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INSIDE COVER Grand Gentleman use style to help build young men of substance. By Matt Dinger Cover by Phillip Danner Photo by Jared Kinley of Light Box Studios

NEWS 4 6

COVER Grand Gentlemen Citizen Spotlight: Jessica Laster

EAT & DRINK 8 Gazedibles

ARTS & CULTURE 11

OKC arcades Pollard Theatre 16 Resonator fridge controversy 18 Paseo Arts Festival 20 Best of OKC nomination ballot 22 Candyman review 25 Calendar 14

MUSIC The Mountain Goats Rocklahoma/ Born & Raised 33 Chad Whitehead column 34 Live music 28

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THE HIGH CULTURE 35

Strain reviews

FUN 36 37

Puzzles sudoku | crossword Astrology

ADAM AGUILAR NOW PLAYING

WATCHPLAYITLOUD.COM

OKG CLASSIFIEDS 38

VOL. XLIII NO. 08 PUBLISHER | Bryan Hallman bhallman@okgazette.com EDITOR | Matt Dinger mdinger@okgazette.com

COMING SOON

november 13

queensryche

CREATIVE DIRECTOR | Phillip Danner DIGITAL MEDIA & PRODUCTION COORDINATOR | Kendall Bleakley SOCIAL DESIGNER | Berlin Green ADVERTISING advertising@okgazette.com 405-528-6000 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Saundra Godwin | sgodwin@okgazette.com Christy Duane | cduane@okgazette.com Clyde Dorr | cdorr@okgazette.com ACCOUNTING/HR MANAGER Monique Dodd | mdodd@okgazette.com CIRCULATION MANAGER Patrick Hanscom | phanscom@okgazette.com CONTRIBUTORS Brett Fieldcamp Trevor Hultner Adrienne Proctor Josh Wallace Chad Whitehead

GRANDBOXOFFICE.COM

I-40 EXIT 178 | SHAWNEE, OK | 405-964-7263

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Grand Gentlemen, From Left to right Sterling Abernathy, Korey Eakers, DeQuan Cooper | Photo Jared Kinley

If the clothes make the man, then Korey Eakers and his Grand Gentlemen are as sharp and cool as a blade. “I was 14 years old and the very first time I ever saw Barack Obama, he changed my life. I had never seen a black man who spoke like that and looked like that, in my lifetime,” Eakers said. That indelible image was left in his mind and he continued his way through Edmond Sante Fe High School where his father had placed his son after a rocky middle school experience. In Edmond, Eakers played football and ran track, securing a track and field scholarship at Southern Nazarene University where he made All-American four times and was twice a national champion, he said.

“I got my degree in sports management and business administration. I was convinced that I was going to go to law school and be a sports agent up until 2018. I started getting really involved and really active in the community. And I decided that community work was actually where my heart was at. The law stuff is still something I think about from time-to-time but I kinda scrapped that to focus on Grand Gentlemen. I really want to do this full-time.” Eakers worked his way through college for GQ Fashions. Afterward, he co-founded The Wardrobe. “We literally built that from the ground up. I’m super proud of that,” he said. In addition to making custom

| Photo Provided

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suits, Eakers and Grand Gentlemen started to lead photoshoots and, at the same time, teach tie-tying to school age children. “We call it positive propaganda. A lot of times, if something happens, you always see mugshots, mugshots, mugshots of young black men, so we just wanted to show an alternative. We call it ‘changing the narrative.’ We want to show well-dressed, professional-looking black men looking happy, fun, with other black men in a good environment. But we wanted to stop doing that and just do something more real, something more tangible, really give back to the ‘hood, give back to our kids’ communities. And so after I graduated, we started doing a lot more of the tie days where we go to elementary schools and talk to the kids and teach them how to tie ties and donate ties. The crazy thing about doing community work, especially working with kids, once you get into it, you get absorbed and sucked into it and the feeling is unmatched. We just wanted to do more. So we did a coat drive that year and then we had a team meeting, and I was like, ‘Guys, the most impactful thing I think about is a scholarship. A part of our message is that we want

to spread the gentleman’s lifestyle, culture and fashion, so I was like, you know, I think we should be gifting some young men with suits, so they can take their first steps into that world, as Obi Wan Kenobi would say,” Eakers said. Grand Gentlemen — now a 10-man organization — has been awarding its

“When I was in high school, I knew when I was older I wanted to be a sharp dresser. I thought I was gonna be rich and I thought that’s how rich people dressed. I’m not rich, but I still do it somehow.” “Man of the Year” scholarships, funded by its own events and private donations. The first year, they gave out $500 and a tailored suit to two young men. The next year, they did three. “The Wardrobe actually sponsors our suits that we give to young men who win our scholarships every year. Once we start our custom suiting company up, we’re going to start doing it ourselves, but they’ve been a big help … This year, we awarded ten young men $1,000 each, a free suit, free shirt, free custom bow tie, and a copy of The Autobiography


of Malcolm X. We got them a free photo session too with their new suits on and we have their families come out for a little ceremony. We got them free extra senior pictures and free family pictures. It was a great event. Great day,” Eakers said. After a $10,000 donation from Nextep during the pandemic, Grand Gentlemen are poised to give out exponentially more scholarships during its next round. Next round, he plans to award ten scholarship recipients from Oklahoma City, three in the Tulsa area and two in Dallas. If the Dallas plans fall through, that pair will be awarded to two more young men in Tulsa, Eakers said. At the same time, he is fostering a parallel organization with the same purpose designed for young women. “I’m of the opinion that if somebody is going to give back to the females or, excuse me, young women in this capacity, it needs to be a female organization led by women doing this. So, my sister, who’s actually the CFO of Grand Gents, is actually starting a sister organization,” Eakers said. The working title for the scholarship will be the Leading Ladies, though the final name of the organization itself has not been chosen. Concurrently, Eakers and his gentlemen have established the Grand Gentlemen Supply Company, which will

UNI_21-RP-012 Thoroughbred Season_Gaz.indd 1

Photo Provided

produce lines of products vetted by Eakers and his men. “Out of everything, the whiskey is actually moving the fastest … We’re also doing beard oils and beard balms and stuff like that,” he said.

For more information about Grand Gentlemen, scan the QR code with your smart phone

COV E R S TORY OKGA Z E T TE .COM | S E P T E M B E R 18/25/21 , 2 0 2 1 1:435 PM


CITIZEN SPOTLIGHT

In each issue, we are highlighting a person in our community who stands out for their leadership, kindness, and good deeds. Know someone like that? Email bgreen@okgazette.com to share their story. Jessica Laster, Sandwiches With Love When Jessica Laster opens the door to her prep area and storage space in the basement of the The Education and Employment Ministry (TEEM) facility, she beams with pride. Her mission, her life’s work, is to lend a hand to help serve and protect those in need. A full-time hairstylist, she started Sandwiches With Love in her free time as a way to give back to people in a space she knows all too well. Just a few years ago, Jessica was struggling with addiction and homelessness when she found herself able to pull through with help and love. “I was homeless for about two years when I relapsed for the last time,” Laster said. :My family was just like, we’re done. They’ve been going through it for so long with me, and they just couldn’t do it anymore. They had an apartment that got foreclosed on. So everybody moved out except for some of us who didn’t have anywhere to go, so we just squatted there until we had to leave. That’s when my uncle started to bring me bags of food, and that was a big deal.” “People were always asking if I had any food. Everybody needed food, and it was the main thing no one had. I still see a lot of myself in the people downtown. They’re not really at the point where they need money; they just need a few basic things, like food. So that’s how all this started, by simply providing these basic things. I just try to love these people where they’re at,” she said. 6

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Jessica Laster of Sandwiches with Love | Photo Berlin Green

She started in 2019, making and distributing about 50 sandwiches per week to homeless camps in downtown Oklahoma City. Since Jessica began her passion project, the community need has only grown, with the size and population of these camps nearly doubling. “We usually feed around 75 people every week, sometimes more, but we’ve been growing a little bit. In the past few weeks alone, we’ve passed out around 120 sandwiches, and we run out every week,” Laster said. Entirely funded by community generosity and donations, Sandwiches With Love is run solely by Laster and a couple of volunteers who pack up and distribute groceries, toiletries, and pet food to as many people as possible. TEEM offered Jessica a space for food and supply storage and in January, Johnnie’s Charcoal Broiler stepped in to help by donating bread and sandwich supplies each week. “You can’t fix someone’s situation, but you can always give them something healthy to eat,” she said, “And, you know, just let people know that you love them.”

Scan the QR code with your smartphone for more information about Sandwiches with Love


OKG

COMMUNITY + MENTAL HEALTH The connection between mental health and addiction is complex. In an ongoing effort to support the health and safety of Oklahoma citizens and better serve our communities, we recommend the following resources to help you or someone you love who may be struggling with mental health or addiction issues. BH

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GAZEDIBLES

Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!

September is National Chicken Month, but, let’s be honest. Every month is National Chicken Month as far as we’re concerned. There’s no shortage of ways to prepare this delectable bird. Whether fried, baked and everything in between, each culture has a tasty version to share. By Gazette Staff Photos Phillip Danner or provided

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Cheever’s Cafe

Eischen’s Bar

Ray’s Chicken Kitchen

The first concept from Good Egg Dining Group, Cheever’s Cafe has been one of Oklahoma City’s most decorated restaurants since 2001. Known for the exceptional contemporary comfort food and its chicken fried steak, another crowd favorite has always been the chicken and waffles from the brunch menu. The fried chicken matched with the cornmeal waffles gives great grace to the brunch palette or try the roasted chicken and pepper jack strudel with its signature curry oil if you head in later or want to skip the breading.

A reputation of a century plus another quarter of one is reason enough to hit the road to Eischen’s Bar, about a half-hour drive from the city’s core. Legendary for its perfectly tender whole fried chicken served with white bread slices, onions and two varieties of pickles, the only way to fully experience Eishen’s is to also get the chili cheese nachos and a side of fried okra (since you came all this way anyway). With a simple menu all done to perfection, it’s no secret why Eischen’s has never been an Oklahoma secret.

Chef Ray’s Street Eats food truck has been around the block many times in the OKC metro and its brick-and-mortar location inside the beautiful Parlor food collective takes it up a notch. An expanded menu of chicken finger creations inspired by a variety of different cuisines is the centerpiece, with flavors ranging from Nashville hot to Korean red chili glaze. The Deep South Sandwich (pictured) had a sweet twist to the fried chicken that was a top of the crisp slaw and abundant (and we mean abundant) pimento cheese.

2409 N. Hudson Ave. cheeverscafe.com 405-525-7007

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109 S. 2nd St., Okarche www.eischensbar.com 405-263-9939

11 NE 6th St. (inside Parlor) 405-294-4740


S&B’s Burger Joint multiple metro OKC www.sandbburgers.com

Taj Cuisine of India 1500 NW 23rd St. tajokc.com 405-601-1888

Known for their wild burgers and rich shakes, S&B’s pickled fried chicken appetizer should not be missed. The chicken is brined in pickle juice and fried, then lightly dusted with ranch seasoning. For those who need more ranch or pickles, it’s served with a side of it pickled. The soft hint of dill comes out through the chicken bites, highlighting the flavor and adding a satisfying crunch with each bite, but it’s subtle, so don’t shy away if you’re not much of a pickle person.

Taj’s chicken tikka masala, with its tender, boneless chicken drenched in a rich and creamy tomato base, tastes exactly like it did twenty years ago and that’s no complaint. If you want to keep it boneless, their chicken biryani, with its hint of mint, always hits the mark and their tandoori chicken, marinated in yogurt and spices then grilled in the eponymous tandoor (clay oven), will satisfy bone-in fans. Their chicken dishes are just a few of the reasons why Taj is a celebrated OKC mainstay.

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Moni’s

Chow’s

17200 N May Ave.

3033 N May Ave. 405-949-1663

monisokc.com 405-285-5991

If you haven’t been to Moni’s in a few years, John and Rachel Foster have drastically expanded both their skills and the restaurant itself. The chicken rollatini, which is spaghetti served over a chicken breast stuffed with cheese and basil in a creamy pink mushroom sauce, is definitely among the best Italian dishes being served in the OKC metro, but the chicken piccata, with its lemon caper sauce, isn’t one to miss either.

If you’ve been to Chow’s, you know about Chow’s. If you haven’t been, it’s time for you to learn. Chicken is an easy introduction and sweet and sour chicken is the first entree on both the lunch and dinner specials. But where Chow’s really excels is at its authentic Asian dishes rather than Americanized “Chinese fare. That being said, you should definitely give their steamed chicken with ginger scallions or black bean sauce a go.

Blue Sky Bank is pleased to announce the addition of Kyle Powell to our team. Kyle joins the bank as Chief Lending Officer with over 16 years of banking experience in national, large regional, and community banks. Kyle is a graduate of the University of Wyoming, where he obtained his BS in Finance with a minor in Banking and Financial Services. He also graduated Leadership Oklahoma City as a member of LOYAL Class VII. During his career, Kyle has worked in lending, special assets, and credit departments. Kyle will be responsible for implementing the vision and strategy of the bank while overseeing the daily operations of our commercial banking team across the bank’s eight locations in Tulsa, Pawhuska, Cleveland, Cushing, and San Antonio. He will also serve as a member of the Executive Loan Committee and Executive Management Team. Kyle previously served on the Boards of Oklahoma Contemporary and Redbud. In 2012, Kyle was the recipient of the Journal Records, “40 under 40”, being recognized as a young professional working to make Oklahoma a better place.

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Round1 in Quail Springs Mall | Photo Phillip Danner

A Journey of Pizza Consumption and Self-Discovery By Trevor Hultner

I have a confession to make. I didn’t go to arcades when I was a kid. Part of the reason why is that I’m a child of the 90s. I was born a whole decade after the arcade boom and bust, and by the time I was ten years old - at the turn of the millennium most arcades simply didn’t exist in the public sphere. Games themselves mostly lived in our bedrooms or basements or over at friends’ houses, on consoles we had or consoles we wanted, and the desire to pinch pennies (or quarters, as the case may be) for a weekly trip to the mall was just never ingrained in me. Still, the arcade has remained a popular part of the American imagination, a formative youth place that persists in pop culture. What drives this nostalgia? Can I access some vital part of it, even though I missed it entirely when it mattered most? I decided to pay a visit to some places that promised the classic arcade experience to see what was up. This is what I found.

ROUND1 BOWLING AND AMUSEMENT My journey toward ludic enlightenment began at Round1 Bowling and

Amusement, a new “family entertainment complex” recently built into the side of Quail Springs Mall. The first thing you need to know about Round1 is that it’s cavernous. Truly sprawling. It takes up a huge chunk of the first floor of the mall, from the southwestern entrance to the food court. The second thing is this: there are different versions of Round1, depending on when you go. During the day, the space is like a de-branded Chuck E. Cheese. Food – primarily pizza, burgers and other fast fare – is served, the party rooms lining the outer wall are open for parties and kids are free to run free on the premises. After 10 p.m., you have to be over 18 to keep hanging out. And after midnight, Round1 is transformed into a full-on bar with $2 wine glasses and $4 pints along with an extensive selection of liquor. Anyone under 21 is kicked out. There’s certainly no shortage of things to do at Round1 for any age group. Billiards tables and a bowling alley take up a considerable amount of floor space for folks whose interests include rolling balls on a flat surface. Then there’s the frankly silly number of claw games with all sorts of toys and stuffed animals inside. A few Skee-ball machines rest in the back, waiting for a few choice bullseyes. And then, of course, there’s the arcade itself: a few dozen cabinets from every generation lined meticulously up along the outer rim of the facility, blinking and flashing alluringly; there’s a space over by the restaurant area where

the bigger machines sit, beckoning players to take a ride that must have blown kids’ minds in their heyday. The thing about Round1 is, as much as they make it a kind of all-purpose place to visit, it’s less of a “barcade” and much, much more of a family fun destination. The place is primarily for kids, down to the prize wall filled with colorful toys up by the registers. The pizza’s pretty good and you can get soda by the pitcher for like $7, which is genuinely a pretty good deal for events like birthday parties. Does Round1 offer a classic “arcade” experience? Maybe a specific type. This sprawling and still-shiny entertainment compound above the food court replaces the smaller, dingier, arguably-more-”nostalgic” Tilt arcade that was tucked in the back corner of the food court for years.

UP-DOWN ARCADE BAR Walking into Up-Down in the Plaza District, it’s clear this place’s reputation precedes it. It’s packed, even late at night on a Sunday before the work week. As other guests entered behind me, I overheard them whisper excitedly to their friends about the place. It’s been open for a year, but we had only been in a COVID lull for a couple of months. The lights are turned down low, and the sound of arcade and pinball machines fill the air over the eclectic music playlists piped in through the speakers. I need to make another confession: I’m not a “bar” person, which is to say,

I don’t drink and I don’t really go out to bars, but this was the first bar I’d been in with two levels and an upstairs patio. I am easily impressed by new (to me) stuff, so after grabbing a couple slices of Up-Down’s delicious pizza, I made my way up and out to soak in the atmosphere. There is definitely a specific sense of nostalgia Up-Down wants to evoke in its patrons, and that nostalgia is targeted directly at my generation and maybe the cohort right behind it. Classic 80s and 90s arcade cabinets like Ms. Pac-Man, Mortal Kombat II and a sixperson X-Men game sit alongside stations where groups of friends can play Nintendo 64 couch co-op games. Every game is one token to play (the equivalent of a quarter), and when the drinks are between $3 and $8 and the slices are $3.50, it’s very easy to see how someone could end up effortlessly dropping a bit of cash here in a night. But if I had to be honest, I don’t think the appeal right now is the games themselves. The vibe at Up-Down is simply immaculate. After a year and a half or so of the pandemic, going to a place that was just … positive. Everyone was enjoying themselves. Good conversations were being had over tasty food and great drinks. That in and of itself has become a much stronger force of nostalgia than any game cabinet or pinball machine. I’d absolutely bring friends here just to hang out. In her book “Coin-Operated Americans: Rebooting Boyhood at the Video Game Arcade,” cultural histo-

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Friday, Sept. 3, 2021 • 6-9pm Masks Encouraged

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rian Carly A. Kocurek describes a similarly-oriented Barcade in Brooklyn as “a children’s play space reimagined as an adult entertainment venue. It is also a place where the history of the video game machine folds back into itself— here, the video game returns to its origins as a bar amusement.” Watching smiling crowds of people my age and younger mill around from machine to machine, I can see what Kocurek meant: the convergence of multiple generations of, for lack of a better term, “kid,” here. Nostalgia erases the years, but one only needs to turn around and face the multipanel OLED displays reorient oneself in the present.

CACTUS JACK'S FAMILY FUN CENTER When it comes to Cactus Jack’s, located on Council Road and NW 10th, there is basically nothing manufactured about the nostalgia on display here. According to their website, Cactus Jack’s is the oldest and longest-running pure arcade in the entire metro, and its current lineup of game cabinets and pinball machines spans literal decades. It is situated in an old and extremely 12

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long cinderblock building, with a sign advertising “PINBALL ARCADE SKEEBALL POOL&MORE” out front. What you see is definitively what you get. You come here to do one thing, and one thing only: play video games. Everything in this facility is geared toward getting you to do that. Yes, there are snacks. Yes, there is alcohol. Yes, you can hold your kid’s next birthday party here. Yes, you can get prizes for winning Skee-ball. No, it is not a “Family Entertainment Complex” in the same way Round1, or similar venues like Chuck E. Cheese, Main Event or Dave & Buster’s are. It’s also not a barcade, catering to a form of nostalgia more akin to a vague notion of “what it must have been like.” It is a trueblue arcade. And to be honest with you, that’s a good thing. If we’re talking about the modern arcade being a portal to the past, this is the closest unvarnished experience you’ll have in that regard, and there are not many places like that left, basically anywhere. The atmosphere here is no-nonsense,


UpDown in the Plaza District | Photo Berlin Green

Cactus Jack’s Family Fun Center , one of the original OKC arcades, in west Oklahoma City | Photo Phillip Danner

but it is not unwelcome. You can buy tokens in bulk for cheap - I got 225 tokens on a plastic scannable card for $10 - but they only work on the games, not the pinball machines. For those you have to put in actual cash. There’s a row of classic rock band-themed pinball machines along a back wall, and tucked away in a corner, an Initial-D racing game machine, something I hadn’t seen at any of the previous places, which stuck out to me. There was also a House of the Dead 4 cabinet hanging out, waiting for someone to pick up one of the light guns, and a bunch of classic cabinets, like Centipede, by the entrance. It felt like an arcade, full-stop. And as I wandered down the midway, stopping to gaze at the extremely 90s cabinet art on some of the machines, I felt something like a memory form in my brain, from a childhood that wasn’t mine: a vision of this place but full to bursting with kids experiencing Pac-Man for the first time. Or Street Fighter II, or Dragon’s Lair. There is a reason arcades remain at the center of our cultural mythology. By all accounts, the arcade should be dead, killed first by the home console and computer gaming markets and then again

by a whirlwind of other economic crises and burst bubbles, but places like this remain. The companies that maintain these increasingly brittle machines remain. The people who grew up playing these games - they also remain, and they bring their kids, and grandkids, here. “Not only has nostalgia affected how we imagine and reimagine the arcade as a contemporary physical site, but it has affected how we conceive of the historical arcade,” Kocurek wrote. “The rehabilitation of the video game arcade has become a major project. The arcade, once a cultural fad, has now become a privileged cultural site in need of protection; particularly successful games have become part of the arcade’s canon. The classic arcade is presented as a kind of living time capsule that consumers can visit and play in, and even newer arcades are often presented as part of a proud cultural tradition.” So, if you happen to find yourself out and about on a weekend looking for something to pass the time, maybe when the Delta variant has settled down some, stop by one of these spots and play a few games. Your childhood might thank you.

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New

Directions Pollard Theatre Company Opens Season 34 under new leadership By Adrienne Proctor

Pollard Theater in Guthrie was purchased in 1919 by George Pollard. | Photo Phillip Danner

2020 was a time of reset for the performing arts. The pandemic brought the entire industry to a standstill, and in the meantime, artists and technicians were forced to look inward. Many things need to change about the performing arts industry, and change happens first in our own communities. Artists need safe spaces to work, and patrons need to be given the full story. What happens behind the scenes is more often a toxic environment than not. The shift occurs when those who make theatre happen – directors, choreographers, board members, and actors – make conscious decisions to create and maintain safe working conditions. The industry as a whole is finally starting to change for the better. The Pollard Theatre in Guthrie stood alone for many years amongst other theatres in the Oklahoma City area. Pollard Theatre’s former artistic director W. Jerome Stevenson had a large role in making The Pollard what it is today. Thanks to his thoughtful, collaborative leadership, The Pollard is the

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inviting, comfortable, and safe environment that this community needs. It was with protecting this legacy in mind that Stevenson set out to find a replacement for his own role. Stevenson stepped down as artistic director early this year, taking a new career path and focusing on other endeavors. Prior to leaving, Stevenson made the choice to select longtime company member Jared Blount to take over as artistic director. Blount has over twenty years’ experience in the theatre industry. He joined the Pollard Theatre Company in 2011 as an actor, and became the director of media in 2015. Blount has performed in multiple roles at The Pollard, including starring as Leo Bloom in their 2017 production of The Producers, then in an acclaimed role as Hedwig in Hedwig and the Angry Inch. Blount is known for his singing ability and rock star persona, having also performed in rock musicals Heathers, American Idiot and Altar Boyz, but his acting is second to none. Blount has been a favorite of Pollard audiences and theatre critics alike since he first came on the scene, and he’s only grown since. Blount is also a talented director, and directed The Pollard’s revival of Evil Dead: The Musical and Ghost: The Musical. As a director and leader, Blount is similar to his predecessor. Blount is hard working, outrageously talented, and possesses no ego to be found. One

of the most genuine and approachable directors in the industry, he fosters the collaborative atmosphere that was set in motion by Stevenson. Blount leads with heart and continues the legacy of making The Pollard the enriching experience it is. Under Stevenson’s direction, the historic Pollard Theatre became a shining beacon for the community, and a special kind of home for all who entered through its doors. Now as the company goes in new directions, the theatre is in more than capable hands. Prior to re-opening after the COVIDrelated shut down, The Pollard hosted a fundraising benefit in May. Welcome Home: A Night Benefitting The Pollard took place at the Magnolia Moon outdoor venue in Guthrie. The event featured food trucks and live performances from local musicians Johnny Woods and The Jason Young Band. “The community of Guthrie really showed up and supported us during our Welcome Home Event” said Aaron Marshall, chair of The Pollard’s fundraising subcommittee. “We raised over $18,000 from that night alone, and with the proceeds were able to open Season 34.” “More than just a benefit for the theatre, we wanted to give back to the community. The Pollard has always been about creating live theatre in a small-town atmosphere, and we have a

loyal patron base of Guthrie community members. We wanted to show our audiences that we can only come back with their help, and they never let us down,” he said. The Pollard opened Season 34, In Good Company, with the crowd-pleaser The 39 Steps. This parody on the classic crime film from the 1930s brought in sold-out audiences to the theatre. The cast of four played upwards of 100 characters, and the action never stopped on stage. One thing that did stop was the air conditioner, and the historic building proved once again that the show must go on, and that programs can double as fans. The rest of this season’s lineup includes a new, immersive production of Dracula in October. Blount is slated to direct. Blount has an eye for the spooky and weird, and this production will be all that and more. Their new Christmas tradition continues in December with It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play. Previously scheduled pre-pandemic shows You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown and Puffs will run in the Spring of 2022. The company is also adding on an additional lineup. The Pollard Performance Series features musicians and performers in limited engagements. Shelly Phelps and the Storm performs September 3rd and 4th, followed by Todd Oliver January 14th and 15th,

2022. Heartbreak Hotel: An Evening with the King runs February 4th-13th, 2022. Cross, Rags and Young closes out the Performance Series in June 2022. Flex-pass tickets are on sale now, and can be purchased at thepollard.org. For more information about Pollard Theater and to purchase tickets, scan the QR code with your smart phone

Adrienne Proctor is an Oklahoma City-based writer and freelance theatre critic.

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YOUR MUSEUM HAS REOPENED!

Members of the Resonator art collective in Norman have faced backlash with some residents over their free food pantry | Photos Berlin Green

TOP 10 SCIENCE MUSEUM The results are in for USA Today’s Readers’ Choice awards, and we are proud to announce we’ve been voted the 9th Best Science Museum in America! USA Today assembled a panel of industry experts to identify the top 20 science museums in the U.S. The publication then opened the list to voting, asking the public to choose their top 10, and YOU helped us receive the #9 spot! Thank you for helping the Museum win this national recognition!

INTRODUCING SCIENCE ON A SPHERE! Guests interact with our brand-new Science on a Sphere, a large sphere hanging from the ceiling in the Current Science Studio that displays space and Earth-based content from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

NEW MUSEUM HOURS!

The museum is open every Friday and Saturday from 10AM to 5PM, and on Sundays from 12PM to 5PM. Monday thru Thursday, we are closed. (Note: Noble Planetarium is open, but Omni Theatre and WaterWorks are still temporarily closed. Stay tuned for updates!)

Fort Worth Museum of Science & History 1600 Gendy Street, Fort Worth, TX 76107 16

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FOOd Fi ght

A group of Norman activists is fighting the city to maintain access to free food for the unhoused. By Br e tt F i el dc a m p

“Having food be accessible benefits all of us.” This statement, seemingly simple and inarguable, comes from Bridget Burns, co-founder of the group UNR, or Uprooted & Rising: Indian Territory, and one of the leaders of a band of local activists that set up and maintain a free, accessible pantry and refrigerator in Norman. Along with the owners and staff of the Resonator art space, and with help from a few unaffiliated volunteers, the pantry and fridge had provided much needed availability of fresh, worthwhile food, as well as providing cold water and electrolyte drinks to help protect against the blisteringly hot summer months, all in one easily accessible place. But that changed at the end of July when an archaic city ordinance was used to push the fridge over a mile away inside the Outreach Thrift & Donation Center. “It’s unfortunate, but Norman has some people that are very unkind to unhoused people,” says Alan Hatcher, a volunteer with UNR that has helped to develop and maintain free fridges and pantries in other communities around the OKC Metro. “The beautiful thing about the original location was the visibility. People knew where it was and it was easy to access, and other people could see it being used and could see how it was necessary and important.” That necessity and importance has become a ballooning concern in a time of increasing pandemic-prompted unemployment and expiring eviction moratoria. UNR and the Resonator team see the fridge and pantry combination as a small and straightforward way of helping to address those spiraling issues without the bureaucracy at work in many assistance programs.

“Getting on food stamps can actually be more difficult than people realize, and it takes a long time,” said Rai Fordyce, another one of the fridge volunteers with Resonator. “There’s so much paperwork, and you have to provide proof-of-residency, which not everyone can do.” In June, the city government, at the urging of some very active and vocal citizen groups, hit the team with potential violations of two city ordinances designed for health and safety. The first, Section 10-203, involved questions of trash and sanitation. “They eventually just kind of dropped that one,” Hatcher said. “Before it moved, people had started to really take care of it and clean it.” The second, Section 10-204, wasn’t so easily shot down. “It’s about having an unattended appliance outside,” explained Hatcher. “It comes from the 40s or 50s when they used to manufacture refrigerators that locked from the outside, and kids could get stuck inside them. Obviously that’s not a concern anymore.” The city demanded that they move the fridge to a different location where it could be kept indoors and attended. Outreach Thrift was happy to oblige, but the distance from the pantry and their available business hours were immediately recognized as problems for the community members the project is intended to help. “Going from the pantry to the fridge at Outreach can be an hour round-trip on foot,” said Jenna Ziegler, a volunteer that got involved with the project after donations of her own homegrown herbs were a hit among the fridge’s users. She said that, from what she’s seen,


the fridge and pantry are a valuable resource for more than just the city’s homeless population. “A lot of the first things that we see go are potatoes and eggs, things that need to be cooked pretty quickly, and milk, which needs to be refrigerated,” Ziegler said. “So it’s clear that a lot of the people utilizing the fridge are people that maybe do have homes that are maybe struggling with food availability.” With so many different people and communities within Norman seemingly all relying on the fridge for food availability, the volunteers are adamant that it should stay in a location easily accessible by the city’s bus routes and walkable areas, and that it should be accessible 24 hours a day. “Everybody in the community thinks that this ordinance really doesn’t apply,” Hatcher said. “I think it’s fair to direct some frustration toward the city. Mayor Clark says they’re fearful of a lawsuit. I think it’s pretty awful that you would be willing to limit people’s access to food just to avoid a lawsuit or to avoid upsetting some people in the city.” “I can see this potentially affecting the mayoral race in Norman,” added Helen Grant, part of the Resonator team. “Mayor Clark has already been forced to speak about it just because it’s started getting press and people are bringing it up.” There has been a small bit of movement on the city’s part. An assistant city attorney has been in contact to discuss drafting a new ordinance that would make a specific exemption for community fridges like this one, with plans for it to go before the Norman city council early next month. While the team said that the city attorney does seem “genuine in his support,” they said he would neither commit to letting them see the draft before it goes to the council,

nor would he give them specifics on what part of the city code might be changed. While they wait for some kind of concrete decision, the team continues maintaining the fridge in its current location and stocking it with donations from the community. Monetary donations come in through Venmo and CashApp accounts that they have set up solely for the fridge and pantry, but they also see a remarkable amount of generosity from the public helping to stock on their own. “Donations range from people growing their own food and bringing it by to people getting from the Food Bank, taking the things they want from their supply, and then bringing the stuff they don’t care for to drop it off and pay it forward,” Hatcher said. In addition to fresh foods, water, and canned goods, the team says that they always need things like mosquito repellant and hygiene products as well. You can find Venmo and CashApp information for donations on Facebook and Instagram at UNR_ ResonatorFridge, and Norman residents can call or message Mayor Clark’s office and the City Council to voice support for the project.

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Labor Day in the Paseo After a year’s break and a rescheduling from its regular Memorial Day weekend slot, the Paseo Arts Festival will happen Labor Day Weekend. The festival runs from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sept. 4 and 5 with live music until 10 p.m. both days, and Sept. 6 from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. All of the festival’s entertainment

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savory and sweet. Think gyros, Asian food, monster wraps, grilled sirloin on a stick and tacos,” according to a news release. Craft beers will also be available, along with Budweiser beverages, at the festival. This year’s festival will also be much more spaced out than previous events, Paseo Arts Association Executive Director Amanda Bleakley said. “There’s normally a festival that sets up around the Paseo Grill and goes into the south parking lot. They’re not setting up, so we’re gonna have a lot more space,” Bleakley said. The Paseo Arts Festival, typically slated for the “I’m going to spread people Memorial Day weekend, goes ahead during Labor out. Our food vendors are going Day weekend this year. | Photo Josh Vaughn to be spread out and we’re sugwill occur outdoors, with adherence to gesting to our artists that they wear CDC guidelines. their masks. In our building, we’re reNearly 100 visual artists will be repquiring masks of all the volunteers that resented in the 44th iteration of the come and go and then people who come festival, showcasing paintings, ceramin who want to go shopping. We have all ics, photography, sculpture, woodworkthe different stores and galleries down ing, jewelry and glass work. there and they’re all private businesses Also, more than 50 musicians and so they can mandate what they want.” live performers such as belly dancers Hand sanitizer will also be available will be doing their thing on two stages, at various places around the festival and and the food court will feature 20 food there will be some disposable masks and drink vendors with “traditional and available for attendees. not-so-traditional festival treats, both This year’s feature festival art was

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illustrated by Jerry Bennett and will be available as small and large poster prints. Bennett is a renowned artist known for his work for all your favorite nerdy brands like Mar vel and Lucasfilm, but perhaps his most prestigious work has been illustrating Chicken-Fried News and multiple covers for Oklahoma Gazette. The festival is the largest annual fundraiser for the Paseo Arts Association. Beverage and merchandise sales directly support the nonprofit and go toward funding other annual events such as Fairy Ball, Magic Lantern, SPACE, FEAST and First Friday Gallery Walks. For more information about Paseo Arts Festival, scan the QR code with your smart phone or call 405-525-2688 for more information


ART S & CULTURE OKGA Z E T TE .COM | S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1

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NOMINATION BALLOT

Oklahoma City’s original and longest-running readers’ poll, Best of OKC, is back for its 37th year! We need your input in telling us the best our city offers, so nominate your favorites RIGHT HERE or at bestofoklahomacity.com until Monday, September 27, 2021. STAY TUNED FOR THE RUNOFF BALLOT PUBLISHING OCTOBER 13!

FOOD & DRINK

16. BEST RESTAURANT OR BAKERY WITH GLUTEN-FREE OPTIONS

17. BEST DESSERT RESTAURANT, SHOP OR BAKERY 1.

BEST LOCAL CRAFT BREWER 18. BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT

2.

BEST LOCAL TAPROOM 19. BEST LATIN RESTAURANT (NOT MEXICAN)

3.

BEST COCKTAIL (AND THE RESTAURANT/BAR THAT SERVES IT)

20. BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

4.

BEST BREAKFAST

5.

BEST BRUNCH

6.

BEST LATE-NIGHT EATS

22. BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT

7.

BEST BURGER

23. BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

21. BEST WESTERN EUROPEAN RESTAURANT, NOT ITALIAN (DANISH, ENGLISH, FRENCH, GERMAN, IRISH, SCOTTISH, SPANISH, ETC.)

24. BEST EASTERN ASIAN RESTAURANT (CHINESE, JAPANESE, VIETNAMESE, THAI)

8. BEST TACO

9.

BEST SANDWICH SHOP

32. BEST CHEF

33. BEST PRE- OR POST- EVENT SPOT TO GRAB A DRINK

34. BEST LGBTQ+ BAR OR CLUB

35. BEST NATIONAL OR REGIONAL RESTAURANT *

ARTS, CULTURE & ENTERTAINMENT 36. BEST LOCAL COVER BAND

37. BEST LOCAL ORIGINAL BAND OR SINGER (EX: SINGER/SONGWRITER, RAPPER, HIP-HOP GROUP)

38. BEST PERFORMING ARTS GROUP (EX: THEATER COMPANY, DANCE COMPANY, ORCHESTRAL GROUP)

25. BEST NEW RESTAURANT (TO OPEN AFTER 8/1/20) 39. BEST RADIO PERSONALITY, TEAM OR SHOW

10. BEST BARBECUE

11.

31. BEST RESTAURANT

26. BEST FINE DINING RESTAURANT 40. BEST VISUAL ARTIST

BEST PIZZA PLACE

27. BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR 41. BEST LOCAL ANNUAL EVENT OR FESTIVAL

12. BEST STEAKHOUSE

28. BEST NEW BAR (TO OPEN AFTER 8/1/20) 42. BEST CHARITY EVENT

13. BEST SUSHI

29. BEST PATIO DINING 43. BEST FREE ENTERTAINMENT

14. BEST SEAFOOD

30. BEST DINER 44. BEST BAR/CLUB FOR LIVE MUSIC

15. BEST RESTAURANT WITH VEGAN OR VEGETARIAN MENU OPTIONS

*ALLOWS VOTING FOR NATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS THAT SUPPORT THE LOCAL ECONOMY.

FOR YOUR BALLOT TO BE COUNTED: You must fill out at least 30 categories. Oklahoma Gazette must receive your ballot (one per envelope) by mail no later than Monday, September 27, 2021.

The ballot may NOT be typewritten, photocopied or hand-delivered. There cannot be multiple hand writings on the ballot.

Make sure your selections are locally owned (unless otherwise noted) and your choices do NOT appear on the ballot more than three times. All contact information must be complete.


45. BEST PLACE FOR KARAOKE

60. BEST PET-FRIENDLY PATIO

76. BEST YOGA, PILATES OR BARRE STUDIO

46. BEST CONCERT VENUE

61. BEST NAUGHTY BUSINESS

77. BEST HEALTH NUTRITION STORE

47. BEST PUBLIC ART, NOT A MURAL (GIVE INTERSECTION AND ARTIST)

62. BEST PLACE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

78. BEST PLACE TO GET FIT*

63. BEST NEW RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT (TO OPEN AFTER 8/1/20)

79. BEST HOTEL*

48. BEST PUBLIC MURAL (GIVE INTERSECTION AND ARTIST)

80. BEST LOCAL PARK FOR MEET-UPS 49. BEST PLACE TO BUY LOCAL ART

64. BEST LOCAL GORCER, DELI, OR SPECIALTY FOOD SHOP 81. BEST PUBLIC BATHROOM*

50. BEST ART GALLERY

51. BEST MUSEUM

52. BEST LOCAL DISTRICT

53. BEST CASINO

GOODS & SERVICES 54. BEST PLACE TO BUY LIQUOR

CANNABIS

65. BEST LOCAL SHOP TO SPRUCE UP YOUR OUTDOOR SPACE

66. BEST LOCAL FLORIST

67. BEST GARDEN SHOP

82. BEST DISPENSARY

68. BEST PLACE TO FIND UNIQUE GIFTS

83. BEST DISPENSARY FOR FLOWER

69. BEST TATTOO SHOP

84. BEST DISPENSARY FOR EDIBLES

LIFE & WELLNESS

85. BEST DISPENSARY FOR CONCENTRATES

86. BEST NEW DISPENSARY TO OPEN AFTER 8/1/20 55. BEST VAPOR SHOP

56. BEST CREDIT UNION OR BANK*

57. BEST PLACE TO BUY JEWELRY

58. BEST THRIFT, VINTAGE OR CONSIGNMENT STORE

59. BEST CLOTHING BOUTIQUE

70. BEST PLACE TO VOLUNTEER

71. BEST NONPROFIT

87. BEST HEAD SHOP (NON-DISPENSARY)

88. BEST HEALTH AND BEAUTY CANNABIS- INFUSED PRODUCT (AND WHO MAKES IT)

72. BEST PLASTIC SURGEON 89. BEST EDIBLE PRODUCT LINE 73. BEST HOSPITAL*

74. BEST MEDICAL SPA (BOTOX, FILLER, ETC.)

90. BEST PUBLIC PLACE TO CONSUME CANNABIS PRODUCTS

75. BEST SPA (NO INJECTIONS USED)

*ALLOWS VOTING FOR NATIONAL ESTABLISHMENTS THAT SUPPORT THE LOCAL ECONOMY.

CONTACT INFORMATION+

(required for your votes to be counted) NAME:

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OKLAHOMA GAZET TE’S BEST OF OKC P.O. BOX 54649 OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73154

PHONE NUMBER: EMAIL: +We use this information for verification and keep it confidential.


REVIEW

It’s not often that a remake, reimaging, reboot, whatever you want to call it of a popular horror franchise lives up to its hype, but when Jordan Peele announced he was co-writing and coproducing a new version of “Candyman,” there wasn’t much question that this one would. This movie definitely feels like it was crafted lovingly by fans of the franchise, who sought — and succeeded wildly — in both updating and turning its mythology on its head without getting lost in the weeds. If you’re looking for a shot-for-shot remake, you’ll be disappointed. But there is lore as well as stylistic continuations from the first classic film. While there are buckets of blood in this version, as in the original, the vast majority of the violence does occur offscreen and unlike some franchises, “Candyman” still doesn’t rely on jump scares amplified by sharp notes to get its points across either (here’s looking at you, Blumhouse). 22

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By Matt Dinger Helmed by Nia DaCosta on her sophomore outing (after 2018’s superb crime flick “Little Woods”), the script takes on a life of its own. This installment focuses on the lives of artist Anthony McCoy (played by Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) and his girlfriend, Brianna (Teyonah Parris), an art gallery director. Their lives soon become entangled in the Candyman myth anchored in the now-derelict CabriniGreen housing project in Chicago. While the narrative arc mostly takes a descent-into-madness trajectory, the mythology of the series is given its own space, told through shadowplay marionettes at various times in the film (stay seated for the end credits, which features an extended scene of marionette storytelling). In addition to recounting the myth of Daniel Robitaille, (R) Yahya Abdul-Meteen ii as Anthony McCoy in Candyman, directe by Nia DaCosta. | Photo Provided, Parrish Lewis/Universal Pictures and MGM Pictures


familiar to fans, new branches of the lore are added, such as the tale of Sherman Fields and his ill-fated end at the hands of murderously aggressive police officers. Updating these elements of the Candyman mythos for new audiences allows for a fresh perspective on the hateful, racist forces that birthed the Candyman boogeyman without erasing any of the horror that gave this movie the sting it had when the original was released in 1992 (Daniel Robitaille met his violent end at the hands of a violent, racist mob sicced on him by the father of his interracial lover, for those who have forgotten). Virginia Madsen reprises her role from the original as Helen Lyle (as least on audiotape) and without giving too

Rodney L. Jones iii as Billy in Candyman, directe by Nia DaCosta. | Photo Provided, Universal Pictures and MGM Pictures

much away, Tony Todd returns for at least one scene as Robitaille/Candyman. Oh, yeah, the bees are back too. Peele broke fresh ground in horror storytelling with “Get Out” and just ended his current revival of Rod Serling’s seminal anthology television series “The Twilight Zone.” His loving hand/hook crafts the perfect go-between for his recent forays into weird tales while DaCosta brings it to life with the intensity Bernard Rose brought to Clive Barker’s short story “The Forbidden” nearly 30 years ago. Candyman opens Aug. 27.

ART S & CULTURE OKGA Z E T TE .COM | S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1

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44th Annual Paseo Arts Festival

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CALENDAR are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

Zoo’s Pollinator Garden to discover life-sized animatronic dinosaurs that demonstrate movement and sounds like the prehistoric creatures. See them roaring and breathing right before your eyes! This new immersive experience connects guests to many of their favorite dinosaurs through 15 one-of-a-kind animatronic displays and 8 skeleton replicas. Learn how dinosaurs evolved over time and where they roamed as well as what the OKC Zoo is doing to fight extinction of Oklahoma’s beloved lizard, the horny toad, also known as the Texas horned lizard., Through Oct. 31. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo.org/ our-events#collection=1556. THROUGH OCTOBER 31

JUNKLAHOMA 2021 JUNKLAHOMA is a ‘junk’ show featured during Piedmont’s annual Founder’s Day celebration. It is presented by The Old Store and showcases a wide variety of handpicked junk, vintage, antique, handmade, repurposed and boutique style vendors. FREE, Sat., Sept. 11, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. The Old Store, 100 Monroe Ave. NW, 405-3732093, fb.me/e/3dPQtv969. SAT, SEP 11

LIVE! on the Plaza join the Plaza District every second Friday for an art walk featuring artists, live music, shopping and more, 6-10 p.m. second Friday of every month. Plaza District, 1618 N. Gatewood Ave., 405-426-7812, plazadistrict.org. FRI, SEP 10

Deep Deuce Director’s Cut Returning for its third

year, Deep Deuce Director’s Cut, presented by Downtown Oklahoma City Partnership and the Business Improvement District, will take place on the grass lot located at 320 N.E. 2nd Street. Attendees are encouraged to bring blankets and lawn chairs for the movie. Join the neighborhood for a special night under the stars for this free outdoor movie., The universe’s best-kept secret will be revealed at this year’s outdoor screening of the 1997 film, Men In Black (PG-13) starring Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones., Fri., Sept. 10. Deep Deuce District, 100 NE Third St., 405-235-3500, deepdeucedistrict. com. SAT, SEP 11 Photo Provided

FILM Floating Films at Riversport OKC: Jaws Floating Films are back at Riversport OKC. Floating Films are a great way for the entire family to hang out together. Bring a blanket or lawn chair and watch the film from the banks of the lower pond or rent a tube or raft for the full Floating Film experience!, Sat., Sept. 11. RIVERSPORT OKC, 800 RIVERSPORT Drive, 4055524040, riversportokc. org. SAT, SEP 11 Swan Song A retired hairdresser escapes his nursing home and embarks on an odyssey across his small town to style a dead woman’s hair for her funeral, confronting the ghosts of his past and rediscovering his sparkle along the way., Wed., Sept. 1, 4:30 p.m. and Thu., Sept. 2, 1:30 & 7 p.m. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456, rodeocinema.org. WED-THU, SEP 1 & 2

HAPPENINGS Andrew Schulz Comedian Andrew Schulz headlines Bricktown Comedy Club $50.00, Fri., Sept. 3, 7:30-9 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 4, 7:30-9 p.m. Bricktown Comedy Club, 409 E. California Ave., 253-324-0075, eventvesta.com/events/7110. FRI-SAT, SEP 3 & 4 Coffee & Cars Coffee and Cars OKC is the largest monthly gathering of car enthusiasts across the state of Oklahoma! Head to Chisholm Creek on the first Saturday morning of each month to share your passion for automotives. The event will be held at the property just north of Pawnee Drive and Cabela Road. Everyone is welcome and there are no fees!, first Saturday of every month, 8 p.m. Chisholm Creek, 13230 Pawnee Dr., 405-728-2780, chisholmcreek.com. SAT, SEP 4 COOP Ale Works Beats & Bites featuring Randy Houser Now in its fifth year, the Beats & Bites Festival is an outdoor event for all ages that brings together the best in music, food and fun. The event is located in the casino’s west parking lot and runs from 6-10 p.m. Randy Houser was originally scheduled to perform June 26, but was postponed due to rain. Riverwind Casino, 1544 W. State Highway 9, 405-322-6000, Riverwind.com. MON, SEP 6 Dino Safari Be in awe as you trek through the

OKC Brew Tours Join us every Friday evening and Saturday day on OKC Brew Tours! The ultimate craft beer experience. Take a ride in the bus as we visit three local breweries within the OKC metro area where we will try and explore multiple tasters at each stop as well as take a behind the scenes tour and learn how beer is made. Its a perfect way to get to know new people and drink OKC’s tastiest beer offerings! $69.50, Fridays, 6-9 p.m. and Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. through Jan. 31. Core4 Brewing, 7 N. Lee Ave, 405-822-0285, okcbrewtour. com. FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS

Oklahoma Railway Museum Train Ride Come take a ride at the Oklahoma Railway Museum on our historic MKT mainline track. You will enjoy a train ride in our historic passenger coaches pulled by our vintage diesel locomotives. Train Rides are available for kids of all ages (0 to 99+) every 1st and 3rd Saturday of each month, April through September. Train rides last approximately 40 minutes. $5.00-$12.00, first Saturday of every month, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. through Sept. 4. Oklahoma Railway Museum, 3400 NE Grand Blvd., 4054248222, oklahomarailwaymuseum.org. THROUGH

transformation., The first 10 educators get in free! $10 per workshop, $15 per couple/pair, Sat., Sept. 11, 11 a.m.-noon. CommonWealth Urban Farms, 3310 N. Olie Ave., 405-524-1864, commonwealthurbanfarms. com/garden-school. SAT, SEP 11 Sherlock Holmes - The Exhibition The great Sherlock Holmes has summoned you – and his is an invitation not to be refused. In Sherlock Holmes – The Exhibition you will be transported into Sherlock Holmes’ London to solve a mystery in a world newly introduced to his groundbreaking methods. This interactive experience will delight audiences of all ages as it showcases areas of forensic science that enabled Sherlock Holmes to solve crimes, and brings to life the historic underpinnings of author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s rich and vibrant stories., Through Sept. 6. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org/ sherlock-holmes. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 6 United Way’s The Hole Shebang! This cornhole tournament will feature teams from a variety of local companies and nonprofits competing for corporate bragging rights and The Hole Shebang! Traveling Trophy. The tournament is accompanied by live music on the Love’s Travel Stops Stage. Food trucks and a cash bar will be on hand along with a United Way Partner Agency Fair highlighting the critical work of nonprofits in central Oklahoma., Thu., Sept. 9. Scissortail Park, 300 SW Seventh St., 405-445-7080, unitedwayokc.org. THU, SEP 9

YOUTH Thick Descriptions Saturday Virtual steAm Learning Journey Are you 6-12 years old and interested in a virtual steAm (science, technology, engineering, Anthropology, and math) Learning Journey?, Join us virtually on the second Saturday of every month as Ms. Allisyn Burleigh discusses Oklahoma topics using steAm! Her topics include language, culture, biology, and much more!, Ms. Allisyn holds a Masters in Early Childhood Education from the University of Central Oklahoma and is a Pre-K teacher. She’s also the founder of a tutoring service called BK Tutoring., second Saturday of every month, 11-11:30 a.m. through Nov. 13. 405-397-0584, thickdescriptions.org/contact-us. SAT, SEP 11

PERFORMING ARTS Art AfloatShowboat Concert Series Art Afloat is bringing local artists together to take over the Bricktown Canal every Thursday night, to be called the Art Afloat Showboat Concert Series., Thursdays. Bricktown Water Taxi, 111 S. Mickey Mantle Drive, bricktownwatertaxi.com. THURSDAYS Ballet Under the Stars This FREE community performance, made possible by Express Employment International, will feature Oklahoma City Ballet’s professional dancers, students from the Oklahoma City Ballet Yvonne Chouteau School, and students from the OU School of Dance performing

both classical ballet and modern dance. Family activities will begin at 6:00 p.m. prior to the performance. Scissortail Park, 300 SW Seventh St., 405-445-7080, okcballet.org. FRI, SEP 10 The Diaries of Adam and Eve Norman Family Theatre presents The Diaries of Adam and Eve, a play in one act based on the works of Mark Twain. Directed and adapted for the stage by Cody Clark., Enjoy Twain’s wryly humorous take on the story of the first humans and how they might have stumbled through a brand new world and developed the first relationship., Free admission!, Please note the facility requires masks to be worn. Free, Fridays, Saturdays, 7-8:15 p.m. through Sept. 4. West Wind Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 1309 W Boyd St., 405364-4049, facebook.com/events/250094736799135. FRI-SAT, SEP 4 & 6

Dope Poetry Night Dope Poetry Night at the Ice Event Center Bar and Grill is every Wednesday starting at 7:30 p.m. Sign-ups begin at 7 p.m.Only the first 25 poets., Come to experience a place where you can be you unapologetically, a place where your voice and presence matter, a place where you’re accepted and loved, where smiles, laughter, thoughts, and feelings are shared, and it’s all free. Just remember to wear a mask. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., 405-208-4240, facebook.com/Ice-EventCenter-Grill-384104648334867. WEDNESDAYS The Red Lamp by Hilliard Booth 3rd Act Theatre Company presents The Red Lamp by Hilliard Booth, directed by Christine Jolly and starring local talent Aaron Bates, David Patterson, Dana Billingsley, Allison Sugimoto, Carold McDonald, and Matthew Moreillon. This fast and furious farce involves a lamp from South America that is supposed to bring good luck to whoever lights it, but when each character tries to light it for a different reason, their actions lead to complications, a few mistaken identities, and some delightfully unexpected outcomes!, All performances are live, with masks required for cast and audiences. September 26 is a streaming event only. $25 with discounts available, Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10 p.m. and Sundays, 2:30-4:30 p.m. through Sept. 26. 3rd Act Theatre Company, 12040 N May Ave., 405593-8093, 3rdacttheatreco.com. FRI-SUN Steel Magnolias (encore) JBT is proud to revisit the show that started out the 63rd season. The action is set in Truvy’s beauty salon in Chinquapin, Louisiana, where all the ladies who are “anybody” come to have their hair done. Helped by her eager new assistant, Annelle, the outspoken, wise-cracking Truvy dispenses shampoos and free advice to the eccentric characters who regular the salon. The group of women experience a lot together throughout the run of the show, but they are always determined to support one another throughout both $10 - $25, Thu., Sept. 2, 8-10 p.m., Fri., Sept. 3, 8-10 p.m., Sat., Sept. 4, 8-10 p.m., Sun., Sept. 5, 2:30-4:30 p.m., Thu., Sept. 9, 8-10 p.m., Fri., Sept. 10, 8-10 p.m., Sat., Sept. 11, 8-10 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 12, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Jewel Box Theatre, 321 NW 36th St., 4055211786, jewelboxokc.com. THU-SUN

SEPTEMBER 4

Paseo Arts Festival The long-awaited 44th Annual Paseo Arts Festival takes place on Labor Day Weekend. Visitors will enjoy almost 100 nationally acclaimed visual artists and live music over three days. Returning this year are craft beers on tap featuring Kona Big Wave, Stella Artois and Golden Road Mango all ice cold and served by the south stage and of course staple Budweiser products at all three beverage tents., Sept. 4-6. Paseo Arts District, 3024 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org. SAT-MON, SEP 4-6 Raising Butterflies There is magic in the Monarch chrysalis! Not only is a beautiful experience, raising butterflies is helpful! Fewer than 10 percent of monarch eggs and larvae will survive to become adult butterflies, largely due to predation of the larvae. Raising them in an indoor habitat boosts survival to rates well over 90 percent. A panel of experts will show participants how and where to look for butterfly eggs and larvae and how to support them as they go through their amazing

OSU-OKC Farmers Market at Scissortail Park Oklahoma City’s largest outdoor market features an all-made and grown-in Oklahoma producer-only marketplace providing access to more fresh products to serve the community. Located at the corner of Oklahoma City Boulevard and South Robinson Avenue, the Scissortail Park Farmers Market will be open, rain or shine, every Saturday from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. through October. Scissortail Park, 300 SW Seventh St., 405-445-7080, cissortailpark.org/osu-okcfarmers-market-at-scissortail-park. SATURDAYS Photo by Berlin Green OKG PICK S OKGA Z E T TE .COM | S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1

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Oklahoma State Fair

TICKETS ARE ON SALE NOW! DISNEY ON ICE

Thursday, September 16..........................................7:30 p.m. Friday, September 17....................12:30 p.m., & 7:30 p.m. Saturday, September 18......11:30 a.m.,3:30 p.m & 7:30 p.m. Sunday, September 19 ....................2:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m. Monday, September 20 ...........................................7:30 p.m.

S EP TEMBER

16 - 26

EASY WAYS TO BUY TICKETS!

OKC FAIRGROUNDS BOX OFFICE, 405-948-6800, or okstatefair.com ADULT OUTSIDE GATE ADMISSION $8 advance, regular $12

ave

$S

15

Offer ends September 15

CA R N I VA L R I D E A R M BA N D S when you purchase an advance carnival ride armband. Advance prices are good through September 15, 2021.

Monday – Thursday / $20 advance / regular $35 Friday – Sunday / $30 advance / regular $45

*Each armband will have a $1 activation fee added.

C H I C K A S AW C O U N T RY E N T E RTA I N M E N T S TAG E

Concerts FREE with outside gate admission

Sept 16th THE OAK RIDGE BOYS 7:30 p.m.

Sept 20th WE THE KINGDOM 7:30 p.m.

Sept 24th GINUWINE 7:30 p.m.

Sept 17th SAWYER BROWN 7:30 p.m.

Sept 21st GARY LEWIS & THE PLAYBOYS

7:30 p.m.

Sept 25th SKID ROW 8:00 p.m.

Sept 18th JACKYL 8:00 p.m.

Sept 22nd ELVIS EXTRAVAGANZA 7:30 p.m.

Sept 26th LA FIERA DE OJINAGA 7:30p.m.

Sept 19th BEATLEMANIA LIVE! 7:30 p.m.

Sept 23rd JAMESON RODGERS 7:30 p.m.

The Of ficial Sof t Drink of the OKC Fairgrounds

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cid=2401a21905&mc_eid=a34bef7305. THROUGH OCTOBER 17

Paseo Arts District’s First Friday Gallery Walk Peruse art from over 80 artists with 25 participating businesses for a night of special themed exhibits, refreshments and a variety of entertainment opportunities, 6-9 p.m. first Friday of every month. Paseo Arts District, 3024 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org. FRI, SEP 3

Comics As Art Exhibition Opening Opening September 3, 6-9pm and hanging throughout the

A room with a View: Scenes of the Italian Countryside Artists from around the world have long been captured by the enduring appeal of the Italian countryside. Its sweeping vistas, at times sprinkled with ancient ruins, make for an enticing subject for artists in a variety of mediums. American artists in particular traveled to Italy throughout the nineteenth century to study not only the great masterpieces of ancient and Renaissance art, but also to sketch and paint the campagna, or countryside, basked in a beautiful glow., WednesdaysSundays. through Nov. 7. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com/visit/ events/room-with-a-view. THROUGH NOVEMBER 7

month, the Paseo Plunge hosts “Comics As Art,” a juried show celebrating the medium of comics featuring framed, finished pages from Oklahoma creators. Selectioned for the 2021 Comics As Art show are Raymond Griffith & Jake Scott Cohen’s Astounding Tales; Clayton Tuttle’s Buffer; Ray Claxton & Sebastián Piriz’s Dani Doomsday; Kathryne Wood’s For God and Country; Alexandra Brodt’s Fracture; Meghan Harvey’s Tadpole. The Best In Show award will be judged by Natasha Alterici, creator of Heathen, and the Audience Choice award will be voted on by patrons during the Paseo Arts Festival. Free, Fri., Sept. 3, 6-9 p.m. The Paseo Plunge, 3010 Paseo St., 405-882-7032, paseoplunge.com/events. FRI, SEP 3 Photo by Kendall Bleakley

ACTIVE Cannaspa Tour OKC Why Cannaspa!, CannaSpa is any spa service that uses cannabis infused products. Examples include: cannabis facials and cannabis massages with infused oils to enhance a deeper muscle relaxation rather than non infused products. Beneficial to people living with MS, fibromyalgia, chronic pain, migraines, anxiety, stress, scoliosis, arthritis, neuropathy, and more., Why Now?, The focus of this three city tour ( Denver, Oklahoma, New York)is all about Cannabis Education with a variety of products, local chefs and recipes, information, education and infused spa services. Our goal is to promote, educate and help regulate the products for creativity, taste and safety, provide $4.20, Fri., Sept. 3, 6-10 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 4, 6-10 p.m. Urban Venue, 1319 NE 23rd, 4242042236, cannaspatour.com. FRI-SAT, SEP 3 & 4

Do It All in the Fall The Fall is one of the best times of year for planting or transplanting whether it’s vegetables or perennials. We will give you useful tips on planting & transplanting plants; establishing & maintaining cool season lawns; how to create your own compost; and how to best determine your landscape’s irrigation needs. We will also have some delicious dishes using fresh vegetables that you will be able to taste and take the recipes home with you. Cost is $5.00. Call 405.713.1125 to register. $5.00, Fri., Sept. 3, 9 a.m.-noon. Oklahoma County OSU Extension Center, 2500 NE 63rd St., 4057131125, extension.okstate. edu/county/oklahoma/index.html. FRI, SEP 3 Home Grown Gardening Let us help take the mystery of successful vegetable gardening with proven tips and techniques for any level of gardener. This workshop will start with site selection, how & when to amend the soil, composting, planning & establishing your garden, choosing the best varieties of vegetables for Oklahoma and so much more., This workshop is FREE, however, registration is required. Call 405-713-1125 if you have questions. Free, Wed., Sept. 1, 6 p.m. Oklahoma County OSU Extension Center, 2500 NE 63rd St., 405-713-1125, extension.okstate.edu/county/oklahoma/index.html. WED, SEP 1

Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUESDAYS

405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org/exhibitions/ upcoming/artnow-2021. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 13 Crystal Z Campbell: Flight Reserve your free timed ticket to experience the inaugural exhibition in our Artist-in-Residence Studio and Gallery. Using light, sound and digital film projection, Flight explores the physical, architectural and cultural residue of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre into the present. Timed with the 100-year commemoration of the massacre, Flight incorporates archival material with digital video, digitized 35-mm film footage, three-channel sound, and vinyl. The artist provides multiple points of entry and angles of refraction, offering an unfixed sense of what is varying parts history, impressions, analysis, and reverie., This exhibition is made possible by a grant from the Mid-America Arts Free timed ticket required., Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Tuesdays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. through Oct. 26. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org/exhibitions/upcoming/crystal-z-campbellflight. THROUGH OCTOBER 26 Fritz Scholder: Beyond Stereotypes After relocating to Santa Fe, New Mexico, for a teaching position, American artist Fritz Scholder (Luiseño) stated he saw one too many over-romanticized and generalized depictions of Indigenous people “looking at the sunset.” With his Indian series, started in 1967, Scholder sought to replace the tourist-approved narratives perpetuated by white artists with the realities he witnessed every day. By combining realism and spirituality with vivid colors and expressive brushstrokes, Scholder created radical new imagery of modern-day Indigenous life., Wednesdays-Sundays. through Nov. 7. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com/ visit/events/scholder. THROUGH NOVEMBER 7 A Life in Looking: The Creighton Gilbert Collection Through themes of religion, architecture, allegory, portraiture, and humor, A Life in Looking: The Creighton Gilbert Collection explores a collection built on seven decades of expertise by this impressive scholar, educator, and connoisseur., first Tuesday-Sunday of every month. through Dec. 31. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., 405-325-3272, ou.edu/fjjma/exhibitions1/ CreightonGilbert. THROUGH DECEMBER 31

Art Moves Art Moves is an Arts Council OKC initiative that provides free arts events each workday from Noon-1:00. The daily line-up features a wide range of artistic mediums including musical and theater performances, live art demonstrations, short film selections, and more, Mondays-Fridays, noon. artscouncilokc.com/art-moves. WEEKDAYS

OVAC Art 365 Oklahoma City Exhibition Every three years, the Oklahoma Visual Arts Coalition (OVAC) hosts the highly competitive program, Art 365, in which five Oklahomabased creative proposals are selected to complete innovative artwork in consultation with a nationally recognized curator. In an unprecedented model for the region, the artists receive an honorarium of $12,000. Over the course of the last year, these artists have created a body of work that will culminate with exhibitions in both Tulsa and Oklahoma City., Through Sept. 18. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE Third St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3. org. THROUGH SEPTEMBER 18

ArtNow 2021 Organized by Guest Curator Helen Opper, ArtNow 2021 presents a dynamic group of Oklahoma-based artists whose works respond to the complexities of contemporary culture, reflecting the vibrant diversity of contemporary art in Oklahoma., Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays. through Sept. 13. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St.,

The Painters of Pompeii This historic presentation of the art of painting in ancient Rome will be presented exclusively at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art before returning to Europe., Wednesdays-Sundays. through Oct. 17. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com/visit/events/pompeii/?mc_

VISUAL ARTS

We Believed in the Sun Honoring the significant legacies of the Civil Rights Movement in Oklahoma City, We Believed in the Sun pairs Ron Tarver, a nationally recognized artist born in Oklahoma, with Ebony Iman Dallas, an emerging Oklahoma artist. The exhibition is organized in consultation with Advisory Council members from the Clara Luper Center for Civil Rights and the Oklahoma Historical Society. We Believed in the Sun will illuminate first-person accounts of the Civil Rights Movement in Oklahoma from the 1950s and 1960s that may be overlooked aspects of the larger history of Civil Rights and that resonate with present-day AfricanAmerican communities in Oklahoma. Free timed ticket required., Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. and Tuesdays, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. through Sept. 20. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org/exhibitions/ upcoming/we-believed-in-the-sun. THROUGH SEP 20 Women of the Banjo A special exhibit at the American Banjo Museum Women of the Banjo chronicles the contributions of women to the colorful past, vibrant present, and unlimited future of the banjo. From prominent contemporary performers such as Alison Brown and Rhiannon Giddens to pop icons Taylor Swift, Dolly Parton and many others, historic insights, instruments, stage attire, and a glimpse of ever-changing fashion trends all help in the telling of this important aspect of banjo history., Through May 31, 2022. American Banjo Museum, 9 E. Sheridan Ave., 405-604-2793, americanbanjomuseum.com/current-exhibits/special-exhibits/. THROUGH MAY 31

2021 ASSEMBLY Colony House

W/ FLEURIE BACK BEFORE YOU KNOW IT

09.28.21

THE HOLDING COMPANY

Billy Strings

SOLD OUT

09.29.21

KOSU PRESENTS

Visit okgazette.com/Events/AddEvent to submit your event. Submissions must be For OKG received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than live music noon on Wednesday see page 34 seven days before the desired publication date. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible.

Mat Kearney

W/ THE NATIONAL PARKS THE JANUARY FLOWER TOUR

Johnnyswim THE JOHNNYSWIM SHOW

Lord Huron

10.19.21

10.20.21

SOLD OUT

Big Head Todd AND THE MONSTERS

Walk The Moon

W/ JANY GREEN DREAM PLANE TOUR

Dr. Dog

10.21.21

11.04.21

11.05.21

11.09.21

W/ TOTH THE LAST TOUR

Gregory Alan Isakov W/ SPECIAL GUEST ISRAEL NEBEKER

Kaleo

W/ BELLE MT. FIGHT OR FLIGHT TOUR

Yola

W/ JAC ROSS STAND FOR MYSELF TOUR

Hippo Campus FOR TICKETS & MORE INFORMATION:

11.19.21

03.15.22

03.30.22

04.20.22

THEJONESASSEMBLY.COM

OKG PICK S OKGA Z E T TE .COM | S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1

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Solo Goat BY MATT DINGER

John Darnielle will be taking the stage for the first time at the Tower Theatre this month. Darnielle, the singer, songwriter and core member of The Mountain Goats, will be playing a solo show Sept. 17. He will be supporting his most recent release, Dark in Here, his 20th studio record under the moniker. Described in promotional materials as “12 songs for singing in caves, bunkers, foxholes and secret places beneath the floorboards,” the record was recorded in March 2020 in Muscle Shoals, Ala., just weeks after the recording of their previous album, Getting Into Knives, in Memphis, Tenn. That record was released in October. Definitely the more somber of the two records, fans of The Mountain Goats will be pleased with the latest record. Darnielle is excited to be back in Oklahoma, a sentiment that even those with a hometown pride might find dubious. But Darnielle is a student of music history and while he loves the hell out of Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa, which he has played, he also perked up when he learned that he would be taking the stage at a theatre that’s 85 years old, Tower Theater. “Interviewing” Darnielle was much more akin to having a conversation with a worldly, experienced friend who

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enjoys a spirited conversation. A voracious reader in addition to being a music fan, Darnielle ended the chat with a bit of news: his third novel, Devil House, will be released in January. The below questions and answers are excerpted from a 30-minute interview with Oklahoma Gazette. An expanded version of this Q&A session can be found at okgazette.com Oklahoma Gazette: Some dates you’re doing full band shows, but here in Oklahoma City, you’re doing a solo show. What was the decision to split the tour like that? John Darnielle: “Well, my drummer works multiple gigs, right? My drummer also tours with the Bob Mould band, and we can’t stay out as a band for six or seven or eight weeks like young folks without kids can do, right? I can’t bring my family on tour with me and I’m not leaving mom at home to hold the bag for longer than three weeks at a stretch. It’s hard. We have two kids. We have a 9-year-old and a 6-year-old and we’re in the middle of a global pandemic, so yeah. So we do three weeks or so, three weeks and change, and then we come home and then Jon [Wurster], as soon as he’s off tour, his other people are like, ‘Hey, can we take you out?’ so he’ll be out with Bob Mould during that time. I

S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1 | OKGA Z E T TE .COM MUS IC

want to get to Oklahoma. I have a giant crush on Oklahoma and so I had a list of places also that haven’t gotten solo shows because there’s a lot of people who like my stuff who’d really like to see a solo show. You can run deeper in the catalog on the solo show. I can dig much deeper just because it takes less preparation for me to learn a song for me than for everybody to get her to get an arrangement together. So I’m trying to get solo shows in places I haven’t done solo shows. I’ve never played solo in Oklahoma. I’ve only done band shows at Cain’s and Opolis. OKG: As a man who has lived here my entire life, I definitely do not have a crush on Oklahoma. What is it you like about this place? I mean, almost as an anthropologist, what is it that someone like you finds value in about Oklahoma? Darnielle: “A lot of great music comes out of there. There’s small cultural things that for me register in a way they wouldn’t for you, like the University of Oklahoma Press published a translation of a Mercè Rodoreda novel. She’s a Spanish novelist whose stuff until fairly recently was pretty hard to find, but my favorite of her books is published by U of Oklahoma Press. These are the sort of things that bind me to a place and so when I did a reading in Tulsa on my book tour a couple years back, I arranged to see a couple extra days, and to me, it’s a hip town, and it’s a beautiful town itself. I know that most of us who are into music are pretty progressive, me included, and if you live in a kind of a place whose politics tend to be backwards, you can hold it against the place but I also know that there is no place in this country where there’s not a bunch of bitchin’ people doing bitchin’ things. And I ate at this cool restaurant last time I was in Tulsa, they had a boxing ring inside. That’s catnip to me, you know? So those are a

few of the things.” [Editor’s note: The Tulsa restaurant Darnielle mentions is Elote, 514 S Boston Ave., which was featured in the Aug. 18 Gazedibles] OKG: It seems like, with your work, there are these creative bursts followed by production and editing and things like that. Has that always been your process? Darnielle: “Yeah, there’s, there have always been, like periods of intense productivity for me … The way I always think of it is like, when you are working, when you’re writing, you’re always sort of circling a theme, you know, or a mood. For me, it’s always a bit of a mystery … When you actually sort of tap the vein there, if you have the time, if you make the time to put in the hours, it’s just there for you. And I also do think, for me anyway, that the more you work, the more you’re going to work. Work produces more work, if you think of it a certain way. And I do always use the word ‘work’ or ‘labor.’ I don’t think of it as magic. It’s work.”. Tickets are $22.50-$27.50. For more information about Mountain Goats and to purchase tickets, scan the QR code with your smart phone


MU S IC OKGA Z E T TE .COM | S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1

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(left) Buckcherry plays Rocklahoma in 2019. Rocklahoma is one of two large outdoor music festivals are slated to go forward in Pryor despite the rising number of COVID-19 cases| Photo provided

Pryor is the stage for back-to-back festivals this September, including the return of Rocklahoma and the inaugural Born and Raised Festival. By Josh Wallace Eastern Oklahoma is set to be a musical mecca throughout September for rock and country fans as they converge for the return of Rocklahoma over Labor Day weekend and for a new festival just a few weeks later. Running from Friday through Sunday, with a special pre-party on Thursday, Rocklahoma is returning for its 14th year after being canceled last year as the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic spread across the country. Steven Rohall, event promoter and marketing director for AEG Presents, said the festival is gearing up to be bigger and better than ever as they’ve implemented new features and conveniences for festival goers and brought in headliners who have never played the festival before. “First and foremost, people are coming for the music and second, the experience. If you’ve ever been to Rocklahoma you know that we try to provide a great customer experience. We try to listen to our fans and really make adjustments to make it a better experience. For instance, this year parking is included in everyone’s pass, nobody has to buy it on top,” Rohall said. Many of the bands scheduled to perform across three stages over the three-day festival are coming for their first appearance, which is by design as Rohall said it’s important that music 30

lovers are exposed to new talent. As of press time, Rob Zombie is scheduled to appear as the Friday night headliner with Slipknot rounding out Saturday’s lineup. As of press time, Rob Zombie is scheduled to appear as the Friday night headliner with Slipknot rounding out Saturday’s lineup. Sunday’s headliner, Limp Bizkit, canceled their appearance on Aug. 26. “We try to bring not just the heavy hitters, but also some up-and-coming bands that you may or may not know yet and will hopefully be big in a couple of years. A festival is a great place to discover new music. We want to make sure that we’re providing that to people,” Rohall said. “And then there are favorites, who we try to have come back every couple of years, that are fans tell us ‘Oh, man, we loved so and so band,’ and we make sure they come back.” Festival producers take that fan input seriously as each attendee is sent a survey to see who they would like to see perform for the next festival. “We don’t beat around the bush. Tell us who you want to see,” Rohall said. Each day, the music starts at 11 a.m. and continues to midnight, but Rohall said it’s not uncommon for festival goers to keep the party going until 3 a.m.

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ally c i t e g o l o “Unap s” themselve For those who have yet to make the trip to Pryor, Rohall said it’s a special event filled with people from every state in the country and even those from across the globe. It’s not uncommon for people to wander from campsite to campsite where they are offered a beer, some food and good company, Rohall said. “It’s a very friendly crowd and it’s really welcoming. For the most part people just want to be next to people who are going to rock out with them and not judge them for listening to rock music. They’re unapologetically themselves,” he said. For those looking to camp out over the weekend, the festival has a few options to increase the comfort level at or around your campsite, including private restroom rentals. “In the campgrounds we have shower houses, plenty of shower houses around for folks. We have port-a-potties. People can actually also rent their own porta-potties for their camp. So, if you want a private port-a-potty and lock it up so nobody else can use it, you can absolutely do that,” Rohall said. “People will bring pools and get those filled up so they can sit and relax at their campsite. You’ll drive through and you’ll see someone sitting in there with a Bud Light wave and say hello. It’s great.” Over the past few years, event staff have worked to beef up food and drink

offerings during the festival, which means a variety of beer and drink options and better food options. We’re also very cognizant of prices as well. We have one area of the festival, called the Roadhouse, and in the Roadhouse, you can get a $5 beer, which is unheard of for a concert,” Rohall said. Festival planners are also going cashless this year, which is designed for the safety and convenience of festival goers and to allow for speedier transactions. Those without a debit or credit card can convert their cash to a pre-paid Visa card on-site, which is accepted at all vendors and merchandise stands at the festival. Planners also strongly encourage those planning on attending to be vaccinated for COVID-19 or seek a negative test result prior to arriving on the festival grounds to ensure the safety of all those attending. If metal and hard rock aren’t your thing, just wait a few weeks and check out the Born and Raised Festival, which Rohall described as an outlaw and red dirt country music festival. “It’s brand new. 2020 was supposed to be its first year, but obviously that didn’t happen,” Rohall said. “There is a pre-party on Friday the 17th. And then on the 18th and 19th are full days. The 18th headliner is ZZ Top, the 19th is Cody Jinks. It’s a stacked lineup if you’re into that music.”

A LITTLE BIT COUNTRY Rohall said a number of performers legendary to the scene are also scheduled to play, including Robert Earl Keen,


Tulsa

423 North Main St

CAIN’S BALLROOM the Randy Rogers Band and Lucinda Williams, but they’re also giving time for those just coming up. “We have folks like Corey Kent and Jason Scott Band, who you might have never heard of because they’re just now up and coming. We’re excited to lean into the Born and Raised concept,” Rohall said. “I think the coolest story on this one, for me personally, is Zach Bryan. He’s from 10 minutes down the road, he’s active-duty military, he’s only played two or three shows. We’ve got him slotted on Friday and Sunday. He’s a local kid and I think he’s going to end up doing big things. My uncle calls him ‘porch sitting, whiskey drinking music.’” The event is also set to feature barbecue curated by pitmaster Wayne Mueller, of the world-famous Louie Mueller Barbecue restaurant in Tyler, Texas, and a special opportunity to see bands up-close and personal with a VIP ticket. “We’re doing some really cool stuff in VIP as well for that. We’ll have a lot of these artists come in and do unplugged sessions. Essentially, you’ll see them on the main stage or the second stage and then you’ll go to VIP and instead of being around 15,000 people, you’ll be with 800 to 1,500 and get like this private, intimate unplugged session from Jack Ingram, or Jamie Lin Wilson or Wade Bowen. It’s going to be really cool in there,” Rohall said. Like Rocklahoma, festival planners encourage attendees to be vaccinated or to have received a negative test result for COVID-19. The event is also cashless.

For more information about Rocklahoma and to purchase tickets, scan the QR code with your smart phone

Thoughtful, Compassionate

MEDICAL MARIJUANA CARE For more information about Born and Raised and to purchase tickets, scan the QR code with your smart phone

Passion for education Experienced and knowledgeable staff Large selection of products C U R E O K L A H O M A .C O M 405.480.2873 7 1 0 5 N M AY AV E , OKLAHOMA CITY MU S IC OKGA Z E T TE .COM | S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1

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Listen to KOSU at home, at work, in your car, on your computer, on your phone, on your TV, or on your smart(er) speaker. Photo by Mark Tegethoff on Unsplash

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It’s not every day I get called a Nazi. On Thursday, Aug. 19, Tower Theatre and Ponyboy announced that we’re requiring proof of vaccine or negative COVID-19 test to attend our shows. This decision was not a move we wanted to make initially and something our team wrestled with for weeks. During our Don’t Call It a Comeback series, we were blown away by the turnout and support from the community. We were also blown away by how quickly the Delta variant nearly upended things, even in this great age of “personal responsibility.” Despite our highest hopes and plans, the series was still overshadowed by COVID. One case within the local music scene quickly showed us how our best plans can fall apart. And the show we built the Comeback series to lead up to? Rescheduled due to COVID quarantine measures within the tour. Flashes of March 2020 have been impossible to ignore. We are not out of this yet. As August progressed, our team talked every day about our position and what moves we should consider. Another of our confirmed tours for the fall began the process of rescheduling

for 2022 and my eye twitch came back immediately. The news and the numbers continued to accumulate: Jason Isbell and Japanese Breakfast were among the first artists to insist on vaccinated guests at shows. Several of our tours informed us that they would be following suit. Jazz Fest in New Orleans was cancelled again entirely. Live Nation and AEG, the two largest concert promoters in America also adopted vaccine-only policies. The day before we announced, the king himself, Garth Brooks, cancelled his fall arena tour, commenting, “I must do my part.” After a rapid week of communication, prep within our team and conversations with artist reps all across the country, we made our announcement. “Don’t read the comments,” was everyone’s advice, including a journalist I spoke with that morning who was nervous for us. By noon we had told every TV station in OKC and posted the news online while our team gathered inside the Tower offices to track the reaction. Comments like “This is the #1 way to go out of business,” “racist policies,” and “this decision is obviously virtue signaling” were quick to compile online,

but so was the clap back from OKC. As expected, some were quick to dismiss our decision, but the large majority of comments were supportive. Go read for yourself. The ratio doesn’t lie, especially when you factor for bots. And while those salacious bits are fun to read, so are the comments from tours: “That sounds great to us. Looking forward to an awesome and safe show with you all!” “We are 100% in favor of this.” “Sounds good to us. We are preparing announcements for tourwide…all markets.” “We are in full support and will do everything we can to spread the word. Thanks for being so proactive with this. I know it’s not an easy time.” “Thanks, we’re all about it.” “Hope that more venues and businesses will take your lead.” “We fully support and are all vaccinated.” Thirty minutes after we announced our new policy, ACL Festival in Austin, Texas announced that the same measures would be enacted for their outdoor festival. Tower and Ponyboy might be the first venues in Oklahoma City to make the move, but we’re in step with

our industry and the music community. And while we didn’t need Jason Isbell to give us the rock fist emoji on our tweet, we aren’t mad about it either. Where do things go from here? I don’t know; none of us do. Another year of live entertainment could cancel if things continue the way they’re going, but it’s too soon to call it. Bands need to tour to begin climbing out of the financial ruin of the last 18 months. Many are already out on the road, adapting to quickly changing circumstances and doing their best to stay healthy. We are all disappointed by a cancelled or rescheduled show, but it’s nothing compared to what an artist feels when the cancelled or rescheduled show also means cancelling and rescheduling their livelihood. The economics of touring are tricky. Tours can generate a lot of revenue, but they also rack up a lot of expenses. A good tour bus and driver can cost a band thousands of dollars a day whether they have a show or a night off. Most tours are only four or five shows away from losing money. I remember an artist in 2017 telling me that they had to cancel a week of shows when a tornado hit Florida. He said it would take them almost two years to catch up on that lost revenue. The only way to catch up? Add more dates to next year’s tour. This financial high wire act is playing out in vans and tour buses around the country. If you’re already out on the road, you’ve made commitments that you still have to honor even if the show doesn’t happen. Your tour bus isn’t free if the show cancels. Album sales and radio play used to support artists, but streaming monies today aren’t enough to sustain most bands. Artists have suffered greatly and they’re determined to make a living this year. Most would prefer to never tell you how to live your life; just come to the show and enjoy the music. Unfortunately, life just isn’t that carefree right now, especially when your job is to travel in a metal tube, interacting with people all across the country during a pandemic. Maybe that’s one thing we can all agree on: Life right now has been pretty rough all over and none of us are feeling very carefree. Bands and venues are working together to try and make sure the show can go on. No one wants to make their fans sick and lose their income at the same time. We head into the fall knowing the odds are against us, but when has that ever stopped rock and roll?

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These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

SATURDAY, SEP. 4

Blue October, Tower Theatre

Hosty, The Deli. Electric

Hanson, Cain’s Ballroom

FRIDAY, SEP. 10

Johnny5 Band Live, Thunderbird Casino. Classic

Cole Swindell Live in Concert, First Council Casino

Starshine Spotlights - Live Music during Weekend Brunch, Aurora Breakfast Bar & Backyard

Rock cover band

Rocklahoma, Pryor Creek Music Festival Grounds

THURSDAY, SEP. 2

Star Fighter/ Lazy Rooster Rhythm Co/ MG Bailey, Blue Note

Acoustic Open Mic, Core4 Brewing

Starshine Spotlights - Live Music during Weekend Brunch, Aurora Breakfast Bar & Backyard

Rock the Route, Downtown Yukon

Ian Moore, Tower Theatre

RThe Dead South with Elliot Brood, Tower Theatre

John Calvin Abney, Coffee Jerks -- Deer Creek

Umphrey’s McGee, Cain’s Ballroom. With Montu

Lady A, Carly Pearce, Niko Moon, Tenille Arts, Lloyd Noble Center The Velvet J’s/ Pete Hess Band/ Hogfeed, Blue Note

FRIDAY, SEP. 3

SUNDAY, SEP. 5

Arcadia Blues Festival, Arcaida Blues Festival

Hosty, The Deli. Electric

British Invasion Group, Legacy on Main Street.

Gyro Robo/ The Killings/ Counter Culture Prophet, Blue Note

Lost in Love Tour, Tower Theatre

Tribute

Rocklahoma, Pryor Creek Music Festival Grounds.

The Cadillac Three, Cain’s Ballroom. Country

Hanson, Cain’s Ballroom

Starshine Spotlights - Live Music during Weekend Brunch, Aurora Breakfast Bar & Backyard

Josh Ward, Diamond Ballroom. Country

Live from the Lawn Presented by American Fidelity: Lillie Mae, Scissortail Park. Rocklahoma, Pryor Creek Music Festival Grounds. Steely Dead, Tower Theatre

WEDNESDAY, SEP. 8 Andy Frasco & The U.N., Cain’s Ballroom

THURSDAY, SEP. 9 Acoustic Open Mic, Core4 Brewing

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SATURDAY, SEP. 11

Local Man Ruins Everything/ Datura, Blue Note Scott Keeton Band, Remington Park Starshine Spotlights - Live Music during Weekend Brunch, Aurora Breakfast Bar & Backyard

SUNDAY, SEP. 12

TUESDAY, SEP. 14 Costanzas/ Jerk!, Blue Note Lost Dog Street Band, Cain’s Ballroom. And Westbound Down and Matt Heckler

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.


For more information strain reviews scan QR code with your smart phone.

Strain name: Black Cherry Jelly Strain name: Cherbet Grown by: Arbuckle Farms Acquired from: Tegridy Market Date acquired: Aug. 17 Physical traits: Purple and orange with hints of light green Bouquet: sweet and gassy Review: Arbuckle Farms has always been one of my favorite growers, but I hadn’t checked in since the final issue of Extract (thanks, COVID). Unlike a number of farms during that lull, Arbuckle has only improved upon their previous successful growing strategies. Dan Wade is still at the helm of their cultivation arm (and was the first grower I ever interviewed for The High Culture), so it’s great watching him fully hit his stride. Nowhere is that more evident than in their latest Cherbet run. The scent is so sweet it sometimes hits your nostrils like a fruit

soda and they all but make the green disappear under the dense trichomes, so if you’re looking for a strong, tasty purp, give this one a go. If you’re looking for something a little funkier with a hint of sweetness, go for their Garlic Tarts. Or if you’re looking for a facemelter, Arbuckle Farms’ MAC-1 (Capulator cut) has only gotten better with experience.

Grown by: Zero Group Acquired from: Quail Greens Date acquired: Aug. 18 Physical traits: purple and light green Bouquet: sweet and earthy Review: When I walked into Quail Greens, I let the budtender, who also happens to curate their flower selection, make my choices for me. Of the four strains I walked out with, Black Cherry Jelly is my first recommendation. Another dessert strain with a bit of a kick, this is my first taste of Zero Group, but I’ll be keeping my eyes out for more. This one goes down smoothly and its effects are mirrored here with an intensely calming high. While this was my only foray into their flower to date, the new Zero Group menu looks tasty for those with a bit of a sweet tooth. Looking forward to getting my hands on their Divine Banana, Sherb Cake and Strawberry Jelly.

HIGH CULTURE OKGA Z E T TE .COM | S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1

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PUZZLES NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE | JIGSAW PUZZLE By Christina Iverson and Jeff Chen | Puzzles Edited by Will Shortz | 0822

Note: When this puzzle is done, insert the five shaded jigsaw pieces into the box at the bottom to get a three-word phrase, reading across, for what jigsaw puzzles provide. 90 ‘‘ka-POW!’’ Goldberg, in brief 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 93 ‘‘With patience and 44 Like cioccolato or torta perseverance you’re sure 47 Titus and Tiberius 19 20 21 22 to ____’’ 50 Bosom buddies 23 24 25 26 97 Course goal 52 Staple of skin care 100 Songs that can be trilling? 53 Sought office 27 28 29 30 102 Castigates 55 U.P.S. competitor 103 Fairy-tale figure 56 Steady, maybe 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 105 Confer, as credibility 58 Wrath 106 Gets wild and crazy 59 Exercise program since 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 108 Legendary the 1990s 109 Leave skid marks, maybe 60 Sharp, on a TV, informally 46 47 48 49 50 111 N.F.L. standout 61 Peak sacred to the 51 52 53 54 55 56 113 Homes for high fliers goddess Rhea 114 Instruction to drivers 62 Noshed on 57 58 59 60 61 62 leaving cars at a garage 63 ‘‘You’ll ____ for this!’’ 115 ‘‘C’mon, slowpoke!’’ 64 Words with a ring to them? 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 116 Ends, as a mission 65 Letter between foxtrot 117 Mary Poppins, for one and hotel in the NATO 71 72 73 74 118 Pick up on alphabet 68 How people often scroll 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 DOWN through social media 1 O-line anchor 69 ‘‘That’s gotta hurt!’’ 83 84 85 86 87 2 Feel regret 70 ‘‘The Puzzle Palace’’ org. 88 89 3 Trojans’ sch. 72 More straight-faced 4 Distinctive part of a 73 Creamy Italian dish 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 cookie cutter 76 Word that becomes its 5 ‘‘Tap tap tap ... ‘‘ activity own opposite by putting 100 101 102 103 104 6 Get into a lot a ‘‘T’’ at the front 7 Jacob’s brother, in the Bible 77 Singer whom M.L.K. 105 106 107 108 8 Moved like waves or muscles Jr. called the ‘‘queen of 9 A certain degree American folk music’’ 109 110 111 112 10 St. ____ University 80 Play again, as a TV special (Philadelphia school) 81 Companion in Brittany 113 114 11 Rescue dog, for one 84 Brain diagnostics, for short 115 116 12 Response to the Little 85 Used as a rendezvous Red Hen point 117 118 13 Language related to Manx 86 Devote 14 Egg, e.g. 87 Name suffix meaning 15 Keats, for one ‘‘mountain’’ ACROSS 31 Francis of old game shows 66 Bonnie with five Top 40 16 Sounds in a yoga studio 90 Fir tree hits in the 1990s 17 Government economic 91 ‘‘Is it still a date?’’ 1 Part of a pie or the earth 34 Bounded 67 Euphoric feeling org., at any rate? 92 Roman goddess of wisdom 6 Style that makes waves 35 Capital on a 126-mile long canal that’s used as 71 Love to bits 18 ____-Cat 94 Prefix with color or state 10 Doe in a court case a skating rink in the winter 72 More like a dive bar or 28 Big suit 95 Sugar ending 14 Flubs 39 English breakfast, e.g. certain bread 29 Derby, e.g. 96 W.W.II fighters 19 Keister 40 ‘‘What’s most useful next 74 Beehives, but not 30 Menial laborer, metaphorically 97 Apps made with 20 China holder? is to ____’’ hornets’ nests 31 Loads jalapeños and cheese 21 Axe target 45 College-app component 75 Daredevil’s hashtag 32 Take back, for short 98 ‘‘You agree?’’ (*nudge, 22 Some Madison Avenue 46 Role for “Ronny” Howard 76 Very in 33 Retreat nudge*) workers 48 Joshes 78 One of the B’s in BB&B 36 ‘‘Was it ____ I saw?’’ 99 Gathers some intel 23 End of many a sports 49 State flower of Utah 79 Good name for an investor? (classic palindrome) 101 Actor Brody broadcast 50 One of the B’s in BB&B 82 High-end Italian auto, 37 Mists, e.g. 104 Singer Willie 24 Freestyles, perhaps 51 Field work of note in 1979 informally 38 Feeling it after a 106 Annoying 25 Barflies 54 Rifle, in frontier lingo 83 ‘‘As you go, make sure marathon, say 107 Grannies 26 Botch 57 ‘‘To connect things up you exercise your ____’’ 41 Approves 110 Blood line 27 ‘‘First, you’re going to you’ll have to ____” 88 At peace 42 Perspective 112 Temporal ____ want to dump out the 63 Ones getting the crumbs? 89 Little bouquets 43 Achievement for Whoopi box and ____’’

Stumped? Call 1-900-285-5656 to get the answers to any three clues by phone ($1.20 a minute).

SUDOKU EASY | N° 706438908 Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3-by-3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9. www.printmysudoku.com Grid n°706438908 easy

9

5

8 3 1

9 1 3 7 2 8 5 2 7 4 1 5 3 9 7 4 3 5 8 2 7 4 3 36

S E P T E M B E R 1 , 2 0 2 1 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS Puzzle No. 0815, which appeared in the August 18 issue.

A T O P

R O F L

O O P S

I S L A M

H A L F

E L I O

S O A P

C O U P E

T O F U

I C E M E G N O D M C E O R M I P T L E X T E O E U N T P R O E P

C L E O O L N S I V E S O M T W E O U S G U S A C D O H A R E L L I T A A G O N L E N D T A O A I L N T I D B O D S Y S O U R N E D E D

C F C S P A W A T E L I N E S W I N O N C E M A I E W E L L N A L D D G A G O E B L R Y A C A S D E S E R L S S T E E K V A S S N P U T O E S T E M P S P A N I U P T O N P S S T

P D E A R D T U H A L A L A P I T R E E E G A D E M I A T S L G U I C A F C L O A C T S H A A S T H

E N T R O P Y

A I R B N B S

S L F I E M A S I T K E A A T O R M P I I C

R E O I L

C R O N Y

E S M E

H O M E S T E A D S

I C E E

A D D S

T A R O T

E L S E

D A R K

O D I E

R A N T

VOL. XLIII NO. 08 Oklahoma Gazette is circulated at its designated distribution points free of charge to readers for their individual use and by mail to subscribers. The cash value of this copy is $1. Persons taking copies of the Oklahoma Gazette from its distribution points for any reason other than their or others’ individual use for reading purposes are subject to prosecution. Please address all unsolicited news items (non-returnable) to the editor. For subscription inquiries, email kbleakley@okgazette.com

3701 N. Shartel Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73118-7102 PHONE (405) 528-6000 www.okgazette.com Copyright © 2021 Tierra Media, Inc. All rights reserved.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY - WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 2 Homework: What’s your greatest blessing? Newsletter@FreeWillAstrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19)

Aries poet Anna Kamienska wrote, “I’ve learned to value failed conversations, missed connections, confusions. What remains is what’s unsaid, what’s underneath. Understanding on another level of being.” In the coming weeks, I suggest you adopt her perspective as you evaluate both past and present experiences. You’re likely to find small treasures in what you’d assumed were wastelands. You may uncover inspiring clues in plot twists that initially frustrated you. Upon further examination, interludes you dismissed as unimportant or uninteresting could reveal valuable wrinkles.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

After studying your astrological omens, I’ve decided to offer you inspiration from the ancient Roman poet Catullus. I hope the extravagant spirit of his words will free you to be greedy for the delights of love and affection. Catullus wrote, “Give me a thousand kisses, then a hundred; then another thousand, then a second hundred; then yet another thousand.” I’ll add the following to Catullus’s appeal: Seek an abundance of endearing words, sweet favors and gifts, caresses and massages, help with your work, and fabulous orgasms. If there’s no one in your life to provide you with such blessings, give them to yourself.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

Gemini author Elif Batuman writes that the Old Uzbek language was rich in expressions about crying. There were “words for wanting to cry and not being able to, for loudly crying like thunder in the clouds, for crying in gasps, for weeping inwardly or secretly, for crying ceaselessly in a high voice, for crying in hiccups, and for crying while uttering the sound ‘hay hay.’” I recommend all of these to you in the coming days, as well as others you might dream up. Why? It’s prime time to seek the invigorating release and renewal that come from shedding tears generated by deep and mysterious feelings.

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

A blogger named MythWoven imagines an “alternate universe where I literally go to school forever (for free) so I can learn about art and literature and history and languages for 100 years. No job skills. No credit requirements. No student loans. Just learning.” I have longings like hers. There’s an eternal student within me that wants to be endlessly surprised with exciting information about interesting subjects. I would love to be continually adding fresh skills and aptitudes to my repertoire. In the coming weeks, I will give free rein to that part of me. I recommend you do the same, my fellow Cancerian.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

In 2016, the International Garden Photograph of the Year depicted lush lupine flowers in New Zealand. The sea of tall purple, pink, and blue blooms was praised as “an elegant symphony” and “a joy to behold.” What the judges didn’t mention is that lupine is an invasive species in New Zealand. It forces native plant species out of their habitat, which in turn drives away native animal species, including birds like the wrybill, black stilt, and banded dotterel. Is there a metaphorically comparable phenomenon in your life, Leo? Problematic beauty? Some influence that’s both attractive and prickly? A wonderful thing that can also be troublesome? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to try to heal the predicament.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

“I often wonder who I am and where is my country and where do I belong and why was I ever born at all,” wrote Virgo author Jean Rhys (1890–1979). I don’t think you will be agitated by those questions during the next eight weeks, Virgo. In fact, I suspect you will feel as secure in your identity as you have in a long time. You will enjoy prolonged clarity about your role in the world, the nature of your desires, and how you should plan your life for the next two years. If for some inexplicable reason you’re not already enjoying these developments, stop what you’re doing and meditate on the probability that I am telling you the bold truth.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Several states in the US have statutes prohibiting blasphemy. Saying “God damn it” could theoretically

get you fined in Massachusetts, South Carolina, and Wyoming. In the coming days, it’s best to proceed carefully in places like those, since you’ve been authorized by cosmic forces to curse more often and more forcefully than usual. Why? Because you need to summon vivid and intense protests in the face of influences that may be inhibiting and infringing on your soul’s style. You have a poetic license to rebel against conventions that oppress you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Everyone dreams at least three dreams per night. In a year, your subconscious mind generates over 1,100 dreams. About this remarkable fact, novelist Mila Kundera writes, “Dreaming is not merely an act of coded communication. It is also an aesthetic activity, a game that is a value in itself. To dream about things that have not happened is among humanity’s deepest needs.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because September is Honor Your Dreams Month. To celebrate, I suggest the following experiments. 1. Every night before sleep, write down a question you’d like your dreams to respond to. 2. Keep a notebook by your bed and transcribe at least one dream each time you sleep. 3. In the morning, have fun imagining what the previous night’s dreams might be trying to communicate to you. 4. Say prayers of gratitude to your dreams, thanking them for their provocative, entertaining stories.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

In her autobiography Changing, Sagittarian actor Liv Ullmann expresses grief about how she and a loved one failed to communicate essential truths to each other. I propose we regard her as your anti-role model for the rest of 2021. Use her error as your inspiration. Make emotionally intelligent efforts to talk about unsaid things that linger like ghostly puzzles between you and those you care about.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

“I could do with a bit more excess,” writes author Joanne Harris. “From now on I’m going to be immoderate—and volatile,” she vows. “I shall enjoy loud music and lurid

poetry. I shall be rampant.” Let me be clear, Capricorn: I’m not urging you to be immoderate, volatile, excessive, and rampant every day for the rest of your long life. But I think you will generate health benefits and good fortune if you experiment with that approach in the coming weeks. Can you think of relatively sane, sensible ways to give yourself this salubrious luxury?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

While wading through the internet’s wilder terrain, I found a provocative quote alleged to have been uttered by the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates. He supposedly said, “My ultimate goal is to look totally hot, but not be unapproachable.” I confess that in the past I have sometimes been fooled by fake quotes, and I suspect this is one. Still, it’s amusing to entertain the possibility that such an august personage as Socrates, a major influencer of Western culture, might say something so cute and colloquial. Even if he didn’t actually say it, I like the idea of blending ancient wisdom with modern insights, seriousness with silliness, thoughtful analysis with good fun. In accordance with astrological omens, I recommend you experiment with comparable hybrids in the coming weeks. (PS: One of your goals should be to look totally hot, but not be unapproachable.)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

“If you don’t know what you want,” writes Piscean novelist Chuck Palahniuk, “you end up with a lot you don’t.” Very true! And right now, it’s extra important to keep that in mind. During the coming weeks, you’ll be at the peak of your ability to attract what you want and need. Wouldn’t you prefer to gather influences you really desire—as opposed to those for which you have mild or zero interest? Define your wants and needs very precisely.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes /daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY - WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 9 Homework: ThisiswhatIdotoearnaliving.Letme knowwhatyoudo.Newsletter@FreeWillAstrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19) “We need to become more unreasonable but in an intelligent way,” says Aries politician Jerry Brown. Yes! I agree! And that’s especially true for you right now, Aries. To Brown’s advice, I will add this message from Aries fashion designer Vivienne Westwood: “Intelligence is composed mostly of imagination, insight—things that have nothing to do with reason.” Here’s one further suggestion to help you take maximum advantage of cosmic rhythms, courtesy of Aries historian Arnold J. Toynbee: “The supreme accomplishment is to blur the line between work and play.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “I have become whole and complete, like a thundering cloudburst in summer,” wrote Taurus poet Miklós Radnóti. I love that metaphor for fullness: not an immaculate icon of shiny, sterile perfection, but rather a primal, vigorous force of nature in all of its rumbling glory. I hope you like this symbol as much as I do, and I hope you use it to fuel your creative spirit in the coming weeks. PS: Keep in mind that many indigenous people welcome rainstorms as a source of fertility and growth. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) “Pandiculation” is a word that refers to when you stretch and yawn at the same time. According to my understanding of the astrological omens, you will benefit from doing a lot of pandiculations in the coming days. I also recommend gazing lazily out the window and looking at the sky a lot. Keep your shoes off as much as possible, get a massage or three, and let yourself sleep more than you customarily do. Did you know that sighing deeply is good for your lungs’ health? Here’s your homework: Dream up all the things you can do to relax and renew yourself. It’s prime time to indulge in generous acts of self-healing. CANCER (June 21-July 22) The ancient Roman author Pliny’s ten-volume Natural History, written in the first century, was a

monumental encyclopedia of the natural world, unprecedented in its own time and for centuries afterward. It offered compilations of facts about astronomy, geography, zoology, botany, mineralogy, and many other subjects. There was one big problem with it, however. It contained a great deal of erroneous information. For example, Pliny described in detail many non-existent animals, including dragons, flying horses, and giant serpents that swallowed bulls and snatched birds out of the sky. My reason for telling you this is to inspire you to be extra discerning in the coming weeks. Be especially skeptical of authorities, experts, and other know-it-alls who are very confident despite being inaccurate or erroneous. It’s time for you to increase your trust in your own authority.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) College student Amelia Hamrick studied the right panel of Hieronymus Bosch’s 15th-century painting The Garden of Earthly Delights. It depicts a hellish scene. Cities are on fire. Weird beasts devour sinful humans. There are demons and torture chambers. Hamrick did what no one in the history of art had ever done: She transcribed the musical score that the artist had written on a man’s naked hindquarters. Her work inspired a composer to create a recording entitled “500-Year-Old Butt Song from Hell.” In the coming weeks, I invite you to perform feats comparable to Hamrick: 1. Explore the past for useful, overlooked clues. 2. Find or create redemptive transformations out of stressful situations. 3. Have fun telling stories about your past misadventures.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “There are those fortunate hours when the world consents to be made into a poem,” writes Leo poet Mark Doty. That’s great for a poet. But what about for everyone else? My variation on Doty’s comment is this: There are fortunate hours when the world consents to be made into a holy revelation or a lyrical breakthrough or a marvelous feeling that changes our lives forever. I expect events like those to come your way at least twice in the immediate future.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Born on one of the Galapagos Islands, Diego is a giant tortoise who has lived for over 100 years. He’s a member of the Hood Island species, which had dwindled to a population of 15 by 1977. That’s when he and his tortoise colleague, whose name is E5, became part of a breeding program with 12 female tortoises. E5 was reserved in his behavior, but Diego was a showboat who vocalized loudly as he enjoyed public mating rituals. Together the two males saved their species—producing over 2,000 offspring in subsequent years. According to my astrological analysis, you could be as metaphorically fertile as Diego and E5 in the coming months—even if you prefer to adopt an approach more akin to E5’s.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Between 37 and 41 BCE, Virgo-born Caligula served as third Emperor of Rome. To do so, he had to disprove the prophecy of a renowned astrologer, Thrasyllus of Mendes. Years earlier, Thrasyllus had predicted that Caligula, despite being well-connected, “had no more chance of becoming emperor than of riding a horse across the Bay of Baiae”—a distance of two miles. Once in power, Caligula arranged to have a series of pontoon boats arrayed across the bay, enabling him to ride his favorite horse Incitatus from one shore to the other across the Bay of Baiae. I foresee the possibility of a comparable turn of events for you, Virgo. Is there a curse you want to undo? A false prophecy you’d like to cancel? Someone’s low expectation you would love to debunk? The coming weeks will be a favorable time.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) “Themeaningofmyexistenceisthatlifehasaddresseda questiontome,”wrotepsychologistCarlJung.“Or, conversely,Imyselfamaquestionthatisaddressedtothe world,andImustcommunicatemyanswer,forotherwise, Iamdependentupontheworld’sanswer.”Theseare superbmeditationsforyouSagittariansduringthe comingweeks.BetweennowandOctober1,Iinviteyouto keepajournalwhereyouwriteabouttwosubjects:1.What isthemainquestionthatlifeasksyou?2.Whatisthemain questionthatyourlifeaskstheworld?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) North Korea’s Capricorn leader Kim Jong-un has an amazing résumé. Official reports say he learned to drive at age three and was an accomplished sailor at nine. As an adult, he developed the power to control the weather. He’s a skilled musician and artist, as well as a scientist who developed a miracle drug to cure AIDs, Ebola, cancer, heart disease, and the common cold. Most impressively, Kim is an archaeologist who discovered a lair where magical unicorns live. Is it possible you have unexpressed powers like these, Capricorn? If so, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to identify them and start tapping into their potential. It’s time to develop your dormant talents. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Aquarian author Toni Morrison testified, “I think of beauty as an absolute necessity. I don’t think it’s a privilege or an indulgence. It’s almost like knowledge, which is to say, it’s what we were born for.” I urge you to adopt her perspective during the next four weeks, Aquarius. In my astrological opinion, a devoted quest for beauty will heal exactly what most needs to be healed in you. It will teach you everything you most need to know. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) For painter Vincent van Gogh, love wasn’t primarily a sentimental feeling. Nor was it an unfocused generalized wish for health and happiness in those he cared for. Rather, he wrote, “You must love with a high, serious, intimate sympathy, with a will, with intelligence.” His love was alert, acute, active, and energized. It was animated with a determination to be resourceful and ingenious in nurturing the beloved. For van Gogh, love was always in action, forever moving toward ever-fresh engagement. In service to intimacy, he said, “you must always seek to know more thoroughly, better, and more.” I hope you’ll make these meditations a top priority during the next seven weeks. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes /daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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