Page 1

Collidescope 3.0 explores America’s racial history Page 6

OPINION: Humor makes politics easier to handle Page 10

Club ice hockey #2 seed in playoffs Page 13

Aaron Carter makes a return with his new music Page 17

Old Gold&Black WAKE FOREST’S STUDENT NEWSPAPER SINCE 1916 T H U R S DAY, F E B RUA RY 16 , 2 017

VOL. 101, NO. 6

“Cover s the campus like the magnolias”

oldgoldandblack.com

Speak out on the quad challenges immigration policy MSA and SASA organized a speak out in response to a professor’s article about immigration BY LAUREN BARBER Staff Writer barblp0@wfu.edu

Photo Courtesy of Elle.com

An abridged copy of the “A Seat at the Table Syllabus” by the scholars appears on Elle.com, while the full syllabus spans 25 pages of an online publishing portal.

Dozens of students, faculty and staff convened on Manchester Plaza on Friday, Feb. 10 for a speak out in response to recent events that have raised questions about the role of Islamophobia in federal policy-making and campus climate. According to attendees, the direct impetus for the speak out stemmed from an inflammatory article, “Europe’s Islam problem and U.S. immigration policy,” written by Shannon Gilreath, a Wake Forest professor of law and women’s, gender and sexuality studies. In late January, President Donald Trump issued an executive order effectively barring entry to the U.S. by people from seven Muslim-majority countries for 90 days and nearly all refugees for 120 days. Gilreath uses his identity as a gay man to advocate for increased controls on the immigration of Muslims like the ones that result from the order, writing that “Islam is endemically antithetical to the wellbeing of gay people.” Gilreath also claims that Muslim immigrants have “no intention of integrating into more enlightened Western concepts of equality and tolerance.” Many students, faculty and staff found his central argument Islamophobic. “The way [Gilreath] talked about Muslim people was offensive and overgeneralizing,” said sophomore Roohi Narula, an executive member of the South Asian Student Association (SASA). She, along with other student leaders in SASA and the Muslim Student Association,

Elle scholars offer ‘A Seat at the Table’ After meeting Solange, ELLE.com scholars created a comprehensive syllabus on race and womanhood BY HEATHER HARTEL Social Media Chair harthf15@wfu.edu Solange Knowles’ new album A Seat at the Table is an anthem for solidarity, pride and healing — specifically to celebrate the existence and humanity of black womanhood. Recently, a group of women invited other scholars to do exactly this: to offer them a seat at the table. Five undergraduate women — Lauren Barber, Mankaprr Conteh, Alex Dean,

See Speak Out, Page 5

Erica Jordan and Ann Nguyen — collaborated to create and to publish a syllabus to accompany Solange’s masterpiece. The collaborative effort combined literary texts, pieces of music, art and videos to reflect the ideas Solange portrays through her music. The women that made this possible are the ELLE.com scholars. These scholars are part of a highly competitive undergraduate journalism program, which aims to create content focused specifically on girls and women of color. They are taught under the expertise of Melissa Harris-Perry and Sherri Williams as a subset of the Anna Julia Cooper center. After the group travelled to Stanford in

the fall to participate in conversation with Solange, senior ELLE scholar, Ann Nguyen, suggested the idea of a syllabus for her new album, designed after Candice Benbow’s famous “Lemonade Syllabus.” “The ELLE scholar program aims to center young women of color, which is exactly what the syllabus aims to do,” Nguyen said. “This syllabus frames young women of color as readers; readers of really important texts meant to create change not only in society but in ourselves.” The “A Seat at the Table Syllabus” published on ELLE on Feb. 10 was a collaborative effort by the five scholars. It is respectively divided into five sections central to the album, each chosen by an individual scholar: resisting racism, understanding gender and sexuality, the role of relationships, nurturing ourselves and a section for young girls of color. “It was a two part collaboration both between the ELLE scholars but also collaboration with complete strangers,” said senior ELLE scholar, Mankaprr Conteh. “Solange talks about how her conversations created her album, and we wanted that to be a part of the syllabus, so we reached out to strangers ages 16 to 30 as well as to famous people to add their voices.”

Photo Courtesy of seatsyllabus.com

See Syllabus, Page 4

Former deacon to lead graduate program Wake Forest alumnus Stan Meiburg will direct the Graduate Programs in Sustainability BY KATHERINE CASSIDY Staff Writer casski15@wfu.edu

Wake Forest announced on Feb. 2 that that former Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Official and Wake Forest alumnus Stan Meiburg has been selected to direct the Wake Forest Graduate Programs in Sustainability. Meiburg received his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science at Wake Forest University in 1975. He then pursued a Masters and a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University.

Meiburg has significant experience in public service, as he began his work for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1977, shortly after graduating from Wake Forest. Throughout nearly 40 years at the EPA, Meiburg engaged with a variety of vital projects throughout the agency. He has served in several different positions at the EPA, and has received numer-

ous recognitions for his accomplishments, including the Distinguished Federal Executive acknowledgement in 2010 and the EPA’s Gold Metal for his contributions to the amendments of the Clean Air Act in 1990. Most recently, Meilburg served as the second-highest ranking official in

See Sustainability, Page 6


Collidescope 3.0 explores America’s racial history Page 6

OPINION: Humor makes politics easier to handle Page 10

Club ice hockey #2 seed in playoffs Page 13

Aaron Carter makes a return with his new music Page 17

Old Gold&Black WAKE FOREST’S STUDENT NEWSPAPER SINCE 1916 T H U R S DAY, F E B RUA RY 16 , 2 017

VOL. 101, NO. 6

“Cover s the campus like the magnolias”

oldgoldandblack.com

Speak out on the quad challenges immigration policy MSA and SASA organized a speak out in response to a professor’s article about immigration BY LAUREN BARBER Staff Writer barblp0@wfu.edu

Photo Courtesy of Elle.com

An abridged copy of the “A Seat at the Table Syllabus” by the scholars appears on Elle.com, while the full syllabus spans 25 pages of an online publishing portal.

Dozens of students, faculty and staff convened on Manchester Plaza on Friday, Feb. 10 for a speak out in response to recent events that have raised questions about the role of Islamophobia in federal policy-making and campus climate. According to attendees, the direct impetus for the speak out stemmed from an inflammatory article, “Europe’s Islam problem and U.S. immigration policy,” written by Shannon Gilreath, a Wake Forest professor of law and women’s, gender and sexuality studies. In late January, President Donald Trump issued an executive order effectively barring entry to the U.S. by people from seven Muslim-majority countries for 90 days and nearly all refugees for 120 days. Gilreath uses his identity as a gay man to advocate for increased controls on the immigration of Muslims like the ones that result from the order, writing that “Islam is endemically antithetical to the wellbeing of gay people.” Gilreath also claims that Muslim immigrants have “no intention of integrating into more enlightened Western concepts of equality and tolerance.” Many students, faculty and staff found his central argument Islamophobic. “The way [Gilreath] talked about Muslim people was offensive and overgeneralizing,” said sophomore Roohi Narula, an executive member of the South Asian Student Association (SASA). She, along with other student leaders in SASA and the Muslim Student Association,

Elle scholars offer ‘A Seat at the Table’ After meeting Solange, ELLE.com scholars created a comprehensive syllabus on race and womanhood BY HEATHER HARTEL Social Media Chair harthf15@wfu.edu Solange Knowles’ new album A Seat at the Table is an anthem for solidarity, pride and healing — specifically to celebrate the existence and humanity of black womanhood. Recently, a group of women invited other scholars to do exactly this: to offer them a seat at the table. Five undergraduate women — Lauren Barber, Mankaprr Conteh, Alex Dean,

See Speak Out, Page 5

Erica Jordan and Ann Nguyen — collaborated to create and to publish a syllabus to accompany Solange’s masterpiece. The collaborative effort combined literary texts, pieces of music, art and videos to reflect the ideas Solange portrays through her music. The women that made this possible are the ELLE.com scholars. These scholars are part of a highly competitive undergraduate journalism program, which aims to create content focused specifically on girls and women of color. They are taught under the expertise of Melissa Harris-Perry and Sherri Williams as a subset of the Anna Julia Cooper center. After the group travelled to Stanford in

the fall to participate in conversation with Solange, senior ELLE scholar, Ann Nguyen, suggested the idea of a syllabus for her new album, designed after Candice Benbow’s famous “Lemonade Syllabus.” “The ELLE scholar program aims to center young women of color, which is exactly what the syllabus aims to do,” Nguyen said. “This syllabus frames young women of color as readers; readers of really important texts meant to create change not only in society but in ourselves.” The “A Seat at the Table Syllabus” published on ELLE on Feb. 10 was a collaborative effort by the five scholars. It is respectively divided into five sections central to the album, each chosen by an individual scholar: resisting racism, understanding gender and sexuality, the role of relationships, nurturing ourselves and a section for young girls of color. “It was a two part collaboration both between the ELLE scholars but also collaboration with complete strangers,” said senior ELLE scholar, Mankaprr Conteh. “Solange talks about how her conversations created her album, and we wanted that to be a part of the syllabus, so we reached out to strangers ages 16 to 30 as well as to famous people to add their voices.”

Photo Courtesy of seatsyllabus.com

See Syllabus, Page 4

Former deacon to lead graduate program Wake Forest alumnus Stan Meiburg will direct the Graduate Programs in Sustainability BY KATHERINE CASSIDY Staff Writer casski15@wfu.edu

Wake Forest announced on Feb. 2 that that former Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Official and Wake Forest alumnus Stan Meiburg has been selected to direct the Wake Forest Graduate Programs in Sustainability. Meiburg received his Bachelor of Arts in Political Science at Wake Forest University in 1975. He then pursued a Masters and a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University.

Meiburg has significant experience in public service, as he began his work for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1977, shortly after graduating from Wake Forest. Throughout nearly 40 years at the EPA, Meiburg engaged with a variety of vital projects throughout the agency. He has served in several different positions at the EPA, and has received numer-

ous recognitions for his accomplishments, including the Distinguished Federal Executive acknowledgement in 2010 and the EPA’s Gold Metal for his contributions to the amendments of the Clean Air Act in 1990. Most recently, Meilburg served as the second-highest ranking official in

See Sustainability, Page 6


OGB

“ encourages interaction with staff Editorial Board This column represents the views of the Old Gold & Black Editorial Board.

As students, we can all bond over the fact that Wake Forest is a rigorous school. The courses are laborious, the social life reflects the pressure of the school and living in close quarters among people who are equally intelligent, driven and wellrounded can be demanding. Yet midway through our semester when we are slammed with tests and papers, roommate relationships start to get testy and Spring Break is just far enough away to make us pessimistic, it's important to recognize those who help us succeed each and everyday at Wake Forest — even when we don't realize it. In looking at our Wake Forest experiences, students often define their time here as being impacted by professors and faculty, friends, clubs, sports and other extracurricular activities. While all these aspects of campus are important, we often overlook those who work hard and

It is important to treat everyone with the kindness and respect that you would want for yourself." tirelessly for us — campus workers such as those who work in the P.O.D., Zicks, Subway, Starbucks, the Pit, the janitorial staff, Campus Facilities and in other positions around campus that serve various student needs. We often do not appreciate the work they put in — each day members of the janitorial staff clean our dorms, academic buildings and other administrative buildings on campus. Employees work in the Upper Quad P.O.D. and Subway 24 hours a day, seven days a week dealing with students at late hours of the night. It takes a lot of work from a lot of dif-

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THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF WAKE FOREST UNIVERSIT Y SINCE 1916 McKENZIE MADDOX EDITOR-IN-CHIEF maddml14@wfu.edu

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ferent people to operate a campus of this size, and often times students neglect to realize how much of an impact these people have on our everyday lives. Some students have taken steps to get to know various campus employees on a personal level, introducing themselves and building a relationship that goes beyond "thank you for swiping me into the Pit." We as the Editorial Board of the Old Gold & Black believe this attitude towards those employees on campus should permeate throughout campus. Within our own operations, the Editorial Board has gotten close to the janitor, Odi, who cleans the upper floors of Benson. Despite the mess she cleans everyday, not one day has passed where she hasn't greeted everyone in the office with a smile, calling us her "niños" and "niñas." During the tough weeks and

countless hours we spend on the paper, seeing her smiling face is what keeps many of us in the office optimistic and happy during the week. Because of our relationship with her, along with many other campus staff, we find it crucially important that students treat these employees with respect and kindness and to be grateful for what they do for the Wake Forest community. As a call to action, we encourage students to each take five minutes out of each of their days and choose a campus staff member they interact with regularly to thank and give an extra sense of appreciation for all that they do on campus. It does not have to be a big gesture, but each student at Wake Forest should show their gratitude and appreciation to all of those who work and better the lives of the students of Wake Forest.

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News | Old Gold & Black

Thursday, February 16, 2017 | Page 3

Deacon Profile: Charlie Brennan

BY ERIN STEPHENS News Editor stepec14@wfu.edu

Senior Charlie Januszewski, better known to those who find him on Spotify as "Charlie Brennan," will spend his Friday differently than most college students. His latest album, "The Last Time," will be available to all listeners to showcase his vocal, lyrical and producing skills. How did you first get involved in music? Well, I took a class in elementary school, actually. It was kind of like a garage band class where you learn how to make music on your computers. And I really liked it. We had to share our pieces at the end of the day and I was always really pumped to share mine with the class. I just don't have a passion for academics, but I found that making music was the one thing I was really into. And this was in fifth grade. I went home and basically just begged my parents to get me garage band for me to be able to do things at home too. And it started to grow from there into discovering how to record vocals. I would do it in my basement and hide from my family because I didn't want them to hear me. Then when I was in ninth grade I really started putting things together. I put them out on Youtube when I'd make songs with my friends and it was a lot of fun. From there I got in contact with a producer in Stamford, CT who taught me a lot about production — mixing, mastering music and getting it to radio quality. I learned a lot about that and started making full length albums from there around my sophomore year of high school.

And I was in the studio just the other day with him and I've been working with him since high school. We've gotten to a point where he really understands the sound I'm going for, and its really rare that you find a producer like that. A lot of artists work with producers who are hoping to get a certain style. I've been really lucky that I found someone who knows what I'm looking for. He actually enjoys my music, which is great too. He told me he listens to it all the time, and I think thats awesome because I'll bring something in and he'll help me improve it. We did some of that on Tuesday. I was recording some piano layers and he said, 'You should add this in here.' Its really just a great atmosphere. So that has all been really encouraging in creating full length projects and putting those out. Do you have a favorite part of the recording process?

I'm trying to think, because I love all of it, really. And I do all of it myself. I handwrite the songs, play them on the piano, bring them into the studio and add different instruments. As for my favorite part, I love getting the vocals down and getting a clean recording. Because when I'm here, recording a demo on my laptop, it's just not the best it can be because its kind of bad quality. But once you get in the studio and get a good vocal down and good harmonies down, it really makes the song sound like it's going somewhere, if that makes sense. And once you do, it feels awesome.

How did you get in touch with your producer?

Is there anything that has surprised you along the way?

It was so random. But one of my teachers from high school actually sings on the side. And he was like, 'I'm gonna put you in contact with this guy.'

Well after that I got into licensing and one of my songs got featured in a Pepsi commercial. It's called 'The Ocean.' It was my first experience with

Taylor Nisi/ Old Gold & Black

any kind of licensing and I was pretty blown away by it. I got an email one day in the middle of summer. I was at the beach with my family and I got an email saying, 'We want to use your song for a beverage company,' so I said 'sure.' Then I got the contract and it was for Pepsi and I was shocked. And most recently I worked with American Eagle, and they play my music in their stores, which is pretty great. It's been really great this past year. I've really grown as an artist and have been able to reach new areas that I haven't before. You were talking earlier about your style. How would you define it?

I have a really hard time doing that because I don't really know what style it is. I always say Pop Alternative, which is such a vague term, but I think it works. Particularly with this new album I really tried to push myself into new genres but still hold something true to it. This album has one song with disco elements in it. The single I put out most recently called 'Cool' has some electronic elements to it, but is still attainable to a Singer-Songwriter genre. I did an EDM song with my friend Miller back in September, and that was a lot of fun because I've never Charlie Brennan/ Old Gold & Black done anything like that before.

THE MORE YOU KNOW

I write everything on piano and it starts from a Singer-Songwriter background but I've been trying to break into more genres to see what I can do and what I can push myself to do. I think that's really important when you're writing music, because if you get into a rut and do a lot of the same stuff it can get a little boring. I spent a year on this album, so that was a long time. I wrote like 40 songs for it, and cut it down to 11. It's been a long process but im very excited because its almost out. Is there a theme or inspiration that goes along with your upcoming album? Yeah, kind of. It's been over the course of the past year so a lot has happened. The root of it is from a break-up — boring, I know. And everyone's thinking "Cliche" but, you know, it helped me write a lot, and helped me get over it. And actually, I guess that really helped me a lot with finding a style and genre. Before this album I would write a lot about whatever I thought, not whatever I had experienced myself. I'd write more about what other people experienced, I guess, or what I assumed it was like. But this was the first time I was writing from myself, so that really helped a lot. And it is very cathartic.

• The average GPA of graduating seniors at Wake Forest has been rising steadily, which is consistent with national trends • The rate of grade inflation nationally over the last 50 years averages 0.14 GPA points per decade • According to a study published in the Washington Post, Wake Forest has one of the highest grade inflation rates of private schools in the country


Page 4 |Thursday, February 16, 2017

Old Gold & Black | News

Syllabus: Intentions of syllabus misreported Continued from Page 1

At the heart of the “A Seat at the Table Syllabus” is the idea of crediting the voices of those who often get their voices taken away, while using Solange’s album as a guide. As her album explored both the joys and the pains of black womanhood, the syllabus aims to echo these pursuits. “I was inspired by hearing Solange explain how she created ‘A Seat at the Table’, and how it was such a public representation of who she was as a private woman,” Nguyen said. “What it is to me, is a representation of public art, public text that’s available to anybody who wants to read it; to help them make sense of their own private lives and the complexities of being a woman of color.”

After hundreds of submissions, the five scholars were responsible for filtering through the provided texts and deciding which were central to their message; work that took them weeks to compile the final project. However, the work done by these women was falsely reported by news organizations. BET published an article falsely stating that Solange was asking for submissions to create a collaborative syllabus. Essence magazine reported that Wake Forest was introducing a course on the new album. Even student news organizations reported on the new, benchmark Solange course coming to campus. “False reporting is frustrating because nobody reached out,” Nguyen said. “We’re out here trying to help young women of color uncover and guide their inner truths. How can we do so effectively and authentically when truth is not the priority of the people reporting it?” The “A Seat at the Table Syllabus” is not one that college students typically picture. It does not include dates for exams, quizzes or papers — it is not even for a real course. Instead, it offers scholarly submissions of texts and multimedia that align with Solange’s messages in her album. The article published on Elle.com never implied plans to begin a Solange course at Wake Forest. “Like Solange, we asked young women to think deeply about resisting racism, understanding gender and sexuality, the role of important relationships in their lives, and how they nurture themselves,” wrote the ELLE scholars online. “Some of the submissions were books and articles we expected; but some submissions were original artwork, poetry, and stories.” Upon recognizing the fundamental misunderstandings about the syllabus, the ELLE scholars reached out through various online platforms to increase visibility and offer Photos Courtesy of seatsyllabus.com clarification. Before the Grammys, they live tweeted for an hour about the syllabus. They also did a Facebook live event The syllabus is broken up into five sections, all of which parallel messages from Solange’s answering questions and offering insight into the process. new album. Texts and art pieces with themes of black womanhood compliment her music.

Award-winning author to visit campus this month Joseph Bathanti, a former NC Poet Laureate, will work with students interested in writing BY EMILY LAIR Staff Writer lairev14@wfu.edu Award-winning poet, novelist and professor of creative writing at Appalachian State University Joseph Bathanti will visit campus as Wake Forest’s Writer-in-Residence from Feb. 20 to Feb. 24. Bathanti will read his poetry and prose on Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 3:30 p.m. in the ZSR Library Auditorium as well as answer questions from students, staff and faculty. The event is open to the public and a reception will follow. “I plan to read from a selection of my work from fiction and non-fiction,” Bathanti said. “I’m going to read a sampling of that work and answer questions, as many questions as people want to throw until the cows come home.” Bathanti, a former Poet Laureate of North Carolina nominated by Governor Perdue, has published over 20 awardwinning works of poetry, short stories, novels, memoirs and essays. Tom Phillips, an associate dean and director of Wake Forest Scholars has helped organize this event from across the pond in Vienna, and is sure Bathanti will contribute to Wake Forest’s vibrant creative writing culture. “He has a genuine and powerful voice for everyday people struggling to make sense of and forge a better life,” Phillips said.

excited to hear the Poet Laureate of our state,” creative writing student Hannah Lafferrandre said. “I’m interested in his musings on faith, community and place because all of those subjects bleed into all areas of my life as well as my writing.” In addition to the poetry reading on Wednesday and visits to creative writing classes, Bathanti will spend time with Wake Forest’s ROTC Senior Cadet Corps. “I’m going to share with the veterans what I’ve been doing, share some writing and try and elicit response and have a really open discussion with them,” Bathanti said. Bathanti has worked with armed service veterans to use creative writing as a form of expression and recovery in the response to physical and emotional scars from active duty, and has also recently been named the Charles George VA Medical Center Writer-in-Residence in Asheville, N.C. “Typically the Poet Lareate goes into hospitals, schools, prisons, libraries and the sort, but I also had a signature project,” Bathanti said. “My signature project was working with veterans to really harvest their stories through personal essay, poetry sessions.” Bathanti is the author of many award-winning works of poetry short stories, essays and novels, including Restoring SaPhoto Courtesy of NC Department of Natural and Cultural Resources cred Art, East Liberty and Half of What I Say is Meaningless, Bathanti, the university’s Writer-in-Residence, which was the winner of the 2012 Will D. Campbell Award was also the Poet Laureate of North Carolina. for Creative Nonfiction. Although Bathanti is a graduate of the University of PittsDuring his brief time as Writer-in-Residence at Wake Forest, Bathanti will interact with the university’s creative writ- burgh, he and his wife are looking forward to visiting Wake ing students and their faculty, conducting workshops with Forest’s campus, as one of their children was a Demon Deastudents of Amy Catanzo, Eric Ekstrand, Carter Smith and con graduate in 2009. “I have good friends at Wake Forest,” Bathanti said. “It is Eric Wilson’s classes. “There’s such a great talent in North Carolina, and I’m so like one of those campus homes to me.”


News | Old Gold & Black

Thursday, February 16, 2017| Page 5

Speak Out: Students denounce policy as Islamophobic Continued from Page 1

orchestrated the speak out in order to create a forum for exchanging narratives and proposing solutions. “The problem is that Muslims aren’t often humanized and it’s easy to disregard a group of people when that’s the case,” said junior Rakin Nasar. “A speak out allows individual voices and stories to be heard in a way that forces people to engage them.” Narula echoed Nasar’s concerns. “For students most directly impacted by these policies and political atmosphere, this is not just a one-day Facebook newsfeed thing,” Narula said. “It’s changing my entire future in terms of where I can or cannot live.” During the event, junior Varun Reddy iterated that Gilreath’s article “breaches the line into ethnocentric, xenophobic criticisms of people who are part of the Wake Forest community.” Reddy outlined the organizers’ demands “that Dr. Gilreath issue a formal apology to members of our community, that he meet with members of the MSA and SASA communities and that action be taken to directly remedy this.” Organizers also encouraged peers to submit bias reports. “He’s someone who holds academic power and who we came here to learn from. We want the administration to know this is not okay,” Narula said. Fahim Gulamali, assistant director of programming and student engagement at the Pro Humanitate Institute, was also a member of MSA as an undergraduate. “I received a voicemail from a colleague in the Office of Student Engagement [that] morning saying ‘our office stands with you and we’re here to show

Kate Shapiro/Old Gold & Black

At the speak out, organized by the Muslim Students Association and South Asian Students Association , faculty members and students expressed concerns about a recent article on immigration policy by law professor Shannon Gilreath. up in any way you want us to.’ That’s an awesome example of allyship,” Gulamali said. “Presence matters. Administrators and faculty have the power to show up in multiple forms if you can’t be there physically you can be on online platforms or talk to students in your classroom.” Angela Mazaris, director of the LGBTQ Center, spoke briefly but emphatically. “Shannon Gilreath and the article he wrote do not represent the views of the LGBTQ Center at all,” Mazaris said. “If you’re queer and Muslim — or straight and Muslim — you are welcome in the LGBTQ Center.” The speak out lasted just short of an hour. Audience members were visibly moved by many of the testimonies including sophomore Yaffa Ali’s reading of original poetry. Ali dedicated the poem to three Muslim UNC students who were murdered in 2015.

“The part of the poem where I talk about ‘wrapping the hijab a little tighter’ is actually from one of their friends,” Ali said. “She recited a poem at a service and I thought it was so powerful. In a way it was perfect that the speak out took place on the exact two year anniversary of that event.” Ali wants her poetry to redirect hate in order to foster more discussion, and she believes the speak out was successful. “I felt energized and realized I felt more enraged than fearful about what’s happening,” Ali said. “It was beautiful to have that moment of solidarity together.” Gilreath’s article was removed from the Wake Forest Law School site but remains on the Washington Blade’s site where it was originally published on Jan. 19. Trump’s executive order is also being challenged in the federal court system.

Kate Shapiro/Old Gold & Black

Non-Muslim students, faculty and staff also stood on the quad in solidarity.

WAKE IN A WEEK Founder’s Day Convocation Time: Feb. 16 at 4 p.m. Location: Wait Chapel In observance of the anniversary of the founding of Wake Forest, the university will award the Medallion of Merit, the highest honor bestowed by the University, to James Barefield, Professor Emeritus of History and Herman E. Eure, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus of Biology.

Collidescope 3.0: Adventures in Pre- and Post-Racial America Time: Feb. 10-11 & 16-18 from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Location: Tedford Theater This theatrical production is in response to the seemingly perpetual killings of young black men in America. It explores the often tragic history of black and white racial relations in America.

The Economic Aspect of Commerical Sport: What’s the Score? Time: Feb. 21 at 5 p.m. Location: Kirby B02 This will be a public talk by Dr. A. Baade, the A.B. Dick Professor of Economics and Business at Lake Forest College in Illinois. Contact Joanna Hamilton of the Economics Department for inquiries.

Reckoning & Resistance: A Discussion of What’s Next with the Co-Founders of the Women’s March Time: Feb. 16 from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Location: Wait Chapel In a discussion moderated by Melissa Harris-Perry, organizers Tamika D. Mallory, Carmen Perez, and Linda Sarsour will explore what’s next in the movement.

Community Complexities Time: Feb. 17 at 5 p.m. Location: Scales Fine Arts Center, Tedford Theater Explore the challenges of addressing diversity and inclusion on college campuses on the Tedford Stage prior to the performance. After the discussion, enjoy a reception in the lobby.

How to Study for Tests and Exams: Skills for Success Time: Feb. 22 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Location: Wingate 201 If you are feeling overwhelmed by the amount of information you need to study, or if you would like to improve your ability to learn and remember course material, this workshop will offer helpful skills.

PREPARE’s 25th Annual Speak Out Time: Feb. 16 from 5:30 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. Location: Farrell Hall, Broyhill Auditorium Listen to stories from those affected by sexual assault in our community and honor all victims of relationship and intimate partner violence. Contact Yasi Emamian for inquiries.

Maya Angelou Residence Hall Ribbon-Cutting and Dedication Ceremony Time: Feb. 17 from 3 p.m to 5 p.m. Location: Angelou Parlor The university will dedicate the residence hall named for poet and professor Maya Angelou. There is very limited capacity for the ceremony, but it will be livestreamed.

Secrest Artists Series: “Orchestre National de Lyon” Time: Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m. Location: Wait Chapel Featuring internationally-renowned conductor Leonard Slatkin and violin virtuoso Gil Shaham, the program will include works by Ravel, Berlioz’s Symphony Fantastique, and a richly romantic violin concerto by Samuel Barber.


Page 6 | Thursday, February 16, 2017

Old Gold & Black |News

Sustainability: Meiburg brings leadership from EPA Continued from Page 1 the EPA under the Obama Administration as the Acting Deputy Administrator. The university is invested in this news program and the endless opportunities that Meiburg’s return to Wake Forest will bring to the Masters in Sustainability. In Meiburg’s own words, “Leading sustainability programs at Wake Forest is a fabulous opportunity.” Meiburg looks forward to continuing his work encouraging future leaders of environmental protection while utilizing his experience to provide a realistic understanding of sustainability operations. A program grounded in the understanding of the importance interdisciplinary study, the

curriculum of the masters program in sustainability addresses the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences and legal studies to provide a comprehensive and multifaceted study of sustainability and how it relates to current practices in society. Students often complete this degree in conjunction with a law or divinity school degree. The one-year-long degree focuses on giving students the practical skills necessary to become a leader in sustainable practices and in future career paths. Coursework focuses on hands-on programs and activities that give students the opportunity to work with leaders in the field of sustainability. For example, masters students had the opportunity to work with Meiburg himself while he was still posted at the EPA.

Wake Forest Faculty are excited to welcome Meiburg back to campus. In a press release published earlier this week, Provost Kersh said that, “Stan Meiburg brings a compelling vision, deep knowledge of environmental policy and national leadership experience … we expect his impact on sustainability education to extend beyond graduate programs to benefit Wake Forest as a whole.” The University is optimistic that, under the leadership of Meiburg, the Masters in Sustainability will be very impactful not only on this campus, but also in the world at-large. In the name of Pro Humanitate, the Wake Forest community welcomes Meiburg to share his experience in mindfulness with his fellow Demon Deacons and become the future leaders.

Photo courtesy of magazine.wfu.edu

Meiburg worked for the EPA for almost 40 years before returning to Wake Forest.

New production provokes meaningful dialogue Collidescope 3.0 explores America’s racial past through a theatrical, science-fiction play BY LAUREN BARBER Staff Writer barblp0@wfu.edu Collidescope 3.0: Adventures in Pre- and PostRacial America, Wake Forest University Theatre’s first production of the semester, premiered on Friday, Feb. 10. In this devised work of science fiction, audiences assumed the anthropological perspective of aliens who land in America and explore the country’s history of anti-black racism from a “rational” perspective. Over the last several months, theatre students have collaborated with co-creators Ping Chong, an internationally-acclaimed theatre artist wellknown for incorporating media onstage, and Talvin Wilks, a noted director and dramaturg. Chong is in residency at Wake Forest during January and February 2017. Though the production itself is a work of science fiction, the stories that inform each scene are factual. The opening scene portrays the 2012 murder of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teenager whose death — along with that of Michael Brown in 2014 — inspired Chong to create Collidescope, which ran later that year in collaboration with University of Maryland students. Collidescope 2.0 ran at University of Massachsetts Amherst in 2016 before the creative duo brought the play to Wake Forest. “I knew about the production because I remember the company and Ping Chong reaching out to students to ask about their experiences with race relations on campus,” said sophomore Sania Ali. “I provided my feedback, as did many others. Because of that, I had the notion that it would be more catered to things happening on our campus but I didn’t see that reflected other than the one scene in North Carolina.” Nearly all scenes are set prior to the civil rights movement of the mid-20th century. “They started with Trayvon, who is an iconic, contemporary case of racial discrimination, but didn’t branch into areas like mass incarceration, police brutality or immigration. I thought the play would build up to that, especially because I think the play’s overall message was that there are these deep, entrenched systems of racism that do not end at 1964,” said sophomore Briana Powell. During scenic interludes, new “coordinates”

of time place, and context flashed on the stage’s backdrop. “The production and acting were great,” Ali said. “I was confused at first because it was hard to grasp what’s going on from the perspective of the aliens but then it clicked and I think it added an interesting layer.” Powell agreed, with Ali’s comments. “The theatricality of the lighting, the sound and the placement of the actors was very visually interesting and added depth,” Powell said. “It was very dynamic.” Some scenes were historical fiction, while others included influential black thinkers and activists such as Patrick Henry and Fannie Lou Hamer. “When a black person from history was played by a non-black person of color or a white person, it was very shocking to me,” Powell said. “Sometimes it felt minstrel-esque. At the same time, there aren’t a lot of black students at Wake Forest in general, so I can understand why that was the case.” Throughout the play, actors embodied characters with different racial and gender identities. “The few narratives of black women they had

were good and strong, but I would have liked if they touched on our experiences more given the unique intersections of our marginalization,” Powell said. Despite some critique, Powell still found the experience worthwhile. “I definitely recommend people see the play,” Powell said. “The actors did a fantastic job and the set was amazing as was the concept. This is such an important conversation to have, especially because we’re situated in a predominantly white, southern university.” Ali echoed Powell’s encouragement. “I think it’s an important production to see, especially if you go with friends and see what kind of discussions might come of it,” Ali said. “Regardless, I would hope that people would watch it with a critical eye. There were some scenes that were very heavy and a lot to process.” Powell, too, believes the play should provoke meaningful dialogue between students. “I’m most grateful for the conversations afterwards. I’ve had so many good, deep conversations about it so far and it’s only been a day,” Powell said. “The play is definitely the beginning of a conversation and that’s what’s so great about it.”

Throughout Collidescope’s run, the Interdisciplinary Performing Arts Center has sponsored panel discussions and other related events meant to foster dialogue on campus and within the community. Following the Thursday, Feb. 16 performance, student activists will discuss their involvement in social justice movements on a panel moderated by Fahim Gulamali, assistant director of programming and student engagement at the Pro Humanitate Institute. Prior to the Friday, Feb. 17 performance, representatives from Wake Forest, Duke and Catawba College will explore the challenges of addressing diversity and inclusion on college campuses. A reception with food provided by the women of El Buen Pastor will follow. “Collidescope isn’t something you go to alone and only think about by yourself,” Powell said. “I think the point of it was that they want you to go home and have a conversation about it. You have to delve into it and unpack it. When a piece of art isn’t necessarily complete within itself and it requires your own participation and analysis, that’s the best kind of art.”

Ken Bennett / Wake Forest University

Students Eli Bradley, Lyndsey Hannah, Anne Peyton Brothers, Jay Buchanan, and Branden Cook star in the Wake Forest Theatre production of Collidescope 3.0: Adventures in Pre- and Post-Racial America, written and directed by Ping Chong.


Thursday, February 16, 2017 | Page 7

Old Gold & Black | News

Law Professors address Trump administration Law students and faculty gathered to discuss the legal context of the current political climate and its implications BY HEATHER HARTEL Social Media Chair harthf15@wfu.edu At noon on Monday Feb. 13, an auditorium in the Law School teemed with excitement. Filled with students chatting about their weekends, arguing over the topics to be discussed in the panel and enjoying the free pizza, law school students prepared to continue the ongoing series predicting and analyzing the future under the new administration. The second event in the “What Will Happen in Trump’s Administration?” series, this specific panel focused on the overarching themes of regulation, climate change and immigration. Law school professors Sid Shapiro, John Knox and Margaret Taylor, Heather Hartel/Old Gold & Black all professionals in these respective fields, This widely discussed tweet by Donald Trump flashed on the screen as law professor John Knox began his tackled the individual topics. discussion on climate change and the future of the Paris COP21 agreement under the Trump Administration. “This is the second installment of this Taylor’s presentation also touched on othevent,” said Grace Sykes, a third year law on the basis that there’s simply nothing to he added his optimism regarding internaer executive orders by President Trump that tional efforts. student. “It’s hard to stay abreast of every- regulate.” “China is actually really committed to have not yet gained media attention beKnox spoke second, focusing on climate thing lately, so it’s great to have people that change under the Trump administration. reducing its greenhouse gasses by investing cause of the focus on the highly-publicized are able to really break everything down.” Shapiro was the first to speak, beginning As he began his presentation, he flashed a heavily in renewable energy and shutting exclusion order. She concluded by comparing this adminhis presentation with a headline from The tweet from then-candidate Trump read- down coal fired power plants,” Knox said. Washington Post reading “The Most Am- ing, “The concept of global warming was “With these two things we are already see- istration to that of President Eisenhower’s bitious Rollback Since President Reagan.” created by and for the Chinese in order to ing a change in CO2 emissions. We’re basi- — specifically the concerns expressed by Shapiro then took a few minutes to explain make U.S. manufacturing non-competi- cally plateauing out, which is a pretty big historians on his immigration policy. As she read a historic analysis of Eisenhower’s the specifics of regulatory rollbacks that tive.” Students laughed as they read, but deal.” immigration policy, the room turned silent. quickly became somber by Knox’s discusFinally, Taylor presented on immigration President Trump has either begun or has “Americans, of course, can reasonably dission on the bleak reality of climate change. under the Trump administration. Although hinted at thus far. “Despite Obama’s efforts, he was not able the event was meant to look to the future, agree over appropriate levels of immigration Shapiro broke his presentation into four and appropriate levels of enforcement, but main topics: The Congressional Review to get climate regulation through Con- Taylor decided instead to analyze the events we should not disagree on the humanity of Act, cabinet appointments, the 2-1 Execu- gress during his first term, he put most of of the past few weeks. Specifically, she fo- migrants,” Taylor read. tive Order regarding regulation and pend- them through with executive regulations cused on the Executive Order entitled “ProWhile the future is impossible to predict, ing house legislations — specifically the through the EPA,” Knox said. “I person- tecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist the legal scholars attending the event gained ally don’t think it would be all that diffiEntry into the United States,” colloquially Regulations From the Executive in Need of relevant knowledge about their role in the Scrutiny Act of 2015 — and the Regulatory cult to basically stop all climate regulation known as the exclusion order. political climate over the next few years. in its tracks.” “Apart from the legal question, there is a Accountability Act. “Having the knowledge of understanding Knox also outlined the impact of the subtext in this exclusion order,” Taylor said. what has happened and what is going to “In most instances, the Trump administration will not just be able to get rid of Paris Agreement, which brought together “The vague language invites uneven appli- happen leaves me feeling optimistic,” Sykes regulations,” Shapiro said. “They’re not 195 countries to attempt to curb climate cation and purposeful discrimination by said. “Especially because most of us here are going to be able to develop the regulatory change by focusing on and regulating adjudicators. For example, an ill-informed entering the legal profession, we can take record that regulation is not necessary. At carbon emissions per country. Although order by a border patrol agent that someone what we’ve learned to mitigate — or if you the end of the day, the courts are likely to Knox was relatively grim regarding do- who holds typical beliefs of Islam somehow agree, how to support — the actions taken by our president.” knock back efforts to withdraw regulation mestic efforts to combat climate change, bears a hostile attitude to the U.S.”

POLICE BEAT Larceny

Underage Consumption

Noise Complaints

• Suspect took a computer from a classroom in Tribble. The report was filed on Feb. 8 at 4:03 p.m. • Suspect took an Xbox controller from the A wing study room in Bostwick. The report was filed on Feb. 8 at 6:26 p.m. • Victim misplaced her purse and believed it had been stolen from South. The property was located. The report was filed on Feb. 10 at 12:03 a.m. • Suspect removed an unsecured laptop from the ZSR Library. The report was filed on Feb. 10 at 1:15 p.m.

• During a traffic stop at the East Gate on campus, a passenger in a vehicle was cited for underage consumption. The report was filed on Feb. 10 at 3:04 a.m. • An underage student consumed alcohol, became ill and was transported to Student Health for treatment from Collins. The report was filed on Feb. 10 at 11:24 p.m. • Two underage students had a bottle of whiskey each at a sporting event at the LJVM Coliseum. The report was filed on Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m.

• WSPD responded to a loud party on Wakefield Drive and asked the students to turn the music down. The offender was cited for a noise ordinance violation. The report was filed on Feb. 11 at 2:27 p.m. • Both WFPD and WSPD responded to a noise complaint on Polo Rd. There was loud music and a party in the backyard. The music was turned off and the attendees dispersed. The report was filed on Feb. 11 at 6:00 p.m.


OPINION OLD GOLD & BLACK

T H U R S D AY, F e b r u a r y 1 6 , 2 0 17

PAG E 8

Online

at : w w w. w f u o g b . c o m

e d i t O r : Henr y Bonilla, bonihj15@wfu.edu a s s t . e d i t O r : D av i d A j a my, a j a m d g 15 @ w f u . e d u

The views expressed in all opinion columns represent those of the article’s author, not the opinions of the Old Gold & Black Editorial Board

Tried and Drew| Armed Forces in Middle East

“ raises many troubling questions Raid in Yemen Since 9/11, the U.S. has recklessly forced itself into conflict in the Middle East Drew Finley

Staff Columnist finlag15@wfu.edu

Amid the confusion and frenzy of President Trump’s recent executive order, which barred U.S. entrance to scores of immigrants and refugees alike, one recent event in American politics that failed to attract any sustained attention was the American raid in Yemen. While U.S. forces conducted the raid itself on Jan. 29, detailed reports of the outcome of the mission were only revealed last week. These reports affirmed that as a result of the raid, 23 civilians and one elite Navy SEAL were killed and a $90 million aircraft was destroyed after a crash landing. White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer characterized the raid as “a successful operation by all standards” and also noted

It is inexcusable and ... irresponsible to claim that a mission like this one succeeded, given that it ... failed by all objective measures.” that it was “very, very well thought out and executed.” Almost no one outside of the Trump Administration agrees with Spicer’s assessment, however. Sen. John McCain called the raid a “failure,” local residents described the incident as “chaotic” and the raid is now under U.S. military investigation after some reports suggested that Trump gave the go-ahead for the mission as he was eating dinner. Many have been quick to criticize the Trump Administration after the details of the mission came to light, and they are right to do so. It is inexcusable and indeed irresponsible to claim that a mission like this one is successful, given that it in fact failed by all objective measures. Yet while the White House’s reaction to the raid certainly raises serious questions about the Administration’s commitment to telling the truth to the American

people, another troubling thought is why U.S. forces are even in Yemen at all. Purportedly, American forces are currently in Yemen to locate and neutralize top commanders of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, also known as AQAP. That might very well be true. But as Ali Khedery — who holds the title of the longest continuously serving American official in Iraq — reminds us, American Middle East policy has made a habit of “substituting unpleasant realities with rosy assessments based on questionable assumptions.” The January raid, then, can be understood as a small part of a much larger and disturbing narrative of U.S. intervention in the Middle East, where bombings, drone strikes, and at times indiscriminate killings are starting to look like norms rather than exceptions. Before the Navy SEAL was killed, practically nobody even cared that American forces were dropping bombs in Yemen. After all, as the historian Andrew Bacevich reasoned, “whoever was killed and maimed by U.S. ordnance falling from the skies, it wasn’t our guys.” But now the thinking is supposedly different.

Now that a Navy SEAL has died, and now that a $90 million aircraft has been destroyed, some have suggested that Trump’s reckless decision to greenlight the raid represents a shocking degree of indifference towards innocent loss of life. Yet that indifference is hardly emblematic of just the Trump Administration. Ever since the attacks of Sep. 11, 2001, the U.S. has entangled itself in conflicts that it has virtually no hope of getting out of and has frequently bombed countries without much care for who is ultimately killed — all in the name of the “War on Terror.” To be sure, groups like al-Qaeda and the Islamic State do pose very real threats to U.S. interests, but those threats do not give the U.S. free license to do essentially whatever it sees fit in a region that is already deeply divided and fragile. So while the raid in Yemen as an isolated incident is undoubtedly problematic in and of itself, Americans would also do well to consider why it is that U.S. forces are in Yemen to begin with, and what that means for the future of U.S. foreign policy under a President who is highly unlikely to make things much better in the region.

“ Becoming a vegetarian addresses ethical problems Wil(cox) Be Right| Vegetarianism

A vegetarian diet counteracts abuses of the agriculturalmaustrial complex Amanda Wilcox Staff Columnist wilcaf16@wfu.edu

My decision to adopt a vegetarian diet a few months ago wasn’t a difficult one. When I seriously considered my moral, political, environmental and religious beliefs, I realized that in order to fully live out my values, I needed to stop eating animals. The encouragement of my alreadyvegetarian twin sister and a bout of food poisoning from some bad sushi were all it took to get me started and sticking to it has been a breeze. Admittedly, my dalliances with eating animals as a college student were fairly limited already; becoming vegetarian has not changed my get-up-and-go or my performance in the swimming pool whatsoever. Nor has it elevated me to a

The environmental and ethical implications of eating meat deserve careful consideration from all.” higher plane of consciousness as many vegetarians and vegans on social media might lead one to believe. I’m not here to tell you that your cheeseburger is just pain and suffering on a bun, but the environmental and ethical implications of eating meat deserve careful consideration from all, regardless of whether or not you choose to be vegetarian. One of the most compelling arguments for adopting a plant-based diet lies in the world of ecology: trophic efficiency. As energy is transformed and moves up a step on the trophic ladder, approximately 90 percent is lost as waste heat. Let’s start out with 1,000,000 joules of sunlight. A plant stores only 10,000 joules of that energy as biomass, and it follows that a grazing cow stores 1,000 joules. Thus, a tomato or stalk of corn has about 10 times the calories for the same investment of sunlight as a steak, and the ecological cost of a steak is about 10 times as high as that of a

vegetable. Had the plants that fed the cow that became your steak been eaten by humans instead, they would have contained enough energy to feed you and nine other people. In a world in which approximately one in nine people do not have enough food to lead a healthy and active life, eating low on the food chain makes sense. Also, if the inhumane practices at factories and slaughterhouses don’t change soon — in which animals are treated not as sentient beings but as cogs in a machine — animal cruelty will continue to cast a long shadow over the meat industry. Factory chickens, for example, typically live out their lives confined to a space smaller than an iPad and are unable to spread their wings, walk or feel grass under their feet. Pigs, whose intelligence surpasses that of dogs, often have their tails cut off without anaesthetic so other animals do not bite them. This course of action is completely indefensible, especially when you consider the words of celebrated scientist Jane Goodall in her book The Inner World of Farm Animals: “Farm animals feel pleasure and sadness, excitement and resentment, depression, fear and pain. They are much more sensitive and intelligent than we ever imagined.”

Some skeptics may argue that regardless of whether they eat meat themselves, slaughterhouses will keep churning. However, the agricultural industrial complex is still subject to market factors of supply and demand. Purchasing food from inhumane corporations is an unequivocal endorsement of their behavior. The attitude of many regarding meat consumption is not unlike political apathy; when people decline to participate, believing their votes do not matter, they miss the truth that however hopeless the state of affairs may seem, nothing will change for the better if one simply throws in the towel. If you don’t stand up and say no to practices to which you object, no one else will ever have to think twice about saying yes. Animals have no voice that we can understand, so they rely on us to speak for them. Becoming a vegetarian is far from a mistake; it’s just a missed steak. Moreover, the vegetarian food regularly available at Wake Forest is surprisingly creative, varied and tasty. Minimizing or eliminating your meat consumption is easy. Consider doing it for the good of your body, for your own joy, for our fellow animals and for the planet we all share.


Opinion | Old Gold & Black

Thursday, February 16, 2017 | Page 9

“ is not as diverse as it claims Wake Forest That’s so Raven | Campus Diversity

More changes need to be made to truly help students feel more comfortable Raven McCorkle Staff Columnist mccorc16@wfu.edu

Wake Forest as a community has a problem and no one is doing anything about it. Coming from a small town in North Carolina where I went to a mostly white, conservative Christian public school, I was excited to attend Wake Forest, as I had heard the preachings of diversity and

This is a problem, and other we are wanted or respected here. you are talking about issues of race people of color feel the same inWhen a sociology class and look around to see way. We don’t feel like we are few people of color, that is a problem. wanted or respected here.” When you go through Greek recruit-

inclusion. My tour guide was a person of color; this made me feel better about other North Carolina schools I had been looking at. However when I arrived, I couldn’t help but feel like I was in the second chapter of high school. Everywhere I looked on campus, I was surrounded by white faces. Students, professors and staff members alike, the only faces of color I saw were in the Pit or facilities workers. This is a problem, and other people of color feel the same way. We don’t feel like

ment, see up to 10 people of color, and have someone tell you, “I love a good fiery African-American,” or “we have Latinos, but they’ve been Americanized,” that is a problem. When you are told, “You should join a black sorority, you’ll fit in there,” that is a problem. When you have a mandatory talk about diversity during orientation, and many people skip it, that is a problem. When people run through the freshman halls screaming the N-word, defacing refugee posters and posting derogatory pictures on Instagram, that is a problem. Wake Forest as a community should try

to do better. I know that there are people who care about the minority groups on campus, but it is very hard to feel comfortable here. Many students of color want to transfer, and many have. Many feel they were lied to during admissions about Wake Forest’s great diversity rating. I am one of those people. The sad part is, no one feels comfortable talking about these issues. Something needs to change; students shouldn’t have to feel like they are unwanted. I know it will be hard to implement change — everyone pretends that there isn’t a problem. I do not know how to remedy this issue, but we have to start somewhere. By realizing this issue, hopefully we can find a way to truly promote a diverse campus a type of diversity that is more than just a nice looking pie chart.

All is Ferr(er)| Religion

“ desire to turn to an omnipotent being Humans subconsciosly During times of crisis, we have a tendency to crave help from a higher being Kyle Ferrer

Staff Columnist ferrka16@wfu.edu

Human beings are funny. When things unfold a certain way, there’s a programmatic response we all seem to have that most of the time cannot be overridden. Out of all of our synthetic reactions, we default to a singular jolt or emotional grasp. It’s wiring no surgeon can reach, no bullet can sear through — some phantasmagoric circuit quietly exiting within us. One of the most interesting responses we contain is our innate turning towards God.

[Appealing to God] says something about our nature, how primal our cry for help turns out to be.” I had the flu last week — all the bells and whistles of your stereotypical bedridden illness — but the symptom that really caused me to break down was the nausea. It was the kind of nausea that seems to purposefully set itself on the brink of relief, and throwing up seems only a uvular jiggle or two away. But it never comes, no matter how hard you try, and it transformed me into a roiling insomniac. It was as I was lying in bed, getting up every so often to stand in front of the trash can in the hallway, that I turned to God. It wasn’t some spiritual clarion call or hyper-sophisticated kowtow. It was just a sort of automatic yearning towards something higher in hopes of a helping hand. Simple; a “Please, God. Help me.”

While that colloquialism is most of the time inane when said aloud, I intentionally, if somewhat subliminally, imbued it with mental direction. I formed in it, meaning, and sent it along a hopeful vector. It was essentially an act of desperation, pain as avenue for cosmic plea. The fact that I did this is interesting to me, because I am not at all a religious person. I was raised Catholic, went through all my steps of catechism, even went to Catholic school, but was never enamored or even slightly piqued by my religious milieu. This is not to say I do not believe in God. I just don’t particularly believe one religion can tell me definitively what the other world will be like. But that gets at another conversation. What gestated some feeling in me is how instinctual it is for us to want help, not only from our fellow humans, but from some omnipresent, omnipotent whisp we believe can not only help us, but is always attuned to our every thought. And as someone who never engaged with God on any level, it is odd that I would appeal to that very someone.

It says something about our nature, how primal our cry for help turns out to be. We want explanations for things; etymological, mythological minutia that allay our own internal entropy. Marx, among others, has discussed religion, calling it “the opiate of the masses.” Religion as an institution may itself be a drug, a near-intravenous apparatus designed to bombastically assuage and persuade, but the yearning towards something higher isn’t so much a drug as an inchoate desire. When our aircraft starts wobbling, we look laterally, earthward, but when it’s time for the captain to land in the Hudson, we scramble, we shed, and in our earliest husk we look up, down, and through. We request something transcendent, we pivot skyward. In that one moment, leaning over the trash can, head bent, it was like I was consciously fighting to deny my plea, because I knew I was about to reach towards something I wasn’t even sure I believed in, something foolish. But I did it anyway.

Word on the Quad | Professors

Who is your favorite professor at Wake Forest?

“Professor Billy Hamilton, department of German & Russian.” Kari Burgess (‘19)

“Professor Jennifer Pyke, department of English.” Rachel Myers (‘19)

“Professor Heath Greene, department of Psychology.” Spencer Schiller (‘18)

“Professor Oana Jurchescu, department of Physics.” Sajant Anand (‘17)


Page 10 | Thursday, February 16, 2017

Old Gold & Black | Opinion

“ humor after this past election Americans need Straight from the Hart(el)| Comedic relief

Americans should embrace the satirical humor directed at the new administration

These deep-rooted issues demonstrate the disparity between the truths as the media offers them and the truths the new administration offers. ”

Heather Hartel

Voltaire’s Candide is one of the earliest, most celebrated satires, as it masterfully mocks the ideas of philosophy, wealth and the world’s evils through humor. At first, it seems that the novel is a traditional narrative, yet after Candide’s journey through France and eventually the world progresses, it becomes clear that Voltaire is actually attempting to mock preexisting institutions through his Enlightenment-era masterpiece. Humor has long existed as a means of assessing society in a less-critical manner. Following similar guidelines, Saturday Night Live consistently uses humor to mock modern institutions and people without outwardly noting the mimicry. During the election, the popular sketches with Kate McKinnon as Hillary Clinton and Alec Baldwin as Donald Trump openly criticized both candidates and their corresponding scandals throughout the cycle. However, the particular episodes mocking Sean Spicer were exemplary in both evaluating Trump’s new cabinet and ad-

Staff Columnist harthf15@wfu.edu

The election cycle in conjunction with the first month of the Trump administration have been the opposite of lighthearted. From a temporary ban on Muslims, to potential Russian interference in the election, to a woman who lacks knowledge about the public education system appointed the secretary of the entire organization, the American public desperately needs a break from the absurdities that have filled the past year. During the past two weekends on Saturday Night Live, the cast offered viewers a lighthearted break from traditional media with their sketches of Melissa McCarthy in full costume as Trump’s press secretary, Sean Spicer. These sketches embody the intersesctionality between humor and politics, which is not a new idea at all.

dressing the fears associated with the progression of mistrust of the country’s officials. The first sketch opened with an official C-Span introduction, followed by McCarthy yelling at reporters that she wanted to “begin today by apologizing on behalf of you to me for how you have treated me these last two weeks.” This comedic statement partnered with her appearance and her attempt at a manly voice set the tone for the rest of the sketch. Additionally, the most relevant part of the sketches are the interactions between Spicer and a New York Times reporter on the discussion of the “ban,” wherein the reporter asks and Spicer openly argues that it is not, in fact, a ban. The twisted humor in these sketches derives from the fact that they truly occur in real life. The executive action itself and the official statements that ensued discounted that it was a ban at all. However, through the president’s statements before and after the ban, it becomes clear that the executive action directly targets the global Muslim community. These deep-rooted issues demonstrate the disparity between the truths as the media offers them and the truths the new administration offers. Further, the ironic use of humor targets the issues deep rooted within the Trump

administration: the repetitive dismissal of the media as incorrect and acting antagonistically to the American people and the president himself. Kellyanne Conway’s statements after the inauguration regarding the existence of “alternative facts” demonstrate the separation between traditional media and the president’s press office. Overall, Saturday Night Live employs traditional elements of satire to mock the new administration humorously. In a way, the American public desperately needs this specific method of storytelling during this transitional period. With so much pessimism and uncertainty regarding the truth, taking the time to laugh about politics becomes vital.

Saturday Night Live/NBC; Twitter

Democrats “should choose their battles wisely From a Different Engel| Gorsuch nomination

Accepting Gorsuch’s nomination would bolster Democrats’ efforts for change

If they try to block the nomination of the well-regarded jurist, [they] could negatively affect some of the other causes they will fight for in the near-future.”

Charlie Engel

sentiment to block the nomination of Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. An approach that would immediately satisfy the base, the blocking of a confirmation hearing would mimic the immature precedent set by the Republicans, and it would be a regrettable one. McConnell and Republican Party leadership jumped into the trough when they decided to block Merrick Garland; it’s a lowly political move that is profoundly wrong and it encompasses the ugliest facets of partisan politics. Democrats shouldn’t make the mistake of jumping in and joining them. Fifty-six percent of Americans still believe Republicans were wrong to block Garland, according to a Quinnipiac poll taken earlier this month. Similar opinion supports Gorsuch in the poll — 65 percent of Americans believe Democrats should allow for a confirmation vote. With the presidency and congress in Republican control, Democrats have the refreshing opportunity to pick their battles. But political capital would be unnecessarily wasted if they try to block the nomination of the well-regarded jurist, which could negatively affect some of the other causes they will fight for in the near future. Gorsuch’s conservative bent and originalist philosophy match that of the late Justice

Guest Columnist engece15@wfu.edu

In wake of President Donald Trump’s executive orders, subsequent large protests and noteworthy pushback against Republican legislators in town halls across the country, the agitation that Democrats currently share is evident. It’s easy for Democrats to place the blame for this current political state on those who voted for Trump. Yet the Democratic Party needs to take time to be introspective, as it is also due to their ineffective message to working-class rural voters and a lack of Democrats getting to the polls in the recent national election. Provided that senate majority leader Mitch McConnell and Republican leadership don’t “go nuclear” for the Supreme Court voting procedure in the Senate, a term used to describe the process of changing the voting procedure from a supermajority to a simple majority, Republicans need Democratic support to reach a supermajority of 60 votes both to stop a Democratic filibuster and to confirm the nominee. Democratic leadership could use this

Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/TNS

Scalia, and there is reason to believe that this might not be Trump’s only appointee, as Justices Kennedy and Bader-Ginsberg are 80 and 83, respectively. Democrats would be wise to save the fight for if the moderate Kennedy, or the liberal Bader-Ginsberg choose to leave the bench during the Trump presidency, perhaps with a Trump appointee who’d be more contentious. Additionally, the Democrats should save the fight for the GOP’s vision to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, for women’s rights, for the likely shift in voting rights policies under the controversial Jeff Sessions and for the archaic environmental approach of the Trump Administration in a time where Climate Change is an everpressing concern. Blocking Gorsuch comes across as partisan and immature, whereas the focus on

policy challenges can harness grassroots passion and frustration to make meaningful strides in organizing and mobilizing against these GOP changes. It builds a bigger tent rather than deciding, like the Republicans did last year, to simply obstruct because it inconveniences the party’s interests. That is not to say that Gorsuch should be exempted from the extensive questioning that is asked of any other Supreme Court nominee during his hearing. The Democrats on the committee should probe Gorsuch extensively on how his confirmation would affect important issues such as environmental regulations, abortion, gay rights, civil rights and affirmative action. By confirming Gorsuch, the Democratic Party can show that it’s a party of reason, which it can leverage for upcoming struggles during the first two years of the Trump administration.


SPORTS OLD GOLD & BLACK

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Online at: www.wfuogb.com twitter: @sports_ogb editOrs: Ethan Bahar, bahaea15@wfu.edu; Daniel Pachino, pachdb15@wfu.edu asst. editOr: Tommaso Moneta, monet14@wfu.edu

Deacs dominate Wolfpack in historic win Wake Forest's 88-58 win over N.C. State is its largest home victory in the storied series BY KYLE TATICH Staff Writer tatika14@wfu.edu Before Saturday, Feb. 11, Wake Forest had played NC State 75 times at home since the two programs first met in the 1910-11 season. Yet, no home game in the storied series produced a greater margin of Deacon victory than this weekend’s dominating 8858 performance over the Wolfpack. With a game-high 23 points, sophomore John Collins proved once again why he is one of the best — if not the best — post player in the ACC. Collins scored on three uncontested baskets to open the game, contributing to the Deacs’ 21-10 lead after just nine minutes of play. At the half, it was Wake Forest leading NC State 44-24, which gave the nearly 13,000 in attendance the sensation that the Deacon and Wolfpack seasons had officially moved in different directions. "I think we came out there with fire, with energy," Collins said of his team’s quick start. "We talked and we were flying all around the place, passing the ball, scoring. I think we found our energy, found our flow early and we kept them down like we were supposed to and finished out the game." Similarly, coach Danny Manning spoke highly of his team’s performance, and par-

ticularly the play of his defense, claiming that his team “competed for two halves." Manning also raved about Collins. “John is a work in progress. We are certainly happy and pleased with his production…he’s doing a really great job manufacturing points for himself.” Collins not only recorded his eighth consecutive 20-point game against NC State, but he also extended a streak that had not been matched in the ACC since NC State’s T.J. Warren recorded 15-straight 20-point games in 2013-14. Collins was not alone in creating offensive production for the Deacs, however. Sophomore guards Keyshawn Woods and Bryant Crawford connected on five and three 3-pointers of their own respectively. At one point Woods completely took over the basketball game, connecting on three straight field goals from beyond the arc in the second half. His production comes at an opportune time for the Deacs, who face a talented three-point shooting team in Duke on Saturday, Feb. 18. In last week’s Blue Devil victory over the Tar Heels, Duke connected from beyond the arc on 13 occasions, seven of which came from the hands of Grayson Allen. The Deacs will look to rely on Woods’ seemingly more consistent production on Betsy Mann/Old Gold & Black Saturday to keep up with the Blue Devils’ Keyshawn Woods matched a career-high five 3-pointers to compliment guards. Saturday's game against NC State was John Collins' game-high 23 points in leading Wake Forest past NC State. followed on Tuesday evening when the Deacs traveled to Clemson, S.C. to face the better than it had all season, connecting on and Crawford, who scored 25 of his own, Tigers at Littlejohn Coliseum. 10 3-pointers and 27 free throws to defeat all in a losing effort. Unfortunately for coach Manning and Wake Forest 95-83. The Deacs were led by Wake Forest will face Duke on Saturday the Deacs, Clemson shot the basketball Collins who scored a career-high 29 points at 1:00 p.m. at Cameron Indoor Stadium.

NBA Recap: Cavaliers lose Kevin Love for six weeks LeBron James hit the shot of the season to knock off the Wizards and Kevin Durant returned to Oklahoma City BY DANIEL PACHINO Sports Editor pachdb15@wfu.edu The past two weeks of NBA play have been highly eventful and full of exciting action between many of the league’s top teams. The Washington Wizards and Cleveland Cavaliers had arguably the greatest game of the season to this point. In addition, Kevin Durant made his emotional first return to Oklahoma City. When his Golden State Warriors took on his former team, the OKC Thunder, who they crushed for the third time this season. In addition, the Wizards and Cavaliers put on a show last Monday, Feb. 6 in a game that Cleveland narrowly defeated Washington 140-135 on the road in overtime. Kevin Love had one of his best games in his Cavaliers career, scoring 39 points, including 6-10 shooting on three-pointers and adding 12 rebounds. LeBron James was his usual, dominant self scoring 32 points, dishing out an astonishing 17 assists, and shooting an incredible 6-8 from three-point land. On the other side, the Wizards’ star guards were phenomenal. Point guard John Wall poured in 22 points while contributing 12 assists. The real star for Washington in this contest, though, was shooting guard Bradley Beal, who scored 41 points on a very efficient 57 percent from the floor, including 43 percent from deep. Even though the Wizards lost this game, they proved themselves to be a real force to be reckoned with in the

is a huge blow for a team that was already struggling prior to hearing this devastating news. Love is averaging 20 points and leads the team in rebounds, with 11 per game. Love’s production will be very difficult to replace for Cleveland over the next six weeks, and if they cannot figure out how to do so, their first overall seed in the East is undoubtedly in jeopardy. In Kevin Durant’s first return to his old home of Oklahoma City, he and the Warriors dominated Russell Westbrook and Durant’s former team by a score of 130-114. The score even makes it appear closer than the game ever was. Durant, Stephen Curry and the Warriors outplayed the Thunder the whole game and it never felt as if Oklahoma City ever stood a chance. Durant scored 34 points in his emotional return to the Chesapeake Energy Arena, and Curry, Klay Thompson each added 26 more. The Warriors were simply too much Nuccio DiNuzzo/The Chicago Tribune/TNS for the one-man-show that is the OKC Thunder. Sure, Russell Westbrook had 47 points, 11 rebounds and Washington Wizards' point guard John Wall skies for eight assists, but the unbalanced Thunder team was simply a layup over Chicago Bulls' guard Rajon Rondo no match for the best team in the league. The Thunder are now 0-3 on the season against Golden State. In other news, the Toronto Raptors made a trade on TuesEast. It took arguably the greatest play of the season so far, a buzzer-beating, turn around three-pointer by LeBron James day with the Orlando Magic for power forward Serge Ibaka, only gave up Terrance Ross and a 2017 first round to force overtime and beat this red-hot Wizards team. The pickand in return. This seems like a great trade for Toronto who biggest thing holding them back from being a legitimate is absolutely in the “win-now” mode and needed to make a title contender in the East is the fact that the Wizards es- big trade if they want to compete with the Cavaliers, Celtics sentially run a six-man rotation of their starters and Kelly and Wizards in the East. Oubre off the bench. However, sitting at third place in the Starting Friday, Feb. 17, NBA All-Star Weekend will beEastern Conference, the Wizards are as hot as any team in gin in New Orleans, LA. On Friday, there will be the Risthe league and are absolutely a team to be taken seriously in ing Stars Challenge as well as the Celebrity All-Star Game. the second half and playoffs. Saturday will include the Skills Competition, Three-Point The Cavaliers, on the other hand, are in very big trouble. Contest and the Slam Dunk Competition. Finally, on SunIt was announced Tuesday, Feb. 14, that power forward day the All-Stars from each conference will compete in the Kevin Love will miss the next six weeks of the season. This NBA All-Star Game.


Page 12 | Thursday, February 16, 2017

Old Gold & Black | Sports

ACC Recap: Hokies upset No. 12 Virginia The Virginia Tech Hokies remain on the NCAA Tournament bubble with its upset over the Cavaliers BY KIRBY MCMULLEN Staff Writer mcmukr14@wfu.edu Last week, the focus of conversation in the ACC was centered around the “Tobacco Road” rivalry on Thursday, Feb. 9 in Cameron Indoor Stadium. The Crazies were a little louder, the calls a little tighter and the baskets were more important. North Carolina’s eight-mile journey down the road to Durham ended in a loss with a final score of 86-78. This game could potentially serve as the springboard the Blue Devils need to ignite them down the final stretch of regular season play. Duke was led by Grayson Allen who contributed 25 points and Luke Kennard who dropped 20 points en route to the Blue Devil victory while the Tar Heels’ only bright spot was junior Justin Jackson, who added 21 points. One of the most important wins from conference play this weekend was Notre Dame knocking off Florida State in South Bend. This all but assured the Fighting Irish’s NCAA Tournament bid come midMarch. Notre Dame was led by the standout performance of potential All-ACC forward Bonzie Colson who poured in 33 points. The Irish were also supported

by 15 points from both Matt Farrell and Steve Vasturia. Florida State lost 84-72 mostly, in part because stars Dwayne Bacon and Jonathan Issac only had 12 and four points, respectively. Perhaps the most exciting game of the weekend was the Commonwealth Classic between Virginia and Virginia Tech in Blacksburg on Sunday, Feb. 12. After two overtimes, the Hokies ultimately prevailed over their in-state rival by a final score of 80-78. Virginia Tech was led by guards Seth Allen and Justin Bibbs who put up 20 points and 16 points, respectively. The Cavaliers only highlight was London Perrantes’ 22 points. It wasn’t even that much of a bright spot, as Perrantes went a woeful 7-22 from the field. As we turn the page to the final few weeks of the regular season, it’s time for teams and fans alike to buckle up as the conference standings will come down to the wire. The ACC Tournament in Brooklyn quickly approaches. Some games this upcoming week to look forward to include Wake Forest at Duke on Saturday in Durham, Virginia at North Carolina on Saturday in Chapel Hill and Syracuse at Georgia Tech on Sunday in Atlanta. All of these games, as with many others throughout the remainder of the regular season, are imperative towards NCAA Tournament bubble teams and seeding, as well as individual player accolade races.

Robert Willett/News & Observer/TNS

Virginia Tech overcame a 14-point halftime deficit to force overtime. In the second overtime, it was Seth Allen of the Hokies that hit the game-deciding jump shot.

In terms of ACC teams for the NCAA Tournament, we should look at teams in three categories. The locks include North Carolina, Florida State, Virginia, Louisville and Duke. Notre Dame is in the category of

teams that should get into the tournament. Finally, Syracuse, Wake Forest, Virginia Tech, Georgia Tech and Clemson all fall under the category of teams that have work to do if they want a bid come March.

Wake Forest seeks revenge at Cameron Indoor The Demon Deacons look for their first victory in Durham since the 1996-1997 season, when Tim Duncan led his team to a 12 point win BY BRANDON PALMER Business Manager palmbo14@wfu.edu When people think about great college basketball, often the first words out of their mouths are “Tobacco Road.” This of course refers to the rivalries between Duke, North Carolina, NC State and Wake Forest. While the rivalry between Duke and North Carolina has become the most prominent of the group and is likely the most important in all of college basketball, it is vital to remember that Duke and Wake Forest actually have the longest standing rivalry of the group. As the teams prepare to play in Durham on Saturday afternoon, it is hard to dispute the fact that these two teams are as equally matched as they have been in years. This was proven in late January when the teams met in Winston-Salem. The Deacs controlled the game, leading by 10 for much of the contest, until the final two minutes. In a scene that has become much too familiar for Deacon fans, the team was not able to hold onto the lead as Duke star Luke Kennard scored 34 points and did not miss a shot in the second half to bring Duke all the way back. While the loss was certainly devastating, the Deacs have bounced back and played extremely well in almost every game since the Duke loss. This team has proven time and time again that they can play with any team in the country and I expect the game on Saturday to be no different. While playing the Blue

Betsy Mann/Old Gold & Black

Wake Forest sophomore Doral Moore dunks on Duke’s Harry Giles in last month’s game in Winston-Salem.

Devils in Cameron Indoor Stadium is certainly a much more difficult task then playing them at home, I believe the Deacs are primed to get the marquee win that they so desperately need. It will certainly not be easy and it is definitely not probable; however, the Deacs are absolutely due for a toss up game to finally fall their way, so it may as well be this one. This Duke team is supremely talented, but for whatever reason has not been able to mesh together. Because of this, it is impossible to know which Duke team will step on the court at any time. If the Deacs are able to come out early and jump on the Blue Devils, it will increase the Deacs’ chances to put themselves in position to win the game. The keys to the game offensively will be Bryant Crawford and John Collins. Collins will likely be matched up with Harry Giles and Amile Jefferson, two sub-par defenders. I think the Deacs will look to work through Collins on the offensive side of the floor. Crawford will also need to have a big game as Duke has no true point guard. Crawford should be able to control the pace of the game as he wishes and be able to set up his teammates for easy passes. Defensively, the Deacs need to force Duke to pass the ball inside. Duke relies on three-point shooting and if the Deacs fail to rotate on screens and put hands in the face of the Duke shooters, then it will be extremely difficult for the Deacs to come away with the victory. If the Deacs can somehow figure out a way to control Grayson Allen and Kennard, then I believe that the Deacs will be able to finally take down the Blue Devils in Durham for the first time in 20 years.


Thursday, February 9, 2017 | Page 13

Sports | Old Gold & Black

Wake Forest Baseball begins new season

The Wake Forest mens baseball team looks to replicate a strong 2016 season with its most balanced team in years BY CHRISTINA THOMPSON Contributing Writer thomcm14@wfu.edu

The Demon Deacons are looking to make the ACC and NCAA tournaments for the second straight year under Head Coach Tom Walter. Another highlight of this Wake Forest Baseball season is the opening of their brand new clubhouse featuring a locker room, equipment room, training room and players lounge. The facility is arguably the best in the country. The Demon Deacons will feature a well-balanced team this year. The pitching staff has improved while the hitting and defense will continue to be one of the nation’s best. The pitching staff features experienced veterans and some impact rookies. Parker Dunshee, Connor Johnstone, and Donnie Sellers will lead the starting rotation. Swingmen Drew Loepprich and John McCarren will add valuable innings as starting and bullpen pitchers. Griffin Roberts, Rayne Supple, and Chris Farish will anchor the back end of the bullpen. The addition of the freshmen class and emergence of sophomores will add more depth and versatility than previous years. Offensively, Gavin Sheets and Stuart Fairchild will lead the Deacs in the middle of the lineup. Jake Mueller, Jonathan Pryor, John Aiello, Ben Breazeale, Keegan Maronpot, Bruce Steele and Logan Harvey will round out the lineup that produces power, high intensity, and speed.

The freshmen class will provide back up off the bench behind the impressive lineup. “The balance of this year’s team has been the best since I’ve been here,” said John McCarren, senior pitcher. “I’m looking forward to continuing our success in this year’s ACC and national tournaments. We have all the components to make serious runs in both tournaments and re-

store Wake Forest’s baseball dominance nation wide.” The Deacs open up on the road this Friday in Houston, Texas against the University of Houston and Nicholls State University. They will be playing both teams twice before heading back for their home opener on Tuesday, Feb. 21 against UNC Greensboro at 4 p.m.

Sarah D. Davis/ACC.com

The Demon Deacons Baseball team begins its season this Friday, Feb. 17, in Houston, Texas against the University of Houston and Nicholls State University. The home opener is Feb. 21.

Mens’ Club Ice Hockey Team reaches playoffs Mens Club Ice Hockey earns No. 2 overall seed in upcoming ACC Club Hockey playoffs

year, despite their 9-7 record, and losing during the first round of playoffs in the 2014-2015 season, the team is hoping that their high seed, backed by their 173-1 record, will carry them far into the tournament. The Deacs will first face the No. 7 seed JMU on Friday, Feb. 17 at 4:30 p.m. If successful, the team will subsequently take on NC State, a squad the Deacs have already defeated twice this season. The championship game will take place on Sunday, Feb. 19. At home, the team boasted an undefeated record and finished with the second

best record in league play at 7-1-0. Their record won them first place in the Carolina division of the ACCHL. Their only lost this season was to No. 1 seed UVA. The club ice hockey team is coached by head coach Dave Pasquale and assistant coach Kelly Curl. The Division 2 team is a student-run club, which practices at least two times a week. Seniors Ben Walker and Trevor Incledon serve as the team’s co-captains. Walker spoke to the cohesiveness of the team as a reason for this year’s success. “Whether they’re a shooter from the first line or a fourth line guy who’s more of a

grinder,” Walker said, “you know that’s been one of our keys to success is everyone just fulfilling their role. We’ve got a very deep and very skilled team and when we play our best hockey it’s hard for any BY LUCY NELSON other team in the league to match us.” Contributing Writer In addition to competitive play, the nelsld16@wfu.edu team recently hosted a charity event at their match against Elon, where they Wake Forest’s mens’ club ice hockey raised money to support Hurricane Matteam secured the No. 2 seed in the Atthew victims. lantic Coast Collegiate Hockey League “We, along with the coaches, are re(ACCHL) playoffs hosted Feb. 17-19 in ally working hard with the school and Charlottesville, Va. with the community to make sure people After not qualifying for the playoffs last know about the team, whether they want to play or support it,” Walker said. “The support really makes a difference.” The team chemistry has also been a crucial to the success of the season. “The team is very close, I have to say,” said sophomore Brady Gales. “There’s no one age group that stands out from the rest. From the coaches down, it’s very serious and very competitive. When we’re on the ice it’s practice to win, not practice as a joke.” When looking to the future of the program, freshman Blake Mueller explains how he looks up to the older players. “It’s kind of cool to see how dedicated our seniors are now,” Mueller said. “So it will be important to keep the freshmen and everyone else dedicated, committed, focused on our goals to continue what those seniors started and keep pushing the program in the right direction, a positive direction. Keeping and essentially trying to get better.” Walker concluded by saying, “For the time being we’re just taking it one game at Photo Courtesy of Dean Shore a time, keeping our eyes on the champiThe Wake Forest Club Ice Hockey Team has reached the ACC Club Hockey playoffs for the first time in two onship, and hoping we can surprise some years following a phenomenal regular season in which the team went 17-3-1. people in Charlottesville.”


Page 14 | Thursday, January 26, 2017

Old Gold & Black | Sports

Women’s basketball drops two this week The Wake Forest Women’s basketball team looks to bounce back this week BY ELIZABETH WALLACE Staff Writer wallem14@wfu.edu The Deacs took a rough loss on Thursday, Feb. 9 in Tallahassee, Florida when facing off against the Florida State Seminoles, losing 102-60. However, this wasn’t shocking because Florida State is now 11-1 in the ACC and 23-2 overall, while Wake Forest is only 14-10 overall and 5-6 in the ACC. Florida State consistently scored at least 20 points a quarter, while Wake Forest’s highest points per quarter was only 18. The Seminoles were able to get off 69 total shots; 17 more than the Deacs. Their free throw percentage was 84 percent, which trumps the Deacs 53 percent. The Deacs struggled with turnovers — especially because Florida State converted 39 points off of their 26 total turnovers. The Seminoles completely dominated in every aspect of the game. They had 66 points in the paint while Wake Forest only had 26, 14 second chance points,Wake Forest had 10 and 16 fast break points, Wake Forest had just four.

Brian Westerholt/Sports On Film

A strong win by the Wake Forest Women’s Basketball team on Sunday, Feb. 5, by a score of 57-48 against Pittsburg, the Demon Deacons followed it up with two tough road losses this past week to Florida State and the University of Virginia.

The most shocking statistic was the bench point difference — Florida State had 40, while the Demon Deacons only had 10. This just shows how deep Florida State’s bench was. Although the Deacs did not pull out the win, Elisa Penna finished with 18 points. However, she fouled out. Alex Sharp led the Deacs in rebounding, finishing with eight total boards. Florida State had six players score

more than 10 points: Shakayla Thomas (23), Chatrice White (14), Ivey Slaughter (13), Brittany Brown and Imani Wright (12) and Ama Degbeon (11). Two of those players are not even starters for the Seminoles. The Deacs played against the UVA Cavaliers on Sunday, Feb. 12 in a nailbiter. The final score was 60-57, Deacs los-

ing in overtime after coming back from a 16 point defecit in the second half. Ariel Stephenson led both teams in scoring 21 points and she also sent the team into overtime with her shot at the end of the second half. The Deacs play the Duke Blue Devils on Thursday, Feb. 16, at home in the Lawrence Joel Coliseum at 7pm.

Who to buy and who to sell in Fantasy Basketball The players to buy low on and sell high on as the NBA All-Star Break approaches this weekend BY JONATHAN BELL Contributing Writer belljh15@wfu.edu

of commission, Rubio has been getting close to 35 minutes a game. In conjuction with those minutes have come production as Rubio is 21st on ESPN’s player rater (a metric which combines all the fantasy stats and compiles them into one number) over the last 15 days. Rubio is also making nearly two 3-pointers a game over his past eight, a surprising feat considering that he had only made 22 triples in his first 41 games this season. Even if he slows down a bit, the lack of competition and heavy upside in the assists and steals category means get Rubio while you still can.

Jrue Holiday, PG, New Orleans Pelicans Keeping on the theme of point guards, Holiday is another one to look out for. The oft-injured veteran is finally healthy and producing this season and if you’re looking for help at the position, make sure to try to make a run at Holiday. Third on ESPN’s player rater over the last 15 days and 10th over the last 30, Holiday has gotten and stayed hot. In his last 11 games, Holiday has registered seven double-doubles, seven games over 20 points and seven games with multiple steals (he is currently averaging a career high 1.6 steals per game). Getting you four rebounds a game, Jeff Wheeler/Minneapolis Star Tribune/TNS Holiday is no longer just a good fantasy player, he’s an Minnesota Timberwolves’ point guard Ricky Rubio elite one and if someone in your league isn’t valuing him will be more valuable now with Zach Lavine injured. as such, it’s time to swoop in and snag him for yourself. Buy Low Ricky Rubio, PG, Minnesota Timberwolves. Considered by many to be on the chopping block of a T-Wolves team that had one too many guards to start, Rubio was afforded an amazing fantasy opportunity when teammate Zach Lavine went down and has been taking advantage of it. Since Lavine has been out

Sell High James Johnson, PF, Miami Heat After signing with the Miami Heat from Toronto on a one-year deal, the former Demon Deacon really didn’t do much for the first part of the season. But starting in late January, he finally started to give the production that fantasy owners desired. Having scored over double

Steve Nurenberg/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS

The undrafted free agent rookie from Indiana, Yogi Ferrell scored a career high 32 points on Feb. 3 against Portland.

digits in his past 10 games, and 15 or better in eight of those 10, Johnson has suddenly risen to 27th on the player rater. However, Johnson has never sustained production like this ever before in his NBA career and it’s unlikely that he has suddenly discovered new parts of his game at age 29. Despite the hot shooting and increased minutes, don’t expect this hot streak to stay. Trade Johnson for some value before you hold onto him too long and he ends up riding your fantasy bench once again. Yogi Ferrell, SG, Dallas Mavericks The undrafted free agent rookie burst onto the scene recently with an explosion of production for the Mavericks. After being cut by Brooklyn, Ferrell signed a 10 day contract with Dallas and made the most of the opportunity. However, it is likely that this won’t last. With J.J. Barea due back from a calf injury and Deron Williams returning to action last game, Ferrell will no longer see the same opportunities as before. Trade him while this hot streak continues and then watch as his production declines.


Sports | Old Gold & Black

Thursday, February 16, 2017 | Page 15

Five takeaways from the 2016 NFL season Led by two offensive rookies, the Dallas Cowboys emerged as one of the most effective offenses in the NFL BY ZACH SEARLE Staff Writer searzf14@wfu.edu The 2016-17 NFL season was interesting, to say the least. With notable rookie performances, unexpected playoff contenders and the best comeback in Super Bowl history, there is a lot to take away from this year’s season. Below, I have highlighted the top five things that I took away from this year’s season: (1) The Dallas Cowboys have a bright future ahead Led by rookies Ezekiel Elliot and Dak Prescott, the Dallas Cowboys put on a show in Arlington this season and earned the No. 1 seed in the NFC. Elliot, who was drafted fourth overall in last year’s

Dan Honda/Bay Area News Group/TNS

Quarterback Derek Carr was playing at an MVP level before suffering a season-ending injury late in the year.

NFL draft, ran for over 1,600 yards and averaged over 100 yards per game. Prescott, who was drafted in the fourth round and took over after quarterback Tony Romo’s preseason injury, threw for over 3,600 yards with 23 touchdowns and a 104.9 passer rating on his way to winning NFL Rookie of the Year. With a dominant offensive line, a talented receiving core and a formidable defense, the Cowboys were able to win 13 games this season, which was nine more than last season. Led by young talent, look for the Cowboys to be real contenders again next year (2) Matt Ryan has proven he is elite The Atlanta Falcons had an unexpectedly great season thanks to an incredible receiving core, a strong defense and an MVP quarterback. With just under 5,000 passing yards, 30 touchdowns and a trip to the Super Bowl, Matt Ryan has proven himself to be one of the best quarterbacks in the league. Look for Atlanta to remain dangerous as they continue to grow next year. (3) Derek Carr is the future in Oakland In what was one of the most shocking performances of the year, the Oakland Raiders, led by quarterback Derek Carr, had the opportunity to clinch the No. 1 seed in the AFC until a late, season-ending injury. Despite the injury, the Raiders, with help from talented receivers, have the opportunity to make some noise in the AFC again next year. Look for them to build upon this season’s performance and get back to the playoffs next year. (4) The playoffs were uninteresting, but the Super Bowl will be remembered forever This year’s playoffs were a poor representation of the NFL’s top talent. Eight out of 10 games were decided by 13 or more points as many teams struggled to match their regular season performance. Despite the lackluster playoff performances, Super Bowl 51 gave the fans a game for the ages. (5) Tom Brady is the greatest quarterback of all time After this season, Tom Brady has truly demonstrated

Richard W. Rodriguez/Fort Worth Star-Telegram/TNS

After veteran quarterback Tony Romo suffered an injury in the offseason, rookie Dak Prescott took over for the Cowboys.

just how great of a quarterback he is. Despite missing the first four games, Brady finished the season with a 112.2 passer rating, throwing for 28 touchdowns and 3,500 yards. To cap off an incredible season, Brady led his team to the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history. Down by 25 early in the third quarter, Brady and the Patriots came back to win it in overtime. The win gave Brady his fifth Super Bowl Ring and fourth Super Bowl MVP award, the most for any NFL quarterback.

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OLD GOLD & BLACK

Because if you’re a true “grammy,” you went to bed and didn’t actually watch the Grammy Awards BY NICHOLAS DEMAYO Life Editor demanj14@wfu.edu The 59th Annual Grammy Awards was a night full of the music industry’s most memorable moments of 2017 thus far. These photos tell you all you need to know about the big night:

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Congrats! Twins!

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Comedian Patton Oswalt points us in the general direction of the bathroom.

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Adele’s arms get tired.

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Jesse does a bad Pharrell Williams impression.

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Bruno Mars as Prince.

James Corden is not LL Cool J. Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times/TNS

James Hetfield screams into the void (of a muted microphone).


Thursday, February 16, 2017 | Page 17

Life | Old Gold & Black

WAKE RADIO | Carter Comeback

Former teenage-heartthrob releases a surprise comeback single and regains relevance BY CALEB WOODY Staff Writer woodcw16@wfu.edu

Aaron Carter, the famed “I Want Candy,” singer has made an impressive reemergence in the music scene. Following a lackluster career after his Oh Aaron album, he created two more albums, Another Earthquake and Saturday Night before taking a two year break from music until the release of two new singles in 2016 and 2017 respectively. “Fools Gold” was released April 1, 2016 to a surprised pop-music audience. Many who had heard the song had no idea who he was or what the hype was all about, while others couldn’t believe that this dated icon of early 2000’s pop music had modernized so much that he was able to garner real appeal from the modern pop music audience. Overall, his return was marked primarily by surprise and mixed feelings. His later single “Sooner or Later” was released on Jan. 20, 2017 and due to a relatively successful marketing campaign on Spotify’s part, it reached decent popularity.

The song, upon first inspection, seems to be yet another EDM-inspired pop flop. However, once you delve deeper you see that the song really contains all the elements that a modern pop song needs to gain brief popularity — and all this song will gain is brief popularity. With Justin Bieber-inspired vocals that are the definition of pop-generic, this song starts off rather unenthusiastically. Yet, as the song progresses, you can hear stronger and stronger EDM influences, lending the song fitting in either a dance house or a car packed with your friends. As the beat crescendos to what would be the ubiquitous “drop” that most modern pop songs now contain, Carter’s vocals take a trip back in time to his teenage-heartthrob years and we get a healthy dose of boyband-esque sound. Carter’s light and bubbly vocals are in turn backed by a deep bass with lilting beats interspersed between. All this combined creates a truly unique soundscape that blends the best for early 2000’s pop with the heavier, beat infused pop music of today. Carter making a “comeback” is something that wasn’t on anyone’s radar and it caught quite a few people by surprise. He isn’t the only artist to follow the musical formula of hiding from the public eye and then releasing a single every few years.

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1. puppiesinonesies 2. boopmynose Album artwork courtesy of iTunes

Carter’s pop styling meets electronic dance music in “Fools Gold.”

This trope can be seen in Justin Timberlake with his album, The 20/20 Experience and Britney Spears with her album Glory. Some may think that a resurgence of America’s musical sweethearts may revitalize the music industry and others argue that older artists should make way for the new generation. However, all that can be really said is that Carter’s flame definitely hasn’t died out yet.

New Old Gold swipe gives students hope BY RAVEN MCCORCKLE Staff Writer mcorc16@wfu.edu

I don’t know if you’re aware of this, but whoever you are, your life just changed for the better. I’m not saying that you won the lottery or anything, but Chick-fil-a just added chicken nuggets to the Old Gold menu, which is basically the same thing. You read that correctly. Chicken. Nugs. I know my life definitely took a sharp turn uphill last week. I was standing in line to get some of my favorite sweet tea — the only good sweet tea on the Wake Forest campus. I personally feel the presence of a higher being when I drink that good, southern sweet tea. Anyway, I was a little hungry, but Starbucks has gotten the best of me this semester. I have less than 100 food dollars left, so of course, I have to budget wisely. There’s no way I’m going to pay real money for food.

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Humor Column | Chicken Nuggets

Chick-fil-a introduces new eight piece chicken nugget Old Gold to hoards of starving fowl fanatics

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the

Aaron Carter makes comeback

Is that a tear in my eye? No, I’m just allergic to brilliance. Kidding, it was probably actual tears of joy. It gets better for me, by the way. I got to the counter, ordered that precious Old Gold, and swiped my Deacon OneCard which is apparently the key — or card — to heaven. I grabbed my bag, went to sit down to eat and saw that there were not one but TWO orders of fries in my bag. Chick-fil-a, you’ve done it again. You’ve changed my life. Omar L. Gallaga/Austin American-Statesman/TNS A similar thing happened last semester The new Old Gold consists of eight when I realized that Chick-fil-a is opened chicken nuggets, fries and a drink. for breakfast everyday except for Sunday. I couldn’t pay for my favorite meal, I don’t know why, but I assumed that bethe Chick-fil-a nuggets, because of this cause we were on a college campus where dilemma. I was standing in line and all food places are different, we wouldn’t heard my stomach growl. “Oh man,” I have Chick-fil-a breakfast. I’d like to say thank you to not only thought to myself. “I’m starving. I wish the Chick-fil-a workers, but President I had some nugs.” At that moment, an angel came and Hatch, President Barack Obama, the touched my shoulder to get me to turn founder of Chick-fil-a, Mr. Samuel around to the Old Gold menu. The Truett Cathy, the glorious chickens who gates of heaven opened. I heard trum- died for me to have the nuggets and pets — or maybe it was the sound of whoever allowed this to happen. A coincidence or a miracle, the world people making decisions they’ll regret may never know — or care. Chick-filby eating at Moe’s. Four words: Old. Gold. Number. a has nuggets as an Old Gold, so why would you be questioning it? Four.

3. dailydoseofkittens 4. itsrainingdogsandcats 5. animalswoofmeow 6. thekangaroosanctuary 7. doggosdoingthings 8. fluffybabypets 9. _instabirds_ 10. animalphotatoes Courtesy of Julia Haines

Drink of the Week The Teddy Roosevelt Mint Julep Kick back on President’s Day Weekend with the 26th POTUS’ cocktail of choice. • 6 mint leaves • 2 teaspoons sugar • 2.5 oz. of bourbon • Crushed Ice • Club Soda Serve in a mule mug! Enjoy Responsibly!


Page 18 | Thursday, February 16, 2017

Old Gold & Black | Life

Trending Alert | Love Your Melon

Students join clothing company with a cause Love Your Melon donates hats to children battling cancer and colleges are joining in the fight BY SARAH BOYCE Staff Writer boycse15@wfu.edu

‘Love Your Melon’ (LYM) is an apparel brand that 20 Wake Forest students have joined as campus crew members who are dedicated to fighting against pediatric cancer. This nation-wide organization that currently has 12,600 members across all 50 states, is committed to giving a hat to every child battling cancer in the U.S. LYM’s mission also includes partnering with nonprofit organizations that focus on fighting against pediatric cancer. Fifty percent of LYM profits are given to their nonprofit partners who are also dedicated to this cause. On Oct. 22, 2012, Zachary Quinn and Brian Keller brainstormed this idea in an entrepreneurship class at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota. There are now 761 campus crews across the nation that help promote the mission of LYM by marketing their products to campus and community members while also raising awareness of pediatric cancer. “I was looking to join more clubs,” said sophomore Margot Frank “especially ones that have social enterprise or charitable aspects. It is a low-commitment, fun group of people and I love knowing what exactly I am supporting.”

Maddy Boyd created the Wake Forest campus crew almost two years ago, according to Katie Hedden, the current captain of LYM at Wake Forest. The Wake Forest campus crew now includes 20 members and has broadned its reach. “With a mission of putting a hat on every child battling cancer in America,” Hedden said, “Both Maddy and I were drawn to this determination to help improve these kids’ or superheroes’ (as we call them) lives.” This past fall, the Wake Forest campus crew held their first donation event and sent four executive crew members to visit the pediatric oncology floor of Brenner Children’s Hospital. They donated 50 beanies to both inpatient and outpatient kids going through treatment and their families. “It was such an amazing and fulfilling experience as we got to see how tough these kids — of all ages — really are,” Hedden said. “Most of them had smiles and personalities that lit up the room.” This semester, the crew is creating a ‘Superhero Adventure’ for a child in the area battling cancer. This event will provide them with a day full of fun by letting them participate in their favorite activities, like rollerblading and eating pizza. They are also planning a promotional event outside the Pit in April. “Being the captain and member of this crew has been an incredible experience,” Hedden said. “I love sharing it with new people every day.”

Photo courtesy of Wake Forest Love Your Melon Crew

The Wake Forest Love Your Melon Crew has grown into a dedicated staff of 20 students who want to make a difference in the lives of children with cancer. Wake Forest campus crew public relations director, Katie Dickens, believes LYM is important to Wake Forest because the fight against cancer is something so near and dear to the heart of the Wake Forest community. The “Love Your Melon’s presence on campus is another way we can show our support for those who have been touched by the disease,” Dickens said. As an organization, LYM has surpassed its initial goals of donating 45,000 hats and $1 million to nonprofit partners. They have now helped donate over $2.5 million and over 90,000 hats.

“It started out just as a school project for those two students,” Frank said. “Now it’s a known brand that I see people wearing all the time.” Frank hopes other organizations on campus, including Greek life organizations, will soon get involved with LYM to spread awareness of pediatric cancer. “Our main goal this year has been to have a lot more brand awareness on campus and we’ve seen that take off,” Dickens said. “I’m hoping for more involvement and most importantly, support through sales.”

Movie Review | Hidden Figures

Oscar-nominated movie impresses audiences Hidden Figures tells the story of three African-American women who launched America into space

BY SYDNEY CALKINS Contributing Writer calksm15@wfu.edu

Hidden Figures, directed by Theodore Melfi, is based off the inspiring true events written in Margot Lee Shetterly’s original book. This movie has been nominated for three Oscars, including the impressive nomination for Best Motion Picture of the Year. The story follows the lives of three young African-American women — Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson — some of the mathematical geniuses working for NASA during the Space Race. At the NASA office, these women were known as the “computers” since they were responsible for crunching the numbers that were used to successfully send the rockets to space.

This movie observes the difficulties that these women faced on a day-to-day basis while trying to do their jobs because of discrimination against their gender and race. Regardless of these difficulties, Johnson, Vaughan and Jackson each prove that they are just as capable, if not more so, than the men who are traditionally given the larger roles in the NASA office. The movie follows each of these women as they fight to break down the boundaries within the NASA office in order to serve their country and do their part in becoming the first country to put a man on the moon. Not only was this movie a phenomenal performance by the actors, I was also very impressed by the way this historical story was told and how quickly I was drawn in. Many times I am skeptical about going to see a movie based on true events because I’m worried that it will turn into more of history lesson rather than a relaxing experience. This was absolutely not the case for Hidden Figures. I was capti-

vated by this movie through its entirety, waiting for the next rocket to be launched or calculation to be solved. I also think that this movie appeals to a variety of audiences. As a college student I appreciated the historical nature of the movie and I felt that I walked out with improved knowledge of the Space Race. However, I think that my 15-year-old sister would enjoy this movie too, because it is also simply an entertaining story. This movie can also serve as an inspiration for younger kids, as it reveals important lessons about chasing your dreams and breaking down any boundaries that are keeping you from accomplishing your goals. Overall, I would recommend this movie to someone who wants to become more informed about the Space Race and the women behind the scenes as well as someone who just wants a good story. After leaving the theater, I had no quesPhoto Courtesy of IMDB tions as to why this movie has received Hidden Figures is in the running for the nomination for Best Picture. Best Motion Picture at the Oscars.


Life | Old Gold & Black

Thursday February 16, 2017 | Page 19

Travel Column | Viennese Coffeehouses

Discover coffeehouse culture in Vienna Viennese coffeehouses offer their delicious goods and relaxed atmosphere to visitors who like to slow down and smell the coffee BY ELISE DEAN Contributing Writer deanea14@wfu.edu

To many, Austria is simply one of those European countries clustered on the map with little relevance. At least, that is what I thought of Austria before choosing its capital, Vienna, as my location for study abroad. Contrary to what little I knew of Viennese culture, it happens that Vienna is deeply rich with history, art, music, and, most importantly, Viennese coffee houses. Over time, the phenomenon of Viennese coffeehouses has played an integral part in shaping the culture of Vienna. Unlike any restaurant or coffeehouse in the U.S., Viennese coffeehouses practice a special type of philosophy that boasts a sense of leisure and relaxation for all guests. Rather than rapidly serving a customer and placing the check on the table within moments of the customer’s last bite, it can be often difficult to wave down the waiter for the check in Viennese coffeehouses. Let us not forget about the main reason why Viennese coffeehouses are life-changing for any tourist who happens to stumble inside: the pastries and coffee. Prior to my escape to Vienna last fall, I was not a coffee addict, a seemingly impossible thing to ignore on the Wake Forest campus filled with college students buzzing from a caffeine high. However, when I found my way inside a Viennese coffeehouse, I was instantly hit with the familiar smell of freshly brewed coffee.

As I was whisked off to my table, I passed by a large, refrigerated case in the middle of the restaurant. Upon peering inside, my eyes identified rows of decadent pastries, cakes and desserts. From the dense, chocolate-y goodness of a slice of ‘Sacher Torte’ to the light hazelnut flavor in an ‘Esterhazytorte,’ there are many flavors that Vienna offers. Coming from an American culture where dessert and sweet treats are often seen as a delicacy after the main course, I was taken aback when I realized that nearly every person in the coffeehouse had some type of pastry on their table. A piece of ‘Apfelstrudel,’ the infamous Viennese version of an apple turnover, is a perfectly acceptable alternative to a sandwich for lunch. After ordering a plate of ‘kaiserschmarrn,’ the classic miniature and decadent Viennese pancakes, I took in my surroundings. To my left, a woman was reading “Die Presse,” a traditionally right-leaning Austrian newspaper. To my right, a Viennese couple was rapidly speaking in German. Although I am certainly not well-versed in the German language, I was able to understand that they were discussing the relentlessly chilly weather that had enveloped the city. Both tables had clearly been in the coffeehouse for several hours, as their plates are entirely empty, minus a few stranded crumbs. This is the Viennese coffeehouse philosophy. You sit, you eat, you read or you talk. Whether you discuss everything under the sun for 30 minutes with a friend or order five different pastries over the span of three hours, you will never be bothered. As the coffee beans are abundant and the pastries are Elise Dean/Old Gold & Black scrumptious, there will always be a time and space for lengthy and intellectual table-talk in a Viennese The ‘Sacher Torte’ tempts all tourists with a sweet tooth to visit one of Vienna’s famous coffeehouses. coffeehouse.

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If interested contact Becky Swig swigrr15@wfu.edu


Old Gold & Black | Life

Julia Haines/Old Gold & Black

Page 20 | Thursday February 16, 2017

F QUAD S H I O N RAINCOATS

Nelson French Freshman “It keeps me dry, and my mom said the color blue matches my eyes.”

Julia Haines/Old Gold & Black

Julia Haines /Old Gold & Black

Abby Mrvos Senior “Raincoats are a necessity since Wake Forest floods a lot.”

Krishna Chopra Freshman “The color of my raincoat is fun. It’s bright, semi-obnoxious and you can spot me across campus.”

Photo Courtesy of Clipart/Julia Haines/Old Gold & Black

2/16 issue of the Old Gold & Black  

2/16 issue of the Old Gold & Black