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O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM


INSIDE COVER Even though the trees and temperatures tell a different tale, Halloween is upon us. We take a look at some spooky sites in the state and offer up a pair of Halloween cocktails. This issue also includes the inaugural installment of our new column, The Toe Tag, with a tale of an Oklahoma outlaw’s adventures after death. By Gazette Staff Cover by Phillip Danner

News COVER Oklahoma haunts The Oklahomo Hiker 10 Citizen Spotlight: Camille Landry 12 Black Sky Affair 4 8

EAT & DRINK 14

Haloween cocktails/Halloween Kills Review 16 Gazedibles

Arts and Culture OKCMOA virtual tours Best of OKC 23 The Toe Tag 26 OKG picks 18

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Music Johnny Manchild Chad Whitehead column 30 Soundcheck: Local Man Ruins Everything 26

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The High Culture 33 35

Guyutes recipe Strain Reviews

FUN 36 38

Astrology Puzzles sudoku | crossword

OKG CLASSIFIEDS 36

VOL. XLIII NO. 12 PUBLISHER Bryan Hallman | bhallman@okgazette.com EDITOR Matt Dinger | mdinger@okgazette.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Clyde Dorr | cdorr@ okgazette.com Grant Freeman | gfreeman@okgazette.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR Phillip Danner

CIRCULATION MANAGER Patrick Hanscom | phanscom@okgazette.com

DIGITAL MEDIA & PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Kendall Bleakley

CONTRIBUTORS Sarah Atwood-Cotton KM Brmalett SOCIAL DESIGNER Brett Fieldcamp Berlin Green Christina Denai Greene Evan Jarvicks ADVERTISING Ryan Spencer advertising@okgazette.com Chad Whitehead 405-528-6000 DIRECTOR OF SALES Christy Duane | cduane@okgazette.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Saundra Godwin | sgodwin@okgazette.com OKGA Z E T TE .COM | O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1

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By Matt Dinger

Every year we celebrate the spectacle that is Halloween, with equal parts candy, imagination, and simulated frights, yet there are those among the living who believe there’s but a thinly veiled separation between the realms of the familiar and the unseen. While anecdotal evidence is not confirmation, there’s something to be said for the countless inscrutable events that too many otherwise rational people have w itnessed. Throug hout Oklahoma, it ’s easy to stumble upon an old town or abandoned building with a legend of its own, long thought to contain the residual energies of those who departed or be upon ancient burial grounds. Spots of sudden, tragic death abound, many with a wealth of lore to explore for the open-minded. The following five places scattered about the state are imbued with interesting history and mystifying lore.

Stone Lion Inn The Stone Lion Inn sits dignified and alluring in the historically energetic town of Guthrie. At once welcoming yet mysterious, this ambience might best be attributed to its tragic history, which some claim manifest as a playful and sometimes cuddly child ghost. The fourstory, Victorian building was constructed in 1907 by F.E. Houghton, a family man who fathered 12 children. Over a period of years, the Houghtons were beset with a number of tragedies, the worst of which was the sudden death of their 7-year-old daughter. Irene. Rumor has it that the girl met an untimely end when the home nurse overdosed her with an opium-based medication while treating a case of whooping cough. The Houghtons continued to struggle, with financial hardship on the heels of their personal loss, and they soon decided to lease partial space of the inn to an un-

Stone Lion Inn in Guthrie | Photo Phillip Dannner

dertaker, who proceeded to do what morticians do. After Mr. Houghton’s passing in 1943, his wife, Bertha, then converted the family (and funeral) home into a boarding school until her death. To this day, the structure remains, now filled with wonderfully bizarre decorum and even the original embalming table, to the morbidly curious visitor’s delight. Operating as a bed and breakfast, anecdotal accounts of childlike figures crawling into bed or tucking in guests have been widely reported. The third floor is said to be Irene’s favorite spot to play now as it was up until her death. Music boxes playing randomly, toys operating themselves and the sound of giggling have been heard. In other areas of the Inn, guests have reported the smell and sight of a gentleman, likely Houghton himself, smoking his tobacco pipe. Doors frequently open just to close themselves again, and personal belongings apparently move without notice. The Stone Lion Inn not only offers an intersting

take on the traditional bed and breakfast, also serves as a home for its renowned murder myster dinners. Whether you’re a history buff, skeptic, or a believer, this locale offers every reason to visit.

Kitchen Lake The serene and naturally beautiful site known as Kitchen Lake, a 30-acre park and fishing hole, is tucked away in south Oklahoma City. While its lush greenery and quiet atmosphere lure in those seeking a peaceful getaway, there are rumors of more ominous activity that surrounds the territory. Local legend speaks of a witch who inhabited the quaint wooden house with it’s stone chimney, situated at the corner of Air Depot Boulevard and SE 119th St. It is said she perished in her home after a fire mysteriously ignited, ravaging the land. Some believe the fire was created by a lightning strike, though others tell

of teenagers who were out to cause harmful mischief that night. Whatever the occurrence, the witch is considered to be a lingering presence where the stone rubble still remains, hellbent on communicating her vexation after many decades. The current tales describe events of visible smoke with no observable origin and piles of ashes that suddenly begin to smolder. Perhaps even more disturbing are the reported animal carcasses found to be in unusual positions, some even hanging from nearby trees. For those bold enough to explore in the darkness, there are apparent sights of flames that flash brightly only to immediately vanish, as well as personal accounts of vehicles stalling and headlights burning out while attempting to leave. Visitors recount the general eeriness having crossed the narrow, desolate bridge leading to the

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grounds of this restless being and the leftovers of her home.

Pawnee Bill Ranch Not every haunt is a dark and demolished scene. Some places, like the Pawnee Bill Museum Ranch are popular and busy establishments, yet still frequently rumored to harbor the spirits of the Lillie family. Gordon William Lillie, better known by his moniker “Pawnee Bill,” was a man of many talents. A cowboy, teacher, and interpreter to Maj. Edward Bowman, U.S. Indian agent, he’s most recognized for his role in the entertainment industry. Lillie began his own wild west tour involving his wife May Manning, which was an immediate success. In 1902, they acquired the land that was aptly named “Buffalo Ranch” on which they built their home and strived to start a family. Shortly thereafter began a series of devastations for the couple. Their first child died when only several months old and because of a complicated surgery, May Manning was unable to conceive again. Fate led them to meet a boy traveling on an orphan train, who they soon accepted as their son. Billie was 8 years old and left home to play with a friend, but the family cook found the boy, who had accidentally hanged himself from a radio tower visible from the home. The pair did the best they could, throwing themselves back into business and performances until 1936. As they returned home one night, Pawnee Bill lost control of the vehicle, killing his wife. He never fully recovered physically or emotionally. A decade later, Pawnee Bill passed away in his sleep, leaving behind not only this sorrowful legacy but the ranch, now a state-owned time capsule complete with original furnishings and creations of the Lillie family. Accounts from museum guests claim to see paintings that shift and morph into an altogether different picture, sometimes including the face of Pawnee Bill. Sightseers also talk of being jolted suddenly by fierce electrical shocks , along with reports of a lady adorned in 1930s attire who sits in what was once May Manning’s favorite chair. There are narratives recounted by security guards and staff over the ages who believe they were pranked by Pawnee Bill himself, as well as sounds of a child laughing and, at times, crying. Not only does the ranch promise a spooky and informative experience but the town of Pawnee itself is cloaked in ghostly folklore for those looking for possible encounters.

St. Vincent Asylum While there’s no shortage of abandoned, creeptastic structures throughout the state. One building that stands alone, 6

O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM COV E R S TORY

forgotten and decaying, that paranormal investigators say contain the disgruntled energies of those who lived and some who died within its walls. The former site of the St. Vincent Insane Asylum sits shrouded in overgrown plant life along NE 23rd St. Constructed in 1945 for the Brothers of Mercy, a Catholic nursing order hoping to help the mentally ill, the facility was utilized not only as a mental institution for males, but included a rehab for alcoholics and drug users, as well as a nursing home for the elderly. Housing the most vulnerable of society under one roof would provide an unfortunate opportunity for those seeking to abuse their power, wreaking havoc on the patients. In 1962, a nurse was charged with murdering two people, though it is thought he had a hand in several other deaths. As the establishment was home to many elderly who died seemingly from natural causes, it was difficult for police at the time to uncover the truth in its entirety. The orderly was found to have brutally smothered the patients, his reasoning being “to see what it felt like.’’ He was eventually diagnosed with schizophrenia and the charges subsequently were dropped. In 1988, the Rev. Richard Frank Dolan attempted to help those in need of recovery by opening an additional living quarters within the location, which he named the Main Artery. However, his good deed was unable to blossom after he was found beaten to death in his nearby apartment that year. In the following years, the place was a final resting spot for numerous males of all ages, many who were homeless with no family. After so many deaths, both natural and stolen, it’s no


The Black in Guthrie | Photo Matt Dinger

surprise the paranormal teams that gained access to the obliterated grounds have returned with what they perceive as evidence, including multiple EVP recordings of victims stuck betwixt realms, as well as claims of physically being touched or scratched in a less than friendly manner. Reports of strong sulfur smells that linger then disappear, along with whispers and name-calling are discussed amongst groups of paranormal investigators. Commonly described throughout the experiences is a heavy, palpable energy that envelops those who enter, making it more difficult to breathe. Many of them warn of danger not only from possible invisible forces but from the building’s structural integrity that is in fast decline, making it hazardous to explore this three-story landmark that is marked with “no trespassing” signs.

The Black - First Territorial Prison The last location is a return to where we started with the first federal prison in the Midwest Indian territories, known as “The Black” or “Black Jail” in Guthrie. Erected in 1892 and appointed the name by its inmates, due to the 18-inch-thick walls made from dark limestone, in addition to the basement that served as an inhumane form of solitary confinement. The walls were so solid it’s suspected that during summer, many prisoners would die from dehydration or heat stroke. They did not fare well in the winter either, as the damp, chilled at-

mosphere created perfect conditions for seasonal illness to spread with little to no air flow, causing deadly respiratory issues. The prison also housed James Phillips, the first white man from the jail who was sentenced to death by hanging after needlessly murdering a local. He soon apparently “died from fright” as he witnessed from his cell window the construction of gallows he was to swing from the next day. In the early 1900s, the jail was eventually shut down and the building remained in use by various religious organizations. Until the 1970s, it functioned as a temple of sorts for the Nazarene Church and following their departure, was occupied by the Samaritan Foundation, a strange religious cult frequently associated with murder and scandal. It was inevitably shut down for good in 1995 after an inspection by the Department of Health determined the compound unfit to house the families and children living within. It still stands today, empty and in disrepair, with stories surfacing of ghosts from past inmates and victims of possible religious foul play. Accounts of James Phillips in particular are common, visibly standing in the same window he viewed his last earthly scene before collapsing. Even more common are the alleged loud, anguished howls being heard, including several EVPS collected by the group G.H.O.U.L.I. (Ghosts, Haunts of Ok la homa a nd Urba n Legend Investigations). W hether fact or fiction, it remains a chilling thought to consider the souls of those once physically confined, are still trapped to this day. COV E R S TORY OKGA Z E T TE .COM | O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1

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The Oklahomo Hiker The Tulsa-based hiking expert that wants queer people to take a hike...literally By KM Bramlett

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As autumn ushers itself in and the outdoors feels less hellish, it’s an excellent time to get out for a hike. If you’re interested in hiking for the first time, it might be hard to know where to start. What gear do you need? Which trails are beginner-friendly? What should you do if you need to...you know...poop in nature? And, yes, there’s a right way and a wrong way to shit in the woods. The Tulsa-based hiker Paul Sweet, aka the Oklahomo Hiker, shares his advice for anyone who is interested in hiking for the first time. He also chronicles his hiking adventures on YouTube and recently established an online community for LGBTQIA+ outdoor enthusiasts to demonstrate that “members of the queer community are out there going on badass adventures just like everyone else.” Sweet, originally from Joplin, Mo., has been hiking as long as he can remember and fell in love with the outdoors on trips across southwest Missouri and northwest Arkansas as a kid with his family. Today, he lives in Tulsa with his husband David and works full-time as a pianist, piano teacher, and composer. When he has time off, he spends it crisscrossing the state of Oklahoma and surrounding areas looking for beautiful trails to explore, and he loves every moment, whatever it brings. “There isn’t anything about a hike I don’t like,” Sweet said. “I’m well-versed in the challenges a trek might present - physical pain/exhaustion, unpleasant weather conditions, insect bites, etc. but once you accept those as part of the experience and learn to mitigate their effect, there is little that can detract from the satisfaction I find out in the wild,” Sweet said. The experiences do bring some annoyances, however. “Human impacts on the trail are most frustrating; discarded trash, defaced trees or rock surfaces, illegal development within protected areas... things of that nature,” he said. Acutely aware of his limited time on the trail, he spends it deliberately. “What I love most about hiking is the ability to create myself, to choose my own adventure and to see it through and learn and grow in the process. We get this one life and I feel a deep responsibility to curate my own with meaningful experiences - be it in nature, in my art as a pianist, or in connections to others.

On a less philosophical level I enjoy the solitude of a solo hike, the challenge of a strenuous journey, and being able to observe the wonder and beauty of the natural world,” Sweet said. When it comes to hiking destinations, Sweet thinks there is a wide variety of natural beauty in the area, as Oklahoma contains everything from desert, to forest, to mountains. “We have it all, even if it is a bit of a drive,” Sweet said. The Ouachita Mountains in southeast Oklahoma are his favorite place to traverse since there are lots of challenging trails and big rewards on scenery in that area. He also finds the Wichita Mountains in the southwest part of the state beautiful and appreciates the arid, desert-like landscapes there. Sweet decided to begin documenting his outdoor adventures on YouTube to share with his best friends, Moe and Jeff, who live in the northeast region of the US. “It was my way of letting them come along with me on my hike. Moe and Jeff, as well as my husband David and I, spend a good deal of time watching hiking videos on YouTube and, while there are many to choose from, we noticed there isn’t a lot of queer representation in that space. Since we were already starting to make videos for each other we decided to start channels of our own so that fellow LGBTQIA+ folk could see people like themselves enjoying the outdoors,” Sweet said. This was the origin of Sweet’s YouTube channel called “Oklahomo Hiker.” Since part of his mission is to promote queer visibility in hiking, he wanted the name of the channel to reflect that goal. He also remembered being called a homo as a kid and wanted to reclaim the term and “wear it with pride.” His friends Moe and Jeff have established their YouTube personas as “The Hiker Trash Husbands.” Sweet’s love of sharing nature with others has continued to develop. In September 2021, he started a Facebook group called “Oklahomo Hikers” and has begun hosting group hikes for queer people in search of a support system and a place to learn more about enjoying the outdoors. “The Oklahomo Hikers group on Facebook is a forum for discussion about the many places we have to explore locally and regionally and for sharing the experiences we are all


having outdoors. It’s been exciting to see interest in the group grow and to meet new people who share a passion for outdoor recreation,” he said. The group hikes are intended to create a deeper sense of community, build friendships, cultivate confidence in outdoor activities, and serve as a way to learn best practices from each other. “Members of the queer community are all invited to join, regardless of location. It is specifically geared toward folks in Oklahoma and the surrounding states, but there are active members from many parts of the country,” Sweet said. Subscribe to the Oklahomo Hiker YouTube channel (www.youtube. com/OklahomoHiker) or follow them on Facebook and Instagram for more information.

quickly if you happen to get your feet wet. Wool socks are also great because they keep your feet warm even if they get wet. Dressing in layers is great, especially in synthetic or wool fabrics, because they keep the moisture away from your skin and can be added or subtracted as you heat up or get cool. A basic set might be a form-fitting base layer like a T-shirt, something like a fleece layer for added warmth, a puffy jacket for cooler weather, and a raincoat to keep you dry. A pair of trekking poles are a nice addition, as well, as they help you with balance and stability in changing terrain. What are the most important safety precautions new hikers should consider? My best advice here is to plan ahead. Know the weather you’ll be facing, have a map so you don’t get lost, and stay in an area with cell service so you have a way to call for help should you need it. S W E E T’S H OW-TO T I PS O N GETTING STARTED: What is a good distance to start with? Keep it short when you are getting What should beginners know? started. A mile is a good place to start. I think the best advice is to start small Taking a short route lets you gauge your so that you can learn what you like and skill level and tells you whether you are what your body can handle. Beginners ready for more in future hikes. should also have a map and know how to How much water and food are necread it so that they don’t get lost while essary? they’re out. Going with an experienced This really depends on the season and friend or a group can be a great way to help length/difficulty of trail. A good place mitigate that risk. The AllTrails app is a to start, though, is to try and drink 16 great resource for hikers of any experience ounces of water and eat a hundred calolevel. It has maps for most trails, can tell ries or so every half hour you’re on a you whether you’re on course or not, and hike. I can burn anything from a couple has information about current trail condihundred calories on an easy 1-3 mile tions as reported by other users of the app. hike to over five thousand calories on a strenuous 10+ mile hike. It’s also a good idea to study up on the weather and dress accordingly so that you Can hikers bring their dogs on a hike? don’t get caught unprepared. This totally depends on the rules of the What gear is absolutely necessary space you are hiking in. Check the website to get started? of the park/area you are planning to hike One should obviously have a good pair to see if they allow dogs on their trails. If of shoes - hiking boots or trail runners no information is available online, give are ideal, but a pair of sneakers can also them a call to find out for sure. What should a hiker do if they need serve just as well for a first timer on an to poop on the hike? easy trail. Again, having a map and compass and/or a trail app is important. I always try to go to the bathroom I always suggest bringing a bottle of before I leave and many trailheads have water and a snack, even for very short facilities nearby. If you suspect you’ll hikes; most definitely on longer and need to go while on the trail, carry a more challenging hikes. Bug spray and small hand trowel and bring some toilet sunscreen can also come in handy depaper along. If an on-trail bathroom pending on the season. Beyond that, a emergency happens, you can step off the comfortable shirt and pant or short trail at least a hundred feet and a couple would be all that is needed to serve a hundred feet away from natural water beginner well in their first few hikes. sources, such as ponds and streams, dig My best advice for a beginner is to grab a hole eight inches deep, and bury the a backpack, throw in some water, some toilet paper and human waste when you snacks, a basic first aid kit, a map, and are done. maybe some bug spray and sunscreen Where do you recommend new and get out there. hikers go to get started? What gear is nice to have but not Visiting one of the many great state absolutely necessary? parks in Oklahoma or surrounding As your skill level grows you can upgrade states is a great place to start. There you to high performance fabrics that wick will often be in close proximity to services, have good cell service, and be on moisture away from your body and regulate temperature, trekking poles the trail with other hikers in case you for balance and stability, a backpack find yourself needing assistance. As your with a water bladder so you don’t have experience level grows, designated wilto pull your pack off every time you want derness areas (not common in a sip, and a host of other items geared Oklahoma, but plentiful in some of the toward experienced hikers. I like a good surrounding states) can be a great place pair of trail runner shoes. They handle to get a more secluded and often more most types of terrain well and dry out scenic hiking experience.

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CITIZEN SPOTLIGHT

Leading Through Literacy

CAMILLE LANDRY OF NAPPY ROOTS BOOKS

In each issue, we are highlighting a person in our community who stands out for their leadership, kindness, and good deeds. Know someone like that? Email bgreen@ okgazette.com to share their story. Words are powerful, and no one understands that quite like Camille Landry. A voracious reader, her love of literature carried her long through childhood and adulthood, and it’s through the power of words that she serves her community. A writer, artist, activist, and social justice advocate, Landry helps people find and share their voices through literacy, art, and community. She does so much that when I ask her about what all she is involved in, she laughs. “Whatever comes across my everloving mind, and that is a true answer. I’m retired, and I’m not trying to make money off any of this; there is no money to be made off of any of this. So I do whatever catches my fancy,” Landry said. “Nappy Roots is a bookstore, but it’s also a community; it’s a place where people can come together and talk about all the issues that impact us. Like why aren’t there any textbooks in our classrooms? This is a place where folks even from outside the community can come that don’t have another place.” She opened Nappy Roots Books in 2017 after retiring from a career in IT. She’d long been working in social justice advocacy as a writer with the Oklahoma Policy Institute but wanted to create a space for community and educational enrichment. The business was one of the first to enter into the space of Black Wall Street Marketplace, starting in a small space with books provided by Camille herself. Now in a larger space at 3705 Springlake Drive, Nappy Roots 10

is still the only bookstore in northeast Oklahoma City, and it does far more than just sell books. The space hosts writers, artists, workshops, discussion groups, festivals, and more. Twice a week they offer academic enrichment sessions. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, Landry would see as many as 50 students using this time to help with assignments, ACT test preparation, college, and trade school applications, and simply study. Though the pandemic has forced some things to slow, the space is vital for students in an area where schools often lack funding for textbooks and other necessary school resources. She believes that literature connects us, and bookstores are a vital part of our communities. During these times of political and social turmoil, literacy is what ultimately creates change. “How do you know what you don’t know? You can’t know what you don’t know. It’s the great unknown. So our world, on the one hand, is expanding like crazy. On the other hand, people live in their own little bubbles, and we’ve become so siloed and defensive. So that’s part of what we really tried to do is break down some of those barriers, which can happen best with a book. I think I might be a little bit biased, but a book is how you get inside someone else’s head. How else do you do that? Through all kinds of art. It could be a novel. It can be poetry. It could be nonfiction. It can be a play. It could be a piece of visual art. But this is how you find out what’s going on in somebody else’s internal landscape and what their reality is. Absent that kind of information, we’re all poor. We’re all fractionated, fragmented, and at odds with each other, and we’re not working on the things that are important. We’re just letting it go by the wayside because

O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM CITIZ E N S POTLIGHT

Camille Landry | Photo Berlin Green

we’re so caught up in the crazy. We have to change this. Because I believe that knowledge is power, this is why having bookstores are important; it’s crucial to have access to information and that exchange of ideas.” When looking towards the future, Landry would like to see the space grow and be able to host more workshops and events that empower, enrich and connect the community. “We need a place where art and literature can come together, and I would love to make that happen. There are so many things that we can do, in addition to the informational programs and academic enrichment programs we already do. I would love to have enough space where we could have a theater group performing in one room, dance going on in another, and someone is throwing a pot on a wheel in yet another room. We’ve got people meeting to figure out issues of police brutality and how to respond to that. All of these things need to happen. They are all equally important. So that’s what I’d like to do and what I’m pushing towards. And all of these things can happen. This area really needs something like this, and I’m working on that. It’s out there.” It’s not just Nappy Roots Books that keeps Camille busy; she spends her time serving our communities in a number of areas from art, education and social justice, to saving the planet. “I’m involved with Black Lives Matter. And I’m involved with some of the organizations or things that we’ve started, like the Northeast Coalition on Homelessness and Moms Demand Action On Gunsense, which is a national organization. I’m involved with a number of local activist groups working on everything from schools to the environment and definitely with

the arts. I do NaNoWriMo every year but have yet to publish the great American novel.” Throughout the year you’ll find her hosting a variety of community events from art and community discussion during her recent On The Shoulders of Giants project with Skip Hill at the Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, to an intimate evening of vibrant music, art, and poetry in the Nappy Roots Books parking lot. “Doing those kinds of things is really important. It’s important for the kids; it’s important for the community, it’s important that the history not be lost as important, that people find their voices, and figure out how to come together because one person shouting makes a little bit of noise. But a thousand people shouting makes a war. It becomes hard to ignore. So that’s what we’re trying to be.” For more information about Nappy Roots Books, scan the QR code with your smart phone.


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Black Sky Affair By Ryan Spencer

“Light...travels so fast that it takes most races thousands of years to realize that it travels at all...” - Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy Clever and true. In 1676, Danish astronomer Ole Roemer, noting discrepancies in the orbital period of Jupiter’s innermost moon Io in relation to its parent planet, became first of our race to discover light does indeed move as opposed to being an instantaneous phe-

nomenon. Though his calculations were constrained by the astronomical givens of the time, his conclusion was accepted in the scientific community by the early eighteenth century. It’s fast— 186,282 miles per second in pure vacuum. That’s 617 million miles an hour. But it’s not infinite, establishing an astrophysical “speed limit.” Combined with the model of an expanding and accelerating universe, it means there are things out there we’ll likely

never see regardless how far we voyage or further our means of detection. And that’s all right. An observational cosmological sphere billions of lightyears across, where a single lightyear is virtually six trillion miles in itself, is plenty. Visible light constitutes a mere fraction of the electromagnetic spectrum of radiation. Radio waves, microw ave s, i n f r a r e d a nd ultraviolet radiation, X-rays, and gamma rays make up the remainder. All move at lightspeed and are considered “light” in astronomical and a s t r ophy sic a l c i r c le s . Einstein’s theory of relativity teaches us that this universal lightspeed constant binds space and time together into spacetime and is known in physics as c (think E=mc2). This constant seemingly also applies to the pace at which gravity and gravitational waves operate. The elementary units by which light propagates are photons, ultramicroscopic particles of no mass whatsoever. Unlike everyday objects and even subatomic particles such as protons, neutrons, and electrons, this utter masslessness allows photons to travel at the

absolute upper bound of the physically possible, meaning the arrow of time as we know it doesn’t exist at all from their perspective. Voyager 1, launched in 1977 and now the most far-flung humanmade object at over 14 billion miles away, requires more than 21 hours for its telemetry to journey home at lightspeed, though the photons comprising its signal wouldn’t notice this time differential if they could. For a photon, there is only a lone instant. When we gaze into a limpid night sky, we look back in time, and the greater the viewed object’s distance, the farther back we see. A glance at the night sky doesn’t reveal a literal snapshot of reality, such are the ranges involved. We perceive the star Vega as it was 25 years ago, Sirius as it was 8.5, the moon as it was a second before, the neighboring galaxy of Andromeda 2.5 million years hitherto. All at once. Though the speed of light might impede us, it unveils through its limiting mechanism our universe’s chronology. Astronomers use this to peer into the very beginnings of creation itself. Good bargain. We trek through time, staring into the light of the night. Get out there. Here’s to deep skies, and happy traveling.

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The BackBar with Brett Fieldcamp, CSS Photos Phillip Danner

Friday the 13th,

Part VIIMI:anhattan

Jason Takes

Made with all the trappings of a classic Manhattan, but with everything blood red, fruit-forward, and strong as the Camp Crystal Lake Killer. The all red-wine-aged Slaughter House Whiskey isn’t just onbrand for Halloween, it’s also delicious with loads of butterscotch and slight fruit notes. La Fuerza Rojo is the first vermouth from the Andes. Made entirely with Argentine Malbec, it’s dense with dried, dark fruit and South American botanicals. This cocktail has enough sweetness and unique herbal notes to keep you coming back for sequel after sequel…

14

O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM E AT & DRINK

- 2oz - Slaughter House Whiskey - 3oz - La Fuerza Rojo Vermouth - Dash - Peychaud’s Bitters - 1 Woodford Reserve Bourbon-Aged Cherry - Spoonful - Woodford Reserve Bourbon-Aged Cherry Syrup - Dash - actual blood (optional)

Mix all liquid ingredients and stir over ice or eyeballs (your choice.) Strain into glass and add cherry. Garnish with machete.


E N AS F EW EATU YO RED RK IN T IM ES ! TH BY

CHARLES DICKENS • ADAPTED BY MICHAEL BARON • DIRECTED BY MICHAEL BARON & ASHLEY WELLS

Go from Humbug to Happy in One Magical Night!

f r n o tu R e e h T the Liv in g De ad A new take on the classic and aptly named Corpse Reviver cocktail that was originally designed as a hangover cure. Trust me, if you get down on enough of those Manhattans on Halloween night, you’ll be needing one of these spiced apple cocktails come Nov. 1. Whereas the classic Corpse Reviver No. 1 calls for a combo of cognac and French appledistilled Calvados, here we’re just going for some simple apple-spiced brandy with a couple extras you should have leftover from the party the night before: some of that same sweet red vermouth and a can of cider (so, of course, we’re going with a local favorite here.)

If you’re in the mood to watch Michael Myers graphically and gruesomely slaughter people for 100 minutes, then Halloween Kills is the movie for you. But if you’re looking for plot development, characterization or anything but a three-ring circus of tired horror tropes, you’re out of luck. The second installment of the latest reboot series of the Halloween franchise from David Gordon Green and Danny McBride (the team who brought you Eastbound & Down, Vice Principals and The Righteous Gemstones — yes, seriously) is the inverse of the first Halloween film the pair made together. Like Rob Zombie’s version before these, the first film came across as a loving homage from a pair of dedicated fans. In fact, John Carpenter, the writer/director of the original 1978 slasher classic personally approved Green and McBride’s version after he and Blumhouse gained control of the rights. While this one picks up where the first one ends, it carries none of the cadence or craft that made that one a notable

- 1oz - Applejack Brandy - 1/2oz La Fuerza Rojo Vermouth - 6oz - Anthem Brewing’s Super Fancy Apple Cider

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Mix brandy and vermouth in whiskey glass. Pour cider into mixture and stir. Try not to chug. Like the heroine in a horror movie, it’s stronger than you think.

entry in the franchise. While the performances are admirable and the kills creative, the lack of any real plot makes it easy to lose interest. A minor plot arc takes a stab at adding a little social commentary to the mix, but mostly falls flat on its face (if you’ve already seen the flick, both puns were intended). Even with OG scream queen and Laurie Strode actress Jamie Lee Curtis reprising her role in the film, albeit in a way that’s mostly divorced from Myers’ murderous rampage, the movie seems like an unnecessary entry, a placeholder that fulfills a contractual obligation rather than adding any new elements. Hopefully, it just acts as a weak bridge to the next film in the franchise, Halloween Ends, which is slated to be released next October, because a strong start and a strong finish might be enough to save the trilogy. Halloween Kills is now playing in theaters and streaming on Peacock.

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Autumn Road Trip

Restaurants The autumn transition brings a spectacular show of transforming leaves and the perfect excuse for a road trip to some of Oklahoma’s most scenic places. As we all well know, finding new (to us) restaurants along the way is always the best part of being on the road. From country cooking to fine dining, here are seven spots from around our great state to add to your list. By Berlin Green Photos provided

Meers Burgers

Southern Belle Restaurant

580-429-8051 26008 State Highway 115, Meers facebook.com/MeersBurger/

918-653-4458 821 US-59, Heavener facebook.com/southernbelleheavener/

The Wichita Mountains are a popular place to watch the seasons change, and Meers is a must-stop spot when you’re exploring the area. Dine in a rustic decor that is more than Insta-worthy, and peruse a menu of an array of freshly made favorites, including barbeque brisket, steaks, and the “best burger in Oklahoma.” The Meersburger is a massive burger made with grass-fed longhorn beef and served to you on an old, dented-up pie pan. Don’t forget to snag an ice-cold brew; Meers has their own beer produced by Choc Beer Co.

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

The Southern Belle is another fun stop the whole family will enjoy. This lovely little diner is tucked inside a restored 1905 model railcar, and it offers some amazing and savory home cooking. Here you’ll find some of the state’s best fried chicken fingers, as well as perfectly cooked steaks, burgers, sandwiches, pork chops, and more. Plus a mouthwatering selection of pies and cheesecakes, so you’ll want to make sure you save room for dessert. For all of you on that side of the debate, a candy corn cheesecake is among their current seasonal offerings.

Hammett House 918-341-7333

1616 W. Will Rogers Blvd., Claremore

hammetthouse.com

If you love home-cooking, you must stop here. Since 1969, Hammett House has been a landmark of Claremore for a reason. Their extensive menu holds everything from freshly prepared country-fried chicken and rib-eye steak to lamb fries and Atlantic salmon. Don’t forget the pie. Their impressive pie menu has all the classic flavors and more served fresh each day. Try the double-crust blueberry or the lemon-pecan pie delight, and you won’t be disappointed .

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O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM E AT & DRINK

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White Dog Hill

Petes Place

The Rock Cafe

Kendalls

This is one of those places that’s simply worth the drive on its own. Here you’ll experience wide-open spaces and some of the most beautiful sunsets Oklahoma has to offer. Accompany those gorgeous views with an impressive cheeseboard and a fine wine from their curated collection, or go all-in with a fine dining experience you won’t soon forget. From their KC New York strip to their grilled tiger shrimp skewers, every dish is incredible. Check out their chef’s specials which offer unique dishes each week sure to delight your palate.

In the hills of Krebs, you will find a sweet little Italian restaurant with a rich history spanning more than four generations. Pete’s Place, an Oklahoma landmark known for delicious home-cooked Italian and hand-crafted beer, serves family-style meals of all your classic favorites. Chicken alfredo, chicken parmesan, lasagna … The list goes on. Complete your experience by tasting a flight of their hand-crafted Choc beers which they’ve been brewing since before Prohibition.

If you’re heading towards Tulsa, a pitstop in Stroud can make a fun excursion for all ages. Kids will be delighted to find that the Rock Cafe is an inspiration behind Disney Pixar’s Cars. Adults will find themselves fascinated by the historic rock walls, foundation, and original grill, all intact since WWII. To refuel yourself, try classic German dishes like Jägerschnitzel and Spätzle or go all American with a chili cheeseburger or their “cowboy candy” onion strings and jalapeño rings lightly breaded and fried served with honey mustard.

If you hope to catch something spooky during your meal, Kendall’s might be your spot. The century-old restaurant has long been rumored to be haunted, with multiple stories of ghosts and spirits marking its rich history. If frights aren’t your thing, perhaps the food is. There’s a homestyle meal for everyone, from perfectly cooked burgers and fresh sandwiches to savory pork cutlets and fried catfish. Best of all, every meal comes with a warm, delicious cinnamon roll for dessert.

580-323-6922 22901 Route 66, Clinton whitedoghill.com/

918-423-2042 120 SW 8th St., Krebs petes.org

580-323-6922 22901 Rt 66., Stroud rockcafert66.com/

405-872-0303 100 S. Main, Noble kendallsrestaurant.com/

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Amanda Harmer guides a class virtual through the museums collection. | Photo provided

Virtual Visual Visitation

alone is a nail in the class field trip’s coffin. All of them combined make it impossible. That’s where the Oklahoma City Museum of Art is stepping in with an all-new Virtual Field Trip program designed specifically to work around all of those obstacles. “With the uncertainty surroundOKCMOA is launching a new virtual field ing the upcoming school year, we had trip program to bring the museum into to find ways to continue to bring the classrooms statewide. Museum to Oklahoma students,” OKCMOA Curatorial Affairs Director By Brett Fieldcamp Rosie May said. “With the launch of Virtual Field Trips, we will be able to serve even more students.” There are few childhood traditions more anticipated or memorable than Obviously, COVID-19 is the most imthe field trip. That feeling of getting to mediate and pressing concern, even if school on the day with your permission students have been returning to the slip in hand, knowing that you’re going classroom en masse. With rising varito get to do or see something so far out ants, spiking case numbers, and growing of the ordinary for your usual school alarm over the rate of infection among day that they couldn’t even fit it inside schoolchildren, the looming uncerthe same building. Knowing that you’re tainty about in-person schooling versus going to learn about something cool or remote learning has only increased. Understanding this, the team at interesting that you’ll get to see and ask questions about instead of just reading OKCMOA wanted to create a service out of the textbooks and scribbling on that could be just as useful inside a full your homework. It’s a feeling that we classroom as inside a full Zoom session. likely all remember, and one that we “The ‘cart’ we have is really cool,” surely all want for the next generations said Marketing Director Becky Weintz, as well. speaking about the camera-equipped But of course, budget cuts, classmobile station that will be used to show room sizes, teacher shortages, and virtual visitors around the space. “It now COVID-19. Each of these issues has these really high-quality HD 18

O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM ART S & CULTURE

cameras that can zoom way in to show small details, and it’s all set up for our curators to jump right into whatever platform a class is using.” The team’s main focus is making sure that students can receive the same kind of “inquiry-driven” experience that they would get in an in-person tour or field trip. “It’s going to be really cool to have the curators themselves actually controlling the cart,” Weintz said. “They can take and answer questions from the kids in real time.” This new project isn’t all just for the sake of COVID-19 precautions, though. A big part of the idea was also acknowledging that not every school in the state could so easily arrange a student trip even before the pandemic. They wanted to make it easier for classes from all across Oklahoma to experience what the museum has to offer. “Even though we always reimburse the schools for travel, it’s just not possible for a lot of schools to come here,” Weintz said. “It’s like, the panhandle is what, four or five hours away? That would be a huge and difficult trip for a school to bring their students all that way. This way, we can give them that experience without them having to worry about all of that.” And it’s not just the travel logistics that trip up so many schools. With

education budgets still dwindling, many of them, especially inner-city schools, simply don’t have the funding available to give their students a true field trip experience. “This is definitely something that we intend to keep available even after COVID,” Weintz said. “We want to make sure that every school has the opportunity to see what we have here and to learn from our curators. We’re excited to really ramp up and continue our inperson tours and field trips, but this will also be available for any school that feels it’s better or easier for them.” The Oklahoma City Museum of Art is currently booking virtual field trips for schools, with several themes available ranging from their current “Painters of Pompeii” exhibit, “examining art for context,” and a virtual class about careers in the museum and art history fields. There is even a “meet an archeologist” unit available where students will be able to speak directly with a working archeologist that has helped excavate historical sites around Europe. “This is a great example of a program we would not have been able to offer in person,” May said. “With virtual learning, the sky is the limit.”


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22

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TICKETS & MORE AT TOWERTHEATREOKC.COM @TOWERTHEATREOKC You may not recognize the name of Elmer McCurdy. Unlike the infamous Bill Doolin or Jesse James, who were outlaws known for their exploits in crime, Elmer was more famous deceased than he was while alive. McCurdy was an Oklahoma outlaw at the turn of the 20th century. In 1911, he was fatally shot by sheriff’s deputies after the commission of a train robbery in the Osage Hills, which is not Osage County as well as portions of Tulsa, Mayes and Washington counties. The loot that cost him his life was only worth forty bucks and some change along with two bottles of whiskey. He was only 31 years old when gunned down, but that was only the beginning of an afterlife of sorts that lasted another 66 years.... McCurdy’s body was never claimed, and he never had a funeral. The Pawhuska funeral home embalmed him with three times the amount of arsenic, eternally preserving his corpse. With no next-of-kin, the funeral home was said to have charged spectators five cents to see the famous outlaw. Rumors were told that people would deposit the money into Elmer’s mouth. In 1916, two carnies posing as Elmer’s brothers arrived at the funeral home to claim his body, and he was released to them without question. He would then travel the country as a carnival sideshow attraction and prop for museums. By the time his corpse arrived in California, it had been sold six times. He ended up on the set of The Six Million Dollar Man in 1976. McCurdy

was hanging from a bannister in a funhouse ride on set when the crew noticed that an arm had fallen off, exposing tissue and bone. Beneath the wax that had been placed over his body throughout the years laid the revelation that what they thought was a prop was in fact once a living human being. An autopsy was conducted by famed “coroner to the stars” Dr. Thomas Noguchi, and Oklahoma’s own forensic anthropologist Dr. Clyde Snow, was consulted to help identify the remains. Dr. Snow used X-ray superimposition to identify the travel-weary body as McCurdy. On April 22, 1977, Elmer McCurdy was finally laid to rest in the Boot Hill section of the Summit View Cemetery in Guthrie. He is reportedly buried under six feet of concrete so his body would never be disturbed. Buried next to the famous outlaw, Bill Doolin. The owner of the Stone Lion Inn, also in Guthrie, has held murder mystery events at the cemetery and it is rumored that she has purchased the plot next to him for herself. The outlaw who traveled the world more dead than alive, McCurdy’s grave still gets frequent visitors and, while they are no longer depositing the coins directly into his mouth, a sizable pile of coins still gathers at the base of his tombstone.

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CALENDAR

person in advance $25 per person night of show (if available), Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10 p.m. through Oct. 30. Trail of Fear Haunted Scream Park, 11101 SE Lee Blvd,, (844) 332-FEAR, lawtontrailoffear.com FRI & SAT, OCT 29 & 30

are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

The Midtown Men This amazing quartet of Tonyaward winning stars from the original cast of Broadway’s Jersey Boys is the first vocal group ever formed by the principal cast of a high-profile Broadway show. After sharing the stage for over a thousand performances, Tony Award-Winner, Christian Hoff, Michael Longoria, Daniel Reichard and Tony Award nominee J. Robert Spencer decided to take their signature sound and chemistry to audiences everywhere., “Sliding up to the microphone, the singers had the air of the Rat Pack, Motown and a nightclub act rolled into one.” -The New York Times $17 - $57, Fri., Oct. 29, 8-9:30 p.m. OCCC Visual and Performing Arts Center Theater, 7777 S. May Ave., 405-682-7579, occc.edu/pas/subscribe. FRI, OCT 29

FILM The Electrical Life of Louis Wane The extraordinary true story of eccentric British artist Louis Wain (Benedict Cumberbatch), whose playful, sometimes even psychedelic pictures helped to transform the public’s perception of cats forever., Moving from the late 1800s through to the 1930s, we follow the incredible adventures of this inspiring, unsung hero, as he seeks to unlock the “electrical” mysteries of the world and, in so doing, to better understand his own life and the profound love he shared with his wife Emily Richardson (Claire Foy)., Wed., Oct. 27 and Thu., Oct. 28. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. WED & THU, OCT 27 & 28

Oklahoma Film Society Presents: OKC Horror Fest! Join us for the fourth week of the Oklahoma Film Society’s HORROR FEST 2021! For the entire month of October, the Oklahoma Film Society has curated some of the most shocking and spellbinding horror films to bring to you absolutely FREE! Join us at Rodeo Cinema on Film Row (within the Paramount Building) for these special onenight-only screenings and engage in discussions with the audience after the films!, Wed., Oct. 27 and Thu., Oct. 28. Rodeo Cinema on Film Row, 701 W. Sheridian Ave, 4058123275. WED & THU, OCT 27 & 28 Old Henry A quiet man and his son take in a wounded stranger near his homestead, along with a bag full of cash. The stranger claims he’s a sheriff being pursued by outlaws, but the man can’t be sure., Wed., Oct. 27 and Thu., Oct. 28. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. WED & THU, OCT 27 & 28

Her/Story Private Premiere The Film Brigade presents:, Her/Story Private Watch Party, Saturday, November 6, 2021, Ice Event Center & Grill, 6pm-8pm, Doors open at 5:30pm, ~ Hosted by Nikki Nice ~, Vibe Creator: DJ KV, ~Performances by Confide, Bandio Baba, Rak, Jallow, W3sst, Skye Hai, and Slow P ~, General admission - $15, VIP - $25 includes a wine, finger food, and access to VIP room, High School Students: $5 with current High School Schedule, College Students: $10 with current college ID, Vendors - $50, Must be 21+ to drink, Tickets on sale on Eventbrite. com, For more information email hoodconscioustudios@gmail.com Prices Vary, Sat., Nov. 6, 6-8 p.m. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., (323) 346-8683, eventbrite.com SAT, NOV 6

Pumpkin Harvest Craft Festival The festival features over 45 crafters, the

Pumpkin Patch Café, Friends of the Park Bake Sale and the Friends of the Library Book Sale next door. The craft fair will feature an array of handmade items. A sampling of items include: home decor, repurposed wood art, Christmas ornaments, handmade soaps, jewelry, wood furniture, candles and more. The Pumpkin Patch Café is back with food for sale, as well as the Friends of the Park Bake Sale, which features famous Pumpkin Muffins! The Friends of the Library Book Sale is held in conjunction with the festival, with deeply discounted books. 405350-8937, Sat., Nov. 6, 4 & 9 a.m. Dale Robertson Center, 1200 SAT, NOV 6 Photo provided Mistletoe Market Mistletoe Market is a premier shopping event featuring unique merchandise from a variety of carefully selected vendors from Oklahoma and across the country. Shop for clothing, gourmet foods, gifts, children’s items, jewelry, and much more. $0-$75, Thu., Nov. 4, 9 a.m., Fri., Nov. 5, Sat., Nov. 6 and Sun., Nov. 7, 4 & 9 a.m. Oklahoma City Convention Center, 100 Mick Cornett Dr, Oklahoma City, OK 73109, (405) 768-4037. THU-SUN

HAPPENINGS

Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum Presents School Mental Health: Engagement During Difficult Times The Oklahoma City National Memorial Museum presents School Mental Health: Engagement During Difficult Times, Understand the mental health of parents, students and staff preCOVID and today. Learn how to nurture a positive environment while creating trust and transparency during community interactions. Have your questions addressed by a panel of experts from the Oklahoma State School Boards Association, Mental Health Association Oklahoma and Oklahoma City Public Schools. Space is limited. Register today at MemorialMuseum. com/events. Free, Wed., Nov. 3, 9 a.m.-noon & 1-4 p.m. Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, 620 N. Harvey Ave., 405-235-3313, oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org. WED, NOV 3

Artist Talk with Gay Pasley On October 28th from 5-7:30 PM, visiting artist Gay Pasley will be presenting the zine she made for the Women’s Rights Are Human Rights exhibition and doing a live reading of her essay, “Acting Womanish.” The first 50 Visitors will be treated to a free copy of her limited-edition zine! Seating will be limited for this event. free, Thu., Oct. 28, 5-7:30 p.m. Melton Gallery, 100 N. University drive, 4059746358, www3.uco.edu. THU, OCT 28

Oklahoma Railway Museum Halloween Train Ride All Aboard the Oklahoma Railway Museum’s Halloween Train!, Adults $12.00: ages 13 years and older, Children $5.00: ages 3 years to 12 years, Children under three ride FREE $5.00-$12.00, Sat., Oct. 30, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 31, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Oklahoma Railway Museum, 3400 NE Grand Blvd., 4054248222, oklahomarailwaymuseum.org/events/train-rides/halloweentrain. SAT & SUN, OCT 30 & 31

Devon Ice Rink The Devon Ice Rink returns for its 10th season in the Myriad Botanical Gardens in 2021! Get ready for another great winter of outdoor ice skating at Downtown in December’s premier attraction. Skate across 5,500 square feet of real ice and indulge in seasonal food and beverage offerings. Experience the magical, park-like atmosphere surrounded by the glittering lights of the Devon Ice Rink., Nov. 5-Jan. 30. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, downtownindecember.com/ devon-ice-rink. OPENS NOVEMBER 5

PAMBE Ghana Global Market PAMBE Ghana’s seasonal fair trade Global Market returns this year in a new location. Shoppers of all ages will discover unique gifts, from the useful & handy to the creative & fun. All merchandise are fair trade items, from almost every continent, made by artisans who are paid a living wage for their work. Profits from the sales provide crucial funding for PAMBE Ghana’s elementary school in rural northern Ghana. The Global Market will be open Tuesday through Saturday from 12 noon until 6:00 pm. PAMBE Ghana is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization with the Guidestar Gold Seal of Transparency. Free, Tuesdays-Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. through Dec. 24. PAMBE Ghana Global Market, 2420 N. Robinson, 405/210-5214, pambeghana.org.

Halloween on 9th Street Gather on the sidewalk at sunset (6:15pm) with Factory Obscura for the procession as they carry light into the night together. Illuminated costumes are encouraged, as they march together through Automobile Alley. Bells, chimes, and drums are also welcome. The Procession is a free outdoor event, open to everyone., Sun., Oct. 31. Factory Obscura, 25 NW 9th St., factoryobscura.fun. SUN, OCT 31 Haunt the Hill Join us for a night of spooky fun as local organizations and businesses line up SW 25th st and hand out goodies for kids of all ages. Children of all ages are encouraged to enter the costume contest for a chance to win awesome prizes! Participating businesses are also encouraged to channel their spookiest décor for a chance to win awards for best spirit of Calle Dos Cinco and best overall booth/trunk., Thu., Oct. 28. Historic Capitol Hill, 319 SW 25th St., 405-632-0133, historiccapitolhill.com. THU, OCT 28 24

THROUGH DECEMBER 24

Stargazing in the Park Join the Oklahoma City Astronomy Club on Friday, October 29 from 8pm-10pm for Stargazing in the Park at Scissortail Park!, The Oklahoma City Astronomy Club will have telescopes set up on the Love’s Travel Stops Stage & Great Lawn for the public to view the night sky (or you can bring your own telescope)., This event is FREE and open to the public. Free, Fri., Oct. 29, 8-10 p.m. Scissortail Park, 300 SW Seventh St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark. org. FRI, OCT 29

FOOD OSU-OKC Farmers Market at Scissortail Park Oklahoma City’s largest outdoor market features an

O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM OKG PICK S

all-made and grown-in Oklahoma producer-only marketplace providing access to more fresh products to serve the community. Located at the corner of Oklahoma City Boulevard and South Robinson Avenue, the Scissortail Park Farmers Market will be open, rain or shine, every Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. through October. Scissortail Park, 300 SW Seventh St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org/osu-okc-farmersmarket-at-scissortail-park. SATURDAYS

YOUTH Oklahoma Shakespeare presents the “Children’s Halloween Festival” A Free Family Event made possible by Allied Arts., “Classic for Kids” Performances at 11:00 a.m. & 1:00 p.m. Lyric Kids’ Club House Interactive! Presented by Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma and Devon Energy. Trunk or Treat, Mask Painting, Treats and Surprises. Shakespeare on Paseo, 2920 Paseo St., 405-235-3700, oklahomashakespeare.org. SAT,

Oklahoma Shakespeare: Macbeth Join us this fall for Shakespeare’s spooky tale of witches, revenge, blood and ambition. Coming this Halloween season outside in the brand new Shakespeare Gardens!, Thursdays-Sundays. through Nov. 14. Shakespeare on Paseo, 2920 Paseo St., 405-235-3700, oklahomashakespeare.org. THU-SUN, THROUGH NOVEMBER 14

A Streetcar Named Desire Jewel Box Theatre presents “A Streetcar Named Desire.” This production is widely considered to be one of America’s best written pieces of the 20th Century, penned by lauded playwright, Tennessee Williams. Blanche DuBois, after encountering a series of personal losses, leaves her privileged background to move into a shabby apartment in downtown New Orleans, rented by her younger sister and her brother-in-law. The residents’ contrasting personalities clash in dramatic fashion as they struggle for power in their respective relationships. $25, $15, $10, Jewel Box Theatre, 321 NW 36th St., 405-521-1786, jewelboxokc.com. THU-SUN, OCT 28 - NOV 7

ACTIVE The Haunted Trail at Dodge City Paintball The Haunted Trail, est. in 2020 on the 30 acres of wooded, spooky, terrain of Dodge City Paintball, proves to be one of the most riveting haunted outdoor attractions in the Oklahoma City area. It is by far the largest haunted attraction, taking 20-25 minutes to walk. All along the way, it is packed with creative and unique scares which will challenge your bravery and nerve. See why haunted

OCT 30

PERFORMING ARTS Brazilian All Stars Direct from Rio de Janeiro, the Brazilian All Stars will perform its “Brazilian Nights: The Greatest Hits” program that includes exciting rhythms and beautiful melodies of Brazil’s most famous songs, sambas, bossa novas, ballads, choro, fado, virtuoso instrumental tracks and more. The distinct musical sound of the group’s home country will fill the auditorium with a fusion of styles, from Portuguese and American jazz to Cuban and African rhythms. While transporting the audience on a musical journey, the Brazilian All Stars perform their catalog of memorable and spectacular songs. $45-$99, Wed., Oct. 27 & 7:30 p.m. Armstrong Auditorium, 14400 S. Bryant Ave., 405-285-1010, armstrongauditorium.org. WED, OCT 27 Evil Dead The Musical This hilarious show takes all the elements of the cult classic films The Evil Dead, Evil Dead 2 and Army of Darkness and combines them into one of the craziest theatrical experiences of all time. Five college students go to an abandoned cabin in the woods and accidentally unleash an evil force that turns them all into demons. It’s all up to Ash (a housewares employee turned demon-killing hero) and his trusty chainsaw to save the day. $20 per

Adèle Wolf’s 10th Annual Halloween Spectacular Are you ready to be wowed by a world-class burlesque show? This will be the first in-person Adèle Wolf Production since the start of the pandemic!, The 10th Annual Halloween Spectacular will feature burlesque, cabaret, aerial arts, circus and belly dance in addition to door prizes, costume contest, Halloween themed cocktails and pop-up shopping from our vendors. Attendees are encouraged to dress to impress and pose in the photo booth!, Adèle Wolf Productions is going bigger than ever for the 10th season. Attendees can expect to see several giant stage props, as well as performances on aerial apparatuses and stilts! $25 - $65, Sat., Oct. 30, 8 p.m. The Douglass at Page Woodson, 600 N. High Ave., (405) 673-6162, adelewolf.com. SAT, OCT 30 Hazel Honeysuckle by Neil Kendall


attraction fanatics rank it 5 out of 5 stars., Tickets: $20 Single Event Pass. $30 Fast Pass. Season Pass $60. Season Fast Pass $80., Purchase tickets online or at venue, or $20 - $80, Fri., Oct. 29, 7:30-10:30 p.m., Sat., Oct.

30, 7:30-10:30 p.m. and Sun., Oct. 31, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Dodge City Paintball, 16425 NW 150th St, 405-373-3745, dcphauntedtrail.com. FRI-SUN, OCT 29 - 31 Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUESDAYS

VISUAL ARTS Abstract Remix Oklahoma Contemporary is bringing murals indoors with Abstract Remix, an exhibition of the work of homegrown Abstract Expressionists who use the large-scale format of muralism as a medium for their giant concepts., Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. through Jan. 24. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org. THROUGH JANUARY 24

Festival de Vida y Muerte at Scissortail Park

Celebrate Day of the Dead at the Festival of Life & Death! Featuring interactive activities, community ofrendas, authentic food, cultural market, colorful art, face painting, live music, and traditional dances! Bring your pooch at 1 pm for the Alebrije Parade and don’t miss the Catrina parade and contest. Presented by Morelos Supermercados. Scissortail Park, 300 SW Seventh St., 405-4457080, scissortailpark.org. SUN, OCT 31 Photo Provided

Art of the Heartland - Oklahoma Photography Gallery The Art of the Heartland - an Oklahoma Photography Gallery Show is now live in-person at Social Deck + Dining through the end of the year and is also available to view online in the curated art section of nicolelowry.art., This collection features stunning Oklahoma landscapes by OKC photographer Jason Pierce, Grand Life Photography., Stop by Social Deck + Dining for a cocktail, sharable bites, brunch, or dinner and to browse this captivating sequence of the beauty of Oklahoma., free, Through Dec. 31, noon. Social Deck + Dining, 1933 NW 23rd St., 4054305779, nicolelowry.art/collections/artof-the-heartland-photography-

by-jason-pierce-grand-life-photography. THROUGH DECEMBER 31

Fritz Scholder: Beyond Stereotypes After relocating to Santa Fe, New Mexico, for a teaching position, American artist Fritz Scholder (Luiseño) stated he saw one too many over-romanticized and generalized depictions of Indigenous people “looking at the sunset.” With his Indian series, started in 1967, Scholder sought to replace the tourist-approved narratives perpetuated by white artists with the realities he witnessed every day. By combining realism and spirituality with vivid colors and expressive brushstrokes, Scholder created radical new imagery of modern-day Indigenous life., Wednesdays-Sundays. through Nov. 7. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com/ visit/events/scholder. THROUGH NOVEMBER 7 A Life in Looking: The Creighton Gilbert Collection Through themes of religion, architecture, allegory, portraiture, and humor, A Life in Looking: The Creighton Gilbert Collection explores a collection built on seven decades of expertise by this impressive scholar, educator, and connoisseur., first Tuesday-Sunday of every month. through Dec. 31. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., 405-325-3272, ou.edu/fjjma/exhibitions1/ CreightonGilbert. THROUGH DECEMBER 31 Paseo Arts District’s First Friday Gallery Walk Peruse art from over 80 artists with 25 participating businesses for a night of special themed exhibits, refreshments and a variety of entertainment opportunities, 6-9 p.m. first Friday of every month. Paseo Arts District, 3024 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org. FRI, NOVEMBER 5

A room with a View: Scenes of the Italian Countryside Artists from around the world have long been captured by the enduring appeal of the Italian countryside. Its sweeping vistas, at times sprinkled with ancient ruins, make for an enticing subject for artists in a variety of mediums. American artists in particular traveled to Italy throughout the nineteenth century to study not only the great masterpieces of ancient and Renaissance art, but also to sketch and paint the campagna, or countryside, basked in a beautiful glow., WednesdaysSundays. through Nov. 7. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com/visit/ events/room-with-a-view. THROUGH NOVEMBER 7

contributions of women to the colorful past, vibrant present, and unlimited future of the banjo. From prominent contemporary performers such as Alison Brown and Rhiannon Giddens to pop icons Taylor Swift, Dolly Parton and many others, historic insights, instruments, stage attire, and a glimpse of ever-changing fashion trends all help in the telling of this important aspect of banjo history., Through May 31, 2022. American Banjo Museum, 9 E. Sheridan Ave., 405-604-2793, americanbanjomuseum.com/current-exhibits/special-exhibits/. THROUGH MAY 31

Women’s Rights Are Human Rights: International Posters on Gender-Based Inequality, Violence and Discrimination The University of Central Oklahoma’s Melton Gallery will host “Women’s Rights Are Human Rights: International Posters on Gender-Based Inequality, Violence and Discrimination,” in partnership with UCO’s School of Design. The exhibition and its corresponding programming are designed to celebrate women and gender-nonconforming social justice advocates of all races and ethnicities, while highlighting the inequalities they have fought against., Mondays-Thursdays. through Nov. 18. Melton Gallery, 100 N. University drive, 405-525-3603, meltongallery. com. THROUGH NOVEMBER 18

Visit okgazette.com/Events/AddEvent to submit your event. Submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive

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live music

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as possible.

Women of the Banjo A special exhibit at the American Banjo Museum Women of the Banjo chronicles the

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and it quickly became synonymous with excess, lifelessness, and overwrought headiness, more concerned with showing off technical skills than with conveying anything like emotion or real, relatable experience. So to see a group of young guys in their 20s so fully embracing the origiJohnny Manchild and the Poor Bastards bring progress back to progressive rock nal principles of progressive rock by with new album By Brett Fieldcamp infusing serious jazz and classical proficiency into an inarguably modern rock Have you ever wondered, “What if and pop mentality built around genuine Steely Dan tried to make a My Chemical emotion is honestly refreshing, espeRomance album?” or, “What if Sufjan cially knowing that so much of their Stevens decided to really make a run fanbase is even younger and that this for the pop charts?” or even, “What new album is bound to be majorly ambiwould ‘Moondance’ be like if Van tious for them. JMPB have always had an undeniMorrison made it right now and also wasn’t an insufferable anti-lockdown able jazz/classical streak. It’s unavoidconspiracy nut?” able when a rock band boasts a full Well, the answer to all of those queshorn section and piano around a tions (more or less) has arrived in the leader that majored in music performance and composition. But the maform of We Did Not Ask for This Room, jority of the band’s earlier songs and the new full-length album from OKC’s albums have come across more like a favorite jazz-rock wunderkinds Johnny group of jazz guys that all got togethManchild and the Poor Bastards, who seem to be doing everything they can er to try their hands at making pop to remind us all of what it means to acmusic. It always felt like the hooks and tually make progressive rock music. melodies came first, and then they’d See, once upon a time, the term “probuild some songs around them and gressive rock” wasn’t just used to label find some spaces here and there to bands that define themselves by relentinject some trumpet or some loose, less finger-tapping and blast beats and jazzy drum fills. It was always there, but it wasn’t always there. palm-muted chord syncopations over tightened-up screamo. “Progressive On “This Room,” however, much of rock” and “prog” used to be about inthat is out the window. Opener “The jecting classical proficiency and jazzClock” comes out swinging, both in based improvisations and voicings into meter and in aggression, and it makes the rock and pop music of the time. It a strong case for the kind of album was created and made by musicians you’re about to get: deeply technical, that had been raised or trained on techyet deeply emotional. But it’s the nically oriented music, learning from album’s second track “We” that really Beethoven or Stravinsky or Parker or hits the ground running. This is the Gillespie, and then finding ways to song where the band finally fully emapply those ideas to the largely bluesbraces jazz wholeheartedly, no more inspired rock and pop music that domhalf-measured splashes of jazz here and inated charts in the 60s and 70s. there. This track is full-on. It’s someIt was about progressing rock music, thing like a near-Calypso, with a swaying, rhythmic backbone and pushing it and furthering what it was capable of being. playful piano/brass interplay. Then it’s Not everyone was into it, of course, a heartfelt, pleading croon. Then it’s a 7/8 free-for-all. For a record as long and sprawling as this one, these first two tracks only scratch the surface. “Overboard” is probably the most traditional track for the JMPB sound, but from there on, the entire album is a series of left turns. Sometimes it rocks outr ig ht . Sometimes they bring it way down into more minimalist territory than ever before. Sometimes it’s bursting with the kind of 60’s Euro-Jazz that makes Stars | Album artwork by Gentry Leach it sound like some kind 26

O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM MUS IC

Members of Johnny Manchild and the Poor Bastards (Top) Johnny Manchild, Chris Lashley, James Thompson, Ethan Neel, Ben Wood, Logan From | Photo Dylan Johnson

of sad heist movie soundtrack. You might find yourself thinking that, while clearly emotionally ambitious, it’s not exactly truly experimental. Then you’ll run head-first into “Dose,” with its distorted drum loops and intensity and Manchild’s best Dave Grohl impression. The entire band is pulling out all the stops, but there’s also a remarkably mature level of restraint throughout. Each member has learned what space they occupy within the bigger picture.

And that brings us to one of the clear stand-out elements of the record: the production. There’s a great story about the recording and mixing of the untouchable “Darkness on the Edge of Town” by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band (one of the easiest and most apt comparisons to the Bastards.) They tried and tried to mix the record like Springsteen’s previous megahit “Born to Run,” but the songs just couldn’t fit into that “wall of sound” production style. They had to learn how to set each instrument into its own space and how to allow the players room to breathe. We Did Not Ask for This Room seems like the exact same exercise. JMPB is a band known and loved for its massive, impenetrable wall of sound and instrumentation, but that’s rarely on display here. One of the most ambitious aspects of the songwriting throughout this record is the band’s commitment to restraint, saving the moments when everything explodes so that they can reach the peak of their effectiveness when they do. It’s easy to believe that achieving that space and that masterful level of production and attention was the driving factor behind the band’s decision to record at the legendary Sonic Ranch, an opportunity they were able to realize with the help of a massive online crowdfunding effort. And that effort paid off. This is an album that deserves to be placed alongside the list of great, ambitious follow-ups to breakout success, albums like “Darkness” or “Tusk” or even more recently “Reflektor.” Here’s hoping this one gets the appreciation it deserves a lot quicker than some of those classics. Check out Johnny Manchild and the Poor Bastards premiere these new songs at the album’s official release party Nov. 5 at the Tower Theatre, where they’ll be joined onstage by a host of special guests and will be offering an exclusive, specially-designed poster for the event by artist Avery Huckabee. It’ll also be your last chance to see the Bastards before Johnny relocates his home base to Los Angeles, so this is going to be a special night that you won’t want to miss.


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Touring for a living can be brutal. Behind the fun and obvious thrill of making music, eking out an existence on the road is a treacherous way to pay the bills. And that’s assuming you get along with your bandmates. I’ve had a behind-the-scenes look at touring life since 2005, when bands first started crashing on my couches. I know the look in a band’s eye when they’ve survived another dangerous overnight drive and why having biscuits and gravy steaming and ready upon arrival can be a life-altering flicker of hospitality. I love artists; I wouldn’t do what I do if I didn’t. The last 18 months have been ghastly for the live music industry. Ghastly. However, there are glimmers of light on the horizon. Bands are moving around the country and playing music again with some success. Most festivals are happening, although some big names have held off until next year. Venues are surviving; the Shuttered Venues and Operators Grant has fulfilled its goals of saving venues for the near future. Thank you, as always, to everyone who tweeted, emailed or called their elected official last year on our behalf. Musicians and their teams have not been as fortunate. The financial impact of not touring regularly over the last 18 months has forced many tours out on the road sooner than some may have preferred. Being on the road is trying. Being on the road right now is beyond taxing. Tours this fall have not been the roaring comeback many of us hoped for after a disastrous 2020. Instead it’s been an extra layer of strain and stress as artists navigate smaller crowds, their own COVID-19 measures and the changing politics from city to city. Many tours have shifted to require vaccines and/or negative tests, but that varies by region and genre. Nothing is less rock and roll than stopping for temperature checks, but at the same time, nothing is more rock and roll than touring during a worldwide pandemic. Samantha Crain, who just finished a month long tour in the UK opening for The Staves broke it down well: “Making money on a tour is based on the idea that you get to finish the tour. You put a lot of money into starting a tour. The stressful part of it is, that at any moment, if anyone gets COVID, the whole thing comes to a halt. The tour stops whether the artist recoups their expenses or not.” The risk of a breakthrough case severely impacts the financial outcome of touring. Many artists have postponed their tours yet again and some have cancelled altogether. A break-

Patton Magee, lead singer for the North Carolina rock band, The Nude Party, told me this a few hours before their first show back on the road since March 2020: “I think the impetus has been unfairly put on musicians, especially small musicians to continue taking the hit and we just can’t do it anymore. We got vaccinated, we’re doing our part.” “I remember our booking agent, coming into this period [of COVID], and being like, ‘Just so you guys know, we’re entering the lean days now, the fat days are over.’ Those were the fat days? Sleeping on the floor, getting paid $20 bucks a day? Even when everything is well and good, you’re still skimping by at this level,” Patton said. Ticket sales for certain genres have been slower as well. Consumer confidence in the face of the Delta variant has understandably sagged and struggled. It’s taking more effort to sell the same amount of tickets. Many folks with tickets aren’t coming to the show at all. A sold-out concert on paper and a soldout crowd are totally different realities right now. Overall, the live music industry is in much better shape than it was this time last year and there are reasons to be excited for the future of music here. Oklahoma City band Husbands have their next album recorded and they’ve just signed with a booking agent after playing the mega-indie-buzz Treefort Fest in Boise. 19-year old Josh Fudge took a gap year when COVID-19 hit, writing and releasing an album. Spotify fell in love with it and Josh has amassed more than 150,000 monthly listeners — more than enough to land him with a booking agent from a major agency and management. Samantha Crain hits the road later this fall for a run of shows with American Aquarium. Seeing tour buses and vans in the neighborhood a r ou n d To w er Theatre and Ponyboy again feels great. The shows, regardless of crowd size, mean more right now, even if there’s not much socializing with the band at the merch table. We’re all still in the middle of surviving an event that will be a dividing line of our lifetime. Whether you’re attending live shows yet or not, find a way to support a band this fall. Like the rest of us, they’re trying their best.

Those Were The FaT Days? By Chad Whitehead

through case on a tour may force an artist to cancel multiple shows. Those losses are sometimes enough to kill the financial viability of the tour. The tour might be able to stay afloat by rescheduling smaller markets like Wichita, Tulsa and Oklahoma City, but if that breakthrough case hits when you’re in NYC or headed into a festival … Well, it can ruin the entire run. As quickly as you’re re-acclimating to life on the road, you’re trying to figure out what to do with a rented van and a pile of unsold merch while you quarantine in a town that’s not your home.

Imagine spending thirty or forty days away from home and family, working day in and day out, only to return with less money than you started. This is the human cost of musicians touring today. We’ve all been quick to blame an artist for how they’ve chosen to navigate the pandemic with live crowds and fans, myself included. But we’re quickly approaching the twoyear anniversary of the first documented case. As Sam said: “I’m stuck between a rock and a hard place. I’ve got to make a living, and I’ve done my part and continue to do my part.”

MU S IC OKGA Z E T TE .COM | O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1

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By Evan Jarvicks

CAIN’S BALLROOM

423 North Main St

Tulsa

Local Man Ruins Everything Local Man Ruins Everything

The best Local Man Ruins Everything music video is the one painted by the mind’s eye. Certainly, a talented visual artist could do wonders with the instrumental fusion band’s euphoric sounds, but that would encroach on the purity of Local Man. Even with no words, the music speaks for itself. Comprised of some of the most virtuosic and sought-after musicians one is bound to find in Oklahoma City, the tight-knit group blends highly technical shades of jazz, progressive metal, and math rock to create musical fireworks. The trio’s long-awaited self-titled debut album packs its seven tracks with robust, waterfall-fluid electric guitar work, intricate drum kit rhythms, and low-end slap from a bass guitar reputed to have more strings than a hand has fingers. The performers pull every bit of mileage they can out of their core instruments, spanning a range from heavy to delicate with deft grace. For all of the care put into its outsidethe-box creativity, Local Man Ruins Everything was released in September without fanfare, which may seem unusual for anyone not too acquainted with the band’s laissez-faire approach to promotion. While it’s always a challenge to market complicated time signatures and lyricless songs to a broader audience, the group seems to have a more philosophical angle at times. Local Man is not one to make a fuss to convince people that its music is accomplished and worthy of appreciative listening because truly great music already does that by virtue of its existence. It trusts the quality of its craftsmanship. Between its thoughtfully-paced composition and unintrusive mixing, Local Man Ruins Everything gives plenty of air for its dazzling, complex performances to breathe. Like a fidget toy, it provides peace of mind and spirit through its polyrhythmic sense of release, except it feeds the mind’s eye not merely to satisfy but to elevate. It is, in the truest sense of the word, spectacular.

These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27

Oh Boy Records Presents Arlo McKinley, Ponyboy.

ON SALE NOW

NOV 13 Paul Cauthen, Cain’s Ballroom

Music First: Kyle Reid, The Jones Assembly.

NOV 18 & 19 Zach Bryan, Cain’s Ballroom

Playboi Carti : Narcissist, The Zoo Amphitheatre. HIP-HOP

THURSDAY, OCT. 28 Acoustic Open Mic, Core4 Brewing. Ghostland Observatory, Cain’s Ballroom. Music First: Zac Copeland, The Jones Assembly.

FRIDAY, OCT. 29 A Day to Remember w/ Asking Alexandria & Point North, The Criterion Asleep at the Wheel, Cain’s Ballroom. WESTERN SWING

Chase Rice Live in Concert, First Council Casino. Forgotten Space, Cain’s Ballroom.

SATURDAY, OCT. 30

NOV 19 Grgory Alan Isakov with special guest Israel Bebeker (of Blind Pilot), The Jones Assembly NOV 20 Parker Millsap, The Auditorium at the Douglass NOV 20 Shane Smith & The Saints, Cain’s Ballroom NOV 21 Silvesun Pickups, Cain’s Ballroom NOV 24 Read Southall Band, Cain’s Ballroom NOV 24 Graham Colton, The Jones Assembly DEC 2 King and Country, Paycom Center DEC 10 Randy Rogers Band, Cain’s Ballroom DEC 11 JD McPherson, Cain’s Ballroom

Hallowgriiin, The Jones Assembly.

DEC 12 Todd Snider, Cain’s Ballroom

Featuring Kiley Josey and Brothers Griin

JAN 30 TOOL, BOK Center

Josh Abbott Band, Cain’s Ballroom. COUNTRY

SUNDAY, OCT. 31

FEB 22 Hippo Campus, Cain’s Ballroom FEB 22 Strfkr, Tower Theatre

Hosty, The Deli. Electric

MAR 3 YUNGBLUD, Cain’s Ballroom

Yung Gravy, Cain’s Ballroom. Hip hop

APR 3 girl in red with Holly Humberstone, Cain’s Ballroom

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 3 Walk the Moon, Cain’s Ballroom. ALTERNATIVE/

APR 20 Hippo Campus, The Jones Assembly

INDIE

THURSDAY, NOV. 4 Acoustic Open Mic, Core4 Brewing. Big Head Todd and the Monsters, The Jones Assembly The Hangout presents: Nia Moné, Artspace at Untitled. Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Cain’s Ballroom. ROCK

FRIDAY, NOV. 5 Forgotten Space, Cain’s Ballroom. Walk the Moon, The Jones Assembly. ALTERNATIVE/INDIE

SATURDAY, NOV. 6 8th Annual Rock-N Folk-N Chili Cookoff, Cain’s Ballroom. Presented by Horton Records

Drive, Remington Park. Old No. 7 Stage

SUNDAY, NOV. 7 Hosty, The Deli. Electric O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM MUS IC

Dr Dog with Toth, The Jones Assembly

Highly Suspect, Cain’s Ballroom. ROCK

Tribute to the Big 4, Diamond Ballroom.

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TUESDAY, NOV. 9

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.


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Big Head Todd AND THE MONSTERS

Walk The Moon

W/ JANY GREEN DREAM PLANE TOUR

Dr. Dog

11.04.21

11.05.21

11.09.21

W/ TOTH THE LAST TOUR

Gregory Alan Isakov W/ SPECIAL GUEST ISRAEL NEBEKER

11.19.21

KOSU PRESENTS

Parker Millsap @ THE AUDITORIUM AT THE DOUGLASS

Graham Colton THE 20 YEAR HOMECOMING CONCERT

11.20.21

11.24.21

KOSU PRESENTS

Lucinda Williams @ THE AUDITORIUM AT THE DOUGLASS

01.22.22

KOSU PRESENTS

Mat Kearney

W/ THE NATIONAL PARKS THE JANUARY FLOWER TOUR

Kaleo

W/ BELLE MT. FIGHT OR FLIGHT TOUR

Yola

W/ JAC ROSS STAND FOR MYSELF TOUR

Hippo Campus Johnnyswim W/KATELYN TARVER THE JOHNNYSWIM SHOW

02.24.22

03.15.22

03.30.22

04.20.22

04.21.22

BEST CONCERT VENUE BEST BAR FOR LIVE MUSIC FOR TICKETS & MORE INFORMATION:

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THEJONESASSEMBLY.COM

O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM


Sea

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Shrimp Tikka Masala

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While vacationing in Panama, Jarrod Friedel was directed to a restaurant that served a traditional Indian meal, tikka masala, with seafood. The meal there was terrible, Friedel said, but it gave him an idea. Each month, Guyutes chefs Friedel and Matt Pryor team up with Oklahoma Gazette to offer cannabis-infused dishes that go beyond brownies and gummies. This month, they go far out to sea, offering a nontraditional take on the traditional dish. “I’ve done it the traditional way and it’s such a long all-day process with me adding different stuff at different times

a l

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and stirring. I was like, ‘There’s got to be an easier way.’ And there is. It’s a crockpot,” Friedel said. But make sure to follow instructions carefully here, as the process has been tested multiple times. “Normally, it’s chicken, so my chicken would marinate in here and then my chicken fat renders down everything. I can’t do that with the shrimp. I don’t know what a four-hour cook on shrimp would do but it probably wouldn’t be very good,” he said.

M Ph y B oto

Dosage calculation: 28g x 20 percent THC 28g x 200 milligrams (percentage converted to decimal) 5600 x .088 (decarbing loss) 4928 x .80 (loss in infusion process) 3942.4 milligrams divided by 4 cups 985.6 milligrams per cup 738.4 milligrams per 3/4cup 123 milligrams per serving Note: You can cut the infused cream down to 1/2 cup and use a 1/4 cup of regular heavy cream to lower the milligrams of THC

2 yellow onions diced 3 tablespoon whole milk yogurt 1.5 teaspoons garam masala 1 tablespoon smoked paprika 1/2 teaspoon turmeric 1/4 teaspoon cayenne 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon ginger powder 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 lemon juiced 12 ounces tomato sauce 2 tablespoons fenugreek leaves 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 pound raw shrimp 3/4 cup of infused heavy cream jasmine rice naan bread cilantro Sauté onions in olive oil until translucent. Set aside. In a bowl, add lemon juice and salt. Mix until dissolved. Then add: yogurt, garam masala, paprika, turmeric, cayenne, garlic and ginger. Mix well! (If you want to use chicken cut up into 1-inch chunks add to curry slurry and layer the same, except cook on high for four hours. Add onions to a crockpot, then add tomato sauce layered over onions, then layer your curry slurry on top of the tomato sauce. Place the lid on the crockpot and set on high for three hours. After three hours, add heavy cream and mash up fenugreek leaves. Add them first, mix well, then add tomato paste and mix until paste is dissolved. Take three tablespoons of masala and add to raw shrimp, toss to coat, then aauté shrimp for two to four minutes. Lastly, add the shrimp to the masala. Let sit for 5 minutes before serve over jasmine rice naan. Top with cilantro and serve with naan bread.

HIGH CULTURE OKGA Z E T TE .COM | O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1

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O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM


For more information strain reviews scan QR code with your smart phone.

Strain name: Fish Scale Grown by: Cookies Acquired from: Cookies Date acquired: Oct. 12 Physical traits: frosted purple with hints of light green Bouquet: gassy and sweet Review: While there’s definitely a lot of Oklahoma pride in the state’s cannabis industry, there are also a large number of Cookies fans, and for good reason. The last strain of theirs I fell in love with was the Run The Jewels-branded strain Ooh La La, but this latest collaboration with Compound Genetics gives it a run for its money. The high starts off mild but quickly builds steam, leaving you looking for things you’re holding in your hand. A cross between Gelatti and The Menthol, this is another even-keel smoke that relaxes without completely putting you down though it is potent, so tread carefully if there are still items left on your day’s to-do list. If you like this, there are multiple Cookies/Compound Genetics strains in the pipeline.

Strain name: Kish Mintz Grown by: Dream Leaf Farms Acquired from: The Lettuce Bar Date acquired: Oct. 12

high without bogging you down at all, this one is an excellent mid-day smoke that lasts just as long, if not longer, than far more expensive strains. Another great find on the hundred-dollar ounce shelf here was the Don Mega grown by Firehorse.

Physical traits: light green with purple Bouquet: sweet and spicy Review: Normally, the premier shelf (whether it’s called “top,” “platinum,” “exotic” or so on) is where the strains for these reviews are culled, but upon a first visit to The Lettuce Bar in Choctaw, it was actually the bottom shelf that stood out to me. Usually that’s where mediocre outdoor flower or shake is relegated but the hundred-dollar ounces here looked and smelled as good as the best offerings at many other dispensaries, so a chance was taken. A very pleasing smoke with a strong, euphoric head

HIGH CULTURE OKGA Z E T TE .COM | O C T O B E R 2 7, 2 0 2 1

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY - WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 30 Homework: Tell me what worked for you when all else failed. https://Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19)

Aries philosopher Emil Cioran wrote, “When I meet friends or people I know who are going through a difficult period, I usually have this advice for them: ‘Spend 20 minutes in a cemetery, and you’ll see that, though your worry won’t disappear, you’ll almost forget about it and you’ll feel better.’” I don’t think you’re weathering a terribly difficult phase right now, Aries, but you may be dealing with more riddles and doubts and perplexities than you’re comfortable with. You could be feeling a bit darker and heavier than usual. And I think Cioran’s advice would provide you with the proper stimulation to transform your riddles and doubts and perplexities into clarity and grace and aplomb. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here’s a costume suggestion: the spirit of a dead ancestor.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

According to some spiritual teachers, desire interferes with our quest for illumination. It diverts us from what’s real and important. I know gurus who even go so far as to say that our yearnings deprive us of freedom; they entrap us and diminish us. I strongly disagree with all those ideas. I regard my longing as a primary fuel that energizes my drive to free myself from pain and nonsense. How about you, Taurus? In alignment with astrological omens, I authorize you to deepen and refine and celebrate the yearning in your heart. Your title/nickname could be: 1. Yearning Champion. 2. Desire Virtuoso. 3. Connoisseur of Longing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

Author Jessamyn West confessed, “I am always jumping into the sausage grinder and deciding, even before I’m half ground, that I don’t want to be a sausage after all.” I offer her testimony as a cautionary tale, Gemini. There’s no astrological reason, no cosmic necessity, that decrees you must become like a sausage anytime soon. Such a fate can be easily avoided. All you must do is commit yourself to not

jumping into the sausage grinder. Also: In every way you can imagine, don’t be like a sausage. (To meditate on sausage-ness, read the Wikipedia entry: tinyurl. com/SausageMetaphor)

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

Our fellow Cancerian, author Franz Kafka, told us, “It is often safer to be in chains than to be free.” And yes, some of us Crabs go through phases when we crave safety so much that we tolerate, even welcome, being in chains. But the fact is that you’re far more likely to be safe if you are free, not in chains. And according to my reading of the astrological omens, that’s extra true for you now. If you can celebrate Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are costume suggestions: runaway prisoner, escape artist, freedom fighter.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

Some of us yearn for allies who can act like saviors: rescue us from our demons and free us from our burdensome pasts and transform us into the beauties we want to become. On the other hand, some of us do all this hard work by ourselves: rescue ourselves from our demons and free ourselves from our burdensome pasts and transform ourselves into the beauties we want to become. I highly recommend the latter approach for you in the coming weeks, Leo. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here is a costume suggestion: your own personal savior.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

collection of virtues and talents is worthless.” Libran occultist Aleister Crowley wrote that, and I agree. But let’s phrase his idea more positively: To make full use of your virtues and talents, you must develop a strong willpower. And here’s the good news, Libra: The coming weeks will be a favorable time to cultivate your willpower, along with the assets that bolster it, like discipline, self-control, and concentration. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are accessories I recommend for you to carry with you, no matter what your costume is: a wand, a symbolic lightning bolt, an ankh, an arrow, a Shiva lingam stone or crystal.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Mardi Gras is a boisterous festival that happens every February all over the planet. One hotspot is New Orleans. The streets there are filled with costumed revelers who enjoy acting in ways that diverge from their customary behavior. If you want to ride on a float in the parade that snakes down Royal Street, you must, by law, wear a festive mask. I invite all of you Scorpios to engage in similar festivities for the next three weeks— even if you’re not doing much socializing or partying. It’s a favorable time to experiment with a variety of alternate identities. Would you consider adopting a different persona or two? How could you have fun playing around with your self-image?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

“One of the reasons people are so unhappy is they don’t talk to themselves,” says author Elizabeth Gilbert. “You have to keep a conversation going with yourself throughout your life,” she continues, “to see how you’re doing, to keep your focus, to remain your own friend.” Now is a favorable time to try such an experiment, Virgo. And if you already have skill in the art of carrying on a vibrant dialog with yourself, now is a perfect moment to upgrade and refine it. Try this experiment: Imagine having a conversation with the Future You.

Jungian psychotherapist and storyteller Clarissa Pinkola Estés reminds us, “In fairy tales, tears change people, remind them of what is important, and save their very souls.” I hope you’re open to the possibility of crying epic, cathartic, catalytic tears in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. According to my analysis, you have a prime opportunity to benefit from therapeutic weeping. It could chase your fears and cure your angst and revivify your soul. So please take advantage of this gift from life. Be like a superhero whose superpower is to generate healing by crying.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

“In the absence of willpower, the most complete

Filmmaker Wim Wenders said, “Any film that supports

the idea that things can be changed is a great film in my eyes.” I’ll expand upon that: “Any experience, situation, influence, or person that supports the idea that things can be changed is great.” This is a useful and potentially inspiring theme for you to work with right now, Capricorn. In accordance with astrological rhythms, I hope you will be a connoisseur and instigator of beneficial, beautiful transformations.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Fitness buff Jack LaLanne was still doing his daily workout when he was 95. He was also famous for performing arduous feats. At age 65, for example, he swam a mile through Japan’s Lake Ashinoko while towing 65 boats filled with 6,500 pounds of wood pulp. I think you’re currently capable of a metaphorically comparable effort, Aquarius. One way to do it is by mastering a psychological challenge that has previously seemed overwhelming. So meditate on where your extra strength would be best directed, and use it wisely! If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are costume suggestions: fitness buff, bodybuilder, marathon runner, yoga master.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

When birdwatchers describe a bird, they speak of its “jizz.” This term refers to the distinctive character of its habitual movements, flying style, posture, vocal mannerisms, and coloring. One aficionado defines jizz as the bird’s “indefinable quality,” or the “vibe it gives off.” I’ve got a theory that right now you’re as bird-like as you’ve ever been. You seem lighter and freer than usual, less bound to gravity and solemnity, and more likely to break into song. Your fears are subsiding because you have the confidence to leave any situation that’s weighing you down. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here’s a costume suggestion: the bird that has your favorite kind of jizz.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes /daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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We Buy, You Fly Oklahoma Gazette is currently seeking a route driver to deliver papers in the Metro OKC area. Driver’s earn significant hourly equivalent pay. Our drivers are independent contractors who deliver Gazette’s every other Wednesday. Minivans and trucks work best, insurance and a good driving record are required. To apply email phanscom@okgazette.com or call (405) 528-6000 Deliver Gazettes... and leave the food and people smells for those other drivers.


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PUZZLES NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE | ‘CLUE’: THE MOVIE By Brandon Koppy | Puzzles Edited by Will Shortz | 1024 1

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81 Gave, as gossip 83 Trimmed parts of green beans 84 A Man for All Seasons 87 Matricidal figure of Greek myth 89 Golden-rule word 90 Spanish ‘‘Listen!’’ 91 Dostoyevsky’s Prince Myshkin, so the book title declares 93 Cause for switching positions 97 Scent of a Woman 104 ‘‘____ you decent?’’ 105 ____ Toy Barn (‘‘Toy Story 2’’ locale) 106 Small things that you pluck 107 Breakout band for Harry Styles and Zayn Malik, familiarly 108 Overlie 111 Mad magazine cartoonist Drucker 112 Get the juices flowing? 113 Wayne’s World 114 Space Jam 118 Gene variant 119 Denominator in the velocity formula 120 Beam for train tracks 121 Fragrant ring 122 Candy with the slogan ‘‘Not sorry’’ 123 Skosh 124 Main artery 125 Panic button, of a sort

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26 Guys and Dolls 27 Lucrative and Syllables when you undemanding forget the words 28 Ingredient in a The universe has an McDonald’s McFlurry estimated 1,082 of them 29 Seasonal winds ‘‘A mouse!’’ 31 Fictional brand of Beyoncé chart-topper rocket-powered roller ‘‘Single ____ (Put a skates Ring on It)’’ 32 ‘‘Cross my heart!’’ Simile center ____ Lawrence College 35 Fam girl 36 Sounds of doubt Magazine co-founded 38 Star Trek in 1945 by Hélène 40 Woodworker’s tool Gordon Lazareff Similar-sounding phrase, 42 Some tourist spots in San Francisco such as ‘‘I scream’’ for 43 Tax pro, for short ‘‘ice cream’’ 45 Ancient work that describes Field of Dreams the sacred tree Yggdrasil

46 Trendy home gym purchase 50 Top Gun 55 Baseball family name much seen in crosswords 56 Jerkface 59 Tightly affixed 60 Parrot’s sound 61 Insurance department 63 ‘‘____ for me, thanks’’ 64 Big no-nos 66 Letters From Iwo Jima 67 The Imitation Game 69 The Fifth Element 73 Perfectly comfortable 75 1930s migrant to California 76 Spirits 77 Sesh on Reddit 80 Speed reader?

1 Pet that should come with a lint roller? 2 Given that 3 Exasperated parent’s retort 4 Flue-like 5 Confucian philosophy 6 Singer Rita 7 ‘‘Floating terror’’ of the sea 8 Many social media users 9 Donkey with a pinned-on tail 10 Two in a million? 11 ‘‘The Kiss’’ painter 12 Successfully uses a password 13 Melodious 14 Place to develop one’s chops 15 Innate 16 Part of a makeup test? 17 Texting tech, briefly 21 ‘‘____ es!’’ (‘‘That’s

right!’’: Sp.) 24 ‘‘Clueless’’ protagonist 25 Accept eagerly, with ‘‘at’’ 30 Org. with an annual Codebreaker Challenge 32 Double-crossed and half-baked 33 Embarrassing public episode 34 Restless desire 37 Luxurious 39 Product for one who wonders, ‘‘Am I expecting?’’ 40 Increased into something much more valuable 41 Spy novelist Deighton 44 Weave off the shoulder? 46 Get ready for vacation 47 Civil rights activist Baker 48 It may be forgiven 49 Mystic’s board 50 4x World Series winner Martinez 51 [more info below] 52 Ice cream containers 53 ____ compensation (subject of modern debate) 54 Spanish marinade 57 Drawer of shorts, e.g. 58 Cutthroat mentality 62 Cardinal’s hat, in Britain 65 Tender areas 67 Pop in the fridge 68 Hershey’s chocolate and-toffee bar 70 Diatribe 71 Quaint sign word 72 Noun-making suffix 74 Fumble for words 76 Dodos 77 City that replaced Lagos as Nigeria’s capital 78 Cameo 79 Predatory insect living in woodpiles 82 French fabric 85 Caramel or hot fudge, basically 86 Euphemistic exclamation 88 Ike’s domain in W.W.II 91 Reason the physicist stayed in bed? 92 ‘‘The Shape of Water’’ director 94 Natasha ____, Boris’s partner against Rocky and Bullwinkle 95 Some water-park rides 96 Olympics symbol for

Madrid’s country 98 Sang along when you forgot the words 99 Ingredient in healing gel 100 Latte art medium 101 Arch support 102 Bill killers 103 Utopian 106 Like a birthday cake, pre-party 109 ‘‘____ All That’’ (1999 film) 110 Frequently, quaintly 112 Lugosi of horror films 113 Fish with an elongated jaw 115 Singer Sumac 116 Describe in a negative way 117 Toke

Stumped? Call 1-900-285-5656 to get the answers to any three clues by phone ($1.20 a minute).

SUDOKU VERY HARD | N° 2463 Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3-by-3 box Grid n°2463 diabolic contains the numbers 1 through 9. www.printmysudoku.com

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P A G E A I N C T I N O G P A E L L E C T T I B I E S T E A E N

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VOL. XLIII NO. 12 Oklahoma Gazette is circulated at its designated distribution points free of charge to readers for their individual use and by mail to subscribers. The cash value of this copy is $1. Persons taking copies of the Oklahoma Gazette from its distribution points for any reason other than their or others’ individual use for reading purposes are subject to prosecution. Please address all unsolicited news items (non-returnable) to the editor. For subscription inquiries, email kbleakley@okgazette.com

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