and the Demon Deacon mascot made the jour-

ney to perform in Wake Forest’s first Bowl Game since 2011. Additionally, 72 members of the university’s marching band, The Spirit of the Old Gold and Black (SOTOGAB) sacrificed part of their break in order to support the Deacs with their performances. “Our job is really to create a whole experience for the fans,” Kerman said. “Without us, the game would still happen, but it would be missing a certain energy that only the SOTOGAB and the Spirit Program can provide.” On Christmas Day, students flew to Washington D.C. from their home towns. Some came from as far away as California. Those who lived close enough to school took a bus that left from campus and arrived in the city eight hours later. Everyone stayed at the official Military Bowl hotel, a mere two blocks from the White House. On Monday the 26th, their day began with a small performance at the official Bowl Luncheon, where both football teams and their staff attended lunch in a camaraderie event. After this, dance and cheer practiced

for an hour in the hotel while SOTOGAB bussed to a local high school, where a former Wake Forest basketball player is the athletic director, in order to practice for the next day’s game. After practices were held to review material, everyone was given the rest of the day to explore the nation’s capital. From Smithsonian museums to monuments and eclectic noodle restaurants, the Wake Forest Spirit Program and band members covered the city. For many, this was their very first time in Washington D.C. “Being in the heart of the city and getting to tour it with my team was an amazingly unique opportunity," said sophomore dancer Morgan Eaves, who had never been in the city before. Despite the 3:30 p.m. game, dancers, cheerleaders, the mascot and band members departed D.C. at 7:45 AM for Annapolis in order to participate in the 1.6-mile parade from Historic Downtown Annapolis to the Navymarine Corps Memorial Stadium.

See Military Bowl, Page 4

One hundred and one years ago, passionate student journalists with a vision joined together to create the Old Gold & Black, an independent newspaper covering campus news at Wake Forest. Now just over a century later, similar-minded students contributed to the creation of the Old Gold & Black app, which effectively launches the second century of the newspaper into the digital world. Shelby Devine, a junior and former staff member of the newspaper, first imagined the idea for the app and worked alongside the computer science department to make her dream a reality. “I was trying to think of ways to make the paper more accessible to busy college students, and I thought that creating an app would accomplish that goal,” Devine said. “By having a mobile version of the newspaper on their phones, I think the Wake Forest community can be even more connected than it has been in the past.” The American Press Institute cites that 94 percent of millenials own smartphones, and of this demographic, 82 percent of them get most of their news from online sources. The way students consume the news is changing as the prominence of smartphones and social media increases. The app is now available on the App Store and is designed after major news organizations in the way it presents articles. Upon opening the app, users see the basic headings for News, Opinion, Sports and Life and can navigate through the sections to find individual stories. Most stories also feature photographs and information about the writer. The app also includes a page with the names and photographs of the team that helped create the program.

See New app, Page 5


The Old Gold & Black launches a new media platform Page 5

Opinion: Obama's legacy should be cherished Page 8

Deacs fall to Tarheels 87-93 Page 9

Review: New Star Wars movie falls short of expectations Page 14

Old Gold&Black WAKE FOREST’S STUDENT NEWSPAPER SINCE 1916

VOL. 101, NO. 1

T H U R S DAY, JA N UA RY 1 2 , 2 017 “Cover s the campus like the magnolias”

www.wfuogb.com

New OGB app further launches newspaper into digital age Computer Science students helped create a newspaper app now available in the App Store BY HEATHER HARTEL Social Media Chair harthf@wfu.edu

Photo by Jordan Snow/ Old Gold & Black

Some members of the Dance Team pose for a photo after a walk along the Harbor in downtown Annapolis, MD. The dance team, cheerleading team, and members of the marching band all sacrificed part of their winter break to cheer on the Deacs'.

Sideline spirit cheers on athletes

The Dance Team, mascot and marching band add to thrill of victory at the Military Bowl game BY KELLIE SHANAGHAN Contributing Writer shanke15@wfu.edu Wake Forest football’s victory over Temple University was unexpected, thrilling and just simply incredible. Everyone will remember the experience differently, whether they were on the field, in the stands or at home watching. One truly unique bowl game experience shared by very few students is that of the Dance Team, Cheer Team, mascot and The Spirit of the Old Gold and Black marching band. “This game is probably one of my top five college experiences,” said junior Dance Team member Natalie Kerman, “I love dancing, I love what I do and I love cheering on the Deacs.” Athletes from the Spirit Program, which includes dance, cheer and the Demon Deacon mascot made the jour-

ney to perform in Wake Forest’s first Bowl Game since 2011. Additionally, 72 members of the university’s marching band, The Spirit of the Old Gold and Black (SOTOGAB) sacrificed part of their break in order to support the Deacs with their performances. “Our job is really to create a whole experience for the fans,” Kerman said. “Without us, the game would still happen, but it would be missing a certain energy that only the SOTOGAB and the Spirit Program can provide.” On Christmas Day, students flew to Washington D.C. from their home towns. Some came from as far away as California. Those who lived close enough to school took a bus that left from campus and arrived in the city eight hours later. Everyone stayed at the official Military Bowl hotel, a mere two blocks from the White House. On Monday the 26th, their day began with a small performance at the official Bowl Luncheon, where both football teams and their staff attended lunch in a camaraderie event. After this, dance and cheer practiced

for an hour in the hotel while SOTOGAB bussed to a local high school, where a former Wake Forest basketball player is the athletic director, in order to practice for the next day’s game. After practices were held to review material, everyone was given the rest of the day to explore the nation’s capital. From Smithsonian museums to monuments and eclectic noodle restaurants, the Wake Forest Spirit Program and band members covered the city. For many, this was their very first time in Washington D.C. “Being in the heart of the city and getting to tour it with my team was an amazingly unique opportunity," said sophomore dancer Morgan Eaves, who had never been in the city before. Despite the 3:30 p.m. game, dancers, cheerleaders, the mascot and band members departed D.C. at 7:45 AM for Annapolis in order to participate in the 1.6-mile parade from Historic Downtown Annapolis to the Navymarine Corps Memorial Stadium.

See Military Bowl, Page 4

One hundred and one years ago, passionate student journalists with a vision joined together to create the Old Gold & Black, an independent newspaper covering campus news at Wake Forest. Now just over a century later, similar-minded students contributed to the creation of the Old Gold & Black app, which effectively launches the second century of the newspaper into the digital world. Shelby Devine, a junior and former staff member of the newspaper, first imagined the idea for the app and worked alongside the computer science department to make her dream a reality. “I was trying to think of ways to make the paper more accessible to busy college students, and I thought that creating an app would accomplish that goal,” Devine said. “By having a mobile version of the newspaper on their phones, I think the Wake Forest community can be even more connected than it has been in the past.” The American Press Institute cites that 94 percent of millenials own smartphones, and of this demographic, 82 percent of them get most of their news from online sources. The way students consume the news is changing as the prominence of smartphones and social media increases. The app is now available on the App Store and is designed after major news organizations in the way it presents articles. Upon opening the app, users see the basic headings for News, Opinion, Sports and Life and can navigate through the sections to find individual stories. Most stories also feature photographs and information about the writer. The app also includes a page with the names and photographs of the team that helped create the program.

See New app, Page 5


OGB

“ OGB staff prepare for a new media platform This column represents the views of the Old Gold & Black Editorial Board.

After an exciting year celebrating our centennial volume, the editorial staff of the Old Gold & Black is looking forward to expanding the way in which we reach the campus community. This semester we have launched a new mobile app that will allow Deacons to stay up-to-date with current events on campus on their mobile phone. As this is a new project, we are still brainstorming ideas of how to best keep the campus community connected through our new platform. If anyone has any suggestions or has an interest in becoming involved in the project, we encourage them to reach out to a member of our staff for more information. In addition to introducing new out-

Despite the [many] changes, the Old Sports Section since joining the Old sophomore Henry Bonilla, who worked with Swig as the Assistant Editor in the Gold & Black will maintain its commit- Gold & Black as a freshman. ment to serve as a conduit of relevant The position of Print Managing Editor fall semester of 2016. Our life section will be comprised of information to the campus community. will be held by sophomore Becky Swig. lets to keep our community informed, many of our staff members have transitioned their roles. Junior McKenzie Maddox will be resuming her role as Editor-in-chief after spending a semester abroad in London. Maddox previously served as Editorin-chief during the spring semester of 2016. Junior Ryan Johnston, previously Sports Editor, will be taking over as Online Managing Editor this calendar year. Johnston has worked on the

Old Gold&Black

THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WAKE FOREST UNIVERSIT Y SINCE 1916 McKENZIE MADDOX EDITOR-IN-CHIEF maddml14@wfu.edu

BECKY SWIG PRINT MANAGING EDITOR swigrr15@wfu.edu

>> NEWS Natalie Wilson, wilsnh15@wfu.edu Erin Stephens, stepec14@wfu.edu Assistant Editor: Amanda Wilcox, wilcaf16@wfu.edu

>> SPORTS Jack Duesterdick, duesjp14@wfu.edu Kyle Tatich, tatika14@wfu.edu Assistant Editor: Tommaso Moneta, monet14@wfu.edu

>> OPINION Henry Bonilla, bonihj15@wfu.edu

>> LIFE Julia Haines, hainjm15@wfu.edu Nicholas DeMayo, demanj14@wfu.edu Assistant Editor: Emily Wilmink, wilmer16@wfu.edu

>> SOCIAL MEDIA CHAIR Heather Hartel, harthf15@wfu.edu

>> BUSINESS STAFF Brandon Palmer, palmbo14@wfu.edu Garrett Erickson, ericgj14@wfu.edu

>> ADVISER Phoebe Zerwick, zerwicp@wfu.edu

Swig has worked on the Opinion Section since her freshman year. In response to the new app and the goal of increasing our social media presence, Heather Hartel will assume the newly created role of Social Media Chair. In the news section Junior Erin Stephens and sophomore Natalie Wilson will serve as the section editors for this upcoming calendar year. Stephens spent the fall semester abroad in Paris while Wilson was previously Life Editor. Freshman Amanda Wilcox will be the Assistant News Editor. The Opinion Section will be run by

junior Nick DeMayo and sophomore Julia Haines. Demayo is returning from studying abroad in London and Haines previously held the position of News Editor. Freshman Emily Wilmink will serve as their assistant. In the sports section, juniors Jack Duesterdick and Kyle Tatich will be the section editors after both spending semesters abroad, with the help of Tommasso Moneta as the assistant. Despite all of these changes, the Old Gold & Black will maintain its commitment to serve as a conduit of relevant information to the campus community in the upcoming months.

FOLLOW THE OGB ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM FACEBOOK.COM/OGB1916

BRANDON PALMER BUSINESS MANAGER palmbo14@wfu.edu

RYAN JOHNSTON ONLINE MANAGING EDITOR johnrc14@wfu.edu

>> POLICIES The Old Gold & Black is published Thursdays during the school year, except during examinations, summer and holiday periods, by Triangle Printing of Durham. To subscribe, please send $35 to P.O. Box 7569, Winston-Salem, NC 27109. Š 2014 WFU Media Board. All rights reserved. The views expressed in all editorials and advertisements contained within this publication do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the OGB. As part of our commitment to reporting news fairly and accurately, we will not remove any previously published content. If an error in either our online or print content is brought to our attention, we will revise the originally published article with an appended correction. In order to facilitate thoughtful and appropriate debate, profane, vulgar, or inflammatory comments on our website are not allowed and will be deleted. For more information on our commenting policy, please see our website. We reserve the right to reject advertisements deemed inappropriate. Our full policy, and how to advertise with the OGB, can be found on our website.

>> SUBMISSIONS

The OGB welcomes submissions in the form of story tips, columns and letters to the editor. Letters to the editor should be fewer than 500 words, and columns should be around 500 words. Send yours via e-mail to maddml14@wfu.edu the Monday before publication. We reserve the right to edit all letters for length and clarity. No anonymous letters will be printed.

>> ONLINE MEDIA Web: wfuogb.com Facebook: facebook.com/ogb1916 Twitter: @wfu_ogb Instagram: @wfu_ogb Snapchat: @wfu_ogb

@WFU_OGB

@WAKEFOREST_OGB


News | Old Gold & Black

Thursday, January 12, 2017 | Page 3

Deacon Profile: Nick Raefski

BY JULIA HAINES Life Editor hainjm15@wfu.edu

How do you prioritize your time and achieve this balance between your different interests?

Nick Raefski is a sophomore planning to major in economics and political science, which are seemingly standard selections considering his many different interests. The Wake Forest track runner's new documentary, "Hot Topic," recently gained funding through Kickstarter, and Raefski has used his many hobbies, which also include creating his own fashion line, to manage recent struggles with a mental health diagnosis. How have you become involved in such a wide variey of activities? During first semester at Wake Forest I was diagnosed with severe Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), so I really struggled my freshman year with finding my sanity. I wasn’t really myself, and I lost a lot of people who were close to me. I was noticing a lot of behaviors, like I was counting a lot, talking to myself and always felt uneasy. Then, second semester, as soon as I got back to campus, I injured myself running, and that was the push that kind of set me off. I just kind of lost it. I stopped eating, I stopped sleeping, I couldn’t run, because I had no energy, and I counted everything. I counted steps, and I would shower five times a day. Eventually, I pushed those in my life who were closest out, and once they left, I was a wreck. The doctors thought it was something physical. I got tested for everything. One night I kind of had a breakdown and I called my mom around midnight and told her that something was off. Unbeknownst to me, I had a family history of severe mental illness in my family. After that, I was properly diagnosed and I saw the people I needed and I got back to being really healthy. Once that happened, I realized that you only really get to live life once, and there had been things that I was always interested in that I had never pursued. So I decided to just "do me." A lot of people from the outside look at me and think that I have a lot of different crazy lives, and that’s definitely true, but it kind of helps me balance. Running is something I love to do, but that’s only one aspect of my life. School is another aspect and my fashion line is another, but they don’t all intertwine as much as people might think. Everything balances out. It’s calming; it’s like a scale.

During first semester, I produced my first collection in my fashion line. I’ve taken a break to focus on athletics and academics. However this summer, in addition to producing my movie, I’ll hopefully be able to produce my second collection. Fashion is really a passion of mine. I like dressing and I like fabrics. That’s really relaxed. The movie is something I will do over the summer. They’re different, but they all have their benefits in my life. They help me to live as normally as I can live. It can definitely be a lot at times, but I’m happiest when I’m running around kind of doing that. I don’t like just sitting down to relax, I’m always going. I live a very rigid schedule, so I’m constantly planning. I’m also constantly thinking. At night, I’ll check to see if I got everything done, and if I didn’t, then I’ll probably go back and keep working. Scheduling is sometimes hard in regards to working with the movie. It’s hard when you’re working with people when 2:10 to them is really 2:30. You have to learn to deal with it. The whole film, it’s a lot more fluid, that’s something I learn about as I go along. Running is something I really do enjoy. Maybe I’d put that over the others, but only by a little bit. One thing I learned last year is that you can’t just define yourself in one thing. I had defined myself as a runner. Now I’m at this point where I don’t see myself as the work I do or the paths I undertake. I just see myself as Nick. I’m Nick — I’m a little bit different and I like a lot of different things. I don’t just see myself as just a producer or just a runner; I’m me, and I’m happy to be doing these things.

that’s weird and different. I needed something like that to push me. My first collection had four sweatshirts, four t-shirts, two pairs of jeans and a hat. People saw it, and they wanted to buy it. That was really cool. I started talking to a lot of people and investigating people who produce clothes, but I decided that my first collection was so personal and so special to me that I just didn’t want it to be for a large audience. My first collection isn’t available for purchase, and I only have a couple of prototypes for each model. I’m really hoping that this summer I’ll be able to make both a mens' and womens' line, and someone will pick it up. It would be really cool if you asked someone who they’re wearing, and they would be like, “Oh, I’m wearing Nick.” The fashion is very different, and I think that it scares a lot of people. When I first told people that I was going to design a collection, they asked why, and one thing that was cool for me was to see those people slowly start to get a picture and find it cool. It was also cool for me to know that I had the idea in the back of my head the whole time, it just took some work. Your new documentary, "Hot Topic," explores marijuana use and legalization. What has been your approach to such a controversial issue?

Last year, I had the hardest struggle I’ve ever endured. When I was at my lowest point, I lost everything. I lost the people closest to me in life. I lost my sense of self. I lost running — I had nothing. And so I had to slowly build myself back up. I’d always been interested in fashion, but I was always scared to do it. I’m a straight guy that likes to dress, and people think

A year ago I never thought that I would produce a documentary. Being in college, however, I’ve realized that it’s a great avenue to explore a topic you might be interested in. We’re exploring the topic of marijuana and we’re kind of coming from a very unbiased side. Marijuana is a very polarizing topic. We've got people from the far left saying it’s harmless and that it does nothing to you, and that’s not true. Then we've got people from the far right saying that if you use marijuana once, then it will kill you, and that’s not true either. We’re really trying to reach a middle ground and we’re interviewing people from every walk of life. We’ve interviewed doctors, a lot of drug dealers, a lot of people who use marijuana and a lot of people who are pushing against it being legalized. It’s an incredibly interesting topic and really complex.

Photo by Justin Crail/ Old Gold & Black

Photo by Justin Crail/ Old Gold & Black

What was your inspiration for your fashion line?

Photo by Justin Crail/ Old Gold & Black

POLICE BEAT

Larceny/Damage to Property

• Offender removed an HDMI cable and three HDMI cable adapters from a classroom in Greene Hall. The report was filed on Jan. 6th at 4:12 p.m. • Offenders removed golf cart from BB&T Field House. One offender was taken into custody by WSPD while the other fled the from the location. The golf cart was returned to BB&T Field. The report was filed on Jan. 8th at 11:51 p.m.

Miscellaneous • Unknown suspect(s) broke the windows of a parked vehicle in Lot W-3. The report was filed on Jan. 5th at 2:02 p.m. • An offender was pulled over for traffic infractions, charged with numerous traffic violations and referred to the Dean. The report was filed on Jan. 2nd at 2:17 p.m.


Page 4 |Thursday, January 12, 2017

Old Gold & Black | News

Military Bowl: Students provide other perspectives Continued from Page 1

“Since I had the megaphone during the parade, I would yell with much more energy and volume anytime Temple fans were next to us,” freshman Christian Trevathan said. The tailgate performance later in the afternoon ended memorably with Bob McCreary, who recently donated 15 million dollars to Wake Forest Athletics, conducting the fight song. “Everyone agrees that it was a pretty cool honor to have Bob McCreary conducting, but it was also very entertaining to watch,” drummer Cole Teander explained. By the time the game started, the excitement in the stadium was palpable. Looking up from the turf, cheer and dance members could see hundreds of fans whirling gold poms in the crisp Annapolis evening.

Photo by wfubands.wfu.edu

Members of the Wake Forest Marching Band, the Spirit of the Old Gold and Black, travelled with the Deacons to the Military Bowl game.

The fans were teetering at the edge of their seats, the fans were providing rapt attention to the field. “The audience seemed to respond to your every action and although it seemed scary at first, it became one of my favorite parts about the whole game itself,” Trevathan said. While a passionate stadium improves the crowd’s experience and encourages the players, for cheer and dance performers, performing to a large crowd adds another level of excitement to their job.At most away games it is difficult for a large crowd of people to travel and support the team, so it often feels as if the band and Spirit Program are performing more for the opposing team’s fans rather than Wake fans. This game was different. “We weren’t on Deacon turf, but we were performing to a Deacon crowd,” Kerman said.

Photo by Jordan Snow/Old Gold &Black

The Wake Forest Dance Team took time to tour Washington D.C. before heading to Annapolis to cheer on the Deacons at the Military Bowl.

Spanish department to offer new summer opportunity Students will be able to finish the foreign language requirement abroad starting this summer BY KYLE TATICH Staff Writer tatika14@wfu.edu Beginning in the summer of 2017, students will be given the option to complete their Spanish foreign language requirement or continue their studies abroad. This new five-week course will be taught in Salamanca, Spain by Universidad Salamanca professors and counted as credit for Spanish 212. Students who have most recently completed Spanish 153 or 154 will be eligible for this program, which will begin on May 25 and conclude on July 1. Program participants will have the opportunity to reside with host families or live in a residence hall. In addition, they will have access to the Wake Forest “Centro,” a space on the city’s main street for Wake Forest students to study, converse and enjoy time with one another. In addition to having the opportunity to explore the historic “college town” of Salamanca, students will

travel as a group on two weekendlong excursions to different cities across Spain.

The trips will include sightseeing and cultural immersion. Excursions during the semester-

long programs have typically included trips to the cities of Madrid, Toledo, Cordoba, Granada and Sevilla as well as the northwest region of Galicia. Each location is rich in culture, religious history, climate and geographical features. For several decades, Wake Forest has been a leader among top-ranking research universities in international education, measured by excellence, academic credit received and general participation among undergraduates. Wake Forest has demonstrated its commitment to language immersion programs as it prepares to celebrate its 40th anniversary of the Wake Forest Salamanca Program in 2018. In Salamanca students can expect to improve their Spanish speaking abilities tremendously and fall in love with the city’s rich culture, unique cuisine and vibrant nightlife. Students studying in Salamanca enjoy exploring the city’s historic sites and spending time in the famous Plaza Mayor with an early evening tapa and a glass of wine. The study abroad office will accept Kyle Tatich/Old Gold &Black applications through March 15 and Students who take advantage of the Spanish department’s new pro- students will be accepted on a rolling gram will enjoy Salamanca’s beautiful vistas during the summer of 2017. basis.


News | Old Gold & Black

Thursday, January 12, 2017| Page 5

New app: OGB expands social media platforms Continued from Page 1

The development of the app is still in progress, and plans for additional features are underway. “So far, the app will have the articles we print in the weekly newspaper organized by each section,” Devine said. “Next semester we are hoping to add more features like a ‘trending now’ section or notifications that are sent to your phone when something exciting happens on campus, such as winning a big sports game or something else that people want to know and read about.” After forming the initial idea for the program, the physical creation of the app ensued.

Devine reached out to Professor Daniel Cañas of the computer science department to help with the creation and design of the app. He later proposed the idea to students in an upper level programming class. Seniors Mara Rodriguez and Amanda Zihenni, alongside junior Jennifer Sun, worked with Professor Cañas to fulfill the requirements of the app. “One of the most difficult decisions we had to make was the design of the USR interface,” Cañas said. “This is not something particular to the OGB app, it is something in every app development. In terms of programming, we spent a lot of time making the app independent from where the

data is stored. Our goal was to publish the newspaper in a mobile device that would not generate extra work for those managing the newspaper, and I think we achieved this goal.” Because young people often consume news more digitally, the creation of the app is intended to increase traffic to student-written stories and to make their individual work more accessible for students. “This project has been so rewarding because the app was created by students and is intended for students, parents, and the Wake Forest community,” Devine said. “With this in mind we made the app something that stuHeather Hartel/Old Gold&Black dents will want to use as a way to ac- The app separates student stories by cess relevant Wake Forest news.” section to offer simplicity for readers.

Departments offer new interdisciplinary courses Students can explore the Latin diaspora and the intersection of public history and humanities BY NATALIE SONIER Staff Writer soninv16@wfu.edu With the start of the new year, Wake Forest will offer new classes this spring semester that will focus on a broad range of subject matter, allowing some students a first-hand look at fresh material taught by familiar professors. One course being taught for the first time this semester is “Not Just Black and White: Transcultural Stories of Latina Women in the U.S.,” taught by former

Natalie Caudill/Dallas Morning News/TNS

New humanities courses offered intend to encourage thought and community.

WFU professor Ana León-Távora. Once a WFU professor, León-Távora became acquainted with current professor Wanda Balzano. Now, Balzano has invited her back to teach this course as a guest professor from Salem College. León-Távora has developed this class with the intention to investigate and understand the tolling “physical, mental, cultural [and] linguistic” experience of being an immigrant raised in two different cultures — all from a woman’s point of view. “My class focuses on the Latin diaspora, tackling issues of migration, gender and cultural identity, bilingualism and biculturalism, and ‘transculturation’ as first coined by Cuban anthropologist Fernando Ortiz,” León-Távora said. Students will analyze the works of female authors from different cultural backgrounds, who have all detailed the reality of immigration and the diaspora occurring in the U.S. León-Távora will also introduce them to music and a film series that questions the effect of immigration on personal identity, emphasizing the connection between artistic and literary resources to understand culture. The exploration of diversity on campus and the element of local hands-on experiences will also be offered to students. Given her affiliation with Salem College, Salem College students will be taking

the class alongside Wake Forest students. Students will also be involved with campus events promoting cultural diversity organized by León-Távora and other professors. Additionally, students will be able to interact with a recent TED talk speaker — a woman who experienced life as an undocumented citizen — asking questions and hearing her speak first-hand about the topic of the course. There will also be opportunities to get to know the local Hispanic community in Winston-Salem. Another new course being offered this spring, taught by Dr. David Phillips, is “The Humanities and History: Intersections of Public History and the Public Humanities.” Phillips says he developed the idea of this class based on his prior work and experience in “public humanities, place identity, and an interest in local culture and history.” The course aims to explore how historical public projects contribute to a sense of community and an understanding of a feeling of attachment between citizens that revolves around a similar memory of a certain place. This class focuses on the concept of placemaking, and how people find a stronger sense of community and create a societal focal point by improving neighborhoods, streets, public parks and more. Phillips says that while students “explore the concept of place memory and

the role it plays in establishing the power of place,” they will focus mainly on locations surrounding Winston-Salem. In turn, students will discover how members of the Winston-Salem community have become connected throughout history based on the physical development of their city, and therefore how culture has evolved as a result of these fortified connections. Students will be able to experience a sense of community on a smaller scale by working in teams for some projects. Interaction is encouraged, as students will have to branch out and interview peers or members of the Winston-Salem community about their opinions regarding the influence of place on their sense of belonging to a community. The idea of placemaking will be incorporated by a project that requires students to recreate a model of a place in Winston-Salem, based on the information they collect by of communicating with people and listening to their stories. Therefore, the importance of memories as a viable historical resource to form personal identity is emphasized. Both professors acknowledge that there are still open spots available in their courses for interested students. Students are encouraged to step out of their comfort zones and though the doors of one of these courses’ classrooms.

OUTSIDE THE BUBBLE

Meryl Streep criticizes Trump California’s iconic ‘tunnel tree’ Fort Lauderdale shooting suspect may face death penalty in acceptance speech felled by winter storm Actress Meryl Streep’s Golden Globes speech took on a serious tone when she criticized President-elect Donald Trump’s mockery of a disabled reporter. Rather than speaking about her career, she called for empathy and respect without mentioning Trump by name. “And this instinct to humiliate, when it’s modeled by someone in the public platform...it kind of gives permission for other people to do the same thing,” the actress said. Trump responded on Twitter, stating that Streep was “a Hillary flunky who lost big” and told the New York Times that he was “not surprised” to be criticized by “liberal movie people.”

Over 130 years ago, the owners of land that is now Calaveras Big Trees State Park in California carved an enormous hole in the base of one of its sequoia tree. The 150-foot tree’s trunk was 33 feet in diameter and its tunnel was large enough for an automobile to drive through. As a result, the massive tree became a muchbeloved tourist attraction and one of the state park’s most popular features. On Jan. 8, after a particularly devastating winter storm, the tree fell, complete with more than a century of names carved on its trunk. “This iconic and still living tree — the tunnel tree — enchanted many visitors, the Calaveras Big Tree Association wrote in a Facebook post. “The storm was just too much for it.”

Esteban Santiago is suspected of killing five people and wounding several others at the Fort Lauderdale airport on Jan. 6. He has confessed to planning the assault and may be subject to the death penalty. He has been charged with using and carrying a firearm during and in relation to a crime of violence, performing an act of violence against a person at an airport serving international civil aviation that caused serious bodily injury; and causing the death of a person through the use of a firearm. The first charge entails a maximum penalty of life in prison and the second two are punishable by death. Santiago’s arraignment is scheduled for Jan. 23.


Page 6 | Thursday, January 12, 2017

Old Gold & Black | News

Snow presents challenges to sorority recruitment Hundreds of undergraduate women participated in sorority recruitment last week despite winter storm delay BY EMILY STRACHAN Contributing Writer straeg13@wfu.edu

Last week, undergraduate women participating in The Panhellenic Council’s Formal Recruitment returned from winter break earlier than most students. The well-organized event, planned months in advance, was thrown off course when winter storm Helena struck Winston-Salem on Friday night. However, cheers swept through Reynolda Campus Tuesday night as young women received bids from different sororities. Bid cards were delivered to Potential New Members (PNMs) in Benson Tuesday evening — a day after the originally scheduled distribution. Senior Emily Beisler is the Gamma Rho Chi (GRC) coordinator for 2017’s recruitment process. A GRC is essentially a counselor for potential new members. “About 480 women went through recruitment this year … which is more than usual,” Beisler said. To date, The Panhellenic Council is made up of eight all-women

organizations: Alpha Delta Pi, Chi Omega, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Zeta, Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Beta Gamma, Kappa Delta, and Kappa Kappa Gamma. Before sororities, local societies were outlets for Wake Forest women to gather in sisterhood. The history of these organizations began in 1948, when Strings was formed — others societies followed suit. According to The Office of Student Engagement’s website, “With the booming population [of society affiliation] by the 90s, the Intersorority Council voted to join with inter/ national sororities from the National Panhellenic Council. This resulted in a sweeping transition from local societies to national sororities in 1993.” Now, women interested in joining a sorority within the Panhellenic Council can attend recruitment, which is held the week before the start of the second semester each year. It’s a fourday process. On day one, PNMs attend parties at all eight organizations. On day two PNM’s attend up to six parties followed by day three, up to four parties, and day four, up to two parties. PNM’s can drop out of the process until they sign the MRABA — a binding agreement

that states if that if a PNM accepts the bid, they can’t go through recruitment again for an entire year. Typically, women receive bids the day before classes begin. This year, day three of recruitment went on “pause” for a day due to winter storm Helena, resulting in new members finding out about bids after classes on Tuesday. Snow flurries arrived at campus on Friday evening, and promptly, Betsy Adams, the director of fraternity and sorority life, called a meeting to discuss the storm with sorority presidents and recruitment chairs. Frances Wells, the president of Kappa Kappa Gamma, was one of the sorority leaders who attended the meeting. “In the middle of day two parties I got an email from Adams asking to meet during our dinner break about what we should do about the snowstorm,” Wells said. Wells said that the meeting “caught everyone off guard, because these plans had been made for months.” Additionally, Wells recalls Adams saying: “We can’t have recruitment tomorrow for the safety of our students: here’s the new plan.” The new plan consisted of pushing back recruitment by one day. Preference night was moved from Sunday evening to Monday morning. Bid cards were

Graphics by McKenzie Maddox/Old Gold & Black

distributed Tuesday night instead of Monday afternoon. Wells says that it was hard for her to tell her chapter about the change of plans because she knew everyone would be disappointed. Chapters and PNMs were not the only people affected by the snowstorm switch-up. The snow also created a lot of anxiety for the recruitment team. Beisler says she, “talks to the PNMs who need extra consoling, and we just make sure that girls are happy and are having a healthy recruitment process.” When the storm hit, Beisler faced unique challenges as a counselor. The delay added an extra sense of anxiety among the women on campus. She says that, “for some girls it was a good day to relax and catch up on sleep … while for others is made the week more stressful.” Active members recall the stress associated with recruitment week as a PNM. “The entire process was very overwhelming because I was so unfamiliar with sorority recruitment,” sophomore Sarah Thompson said. “I had no idea what to expect.” The main issue with bid day being pushed back is that PNMs and active members are not supposed to interact with each other during the recruitment process. With many active members and PNMs in the same classes, it was crucial that everyone maintain the strict silence policy between active members, PNMS, GRC’s and the recruitment team. The first day of classes was undoubtedly more awkward this year as silence was crucial to maintaining honor within the recruitment process. Surely, all involved are sighing a social breath of relief as we head into the second week of school.

WAKE IN A WEEK “The State of Eugenics” Film Screening Time: Jan. 12 from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Location: Porter Byrum Welcome Center, Kulynych Auditorium The “State of Eugenics” captures the story about how 30 states regularly sterilized certain citizens during the 20th century. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion with the film’s director, Dawn Sinclair Shapiro.

Pathways in Ministry: Navigating the Ordination Process Time: Jan. 18, 11 a.m. Location: Wingate Hall, Room 202 A workshop and panel discussion will be held to provide students with resources for personal and professional skill development that will facilitate their ability to attain and thrive in ministry careers.

The Trump Administration and Environmental Policy Time: Jan. 17, 6 p.m. Location: Porter Byrum Welcome Center The Center for Energy, Environment, and Sustainability has gathered environmental, political and academic experts to speak about how U.S. environmental policy will take shape during the Trump Administration.

12th Annual MLK GospelFest Time: Jan. 15 at 3 p.m. Location: Brendle Recital Hall 12th Annual MLK GospelFest The GospelFest is an annual gospel celebration in honor of the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and is free to students.

Cultivating the Soul and Soil: Growing Food, Community, and Jewish Spirituality Time: Jan. 19, 5 p.m. Location: Wingate Hall, Room 202 Dr. Shamu Sadeh will speak about Adamah Farm, which is changing the way we think about Judaism, food, farming and sustainability.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration Time: Jan. 16 at 7 p.m. Location: K.R. Williams Auditorium, Winston-Salem State University Wake Forest University and Winston-Salem State University collaborate annually to hold a large celebration in honor of MLK Day.

Wake Forest Meditation Group Time: Jan. 16, 4 p.m. Location: Reynolda Hall, Room 23 The Wake Forest Meditation Group offers instruction in the basic philosophy and practice of meditation, including how to begin and maintain a regular practice. Each session will end in tea and conversation.

Sophomore Major Declaration Time: Feb. 6-10 Location: Department offices Every sophomore with at least 40 completed hours should set up an advising appointment at his or her desired major and minor department during this period unless the student has applied to the School of Business. Sophomores who wish to declare minors should do so during this same period. Students who do not declare by Feb. 10 risk being unable to register for their major and minor courses during major/minor registration. Major/minor advising/registration will be conducted March 13 - 24. Questions concerning the process should be directed to Susan Parrott at parrotsw@wfu. edu or 336-758-5172.


OPINION

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Online editOr:

at : w w w. w f u o g b . c o m

Henr y Bonilla, bonihj15@wfu.edu

OLD GOLD & BLACK

The views expressed in all opinion columns represent those of the article’s author, not the opinions of the Old Gold & Black Editorial Board

“ not disdain intelligence agencies Trump should Tried and Drew| Presidential Policies

President-electTrump should not undermine evidence that intelligence agencies have reported.

The true disgrace was the The true disgrace was the PresidentPresident-elect’s complete de- elect’s complete denouncement of the nouncement of the findings of findings of the intelligence commuthe intelligence community...” nity — an intelligence community, to fice of the Director of National Intelligence informed the American public that “we assess Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered an influence campaign in 2016 aimed at the U.S. presidential election.” The report noted that “Russia’s goals were to undermine public faith in the U.S. democratic process, denigrate Secretary Clinton and harm her electability and potential presidency.” It also concluded that “Moscow will apply lessons learned from its Putinordered campaign aimed at the U.S. presidential election to future influence efforts worldwide, including against U.S. allies and their election processes.” What started out as frivolous jokes about Putin and Trump’s relationship have now become all too real: the Russian government and Putin himself demonstrated a “clear preference for President-elect Trump,” the report determined. They carried out an extensive and powerful campaign aimed at hurting Hillary Clinton’s chances to win the election. But even though these revelations represent the most serious and egregious threat to American elections in recent history, they somehow managed to not be the most shocking aspect of the ordeal at all.

Drew Finley

Staff Columnist finlag15@wfu.edu

The common claim that the 2016 presidential election is in many ways unprecedented doesn’t attract as much attention as it once did. Despite how stunned and appalled many Americans were when they realized that a billionaire businessman with no political experience was headed to the White House to occupy the most powerful office in the world, many people by now have nonetheless accepted, to varying degrees, no doubt, that Donald Trump will be the President of the United States for at least the next four years. Americans know all of that, and they have known it since early on the morning of Nov. 9 when Trump declared victory. What we did not know until this past Friday, however, was the extent to which Russia and its President Vladimir Putin meddled with the election itself. In a 14-page declassified report released on Friday afternoon, the Of-

be sure, that Trump himself will oversee in a matter of days. In the face of overwhelming evidence from the report that left no doubt of Russia and Putin’s attempts to influence the election, Trump issued a statement which asserted that “while Russia, China, other countries, outside groups and people are consistently trying to break through the cyber infrastructure of our governmental institutions, there was absolutely no effect on the outcome of the election, including the fact that there was no tampering whatsoever with voting machines.” A statement like this one is grossly irresponsible and represents a long pattern in the way that Trump chooses to communicate with the American public. The report from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence made no mention of tampering with voting machines, and it likewise said nothing about whether Russia’s attempts to influence the election were successful It only stated that the attempts were made. Trump’s statement, then, falls into a long line of declarations that he has made, which either ignore, sidestep, obscure or otherwise completely refute the existence of established facts.

Diedra Laird/Charlotte Observer/TNS

But anyone who has followed Trump’s campaign over these past months cannot find this statement entirely surprising. After all, he has essentially made it his business to offer sweeping solutions to enormous problems while offering no concrete plan about how he will reach his goals. When Trump affirms that he wants to make “America’s safety and security” his “number one priority,” we would like to believe him. We fully expect that he wants all of America’s citizens to be safe and secure. But when the President-elect of the United States effectively tries to change the subject entirely when confronted with a major report from the intelligence community, we can say with certainty that something has gone horribly wrong. Trump will surely try to keep America safe and secure during his presidency, but as is the case with basically all of his other policies, it is very unclear how he will go about doing that.

Word on the Quad | Winter Break

What was your favorite part of winter break?

“Going to the beach.” Giovanni Continanza (‘20)

“Going skiing.” Harrison Hetrick (‘20)

“Relaxing at home after studying abroad.” Katie Coleman (‘19)

“Seeing my family.” Addie Wright (‘20s)


Page 8 | Thursday, January 12, 2017

Old Gold & Black | Opinion

“ Obama’s presidential legacy should live on Wil(cox) Be Right| President Obama

The character, policies and actions of the president should continue to shape the future of America

Despite [...] opposition that Obama faced, the legacy that he forged with the legislation passed under his tenure will outlive him.”

Amanda Wilcox

lead to better health outcomes and a more sustainable future for the country in the long run. Moreover, Obamacare has survived and thrived despite unprecedented Republican obstruction, which is an accomplishment in itself. According to economist Paul Krugman, “What conservatives have always feared about health reform is the possibility that it might succeed, and in so doing remind voters that sometimes government action can improve ordinary Americans’ lives [...] Obamacare has survived, it’s here, and it’s working. The great conservative nightmare has come true. And it’s a beautiful thing.” Perhaps the legacy that most directly im-

Staff Columnist wilcaf16@wfu.edu

I will miss President Obama. He is the only president I remember clearly, and as my political awareness has grown over time, I have been struck more and more by the spirit of humanity, grace, integrity and intellectual brilliance that he radiates. I was fortunate to be present at his first inauguration in 2009, and even though I was just a shivering 10-year-old on that very cold day, its history and gravity remain with me. Despite the vicious Republican opposition that Obama faced, the legacy that he forged through the legislation passed under his tenure will outlive him. The Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), for example, was certainly a “big deal,” as Joe Biden remarked, memorably adding an expletive for emphasis. The 25 million beneficiaries of Obamacare previously could not afford coverage or were inhibited from purchasing even inadequate insurance plans due to preexisting conditions — many were just one car accident or cancer diagnosis away from financial disaster. Previously uninsured citizens are no longer forced to avoid medical treatment when they are sick, which will

pacted the lives of ordinary Americans for the better was the recession recovery. Obama took office in the midst of an economic free fall; he inherited and subsequently turned around an economy from the Bush Administration that was in the deepest abyss of the Great Recession. Unemployment reached 10 percent, which was the highest it had been since 1983. Building on the important initial steps that had been taken by the outgoing Bush Administration, Obama’s aggressive and ambitious fiscal stimulus and much-reviled recapitalization of the dreaded big banks put nearly six million Americans back to work, added jobs for 75 consecutive months, and eventually achieved functional full employment. Today, the federal deficit has fallen by one trillion dollars and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is growing at a stable rate. In addition, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act enacted changes in the financial regulatory

Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS

environment that will ensure future economic stability. Unfortunately, the Affordable Care Act and the Dodd-Frank Act are under threat: the incoming Trump Administration has indicated intent to dismantle both. Obama has also embraced a progressive policy agenda to create a more just, equal and beneficial world. The discriminatory “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy on military service was repealed under his tenure and he was a ringing (even if belated) voice of support for marriage equality. He also championed a climate change agenda and through the Paris climate talks, he set ambitious goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. After somberly addressing the nation following far too many deadly acts of gun violence, Obama pushed hard for comprehensive gun control reform, although his efforts were ultimately stalemated by a Republican Congress. Lastly, in addition to his significant legislative accomplishments, Obama’s eloquent speeches and rhetoric over the past eight years have set a higher standard for what we should expect of politicians today. His words in his first inaugural address have striking relevance today: “We cannot help but believe that the old hatreds shall someday pass; that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve; that as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself; and that America must play its role in ushering in a new era of peace.” As we move forward into uncertain times and as his brilliant legislative legacy faces the test of time, we must hold fast to the audacity of hope that Obama leaves with us.

“ best way to reconnect with old classics Records are the A Nat-ural Talent| Vinyl Records

Students should listen to old music through the medium it was recorded on to truly appreciate it

Natalie Sonier

Guest Columnist soninv16@wfu.edu

When I walked in, the smell reminded me of my grandmother’s house — a smell I wouldn’t classify as unpleasant, yet one that is quite distinct. My eyes widened as I tried to take in every inch of the crowded shelves and walkways. As I took a few more steps inside, more nooks and crannies and even entire rooms filled to the brim came into sight. My dad stopped almost immediately when we walked in, his mouth gaping as he recognized a few things he hadn’t seen in more than 20 years. He was surprised to see them in such incredible condition. This was our first adventure together into Jukebox Oldies, the vintage record store located in Reynolda Village, and my first adventure into such a store in general. Because I have always had a fascination with

Modern records are responding to the demand of a younger generation, one with an innocent ignorance toward older music.” vintage things, my attention immediately went to the few albums I recognized. These were artists like The Beatles and The Beach Boys. After seeing my dad shuffle through stacks of vinyl and grow happier each time he saw another album he remembered playing in college, my own interest in listening to records began to grow. Getting down to business, I did some research and asked my parents for a record player for the holidays. However, what use is a record player if you don’t own any records to listen to? So, I returned back to the record store with a friend and I came home with a few LPs that my parents would enjoy — all for a grand total of only $20. When I was in Charlotte during winter break, I visited one of the local record stores, Lunchbox Records, in search of more modern music selections and a few of my favorite bands. Skimming though the names of popular artists and their recent albums, I noticed a common trend:

one modern album on vinyl was the same price as the multiple records I had bought in Winston-Salem. I remembered something the owner of Jukebox Oldies had said. He wanted to shut down his business after the new year and hoped to sell most of his records. If he couldn’t sell them, he was planning on throwing them out. But while in Charlotte, I looked around and saw more than a dozen millennials among the aisles of records. Therefore, something seemed off to me about the recent resurgence in popularity of vinyl and record players among young people. Original vinyl — dating back from the 90’s, 80’s, 70’s, 60’s, 50’s, and so on, used but in pristine condition, and made intentionally to correspond with the development of record players — is being bought and sold at a price far lower than its worth. Nevertheless, modern records are responding to the demand of a younger generation, one with an innocent ignorance toward older music. At first, one could’ve called me a hypocrite for making this claim; I couldn’t listen to KC and the Sunshine Band with my dad or Heart with my mom for more than 20 minutes. However, after listening to a few of their old LPs such as these, the way they were meant to be played I gained an understanding of

why so many people are in love with the scratchy sound quality of a record player combined with the music designed to embrace this unique aspect. So, I urge anyone interested in the revival of vinyl not to disregard older music. Maybe beach classics or even 90’s grunge rock can one day compete with popular modern genres. Instead, try to support not only your local modern record store, but also your local Jukebox Oldies.

Genaro Molina/ Los Angeles Times/TNS


SPORTS OLD GOLD & BLACK

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Online at: www.wfuogb.com twitter: @sports_ogb editOrs: Jack Duesterdick, duesjp14@wfu.edu Kyle Tatich, tatika14@wfu.edu asst. editOr: Tommaso Moneta, monet14@wfu.edu

Football wins first bowl game since 2008 The Demon Deacon football team overcame adversity at every turn to emerge from season with a winning BY RYAN JOHNSTON Online Managing Editor johnrc14@wfu.edu As the smallest school in the Power Five conferences, it’s not often that the Wake Forest football program makes national headlines. The shadow that the recent National Champion Clemson Tigers and other ACC powerhouses, like Florida State and Louisville, cast over the comparatively modestly resourced Wake Forest football program often shifts the spotlight away from the Demon Deacons both in-season and throughout prime recruiting months. Perhaps it was fitting, then, that in 2016, the year in which seemingly anything was possible, that the Wake Forest football program made headlines for the good, the bad, the ugly and everything in between. Starting the season 4-0 for the first time since 2006, Wake Forest exceeded even the most loyal of Deacon fans’ expectations to begin head coach Dave Clawson’s third season at the helm. Early wins over traditionally strong programs such as Indiana and rival Duke provided hope and cause for celebration for a fanbase that hadn’t seen a winning season since 2008. Despite a slew of injuries to key skill players like sophomore quarterback Kendall Hinton and freshman running back Cade Carney, the Wake Forest offense kept humming under junior quarterback and three-year starter John Wolford. The success was met with cautious optimism from the Deacon faithful, but arrived right on schedule for Clawson, who has a history of turning around underperforming programs. Prior to Wake Forest, he coached and brought the football programs at Fordham, Richmond and Bowling Green to unprecedented success. At Wake Forest, the superb start to the 2016-17 season represented the results of the work Clawson and the coaching staff had put into the program over the last two years, and more importantly, the degree

to which each player on the team has improved under Clawson’s tutelage. While Wake Forest finished the regular season 1-5, going to the Military Bowl in Washington D.C. was a gift that few players and fans would trade for any Christmas present. “Clawson has done a superb job in his three years with us,” Athletic Director Ron Wellman said. “He has hired a very good staff and recruits outstanding student-athletes to our program. Once those athletes get to campus, Clawson and his staff develop them to their fullest potential. He is recognized as an excellent coach, but he also understands and supports the unique qualities of Wake Forest. He is a perfect fit for our program and university.” Unfortunately, as is customary with Wake Forest athletics, the good times seemingly came to an end just as soon as they arrived. Just a day before the game at Louisville on Nov. 12, a Wake Forest equipment manager stumbled upon multiple unused Wake Forest plays and offensive schemes in the opposing team’s locker room in Louisville’s Papa John’s Cardinal stadium. An investigation was launched, and on Dec. 13, a press release from the Wake Forest athletic communications department charged former asst. coach and radio analyst Tommy Elrod with leaking confidential and proprietary information about the team to Louisville, Army and Virginia Tech since 2014, when Elrod was let go from the Wake Forest coaching staff. The scandal, dubbed and hashtagged “Wakeyleaks” by Twitter, covered front pages and timelines for days while everybody waited for information to come out regarding why Elrod would commit such a treasonous act against his own program. That information, whether it was ever found or not, was never released to the public. With such a shocking development so close to the bowl game, media rightfully wondered whether the Deacons would be distracted in the biggest game the program had seen since 2011. Wake Forest, however, would let nothing get between them and the Military Bowl trophy. The Deacs’ scored 31 points in the first half, tying their season-high and sending a message to thenNo. 24-ranked Temple that they wouldn’t lay down against a ranked opponent. Though Temple put up a fight in the second half,

Ryan Johnston/Old Gold& Black

Wake Forest's Thomas Brown, a senior linebacker, won the MVP of the Military Bowl for Wake Forest. the game ultimately finished 34-26 in Wake Forest’s favor. Wake Forest will enter the 2017-18 season as champions, and they won’t be looking to relinquish that label anytime soon. Clawson won’t be departing anytime soon, either; he recently signed an eight-year contract extension with Wake Forest.

Wake Forest drops close game to North Carolina After a hard-fought game, the Deacons fail to come out with a win against Chapel Hill BY KYLE TATICH & RYAN JOHNSTON Sports Editor & Online Managing Editor tatika14@wfu.edu; johnrc14@wfu.edu Wake Forest played with heart in an 8793 loss on Wednesday, Jan. 11, against North Carolina. But heart wasn’t enough to beat Roy Williams and the No. 11 Tar Heels. Reminiscent of many Wake Forest games in the recent memory, the Deacons’ comeback fell just short against the Tar Heels at the LJVM Coliseum, tugging at the heartstrings of Demon Deacon fans

who are growing increasingly accustomed to such dramatic losses. “Nobody feels sorry for us,” Manning said. “Nobody can change it but us. We need to learn to play two halves.” Wake Forest found themselves with an 8-0 lead to start the game, fitting their narrative of being a first-half team. By halftime, though, North Carolina had taken command of the game and the scoreboard, as they entered the break with a 49-34 lead. Out of necessity, Wake Forest shook off their reputation of underperforming in the second half. A 20-7 run with 12:29 remaining cut the North Carolina lead to five, and with just under 10 minutes remaining, the Deacs’ had cut the lead to one. The raucous crowd no doubt inspired

the young Deacons who are lacking in experience with nationally televised games, but Carolina’s experience and poise down through the final minutes of the game allowed them to pull away and finish with the victory. Wake Forest basketball has now played 17 games and is nearly one third of the way finished with its ACC schedule. The 20162017 Demon Deacons have proven to be the most competitive team Danny Manning has coached since he took the helm in 2014, but have continued to struggle to play a full 40 minutes and finish close games as victors. The Kenpom statistical ranking — which uses a number of significant factors

See Military Bowl, Page 4

Jeremy Brevard/USA Today Sports

Sophomore John Collins reaches to make a basket against North Carolina last night.


Page 10 | Thursday, January 12, 2017

Old Gold & Black | Sports

Men’s tennis a force to be reckoned with Asst. Coach Chris Eaton discusses Wake Forest’s powerhouse Tennis team BY TOMMASO MONETA Asst. Sports Editor Monet14@wfu.edu As the No. 2 ranked team in the country, Wake Forest has a highly ranked singles player (Petros Chrysochos), can boast about another player in the top five (Skander Mansouri), and has the best ranked doubles team (Christian Seraphim and Skander Mansouri). With a recruiting class that is one of the best in the nation, Alan Gadjiev will be looking to prove himself, as he was ranked a mere No. 122. The success and ambition of our program isn’t unprecedented, and I’m glad that it is being recognized at a national level. However, the coaching staff that has been a critical part of this rise in the ranking does not always receive the credit it deserves. Head coach Tony Bresky has officially legitimized the Demon Deacons as a national power. First, he did this with the help of assistant head coach Jeremy Feldman and now he is doing this working with current assistant head coach Chris Eaton. Chris Eaton, a native to Great Britain, has a lot of experience both as a player and a coach. He has helped coach Henri Kontinen, John Peers and Jamie Murray and has played in the main draw of Wimbledon for four years in a row. Furthermore, he has represented his home country in the prestigious Davis cup. To better understand some of the factors

behind the teams success, the Old Gold & Black sat down with assistant coach Chris Eaton. How many current men’s tennis athletes verbally committed to the school early in their recruiting process? In other words, what is considered early and how soon or late are you aware of the roster for next season? We tend to have some fairly early commitments, which would be around eight months before they would arrive in Winston Salem. However, with these commitments and the caliber of player that Wake Forest men’s tennis program look to recruit, we also have some late commitments and some players who have committed but who are also considering going to play professional tennis as opposed to college. There are some nervous times for us as coaches towards the start of each semester. When would you like to see junior tennis athletes begin visiting and researching colleges? Would you rather know of a potential athlete years ahead of time? If so, what factors do you consider in judging the potential of a 15-year-old as being different from another individual? For junior tennis players, I think it is important for them to start the researching process fairly early as you can gather so much information online now. With regards to visiting, as tennis invariably requires travel to compete at tournaments, players in their junior year could look to combine unofficial visits to schools with going to play tournaments in that specific area. While it is always

Photo courtesy of Rob Ferguson/USA Today

Petros Chrysochos leads Wake Forest’s Tennis as one of the nation’s best college players.

difficult to judge the potential of a 15-yearold player, you can always look for physical and mental attributes on top of their results at the age group that they play. Usually, the top younger players will play in older age groups so we get a good idea of how they will be able to compete against bigger players and that will give us the indication needed that certain players have potential. How do college coaches work junior tennis tournaments? Do you go, or send staff or scouts to view the renown events? What about smaller tournaments in the U.S.? How do you focus on international players, or do they mostly reach out to you? Recruiting at tournaments is done by either the head or assistant coach, and we go to the top junior tournaments to get an idea and scout out who the next potential Deacs’ will be. These are used as talent scouting weeks, and also a good time to connect with coaches and find out which

players will be looking at school and which may be thinking about turning pro. We go to all the major international and national junior tournaments in the U.S. and abroad. We also attend a few smaller events, depending on who is entered in each event. As for the international recruits, we get to see some of them at the Junior grand slams or other major junior events, but there is also a lot of research done on foreign national ranking systems and professional rankings to find out who has the potential to be great on our team. We then try to go and visit them to see them train or compete. Is it better to have a weaker result in competitive tournaments or will the higher placed finish in a less competitive field catch your attention more? Ideally, with where our program is and the goals we have for the program, we are looking for players with great results in high level, competitive tournaments. However, as a coaching staff, we have good knowledge of a lot of players and therefor can decipher the level of a player by who they play and who they beat or lose to. Did you sign Croatia native Borna Gojo expecting him to be an immediate contributor in singles or doubles? Borna is a tremendous talent and we anticipate him to be an immediate impact player for the Deacs in both singles and doubles this spring. His recent results indicate his continued progress and desire to improve and having been in consistent contact with him, I’m confident he will be a huge asset to the team both on and off the court.

NFL Recap: Packers stomp Giants at home TheNFLPostseasonhasbeen uneventfulasthefavoritescontinueto crushunderdog opponents BY ZACH SEARLE Staff Writer Searzf14@wfu.edu The NFL regular season wrapped up almost two weeks ago and finalized the 12 teams that are hoping to bring the Lombardi Trophy back to their city in February. While the top two seeds in each division enjoyed a bye week this past weekend, the remaining teams played in the Wild Card Round to see who would continue their playoff run. Here’s a quick glimpse at the action that took place during the Wild Card round. Oakland Raiders (5) at Houston Texans (4) HOUSTON, TX – The loss of Derek Carr, who broke his leg on Christmas Eve, was definitely felt as the Raiders slipped to the No. 5 seed and faced the Houston Texans in the Wild Card round. Connor Cook, the Raider’s third string quarterback, made his first NFL start in the Wild Card Round. Cook, who had limited playing time the week before, threw for 161 yards and a touchdown but only completed 18 out of his 45 attempted passes. Meanwhile, Brock Osweiler and the Texan’s offense took advantage of a weak Oakland defense.

He threw for 168 yards and a touchdown while Texans running back Lamar Miller ran for 73 yards with a touchdown. In a season that looked so promising for Oakland and their star quarterback, the Houston Texans came out on top 27-14 and will advance to the Divisional Round to play the Patriots. Detroit Lions (6) at Seattle Seahawks (3) SEATTLE, WA – The Lions made their way to Seattle, WA to face the Seattle Seahawks who were coming off of another impressive season in the NFC West. Seattle quarterback Russell Wilson threw for over 200 yards with two touchdowns. Meanwhile the Lions offense, led by QB Matthew Stafford, kept the game close until the fourth quarter when Seattle ran away with it. Seattle was able to use their running game to their advantage as Thomas Rawls, their running back, ran for 161 yards and a touchdown. Seattle came out on top by a score of 26-6 and handed the Lions their ninthth consecutive playoff loss. Seattle moves on to the Divisional Round and will travel to Atlanta to face the Falcons this weekend. Miami Dolphins (6) at Pittsburgh Steelers (3) PITTSBURGH, PA – In what may be one of the best quarterback-running back-wide receiver trios in the NFL, the Steelers offense looked to disrupt the Dolphins and advance to the next round this past Sunday. Steelers wide receiver Antonio Brown came out hot, with

two touchdown receptions in the first quarter and 124 receiving yards for the game. Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell, continued his remarkable season with 167 yards rushing and two touchdowns. He is a consistent threat on offense this season. Miami’s quarterback Matt Moore on the other hand, threw for 289 yards with a touchdown. Following a vicious hit on Moore, the Miami offense seemed to be stunned for the remainder of the game as they only put up 6 points in the second half. The Steelers, who are legitimate Super Bowl contenders, came out on top in this one by a score of 30-12 and will go against the Chiefs in Kansas City this upcoming weekend. New York Giants (5) at Green Bay Packers (4) GREEN BAY, WI – The Green Bay Packers eliminated the Giants on Sunday after another incredible performance by quarterback Aaron Rodgers who threw for 362 yards with four touchdowns. Rodgers, who has had another remarkable season, is one of the top candidates for League MVP and continues to impress as he hit another Hail Mary pass to end the first half, his third completed Hail Mary in the past two seasons. Giants QB, Eli Manning, threw for 299 yards with a touchdown in a disappointing team performance all around. The Packers went on to beat the Giants with a final score of 38-13. Green Bay will travel to Dallas to face the No. 1 seeded Cowboys on Sunday.


Thursday, January 12, 2017 | Page 11

Sports | Old Gold & Black

Looking back on a historic soccer season Despite loss in NationalChampionship game,Wake Forest will enter next season with confidence BY RYAN JOHNSTON Sports Editor johnrc14@wfu.edu With a 17-3-2 record in the 2015 season, Wake Forest’s men’s soccer was expected to continue their dominance, but with a record of 19-3-3 and 14 home wins, Wake Forest’s season overshadowed the prior. With a tough regular season schedule and losing key players like Jack Harrison and Michael Gamble, among others, the Demon Deacons still outscored their opponents 36 to 13. The 2016 season was one for the record books. Winning the ACC Championship was no walk in the park, having to battle out wins over No. 12 Notre Dame and No. 7 Louisville. Wake Forest showed not just technical superiority, but also mental fortitude by winning the final in a convincing 3-1 win over No. 3 Clemson. The NCAA’s brought another level of difficulty, but were also met with an unrelenting Wake Forest. The 2-0 win over Coastal Carolina led to a 2-1 win over Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, a convincing 2-0 win over Virginia Tech, and a 2-1 extra time win versus head coach Bobby Muuss’s previous team, displayed Wake Forest’s continued dominance. The final was one of destiny. Having had only a single full day of rest, the rematch of last year’s elite eight game versus Stanford was the most important game of

the team’s season. With such a short rest and a long run of games before the final, you could tell there was a fatigue to the way everyone played, but it didn’t start well for Wake Forest. Stanford had control for the the first 30 minutes of the game with a physically overpowering style. Wake Forest persevered, though, and applied pressure to Stanford. The second half continued in a similar manner, with Stanford imposing a very physical game on Wake Forest’s more technical style. Neither team could come through in the end, and through 110 minutes the game remained scoreless. For a game like this to end in penalties, it showed how strong each team was and how evenly matched the teams were. Through the first six penalties the game was still even at 3-3, but two stops from Stanford goalkeeper Andrew Epstein helped the Californian team pull through and win 5-4. On the final, Muuss said “Stanford executed their gameplan and played very, very well. What else can you say? We had an opportunity to win the game. I felt comfortable and confident in the guys who were stepping up [for penalties], but it just wasn’t our day unfortunately.” One exemplification of this season’s excellence is senior midfielder Ian Harkes. The recipient of the MAC Hermann Trophy, the highest honor recognizing the best player in college soccer, rumored DCU homegrown eligibility, and two year captain, Harkes had already become the first player in ACC history to be named the ACC Midfielder of the Year, ACC Championship MVP and

Photo courtesy of Brian Westerholt/Sports on Film

Junior forward Jon Bakero will figure to play a large role in Wake Forest’s offense next year. NCAA Tournament Most Outstanding Offensive Player in the same season. Other graduating seniors include MLS Combine invitation recipients Jacori Hayes and Alec Ferrell, along with Ricky Greensfelder, Jared Odenbeck, Hunter Bandy, Hayden Partain, and Tane Gent. The coaching staff and the players are all reasons to believe the Demon Deacons can continue this dominance.

Duke’s Allen must be held to higher standards A program as rich in tradition as Duke must not tolerate the egregious behavior of Grayson Allen BY BRANDON PALMER Business Manager palmbo14@wfu.edu Heading into the College Basketball season, no team was being talked about more than the Duke Blue Devils. As has often been the case during Coach Mike Krzyzeski’s reign as head coach of Duke, the Blue Devils were the preseason favorite to win the National Championship. Duke brought in what was considered to be the top recruiting class in the country and some experts went so far as to say that this could possibly be one of the most talented teams of all time. As the season has unfolded the spotlight has certainly stayed closely focused on the Blue Devils; however, it has been for all the wrong reasons. As the Blue Devil’s season has unravelled, their struggles on the court have been overshadowed by the incomprehensible behavior of star point guard Grayson Allen. Allen was suspended “indefinitely” after purposefully tripping an Elon player in January. This was the third time in a calendar year that Allen was seen tripping a player during a game. After this final incident Allen was uncontrollable on the bench. After the game, however, Coach K said that Allen sincerely apologized and that it was a mistake, the following day it was announced that Allen would be suspended indefinitely, which equated to one game. In the weeks following this incident, Coach K has now taken a leave of absence and Allen has found himself in the midst of even more controversy. In his second game back from suspension,

Brad Horrigan/Hartford Courant/MCT

Grayson Allen, hailed as a potential player of the year candidate before the season, has been nothing short of immature with his behavior this season, to the detriment of Duke basketball. it appeared that Allen once again tried to trip an opposing player. After the game officials from the ACC released a statement saying that nothing could be conclusively determined after watching a replay of the play. However, it is hard to give the benefit of the doubt to someone with the history of Allen. This potential tripping incident was not the only issue that Allen caused this week, as on Tuesday against Florida State, it appeared as if Allen pushed a Florida State assistant coach. It will once again be hard to prove that Allen intentionally did this, but clearly this is not an issue that is likely to go away anytime soon. There is no doubt that Allen is extremely immature and has some serious growing up to do; however, it seems as

if this type of behavior is being overlooked, if not allowed to foster, by the coaches at Duke. It has appeared that the standards that would be applied to every other program in the country are not required to be followed by coach K and Duke. In the grand scheme of things, tripping a player on the court is a very minor infraction and in any other sport would simply be a foul. When a behavior continues to exist with nearly no action being taken to put an end to it, the responsibility must at some point fall on the adults who are in charge of coaching the player. Hopefully, at some point Duke will realize that in the long run winning a game is less important than having the opportunity to teach a student-athlete a valuable life lesson.


Old Gold & Black | Sports

Page 12 | Thursday, January 12, 2017

ACC Recap: No. 9 FSU defeats No. 7 Duke

Florida State is poised to make a run at the ACC Championship behind its stacked roster BY KIRBY MCMULLEN Staff Writer mcmukr14@wfu.edu

As we start the Spring semester, we shift our focus in the Atlantic Coast Conference from non-conference play to what is possibly going to be the toughest, most competitive four months in the history of the conference. The team that will turn the most heads this season is not named North Carolina, but actually the Florida State University Seminoles are the team who many people have predicted to win this year’s ACC Championship. The Seminoles are loaded with talent this season including Xavier Rathan-Mayes, Jonathan Issac, Dwayne Bacon and Michael Ojo. The ‘Noles are inevitably the most athletic team in the conference and are capable of beating anyone with their suffocating defense and timely offensive production in the paint. However, a team that could challenge Florida State for the conference crown is the Duke Blue Devils. Yet, the Blue Devils have already faced several offthe-court challenges, including Grayson Allen’s tripping antics and Coach K’s leave of absence to undergo back surgery. Duke will need to get its affairs in order and get healthy fast if they want to challenge for the conference title. Look for the remarkable freshman class of Jayson Tatum, Harry Giles and Marques Bolden to

Chuck Liddy/Raleigh News & Observer/MCT

The Florida State Seminoles had a thrilling victory over the Duke Blue Devils 88-72 behind Xavier Rathan-Mayes’ 21 points. Their victory marked their 12th straight win and is likely to catapult them into the top ten in the NCAA.

supplement the accomplished lineup of veteran Blue Devils Grayson Allen, Luke Kennard and Amile Jefferson in what might be a National-Championshipworthy rotation come season’s end. Roy Williams and the North Carolina Tar Heels finshed last season walking off the court in defeat after losing the National Championship in heartbreaking fashion at the hands of Kris Jenkins and the Villanova Wildcats. The Heels’ ability to reload with talented freshman and well-developed upperclassmen will once againput the Heels in a position to challenge for the right to be called ACC Champions this season. After losing talented seniors Marcus Paige and Brice Johnson to the NBA Draft, look for the talented trio of Joel Berry II, Justin Jackson and Isaiah Hicks to

lead the Heels charge to reign supreme over the rest of the conference in Brooklyn come March. Some key games that could sway the ACC standings that you should look out for are Florida State at North Carolina on January 14, Virginia at Notre Dame on January 24, North Carolina at Duke on Feb. 9 and Notre Dame at Louisville on March 4. Predictions:

Season-ending ACC stadings: Florida State, Duke, North Carolina, Virginia, Notre Dame, Louisville, Virginia Tech, Miami, North Carolina State, Clemson, Pittsburgh, Syracuse, Wake Forest, Georgia Tech, Boston College. ACC Tournament Champions: Florida State Seminoles ACC Player of the Year: Luke Kennard All-ACC First Team: Joel Berry II (UNC), Dennis Smith Jr. (NCST), Luke Kennard (DUKE), Jaron Blossomgame (CLEM), Michael Young (PITT)

Men’s Basketball: Moral victory stage is over Continued from Page 9

to rate the strength of a given team — classifies Wake Forest as the No. 44 best team in the country, a ranking that demonstrates significant improvement from Manning’s first two seasons when the Deacs finished the year No. 120 and No. 118 respectively. While it has not necessarily translated to more tallies in the win column, improvement in statistical rankings should be considered a significant step forward for Wake Forest, since it proves the Deacs are more talented and competitive now than they were in previous seasons. Wake Forest is seemingly winning each game it is supposed to win and just barely losing to superior programs. At this point in the season, the Deacs have lost each of their seven games to teams that currently rank in the top 40 in the statistical rankings. Villanova (3), Virginia (4), North Carolina (5), Florida State (19), Xavier (22), Clemson (24) and Northwestern (40) all rank ahead of Wake Forest (44). The Demon Deacons have experienced a fair amount of disappointment in each of these seven losses, as many have come as a result of epic collapses in the final 10 minutes of the games. Questionable late-game substitutions and lineups have supplemented mental errors and wasted possessions, preventing Wake Forest from defeating opponents that had often been dominated by Deacs for a majority of the game. No game was more frustrating than the ACC home opener against Clemson on New Years Eve, when the Deacs allowed the Tigers to end the game on a 15-0 run to give Clemson a 73-68 victory. Fans were angered most with the decision to take sophomore John Collins out of the game late in

Jeremy Brevard/USA Today Sports

Junior Konstantinos Mitoglou is challenged by North Carolina sophomore Luke Maye in an attempt to get more points for the Deacons on the board. The Deacons failed to earn the win after a long and tough fight against the Tar Heels.

the second half — especially since he had been dominating the paint with 20 points to that point. Manning’s questionable lineups, Austin Arians’ turnovers and the inability to give Collins some shots down the stretch cost Wake Forest its first ACC home game of the season. At 10-7 and 1-4 in the ACC, the Deacs’ season is far from over. With greater depth, improved overall shooting

and the superb play of sophomores John Collins and Bryant Crawford, Wake Forest has the talent and ability to defeat any opponent. If it can figure out how to play a full 40 minutes the Deacs could win any given night. Wake Forest will host Miami next Wednesday, Jan. 18 at the Joel and will look to get back on track against a Hurricanes team that has seemingly played at a similar level as the Deacs’.


LIFE

T H U R S D AY, J a n u a r y 1 2 , 2 0 17

PAG E 13

Online e d i tO r s : Nick

at : w w w. w f u o g b . c o m DeMayo, demanj14@wfu.edu Julia Haines, hainjm15@wfu.edu A S S T. E D I T O R : E m i l y W i l m i n k , w i l m e r 1 6 @ w f u . e d u

OLD GOLD & BLACK

Get to Know Your New Student Instructors This semester, three incoming students, including one transfer student and two freshmen, decided to explore their interest in BodyPump group fitness classes and become instructors. BY CAROLINE DAI Contributing Writer daij16@wfu.edu Sophomore Sarah Jennings hopes to help people combat stress and difficult parts of their lives through yoga. Her goal is to inspire more people by working collaboratively with staff and encouraging wellbeing for students on campus. How did you get interested in group fitness? I actually hated group fitness at first, because I was a very self-conscious person. I started doing yoga from Youtube videos and weight training at my local gym on my own. After a while, I started trying out different yoga classes, and while I liked some, I couldn’t afford a lot of them. Now, I like them because I see how useful it is to have someone tell you what you are doing wrong, how to correct it and how to safely do a pose.

Freshman Caroline Dai started Body Pump class in China, and hopes to continue instructing Body Pump and learning about the culture of Lesmills in a global setting. What are you most excited about? I am grateful that Wake Forest offers opportunities for students to explore interesting programs, and I always love it when participants challenge themselves and go the distance. I also love it when we have people who have tried it for the first time discover the strength about themselves that they have never knew before. Hopefully with Campus Recreation we can introduce this successful program to more people.

Do you have any goals for this semester?

How did you get interested in group fitness? I first started doing group fitness in high school because I was so bad at just working out on my own. When I was alone, would get lazy. But when you workout with other people, you are held accountable. When I had a scheduled class, I would actually go rather than making up excuses. I love group fitness because you are all in it together — everyone is working hard together. What I love about BodyPump especially is that it is hard for everyone, even the instructor. Everyone can be at different levels of fitness but everyone can do the exact same workout and just change their weights. Do you have any goals for this semester?

I wanted to teach yoga because it has had a huge impact on my life. I have depression, anxiety and ADD, so doing yoga helped me manage a lot of the effects of those things. I want to help other people learn how to manage difficult parts of their lives through a consistent practice.

My goal for this semester is to teach classes on my own and be confident in it. I want to utilize my confidence and spunk and bring that into my teaching. I am nervous that I won’t look like an instructor because I don’t have rock hard abs or super duper strong thighs, but I’m also excited to get more in-shape and be able to lift more as I get more experience.

Do you have any experience instructing? I was certified to teach about two years ago. I taught at College of Charleston my freshman year, and have been teaching downtown at Paz Studios since May. They sponsor yoga in Bailey Park, a free class that a lot of Wake Forest students go to.

What was the training process like? The training process was actually really fun. BodyPump Bootcamp is a weekend long training session and you learn the ins and outs of being an instructor. You meet a lot of cool people and really learn what your body can do.

What did you learn during instructor training? My second favorite part about being an instructor is watching a student succeed at a pose they were having trouble with. My favorite is the look of calm I see on everyone’s face when a class ends. One thing I learned about myself through teaching was that as I helped and taught more people, I felt even more inspired to do the best I can in my own practice on and off the mat. Yoga is a lifestyle of gratitude, service and discipline. It can be applied everywhere and all the time.

What is your favorite part of being an instructor?

What are you most excited about? This semester I just hope to teach at least one person something new. I get nervous during a class, when I see students getting frustrated or thinking they are failures. I wish they knew that if they stuck with it, they would be improving in no time.

Freshman Emma Bossier has tried BodyPump before, but has never taught. Her vision is to bring positive energy to the Campus Recreation program and to encourage participants to feel connected with fitness regardless of experience level.

Photo Courtesy of Emma Bossier

Freshmen Emma Bossier (Left) and Caroline Dai (Right) stand with their initial training instructor Leslie Ann Quillen in Greensboro.

When I first started BodyPump, I was obsessed with my instructor, Pam. She was so spunky and she would dance to the music while we were “pumpin’” as she would say. I thought she was the coolest person and I saw myself in her, so I thought that maybe I could be like her too. My favorite part about being an instructor is being able to do what Pam did for me. She really made me fall in love with fitness and BodyPump, and I genuinely believe that she changed my life. I want to be that person for other people. The process of becoming an instructor has really forced me to be more confident. When you’re teaching, you can’t be shy or timid — you are the teacher and you have to rock it. I’m still working on this, but I know I will get there.


Old Gold & Black | Life

Page 14 | Thursday, January 12, 2017

Movie Review | Rogue One

Rogue One: A new hope for the franchise? WARNING: SPOILERS. Rogue One, the first installment of the StarWars Stories, lacks the strong characters and exciting plot fans expected BY CALEB WOODY Contributing Writer woodcw16@wfu.edu After the release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens during the holidays of 2015, there was a resurgence of love and nostalgia for the timeless galactic story of good versus evil. This new addition to the Star Wars cinematic universe was further complimented by the addition of the Star Wars Stories series, a franchise of stand-alone spin off films planned to be released concurrently with the main Star Wars films. The first feature in this series, Rogue One, released this past December, was met by generally positive reviews. It received an 85 percent from “Rotten Tomatoes,” a 65/100 from “Metacritic” and an 8.1/10 from “IMDB”. Rogue One was obviously a highly anticipated feature due to the positive reception of the Star Wars franchise reboot following the release of The Force Awakens and the fact that it bridges the hiatus between The Force Awakens and the asof-yet unnamed eighth installment in the new trilogy (set to be released in December 2017). However, fan-boy, rosy glasses aside, Rogue One falls a touch flat from my expectations for the series. Rogue One suffers from a movie trope that is commonly found in long-awaited sequels, spin-offs and reboots; the idea that a real, developed story is not needed as long as we include enough throwbacks for the longtime fans. It started with the characters. I watched this movie, and I wanted to care what happened to the people on screen. I wanted to care about their struggles and fears, and I wanted to root for their victories, but I just couldn’t. The opening scene introduced Galen Urso, the original designer of the Death Star-made a changed man, his daughter Jyn-an almost carbon copy of Rey from The Force Awakens, and a power-suited Saw Gerrera, a rebel extremist who truly seemed to serve no plot purpose other than to serve as the transition between child Jyn

and young-adult Jyn. These characters all seemed hollow and archetypal, none holding either the bad-boy coolness of Han Solo or the hero-valor of Luke Skywalker. The director, Gareth Edwards, then continually added more characters to the mix, none possessing any true motives, personalities or depth. From the blind pseudo-Jedi Chirrut Imwe (don’t even get me started on the whole blind warrior trope) and his mercenary friend Baze Malbus to the defected imperial pilot Bodhi Rook none of these characters mattered to me. They didn’t do anything or had no real reasoning behind being in the story other than to provide cool hero deaths that I suppose were meant to be meaningful, but felt more like watching mannequins die. As a brief interjection, I would like to say that I greatly appreciate the attempts that Disney is making to paint the Star Wars universe as a more diverse environment. From main character Cassian Andor’s thick Mexican accent to the inclusion of women in positions of leadership and power and to the inclusion of under-represented races and ethnicities, Disney is making excellent strides in creating an inclusive narrative out of one of the most-loved stories of all time. Following the complete lack of character development, the gimmicks intending to appeal to older Star Wars fans began to get a bit tiresome. These include cameos by R2D2 and C-3PO, the dramatic and over-the-top reveal of Darth Vader, the battle on Scarif (greatly reminiscent of the battle of Hoth in The Empire Strikes Back) and the blasphemous use of CGI to recreate a creepy and inhuman Grand Moff Tarkin (originally portrayed by Peter Cushing until his death in 1993) and a younger, plastic looking Princess Leia (originally played by Carrie Fisher). These unnecessary add-ins show a lack of ingenuity and passion in Disney’s acquisition of Star Wars — preferring to follow George Lucas’s Formula for success rather than forge their own path. The one exception to this is the ending of the film. After Tarkin ordered the destruction of the Empire’s base on Scarif, Cassian and Jyn embrace on the beach and await their death. This is an ending I was not anticipating, and it very much breaks away from the “everybody lives happily ever after” endings that the original Star Wars could be known for. This, combined with the seamless transition from the events of Rogue

One to A New Hope at the end of the film, was a welcome breath of fresh air from Edwards. This was something that struck just the right nostalgic chords. Overall, Rogue One, while at times lacked character development, is still a great movie and deserves it’s accolades. I would rate the film an 8/10.

Photo courtesy of...

Disney/MCT

Fans appreciated the cameos by old characters and the touch of nostalgia that the film encompassed.

Restaurant Review | Crafted-The Art of the Taco

Crafted-The Art of the Taco revamps an old classic The unique taco chain, originally located in Greensboro, just opened a location in Winston-Salem to the delight of residents BY CAITLIN HERLIHY Senior Writer herlcr13@wfu.edu Traditional meets trendy at Winston-Salem’s new taco joint. Located on N. Liberty St., Crafted-The Art of the Taco boasts an elaborate selection of gourmet burgers, fresh salads and, of course, a variety of tacos. The chain originated in Greensboro before expanding to Winston-Salem last fall. Since its opening, the restaurant has quickly escalated to a local favorite. Strands of white lights dangle overhead, and the simplistic décor establishes an effortlessly cool vibe. The warm lighting and floor-to-ceiling windows create an inviting atmosphere perfect for grabbing dinner with friends. Patrons have the choice between sitting at a private table or opting for the community tables in the center of the restaurant. The restaurants’ energy is infectious, and the attentive wait staff zips around from table to table. The restaurant was packed for dinner, so we took a seat at the bar while we waited for our table. We started with chips and guacamole — a personal favorite no matter where I go. The crispy chips were cooked to perfection, and the guacamole was both creamy and chunky.

We washed the Chips and Dip appetizer down with one of the many craft beers available on tap. Crafted-The Art of the Taco claims to be a taco joint, rather than a traditional Mexican restaurant. Each recipe is a collaboration of international influences ranging from Asian to Mediterranean cuisine. Customers can select their preferred taco style — Po’ Boy, Oxford, ‘Mericanized and more — and pair it with a variety of protein options, including chorizo, braised chicken, pulled pork, falafel and seared tuna. Guests can transform any taco style into a burger or rice bowl, as well. I opted for the Baja Style and Wayfarer tacos. The Baja Style featured cilantro, guacamole, Baja sauce, pico de gallo and your choice of meat. The Wayfarer taco included pulled pork, Korean red sauce, sesame marinated cucumber and red onion relish. To my disappointment, the tacos were smothered with sauce, masking the various flavors inside the tortilla. My side of pimento macaroni and cheese, however, was mouth watering. We capped the meal with an order of churros and fried-dough pastries smothered in cinnamon sugar and drizzled with warm chocolate sauce. Although the presentation was lacking, the churros themselves were sweet and delicious. While I admired the whimsical recipes and charming décor, I would prefer The Porch or El Rancho to fulfill my taco cravings. Nonetheless, Crafted The Art of the David Joles/Minneapolis Star Tribune/TNS/MCT Taco is a perfect spot for drinks and an appetizer or Crafted offers customers many different varieties of the two. Pull up a spot at one of the community tables, and classic taco along with other burger and salad options. you may make a new friend.


Life | Old Gold & Black

Thursday, January 12, 2017 | Page 15

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Page 16| Thursday, January 12, 2017

Old Gold & Black | Life

Lifehacks for Europe A student’s perspective of tips and advice for maximizing your experience abroad. BY NICHOLAS DEMAYO Life Editor ldemanj14@wfu.edu

It pays to be less than 25 years old

Spending a semster in Europe provides students with the opportunity to glean a wide variety of cultural knowledge. After all, Europe offers amazing art, architecture and historic sites coupled with great food and entertainment. No one really expects, however, that they will be barked at by an Italian waiter, get lost looking for an ATM and miss their bus four times — all while making their way to the Coliseum. It is during these moments that Europe seems to be one of the most daunting and uninviting terrains in which one must navigate. To assist during those tough times, here are some street-smart tips for traveling in Europe that I have picked up from my adventures — and misadventures — while studying abroad.

Along the same lines as museum entry, European countries offer massively reduced rail, public transport and theatre tickets to people under the age of 25 — regardless of their university affiliation. For 35 U.S. dollars at most, you can get a railpass that reduces fares by one third. From my experience, that initial charge pays for itself after a couple of trips. This doesn’t just apply to rail services, but also subsidized theatres, such as the National Theatre in London. Tickets for those under 25 years of age can be as cheap as 10 U.S. dollars. By just signing up online, you can have a nice evening at the theatre for not a lot of money. The Italians are particular about their coffee In the U.S., it is customary to order a coffee along with breakfast. But in Italy, coffee is usually consumed on its own or at the end of a meal. In Rome, I sat down to an early lunch and ordered an espresso. Taken aback, the waiter took the menus from the table expecting that I was only there to drink coffee and not to have a meal. When I asked to have the menus back, he exclaimed, “oh so you want to eat too!” From this experience, I learned to never ever order coffee before a meal in Italy. Don’t do this unless you want to confuse and aggravate your waiter. It is also extremely unusual for someone to order a cappuccino in Italy after noon. So try not to tip yourself off as a completely clueless tourist and get up early for some foamy coffee. Roman busses are free, sort of

Nicholas DeMayo/Old Gold & Black

Tipping traditions are not the same everywhere People commonly assume that it is not necessary to tip in Europe unless there is a large group or exemplary service. And even in the case when there is great service, only a couple euros will do to show appreciation. In Prague, however, wait staff rely on tips from all patrons as part of their salary. So when in Prague, do as the locals do and tip your wait staff the expected 10 percent of your bill. Also, make sure to lookup tipping traditions online for each city you visit in Europe.

Technically you must legally buy a ticket to ride Roman busses; however, you will definitely stand out from the crowd if you do so. I did not witness one local Roman inserting a ticket into the machine, and busses are so crammed and behind schedule that the driver probably would not even notice if you did not either. So instead of wasting your time fumbling around with the ticket machine, you are better off trying to find a seat on those overcrowded death traps. If you so choose to use this cost-effective mode of transport, be prepared to wait awhile for your bus to arrive at your stop. Traffic is a nightmare in central Rome, so buses that typically stop once every 10 minutes might not show up for 45 minutes at a time.

Passports can double as a museum ticket A perk of being a student in Europe is that most museums offer free admission with a valid student ID. But typically, a student ID card from the United States will not grant you free entry into museums. Remember to bring either your passport’s student visa or another form of identification card from you study abroad program when you go to museums and historic landmarks because some places will count that for their free or reduced-price tickets. That could save you up to around 20 U.S. dollars, so it is definitely worth a try.

Nicholas DeMayo/Old Gold & Black

Nicholas DeMayo/Old Gold & Black

Wine is cheaper than beer in France and Italy One of the great joys of studying in Europe is the ability to socially enjoy alcohol in pubs and taverns amongst locals. In the United Kingdom and Ireland, the most economical drink to purchase is a pint of beer or ale, costing you around five dollars. For that matter, bars in Germany, Czech Republic and Austria will provide you with beer by the half liter for as little as three dollars — even a better value than the traditional English pub. But in France and Italy, it’s best to take a break from the bubbly stuff for some wine served by the glass or even by the pitcher for groups. In France, prepare to pay about five dollars for wine and around eight dollars for beer, while in Italy you can buy a liter of house wine to share at an incredible price of around six dollars. Meals at restaurants take a while One final and very important thing to realize about dining and living in Europe is that traditions and insistence on small, family-owned restaurants supersedes large chains and franchises. Whereas American waiters push you in and out of your table as quickly as possible, European servers will take more time to serve you and typically exceed your expectations because of their traditions of hospitality. This means that sometimes you will receive a dessert, coffee or side item that you did not even order. This demonstrates the pride that each restaurant takes in their respective cuisine. So although dinner might take a little longer in Europe, dining out is worth the wait. My study abroad trip took me to five different countries and many more cities than I can list here. I know that many about to go abroad will have a tremendously different experience than my own. All of these tips come with a story to tell, and perhaps to encourage others to share their stories is the most important piece of advice someone who has studied in another continent can give.

Old Gold & Black - 1/12/17