Issuu on Google+

ISSUE 1 MANIFEST WEST 1

O K I E M A M A


CONTRIBUTORS AIMEE TIETZE ADAMS E DI TO R I N C H I E F P H OTO G R A P H E R

CS ADAMS EXECUTIVE EDITOR ART DIRECTOR

MADELINE MCKEEVER LEAD DESIGNER Editor

ASHLEE BAZER EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

COURTNEY COMPTON STYLE EDITOR

AMY CARGILL FILM EDITOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Andy Jacobs john Siron

ANA CALHOUN JACK FOWLER K.P. O'NAN WHITNEY WOMACK AMY WILLS WRITERS

CARY ANNE JOSH WELCH CARL ZOCH PHOTOGRAPHERS

JACK FOWLER LINDSey MARTIN ARTISTS

ELIZABETH THANKFUL SHANNON M.E. & BLUE of VENICE STYLE ASSISTANCE

ANNA RANEY MODELS

production

LOUISA BREWER PROOFING

ANNE SAGE Special thanks

2

O K I E M A M A


LETTER from the EDITOR

Welcome to OKIEMAMA, where we are forging the landscape for a forward, creative and specifically, more awesome Oklahoma. I am super full of love to be writing this first letter to express my immense gratitude to all those brave spirited folk who believed in the overall vision from the beginning and became immediately available to make things happen. I believe in being an independent thinker and I believe in being an Indie Publisher in bringing inspiration to story, interviews and lifestyle direction. Sharing is embedded in the vision, and connecting authentically. It is through these real connection points, we will make a positive transfer and impact that will transform and shape our landscape and community. Once we work from within, our image, a more fabulous positive overall image of Oklahoma will take form. Many people have said from the beginning, “You want to change the way people look at Oklahoma.” Well, really it is more that WE change the way WE look at Oklahoma, and live here. It is not an easy place to stay, especially for Dreamers. Its an easy place to get restless and at the same time, an easy place to get lazy, lose the hunger that fuels the inhabitants of the more Cosmopolitan metros. There are many advantages to being here, or from here... but now especially now, the timing could not be better. Opportunity is here and we cannot wait to share in with you in watching those doors open. This issue was a vision of the Winter past, but unfolded in many killer directions I could not predict. For instance, “Skating” was a big part of the art direction of the fashion focus v o l .

1

PHOTOGRAPHY: CARL ZOCH

which unfolded in Venice, but also Blogger Laura Tremaine joined our profile section and she is married to the Creator of Jackass, and former Editor of Big Brother magazine, the Skateboarding zine. A little bit of skating synergy. Also, I was exposed to some awesome fare while in travel, Square Meals San Francisco, and Im excited they shared an amazing recipe for a Killer Quinoa salad. It’s an amazing salad with protein, greens, great flavor you can eat for any meal, so a special thanks to them for sharing this. This magazine was intended to be a sampler, but now at over 100 pages, we are stoked to see the vision take shape. Currently, we are seasonally produced, publishing 4 times a year, and we will keep you updated on subscription/distribution options. We consider ourselves to be a satellite platform, so hook up your friends and refer on cool stories you think are a fit. Again, thank you for reading and sharing, we hope you enjoy a little trip to the West Coast and back with our launching edition, Manifest West. Gratefully,

3


CONTENTS features

profiles

16

LA WOMAN A look at the lives of three women in LA

CITATION A mod restored ranch style hom in Tulsa

44

WE ARE ONE  How the Thunder has taken us all by storm

82

MANIFEST  The journey to find what Okies are doing in California

4

31

fashion

58 

VINTAGE IN VENICE The freespirited pockets of Venice Beach

O K I E M A M A


sections DESIGN

MUSIC

6

XERISCAPING

96 TUNE IN TOKYO

Modernize your landscape by Ana Calhoun

9

SUNSHINE ON DESIGN

Dwell on Design summary

Sounds without bounds

98 TYSONS BRIDGE Ambassador through music

STYLE

FOOD

21

STYLIN IN THE CITY

12

RECIPE – Square Meals SF

Accessories picks while the weather is warm

Quinoa salad made right

14

ROXY’S

102 STYLING DIRECTION

with Anne Sage

Taking gourmet ice cream on the road

TRAVEL

HEALTH

48 THE AVALON

108 FLORAL ESSENCE

Retro chic stay in LA

91

THE WEEKENDER

His and hers to take with

v o l .

1

Allignment with nature by Whitney Womack

5


XERISCAPING modernize your landscapE by ANA CALHOUN

6

O K I E M A M A


What IS xeriscaping? No, it’s not “zero-scaping,” but you can almost think of it like that. The term comes from xeros, the Greek word meaning “dry.” This design practice minimizes water use in a garden or yard through careful plant selection, grouping plants with similar water needs, and reducing water loss through various site strategies. You also can get creative with interesting landscaping features that need no water at all, such as rocks, bricks, gravel, and deck areas. Why xeriscaping? If you have a lawn, chances are it's your biggest water waster. The Environmental Protection Agency reports that lawn care and landscaping account for more than 30% of total water use in the United States, and typically, at least 50% of water consumed by households is used outdoors. This is an incredible waste of our natural resources, especially when you factor in the additional time and energy used to make the water suitable for drinking. Outdoor water usage can be reduced by up to 80% just by implementing a few smart strategies. HAVE A PLAN The most critical step in xeriscaping is to have a workable plan. The plan does not have to be elaborate but should take into account multiple conditions of the site. Exposure // South and west exposures result in the greatest water losses, especially near buildings or paved surfaces. You can save water in these locations simply by changing to plants adapted to reduced water use. However, be cautious about extensive use of rock on south and west exposures v o l .

1

as this can raise temperatures near the house and result in wasteful water runoff. Slope // Steep slopes waste water through runoff and rapid water evaporation. Consider using a drought-resistant ground cover, which can slow water loss and shade the soil. Terracing slopes conserves water by slowing runoff and permitting more water to soak in. Soil // If your soil is heavy clay, common in this area, you will lose water through runoff. If the soil is very sandy, water and valuable nutrients will be lost due to leaching below the root zone. A good soil has a balance of coarse soil clusters (aggregates), sand, and pore spaces. Mulch // Properly selected mulches reduce water consumption by decreasing soil temperatures and the amount of soil exposed to wind. Mulches also discourage weeds and can improve soil conditions. Reduce Irrigated Turf Areas // Turf can be reduced to areas near the house or that get high use. In outlying areas, use more drought-resistant grasses or even meadow mixes containing wildflowers. Bluegrass lawns need large amounts of water. Instead, opt for varieties like Bermudagrass or Buffalograss. Plant Selection // While they can certainly be a good place to start, native plants are not mandatory for xeriscaping. Many types of plants flourish in Oklahoma and can provide an aesthetic from traditional and lush to minimal and modern. 7


Outdoor water usage can be reduced by up to 80 percent just by implementing a few smart strategies.

8

O K I E M A M A


SUNSHINE ONDESIGN In 2010, as many were finding their dreams by shifting sights westward, Oklahoma saw a new influx of pioneers: those migrating to OK from their native California. Dwell Magazine’s Brand Specialist, Sunshine Campbell was among those who made this lifestyle shift. We sat down with Sunshine and talked about her journey to Middle America and Dwell Magazine, and the days when the Dwell on Design showcase was a seedling of an idea. v o l .

1

9


Tell us a little about who you are and where you are from.

My name is Sunshine. Yes, it my given birth name. I was born in Indiana and pretty much grew up on a dairy farm where our home was literally surrounded by cows. My younger years were spent playing amidst the country life in tree houses and hay barns which created my large imagination. I was raised appreciating nature and the natural beauty and aesthetics around me. I moved with my mom spontaneously to LA at age 13, where I spent most of my life living all over LA from the valley in Sherman Oaks and Burbank to living on a boat in Marina del Rey. Before moving to Okieland, I spent most of my time nesting in Venice Beach for 12 years. My career has taken me to many interesting places, landing prominently in Publishing with over six years at Los Angeles Magazine and my most recent years with Dwell Magazine, approaching nine of them.

What do you love about Oklahoma and miss about California?

Many of these companies start out small with a handcrafted product. Have you watched several scale their business appropriately and explode into the international lifestyle furnishings arena? Many companies have launched their business or product via Dwell on Design and walked away astonished at the presence they had. It benefited them greatly and they made some powerful connections for the growth and future of their business.

What are some common traits those smaller businesses have that you witness to be a model for success?

I would say creative marketing and passion for what you are doing. Its also important to make a sincere connection with the design community. Find your niche, follow your heart and connect with others who are doing the same.

I love that OK is evolving and becoming a very cool city. It is really growing, quickly making a bigger statement for itself and the people that were born here and live here. People are super nice, genuine and helpful, whereas some people in LA can be more self driven, competitive and even fake. I miss the Venice Beach sunsets, and sitting in the grass or sand watching the people pass by on the boardwalk. Living in Venice Beach has such a sweet sense of community for the locals who live there. It displays so much life from around the world.

What is your current Job position and what does it entail? Your favorite part of your job? My current position with Dwell is Brand Specialist. I work on the live platform Dwell on Design as well as working with other platforms for digital and print. I help design forward companies, artisans, architects, designers and more come up with an integrated creative way to reach the Dwell audience as they partner with Dwell to market themselves and their name through various programs we have in place. My favorite part of my job is building relationships with amazing people in the design community and meeting some of the most influential people in design today. Dwell, in my opinion, represents design at its very best, and I love being a part of bringing these designs to life through such a great media brand.

One of your biggest annual projects is the Dwell on Design showcase. Can you tell us a little about the history and how you have watched it evolve over the years?

In 2007, I helped launch Dwell on Design in Los Angeles, which is Dwell’s largest market and audience. It was quite an undertaking trying to convince some people of our vision, but we told them it was going to be amazing and like no other show. And it was. Dwell on Design has since grown to be the country’s largest design event.

10

O K I E M A M A


Dwell on Design showcase in LA in June 2012. Follow Sunshine on instagram at @dwellgirl.

v o l .

1

11


Quinoa Salad SALAD: – 2 cups white quinoa – Sea or kosher salt – 4 medium sized Chioggia beets (gold or red are okay too, but red will change the color of the salad) – Olive oil – 6 big handfuls of mixed spring greens (we like a mix with arugula and radicchio), washed and dried – 1 cup toasted walnut pieces – 1 cup fresh, cold goat’s cheese, (aka Chevre) DRESSING: – 1/4 cup Champagne or white wine vinegar – 2 lemons, zest and juice – 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard – 1 tablespoon honey – Sea or kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper, to taste – 3/4 cup olive oil

12

O K I E M A M A


1. Cook quinoa: place 2 cups quinoa and 3 1/2 cups water in a pot with a big pinch of salt. Bring to a boil, stirring once or twice, simmer until the quinoa has soaked up the majority of the water. Cover the pot and turn down heat as low as it will go. Steam quinoa until the liquid is completely soaked up and quinoa is cooked – it should be tender but not soggy. This whole process should take 15-20 minutes. Transfer to a baking sheet and cool in one even layer. 2. Meanwhile, pre-heat oven to 375°. Place all the beets in a single layer on a large piece of aluminum foil, drizzle with olive oil, fold the edges of the foil over the beets to create a sealed packet. Roast beets for about 45 minutes, check to see if they are tender by inserting a small paring knife in the center of the largest beet. If there is any resistance continue to roast until there isn’t , this may take up to an hour. Remove from oven, unwrap and set aside to cool. 3. Once the beets are cool enough to work with, peel the skisn off the beets using your fingers or a clean kitchen towel- they should slip right off. Use a paring knife if not. Chop the beets into 1-inch cubes. 4. Once quinoa and beets are completely cool, together with the walnuts and the greens. Set aside. 5. Make dressing: Put vinegar in blender with lemon zest and juice, Dijon, honey, one teaspoon salt and cracked black pepper to taste. Blend on low speed while streaming in the olive oil until a nice emulsification forms. Taste and season with more lemon or salt as needed. 6. Toss dressing with quinoa salad, adding about a 1 /4 cup at a time. You’ll need a good amount since the quinoa will soak up quite a bit. When you’re happy with the amount of dressing, save the rest for another use. 7. Crumble the fresh goat cheese into the quinoa and toss gently one last time. Serve cool or at room temperature. Serves six to eight.

v o l .

1

13


Roxy’s

Getting the scoop on

Roxy’s Ice Cream Social debuted on the Metro Summer Scene in April 2012. Nearly 4 thousand scoops later, these local lovers, Raena and Shane, are building their cool dream, one scoop, pint and truck at a time.

14

O K I E M A M A


“We are not just

Roxy’s

looks. People

Oklahoma’s Ice Cream Truck Darling launched locally made gourmet goodness this Spring and the cooler seasons ahead isn’t slowing down their mission. Roxy’s, named and branded after the couples three and a half year old spunky Great Dane child. The idea was conceived as Shane was building gourmet food trucks for clients, Sunshine Express, in Colorado and The Food Traveler, a vagabond international fare truck. It was while Shane was building out these two trucks that his wife, Raena, started thinking of something new they could bring to the Oklahoma scene. They love to be involved with people and community and talking with new people, and Raena gets especially excited when she sees the children in the neighborhoods jumping up and down and running up to the truck.

have told us that it is the best ice cream they have ever had.”

Local Roxy’s is the only ice cream truck in the Metro area that serves hand dipped, locally made gourmet ice cream. It is made in small batches with fresh, local ingredients, and is currently a family affair. Raena’s aunt Kathy has been making the ice cream, and is now training Raena to carry on the family skills. Upon their initial vision, they knew they wanted to service the art walks and events, as well as the kids. Raena says, “At first, we were driving the neighborhoods and would see the kids running, which got us so excited. Then, when we would get to other events, where our audience was primarily adults, we noticed, the adults were just as excited!”

Offerings They currently have a wide range of flavors from Cookies and Cream, and Lemon to Raena’s current favorite of the moment, Strawberries and Cream. At most given times on the truck, they will have 5 or more flavors to choose from. A big hit over the summer was the Peaches and Cream, made with the great harvest of Porter, Oklahoma peaches. They also were creative and made a Thunder Ice Cream Sandwich, which was 2 blue sugar cookies filled with the Peaches and Cream goodness. Currently, they only have one truck which services routes in Northwest Oklahoma City, and Yukon, and offers event services They are currently working on building a few more trucks and this Fall, looking to expand via local fine grocers.

v o l .

1

15


TULSA’S MOD MIDCENTURY B y K . P . O ’ N an

16

O K I E M A M A


A mod restored ranch style home in Tulsa, The Citation, has now garnished the attention of international fans, bloggers, and news sources, thanks to its showcase in the recently published, Atomic Ranch: Midcentury Interiors. The Citation is quite unassuming from the exterior, but upon entering, the ambience of a mod past has each guest taking their time with every nostalgic turn. On June 12, 2012, Modern Tulsa hosted an Open House Showcase. Owner Jennie Cluck shared her time and abode with over 300 guests, who toured the home with enthusiastic interest in tow. The ultra modern style of the “Citation” house built by Lloyd Creekmore, exemplifies the positive spirit of post war America. This unassuming ranch style house in the Wedgewood neighborhood of Tulsa, Oklahoma was designed with the future in mind. The “Citation” denotes a midcentury optimism and vision of the future. Its neighbor, “Futurama,” represents prosperity and spatial comfort laid out in roomy, angular ascetics to please the senses and uphold a vision of intimacy and spacious luxury. Architects and designers in this period named their creations with thought to their own desire and design. “Citation” was constructed with Modernism in mind, and that ideal was to blend the greatness of the old with the freedom of the new and undiscovered. Jennie Cluck’s vision as this spectacular house’s third owner was to take it back to a similar point in time. Jennie is not so much a home owner but a curator of a Madmen delighted era. The future and the past are authentically and tastefully intertwined. Jennie wanted to bridge the gap between Modernism and now. This innovative home owner patiently surfed the web, antique shops and flea markets to find the perfect specimens to adorn her home. The film Great Balls of Fire provided plenty of inspiration on how to decorate this icon of a midcentury ranch style home. She painstakingly restored tile and carpet to original colors of aqua, salmon, and avocado. The gorgeous curvy lines and blond colored tones of functioning pieces are displayed in genuine Heywood Wakefield furniture. The yellow wood tones of the shaped plywood tables and chairs provide a sleek and modern contrast to the deep mysteriousness of the paneling. The streamlined but comfortable divans and chairs are nestled close for games and conversation fueled by food from the hybrid kitchen that still boasts a Fridgedare folding burner and a 21st century refrigerator and amenities. 21st century televisions also are cleverly hidden within the home. It’s no surprise this timeless house has been featured in Atomic Ranch: Midcentury Interiors. You can’t leave this home without stopping at the wet bar and imagining yourself back in time, a bar so crisp and delicate that any Mad Man would be gracious to sip and discuss the matters that command the night and the day. In 1956, the “Citation” was profiled in The Tulsa Parade of Homes. Now Cluck is curating a vision to a nostalgic era. The “Citation” is a reference to the past and our link to a time when the future was now and now is both the past and future.

v o l .

1

17


18

O K I E M A M A


Citation is a reference to the past and our link to a time when the future was now and now is both the past and future. v o l .

1

19


NEW EPISODES COMING THIS FALL

20

WWW.OKIEMAMA.COM

O K I E M A M A


SIMPLE

SUMMER 21 v o l .

1

STYLIN IN THE CITY O K I E M A M A21


SHOW

A LITTLE TOE

22

O K I E M A M A


LAUREN BY RALPH LAUREN ALEXA $40 PIPERLIME

INDIO

BEAD SANDAL $40 FREE PEOPLE

DOLCE VITA

BAGELEY SANDAL $120

MATT BERNSEN

JACK METALLIC STRAPPY FLAT $160 SHOPBOP

TORTOISE CAPRI JCREW $55 v o l .

1

SAM EDELMAN GABLE ZAPPOS $100

23


SHADE CITY

24

O K I E M A M A


THE BARGAIN HUNTRESS OLD NAVY $5

THE TRAVELER

RAYBAN LARGE AVIATORS $195

THE CEO

MARC BY MARC JACOBS $130

THE WEEKENDER

BAMAKO BY TOMS $159

THE GYPSY

CHLOE ERINE $199

v o l .

1

25


YOU

ADORN

26

O K I E M A M A


KEY CHARM CHAIN LAYERING NECKLACE $230

CHAN LUU

BRONZE TWO TONED PYRAMID PENDANT $225

PAMELA LOVE

SASHA BRACELET $128

GEMMA REDUX

MOLECULE BANGLE $159

VERRE BY JULIE BURTON

ALIZA BANGLES $40

AMITRA SINGH v o l .

1

27


ROCK THE

WEDGE

28

O K I E M A M A


STEVE MADDEN

MAMMBOW WEDGE $50 MACYS

LUCKY BRAND

SILVIA SANDAL $60 DILLARDS

CYNTHIA VINCENT

JUNO ESPADRILLE WEDGE SANDAL $80 PIPERLIME v o l .

1

SCHUTZ DOMINIQUE ESPADRILLE WEDGE $166 MADISON LA

29


“I didn’t realize Oklahoma had so many, like, fine women . . . You don’t need makeup to be beautiful. That’s the American way of telling a woman she’s beautiful. She can be beautiful without make up. And that’s what I’ve seen in Oklahoma City.” Metta World PeacE LOS ANGELES LAKERS 30

O K I E M A M A


LA WOMAN

Highlighting a blogger, an editor and an actress, la woman profiles the beauty in their red dirt roots and brave pursuits in following a dream. these three women share candid stories on their move to the city of angels.

v o l .

1

31


Laura Tremaine

THE BLOGGER

32

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

33


34

O K I E M A M A


Laura Tremaine is Hollywood Housewife, a lifestyle blogger married to Jeff Tremaine, Director of all things Jackass. Laura takes pride in putting her husband’s career and family first, while candidly connecting with her audience and sharing milestones and tips from the toolbox of fabulous living.

Where are you from in OK? I am from Ardmore, Oklahoma. I actually grew up in Madill, but I went to school in Ardmore and eventually my family moved there.

Can you describe a little what life was like for you growing up in OK? I loved growing up in Oklahoma. I lived in the country off a dirt road for many years, with horses and trees and ponds. I spent weekends on Lake Texoma. My childhood seems so idyllic to me now.

At what point in your life did you decide to make the journey westward? I think some part of me always pictured myself living in a big city far from where I grew up. I’m not sure why that is - I had a healthy imagination, I guess. It became more of a reality when I was in college and I studied abroad in England. Spending that time in Europe made me want to broaden my world view, and I got more serious about leaving Oklahoma after college. I never intended to be gone forever, though. I always thought that I would return to Oklahoma after a little soul-searching. But it just hasn’t worked out like that.

What were those early days in Los Angeles like? The first six months living in Los Angeles were some of the hardest of my life. I moved out here without a job, without a plan. I had only been here a few weeks when 9/11 happened. I had never lived so far away from my family, and I was coming off a personal heartbreak. I felt so aimless, and the country was in turmoil. But I had a good roommate and a good apartment and after about four months I had a good job. By the time my first year lease was up, Los Angeles felt like home.

How did the dream unfold into you becoming Hollywood Housewife? I lived in LA for six years before I became a literal Hollywood Housewife and eight years before I started my blog claiming the title. I gladly quit my television production career after I got married, after some severe disillusionment in reality TV. I always wanted to be a writer. As blogging became more and more popular, it seemed like the perfect way to follow that dream. v o l .

1

I love the candid voice you blog with and the variety of topics from motherhood to family to the film industry to beauty. What is your personal mission or aspirations behind your blog? My personal blog mission is just to have a solid blog. I’ve only been blogging 2.5 years, and it has already brought so much benefit to my life. I’ve made wonderful friendships, I’ve traveled, not to mention that I get to write every day, slowly building an audience and platform. I pour myself into it, and it is the means to its own end.

With many people entering the world of bloggerdome, what advice do you offer those launching a blog and networking via social media? It doesn’t (usually) come overnight. For me, blogging is a discipline. If you create good content, the audience will come.

Favorite blog: My all-time favorite blogger is Oklahoma’s own Pioneer Woman. Other favorites include Cup of Jo, Sarah Bessey, and Girls Gone Child. Favorite movie: Oh, dear. I’m not even sure I have a favorite movie. Silly movies that are close to my heart: Troop Beverly Hills and Sweet Home Alabama. Favorite place to eat in LA: This changes frequently, but I love Cut and also Crustacean. What you miss most about OK? I miss so many things about Oklahoma, all the time. But besides my family, and the general friendliness of the people, I miss the food. As it happens, you just can’t get good BBQ or Tex Mex in Los Angeles. Product you cannot live without: Voluminous mascara

35


Courtney Compton

THE ACTRESS

36

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

37


38

O K I E M A M A


Courtney Compton Benattar, an actress from writing roots, and mother of two, has lived in Los Angeles for over 12 years. Married to a film producer, she has learned to juggle the quintessential Angeleno life. She shares her Native Pride, funny auditions, and how Oklahoma can boost their game overall to be a hub to the growing live arts scene. Tell us a little about where you are from and how you believe growing in that space shaped you personally. I am a Cherokee Indian/Cajun girl from Broken Arrow, a suburb of Tulsa, Oklahoma. I feel like it was a really safe, wholesome place to grow up. It grounded me. My mom always supported me in the arts. But, it was good to start off slow. School plays, Regional Theater, Dinner Theatre, Local print and television. I got to taste everything.

At what point in your life were you called to the City of Angels? Wow. 1999? I moved in with an acquaintance from OU and slept on her futon until I found a “real job” as an assistant. Then I tried to get auditions (and an agent) on the side.

What is your most hilarious or odd audition you can recall? I had an audition for the movie, The Curious Case of Benjamin Buttons. It was for the part of Brad Pitt’s mother, when she dies while giving birth to him. I can remember being so nervous. I had already had one of my boys by then, so I thought I could do it. I went into the casting agent and kind of tried to act like I was giving birth, while I kind of said my lines. I don’t know what to tell you. I was uncomfortable. I had no idea what they wanted from me. She didn’t give me the part. That’s fine. It was weird for both of us.

What does being an OKIE mean to you, and what do you carry with you? I think it is my strong sense of pride. I am proud to be Indian and to be a Sooner. I also have a strong sense of family. I have a necklace that is shaped like OK that I wear everyday.

How was the lifestyle transition from OK->LA? At first, it was a blast. I was going out every night, always to a new place, meeting new people. But soon I got homesick. Everyone is so much nicer in OK. Driving sucks here, and there’s not really many parking lots. Life in LA is very fast paced. You have to slow yourself down. Take a breath.

You have landed some pretty cool commercial acting gigs. What are some of your favorite works and why? I got to do a Little Caesar’s commercial in English and then in Spanish, so that was fun. In one commercial for MGA toys, I was a mom, and I was playing a video game with my kids. Then we “went into” the video game and had a space fight. That was fun to improvise. But the craziest was for the WWE. I was on a subway, with my fake husband and children. Then all of a sudden, all of these famous wrestlers came in and busted up the place. One guy got thrown through the window. Bananas. Also, I got do Del Monte Fruit Chillers and the kids were all frozen. It was cool to see all of the special effects.

Do you have some words of advice for those pursuing a career in commercial acting? Don’t give up! For every commercial audition I have booked, at least twenty other people have said no. I don’t let it bother me anymore. They can’t take my birthday away. I always remember, that after every audition, good or bad, I have my beautiful family to go home to. v o l .

1

If you could speak back to Oklahoma at large and have a word of candid advice, what do you think you would offer? Whatever is going on in LA can happen in OK, too. Art, music, everything. I see Oklahoma evolving every year. It’s amazing. I mean, look at Downtown Tulsa. But please don’t let anyone touch Cain’s Ballroom. I have lot’s of good memories there. Remember when you and I catered for the Counting Crows? I could have died. Favorite actress: There are too many. But, I have really enjoyed watching Meryl Streep and Kate Winslet over the last few years. They are both so real and interesting to watch. Favorite director: Right now, it Alexander Payne. I was a puddle after watching The Descendants. Everyone I know was a mess after watching it. So, he must have done something right. And Sideways wasn’t so bad, either. Favorite place to eat: In LA or OK? In OK it’s Taco Bueno and Braum’s—hands down! In LA, it’s La Otra Taqueria Escuela. What you miss most about OK? I miss my family and the beautiful fall weather. Product you cannot live without: There are so many. Aquaphor, Ginger Essence by Origins, Avalon Organics Vitamin C serum and my Delman Ballet flats.

39


Amy Cargill

THE EDITOR

40

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

41


Favorite actor: Gene Hackman Favorite director: John Cassavetes Favorite editor: Tyler Hubby for The Devil & Daniel Johnston Favorite place to eat in LA: So many! Excluding taco trucks, probably La Cabanita for their mole and margaritas. What you miss most about OK? My family Product you cannot live without: BareMinerals SPF #15 Powder

42

O K I E M A M A


An editor and inherent storyteller, Amy is an incredibly learned talent in film and video production. She shares how she followed her heart to the scenes and cities that helped her accumulate a greater confidence of direction in her inevitable pursuit of dream.

Tell us a little about where you are from and how you believe growing in that space shaped you personally. I was born and raised in Lawton, Oklahoma. My childhood was bucolic. My folks were public school teachers and had summers off, so we spent a lot of time in a camper roaming around Colorado and back. I suppose most of who I am is a reflection of embracing and rejecting where I grew up. I remember someone buying me a subscription to the New Yorker in Junior High, and I can remember the visceral reaction to getting those things in the mail. Looking at the illustrations and seeing the page of concerts that were playing that week in NYC made me really envious of that part of the country. When I bought music it was ultimately the most satisfying to read the liner notes of a record you cherished and then build a portal of knowledge from that information.

At what age looking back do you recall some milestones in memory which affirm your current career paths? I was the editor of my high school yearbook, but I’m pretty sure I was lazy about it. I wrote a lot for the paper, and fancied myself a writer or a journalist.

When did you know you had to pursue film? A professor of mine at OU showed us a film by the Maysles brothers called The Salesman. It changed my life forever.

What aspects of storytelling do you believe makes a great editor? Economy. Focus. Intelligence. I don’t want to watch a movie or hear a record or sit through some boring story where I am handheld through the narrative, overtly led to the finish.

Can you brief us on some of the most awesome projects you have been a part of in your nearly 15 years of editing/archiving film? The first film I ever made was a documentary about these three transgendered women in Chicago fighting for human rights legislation in Illinois. I had absolutely no idea what I was doing, and ended up shooting hundreds of hours of footage and cutting three different versions of “a film” from that experience. Everyone hated what I was doing until v o l .

1

I gave up on the personal stories and focused on what these women actually accomplished legislatively—which, was the smart thing to do. Again, you don’t have to spend screen time showing and telling the audience that here were transgendered people, “Oh, look at how they put on makeup and get a tattoo.” That is really, really dull. It is way more shocking to not even address that part of it and focus on the awesome shit they did. We got a really fantastic premiere at Frameline during Pride Week and the LGBT community really embraced the film and began using it as a community outreach tool for families who were dealing with similar issues. I am proud of that now, after 10 years.

You have lived in Georgia, Chicago and now Los Angeles. Talk about what you learned in each of those chapters which led you to LA. I lived in Athens, Georgia then Chicago then Los Angeles. I followed a guy in a rock band to Athens, loved the community, found it incredibly difficult to make a living. Then 9/11 happened (I was working as a production assistant—my first real job in film- for Dolly Parton making an IMAX movie for Dollywood that day), and I decided I needed to go to a city where I could make at least survival funds and attempt filmmaking. The music coming out of Chicago was really exciting, and I knew some people in film there. I ended up staying ten years. I love that place—the documentary community, the independent music community, everyone was so fantastic. The work ethic is different there— always felt more of a long distance marathon happening, where LA is all sprints. I just couldn’t manage the winters though, and I came to LA two years ago. Best decision I ever made, met the love of my life and probably should have done this years ago.

What does being an OKIE mean to you and what do you carry with you? Despite the political leanings of the state of Oklahoma, being an Okie means being gregarious, honoring tradition and family, and being a solid person. Work hard, play hard. Boomer Sooner!

If you could speak back to Oklahoma at large and have a word of candid advice, what do you think you would offer? Respect women’s rights more, turn up the Flaming Lips and stay proud. 43


ONE we are

44

O K I E M A M A


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSH WELCH // ARTWORK + STORY BY JACK FOWLER

To a native Oklahoman, almost to a man, there is nothing easier to spot in all the world than a foreigner. The alien in question need not be of far-flung descent to prick up an Okie’s ears; be you from Dubai or Des Moines, you will soon notice your new disarmingly talkative acquaintance plying you with subtle questions about your origins, his eyebrows rising slightly with your every added “g” and dropped “r” at the end of your answers. What Okies choose to do with this information once we’ve obtained it varies as widely between us as it does with folks anywhere else. What doesn’t vary is the reason we all possess the ability. We come by it honestly, the same way a dog hit by a car never goes near the highway again. We can’t spot you because we think less of you. We can spot you because we have all grown up knowing what you have thought of us. People’s eyes filled with sympathy when we used to tell them where we were from. They’d actually say, “I’m sorry.” “You poor people,” they’d say, “you’ve been through so much.” v o l .

1

We had been through so much. For a state known for the better part of the 20th century as either the place where they manufactured OU football or a giant gingham-covered square dance, Okies under 40 have been witness to carnage in their lifetimes on par with residents of Northern Ireland. Between wrath-of-God tornados and domestic terrorism, we learned to cringe at the sight of our state’s name flashed on the national news, to shudder at the question, “did you hear what happened?” We were a people steeped in woe. And worse yet, braced for it. But then, like an August snowstorm, a freakish, miraculous gift: Oklahoma City got a professional basketball team. And not just any team—maybe the most perfectly suited group of professional athletes ever assembled for a particular market. Young, insanely hard-working model citizens who hugged their mothers on the sidelines and led locker room Bible studies, it was if the entire roster was genetically engineered to appeal to Okie sports fans. Slogging through that first 23win season was no big deal. We were just happy, and to be honest, stunned that they were here. 45


can pass before teams grab the next rung of a playoff ladder, if they continue to make the playoffs at all. The Thunder, however, seemed to leap entire decades’ worth of conventional wisdom in a single bound, doubling their win total in their second season and storming into the Western Conference Finals the next. By their fourth season, after dispatching three out of the four previous NBA champions on their way to the Finals, the Oklahoma City Thunder were arguably the best young team in the NBA, one that was poised to dominate the West for years to come. Happier than the winning, though, was the genuine love that developed between this small town and our boys. We got to know these guys. We saw them not only beat hell from the Lakers and the Heat and the Knicks, we saw them volunteering at elementary schools and food drives and fund raisers. We came to understand that these young men weren’t biding their time in some dusty outpost they’d been assigned to, playing out their contract until they could jump to somewhere, anywhere, else. They liked it here. They liked us. And, maybe more importantly, they were like us. We saw ourselves in the way Russell Westbrook threw his body into the trees again and again, screaming as he crashed into the floor, only to pick himself up, again and again, grinning. We adored the fact that our starting shooting guard was the worst shot on the team, because it was Thabo Sefolosha’s unflinching defense that was a thing of beauty to an Okie. We all reveled in the knowledge that Nick Collison led the league in charges drawn. Kevin Durant was admired for winning the scoring title three years in a row; he was loved because he did it with the grace and humility of Jimmy Stewart. These guys were playing for us now, because we saw ourselves in the way they played. What we cheered in these men were the things we loved about ourselves, the qualities that we always knew we possessed. What we cheered in them were the things we wanted you to know about us all along. So, we cheer. We cheer louder and longer and with more love in our hearts than any other dump in the league because this teams is ours. We cheer and every CEO and high-powered lawyer and local celebrity with a court side seat puts on the free T-shirt, just like the janitor in Loud City who’s hoarse the next day at work when he tells his buddies about the game. We cheer and we say “thank you” and “good game” to our boys when we see them at the mall or in Bricktown or the Paseo on a First Friday. We cheer and we fly our flags. We cheer and we wear fake beards. We cheer because they are the best version of who we always were.

We hadn’t seen “happy” yet, though, because the next season, the Thunder started to win, and win big. It’s conventional wisdom in the NBA that the maturation of any particular team is an excruciatingly slow process. Years 46

We love seeing our city on the news now. “Did you hear what happened?” doesn’t make us shudder now; it makes us think KD dropped 50 on the Lakers. Live shots of our new, beautiful city at night, between the absolute Renaissance of public art projects and the county-sized population of Thunder Alley, give us chills of pride. We are one, and we are showing you our best face now. We are one, and we want you to see us for who we are. We’ve always been one, and we always will be. The Thunder just made everybody stand up and cheer about it. We’ve all been waiting a long, long time for that. And it feels so damn good. O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

47


48

O K I E M A M A


Avalon

the

B e v e r ly h i l l s r et r o c h i c g etaway When venturing to Los Angeles for a family vacation, I asked many former Angelenos for their recommendations on a modern family friendly hotel. Many referrals and well known names were tossed around, The Standard, The Roosevelt, Farmers Daughter, Argyle and more. These are all iconic hotels and spaces I would love to see, and a few I have visited in my younger LA visits, however, this was the first time I would be introducing my son to the Hollywood vibe and I was searching for something a little more unique to our traveling style. The word that would describe me as a potential guest would be “discriminant�, I wanted an experience with historic relevance, inspiring design, at a slightly more modest boutique style price and I knew something was out there waiting to be discovered. I found the Avalon Beverly Hills and knew it was just the right blend of history, design, and fun our vacay was looking for.

v o l .

1

49


50

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

51


52

O K I E M A M A


The brilliantly alive, but oh so retro chic Beverly Hills design will catch you at the first glance. But you have to look a little closer than you would expect. The Avalon is located on a corner off Olympic and is a bit more demure, than most imagine driving up, which I believe adds to its “boutique” vibe. The design is modern mid century holding the integrity of the architectural period, it is almost a guarantee you will share a room with a piece of Charles Nelson, Isamu Noguchi or Charles Eames. The hourglass pool is the chi, the natural flow of energy of the Avalon. It is around this space the historic photos of Marilyn Monroe were taken, and celebrities, business folk and families gather in the cabanas and share in the colorful ambience surrounding the iconic patio. The Avalon, formally The Beverly Carlton, was built in 1949 and was former home to Marilyn Monroe during the late 40s and early 50s. The hotel was completely redesigned in 1999 for its reopening and its designer Kelly Wearstler delivered a mod statement that remains clean, chic and timeless. Upon its opening, the Beverly Carlton was the place to be seen, and its mod design was carefully bestowed by epic graphic designer, Alvin Lustig. Unfortunately, during the 70s and 80s, the Beverly Carlton lost attention of its keepers and the property lost its swagger, the property became rundown and then transitioned to an apartment complex and then nursing home. In 1998, Property Developer Brad Kortzen purchased The Beverly Carlton, and began his pursuit in Hotel Restoration. At the time, he was dating and collaborating with Kelly Wearstler, Interior Designer and Stylist. Wearstler convinced him to take a chance on her abilities. She researched the historic design elements carefully and the new school mod mid century Avalon Beverly Hills was born. As a guest and researcher on the Property, its evident to me that this restoration project was a Love Child, one that was meant to be. A creation, A restoration, A gift. An open door to the dreams of Kortzen and Wearstler, but also a niche choice to “discriminating” travelers and the integrity of the property itself. The dream set sail and from this project, Wearstler became a style icon, and Kortzen (Viceroy Group) now owns over 25 boutique hotels worldwide, Wearstler and Kors have built a solid empire founded on the power of details and client experience. “Kors is one of the stars in the boutique industry”, says Thomas McConnell, the senior managing director of the hotel group at Cushman & Wakefield. Kortzen, relating to his property development and restoration, seeks to emulate an “old school luxury” vibe. When interviewed by Details Magazine, Kortzen says he caters to the “discriminant guest”, one who is looking for something unique and appreciates bold design. He also realizes, in his restorative projects the important historic relevance and value of the properties he pursues, which is extremely special. The Avalon Beverly Hills over the top design makeover, is a beautiful love story in its own right. As the property served as the muse to the right Creative Development Team (Kortzen + Wearstler), this specific property now serves as inspiration to many other smaller hoteliers, boutique startups, and guests.

v o l .

1

53


54

O K I E M A M A


The “old school luxury� aesthetic comes across in the most hospitable way, via attention to what matters, the details.

v o l .

1

55


56

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

57


VINTAGE I

A fashion focus on timeless reuse and originalit

58

O K I E M A M A


IN VENICE

ty from the freespirited pockets of Venice Beach. v o l .

1

59


60

O K I E M A M A


TUNIC BLOUSE: VINTAGE JEANS: OLD NAVY BOOTS: MINNETONKA JEWELRY: STASH v o l .

1

61


62

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

63


64

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

65


SEQUINED TANK: LONDON VINTAGE SKIRT: COOPERATIVE of URBAN OUTFITTERS SHOES: VANS SKATEBOARD RENTAL: JAY’S RENTALS

66

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

67


68

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

69


70

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

71


72

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

73


74

O K I E M A M A


EMBROIDERED TUNIC: VINTAGE SHOES: CANDELA

v o l .

1

75


76

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

77


78

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

79


DRESS: POEMA SHOES: FRANCO SARTO 80

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

81


MANIFEST

82

O K I E M A M A


WEST

Journey of issue1

WRITTEN BY: AIMEE TIETZE ADAMS EDITED BY: CS ADAMS v o l .

1

83


THE HISTORY of Oklahoma has been paved

with opportunity lined in adversity. From territory to state, our people have struggled to carve a life from the resources the land provides. The land given to the Nations for as long as grass grows and the wind blows, divided in civil war was given away to find itself ecologically destitute within 40 years. The wind blew, but hardly did grass grow and through this bowl of dust an exodus that coined the name that paints a people regardless of the influence of the icons who’s lives have shaped the world. Every heritage has a name intended to be derogatory, but we’ve lived through the sticks and stones and with regard to a word, it seems more like something to be proud of. You will see our strength when you hear it.

THE NAME given to the people who fled with

matresses on cars, the Oakies, labeled by Westerners/ Californians, became a term of embarrassment, as it symbolized desperation, poverty, and vulnerability. As time went on, opportunity grew, and many who had fled Oklahoma had succeeded in making a better life on the West Coast, and they became the newer generations of California and other surrounding areas. So, the red dirt influence became embedded in the culture of the coast from these brave Migrant workers, and these Dreamers manifested a

promise, a blessing in their perseverance. From this historic reference we Okies are way too familiar, but the new creative frontier reveals such richness in our culture’s origins. It is this originality, I see catching the wind of confidence while staying true to those authentic roots. As we near the 83 year marking the migration, we are witness to the emerging landscape of opportunity right here in OK.

I AM AN OKIEMAMA, born in Kansas,

raised in the Tulsa area, with an Arkie Grandfather, who still recycles regularly. With roots from Bartlesville Phillips, to philathropic genius and developer, Charles Page, I have been raised blessed by this land and those who held vision in the resource the land offered. It is because I feel I inherited such abundance in story, that I must share the journey of lineage in the development of OKIEMAMA. On October 12, 2010, USA Today headlined a piece, “More Californians reverse course and head to Oklahoma.” This article was right on target for all the energy being circulated locally and the statistics that were showing the Oklahoma economy was holding up relatively well throughout the housing bailout and other recession factors, which was not the case elsewhere. However, even though this reverse migration was making headlines, I knew it would be necessary to make the trek westward in search of story. My main collaborators were in LA, and they were the ones doing what they could to support this project being manifested, thus the theme of Issue 1, Manifest West.

THE INSPIRATION On an undocumented

day in 1995, I was working at the then stylish, edgy salon off of 15th and Boston, Ross Edwards Salon. It was my first day as Ross’ Salon Assistant, and I was excited to book appointments and look thru magazines and wait on clients as needed. The Salon was an Aveda Concept Salon, which was very cutting edge in its experience based philosophy with regard to beauty and design, and Ross was brilliant with his clients. The morning started slow, I was manning the desk phone and looking through the current Vanity Fair issue. I remember some magical halo entered the picture as I turned the page to see Jeanne Tripplehorn’s couture spread. Immediately, there was an, Oh my God, that is Jeanne, she looks gorgeous moment. I was so proud of her. At that time in her career, she was dating Ben Stiller and for those who don’t know her (shame on you), she had just arrived in Hollywood via her supporting role in Basic Instinct (1992) and Grisham’s The Firm (1993). I was stoked to see a Tulsa Julliard girl being celebrated. Going on about my day, a few hours later the phone rang, and I answered as practiced, “It is a beautiful day at Ross Edward Salon.” The voice on the other end, said, “Hello, this is Jeanne Tripplehorn, and I need to make an appointment for my brother, it’s a very special event.” My mind jumped into my life must really be a sitcom mode, and I assured her we would be able to work out a private appointment. Behind the scenes, as Ross was engaged with 84

O K I E M A M A


17 YEARS LATER...

DREAM + RISK My heart lead me many places

on many journeys, and via the routes of many mistakes. However painful the outcomes, or shortlived the glories, I have always believed in risk. Dreaming is risking. You have to give up one thing to gain another. Clearing your life to be open is absolutely necessary in order for offerings to find their way to you. This magazine is one of those mini dreams. In the pursuit to manifest such a project, I determined that I too, must travel west, and take risk to mine the golden stories from those beautiful people who believed in themselves enough—to know that anything can happen, at the right time, in the City of Angels.

THE JOURNEY - OAKLAND

The journey began in Oakland. I flew into San Fran and had intended to hop around the city a few days, but wound up sucked into the creative portal of Oakland. A girlfriend from high school, Amy Wills (related to THE Bob Wills) had been a big supporter of the project from the beginning. She and her fiancee Tony, both work for Pandora since the days when the company was super small. They were kind enough to sponsor a portion of Manifest West by allowing yours truly to couch surf and pick their brains on all things music, Pandora and other creative topics, such as “What do you really think of Instagram?” a client, I literally ran to him and said, “Jeanne Tripplehorn is on the phone and wants an appointment. Today!” He kept retorting, “Booked. Boo-ooked.” So, I ran to the magazine and did what any assistant in a sitcom would do, I finally caught his attention away from his current client and pointed to her spread and said, “Her. Jeanne Tripplehorn. She wants a private appointment, this evening if possible.” Ross knew who she was, and had just in his momentary zen client experience, and he quickly shifted his life to make this appointment happen. Later that evening, around 8, we greeted the lovely Jeanne and her family to the Salon for a monumental cut for her brother. During the visit, she inquired what my dreams and aspirations were and said boldly, ““Do it! Follow your dream, no matter the cost. God Blesses the risk takers.” Jeanne’s attention and words filled a void in my spirit and calmed my restless tendencies for many years. Her words have become the words of the Village from which I’ve come, the Village of Dreamers, and I pass them on to those in need with hopes of the same countenance of blessing. The synergy of meeting this gifted woman, eight hours after seeing her face in Vanity Fair, I know cannot be happenstance, its the magic from which life is laced, to keep the dreamers in perfect pursuit of the hearts direction. Her words set the direction of my compass 17 years later. v o l .

1

My first night Amy picked the most glorious welcome to Oakland, a tasty trip to Burma Superstar. Go there, and order the Samusa Soup and Rainbow Salad. They also gave me great advice on jogging to the Mountain View Cemetery up Piedmont and gave me a little suggestion on where I should do a little Zine R+D. I had read numerous business articles talking of how people were leaping into new careers without doing any Research and Development, even though this wasn’t the case for me personally, I was committed to giving it my best Scout preparation. I had not grabbed the details on the locale of the shop and the next day after dropping my girlfriend off at work, I headed back for coffee and serendipitously turned directly to the mag store, without knowing it was even there. Standing outside, I was vibrating at a super stoked frequency fueled by all the little Indie Mag gems I could see in the mirror, waiting to inspire me. I grabbed my coffee next door, which is why I actually made the turn in the first place, and headed inside “Issues”, otherwise known as Indie Mag Heaven. I first approached it like I was in a German museum, walking and looking, waiting for someone to shout “Nein!” if I touched the little beauties. But I got fresh with some awesome mags, and ended up reaching out to the super cool owner, Noella. After she delivered some amazing insight, I knew I needed to take her photo. She reminded me of a friend back home who owns the Indie Musichaus, the Opolis, with her subdued Punk like edge and her cool blonde hair. She posed for me 85


“GOD BLESSES THE RISK TAKERS.” Jeanne Tripplehorn

86

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

87


by the magazines and while posing, she belted purposefully, “My great great great Grandfather named YOUR state!!!” I was stoked to share a connection. She showed me emails from her family inviting her to a reunion. In the email, they had also added these family facts which she shared with me, Allen Wright, the Native American Missionary was in her lineage.She’s now in our tribe...are you kidding?

PACIFICA Two months earlier I was on twitter and

had noticed a Photographer I really respected was hosting a mini workshop with an Editor, who is tops, I decided in a flash that was where I needed to be. It flowed with my Cali travel mojo and was sure to give me the post winter, Spring launch into the new reality I was hopeful for. It was a rad artists workshop with 2 killer photographers, one who is a Rad (really no other word) Alternative Wedding Pioneer, Noa of Feather Love, and Chloe Aftel, An Amazing Polariod Diva, and the ridiculously creative former Editor of Rue Magazine and now San Francisco’s 7x7, Anne Sage. What I did know would happen: fun and learning. What I was completely blindsided by: the genuine authenticity of the workshop Starlets. We visited a lot on Wedding Industry topics, Social Media, and talked a lot about the really deep hard work that needs to be done inwardly as an Artist in the expanding creative world. It was cool to see how everyone is on their own roads, in their own cars, going to their own destinations, but sometimes we get a chance to stop at the same gas station and fuel up on the goodness of sharing openly.

VENICE BEACH On the flight from San Fran to

LA, I had met an Aussie woman. I asked her on audio (as I had asked a few others), “What she thought of Oklahoma?”... She answered, “I haven’t! Why would I ever want to go there?”. I wasn’t offended, but it was a reflective moment to sit back and think from a travel commerce level what we had to offer. Generally speaking, “the people are really nice” answer seems to have lost its luster. But after thinking about it, sometimes you really do want to lead with “our people” as a selling point, I mean thats why I was there anyway. Arriving in Los Angeles late in the evening, I was excited to try out a brand new Fiat 500 (latte color), namely as Ive been wanting to test it, but obviously its LA, with their parking issues, this was a total rental situation score! I headed down to Venice Beach and stayed via AirBnB, the girl who rented the room, had just closed her shop on Abbott Kinney and had some pieces she let us use for our shoot, it was great to have so many people, some of which, had no attachment to Oklahoma, helping me. Venice was the initial hub, I was making phone calls trying to coordinate times and calendars with the BraveOs (all the stories I was trying to produce), but more importantly I was impressed, especially considering current communication trends, everyone I connected with was awesome. They were doing everything they could to try and fit some time together in their insane production schedules, but each and every one that could not make it happen this first round, texted and called and responded and offered blessings. Thats just part of the reason they are Kick Ass. I was in Venice 2 days, I had 2 days to get the locations, 88

the clothing, and artistic direction, and meet with Courtney and Amy (LA Profiles) to coordinate everything, and eat and jog and coordinate other Production meetings for the last few days in LA. These two girls (Amy + Courtney) are some heart and soul of OM, as they have both honored the project with immeasurable trust in the vision and were hopeful in what that impact would have, on Oklahoma’s image, and future. Location scouting led me to a cute store in Venice, M.E. & Blue who assisted us with pulling fashions for our Vintage in Venice shoot. Upon meeting her, there was a similar synergy, her Grandfather was from Cherokee, Oklahoma. Again, I reveled in the connection. She spoke very optimistic about our homeland and said, “It makes me think of wide open spaces and like there’s this whole new frontier.” Bingo!

LOS ANGELES

Hitting the LA part of the trip was really like a homecoming. Getting to work on style pieces with Courtney and begin production with her husband Rick for our webseries, The Producer, and pretty much take it down a notch. I had 2 more days before heading back and still had production in the lineup each day. The life moves at a quicker pace for sure out there, and I found it really energizing. Courtney took me to a Spin class at the Y, and we went and had coffee in Larchmont, where we had a Soleil Moon Frye spotting, across from her store. Courtney reminded me of the time Soleil and I shared a cigarette in a cab at OU/Texas in Dallas, and that’s another story. I ventured to the Meherabode, which is the LA meeting place for people who love Meher Baba. This very cool guru, self professed Avatar has a very important connection to Oklahoma, and this is a story surprisingly not many Oklahomans know about. Another amazing BraveO I got to visit with was Director, Richard Farmer. He was on set with Olympus Cameras in production and invited me to take in the scenery, while we shot our first OK->LA episode, which highlights “Dreamers who move from OK->LA”. Richard needs to change his twitter handle to @RICHARDTHERAD because he is. Our last production lineup for another episode of OK->LA was with Cains Ballroom Documentary Filmmaker, Tate Wittenberg. We are really excited for his project to launch in the near too. The last night, Courtney and I were having wine and discussing all the footage, and coverage and photos. It was such a gift to be able to reflect on how many people made room and time and were sending me back with their stories. The challenges I faced in the last 3 years in bringing this concept to fruition are exactly that, the “fruits of the intuition”. My last jogs on the Venice Beach boardwalk listening to The Flaming Lips, “Yoshimi” were some of my fondest moments of the journey, that album has such a burst of positive encouragement, and its definitely a comfort to know when you are riding a wave you never have, someone else has. Let your journey take you where it may, go onward now, keep it real and remember...you don’t have to go west to make it happen. The philosophy of this journey has in part been sponsored by the words of wisdom via Surfer Laird Hamilton, “I have surfed huge waves all over the world only to return home amazed to know my life’s challenge was always right in front of me.” O K I E M A M A


There is no hipper time to be an OKIE.

v o l .

1

89


Fair trade jewelry design, handmade in LA. W: lesbohemiennes.com FB: www.facebook.com/Les Bohemiennes 90

O K I E M A M A


PHOTOGRAPHY: CARL ZOCH v o l .

1

91


his JCREW

ESSEX PANT $70

URBAN OUTFITTERS DENIM WESTERN

$59

TANCHO

LAVENDER POMADE $15

SPERRY TOP SIDER BOAT SHOE $90 92

O K I E M A M A


RAYBAN

WAYFARER $150

ALTERNATIVE APPAREL ECO FOOTBALL TEE $40 BELT EM

UPBOYS! GAP

MILITARY WEBBING BELT $25

PATAGONIA

BOARDSHORT $42

LLBEAN

TOWN + FIELD TOTE $179 v o l .

1

93


hers DEBORAH LIPPMAN RICH RIVIERA BLUE $16

JULIE BROWN

BUTTERCUP SHORT $62

SAN DIEGO HAT COMPANY LARGE BRIM HAT $45

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG CAMARGUE BOX BAG $180

JCREW

BLOUSON TANK $90

MADEWELL

JASPER FLAT $60 94

O K I E M A M A


SAN DIEGO HAT COMPANY SUN HAT $30

DILLARDS

BETSEY JOHNSON HOOPS $20

ELLA MOSS MAXI $178

JCREW

BOY SHIRT $70

LAUREN MERKIN "AVA" CLUTCH $325

TORY BURCH

ADONIS STRIPE ESPADRILLE $140 v o l .

1

95


ONE WORD REVIEWS TUNE IN TOKYO Contributor Amy Wills of Oakland lives a life immersed in modern music culture. She shares some of her top Album recommendations on this edition of Tune in Tokyo, ONE WORD REVIEW. Our Tribe highlights killer sound coming from the red dirt neighborhoods.

OUR TRIBE Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots Flaminf Lips KICKASS

All on a Sunday Afternoon Sugar Free All-Stars FAMILIAL

Can’t Get Past The Lips Broncho ATTITUDE

96

Summer of 2012 marks 10 years since the release of the Flaming Lips album, Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots. We hope you will tune in to this killer album if you havent in the last decade. It seems as most classics, it has aged quite well and , maybe even better with time.

O K I E M A M A


Fear Fun Father John Misty METAMORPHOSIS

Blunderbuss Jack White GRIMEY

awE naturalE THEESatisfaction GROOVIN'

The Lumineers The Lumineers RUSTIC

Barchords Bahamas MELODIC

Adventures In Your Own Backyard Patrick Watson FOLK-TASTIC

My Head is an Animal Of Monsters and Men ICELANDIC

Faithful Man Lee Fields SOULFUL

Here Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros ADDICTIVE

Let My People Go Darando OLD SCHOOL

v o l .

1

97


TYSON'S BRIDGE Former front man of the epic Oklahoma bands Defenestration, and Chainsaw Kittens, Tyson Meade caught a visionary bridge back to his musical path while teaching in China. With his Kickstarter project recently funded, he is now returning to Shanghai to build a harmonious connection between cultures with help from his former student.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARY ANNE 98

O K I E M A M A


Where were you when you decided your next chapter was to return to China? I was teaching and running a boarding school in China for five years. In that time, I fell in love with the people and the culture. I then came upon the idea of doing this album mainly because the violin player that I met—who was all of 15 at the time—struck me like only few musicians have struck me; I have met everyone from Weezer to Smashing Pumpkins to Iggy Pop. This kid has that magical musical fire that exists in very few people. He was the catalyst to this. He goes by the moniker of Haffijy.

You recently lived in Jordan. Can you give us a brief summary of that experience? I lived in Jeddah SA which was very much figures into what I am doing now. I was teaching at a technical college, and I realized that as much as I loved living in the desert and riding around on camels, I was not doing my works. Music is my works.

And you now are returning to make music with your former students. I love the passion behind this project—any hopes to play on a Saturday Night Live stage post production? It seems like a project the general American public would be game on to support. My hope is that America and the world at large supports what I am doing. I would love for Haffijy to turn up playing on an Amanda Palmer record or a Carrie Underwood record or a reconfigured Mahavishnu Orchestra record in the future or even doing a duo record with someone like Leo Kotke. I want Haffijy to be a star because he deserves to be. I would like to watch his rise to stardom from the wings.

Being a native Okie, what do you carry with you into these experiences?

What fare makes up most of your meals while you are in China?

I think Okies have a DIY attitude because we have to make our own fun here. That has helped me immeasurably on the world stage. I am very proud to be from this state And I am thankful that my fellow Okies are so supportive.

I have eaten everything from goose shins to drunk prawn (the prawn still swimming when it gets to the table), to pigeon with all sorts of innards and grain and grubble in between. The Chinese waste nothing.

Can you give us a glimpse into a day in your way of life when living in China?

In our last candid exchanges amongst email, I thanked Tyson for his inspiration to leading others to follow their dreams, and he said some good stuff I decided to share.

When I was teaching, I lived on the other side of People’s Square from the school, and I would spend time in People’s Square watching the old men practice with there swords and musical instruments. At night sometimes, I would get movies from Even Better than Movie World which was across the street from Movie World. Shanghai is the best shopping place in the world. There are a lot of fakes around, but if you look hard enough you can find the real thing—clothing brands like Burberry and Paul Smith at really good prices. v o l .

1

I had the same sort of make believe childhood as you had. The weeds in the field were my audience. I do hope that this inspires others to not let anything hold them back and to figure out how to make whatever they want to happen happen. I thought I was retired as an entertainer, but this is such a fantastic cause and opportunity to promote love. At the end of the day love and peace is what life is all about! 99


“The weeds in the field were my audience.” -TYSON

100

MEADE

O K I E M A M A


connect f /okiemamamagazine t okiemamazine p okiemamazine v o l .

1

w okiemama.com

101


STYLING DIRECTION with ANNE SAGE

102

O K I E M A M A


S

tyle is the end result of a process of choices. We choose this color palette, we leave that piece out, we search for rules, that give opportunities to be broken. It can be intimidating or overwhelming when it comes to the art of preparing a tablescape that is both functionally pleasing as well as modern contemporary in aesthetic. Former Editor of Rue Magazine, Anne Sage, offers insightful guidance on how to formulate a creative direction via proper utilization of artistic constraints in place. We had the opportunity to work with the current Senior Editor of San Francisco’s 7x7 Magazine on editorial set, and pay witness to her creative leadership and synergy between talented West Coast styling collaborators: Floral Theory and Apartment 34. This particular shoot was for Rue’s recent “International Issue”, featuring a Pie Company, says Anne. “There had to be a faraway feeling to anything we created.” With that inspiration, the team did a “little brainstorm on different cultures that might serve pie as a central part of the meal” and landed on the Scandinavian countries. In Rue’s research, they found that Scandanavian’s are known for an aesthetic that honors natural surroundings. Anne believes the creative process almost always leads with those few “constraining factors” and finds them beneficial to her overall vision. It best to utilize those constraints as it poses more of a challenge in building a completely blank slate. Anne also described her brainstorming approach and how she builds the basic design palette. She adds, “I brainstorm in two realms that join together in a murky creative stew. The first is the formal world of line, shape, light, color, all the elements that evoke the emotion I want to spring from my final result. The second is the vast cultural, historical, and geographical information we have at our fingertips; there v o l .

1

might be an obscure historical reference around which I build an entire storyline, or one single photo that I just can’t get out of my head.” In researching the foundation of “good design” across mediums, there are motifs that arise, reinstating their importance: functionality, accessibility, affordability, sustainability and beauty. In this tablescape, we see these elements embedded in original style through the re-use of the air plants, the accessiblity and affordablity of the rustic table choice, and the opportunity to utlize items that you don’t often get to use for an accessory and functional highlight such the glass pitcher. When we asked Anne about the pairing of the rustic table with the contemporary seating, she speaks candidly. “Just as you would never dress all in one style, you should never decorate your home or an event all in one style—the effect is costumey at best, laughable at worst. The most important thing to remember is that no matter what aesthetic you’re working with—be it rustic, vintage, midcentury, industrial, you name it­—the rules of scale, balance, and perspective still apply.” She adds an example, “If you have a very large rustic table, you’ll likely want to seek out big plates in a relatively clean style that won’t be dwarfed by your table; anything twee would feel like a child’s tea party. Think of texture, color, patina, and material as the the vocabulary with which you get to tell a beautiful story. Then edit it by half. Then relax. I promise you’ll do great.” The creative evolution is a playful process, one that should be approached with a respective gratitude toward the building blocks of constraints. It is from those rules that the freedom to rebel hides and the opportunity to be brilliant awaits. 103


“The most important thing to remember is that no matter what aesthetic you’re working with

(be it rustic, vintage, midcentury, industrial, you name it­) the rules of scale, balance, and perspective still apply.”

104

O K I E M A M A


v o l .

1

105


106

O K I E M A M A


Anne Says

How to coordinate your own modern & chic tablescape

EVERYDAY DISHES

Don’t stress about the fancy china for this one, guys.

SOMETHING LIVING

Flowers are wonderful, yes, but I encourage everyone to think about what else they can incorporate into arrangements. The berries, air plants, and even red radishes that Yasmin from Floral Theory used in our tablescape took the look to the next level. The best part is that we got to eat the food and re-use the air plants afterwards.

A CLEAN PALETTE

That’s not to say you can’t use color, but it is best to choose just one and use it wisely to a monochrome effect.

v o l .

1

107


FLORAL ESSENCE ALIGNMENT By Whitney Womack 108

O K I E M A M A


A

flower essence is the vibrational imprint of a flower that has been transferred and stabilized in water. They can help us recognize, resolve, or release conditioned ways of perceiving the world and can help us experience greater well-being and harmony. By creating harmony within, we often notice distinct changes in ourselves physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. Essences can also help us rid ourselves of limiting and destructive patterns of behavior. They can support us in extending our consciousness beyond its present state. They provide a language that helps us understand our emotions and our interiors.

Self Attunement

Every plant has a medicine. It has an action that it generates when used properly. When we approach it with respect, we open our hearts with mindfulness. Participating in our wellness is our responsibility to our bodies. We use our will to project what outcomes in life we desire and like a boomerang, it returns to us with intent. The essences effect is actually a shift in consciousness. The more attuned we are to ourselves, the easier it is to recognize the power of the work. Though some essences stimulate a physical response through the well-being of the spirit and the mind, the primary function is to work directly on the emotions. When that has been addressed or stabilized, physical responses begin to occur naturally. It is then when we truly begin to heal.

Elemental

Rulership of plants by planet and sign works on an elemental level. The qualities and energies of specific plants are assigned to the zodiac following these basic principles. Plant dominion is a system of coordinance that exists between the four elements and the four primordial organs of the plant. 1) seed|fruit, 2) flower, 3) leaf|stem, 4) root. The seed contains the basic blueprint for life, the genetic material, and is therefore associated with fire which represents the spark v o l .

1

of creation, the origin of synthesis. The flower is ruled by air because it reaches out into the atmosphere to receive pollen from airborne insects or from the wind. The leaves and stem are always associated with water which generates foliar growth. The root grows beneath the earth and will always correspond with it. On an individual level, with regard for particular medicinal plants, herbs and flowers, rulership will also align with the part of the body it will treat. This year, everyone will benefit from the use of Sage to illuminate the higher purpose behind global changes happening on a large scale. Combine it with Oregon Grape to remove fear, anxiety, paranoia and despair. This allows us to open up to possibility and helps establish trust in others. Combine them with one of the essences of your Sun sign or ascendant. Take 2 - 4 times daily, especially upon waking and sleeping. Since flower essences are extremely diluted and stabilized in water, you cannot overdose on them. Their efficacy is maintained by the molecular structure of small doses on a frequent schedule. They are not intended to treat or cure physical conditions, viruses or diseases. The methodology behind them is that they affect the emotional and spiritual centers of the body. Aries: Zinnia, Impatien Taurus: Trillium, Gentian Gemini: Buttercup, Cerato Cancer: Mariposa Lily, Clematis Leo: Holly, Vervain Virgo: Elm, Centaury Libra: Mountain Pride, Scleranthus Scorpio: Tiger Lily, Chicory Sagittarius: Star Tulip, Agrimony Capricorn: Oak, Mimulus Aquarius: Blackberry, Water Violet Pisces: Fawn Lily, Rock Rose 109


SNAPSHOTS

IES UDD

B SOM : BO . E F s I r L MY e ente them

SAMOSA SO BURMA SU UP VIA PERSTAR

T IA

N! FU

F

US flora GORGEO

ls

SAG E

-HAVEN INDIE-MAG

110

WIS DOM

S

ER

F UR

GS NIN

R MO

w: A

nne

YELLOW canoe: running Gshot morn in Pacifica

O K I E M A M A


S Venice Art: WHOOPIE! CKET VENICE PO

e RAD

RD th RICHA

LA : OK->

MEHERABODE : short Baba vis it

Hou

se o f Iro

nma n

Cain

s Dud e: TA TE fo r OK ->LA

n irectio

: art d

R DELIVE

I’d ch a in owned up “BIG WHE ELS” if it too I

Self Portrait SLC bathroom

v o l .

1

111


OKIEMAMA // ISSUE1