Best of OKC 2019

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INSIDE COVER P.17 Oklahoma Gazette’s Best of OKC

issue is packed full of the best food, culture, goods and services, health options and more. You voted! Find out who won! By Gazette staff Cover by Ingvard Ashby Photos by Alexa Ace

NEWS 4

CITY Science Museum Oklahoma

launches planetarium campaign

6 CITY East End Merchant

Association 8

CHICKEN-FRIED NEWS

EAT & DRINK

AUG 22-24 $20

11 REVIEW Social Deck + Dining 12 FEATURE Plant

14 GAZEDIBLES new in 2019

ARTS & CULTURE 17 BEST OF OKC

43 ART Brenda Kingery: A

Retrospective at Oklahoma City University 44 FILM 40 Minutes or Less: Local Female Filmmakers at Artspace at Untitled 46 CALENDAR

MUSIC 49 EVENT Summer Daze 2.0 at Opolis 51 LIVE MUSIC

THE HIGH CULTURE 52 CANNABIS Cannabis Cup series 3 56 CANNABIS The Peak

60 CANNABIS The Toke Board 60 CANNABIS strain review

FUN 61 ASTROLOGY

62 PUZZLES sudoku | crossword

OKG Classifieds 63

COMING SOON

OCTOBER 4

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october 25-27

native ink tattoo festival

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NEWS

CIT Y

SMO’s OmniDome Theater has been shut down since late 2015, but a new fundraising campaign seeks to bring it back to life. | Photo Alexa Ace

Giant leap

Science Museum Oklahoma is accepting donations for an improved planetarium to go in the OmniDome Theater. By Miguel Rios

Science Museum Oklahoma (SMO) officials are hoping to raise $3.5 million to relocate Kirkpatrick Planetarium and outfit it with improved infrastructure. SMO recently launched One Giant Leap, a fundraising campaign to help convert the dormant OmniDome Theater into a world-class planetarium. “Our history as a museum began on the fairgrounds as the Kirkpatrick Planetarium, and then as John Kirkpatrick’s vision for the culture in this community grew, we moved to this building in 1978,” said Sherry Marshall, museum president and CEO. “But we also kept our roots with the planetarium by moving it over as well.” While the equipment aged well, it did have a lifespan. Marshall said that if the planetarium was not upgraded, there was a possibility it would have to shut down, but a local donor stepped in to provide financial support. Just last year, Kirkpatrick Planetarium was upgraded with state-of-the-art digital projectors. The timing of the One Giant Leap campaign lined up with the museum’s need for additional infrastructure and desire to refresh the OmniDome Theater, which has gone unused since September 2015. “It was a large-format theater like an IMAX, but we closed it several years ago because financial sustainability was not feasible. It was just too expensive to operate and run,” Marshall said. “We couldn’t compete with the other largeformat theaters. It was a dome theater, so we were very limited on the movies 4

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that we could show. And it didn’t really resonate with our community. … When we talk about things that resonate with our community, the planetarium and being able to see the stars indoors is something we have heard from our visitors is important. They support it, and it’s something they get really excited about and learn from.”

High tech

Marshall said they are excited to refurbish the iconic dome inside and out. One of the main changes will be a 50-foot dome screen for planetarium viewing, which can be dropped in without having to make major structural changes to the dome. “That’s a different screen than what was in the OmniDome, but the new screen fits in there, so we don’t really have to do much demolition,” Marshall said. “That increases the size of our current planetarium screen, and it also gives us a great opportunity to look at our equipment. “We deserve one of the best planetariums in the world, so we will add an additional layer of equipment that creates an experience that you won’t be able to find in many other places. … In addition to our digital projectors that we just got that are amazing, we will add the optical projector, which provides one of the brightest, sharpest, most detailed stars that you’ll find at any planetarium, making us one of the only digital-optical hybrid planetariums in the world.” The donor supporting the planetar-

ium helped upgrade the digital equipment last year and made a $759,120 pledge for the optical star projector, which will be acquired after moving the digital equipment and installing the new screen. However, $3.5 million is still needed for infrastructure and exhibits to begin the final phase of the campaign. “We’ve got this pledge support for the equipment, but we want to make sure that we have the highest-quality setting and space to put it in,” Marshall said. “That entails the right chairs, the right stage for it, the entrance, the area around it, the exhibits that really enhance the hands-on aspect of the planetarium, so there’s a great big project around this to create this center for astronomy. You’ll be able to find exhibits that talk about stars, planets, space, all of the current science. … We’re committed to always having the highestquality and immersive experiences. We’re going to continue that with this planetarium project as well.” The local community has expressed its love for Kirkpatrick Planetarium, which has up to two-hour wait times sometimes, and Marshall said the new location will allow the museum to accommodate more people and boost their programming. “It’s going to increase their ability to see shows,” she said. “We’ll have more seats. We’ll have a bigger dome. The wait times will go down. So the quality of the experience will increase.”

munity, and this higher-level planetarium means we can work closer with groups. … We will be able to get even deeper within our community in looking at how we can work together to make sure everyone has access.” Since the current planetarium takes up a significant portion of the exhibit area, moving it into the unused OmniDome will provide the museum an opportunity to enhance its programming, which Marshall said is always focused on education. “We are flooded with opportunity here on what we can do because not only are we getting this great planetarium space, we have a wonderful new programming space that we can look at in the future that is very prominent in the middle of our museum,” she said. “Education is always at the core of everything that we do. What’s wonderful is everything around us is science. … We’re able to wrap all that together in this big, beautiful bow in our museum, and the planetarium is the anchor for that because that is where it all started.” The museum has exponentially grown in exhibits and programming, and Marshall encourages adults who have only been as students on a field trip to return and experience what is essentially a new museum. “If you have not been here lately, you have not seen our place and the way that we are snowballing and growing. It’s an incredible experience that you just have to see to believe,” she said. “Every time you come here, you’ll see something new. It’s not the same old OmniPlex; we’re Science Museum Oklahoma, and it’s a brand-new experience for our city. … We have adult nights that are so much fun. So many people think that it’s just for kids, and it absolutely is not. We have couples of all ages come to those adult nights, they come here on weekends; it’s just a great place to spend quality time together doing fun things.” The next SMO 21, an adults-only night at the museum with a cash bar and adult-themed activities, is Oct. 25. Visit sciencemuseumok.org/planetarium.

Emphasizing education

The bigger venue will also allow for better partnerships within the community and increased opportunities for education. “Including increasing the quality of life just for Oklahomans in general and providing an unprecedented experience right here in our city, it also provides a resource for teachers, for families,” she said. “We are a partner with our com-

Sherry Marshall is the Science Museum Oklahoma CEO and president. | Photo provided


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CIT Y

NEWS

East End

Efforts to create a commercial district in northeast Oklahoma City continue with a new merchant association. By Miguel Rios

Northeast Oklahoma City Renaissance served as a catalyst for newly formed East End Merchant Association, which continues the efforts to establish a commercial district. The goal is to transform northeast Oklahoma City into an “attractive destination that preserves the rich African American history and rekindles its vibrant cultural and economic activity.” East End was recently announced as the official name of the association. While it was voted on twice, Skye Latimer, association secretary, said there was some contention surrounding it. “In trying to encompass everything that this district could be and has been, there were some great opportunities for great names,” Latimer said. “But this one did win twice, and that was a vote by the people who live here, people who work here. This is what they wanted to be called.” Since its creation, the nonprofit association formed an executive board, created committees, opened a bank account and is finalizing bylaws and its mission statement. “[Association president Victoria Kemp] summed it up really beautifully in our last meeting,” Latimer said. “She said that we want to bring awareness to this district, we want to empower the businesses that are here, we want to become more aware of how the dollar is turning over here, grow new businesses and attract new businesses.”

Beautification

The group wants the district to feel inviting, so Kemp said she hopes to put up public art like murals and sculptures throughout the area. Part of the reason some people dislike the East End name is because it doesn’t explicitly mention anything representative of the area’s black culture. “We really want to see art that represents our experience in Oklahoma,” Kemp said. “People already know that this has been a majority African American neighborhood, and for those people who are mad that that’s not in the name, art is the way we can, A, let people know that this is us and, B, make it more beautiful and interesting for people to come and see. I can just see that down 23rd Street, every block or two blocks, that there is a piece of art that represents what our experience has been in Oklahoma.” First Security Bank & Trust Company, 1541 NE 23rd St., will host a bison sculpture outside their building. Kemp said John Day, the bank’s senior vice president, attends monthly meetings and has 6

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been instrumental in helping the revitalization efforts. “The old president is retiring, so he is about to be the president of the bank,” Kemp said. “He actually already had a plan in place to do a mural on the eastside of his wall, but then when we said, ‘bison’ and we were looking for a place, he asked if he could host the bison. … We want to see the other businesses that are already here, especially the corporate businesses, step up because art is expensive. For us to try to raise dollars to actually build art would take a significant amount of money, so if we could get Tinker Federal Credit Union to erect something — Church’s [Chicken], OnCue, we know COOP [Ale Works] is eventually going to be in our district. The east side starts on Broadway [Avenue]. If we could get all of those corporations to just step up and erect something significant that is a nod to our experience in Oklahoma, we’d be on our way.” Through ethical revitalization, the group also aims to retain and showcase its history and culture.

We want to give the community and the people here something to be proud of when you step outside your door. Brandi Jones “We as a board and as a community and as a team want to really express the rich history that’s here and the art that’s here,” Latimer said. “Putting art in public places really gives people ownership and a sense of community on those spaces. By doing that, we know that that will bring in more people and more businesses and help us achieve our goal.”

Caring businesses

Vice president Brandi Jones said another goal is to ensure the people who live in the area are able to remain there as they work to ethically revitalize neighborhoods. “Even with everything that’s going on with the lack of resources that we have over here for the community, we’re still looking to help them stay,” Jones said. “We want to give the community and the people here something to be proud of when you step outside your door, when you walk down the street, when you take your kids to school. My goal is also to help the kids over here on

the east side with education, with activities, with everything that they don’t have. … Whatever it is that we can provide to help with the youth.” The recent closure of Smart Saver, the only grocery store in the 73111 ZIP code, blindsided members of the community, but Jones said it is just another obstacle they will have to tackle and overcome together. “Even with the grocery store being gone, if we have to give a ride to the grocery store in Midwest City, then that’s what we’re going to do,” she said. “It’s nothing that we haven’t been through before, and I think it’s going to make way for something better. … [We want businesses] that want to be in the community and help the community as well. If you’re a business over here, you have to give back, and the grocery store wasn’t one of them.” Through the new commercial district, Latimer, Jones and Kemp want to emphasize the need for businesses that truly become part of the community and respect northeast OKC. “When you looked at the grocery store, they didn’t respect the store. It looked terrible, and if it doesn’t look like something that is cared for, if you don’t look like you respect it, I don’t think other people are going to respect it either,” Kemp said. “[We want to see] developers that are coming over here to revitalize the community and help the community, not try to come here and try to take something that belongs to someone else,” Jones said. The association hosts monthly planning meetings that community members attend to help with their goals, provide feedback and receive information. Officials said they commonly hear that there should be no reason to leave the

from left East End Merchant Association vice president Brandi Jones, secretary Skye Latimer and president Victoria Kemp continue working to attract and grow more businesses in northeast OKC. | Photo Alexa Ace

east side for any basic needs. “We’re really hoping to see all kinds of development. There’s room for everything; we need everything,” Kemp said. “We need a health food store. We need a hardware store. We need clothes, shoes, retail — you name it.” Through their continued efforts to attract more people and businesses, Kemp hopes to change the idea and narrative of what northeast OKC represents. “We want them to think this is an amazing place to come and visit and to live and to shop and work, and then also we want to hold other businesses accountable that are already here,” she said. “When we talk about what we want the east side to look like, when you drive by [dollar store buildings], theirs is one of the worst. There is trash outside, there is public drunkenness that is allowed and you’re closed at 10 [a.m.] because you don’t have air conditioning.” The association is now accepting donations of any size to help with its overall efforts. “What a beautiful opportunity we have to come into this community and tell the children and tell the people who live here that they are worthy of these dollars to beautify their area, that they have value and that we see them and that we want to uplift where they live,” Latimer said. The next commercial district planning meeting is 6 p.m. Sept. 12 at Florence’s Restaurant, 1437 NE 23rd St. Email Latimer at skye@foldedowl.com for more information on donations.


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7


chicken

friedNEWS

Hubcap gentrification Oklahoma City has a long history with “out with the old and in with the new.” There was the wanton destruction of historic buildings during the height of Urban Renewal’s Pei Plan, and in current times, movements have been set in motion to save the Donnay Building and First “City Titty” Christian Church. There hasn’t been the same outcry for the area formerly known as Hubcap Alley — the area connecting south downtown to Capitol Hill — as its land is being bought and repurposed from salvage yards and auto repair places into the second phase of Scissortail Park. The next phase of the park brings with it the promise of increased development in the area. It is extending to Pull-A-Part Auto Parts Yard, which fronts the Oklahoma River at SW 15th Street and Santa Fe Avenue. According to The Oklahoman, the 14.77 acres on the Pull-A-Part lot is up for sale and the junkyard is moving to a new home on SE 25th Street. The property backs up to the walking trail along the Oklahoma River and has views of downtown and the Boathouse District, making it the perfect place for future development. The broker for the property told The Oklahoman that the land can be converted into space for hotels, office, retail or mixed-use — so anything, really. We look forward to the days of future generations sitting outside one of those mixed-use developments that has apartments above businesses on the ground floor. With a charcoal-flavored soft-serve that is great for getting Instagram likes, but not actually tasty, they motion off to the west. “Over there is where my parents said John TV used to film. Now it’s a restaurant that only serves Brussels sprouts.”

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Conservative moves

Some Oklahomans are probably desensitized by all the cannabis dispensaries and advertisements that pop up everywhere, but Paul Chabot, a twice unsuccessful Republican congressional candidate, is not from here. And he just wants us to please think of the children. In a front-page story titled “Cannabis billboards irk some in state,” The Oklahoman reported that Chabot, once he entered Oklahoma from Texas, noticed several billboards advertising cannabis, which completely ruined his family’s billboard-reading game. Seriously, this was a front-page story. Apparently, cannabis billboards are much harder to explain to his four children than Texas’ myriad erectile dysfunction, adult novelty shops and ubiquitous “You’re going to Hell” billboards. After his second unsuccessful attempt to run for Congress in California, Snowflake Chabot retreated with his family to McKinney, Texas, because California was “overrun by illegals, drug addicts and violent criminals under the umbrella of a radical liberal ideology that has destroyed the state.” He left his state in search of a safe space. In fact, he now dedicates his life to finding safe spaces for other conservatives around the country irked by their states. Chabot owns Conservative Move, a company that helps “right-leaning people and families relocate from

liberal strongholds to red states,” which seems ironic, as he commonly tweets things like “America - Love it or leave it there is a long line illegals waiting to take your place.” “If it was one billboard, maybe I wouldn't have thought much about it, but this is a huge money industry,” he told The Oklahoman, which definitely needed to cover this incredibly newsworthy story on the front page. “You can tell it’s professionally marketed.” Uh, yeah! That’s the point. We voted for medical cannabis, and now we have professionals offering services and products that can help save lives while stimulating the state economy. It’s almost like he does not respect the democratic process and would much rather


subvert the people’s will, but that sure doesn’t sound like a conservative move.

Long shot

Zero percent. That is the odds Rep. Jon Echols, R-Oklahoma City, gives opponents of House Bill 2597 of getting a referendum on the ballot that would allow voters the chance to repeal the bill, according to Tulsa World. Co-authored by Echols, HB 2597 — allowing legal gun owners to open- or concealed-carry their weapons without any additional permit or training — was the first bill signed into law by Gov. Kevin “Sun’s Out, Guns Out” Stitt and will take effect Nov. 1. Proponent Rep. Jason Lowe, D-Oklahoma City, told Tulsa World it is his “sincerest belief that there are citizens among us who should not openly carry guns, especially without a permit or training,” but clarified what the referendum would and would not do. “This petition does not take away guns,” Lowe said. “This petition does not make tougher and more restrictive laws. This petition does exactly what it should and forces the Legislature to rethink our decision to rush a bill ... to fulfill a campaign promise.” The referendum is definitely a longshot bet, requiring 59,320 signatures on an approved petition delivered to the Secretary of State’s Office by 51p.m.7/29/19 Aug. HalfPageGazette2.pdf 29, but let us make a conjecture of our

own, one we would be thrilled to be proven wrong about — 100 percent. That is the odds, we project, that permitless carry will result in a person being shot who otherwise would not be. Perhaps it will be because an incident like the El Paso Walmart shooting will be even harder to prevent when guntoting randos become an even more normalized aspect of daily life. Perhaps it will be because police responding to an active shooter will mistakenly shoot one or more of the many other armed individuals on the scene, possibly even the proverbial “good guy with the gun.” Perhaps a concealed carrier with no safety training will just shoot themselves in the nards playing pocket pool. Or maybe, by some miracle, the NRA is right and more guns will, for the first time in the history of ever, result in fewer people getting shot by said guns, but are we 11:08 AM really willing to take that bet?

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Sushi, noodles, cocktails and happiness.

10-lane bowling alley with fullservice bar and food.

An astounding selection of beer and pub classics.

German-inspired beer hall with housemade sausages and a huge beer garden.

Chisholm Creek

Midtown OKC

Midtown OKC

Midtown OKC

W W W. M C N E L L I E S G R O U P.C O M

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REVIEW

EAT & DRINK

Communal culinary

As Social Deck + Dining builds its customer base in its first year, it is delivering well-executed, high-quality ingredients. By Jacob Threadgill

Social Deck + Dining 1933 NW 23rd St. | besocialokc.com | 405-602-8705 WHAT WORKS: The baked eggs and seared scallops are very well-executed. WHAT NEEDS WORK: The toasted bread got a little soggy on the katsu sando. TIP: The vegetables with everything hummus allow you to explore other options with an entree.

Since opening Social Deck + Dining in the former Chae Modern Korean space, 1933 NW 23rd St., last December, owners Jordan and Jamie Winteroth are still very much in the perilous first year of a restaurant. Under the headline “No, most restaurants don’t fail in the first year,” Forbes did its best in a 2017 story to debunk the common misconception. Citing an American Express commercial, writer Adam Ozimek does his best to debunk the misconception that 90 percent of new restaurants fail in their first year of operation. I’ve always heard a number closer to 60 or 70 percent, which is backed up in studies by Cornell University and Perry Group International, but a 20-year study looking at 81,000 independent restaurants across the country published by a pair of economists in 2014 found that the number of first-year restaurant closures (17 percent) is lower than all other service startups (19 percent). Market specifics certainly play a large role in those numbers. With the rash of new restaurant openings in Oklahoma City this summer, there’s certainly a case to be made that the city is over capacity for independent eateries.

Social is the first restaurant from the Winteroths — Jordan spent a lot of time as manager with A Good Egg Dining Group — and Social is at its point in its life cycle where it has been well-received by those leaving reviews on Facebook, Google and Yelp! with a 4.7 (out of five) aggregate between the sites, but it’s still gaining traction. “Business has been up and down,” Jordan Winteroth said. “We’ve had really good months and things were really starting to shine, and then July was pretty tough. We think that was from people traveling. With school getting started back, we’re hoping that people start getting back into their routines again.” He said they will be sponsoring giveback nights at local public schools and are hiring a marketing team to continue to increase business. After a pair of recent trips to Social, I was thoroughly pleased with pretty much everything I tried at the restaurant, and people should seek it out. I think it works well as both a date night kind of restaurant and a brunch destination. Social sets itself apart in the market by offering brunch service seven days per week. In recent months, the menu has been adapted to carry its popular baked egg dish with lamb meatballs to its dinner menu and add smaller portions of chicken-fried steak, katsu sando

and tikka masala to its lunch menu. “Baked eggs are the most popular dish, and people keep coming back for it,” Jordan Winteroth said. “We added it to the dinner menu because people were disappointed that they could only get it for brunch. … [The] one complaint was people thought brunch was more breakfast than lunch, and brunch should have both.” Served with housemade flatbread, a spicy tomato sauce and lamb kefta meatballs, there is a reason the baked eggs ($14) are so popular; they’re really good. Flecked with onion, mint and garlic, the meatballs are well-positioned in the tomato gravy and topped with feta cheese. It’s basically shakshouka with meatballs, which is hard to beat. At a lunch with a few other guests, the table seemed unanimously pleased with the buttermilk waffle ($9) topped with blueberries, the chilaquiles ($12) in a dark red chile de arbol sauce and the bacon, egg, lettuce and tomato sandwich ($12).

Baked eggs are the most popular dish, and people keep coming back for it. Jordan Winteroth On future visits, I’d like to try Social’s take on eggs Benedict that uses Ora King salmon cakes with sourdough and hollandaise ($16), which is the same price the cakes go for on the dinner menu as an appetizer. I’d also like to give Social’s version of a Dutch baby a try. The thick, eggy pancake is also available in the metro at The Jones Assembly’s brunch and En Croûte, and of course, Oh Baby! in The Collective food hall specializes in the dish with both sweet and savory applications. A dinner trip to Social continued the foundation started by a good lunch visit. The meal began with an order of everything hummus, which is joined by housemade flaxseed crackers; salted, roasted beets; cucumbers; red peppers; and broccoli covered in house oregano vinaigrette. All of the veggies were seasoned nicely,

Katsu sando with cowboy cassoulet | Photo Jacob Threadgill

Seared scallops are served with Della Terra pasta. | Photo Gazette / file

and I liked the fact that except for the beets, they were served raw to retain maximum nutritional value. I recommend this as a starter because it has an ample amount of vegetables and allows you to explore other side items with your entrée. I originally thought about ordering broccoli with the katsu sando for dinner but opted for the cowboy cassoulet instead. The beans are cooked with multiple types of pork and arrive bubbling in a small cast-iron skillet. They’re smoky and wonderful. I was surprised when Winteroth said the side item hasn’t sold well over the summer. “The cassoulet will pick up more traction during the colder months,” he said. “We didn’t want to change up the menu too quick, but next spring and summer, we’ll be taking that one out for a cooler.” The katsu sando ($13) has gone through a little bit of a new preparation since opening. Originally served with dry napa cabbage, the fried pork cheek is topped with cabbage and carrots with a light vinegar dressing. I liked the fact it’s now more like an Asian coleslaw, but the last few bits of the sandwich were a bit soggy. “[The kitchen] probably didn’t strain the cabbage properly,” Winteroth said. “We just switched it up after some customers said they’d do it differently, and we started playing with it.” The pan-seared sea scallops ($28) are a home run on the dinner menu. The scallops were cooked perfectly, not overdone, and the Della Terra pappardelle pasta was nicely al dente. The chunks of Parmigiano-Reggiano were so big and wide you had to do a doubletake to distinguish them from the pasta. As its name says, Social puts an emphasis on encouraging conversation between parties. Booths are sat close together, and other guests can be seated at long communal tables. It worked at dinner; my wife and I struck up conversation with the group next to us as our entrees arrived. With a commitment to use fresh and local ingredients and offer brunch options every day, Social is executing its mission as it closes in on its first-year anniversary.

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EAT & DRINK

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Veggie love

Plant in Midtown aims to provide an outlet for positive nutritional conversation and healthy meals. By Jacob Threadgill

The conversation around a vegan or plant-based diet is often about what a person cannot eat. With the opening of Plant, 1120 N. Walker Ave., in Midtown Aug. 5, owner Emma Ryan wants to talk about the positive effects of leaving behind animal products and processed foods. Ryan herself is a testament to the health benefits of following a plantbased diet. In high school and college, she dealt with autoimmune diseases and was later diagnosed with thyroid cancer that spread throughout her neck. She made the switch in her diet about nine years ago and within weeks felt a tangible difference. “I felt light-years better just by changing my diet,” Ryan said. “That’s not to say I didn’t need Western medicine because I did; I still have surgery and other things. Doctors told me that there was no way I’d ever feel very good ever again or that I could recover 100 percent because I went through so much, but I feel better than I’ve ever been in my life. My doctor told me, ‘I don’t know how you have so much energy all the time because I’ve never met anyone who had everything like you’ve had feel as good as you.’” She wanted to learn as much as possible about nutrition and why it was making such a difference in her life. First, she got a job as pastry chef at the raw vegan Mathew Kenney restaurant in Classen Curve. She then went abroad to help open a vegan restaurant in Amsterdam and returned to the U.S. to get a degree in nutrition. For the last two and a half years, Ryan has worked in Oklahoma City as a private health coach, creating meal plans for clients, among many other duties. “It showed me that there are no

healthy options when going out to eat,” Ryan said. “You can manipulate menus, but there wasn’t anything readily available for my clients to go out to.” For years, Ryan waited for someone else to open a plant-based restaurant focused on nutrition in Oklahoma City, but it never happened. While hosting a cooking class, she remembers people peppering her with the same question: When are you going to open a restaurant?

It’s really meant to plant inspiration in people’s lives so that you can eat better to feel better. Emma Ryan “People kept mentioning it, and finally, I put some menu ideas down on paper,” Ryan said. “One thing led to another, and I kept telling people about it and ended up getting investors. We found this location, and somehow here we are. It was a domino effect.” Ryan originally auditioned and secured a spot in The Collective food hall, a process that she credits with pushing herself into action, but ultimately, she wanted Plant to be a comfortable space for people to spend time and ask nutrition questions. The relaxed space in Plant is filled with comfortable pillows, hanging plants and informational literature. The menu has stayed the same as what it would’ve been in The Collective, but the move to her own space allowed Ryan to add a coffee bar with beans from Sincerely Coffee Roasters and a grab-and-go section featuring items


The Ironman salad contains arugula, black lentils, roasted beets, red onion, basil, tahini and balsamic glaze and a smoothie. | Photo Alexa Ace

like overnight oats, chia pudding, salads, protein bars and ice cream made with coconut milk. Plant is open 7 a.m.-8 p.m. MondayFriday, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday. The heart of the menu is built around all-day smoothies, a pair of fruit-based breakfast bowls and sourdough bread used for almond butter and jam or avocado toast. Brunch with breakfast hash, banana pancakes and mimosa service is served on weekends.

Planting inspiration

Ryan said sourcing healthy bread turned out to be a difficult process. They finally found small-batch bakery Bread Srsly in San Francisco that supplies the gluten-free, oil-free, yeast-free vegan bread. “We cannot keep it on the shelves,” Ryan said. “It’s the only bread we could serve and be passionate about. It’s hard to say bread is healthy, but we can vouch for this.” Smoothies and salads are Ryan’s favorite foods. Plant opens with nine smoothie options made with housemade almond milk or coconut water that have ingredient bases, but every choice includes add-ins. Soaking almonds and rinsing and blending them with vanilla and salt make almond milk. The mixture is strained through cheesecloth and produces a better taste and nutritional product than what can be found in most stores. “We went through 100 pounds of almonds last week,” Ryan said. “I love that non-dairy milks are becoming so popular, but I tell people it’s their first step in taking chemicals out of their pantry, to buy almond milk that doesn’t have as many preservatives. There are brands that only have almonds and water in them, but they’re more expenComfortable pillows at Plant encourage customers to read and talk. | Photo Alexa Ace

sive. You can make it at home for cheaper. If someone were to switch almond milk out for their salad dressing, it would take out 35 added chemicals or ingredients no one can pronounce, and they would probably start to feel a lot better. It’s little things like that that make a huge difference.” Plant supplies an informational guide to explain the benefits for its products, many of which can’t be found in the rest of the city. “We’re called Plant because we’re plant-based food, but it’s really meant to plant inspiration in people’s lives so that you can eat better to feel better,” Ryan said. For instance, the Immortal smoothie contains almond milk; bananas; spinach; dates; chlorella, a chlorophyll and protein-rich algae that is a complete amino acid; cacao nibs, the unprocessed form of cocoa full of antioxidants and fiber; maca, a powder used to replenish adrenal glands and balance hormones; tocos, a natural source of Vitamin E; reishi, a mushroom powder that supports the immune system and stress relief; and ashwagandha, ayurvedic root powder that boots the immune system. Ryan recommends people who are under the weather order the Immortal smoothie and The Healer tea, which is supplied from Urban Tea House and features fresh ginger, lemon and local honey. Lunch and dinner are built around salads and bowls with quinoa and millet that will rotate with the seasons because Plant is using local produce. The Naked Summer Roll has been the most popular salad with local greens, cabbage, basil, cilantro, avocado, shaved almonds and almond-tamari dressing. “Just the other day, a woman was hugging me and crying and just saying thanks for having this because she hadn’t been able to eat out, like go to dinner with her husband, in five years,” Ryan said. “Stuff like that makes everything worth it.” Visit plantokc.com.

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GAZEDIBLES

EAT & DRINK

Concept additions

The last few months have brought an unprecedented number of restaurant openings to the Oklahoma City metro. Here are just seven of the eateries that have opened since May. By Jacob Threadgill with photos Gazette/ file and provided

Frida Southwest

Mizu Ramen + Sushi

Magnolia Bistro

After five years in the works, Frida finally debuted in The Paseo Arts District in July. The restaurant is aiming to reclaim Southwestern cuisine from the likes of Chili’s famous fusion eggrolls in an elegant setting. Lunch and dinner menus are filled with high-end ingredients like Jidori chicken breast and Ora King salmon. The space also features speakeasy The Daley with its own food and drink menus.

Owner Sammie Tan got her sushi training at Aspen’s first sushi restaurant and takes her high-end technique to her home in Oklahoma City by offering both traditional and fusion styles of sushi. Tan boils pork bones for a minimum of 11 hours to create the tonkatsu broth, but Mizu also offers vegetarian- and seafood-based broth options for ramen. During the summer, the brothless mazemen is popular.

Located in Automobile Alley, Magnolia Bistro is owner and chef Dwayne Johnson’s follow-up to popular Brielle’s Bistro in Midwest City that has even more emphasis on Cajun dishes than its predecessor. Huge po-boys and fried green tomatoes are holdovers, but the menu features new items like fried grits and shrimp, Natchitoches meat pies and boudin balls.

500 Paseo Drive fridasouthwest.com | 405-683-7432

12124 N. Pennsylvania Ave. facebook.com/mizuokc | 405-810-5100

722 N. Broadway, Suite 100 facebook.com/magnoliabistro405 405-673-7550

READY FOR A SMOKEFREE NIGHT OUT? VISIT ONE OF THESE

SMOKEFREE VENUES IN OKLAHOMA CITY

SUPPORTING SMOKEFREE BARS & CLUBS FIND MORE SMOKEFREE BARS NEAR YOU FREETHENIGHTOK.ORG

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Gun Izakaya

Sparrow Modern Italian

In Japan, an izakaya is a neighborhood pub where friends and family come together around grilled meats from the yakitori grill, beer and whiskey-based highballs. Gun is a concept 84 Hospitality proprietors Rachel Cope and Jeff Chanchaleune have dreamed about since they opened Gorō Ramen. Offerings extend beyond the grill where dumplings, okonomiyaki, kare udon in Japanese curry and catfish kara-age shine.

The Holloway Group (Cafe 501, Boulevard Steakhouse) has brightened and updated its former Martini Lounge space with this modern Italian restaurant. Showstopping dishes include the Crispy Pepperoni Pizza Tower, chicken Parmesan “pizza-style”— the chicken is pounded thin into a huge circle meant for sharing — and the 100-layer lasagna that takes days to assemble.

3000 Paseo St. gunizakaya.com | 405-900-6615

507 S. Boulevard, Edmond sparrowitalian.com | 405-815-3463

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3100 N. Walker Ave. okcredrooster.com | 405-463-9982

Those accustomed to Red Rooster’s former life as a smoky dive bar are in for a surprise, as the renovated space has brought in plenty of natural light, craft cocktails and farm-to-table ingredients at affordable prices. Dishes like the scallion pancakes and Hatch chile smoked wings are small and meant for sharing. On Mondays, Red Rooster offers its cheeseburger with fries and a beer for $10.

9313 n penn | okc 73120 |405.607.2842 m-f 10am-5:30pm & sat 10am-3pm

www.bankruptcyattorneyokc.com

& ASSOCIATES PLLC

Located in a shopping center in northwest Oklahoma City, Chuanyu Fusion is bringing traditional Sichuan flavors to Oklahoma City. Sichuan cuisine is defined by the Mandarin phrase mala, which translates to “numb-spiciness.” The Sichuan peppercorn, which can be found in many of Chuanyu’s traditional dishes, provides unique buzzing and tingling sensations. It also offers Americanized classics like orange chicken and sesame beef.

Red Rooster

Barn Door Office Furniture Sofas Farm Tables Computer Equipment Printers Bar Stools Holiday Decorations Light Fixtures Book Cases And more!

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CHRIS MUDD

7011 W. Hefner Road facebook.com/chuanyufusion 405-367-7977

Store Closing 60% off storewide

BANKRUPTCY OVER 27 YEARS

Chuanyu Fusion

THANK YOU

for voting for us in the BEST PLACE TO GET FIT category

"I can't help you if you do not call"

(405) 529-9377

Se habla español • Saturday appointments available 3904 NW 23rd St, OKC • 7805 S. Pennsylvania, OKC • 2101 S. Air Depot, MWC

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You Guys ROCK! Thanks for the nomination

BEST

WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE

Rock-n-Roll tees are in, several styles to choose from!

14101 N. May Ave Suite 114

405.936.0680

MON-SAT 10AM - 7PM CLOSED ON SUNDAYS

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Thanks for voting KOSU Radio “Best Combination of Music and The News since ‘Hip to Be Square.’” 91.7 OKC 107.5 TULSA KOSU.ORG

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THANK YOU FO R VOT I N G !

BEST NON-PROFIT BEST PLACE TO VOLUNTEER BEST CHARITY EVENT


BEST OF OKC

When Oklahoma Gazette declares that this is the Best of OKC, we do it with confidence because we’ve got the statistics to prove it. Over 1 million votes get cast in this annual celebration of what makes our city amazing, inventive, adventurous or delicious, and it takes some powerful computing and tolerance of paper cuts to bring it all to glorious fruition. This collection of winners is not just for the casually curious. Gazette’s 2019 Best of OKC issue is a field guide that an intrepid reader could use to explore

every element of goodness (or “bestness,” as it were) in this fair city. Each entry represents something worth experiencing, whether it’s discovering a great bar, hearing a phenomenal singer/songwriter or learning about a new retail store. This issue can solve problems, plan weekends, serve as a tour guide and act as an immediate rejoinder to skeptical outsiders who don’t believe how good we have it. This is the 35th time we’ve taken the deep dive into all things best. We’ve always been proud of our

best, but given the unprecedented strides in all areas covered in these pages, we think you’ll agree that the Best of OKC is only getting better, which means we might have to invent new superlatives to describe this place next year. By Gazette staff. Cover by Ingvard Ashby. Photos by Alexa Ace.

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ BEST OF OKC 2019 HALL OF FAME ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Here you will find a list of companies, restaurants and groups that have been voted the best in their category by our readers’ for more than 10 years!

BEST PERFORMING ARTS GROUP Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma 15 years BEST LOCAL ANNUAL EVENT OR FESTIVAL Festival of the Arts, Arts Council of Oklahoma City 13 years

BEST FINE JEWELRY BC Clark Jewelers 20 years BEST STEAKHOUSE Cattlemen’s Steakhouse 17 years

BEST PLACE TO BUY LIQUOR Byron’s Liquor Warehouse 13 years BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT Ted’s Cafe Escondido 19 years

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FOOD & DRINK BEST LOCAL CRAFT BEER

BEST SEAFOOD

BEST COCKTAIL

BEST DESSERT RESTAURANT, SHOP OR BAKERY

BEST FINE DINING RESTAURANT

BEST FOOD TRUCK OR FOOD CART

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT

BEST NEW BAR TO OPEN SINCE 6/1/18

BEST LATIN RESTAURANT

BEST PATIO DINING

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

BEST DINER

BEST WESTERN EUROPEAN RESTAURANT, NOT ITALIAN

BEST RESTAURANT

BEST BREAKFAST BEST BRUNCH BEST LATE-NIGHT EATS BEST BURGER BEST TACO BEST SANDWICH SHOP BEST BARBECUE BEST PIZZA PLACE BEST STEAKHOUSE BEST SUSHI BEST RESTAURANT WITH VEGAN OR VEGETARIAN MENU OPTIONS

BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT BEST THAI RESTAURANT BEST VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT

38 CATEGORIES •

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BEST NEW RESTAURANT TO OPEN SINCE 6/1/18

BEST CHEF BEST SERVER BEST BARTENDER BEST PRE- OR POST- EVENT SPOT BEST NATIONAL OR REGIONAL RESTAURANT *


BEST OF OKC

Best new restaurant

Oso on Paseo

BEST LOCAL CRAFT BEER

COOP Ale Works 4745 Council Heights Road Anthem Brewing Company 908 SW Fourth St. Prairie Artisan Ales 3 NE Eighth St. Stonecloud Brewing Co. 1012 NW First St., Suite 101 Vanessa House Beer Co. 118 NW Eighth St.

BEST COCKTAIL

Lunchbox

Edna’s, 5137 Classen Circle Disco Nap The Jones Assembly, 901 W. Sheridan Ave. Frosé The Jones Assembly, 901 W. Sheridan Ave. Rosy Palmer The Mule, 1630 N. Blackwelder Ave. The Black Betty The Pump Bar, 2425 N. Walker Ave.

BEST BREAKFAST

Jimmy’s Egg

several metro locations Cafe Kacao Latin Cuisine 3325 N. Classen Blvd. Hatch Early Mood Food two metro locations Neighborhood JA.M. two metro locations Sunnyside Diner several metro locations

BEST BRUNCH

Cheever’s Cafe 2409 N. Hudson Ave. Hatch Early Mood Food two metro locations La Baguette Bistro 7408 N. May Ave. Neighborhood JA.M. two metro locations The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave.

BEST LATE-NIGHT EATS

Empire Slice House 1804 NW 16th St.

Beverly’s Pancake House 3315 Northwest Expressway Bobo’s Chicken 1429 NE 23rd St. Guyutes

| Photo Gazette / file

730 NW 23rd St.

Tacos bring people together, and Oso on Paseo does its best to make sure everyone can enjoy its offerings.

In addition to its specialty tacos — highlighted by the showstopping brisket burnt ends with Dr Pepper barbecue sauce, pepitas and a fried pickle spear — Oso offers its take on classics like carnitas and chicken and uses high-quality ingredients to make them stand out. Oso on Paseo comes from Humankind Hospitality, the folks behind Picasso Cafe and new Frida Southwest. Building off the success at Picasso Cafe that comes from offering a menu evenly split between meat and plant-based options, Oso offers four vegetarian tacos on its vegan-friendly stoneground tortillas (cauliflower, mushroom, sweet potato and nopales).

“I’m the kind of guy that likes to order the weirdest thing on the menu just because, but it kind of goes to show the awareness level of people while dining these days that they know what nopales are and are willing to try and reorder them,” said Shaun Fiaccone, Humankind Hospitality president. The only enchiladas on the menu are vegan. “The world is shifting more to that direction,” said culinary director Ryan Parrott of the vegan enchiladas. “Everyone is kind of leaning toward less animal products and being cognizant of what they’re eating. People should know that whether they are vegan, vegetarian or whatever dietary restrictions you have, you can come here and feel safe with what you’re getting.”

Oso’s appeal goes beyond its tasty tacos. The taco salad is served in an oversized crispy taco shell with housemade Catalina dressing. The Left Coast Burrito packs grilled shrimp, skirt steak and tater tots into a burrito with pico de gallo and queso. It’s weekday happy hour 2-5 p.m. showcases its unique Baja Tiki cocktails, a term that Fiaccone has trademarked. A blend of bright colors and fruit, the drinks allow tequila and rum to shine in ways Oklahoma couldn’t have imagined in decades in the past. “Things have gone really well since we opened,” Fiaccone said. “Honestly, we’re a lot busier than I anticipated.”

The Pump Bar 2425 N. Walker Ave.

BEST BURGER

The Garage Burgers & Beer several metro locations Nic’s Grill 1201 N. Pennsylvania Ave. Patty Wagon Burgers 3600 N. May Ave. S&B’s Burger Joint several metro locations Tucker’s Onion Burgers several metro locations

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Party LIKE IT’S 1920 Friday, September 6, 2019 7:30pm – 9pm • 21 & up

Step back in time to the 1920s! Help raise money for the museum while enjoying hors d’oeuvres and prohibition era cocktails and beer, Charleston dance demonstrations, Rook card games, living history, jazz music, an illusionist, and more. Cash bar, wine pull and 1920s merchandise will be available for purchase. Costumes not required, but welcomed!

Tickets available online at EdmondHistory.org 405-340-0078

THANK YOU FOR THE NOMINATIONS! PLAZA DISTRICT

BEST LOCAL DISTRICT BEST PLACE TO BUY LOCAL ART .......................

PLAZA WALLS IN PLAZA DISTRICT

BEST PUBLIC ART/MURAL .......................

LYRIC THEATRE

GORO RAMEN

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT .......................

JEFF CHANCHALEUNE - GORO RAMEN

BEST CHEF .......................

EMPIRE SLICE HOUSE

BEST PERFORMING ARTS GROUP .......................

BEST PIZZA PLACE BEST LATE-NIGHT EATS .......................

THE PRESS

THE PEAK

BEST RESTAURANT .......................

MAPLES BARBECUE

BEST BARBECUE .......................

DNA GALLERIES

BEST PLACE TO BUY LOCAL ART BEST ART GALLERY .......................

BAD GRANNY’S BAZAAR

BEST DISPENSARY BEST HEAD SHOP BEST DISPENSARY FOR CONCENTRATES BEST CANNABIS KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF BEST PLACE TO BUY CBD PRODUCTS BEST PLACE TO BUY CANNABIS PLANTS

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BEST THRIFT STORE BEST MEN’S CLOTHING .......................

PIE JUNKIE

BEST DESSERT RESTAURANT SHOP OR BAKERY .......................

SAINT’S PUB

BEST BAR FOR LIVE MUSIC .......................

ROSY PALMER - THE MULE BEST COCKTAIL

EXPERIENCE LOCAL TOGETHER

VISIT US ONLINE PLAZADISTRICT.ORG

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BEST OF OKC BEST TACO

Big Truck Tacos

BEST RESTAURANT WITH VEGAN OR VEGETARIAN MENU OPTIONS

¡Revolución!

3009 Paseo St.

916 NW Sixth St.

Coolgreens

Hacienda Tacos

several metro locations

12086 N. May Ave.

Taj Cuisine of India

Oso on Paseo

1500 NW 23rd St.

603 NW 28th St.

The Loaded Bowl

Ted’s Café Escondido

1211 SW Second St.

several metro locations

The Red Cup

Picasso Café

530 NW 23rd St.

3122 N. Classen Blvd.

BEST SANDWICH SHOP

The Mule

BEST SEAFOOD

City Bites

5641 N. Classen Blvd.

several metro locations

Crabtown

Neptune Sub Sandwiches

303 E. Sheridan Ave.

3301 N. Classen Blvd.

Off the Hook Seafood & More

Scottie’s Deli

two metro locations

Pearl’s Oyster Bar

1630 N. Blackwelder Ave.

427 NW 23rd St.

The Drake Seafood & Oysterette

Someplace Else A Deli & Bakery 2310 N. Western Ave.

BEST BARBECUE

Swadley’s Bar-B-Q several metro locations Back Door Barbecue 315 NW 23rd St. Earl’s Rib Palace several metro locations Iron Star Urban Barbeque 3700 N. Shartel Ave. Maples Barbecue 1800 NW 16th St.

BEST PIZZA PLACE

Hideaway Pizza several metro locations Empire Slice House 1804 NW 16th St. Sauced on Paseo 2912 Paseo St. The Hall’s Pizza Kitchen 1004 N. Hudson Ave., Suite 106 The Wedge Pizzeria 4709 N. Western Ave.

BEST STEAKHOUSE

Cattlemen’s Steakhouse

| Photo Alexa Ace

Best steakhouse Best restaurant

Cattlemen’s Steakhouse Cattlemen’s Steakhouse is one of those rare places that is beloved by both tourists and locals. It has been a staple in Stockyards City, the last active stockyard tied to a historic district in the country, since 1910. From basketball celebrities to sitting presidents, Cattlemen’s is often the first stop for people visiting Oklahoma City. It has even hosted a pair of food televisions celebrities — Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives’ Guy Fieri and Man v. Food’s Adam Richman. Cattlemen’s director of operations Dave Egan shared a few interesting facts with Oklahoma Gazette:

6,000 pounds of beef: The restau-

rant breaks down its steak but also uses the product for hamburger meat and beef tips.

1309 S. Agnew Ave.

Mahogany Prime Steakhouse two metro locations McClintock Saloon & Chop House 2227 Exchange Ave. Ranch Steakhouse

504 N. Broadway Ave.

BEST SUSHI

Bacon-wrapped filet mignon, rib-eye and top sirloin are the top three sellers on the menu. The blue ribbon specials are the highest increasing sales that are USDA prime, aged beef.

GoGo Sushi Express and Grill 432 NW 10 St. The Sushi Bar

open for breakfast, too. In addition, it also serves 800 pounds of bacon and sausage per week.

7516 N. Western Ave. Volcano Sushi Bar & Hibachi several metro locations

BEST DESSERT RESTAURANT, SHOP OR BAKERY

Pie Junkie 1711 NW 16th St.

Braum’s Ice Cream & Dairy Store several metro locations Brown’s Bakery 1100 N. Walker Ave. Ingrid’s Kitchen two metro locations La Baguette Bakery 7408 N. May Ave.

BEST FOOD TRUCK OR FOOD CART

Bobo’s Chicken 1429 NE 23rd St. Oh My Gogi! Taqueria Sanchez 4011 NW 10th St. Taste of Soul Egg Roll The Saucee Sicilian

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Ted’s Café Escondido Abel’s Mexican Restaurant 5822 NW 50th St. Barrios Fine Mexican Dishes 1000 N. Hudson Ave. Chelino’s Mexican Restaurant San Marcos Mexican Restaurant several metro locations

BEST LATIN RESTAURANT

Café do Brasil 2 presidential visits: George W. Bush

stopped by while in office, and Ronald Reagan visited before becoming president.

several metro locations Tokyo Japanese Restaurant

two metro locations

several metro locations

400 dozen eggs per week: Cattlemen’s is

Sushi Neko

4318 N. Western Ave.

The Shack Seafood & Oyster Bar

several metro locations

3000 W. Britton Road Red PrimeSteak

519 NW 23rd St., Suite 111

440 NW 11th St., Suite 100 1492 New World Latin Cuisine 1207 N. Walker Ave. Cafe Antigua 1903 N. Classen Blvd.

109 years: Cattlemen’s first opened in 1910,

and the owners have changed over the years, but it is the oldest restaurant in Oklahoma City.

Cafe Kacao Latin Cuisine 3325 N. Classen Blvd. Zarate’s Latin Mexican Grill 706 S. Broadway Extension

33: The brand on the wall of Cattlemen’s represents the

hard six (two 3’s) that Gene Wade rolled to win ownership of Cattlemen’s from Hank Frey during a gambling session at the Biltmore Hotel in downtown Oklahoma City. O KG O KG A ZA EZ TE TE TT . CEO .C MO|MF E | B AR UU GA UR SY T 21, 2019 8

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BEST OF OKC BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Othello’s Italian Restaurant two metro locations

Gabriella’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria 1226 NE 63rd St. Patrono Italian Restaurant 305 N. Walker Ave. Stella Modern Italian Cuisine 1201 N. Walker Ave. Vito’s Ristorante 7628 N. May Ave.

BEST WESTERN EUROPEAN RESTAURANT

Ingrid’s Kitchen two metro locations Fassler Hall 421 NW 10th St. La Baguette Bistro 7408 N. May Ave. Royal Bavaria

3401 S. Sooner Road, Moore Sean Cummings’ Irish Restaurant 7628 N. May Ave.

BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT

Zorba’s Mediterranean Cuisine 6014 N. May Ave.

Basil Mediterranean Café 211 NW 23rd St.

Boathouse District Oklahoma City

September 21 2019 10am–5pm Scott Pelley

6165 N. May Ave. Mediterranean Imports & Deli 5620 N. May Ave. Nunu’s Mediterranean Cafe & Market 3131 W. Memorial Road

BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

Taj Cuisine of India

The whole family is invited to Oklahoma City’s Boathouse District for a fun-filled day celebrating books for all ages!

1500 NW 23rd St.

The 2019 Oklahoma Book Festival is completely free to attend.

Tikka Craze

The day will feature more than 90 authors from around the nation.

Anne Hillerman

Cous Cous Café

Experience panel discussions, presentations, poetry readings, book signings, crafts, food trucks, and more!

Gopuram Taste of India 412 S. Meridian Ave. Himalayas Aroma of India 709 N. Moore Ave., Moore Sheesh Mahal 4621 N. May Ave. two metro locations

BEST JAPANESE RESTAURANT

Gorō Ramen

1634 N. Blackwelder Ave., Suite 102 Musashi’s 4315 N. Western Ave. Shōgun Steak House of Japan 11900 N. May Ave. Sumo Japanese Steak House two metro locations Tokyo Japanese Restaurant 7516 N. Western Ave.

of the

klahoma

Center for the Book

OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

Laurie Williams

Attorney

Sponsors: Jane Jayroe Gamble Connie Green Love’s Herman and LaDonna Meinders Pioneer Library System Gene Rainbolt Oklahoma Center for the Book Oklahoma History Center

Brandon Mull 22

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okbookfest.org

BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT

Grand House Asian Bistro 7516 N. Western Ave. China House several metro locations Chow’s Chinese Restaurant 3033 N. May Ave. Panda Garden Chinese Buffet & BBQ 1000 Alameda St., Norman Szechuan Bistro 1010 W. Memorial Road


C

Best new bar

Good Times

BEST THAI RESTAURANT

Panang Thai Restaurant several metro locations Sala Thai 1614 NW 23rd St. Tana Thai Bistro 10700 N. May Ave. Thai House Restaurant 500 NW 23rd St. Thai Thai Asian Bistro 780 W. Main St., Norman

BEST VIETNAMESE RESTAURANT

Pho Lien Hoa 901 NW 23rd St. Golden Phoenix

2728 N. Classen Blvd. Lido Restaurant 2518 N. Military Ave., Suite 101 Pho Cuong 3016 N. Classen Blvd. VII Asian Bistro 2900 N. Classen Blvd., Suite G

BEST NEW RESTAURANT

Oso on Paseo 603 NW 28th St. Osteria

6430 Avondale Drive, Nichols Hills Red Rooster 3100 N. Walker Ave. Social Deck + Dining 1933 NW 23rd St. Stitch, two metro locations

BEST FINE DINING RESTAURANT

Cheever’s Café 2409 N. Hudson Ave.

Mahogany Prime Steakhouse two metro locations Ranch Steakhouse 3000 W. Britton Road Red PrimeSteak 504 N. Broadway Ave. Vast 333 W. Sheridan Ave.

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR

The Pump Bar 2425 N. Walker Ave. Edna’s 5137 Classen Circle Good Times

| Photo Gazette / file

Whether it is hot or cold, the ample patio at Good Times, 1234 N. Western Ave., is packed with patrons surrounded by colorful street art-inspired murals. In the summer, guests sip on frozen cocktails or cocktail pouches that are essentially adult Capri Suns to find relief from the heat. In the winter, plenty of patio warmers keep the party going outside. “It’s real homey, welcome and laidback,” said Good Times co-owner Zack Moore. “I think people like that. It’s a chill atmosphere. We’ve made a lot of regulars, and I’ve been blown away at how many people come by.” The interior of Good Times is lined with Polaroid photographs of friendly patrons surrounded by memorabilia from years past like original Star Wars posters. “We’re always looking for more

1234 N. Western Ave.

kitschy stuff,” Moore said. While the bar doesn’t have any beer taps, it keeps its selection rotating and offers frozen cocktails and adult Capri Suns, which sell for $10 and are equivalent to two drinks. Good Times’ take on a Painkiller and an alcoholic Vietnamese coffee are permanent selections of frozen drinks, while other selections like French 75 and Cucumber Club rotate monthly. “They sell well all year long,” Moore said of the adult Capri Suns and frozen cocktails. “We add warm cocktails for the winter.” The food menu at Good Times is as accommodating as its drink menu. Serving what owners described as “stoner food,” the menu is adaptable for vegetarians and vegans. The chicken sandwich features a Doritos crust, which

serves as the base for its Stoner Nachos. Good Times offers both regular and vegan chili, a black bean burger patty and Beyond Meat crumbles. New items on the menu include honey Sriracha wings and a crunchwrap. Before new ownership took over the location at Good Times, the site went through multiple concepts over the years, without gaining a permanent audience. Ownership has revitalized The Drunken Fry across the street, which they said has helped create the area as a destination. “There is a lot of development coming around the area too,” Moore said. “There is the art studio next door, and there’s a bunch of luxury condos and apartments going up around in the next couple of years and it’s pretty cool. It will bode well for us.”

Henry Hudson’s Pub several metro locations Louie’s Grill & Bar several metro locations

BEST NEW BAR

Good Times

1234 N. Western Ave. Banquet Cinema Pub 800 NW Fourth St. Barkeep 1121 N. Walker Ave. Chalk 1324 W. Memorial Road Red Rooster 3100 N. Walker Ave.

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BEST OF OKC BEST PATIO DINING

The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave.

Barrios Fine Mexican Dishes 1000 N. Hudson Ave. Louie’s Grill & Bar several metro locations The Mont 1300 Classen Blvd., Norman

“ALL IN” FOR EDUCATION

09 . 13 . 19

The Pump Bar

7:00 P.M.

2425 N. Walker Ave.

CASINO NIGHT, SPIRITS & LIVE ENTERTAINMENT NATIONALCOWBOYMUSEUM.ORG/ANTE-UP

BEST DINER

Sunnyside Diner several metro locations Beverly’s Pancake House 3315 Northwest Expressway

buffet option available all day!

We cater & Deliver!

Boomarang Diner several metro locations Sherri’s Diner 704 SW 59th St. The Diner 213 E. Main St., Norman

BEST RESTAURANT

PAKISTANI/INDIAN CUISINE OKLAHOMA CITY

4104 N. Portland Ave

405.601.3454

7

$ 99 ANY ONE

(1) BOWL ENTREE WITH BIRYANI/RICE

EDMOND

301 S. Bryant Ave.

405.341.8888

8

$ 99 ANY TWO (2) $999 ANY THREE ENTREES BIG (3) ENTREEs WITH WITH BIRYANI/RICE BOX BIRYANI/RICE & NAAN

BOX

& NAAN

Cattlemen’s Steakhouse 1309 S. Agnew Ave. Cheever’s Café 2409 N. Hudson Ave. Taj Cuisine of India 1500 NW 23rd St. The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave. The Press 1610 N. Gatewood Ave.

BEST CHEF

Ryan Parrott

Picasso Café, 3009 Paseo St. Bruce Rinehart Rococo, two metro locations Jeff Chanchaleune, Gorō Ramen 1634 N. Blackwelder Ave., Suite 102 Kevin Lee, The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave. Kurt Fleischfresser, Vast 333 W. Sheridan Ave.

BEST SANDWICH SHOP

BEST SERVER

Rachel Smith The Pump Bar 2425 N. Walker Ave. Gwynivere Langer The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave.

| Photo Alexa Ace

Best Vietnamese restaurant

Pho Lien Hoa

This family-owned restaurant is well established in Oklahoma Gazette’s Best of OKC tradition, taking home the title of best pho for many years. In 2019, it takes the crown for the city’s favorite overall Vietnamese restaurant. It’s easy to see why. In addition to its eponymous pho, the restaurant offers other varieties of Vietnamese soup, vermicelli bowls and rice platters. If you don’t like pho, try hu tieu made with glass noodles or mi made with egg noodles. Banh canh is an udon noodle soup topped with fresh vegetables. Open 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m. daily, Pho Lien Hoa is there is take care of your needs no matter the time of day. “We are very humbled and honored by the recognition,” manager Jim Phan said. “We work hard each day to bring the smiles to the customers from the quality of food and service. The recognition makes us more sincere and energized to work harder each day to serve our valued customers.”

17 hours

The time it takes to boil beef bones and other ingredients to make the pho broth.

Hanna Slaymaker

Celebrating over 42 years of business! Stop in today to grab any of our party subs, chef salads, cookie trays, lean meats or pastries!

The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave. Nissi Benni

19 years

Taj Cuisine of India

Pho Lien Hoa celebrates its 20th anniversary in 2020.

1500 NW 23rd St. Rodney Cattlemen’s Steakhouse 1309 S. Agnew Ave.

P11

The combination of rare steak and lean brisket is the most popular of 19 types of pho on the menu.

MON-FRI 7am-6:30pm Sat 9:30am-4pm 2310 N Western 524-0887 24

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From smoothies to che — a type of Vietnamese sweet dessert — Pho Lien Hoa has a bevy of options to cool you down or tempt your sweet tooth.


BEST BARTENDER

Nathan Cover The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave. Henri Reiley

51st Street Speakeasy 1114 NW 51st St. Melody Coffia Night Trips, 220 S. Vermont Ave. Ranier Crespo The Pump Bar, 2425 N. Walker Ave. Shannon Barrow

Flip’s Wine Bar & Trattoria

5801 N. Western Ave.

BEST PRE- OR POST- EVENT SPOT

The Bleu Garten 301 NW 10th St.

The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave. The Mont

T H A N K S F O R T H E N O M I N AT I O N S !

1300 Classen Blvd., Norman The Pump Bar 2425 N. Walker Ave.

BEST!

Thunder Alley Reno Ave. between S. Robinson Ave. and S. E.K. Gaylord Blvd.

BEST NATIONAL OR REGIONAL RESTAURANT

Selection of Premium & House eLiquids

Fuzzy’s Taco Shop several metro locations Chick-fil-A several metro locations Outback Steakhouse several metro locations Texas Roadhouse several metro locations Whiskey Cake 1845 Northwest Expressway

BEST! Selection of Authentic Mods, RDAs & Tanks

BEST! Selection of Salt Nic Liquids & Devices

BEST!

BEST! VAPE SHOP

• Customer Service • Device Knowledge • Build Expertise

2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 Nominee

6608 N MAY • OKC• 418-4996 WE PROUDLY SUPPORT VAPE ADVOCACY O KG O KG A ZA EZ TE TE TT . CEO .C MO|MF E | B AR UU GA UR SY T 21, 2019 8

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OKIE BORN, OKIE BREWED

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT SINCE 2009

COME DINE WITH AN OKLAHOMA LEGEND HISTORIC STOCKYARDS CITY

1309 South Agnew • 1st Light South of I-40

405.236.0416

CattlemensRestaurant.com OPEN 6AM EVERY DAY 26

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ARTS, CULTURE & ENTERTAINMENT BEST LOCAL COVER BAND

BEST CHARITY EVENT

BEST ART GALLERY

BEST LOCAL ORIGINAL BAND OR SINGER BEST RADIO PERSONALITY OR TEAM

BEST FREE ENTERTAINMENT

BEST MUSEUM

BEST BAR FOR LIVE MUSIC

BEST LOCAL DISTRICT

BEST CONCERT VENUE

BEST CASINO

BEST PUBLIC ART/MURAL

BEST LGBTQ+ BAR OR CLUB

BEST PERFORMING ARTS GROUP BEST VISUAL ARTIST BEST LOCAL ANNUAL EVENT OR FESTIVAL

BEST PLACE TO BUY LOCAL ART

16 CATEGORIES •

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BEST OF OKC

Best visual artist

BEST LOCAL COVER BAND

My So Called Band

Greg Burns

Nicnos Superfreak Uncle Zep Weekend Allstars

BEST LOCAL ORIGINAL BAND OR SINGER

Mike Hosty Jabee

Kyle Dillingham & Horseshoe Road Sophia Massad The Dirty Little Betty’s

BEST RADIO PERSONALITY OR TEAM

Joey and Heather 98.9 KYIS

Lisa and Kent, 92.5 KOMA Rick and Brad, 100.5 KATT Shawn Carey, 96.1 KXY TJ, Janet and JRod, 102.7 KJ103

BEST PERFORMING ARTS GROUP

Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma 1727 NW 16th St.

Carpenter Square Theatre 806 W. Main St. Oklahoma City Ballet 6800 N. Classen Blvd. Oklahoma City Philharmonic 424 Colcord Drive, Suite B Terre Rouge Burlesque

BEST VISUAL ARTIST

Greg Burns David Bricquet Denise Duong Dylan Bradway Jason Pawley

BEST LOCAL ANNUAL EVENT OR FESTIVAL

Festival of the Arts Arts Council Oklahoma City 500 Couch Drive Heard on Hurd

32 N. Broadway Extension, Edmond Norman Music Festival Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon Paseo Arts Festival 3022 Paseo St.

BEST CHARITY EVENT

Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon Boots & Ball Gowns, Infant Crisis Services Crown of Beauty Gala, The Dragonfly Home Hero Awards, Oklahoma Humane Society Red Tie Night

BEST FREE ENTERTAINMENT

Paseo Arts Festival 3022 Paseo St. Dust Bowl Dolls Festival of the Arts

Arts Council Oklahoma City, 500 Couch Drive Heard on Hurd 32 N. Broadway Extension, Edmond Sonic Summer Movies Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave.

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| Photo Alexa Ace

Greg Burns is a visual artist who grew up in Oklahoma City, attending Bishop McGuinness Catholic High School and University of Oklahoma (OU) before adopting ink drawing and watercolor as a vocation. Visual art is a very difficult career path in which to make a living. What made you stick it out? Like most kids, I’ve always drawn. It’s just something that I have always enjoyed. I never really planned on being an artist; it was just something that accidentally happened when I was at OU. I was thinking I was going to be a guidance counselor and use the art as a psychological tool to help children, and then I switched it. I changed from being a psychology major with the art minor to being an art major with a psychology minor. And you know, I never have really had a real job. I’ve fortunately

been able to make a living just painting and drawing, what I wanted to do. How do you choose your subjects, and what is your inspiration? Mostly photographs, and the reason for that is it takes sitting out and drawing on the site; it gets light and it gets dark, and the light changes all the time. I use photographs for information. I don’t copy the photographs. I use them for the details and to remind me exactly of what I’m doing. It doesn’t have to be a good photograph. It’s just a springboard for me to do something. But I create my own perspective. And I just use the photographs for information. Often, I’ll use 30 or 40 pictures to do a painting, but the pictures have nothing to do with the end result. It’s not a picture of that picture. How do you begin? I just sort of get into it. The first line is

the most difficult. And then the next line is a little bit easier and the next line is a little bit easier than that until finally you’re finished. The artwork itself takes on sort of a life of its own. When I’m doing something, you go through so many stages. You start from a blank piece of paper, and then you start adding stuff to it, and at certain points, it’s kind of interesting, and I can go any number of different directions. And then at other points, when you get it farther along, it’s kind of the doldrums; you think, ‘Oh, this is kind of getting boring. I’ve got to put 9,000 more leaves on this tree.’ But then it gets exciting again, and then finally when you finish it, there’s a little bit of a letdown because you know you’ve stopped, that you’ve done everything you can. You can’t go any farther. And so it’s a matter of getting another piece of paper and starting the whole process over again.


BEST BAR FOR LIVE MUSIC

VZD’s Restaurant & Bar 4200 N. Western Ave. 51st Street Speakeasy 1114 NW 51st St. Blue Note Lounge 2408 N. Robinson Ave. JJ’s Alley Bricktown Pub 212 E. Sheridan Ave. Saints 1715 NW 16th St.

BEST CONCERT VENUE

Chesapeake Energy Arena 100 W. Reno Ave. The Criterion 500 E. Sheridan Ave. The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave. | Photo provided

Best charity event

Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon started 19 years ago to honor the 168 victims of the 1995 Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building bombing. Two Oklahoma businessmen, while on a morning run, outlined the event, according to okcmarathon.com. In its first year in 2001, less than 5,000 participants participated in the Run to Remember. Since then, the marathon has been named among the “12 must-run marathons” by Runner’s World magazine. Today, the marathon annually draws approximately 24,000 runners across six different races. The marathon is also a Boston Marathon-qualifying event on a certified 16.2-mile single-loop course. In 2018, 24,667 runners participated from all 50 states and 13 countries. Nathan Chamer won his first ever marathon with a 2:33:44 time. Kristen Radcliff, the fastest women’s marathoner, finished the race with a 2:54:52 time. Other 2018 numbers: Half marathon finish time — 1:11:09 Fastest women’s half marathoner time — 1:19:03 Relay finish time — 2:42:58 Men’s 5K finish time — 00:18:05 Women’s 5K finish time — 00:22:31 The 2019 Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon was made possible with the help of 4,000 volunteers and 86 sponsors. Of the 24,000 runners, 57 percent were female and 43 percent were male. Again, all 50 states and 13 countries were represented. Dr. David Rhodes, an Integris orthopedic surgeon and father of six, finished the full marathon with a time of 2:39:06. Stephanie Andre, the fastest women’s marathoner, finished at 2:45:07, a new women’s state record. Gov. Kevin Stitt made history by becoming the first governor to ever run in the marathon. He challenged Oklahomans to form teams to take on Team Stitt in the relay race. The Red Coyote Racing team won the relay with a time of 2:27:57. Team Stitt came in 190th place out of 700 registered teams with a 4:15:58 time. Other 2019 numbers: Half marathon time — 1:10:21 9,441 total half marathoners Fastest women’s half marathon time — 1:20:38 Men’s 5K finish time — 00:17:04 Women’s 5K time — 00:20:00 47,000 people attended Health & Fitness Expo Next year’s marathon will finish in Scissortail Park. Registration is already open for the 20th OKC Memorial Marathon on April 26, 2020. Visit okcmarathon.com.

The Zoo Amphitheatre 2101 NE 50th St. Tower Theatre 425 NW 23rd St.

BEST PUBLIC ART/MURAL

Plaza Walls

16th Street Plaza District Flamenco by Jonathan Hills The Paseo Arts District Life in The Light by Denise Duong, Film Row New Zealand OKC Thunder player Steven Adams by Graham Hoete, Film Row The OKC Ring, City Center

BEST PLACE TO BUY LOCAL ART

The Paseo Arts District 3022 Paseo St.

16th Street Plaza District 1715 NW 16th St. Artspace at Untitled 1 NE Third St. DNA Galleries 1709 NW 16th St. Festival of the Arts Arts Council Oklahoma City, 500 Couch Drive

BEST ART GALLERY

DNA Galleries 1709 NW 16th St.

Artspace at Untitled 1 NE Third St. Individual Artists of Oklahoma (IAO) 706 W. Sheridan Ave. JRB Art at the Elms 2810 N. Walker Ave. Little D Gallery 3003 Paseo St.

BEST MUSEUM

Oklahoma City Museum of Art 415 Couch Drive

National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum 1700 NE 63rd St. Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum 620 N. Harvey Ave. Sam Noble Museum 2401 Chautauqua Ave., Norman

THE FAREWELL Billi’s (Awkwafina) family returns to China under the guise of a fake wedding to stealthily say goodbye to their beloved matriarch -- the only person that doesn’t know she only has a few weeks to live.

Now Playing

RUSH: CINEMA STRANGIATO 2019

Featuring R40+, this global fan event will give audiences a special look into some of the best performances from R40 LIVE, including songs such as “Closer to the Heart,” “Subdivisions,” “Tom Sawyer,” and more, as well as unreleased backstage moments and candid footage left on the cutting room floor

One Night Only! 08.21.19

MAIDEN

In 1989 Tracey Edwards leads the first all-female crew in the Whitbread Round the World Race, a grueling yachting competition that covers 33,000 miles and lasts nine months.

Opening on

08.30.19

Science Museum Oklahoma 2020 Remington Place

OKC’S UNIQUE NONPROFIT ART HOUSE MOVIE THEATRE SHOWING INDEPENDENT, FOREIGN, AND DOCUMENTARY FILMS.

Showtimes & Tickets at Rodeocinema.org

2221 Exchange Avenue, OKC 405-235- 3456 (FILM) Follow us on

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BEST OF OKC

JOIN US

Best place to buy local art

FOR DRINKS

The Paseo Arts District

ON THE PATIO! Thanks for the nominat ion

Best Lat in Restaurant

405-525-9779 440 NW 11th & Walker cafedobrazilokc.com

DQE

Spank you very much for the nomination! Best Naughty Business

| Photo Alexa Ace

LINGERIE • ADULT TOYS • BDSM & FETISH ITEMS • LOTIONS • NOVELTY GIFTS & CARDS 615 E. MEMORIAL, OKC • 405-755-8600

8009 W. RENO, OKC • 405-792-2020

THANKS FOR THE NOMINATIONS

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR BEST NEW BAR

1234 N. WESTERN AVE. OKLAHOMA CITY, OK 73118 21+ @GOODTIMESOK SUN–FRI 4PM – 2AM SAT 2PM–2AM Good vibes, good drinks & late night eats! 30

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The Paseo Arts District is the best place to by local art, executive director Amanda Bleakley said, partially because of all the area businesses that offer something else entirely. “There’s more than one thing that somebody is going to come to the district for,” Bleakley said. “We want people to come spend time here, walk around, eat at one of the restaurants, go buy art at a gallery, shop at one of the many retail stores … just have that whole experience.” The many artists whose galleries double as studio space are also key to the district’s success. “I think what makes Paseo special is that we have so many artists working here during the day,” Bleakley said. “We’re the most concentrated place in Oklahoma that has this much art happening at all times. … It’s just a really great place to be right now. There’s a creative vibe that has continued on from the ’60s, the ’70s, the ’80s. The creativity is still here. I feel like we’ve just grown up. … Everyone is welcome, and there’s a diversity here. I like to think of us as being a cultural hub. You can walk through, and you can you can feel that something special is going on.” On the first Friday of every month, galleries stay open until 9 p.m. and food, live music and other activities are available “so people can feel comfortable walking into an art gallery and not be intimidated,” Bleakley said. “There’s never any pressure for anybody to buy anything,” Bleakley said. “I think what the Paseo District is all about is just welcoming people to experience art and be exposed to it. … Artists in their nature are very welcoming and want to show people what the world is about through their art, so there’s not a better way to do that than by having a place where you can hang your work and express what you want to say to the world.” Galleries and shops offer contemporary art, landscapes, photography, sculpture, stained glass, pottery and more at prices ranging from $10 coffee mugs to paintings that cost thousands of dollars. “If you’re going to put art in your house or your office or your apartment or whatever, there’s not a better way than to find something that’s an original piece of art from a local artist in Oklahoma,” Bleakley said. “We’re just striving to continue to be the best place to buy art in town. That is something we take very seriously, and we make a point of trying to be a place where people feel comfortable.”


YOU’RE GO ING TO

BEST LOCAL DISTRICT

16th Street Plaza District 1715 NW 16th St. Bricktown Midtown northeast of the downtown business district

R S FO ! K N S T H A VOT EWE’RE E Y H H T! W T SEE BES E HE COM E OF T ON

The Paseo Arts District 3022 Paseo St.

Cruise Line Style Back-to-School Brunch SATURDAY, AUG UST 24 , 1 1 A M– 3 PM ROCOCO NORTHPA RK

Uptown 23rd District

ICE CARVING STATION

N. Broadway Street to N. Pennsylvania Avenue on NW 23rd Street

BEST CASINO

OWNED

1544 W. State Highway 9, Norman

BURGER

Riverwind Casino Grand Casino Hotel & Resort

777 Grand Casino Blvd., Shawnee Newcastle Casino 2457 Highway 62 Service Road, Newcastle Remington Park Racing & Casino 1 Remington Place

Peel and eat shrimp, chilled salads, smoked salmon

LOCALLY

GOURMET

RESTAURANT

3600 N. May Ave

Made to order

THEPATTYWAGONOK.COM

CARVING STATION

PARK HARVEY SUSHI & WINE BAR

WinStar World Casino and Resort 777 Casino Ave., Thackerville

FREE SCHOOL SUPPLY GOODIE BAG (FOR CHILDREN 8TH GRADE & UNDER)

OMELET STATION

(NW 35th and May Avenue)

405-917-1711

OUR

Hand carved roast beef and ham

HOT BUFFET

Scrambled eggs, sausage, bacon, potatoes, french toast, roast chicken, fresh vegetables, pasta

DESSERT STATION

Mini desserts, fresh made belgian waffles, berries and cream

BEST LGBTQ+ BAR OR CLUB

The Boom! 2218 NW 39th St. HiLo Club

ROCOCO PENN 2824 N. Penn Ave. | 405-528-2824

1221 NW 50th St. Partners 2805 NW 36th St. The Copa 2200 NW 40th St. Tramps 2201 NW 39th St.

HAPPY HOUR 3–6 PM M-F SUSHI & BEER SPECIALS 200 N. HARVEY | 405.600.7575

ROCOCO NORTHPARK 12252 N. May Ave. | 405-212-4577 loverococo.com

A SEASONAL GUIDE TO CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

There is a lot to see and do throughout Autumn, and Gazette gives its readers direction on where to find the best festivals, shows, foods and more! FEATURING A 3 MONTH CALENDAR along with expanded editorial content

PUBLISHING WED. SEP 18, 2019

AD DEADLINE TUES. SEP 10, 2019 ADVERTISING@OKGAZETTE.COM

405.528.6000

SUBMIT CALENDAR EVENTS AT OKGAZETTE.COM OR EMAIL TO LISTINGS@OKGAZETTE.COM

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LIFE & WELLNESS BEST PLACE TO VOLUNTEER BEST NONPROFIT BEST PLASTIC SURGEON BEST PHYSICAL THERAPY CENTER BEST HOSPITAL BEST MEDICAL SPA BEST SPA BEST PLACE TO GET FIT BEST HEALTH FOOD STORE BEST LOCAL HOTEL

10 CATEGORIES •

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BEST OF OKC BEST PLACE TO VOLUNTEER

| Photo provided

Oklahoma Humane Society

BEST SPA

The Sweet Mimosa 3916 NW 36th St., Suite 300

two metro locations

Essence Salon Spa and Retreat

Habitat For Humanity

1015 Waterwood Parkway, Suite H, Edmond

several metro locations

Saving Faces Salon/Spa

Infant Crisis Services

2912 Lakeside Drive, Suite 11

4224 N. Lincoln Blvd.

Three Graces

Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma

7108 N. Western Ave.

3355 S. Purdue Ave.

Udånder

The Dragonfly Home

131 Dean A McGee Ave., Suite 105

BEST NONPROFIT

BEST PLACE TO GET FIT

Oklahoma Humane Society two metro locations Homeless Alliance 1724 NW Fourth St. Infant Crisis Services 4224 N. Lincoln Blvd. Mutt Misfits Animal Rescue Society The Dragonfly Home

BEST PLASTIC SURGEON

Tim R. Love, MD FACS

11101 Hefner Pointe Drive, Suite 104 Courtney Caplin, MD, DMD Cosmetic Surgery Affiliates, 2100 NW 63rd St. Derek Shadid, MD Shadid Plastic Surgery Associates 13820 Wireless Way Ivan Wayne, MD Facial Plastic Surgery and W Facial Aesthetics, 13904 Quailbrook Drive Justin Jones, MD Jones Plastic Surgery, 8106 N. May Ave., Suite J

BEST PHYSICAL THERAPY CENTER

Integris Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation Center 4219 S. Western Ave. Mercy Hospital several metro locations Oklahoma Physical Therapy several metro locations Physical Therapy Central several metro locations Valir Health 700 NW Seventh St.

BEST HOSPITAL

Mercy Hospital several metro locations

Integris Baptist Medical Center 3300 Northwest Expressway OU Medical Center 700 NE 13th St. SSM Health St. Anthony Hospital

Best place to get fit

YMCA was founded in 1844 in London, England, and had locations in the United States by 1851. YMCA of Greater Oklahoma City was formed 130 years ago, one month after the 1889 Oklahoma Land Run. Initially, its purpose was to provide “a source of strength and positive influence for young men,” hence its acronym: Young Men’s Christian Association.

1200 N. Walker Ave.

Though it still goes by YMCA in some marketing and in its official name, the U.S. branch of the organization rebranded simply to “the Y” and has continued to evolve with the times. It now has 16

Advanced Aesthetics 13100 N. Western Ave., Suite 201 Bella Luce Med Spa

branches, four program centers and 25 community-based program sites. It now provides “services and solutions to community problems” like financial assistance, teen leadership programs, childcare and much more. With the four values of caring, honesty, respect and responsibility at its core, the Y works in three key areas to strengthen communities: youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. It provides 23 programs in youth development, 11 in healthy living and 12 in social responsibility and the Y boasts significant impact across 23 different communities.

Crunch Fitness 2300 W. Main St., Norman Four Star Fitness several metro locations Lake Hefner

BEST HEALTH FOOD STORE

Uptown Grocery Co. two metro locations Akin’s Natural Foods 2924 NW 63rd St. Dodson’s Health Food & Vitamins 1305 36th Ave. NW, Norman Native Roots Market 131 NE Second St. Omega Health Foods 2427 N. Council Road, Bethany

BEST LOCAL HOTEL

21c Museum Hotel 900 W. Main St.

Ambassador Oklahoma City Colcord 15 N. Robinson Ave. Embassy Suites several metro locations The Skirvin Hilton Oklahoma City 1 Park Ave.

served 68,538 across youth development programs, 86,864 across healthy living programs and 79,654 across social responsibility programs provided one-on-one personal training to 652 individuals

1200 Children’s Ave.

12320 Market Drive

10Gym

YMCA of Greater Oklahoma City

The Children’s Hospital at OU Medicine

Rejuvena Cosmetic Medical Center

several metro locations several metro locations

several metro locations

BEST MEDICAL SPA

YMCA

inspired 243 cancer survivors to grow in spirit, mind and body served 136,727 meals to more than 2,000 children at 29 feeding sites

taught 13,218 children water safety and swim techniques through aquatics programs

helped 443,026 participants dance, stretch, lift and sweat across more than 592 weekly group exercise classes

3209 Northwest Expressway Cosmetic Surgery Affiliates 2100 NW 63rd St. Mariposa Aesthetics & Laser Center 4214 N. Classen Blvd.

taught teamwork, leadership and sportsmanship to 27,507 children through Y youth sports had the help of 5,574 volunteers contributing 112,801 volunteer hours valued at $2,490,646 O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | A U G U S T 2 1 , 2 0 1 9

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2019 BLUE WHALE COMEDY FESTIVAL

AUGUST 29-31 + Tulsa, OK

FRIDAY Headliner

Saturday Headliner

Wolf

byer

Michelle

Nicole

featuring

That’s what we won, right? matteo lane

+

DJ Pryor

+

Jackie Tohn

+

Rae Sanni

Cain's ballroOm

TICKETS + PASSES ON SALE NOW! BLUEWHALECOMEDYFESTIVAL.COM

8 Metro Locations | HideawayPizza.com

Come check out one of our remaining 2019 matches!

ENERGY FC IS STILL

BRINGING THE HEAT! 405.235.KICK 34

A U G U S T 2 1 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

EnergyFC.com

TICKETS AS LOW AS $11

KIDS EAT FREE


GOODS & SERVICES BEST PLACE TO BUY LIQUOR BEST VAPOR SHOP BEST FURNITURE STORE BEST CREDIT UNION BEST FINE JEWELRY BEST THRIFT STORE BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE BEST MEN’S CLOTHING BEST BICYCLE SHOP BEST PET-FRIENDLY PATIO BEST NAUGHTY BUSINESS BEST PLACE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION BEST PUBLIC BATHROOM BEST NEW RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT

14 CATEGORIES •

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BEST OF OKC BEST PLACE TO BUY LIQUOR

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE

2322 N. Broadway Ave.

14101 N. May Ave., Suite 114

Byron’s Liquor Warehouse

Lush Fashion Lounge

Freeman’s Liquor Mart

Blue Seven

4401 N. Western Ave.

7518 N. May Ave.

Moore Liquor

Boutique 206

914 SW Fourth St., Moore

206 E. Oklahoma Ave., Guthrie

Quicker Liquor

mode

9109 S. May Ave.

1227 N. Walker Ave.

Sean’s Wine & Spirits

The Black Scintilla

6969 Northwest Expressway

1112 N. Walker Ave., Suite 104

BEST VAPOR SHOP

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING

3710 NW 50th St.

7518 N. May Ave.

OKC Vapes

Liquid Vapor Lounge 6608 N. May Ave. Prodigy Vapor Co. + CBD Supply several metro locations The Intake Vapor & Smoke 1000 Alameda St., Suite 140A, Norman Vapor Shark (formerly Vapor World) several metro locations

BEST FURNITURE STORE

Mathis Brothers Furniture 3434 W. Reno Ave. Ashley HomeStore several metro locations Bob Mills Furniture 3600 W. Reno Ave. Galleria Furniture and Mattress Outlet 3700 W. Interstate 40 Service Road Suburban Contemporary Furniture 201 N. Portland Ave.

BEST CREDIT UNION

Tinker Federal Credit Union

several metro locations Communication Federal Credit Union several metro locations

Blue Seven

Best pet-friendly patio Best pre- or post-event spot

The Bleu Garten

The Bleu Garten, 301 NW 10th St., opened in Midtown in 2014 as Oklahoma’s first food truck park “to give the consumer an outdoor dining experience that is completely unique.” Its goal is to serve as a venue where food trucks can essentially be hired as independent contractors while serving customers in a welcoming environment. Furry friends are more than

welcome at the family-friendly park any day of the week as long as they are kept on a leash and owners clean up any messes. Visit its website or social media pages for its food truck and live performance calendar. Visit bleugarten.com.

several metro locations Weokie Federal Credit Union

several metro locations

Open six days of the week

(it’s closed Mondays) for roughly 58 hours, The Bleu Garten can host six food trucks at a time.

Huntington Fine Jewelers Lewis Jewelers 2705 S. Interstate 35 Service Road, Moore Mitchener Farrand Fine Jewelers Naifeh Fine Jewelry 6471 Avondale Drive, Nichols Hills

It also hosts a live music series each Tuesday at 7 p.m. and can be rented out for private events.

With about 50 food truck partners, The Bleu Garten is able to offer space to myriad food truck concepts like The Saucee Sicilian,Let’s Do Greek, Whole Latte Pie and Pitchfork Kitchen and Bakery.

10633 S. Western Ave.

2844 W. Wilshire Blvd.

7644 N. Western Ave. GQ Fashions Fine Menswear 3525 NW 23rd St. Mr. Ooley’s 1901 Northwest Expressway, Suite 1023A

BEST BICYCLE SHOP

Al’s Bicycles

several metro locations Bike Lab 2200 W. Hefner Road, Suite 2, The Village Celestial Cycles 2929 W. Hefner Road Schlegel Bicycles 900 N. Broadway Ave. Wheeler Dealer Bicycle Shop 2729 NW 50th St.

BEST PET-FRIENDLY PATIO

The Bleu Garten 301 NW 10th St.

Angry Scotsman Brewing

2912 Paseo St.

True Sky Credit Union

BC Clark Jewelers

Gil’s Clothing & Denim Bar

Sauced on Paseo

The Bleu Garten provides clean restrooms, a full-service liquor bar, shaded seating, misters when it’s hot, heaters when it’s cold and entertainment.

3001 N. Lincoln Blvd.

BEST FINE JEWELRY

1759 NW 16th St.

704 W. Reno Ave.

Oklahoma’s Credit Union

several metro locations

Bad Granny’s Bazaar

Though it only has about 375 seats, it has a capacity of more than 600 people.

BEST THRIFT STORE

The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave. The Pump Bar 2425 N. Walker Ave.

BEST NAUGHTY BUSINESS

Christy’s Toy Box several metro locations Adèle Wolf Productions Patricia’s two metro locations Red Dog Saloon 6417 NW 10th St. Terre Rouge Burlesque

BEST PLACE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION

University of Oklahoma 660 Parrington Oval, Norman

Bad Granny’s Bazaar

Oklahoma City Community College

1759 NW 16th St.

7777 S. May Ave.

Community Thrift Store

Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City

several metro locations

900 N. Portland Ave.

Goodwill Industries of Central Oklahoma

Rose State College

several metro locations

6420 SE 15th St., Midwest City

Save-U-Moore

University of Central Oklahoma

1320 N. Santa Fe Ave., Moore

100 N. University Drive, Edmond

Uptown Cheapskate 1724 24th Ave. NW, Norman

| Photos Alexa Ace

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BEST PUBLIC BATHROOM

OnCue

several metro locations Bar Arbolada 637 W. Main St. Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores several metro locations The Jones Assembly 901 W. Sheridan Ave. The Pump Bar | Photos Alexa Ace

Best women’s boutique

BEST NEW RETAIL ESTABLISHMENT

Lush Fashion Lounge

Opened in March 2009, Lush Fashion Lounge is designed to combine the variety of a bigger department store with the personalized service of a boutique.

“I think what sets us apart is not only are we a one-stop shop where a girl can grab something for a wedding or a night out or a workday or casual, swimsuits, gifts, game day, shoes — you name it — not only do we have, really, something to offer everyone, but we focus really hard on the customer and the customer’s experience,” said owner Carrie Boevers. “That’s what we strive to do, is really put the customer first, give them that boutique experience and really personalized customer attention, but also our selection is very large, too. So they’re getting a boutique experience combined with almost a very large store experience.” Boevers, a Piedmont native with a degree in fashion marketing, said she started Lush as an affordable alternative

to the higher-end boutiques she saw around Oklahoma City. Though the clothing at Lush is less expensive, she still wanted to offer trendy options and provide a personalized shopping experience. “After Lush had been in business a little bit, I had made good relationships with customers,” Boevers said. “I was the one working the sales floor, and we strove to remember our customers by name. That’s kind of where that all started, and as we grew, we still try and remember our regular customers by name. We just grew into this role and really wanted to keep our customers coming back with good service.” While she still works on floor “every now and then,” Boevers now primarily focuses on “behind-the-scenes creative work.” Lush collaborates with local vendors to provide exclusive clothing options, most notably official game-day fashions for University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University and University

2425 N. Walker Ave.

The Peak Dispensary several metro locations 1032 Space 1 NE Second St., Suite 210 Get Bak’d 518 S. Coltrane Road Lotus Gold Marijuana Dispensary by CBD Plus USA, several metro locations Ringside Medical 14201 N. May Ave., Suite 205

of Central Oklahoma fans. “When you’re shopping our local section, whether it be game day or just local general Oklahoma stuff, you’re supporting not only Lush, which is locally owned, but other local vendors as well while you’re getting stuff that you can’t find anywhere else,” Boevers said. Remembering customers’ names and preferences is always appreciated, Boevers said, but actually listening to them and responding is crucial to getting them to come back. “We’re always open to feedback,” Boevers said. “We’re always asking our customers what they want to see more of, what they don’t like. I’m definitely openminded when it comes to criticism, too. … We’re flexible with our customers and our policies. They’re spending their hardearned money with us. We want to make sure they’re happy with every purchase.”

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CANNABIS BEST DISPENSARY BEST HEAD SHOP BEST CANNABIS STRAIN

BEST DISPENSARY FOR CONCENTRATES BEST HEALTH AND BEAUTY CANNABIS-INFUSED PRODUCT BEST EDIBLE PRODUCT BEST BUDTENDER BEST ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE PRACTITINER BEST CANNABIS KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF BEST PLACE TO BUY CBD PRODUCTS BEST PLACE TO BUY CANNABIS PLANTS

11 CATEGORIES •

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The Industry Growers are turning half-baked ideas into full-blown business ventures. Cox Convention Center. September 27/28.

GROW THE INDUSTRY

Where the industry does business. 40

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BEST OF OKC BEST DISPENSARY | Photos Alexa Ace

Fire Leaf Dispensary several metro locations BCC Collective 1015 NW First St. Lotus Gold Marijuana Dispensary by CBD Plus USA, several metro locations Ringside Medical 14201 N. May Ave., Suite 205 Sage Wellness 4200 N. Western Ave., Suite A The Peak Dispensary several metro locations

BEST HEAD SHOP

The Peak Dispensary several metro locations Drew’s Tobacco World 1514 SE 44th St. The Indigo Attic 5012 N. Meridian Ave. Uncle Samz 11005 N. Pennsylvania Ave. Ziggyz Cannabis Co. several metro locations

Best dispensary

BEST CANNABIS STRAIN

Fire Leaf

Original Glue (GG4) aka Gorilla Glue Blue Dream Granddaddy Purple Pineapple Express Sour Diesel

BEST DISPENSARY FOR CONCENTRATES

The Peak Dispensary several metro locations

APCO Med Cannabis Products 313 NW 23rd St., Suite A Fire Leaf Dispensary several metro locations Rabbit Hole Cannabis Dispensary 2500 NW 23rd St. Ringside Medical 14201 N. May Ave., Suite 205 Top Shelf Health & Wellness 2518 N. Meridian Ave.

BEST HEALTH AND BEAUTY CANNABIS-INFUSED PRODUCT

Colorado Cures Hot Canna Cream

CBD Plus USA, several metro locations bath bombs, 420 Bomb Cannagasm Spray, Green Goddess produced by The Greens Bakery

With six locations already in operation, Fire Leaf has quickly become synonymous with medical cannabis in the Oklahoma City metro. Its newest branch, 2810 SW 104th St., recently opened, and three more dispensaries are soon to come online: 1428 W. Britton Road, 1327 S. Broadway in Edmond and 2223 E. Oklahoma Ave. in Guthrie. One of the first dispensaries to start selling medical cannabis after State Question 788 went into effect, Fire Leaf put itself on the map early by hosting patient drives at one of its two original locations, 7876 S. Western Ave. In exchange for signing up at its dispensary, Fire Leaf turned the investment in the patient recommendation back into a set of coupons

valid at its locations, which directed patients back into the business and instilled familiarity with the brand early. Its location in Stockyards City, 2501 SW 15th St., opened earlier in the year. The building had been in the family for decades but was remodeled from a storm shelter company to become Fire Leaf’s flagship store. The Doolittle family, which had become famous for its State Fair sweets over the past half-century, has now become synonymous with local cannabis. “We’re just focusing on improving our operation and our stores, getting more products, talking to more vendors,” Cassi Doolittle said. “We’re never going to stop talking to patients and talking to vendors and improving our product selection.”

Inside the Stockyards location, a show kitchen allows patients to watch many of the infused baked goods and snacks being produced before their eyes. “They actually meet with my store managers too, to pick their brains on what patients are saying, what the patients are asking for,” Doolittle said. “That communication, I think, is great because the kitchen staff’s not in the stores every day to know what the patients are asking for, where there might be a hole in the market of need, and so it’s so good having that communication. My managers can talk to the kitchen and be like, ‘People ask for this every day, and nobody’s doing it. Can we fill that need?’”

lotion, Mr. Mack’s PCRX Hemp Balm, Can-Tek Labs

BEST EDIBLE PRODUCT

Medical Grade THC Gummies - Fruit Punch Lotus Gold Marijuana Dispensary by CBD Plus USA brownie, Nature’s Key caramels, Mr. Mack’s gummies, Arcadia Brands infused gummies, Simple Cure

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | A U G U S T 2 1 , 2 0 1 9

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YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD CLINIC

N E W L O C AT I O N

Natural Choice Urgent Care MMJ Rec’s $70/$30 Vets Call for appointments 405.608.6820

MON-FRI 9AM-6PM SAT 8PM-3PM

RANDY WHITEKILLER, DO SUMMIT BUILDING 5929 N. May Ave, Suite 500 Oklahoma City

FOLLOW

BEST OF OKC Since opening last year, Green Hope Wellness Clinic in Moore has handled thousands of patient recommendations. At a time when doctor recommendations were highly sought and hard to come by, registered nurse Renee Harper assembled a team of doctors and built an online appointment book. Patient recommendation appointments were set six minutes apart from one another with walk-ins allowed on certain days. What once became a waiting game of weeks shifted down to days, hours or minutes. At the same time potential patients were having their applications kicked back to them for paperwork mistakes or photos that did not conform to requirements, Harper put a team in place to handle the license photos and upload user data for an additional $10. What once could be a stressful and time-consuming process soon became streamlined, with patients often walking in the door and then out with their information submitted within half an hour. In the months since opening the clinic, Green Hope Rx, Harper’s dispensary, has opened a few doors down in the same shopping strip, and Harper recently launched

Green Hopes, her nonprofit educational partnership with CBD Plus USA. “Sometimes I think about the magnitude of how big it can be. And I’m like, ‘God, we’re just like the head of a pin right now,’” Harper said. “My endgame is research, research, research. I want to buy, like, Pauls Valley Hospital or something.” Green Hope Wellness Clinic is still evolving, and even Harper does not know what final form it will take, but one of her next steps is kick-starting Blake’s Blessing, a line of cannabis products, with Green Hopes in honor of her grandson who recently died. “The patients that we see here, I used to do consults and charge people $50 to consult with them and write a journal for them,” Harper said. “When the dispensary opened up, I decided to waive that $50. I bought a ton of Regina Nelson’s journals, and I just give them to the patient. And I put in there their specific dose, the target range and what they got, and that’s how we follow up as a dispensary. But I’m going to incorporate in my business model some kind of a follow-up.”

BEST BUDTENDER

Bridget Sharp B.C.C. Collective 1015 NW First St.

Erik Bradshaw, Ringside Medical 14201 N. May Ave., Suite 205 Kalev HaLevi, Lotus Gold Marijuana Dispensary by CBD Plus USA several metro locations Lauren Rodriguez, Starbuds 224. E Main Street Turbo, Green Plus 8613 S. Western Ave.

BEST ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE PRACTITIONER

Green Hope Wellness

2309 S. Interstate 35 Service Road, Moore Bloom Healthcare Herba Verde Wellness Clinic 3100 W. Britton Road, Suite F Natural Remedy MD of Oklahoma 1405 E. Ayers St., Edmond Randy Whitekiller D.O Natural Choice Urgent Care 5929 N. May Ave., Suite 500

BEST CANNABIS KNOWLEDGEABLE STAFF

The Peak Dispensary several metro locations Green Plus 8613 S. Western Ave. Lotus Gold Marijuana Dispensary

STIGMA

by CBD Plus USA, several metro locations Ringside Medical 14201 N. May Ave., Suite 205 Sage Wellness 4200 N. Western Ave., Suite A

BEST PLACE TO BUY CBD PRODUCTS

CBD Plus USA

several metro locations Sage Wellness 4200 N. Western Ave., Suite A Steve’s Greens Cannabis & Wellness 6715 N. May Ave.

TRICHOMES

The Peak Dispensary several metro locations

Best alternative medicine practicioner

LEAF FIND US ON FACEBOOK

@MAGAZINEEXTRACT 42

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Green Hope Wellness Clinic

UWD two metro locations

BEST PLACE TO BUY CANNABIS PLANTS

The Peak Dispensary several metro locations Okie Kush Club several metro locations Sage Wellness 4200 N. Western Ave., Suite A Steve’s Greens Cannabis & Wellness 6715 N. May Ave. UWD two metro locations


ART

ARTS & CULTURE

Global colors

The art of Chickasaw painter Brenda Kingery is showcased in a new Oklahoma City University exhibition. By Jo Light

Artist Brenda Kingery has captured a great deal in her complex paintings through the years, drawing upon worldwide travels and her Oklahoma heritage to create works of vivid color and emotion. Twenty-three of her works are currently on display in Nona Jean Hulsey Gallery inside Norick Art Center (NW 26th Street and Blackwelder Avenue) on the Oklahoma City University campus. The exhibition, Brenda Kingery: A Retrospective, spans decades of Kingery’s life, from 1981 to 2018. A native Oklahoman and member of the Chickasaw Nation, Kingery was born in Oklahoma City in 1939, where she grew up riding a cutting horse and absorbing the colors and textures of her Oklahoma home, especially the weather. “There’s a certain color,” Kingery said via phone, discussing how she perceives Oklahoma. “There’s the wheat; [it] was a big influence. The warm summers, the winds, and then my Native American background was a portion of it.” She began her art career when she was still a toddler. Just after starting school, a teacher spotted her talents. “The kindergarten teacher called my mother and said, ‘You have a baby artist,’” Kingery said. The teacher suggested simply supplying Kingery with art tools but no formal training. In this way, she was able to develop a style and feel for her own work. Kingery said she would give the same advice to any other developing artist. “As children, a lot of positive encouragement would be the thing, I would say,” she said. “A lot of encouragement. And let them play.” Kingery went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from University of Oklahoma (OU) in 1961.

Travel textures

While at OU, she married Tom Kingery. The U.S. Air Force deployed their family “Chaldeans of Ur” by Brenda Kingery | Image Oklahoma City University / provided

to Okinawa, Japan, in 1968. There, she continued her graduate studies at University of the Ryukyus. Living in Japan and immersing herself in another culture was formative for Kingery. In Okinawa, she learned the ink wash, or sumi-e, method of painting, which she still utilizes today along with multiple layers of acrylic washes. But this point in her life was also the first of many phases of travel reflected in her work. Whenever she went somewhere new, it became important for Kingery to learn from and absorb her surroundings. Textiles, in particular, have served as one key inspiration. She interprets the memories and images of her experiences as patterns and colors on the canvas in almost dreamlike ways. Her style has such an otherworldly quality that it has come to be known as “narrative symbolism” within art circles. Preservation of culture is another key thematic element of her work. After Okinawa, Kingery returned to the United States and earned her master’s degree in fine arts from OU. Later, the family moved to Texas, but she maintained connections to Oklahoma, and in 1994, she decided to attend her first Red Earth Festival and powwow. The costumes and dance served as instant inspiration. “When we saw Red Earth, I nearly fell over, it was so fantastic,” Kingery said. “It just turned me around. It started a whole new series of paintings that I’m still working on to this day.” Kingery believes artists have to grow and change or they risk becoming stagnant. She sees the evolution of her style as different series and genre shifts marked by life changes, like moving between countries and connecting with her heritage. “It’s interesting that all of those compound to work on each other,” Kingery said. “And eventually you come to something that’s yours.”

Cultural experience

Heather Lunsford is director of Oklahoma

City University’s School of Visual Arts and met Kingery while living in Texas. She said they have been planning this exhibition for about 14 months. Lunsford selected works for the exhibition with the assistance of anthropologist Emily Santhanam, a curator at Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur. She said the volume of Kingery’s work was impressive. “We went to this big storage unit in San Antonio,” Lunsford said. “And Emily and I laid [the paintings] out all around us.” Although Kingery’s art has been exhibited around the world and locally in a few galleries, including JRB Art at the Elms, 2810 N. Walker Ave., Lunsford said a main goal of the exhibition is to showcase Kingery’s work to more Oklahomans. “Brenda’s coming to the show,” Lunsford said. “Come and meet her. She is one of the warmest, kindest people you can meet. She loves to talk about her work. She loves to engage about her work.” Walking through the exhibition and pausing in front of one energetic piece titled “Match at Jabbok,” Lunsford remarked on Kingery’s ability to absorb and reflect her experiences. “It’s such an amazing evolution,” Lunsford said. “And that’s what I love about it.” As well as being an influential artist and teacher, Kingery has been honored multiple times as a member of the Chickasaw Nation. She was inducted into Chickasaw Nation Hall of Fame this year. In 2007, she was appointed to the board of trustees of the Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts Development (IAIA). The latter is a presidential appointment, and Kingery said she was surprised when she got the call from the White House. “Actually, I had a mop in my hand, and I was cleaning the floors of my

“Masai” by Brenda Kingery | Image Oklahoma City University / provided

studio,” Kingery said with a laugh. Kingery said her experiences on the IAIA board have only helped her continue to learn more about other cultures. “I see different tribal affiliations, different kinds of artists, different kinds of culture, languages,” she said. “And it’s probably the finest appointment on the planet. My goodness, am I grateful for that.” Kingery also continues to work with Threads of Blessing, a group she cofounded that teaches textile art to women in Haiti, Honduras and Uganda. Kingery said she is now working on a series inspired by her Chickasaw heritage. She recently visited Tupelo, Mississippi, to view the Chickasaw burial mounds with a group. “We got to go back to where our ancestors were buried,” Kingery said. “We were so inspired by that, we’re hoping to do a whole exhibit around the inspiration from Tupelo and the mounds.” Kingery said she is looking forward to the exhibition and hopes to meet many of the guests. “I’m coming home in a lot of ways,” Kingery said. Brenda Kingery: A Retrospective runs through Sept. 6. Visit okcu.edu.

Brenda Kingery: A Retrospective through Sept. 6 Nona Jean Hulsey Gallery Oklahoma City University 2501 N. Blackwelder Ave. okcu.edu | 405-208-5000 Free

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FILM

ARTS & CULTURE

Our time

40 Minutes or Less: Local Female Filmmakers showcases the variety and craftsmanship of female filmmakers in Oklahoma. By Jeremy Martin

For actress and producer Michaelene Stephenson, being a filmmaker is exactly what it sounds like. “My main goal would be to help movies get made, and if that means I’m the right person for a role and I need to act in the film, awesome. I really love doing that,” said Stephenson. “But if that means I need to produce it so that the movie gets done, I’m totally there. There’s so many people that have these great ideas, and I just want the art to get made, get finished and get put in front of people.” Presented by Oklahoma Film Society and curated by Stephenson, 40 Minutes or Less: Local Female Filmmakers features short works by Oklahoma screenwriters, producers and directors 6-7:30 p.m. Aug. 29 at Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE Third St. For the screening, Stephenson chose filmmakers whose works she was already familiar with, such as Cate Jones’ darkly comedic short “Sheila” (first seen in the Mono Deux antholog y and featuring Stephenson in a supporting role), as well as works by filmmakers she found through “internet stalking,” i.e., searching for them on Instagram and Twitter. “There are filmmakers that if you’re already involved in the Oklahoma film scene, you’re going to know who they are,” Stephenson said. “They’ve kind of been around the block here a little bit. And then there’s some filmmakers that, at least for me, I had never heard of until Cherish Love, written and produced by Nicole Jocleen | Photo Devoted Media Group / provided

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I curated this event, so I’m really excited to kind of introduce them to the Oklahoma film scene so they can all start networking together and helping each other.” Though assembling the varied lineup of films and filmmakers required Stephenson to do some research, she said she was never required to lower her expectations or standards. “Luckily, we do have a pretty diverse screening,” Stephenson said, “and I think all the films that are screening are really good films, so it’s not like I had to settle for anything to try to have diversity or to have all women filmmakers.” The shorts included range from romantic comedy to environmental documentary to Shakespeare adaptation, but Stephenson said several share subtle similarities. “You’re more likely to have roundedout, fleshed-out female characters, whereas a lot of times, you might not have that with a male writer or director,” Stephenson said. “It’s just so important to have these female voices in the film industry because you’re seeing things from their perspective. … That doesn’t exist as much as it should.” Shakespeare’s The Tempest is set on a magical island, but director Rebecca Lynne Wagner’s adaptation Ferdinand and Miranda was shot in a field on the side of a highway in Norman. Wagner, now based in Los Angeles, said she was inspired to make the film while studying acting at University of Oklahoma. “Usually, when we see Shakespeare on film, it’s typically not done very well,” Wagner said. “People aren’t really trained in it, and it tends to kind of fall flat, so that was sort of my goal — to bring it to life and adapt it film without losing some of the textual integrity.” The five-minute film recreates the play’s Act 3, Scene 1, when Miranda (Andrea Beasley) and Ferdinand (Julian Walker) first meet, which Shakespeare scholar Sylvia Morris describes as the moment Miranda “becomes aware of herself as an independent person.” After acting in other people’s films, Wagner decided she would rather direct. “I was writing stories, and I just kind of felt that it was more important for me to be behind the camera and controlling the narrative, rather than having someone else tell

me what to do or have someone else choose the projects that I worked on,” Wagner said. “Filmmaking is sort of an exclusive group, typically very boys club, I guess you could say, and I know that in my experiences as an actor, I was often really dissatisfied when a male director would be trying to portray a female experience, and then it wouldn’t come across in the way that I thought was truthful to my experience and a lot of other women’s experiences. I feel like I was pushed in that direction simply because I feel like there was a hole in the storytelling.”

‘Soft power’

A trailer for Cherish Love — a feature film by Devoted Media Group currently available on the production company’s YouTube channel — is also included on the screening lineup. Screenwriter Nicole Jocleen said she could ensure the script — inspired by a “social media rant” posted by Azrial Greene-Piña, who plays the title character — featured a strong female lead and supporting characters. As a producer, Jocleen said she could ensure that the women playing those roles felt at ease on set.

It’s just so important to have these female voices in the film industry because you’re seeing things from their perspective. Michaelene Stephenson “I think anytime a female is present as a producer and just on set constantly, that makes them feel more comfortable, especially if it’s a romantic comedy, if you’re going to be kissing or anything,” Jocleen said. “I know that with me being there, I’m going to make sure that whatever you’re doing, you’re comfortable doing it. … I think my presence as a producer and just being there makes them know, ‘OK, this is somebody that I definitely know has my back in the room with me.’” Director and producer Nicol Ragland will be screening a preview of her upcoming film Trans Pecos, a documentary about a company exploiting state

Trans Pecos, directed and produced by Nicol Ragland | Photo provided

law to construct a natural gas pipeline in far West Texas. “Climate change is the biggest issue of our time, and it’s very much an abstract power, these folks behind this industry,” said Ragland, who has degrees in environmental science and photography. “It’s hard to know, exactly, the operating system, so I just was really kind of enamored by the ability to map out how they work, how they essentially misuse the practice of eminent domain. It’s something I’ve never really thought about, private companies essentially able to take land. A lot of people just don’t understand the magnitude of that until it happens to them because essentially, the company can show up on your property, they can stake it out, and they can take it, and there’s nothing you can do about it.” Many films made by women, Ragland said, show greater empathy and “soft power,” creating a feeling of inclusion instead of an “us vs. them” binary. “We have really specific virtues to offer in the world of storytelling, and a lot of it has to do with a level of sensitivity,” Ragland said. “It’s our nature to be nurturing. It’s our nature to create stories of inclusion. It’s our nature to understand the nature of these systems that are hurting us, and also to listen. I think females, by nature, listen. It’s something that is really important within documentary filmmaking … and I think that’s something that is really missing in the media. Now more than ever, it’s necessary that women step in, and they are, and it’s really exciting. There’s a lot of extraordinary male filmmakers, but it’s really our time. So it’s also a level of responsibility. ... How do we step into that, and how do we take ownership and accountability for creating really good and really important stories?” Admission is free. Visit 1ne3.org.

40 Minutes or Less: Local Female Filmmakers 6-7:30 p.m. Aug. 29 Artspace at Untitled 1 NE Third St. 1ne3.org | 405-815-9995 Free


G R A ND O P E NIN G AUGUST 23-25, 2019

THE MEDICINE MAN 5917 S. Sunnylane Road

Oklahoma City, OK 73135 | 405.225.1323 email: themedicinemanok@yahoo.com HOURS: FRI & SAT 10AM-10PM | SUN 10AM-5PM

INCENTIVES A VISA GIFT CARD TO BUY (2) ROUND TRIP AIRLINE TICKETS TO LAS VEGAS TWO DRAWINGS FOR ONE 55” FLAT SCREEN TV

RULES First 10 customers who purchase $3,000 or more cumulatively over the course of four months will go into a drawing (one drawing) for two round trip airline tickets to Las Vegas (visa gift card and blackout dates apply) First 20 customers who purchase $2,000 or more cumulatively over the course of three months will go in a drawing for a 55” inch flat screen you cannot combine the amounts once you reach $2,000 and go into the drawing for the TVs you have to start over for the $3,000 for The Las Vegas tickets or you can bypass the TVs and work up to the $3,000 you have ALL your receipts to participate and be awarded the prize(s). Restrictions: you can NOT work for own or be involved in any shape or form connected to or be part of a dispensary grower seller CBD oil distributor etc. You must be an individual medical card holder with a valid Medical Card and OK state ID. This offer is valid for only OKLAHOMA and its affiliate surrounding states who are medically approved to use their medical cards and purchase medical marijuana in the state of Oklahoma. This offer is strictly for medical marijuana products ONLY no other products such as pipes rolling papers etc. and you must be at least 18 yrs old to participate or a caregiver authorized to purchase medical marijuana for their clients. FREE FOOD: For ALL three grand opening days, customers purchasing medical marijuana or the cartridge products are eligible to partake in food incentive. Friday (Fish and Fries) from 2pm - until we run out and Saturday & Sunday (Curry Chicken OR Curry goat, peas and rice) from Noon and until we run out. (Receipt required and strictly for purchasing Customers only). STARBUCKS GIFT CARDS: The first 25 customers purchasing at least a gram of medical marijuana or the cartridge will receive a free $5 Starbucks gift card Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 11am or until the 25 cards, each day, have run out. (INCENTIVES CAN CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE)

REGULAR HOURS: MON-SAT 10AM-10PM | SUN 10AM-5PM O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | A U G U S T 2 1 , 2 0 1 9

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CALENDAR are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

BOOKS Bryn Greenwood book signing the New York Times bestselling author will autograph copies of the novel The Reckless Oath We Made, 6-7:30 p.m. Aug. 22. Best of Books, 1313 E. Danforth Road, Edmond, 405-340-9202, bestofbooksok.com. THU Last Sunday Poetry Reading a poetry reading followed by an open mic, 2 p.m. last Sunday of every month. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. SUN

FILM Country Music (2019, USA, Ken Burns) an overview of the 16-hour documentary chronicling the history of country music, 3:30-5 p.m. Aug. 25. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-708-6937, towertheatreokc.com. SUN Dinner and a Movie: The Rider (2017, USA, Chloé Zhao) a severe head injury causes a cowboy to rethink his life, 5-8 p.m. Aug. 22. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. THU Floating Films: The Crimes of Grindelwald (2018, USA, David Yates) this Harry Potter prequel chronicles the continued adventures of magizoologist Newt Scamander, 9-10:30 p.m. Aug. 24. Riversport Rapids, 800 Riversport Drive, 405-5524040, riversportokc.org. SAT Mary Poppins Returns (2018, USA, Rob Marshall) the charming British nanny comes back to help the now grown Banks children with their own family, 9 p.m. Aug. 23. Eldon Lyon Park, 7400 NW 36th St, 405-367-4993. FRI The Mountain (2018, USA, Rick Alverson) Jeff Goldblum stars as a doctor specializing in lobotomies in the 1950s, Aug. 23-25. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. FRI-SUN Rush: Cinema Strangiato (2019, USA, Dale Heslip) view highlights from Rush’s 40th anniversary tour at this “exercise in fan indulgence,” 7 p.m. Aug. 21. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. WED VHSandCHILL: A Weekend with Jeff Film Festival a Jeff Goldblum-inspired event with screenings of Into the Night, Vibes and The Fly, along with a musical stage production, live jazz from The Savoy Trio, a standup comedy show and more, Aug. 23-24. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. FRI-SAT

HAPPENINGS 50 Shades of Play live painting, music and erotic poetry, 6-10 p.m. Aug. 24. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., 405-208-4240, iceeventcentergrill. eat24hour.com. SAT

Afro Beats a dance party featuring hip-hop, Caribbean, dancehall and more with DJ Sinz, 11 p.m. July 5. Glass Lounge, 5929 N. May Ave., 405-835-8077, glasshouseokc.com. FRI

variety of roles for the December production of Tchaikovsky’s popular holiday ballet, 5 p.m. Aug. 23. Kovich School of Ballet, 1312 S. Berry Road, Norman. FRI Reading Wednesdays a weekly storytime with hands-on activities, goody bags and reading-themed photo ops, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. WED

Benefit Against Mass Incarceration a discussion and fundraiser presented by The Engaged Buddhist of Norman and featuring baked goods, an art sale, voter registration and live music, 6-11 p.m. Aug. 24. Resonator Institute, 325 E. Main St., Norman, resonator.space. SAT

Slide Outta Summer celebrate the start of the school year with water slides, bounce houses and obstacle courses, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Aug. 24. Mitch Park, 1501 W. Covell Road, Edmond, 405-359-4630, edmondok.com/parks. SAT

Drag Me to Bingo bingo night hosted by Teabaggin Betsy, 9 p.m. Tuesdays. Partners, 2805 NW 36th St., 405-942-2199, partners4club.com. TUE Mesta Park & Heritage Hills End of Summer Bash enjoy beer, food, lawn games, a bounce house and more; bring your own blankets and chairs, 6-10 p.m. Aug. 23. Overholser Mansion, 405 NW 15th St., 405-525-5325, overholsermansion.org. FRI

Story Time with Britt’s Bookworms enjoy snacks, crafts and story time, 10:30-11:30 a.m. first and third Thursday of every month. Thrive Mama Collective, 1745 NW 16th St., 405-356-6262. THU Storytime Science the museum invites children age 6 and younger to hear a story and participate in a related scientific activity, 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. TUE-SAT

MiracleCon a gaming convention benefitting the Children’s Hospital in Oklahoma City with tournaments, retro arcade cabinets, a costume contest, panels and more 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Aug. 24. Nicholson Tower, 940 NE 13th St. SAT Music Industry Networking Night local musicians, promoters and fans are invited to socialize at this community meet-and-greet hosted by Elecktra Stanislava and Evan Jarvicks, 7-9:30 p.m. Aug. 28. Angry Scotsman Brewing, 704 W. Reno Ave., 405673-7713, angryscotbrew.com. WED OKC Pow Wow Club Indian Taco and Native American Arts & Crafts Sale enjoy food and shop for crafts at this event benefitting the Native American Heritage Organization and the Oklahoma City Pow Wow Club, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Aug. 23. NorthCare, 2617 General Pershing Blvd., 405-858-2700, northcare.com. FRI Oklahoma County Free Fair Oklahoma residents will enter food, crafts and more for judged competitions, Aug. 22-24. Oklahoma State Fair Park, 3220 Great Plains Walk, 405-948-6700, okstatefair.com. THU-SAT Paper Sack Project prepare sack lunches to pass out to people on the streets at this event hosted by Debate Night OKC, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Sunday of the month. NE OKC Community & Cultural Center, 3815 N. Kelley Ave., 405-401-3350. SUN Queen Mariah’s Variety Show a monthly stage show featuring various drag performers, 10:30 p.m. Saturdays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-6022030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. SAT Remington Bark a dog-friendly event featuring races, costume contests, adoption opportunities and live music by Superfreak, 3-8 p.m. Aug. 25. Remington Park, 1 Remington Place, 405-424-9000, remingtonpark.com. SUN Renegade Poker compete in a 2-3 hour tournament with cash prizes, 3 p.m. Sundays. Bison Witches Bar & Deli, 211 E Main St., Norman, 405-364-7555, bisonwitchesok.com. SUN Seven Days of Sours sample tart locally brewed craft beers, through Aug. 25, 3-10 p.m. Stonecloud Brewing Co., 1012 NW First St., stonecloudbrewing. com. MON-SUN Space Race a Star Wars-themed pre-game party for the Cannabis Cup featuring music from Wubb,

Anything Goes: An OKC StorySLAM While these regular open-mic storytelling events usually have a specific theme, this time, anecdote-slingers have the chance to talk about pretty much anything, provided it is a true story with a beginning, middle and end and told without notes in seven minutes or less. Audience vote will determine the winner of a bespoke trophy. Participation and attendance is free. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m., and story time begins at 7 p.m. Sunday at 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St. Visit 51stspeakeasy.com. SUNDAY Photo provided Moody Acid and more, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Aug. 23. Fassler Hall, 421 NW 10th St., 405-609-3300, fasslerhall. com. FRI

FOOD Basilmania sample foods created by local restaurants and infused with locally grown basil, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Aug. 23. Will Rogers Garden Center, 3400 NW 36th St., 405-943-0827, okc.gov. FRI Let’s Get Basted! a barbecue cook-off and raffle benefitting Yukon HUD Charities and Toys for Tots, noon-1 a.m. Aug. 24. Henry Hudson’s, 601 S. Mustang Road, Yukon, 405-577-5001, henryhudsonspub.com. SAT Made In Oklahoma sample foods created by local vendors, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Aug. 24. The Gourmet Gallery, 1532 S Boulevard, Edmond, 405-715-3663, thegourmetgallery.com. SAT Oklahoma Craft Beer Summit an event featuring panel discussions, presentations and samples of craft beer with catering by Scottie’s Deli, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Aug. 24. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-708-6937, towertheatreokc. com. SAT Paseo Farmers Market shop for fresh food from local vendors at this weekly outdoor event, 9 a.m.noon Saturdays, through Oct. 19. SixTwelve, 612 NW 29th St., 405-208-8291, sixtwelve.org. SAT Taste of Asia sample 27 dishes from nine Asian countries and enjoy live entertainment at this annual event presented by the Asia Society of Oklahoma, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Aug. 24. Mayfair Church of Christ, 2340 NW 50th St. SAT Vegan | Vegetarian Brunch enjoy veggie hash migas, granola bowls, quiche, cocktails and more, 11 a.m-2 p.m. Aug. 25. Opolis, 113 N. Crawford Ave., 405-673-4931, opolis.org. SUN WSKY Q & Blues enjoy premium whiskey, craft cocktails, beer, wine barbecue and live blues by Justin Echols and The Papa Midnite Blues Band at this event benefitting Classen School of Advanced Studies, 8-11 p.m. Aug. 23. Dunlap Codding, 609 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-607-8600, dunlapcodding.com. FRI

Last Year at Marienbad Director Alain Resnais’ beautiful surreal, ambiguous 1961 film is a contemplation on the unreliability of memory, or some kind of haunted celluloid nightmare or an opulent, romantic fever dream or maybe all or none of the above. Why don’t you watch the new 4K restoration of this story of a woman (Delphine Seyrig) and man (Giorgio Albertazzi) either meeting for the first time or reuniting in an unbelievably expensive-looking yet creepy chateau and tell us quoi le merde you think is going on? The film is Friday-Sunday at Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive. Tickets are $5-$9. Visit okcmoa.com. FRIDAY-SUNDAY Photo provided 46

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YOUTH Early Explorers toddlers and preschoolers can participate in fun scientific activities they can repeat later at home, 10-11 a.m. Thursdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. THU Kitchen Scrap Gardening children ages 7-11 can learn to grow plants from fruit and vegetable scraps at this hands-on gardening workshop, 10-11 a.m. Aug. 24. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. SAT The Oklahoma Nutcracker auditions dancers and performers age 7 and older can try out for a

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS!

Tammi Sauer book signing the author will sign copies of children’s book Nugget and Fang Go to School, 11 a.m.-noon Aug. 24. Best of Books, 1313 E. Danforth Road, Edmond, 405-340-9202, bestofbooksok.com. SAT

PERFORMING ARTS Arsenic and Old Lace two elderly ladies poison elderly men and bury them in their cellar in this classic dark comedy directed by Denise Hughes, Aug. 21-25, Aug. 21-25. Jewel Box Theatre, 3700 N. Walker Ave. WED-SUN

The Book of Will playwright Lauren Gunderson’s dramatization of the compilation of William Shakespeare’s First Folio; presented by Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park and directed by Rex Daugherty, through Aug. 31. Shakespeare on Paseo, 2920 Paseo St., 405-235-3700, oklahomashakespeare.org. THU-SAT The Capitol Steps an evening of lighthearted bipartisan political satire, 8 p.m. Aug. 24. OCCC Visual and Performing Arts Center Theater, 7777 S. May Ave., 405-682-7579, tickets.occc.edu. SAT Driving Miss Daisy a widow and her chauffeur forge an unlikely friendship in Alfred Uhry’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play; directed by W. Jerome Stevenson and starring Brenda Williams and Albert Bostick, Aug. 23-Sept. 7. The Pollard Theatre, 120 W. Harrison Ave., Guthrie, 405-282-2800, thepollard.org. FRI-SAT Homegrown Volume I a concert featuring local musicians and hosted by Terry Ware and Kyle Reid, 7:30 p.m. Aug. 25. Lions Park, 450 S. Flood Ave., Norman, 405-366-5472. SUN Iron Horse Open Mic and Showcase perform music on stage at this show open to all experience levels, 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Iron Horse Bar & Grill, 9501 S. Shields Blvd., 405-735-1801. WED Joel Forlenza: The Piano Man the pianist performs variety of songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra and, of course, Billy Joel, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-701-4900, othellos.us. TUE-SAT Kendell’s Open Mic play up to four songs at this weekly music open mic, 8-11 p.m. Tuesdays. Kendell’s, 110 S. May Ave., kendellsbar.com. TUE Locked and Loaded an all-ages drag showcase hosted by Q and Topatío and featuring Kilo Kikii, 10 p.m. Aug. 23. The Loaded Bowl, 1211 SW Second St., 405-820-9599, theloadedbowltruck.com. FRI Lumpy’s Open Mic Night play a song of your own or just listen to the performers at this weekly show hosted by John Riley Willingham, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. Lumpy’s Sports Grill, 12325 N. May Ave., 405-286-3300, lumpyssportsgrill.com. WED Monday Night Blues Jam Session bring your own instrument to this open-stage jam hosted by Wess McMichael, 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., 405-701-4900, othellos.us. MON OK Country Cafe Open Mic show off your singing talent, 6 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of every month. OK Country Cafe, 6072 S. Western Ave., 405-602-6866, okcountrycafe.com. THU OKC Comedy Open Mic Night get some stage time or just go to listen and laugh at this open mic hosted by Travis Phillips, 7 p.m. Mondays. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. MON OKC Improv performers create original scenes in the moment based on suggestions from the audience, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Oklahoma City Improv, 1757 NW 16th St., 405-4569858, okcimprov.com. FRI-SAT The Return of The Golden Girls a drag parody of the beloved sitcom about four senior roommates, Through Aug. 24, 8 p.m. The Boom, 2218 NW 39th St., 405-601-7200, theboomokc.com. FRI-SAT Untapped: A Drag Xperience a drag showcase hosted by Jak’kay Monroe and Gizele Monáe and featuring Alotta Vahjeen, Jalika T. Raine, Shire Paige and Knittens Uwu, 9 p.m. Aug. 23. Vanessa House Beer Co., 118 NW 8th St., 405-517-0511, vanessahousebeerco.com. FRI


ACTIVE I Love the ’90s 5K a ’90s-themed evening race through Oklahoma City, 8-11 p.m. Aug. 23. Fassler Hall, 421 NW 10th St., 405-609-3300, fasslerhall.com. FRI Moore War Run an annual 5K run through downtown Moore, benefitting student activities and scholarship funds for all three Moore high schools, 7:30 a.m. Aug. 24. Moore High School, 300 N. Eastern Ave., Moore. SAT Open Badminton hit some birdies in some morning pick-up games of badminton with friends, 10 a.m.noon Saturdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., Yukon, 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov. SAT Rock Out Cancer Rockin’ 5K a run and walk benefiting University of Oklahoma’s Stephenson Cancer Center; rock-star-inspired attire is encouraged, 9 a.m.-noon Aug. 24. Regional Park, SE 15th St., 405-255-8218, midwestcityok.org. SAT Run the Alley a three-mile social run for athletes of all abilities ending with beers at The Yard, 6:30 p.m. Thursdays. OK Runner, 708 N Broadway Ave., 405-702-9291, myokrunner.com. THU Stars and Stripes Spin Jam a weekly meetup for jugglers, hula hoopers and unicyclers, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Stars & Stripes Park, 3701 S. Lake Hefner Drive, 405-297-2756, okc.gov/parks. WED

Leviathan I: The Aesthetics of Capital an experimental exhibition created by artist Pete Froslie exploring climate change, moral and political philosophy through electro-mechanics and game engine-based digital projection, through Dec. 31. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., Norman, 405-325-3272, ou.edu/fjjma. WED-SAT Patrick Riley: A Retrospective an exhibit of drawings, jewelry, sculpture and other artworks created by the artist and educator, through Aug. 29. Gaylord-Pickens Oklahoma Heritage Museum, 1400 Classen Drive, 405-235-4458, oklahomaheritage. com. THU A Room in Bloom an exhibition of floral photography by Oklahoma City artist Renee Lawrence, through Sept. 1. Contemporary Art Gallery, 2928 Paseo St., 405-601-7474, contemporaryartgalleryokc.com. FRI-SUN Thoughts on Africa an exhibition of Don Nevard’s photographs of native African wildlife, Aug. 24-Oct. 31. Inasmuch Foundation Gallery at Oklahoma City Community College, 7777 S. May Ave., 4056827579. SAT-THU Urban Abstracts an exhibition of digital artworks created by abstract painter and photographer Lawrence Leif, through Aug. 31. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE Third St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. WED-SAT

Happy Birthday, Marsha! / The Real Life Test Transgender activist and Stonewall rioter Marsha P. Johnson would have turned 74 this week. Celebrate her legacy as a Pride pioneer at this screening of Reina Gossett and Sasha Wortzel’s Happy Birthday, Marsha! a short film about the lead up to Stonewall, presented by Queer Film Continuum. The screening also includes The Real Life Test, a feature-length documentary about local minister and poet Paula Sophia Schonauer, who will be in attendance for a post-film discussion. The films begin 7 p.m. Friday at Norick Art Center, 1608 NW 26th St. A suggested donation of $5-$10 for Q Space youth organization will be collected at the door. Visit facebook. com/queerfilmcontinuum. FRIDAY Photo provided

Twisted Coyote Brew Crew a weekly 3-mile group run for all ability levels with a beer tasting to follow; bring your own safety lights, 6 p.m. Mondays. Twisted Spike Brewing Co., 1 NW 10th St., 405-301-3467, twistedspike.com. MON

SHOW US YOUR GROW! We want photos of your cannabis plants growing or flowering. Your photos could be featured on Extract’s social media accounts or in Extract, our glossy medicinal cannabis magazine.

Wheeler Criterium a weekly nighttime cycling event with criterium races, food trucks and family activities, 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, okc.gov. TUE Yoga with Art workout in an art-filled environment followed by a mimosa, 10:30 a.m. Saturdays. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com. SAT

VISUAL ARTS Advancing the Pencil Portrait, Part I learn how to create better pencil portraits at this class for all experience levels, through Aug. 22. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum. org. THU All My Sisters an exhibition of Janice MathewsGordon’s paintings of women, inspired by the feminist movement and her own childhood and family, through Aug. 31. JRB Art at The Elms, 2810 N. Walker Ave., 405-528-6336, jrbartgallery.com. THU-SAT

Art & Design Faculty Exhibit an exhibition of visual arts, design and research projects created by University of Central Oklahoma faculty, through Aug. 30. Melton Gallery, 100 N. University Drive, Edmond, 405-525-3603, uco.edu. MON-FRI INTEGRIS Art Show view a variety of art works created by people whose lives have been affected by cancer, through Sept. 6. Integris Cancer Institute, 5911 W. Memorial Road, 405-773-6400, integris.tv/ cancer. THU-FRI

Submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail them to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

For OKG live music

see page 51

Submit your photos to mdinger@okgazette.com. Submission must include high-resolution photos, your name, location of grow (city), strain name and if it is a personal or commercial grow.

405-528-6000 | advertising@okgazette.com O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | A U G U S T 2 1 , 2 0 1 9

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MUSIC

EVENT

Mad Honey plays at Opolis’ two-day music festival Summer Daze 2.0. | Photo provided

Summer sounds

Opolis’ back-to-school bash features a local lineup with a few bonus bands touring through Oklahoma. By Jeremy Martin

To completely misquote Alice Cooper, school’s in. It might not seem very rock ’n’ roll, but Summer Daze 2.0 Aug. 30-31 at Opolis, 113 N. Crawford Ave., celebrates the start of the academic year with two days of music by local and touring bands. Opolis owner Andy Nunez said the event helps introduce University of Oklahoma students to Norman. “The student population, it’s changing every year, and they’re coming back into town,” Nunez said. “It’s a way to say, ‘Here’s this group of businesses doing this stuff. … We’re downtown and we’re a little off of campus, but there’s a heartbeat down here that’s been going on.’ … I think everyone in downtown Norman can benefit from it.” The first Summer Daze was held in 2016, but Nunez said

Austin’s Hovvdy (pronounced “Howdy”) releases Heavy Lifter in October. | Image provided

any thoughts of making it an annual event were postponed for birthday parties, first in 2017 for Opolis’ 15th anniversary celebration and then in 2018 for the 15th anniversary of “comrades” Guestroom Records. “These mini festival things are kind of a lot to put together,” Nunez said. “Besides Norman Music Festival, we can probably handle doing maybe one a year.” Though Opolis regularly hosts live music, putting on a larger festival with an outdoor stage in the parking lot requires additional legal permissions. “There’s a bunch of hoop-jumping you have to do, basically, to make sure you do it right,” Nunez said. “Just like anything else, you have to call the city and state offices.” As a restaurant as well as a bar and concert venue, Opolis benefits from having a catering license with Oklahoma’s Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement (ABLE) Commission and already carrying a “pretty substantial amount” of liability insurance for concerts, Nunez said, and sponsors The Garage Burgers & Beer, Notorious P.I.E. and Anthem Brewing Company help mitigate the “kind of a massive amount of production costs.” The lineup includes Sports, Hovvdy, Lomelda, Tyson Meade, Break Up, Smokey Motel, Spinster, Swim Fan, Net, Poolboy, LCG & the X, Mad Honey, Masterhand, Laine, Burl, Mt. Terror, Buzzcut, and Audio Book Club. Nunez said he wishes he could have found space

for even more acts. “There’s a lot of bands that we probably should have booked that we couldn’t have booked,” Nunez said. “We don’t have a huge budget, so it’s a lot of relationships that we’ve built over the course of the year with local bands and regional bands and, in some cases, passing-through-on-the-highway bands touring. Lomelda and Hovvdy jumped on, and we were either going to have the festival and they were going to play that or they would just do a normal show. … It’s a relationship thing more than seeking things out so much, and we’re trying to make it mutually beneficial for everybody.” Los Angeles-based Lomelda, aka singer-songwriter Hannah Read, released M for Empathy in March. Pitchfork said the album’s songs “feel expansive, shapeshifting like shadow puppets on a wall.” Austin-based tourmate Hovvdy (pronounced “Howdy”) releases Heavy Lifter in October. Fader described the music made by Hovvdy’s Charlie Martin and Will Taylor as “the sonic equivalent of a hug.” OKC’s Mad Honey is currently recording six-song EP debut Theories. “It’s a collection of six new songs that includes things we’ve been playing for our whole existence as a band as well as songs written in just the past couple months,” guitarist Keegan Ball wrote in an email interview. “We think it really shows our growth as writers, musicians and people over the past year.” Mad Honey vocalist Tiff Sutcliffe, in the same interview, agreed that the band has evolved since it began. “We’ve changed a lot as a band since our first single, and each time we’ve released something new, it’s involved a lot of experimenting and just growing as people individually,” Sutcliffe wrote. “We’re now at a time where we feel more secure in knowing who Mad Honey is

and what we’re trying to say with our music. Though we’re still developing our sound, our upcoming releases feel a little more raw emotionally, finding some kind of hope in a dark time.” Drummer Austin Valdez said whether the band is playing a smaller show or a larger festival, the goal is to stay present and in the moment onstage. “We don’t really approach it differently,” Valdez said. “Instead, we tend to approach each set specifically to each show we play, both for the audience and ourselves, to keep things fresh. The rest is up to the music.” Collectively, Mad Honey described its sound as “dream pop but a little darker” and said its songs are intended to “make people feel something.” Poolboy released its self-titled debut in June. In a video review, Make Oklahoma Weirder’s Evan Jarvicks said the “high-energy” album is one he really looks forward to “just rolling down the windows and blasting out of the car.” Spinster, fronted by The Annie Oakley’s Jo Babb, released its self-titled debut in June. In a previous interview with Oklahoma Gazette, Babb said Spinster’s plugged-in indie songs have “a little bit more energy” and might also be “a little bit more pissed off” than The Annie Oakley’s stately acoustic folk music. Audio Book Club released its debut EP What If We Got Buff? — which frontman Zach Pearson described in a previous Gazette interview as “straight-up rock music that doesn’t necessarily have a lot of pretty things” — earlier this month. Nunez said Oklahoma’s music scene has so many good bands that even a two-day festival leaves many worthy musicians out. “I think the lineup is going to be fun,” Nunez said. “It’s all bands we like. … If there’s anything I want to communicate, it’s that if there’s any bands out there that didn’t get called about this or whatever, it wasn’t that we weren’t interested; it’s just that some bands got thought of and the slots disappeared pretty quickly. A lot of times, I would just run into people and was like, ‘Hey, we’re going to do a back-to-school show if you want to do it,’ and I had a little list in my phone, and then, before I knew it, the list was kind of long.” Passes good for both days are $15. Visit opolis.org.

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LIVE MUSIC These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

Travis Linville, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Unlikely Blues Band, Bedlam Bar-B-Q. BLUES

SUNDAY, AUG. 25 Calliope Musicals/Hott Handz, Ponyboy.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 21

ROCK

Chad Carrier, Red Brick Bar. ACOUSTIC Edgar Cruz & The Brave Amigos, Othello’s Italian Restaurant. COVER

Avi Kaplan, Tower Theatre. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Eliza Gilkyson, The Blue Door. FOLK Jacobi Ryan/Thomas Who?, Hubbly Bubbly Hookah & Café. HIP-HOP John Carlton & Kyle Reid, The Winston. SINGER/SONGWRITER

The Living Deads, Lost Highway. PUNK

Hosty, The Deli. ROCK Kyle Rainer, Newcastle Casino. COUNTRY Oklahoma Virtuosi, Myriad Botanical Gardens. CLASSICAL

Terry Ware/Kyle Reid, The Depot. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Steve Crossley & Jerry Wilson, Louie’s Grill & Bar. ACOUSTIC

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Everything Is Not OK: Freak City Comes Alive If you are reading this, you can probably read other things like headlines, bills, the social media posts of friends and loved ones, etc., so odds are you have plenty to be upset about. What better way to blow off some steam than four nights of musical catharsis, headlined by Matrix (Thursday), BIB (Friday), Mass Arrest (Saturday; pictured) and Hirs Collective (Sunday) and featuring too many bands to list here without having to leave some out and giving them yet another thing to scream about. Get your earplugs ready 7 p.m. Thursday-Sunday at 89th Street – OKC, 8911 N. Western Ave. Tickets are $15-$55. Visit 89thstreetokc.com THURSDAY-SUNDAY Photo Miles Claibourn / provided

THURSDAY, AUG. 22

MONDAY, AUG. 26

Hot House Band, Othello’s Italian Restaurant.

Jason Hunt, Sean Cumming’s Irish Restaurant.

Shelly Phelps & Dylan Nagode, Jazmo’z Bourbon St. Café. ACOUSTIC

TUESDAY, AUG. 27

FRIDAY, AUG. 23

Country Clique, Friends Restaurant & Club.

Bad Jokes/Audio Book Club/Stepmom, The Deli. ROCK

Kyle Reid, Scratch Kitchen & Cocktails.

Darude/Crystal Vision/Darian Sparks, Tower Theatre. ELECTRONIC

Tejon Street Corner Thieves, Blue Note Lounge. BLUES/AMERICANA

Flock of Pigs/The Fey, Opolis. HIP-HOP/SOUL

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 28

JAZZ

Heartbreak Rodeo, Royal Bavaria Restaurant & Brewery. ACOUSTIC Index Paradox/Brett Landry & The Night Shifts, VZD’s Restaurant & Bar. ROCK Lisa & Laura, Full Circle Bookstore. ACOUSTIC Michael Fracasso/Terry Buffalo Ware, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITER

FOLK

COUNTRY

SINGER/SONGWRITER

Hosty, The R & J Lounge and Supper Club.

Wight Lighters, Hollywood Corners. ROCK

SATURDAY, AUG. 24 Ben & Alycia Goeke, Arcadia Round Barn. FOLK Levi Parham, Full Circle Bookstore. AMERICANA Mad Honey/Swim Fan/Burl, The Deli. ROCK/POP Randy Rogers Band, Frontier City. COUNTRY Spinster/Optional Hypocrisy, Second Wind Coffeehouse. ROCK Sweet Talkers/Shadow of Whales, Trolley Stop Record Shop. ROCK

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John Carlton & Kyle Reid, The Winston. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Rachel Lynch, Mary Eddy’s Kitchen & Lounge. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Rozlyn Zora Melton/Useless Randy, Second Wind Coffeehouse. SINGER/SONGWRITER Turnpike Troubadours/Jason Boland, The Zoo Amphitheatre. COUNTRY

THANK YOU

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

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CANNABIS

THE HIGH CULTURE

Evolving competition

Judging for Oklahoma’s first Cannabis Cup is well underway. But the competition has come a long way since its creation 30 years ago. By Matt Dinger

There is no bigger event in the world of cannabis than the High Times Cannabis Cup. Founded in 1988, Cannabis Cup became open to the public in 1994, former High Times senior editor and Cannabis Cup coordinator Bobby Black said. Until he left the company in 2015, Black attended all but two or three of the Cups. At the beginning of the decade, medical laws were already in effect in California, so Black said High Times started events in San Francisco and Los Angeles. “It was a whole new world doing them here in the States, but they were fun, and they were exciting and we were doing what we did best, which was operating in a gray area. That’s what High Times had always been. We were outlaws, and we were covering an illegal world that we all loved and were passionate about, and we walked that line. When we started doing the States, we didn’t know, at any moment, if it was going to get busted, if feds or local police were going to roll in and tell us we couldn’t do it, but luckily, we were able to pull it off and started doing it in more and more states more and more cities. Eventually, it got so big that we had to bring in event staff and logistical help because the staff of High Times was only, like, a dozen to 25 people at its height, so when you have 40,000 people coming to an event, you can’t really run it with 20 people. You need more help,” he said. “The early Cups, they were a lot of fun and they were just wild, almost like a circus in a way. We would have all these crazy hippie people that would be part of our troupe and everything, and it was kind of run by the seat of our pants. The judging in the competition was not done as scientifically as it should have been, I would say. There were lots of complaints over the years. Everybody accused it of being bought and rigged and all this other stuff, and there were certain years and certain time periods where there may have been an element of truth to that, and there are other time periods where it wasn’t true. But I will say this: It was only after it had come to the States, had been for a year or two in the States, that one of my former colleagues, Nico Escondido, one of the cultivation editors, came up with this system for judging that was very scientific. It was a computerized judging system that had algorithms that took into account weighting certain factors and stuff. And when we started 52

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employing the computerized judging, that was a huge step forward.” Black said back in the Amsterdam days, votes were still being tallied by hand even up until the awards ceremony began. That has all changed.

Judging system

Niki Weed-Gossett applied online to be a judge and was given a slot. Then her husband applied and was also selected. She is tasked with judging 40 sativa strains, while he has 37 indica strains. “I never thought that sampling weed would be like a full-time job. It is a fulltime job, and I’m over here, like, getting anxious because I’ve got like eight more days and like 30 strains to go,” WeedGossett said on Aug. 14. She went and picked up her entries, which totaled about 40 grams, at APCO Med the weekend prior. The cost was $4.20 for all the entries. Weed-Gossett said she purchased a new pipe and had rolled one joint so far, entering her notes in the online portal.

We were outlaws, and we were covering an illegal world that that we all loved and were passionate about, and we walked that line. Bobby Black “It’s got five different things on a scale of one to five. It’s like taste, aroma, texture, effectiveness and burnability. I’ve had one where I gave straight fives. One. And it deserved straight fives,” she said. “I’m finding the average is probably twos and threes and threes and fours, but there are there are definitely, obviously some cultivars out there and some growers that deserve some pretty good recognition for the weed that they grow because that Flower Sativa 7, I don’t even know who the fuck the grower is, but they got a home run from me.” This is Will Foster’s third time judging a Cannabis Cup event. He previously judged Cups in Los Angeles in 2007 and 2012 or 2013. “I didn’t apply. They just sent me a thing and told me I was an honorary judge. I’m judging all the pre-rolls,” he said. Foster has a long and storied history with cannabis cultivation. Growing can-

nabis in Oklahoma sent him to prison, and he spent years in California before returning to the state and founding Herblix. “When they first sent me my first score sheet, there were 35, but I guess only 26 of them made the cut or however they do it, or only 26 that made the actual deadline,” Foster said. “Maybe others signed up that just didn’t make the deadline. I don’t know. I didn’t ask. They’ve only contacted me via email.” He had made it through 14 of them as of Aug. 14. The deadline for the score sheet is Aug. 21. “They’re a mixture of everything, so I’ve got just plain pre-rolls and I have pre-rolls dipped in kief and then some dipped in distillate and rolled in oil,” he said. “There’s a large array of stuff rolled in cannabis leaves. Some people have been pretty creative.” Foster judges two a day and starts fresh with them. “I don’t smoke the whole thing, so I only take two or three hits and then I

Bobby Black | Photo Justin Cannabis / provided

put it out. And the ones that I’ve gave high ratings to, I’ve separated,” he said. “People will eventually get there. It’s a new thing that they’re doing, and a lot of people are probably growing a lot of Colorado and California strains, which they’re going to have problems with because those strains are more tailored for those environments, which don’t have the high humidity. Having the high humidity here is a whole different ballgame. A couple of the entries, I was surprised that a couple people even bothered entering them. I thought they were very low-grade. They didn’t have a good taste. But don’t get me wrong; there’s definitely some people that are doing a pretty damn good job.” Editor’s note: This is the third part in a series about the first Oklahoma Cannabis Cup.


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Peak altitude

Even though The Peak has been operating for less than a year, many consider it an elder in the industry. By Matt Dinger

When The Peak opened its doors last fall, it made sure to distinguish itself as a cannabis dispensary for those who are not inclined toward cannabis dispensaries.

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“We passed [State Question] 788 on June 26, 2018, and I kind of just thought to myself, ‘Man, somebody needs to come in and they need to do a dispensary experience that makes everybody that voted no think, “Maybe I was wrong. Maybe I should give this a chance,”’” owner Corbin Wyatt said. There are five locations of The Peak now open across the state, and they expect the newest location, which they have dubbed The Craft Dispensary, 6808 N. May Ave., to open later this month. It will feature a live grow, a show kitchen and a drive-thru. The Quail Springs location, 3000 W. Memorial Road, will open in September, and a 4,000 square-foot location in Bricktown is expected to be in business by the end of the year. “Our motto from the beginning was, ‘Built for the 43 percent that voted no, not the 57 [percent] that voted yes,’” Wyatt said. “Kind of dispel those preconceived notions about cannabis by building beautiful spaces that could sell anything. This doesn’t have to be the cannabis space. This could easily become a tea shop or something like that.” Wyatt took his idea first to some women who were operating a CBD business out of an Airstream trailer in a 16th Street Plaza District parking lot and re-

The Craft Dispensary location of The Peak, 6808 N. May Ave., is expected to open later this month. | Photo Alexa Ace

branded, opening the first branch of The Peak in November 2018. But well before the doors ever opened for business, Wyatt was entrenched in building the brand. “I wanted to do something different. I didn’t think that associating ourselves with CBD was going to be smart from the beginning. I wanted to be the first cannabis dispensary group in Oklahoma, not the first CBD-turned-cannabis dispensary group. So those girls had been selling CBD out of their Airstream, but whenever we moved over to that first store, we kind of ceased the CBD stuff. We still kept some around, but we waited and we did not market or brand ourselves as CBD at all,” he said. “The day 788 passed, we had one of the first dispensary signs up, right in the Plaza District. People were taking pictures of it, posting it on Snapchat, talking about it online. I saw this kind of cool public declaration that cannabis is here and we’re not going to be shy about it. We’re going to go to the heart of the districts that people like to go to, and we’re going to make an impact.” The Edmond location opened almost at exactly the same time as the one in Plaza District. “I think Edmond was a place where it’s a little bit of an older clientele, and I continued on page 59




THE HIGH CULTURE continued from page 56

CANNABIS

think that it was a place where if we could succeed there and if we could build an experience that held up to the standards that Edmond has — it needs to be posh, it needs to be clean and it needs to be sanitary — I knew that if we could do well in Edmond and if we could show them that we can build a great experience there, that we could build an experience to fit in anywhere in the state,” he said.

other people in the industry, and it seemed like we had this similar vision,” Wyatt said. “We wanted to do the same thing. We had a couple different places like the one on 23rd Street, for instance, and it just kind of ended up being a diverging of values and a diverging of how we wanted to work with our patients and display ourselves and how we wanted to do business.”

I wanted to be the first cannabis dispensary group in Oklahoma, not the first CBD-turned-cannabis dispensary group.

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Fresh business

All of these moves and branding decisions were pragmatic. Wyatt, 25, studied business before he set out on this venture.

“I graduated from UCO with a marketing degree and I was very, very fortunate to have a group out in California contract me to do some marketing work with their startup, and so they kind of just taught me the ins and outs of marketing,” Wyatt said. “They were great mentors to me, and I kind of applied what I saw them do with their startup to be very successful to a cannabis business here so we could get off the ground going in a very similar way, and it took off better than I ever imagined it would. Search engine optimization is actually my specialty, so I knew if there was one part of this that I could do right, it was getting us to the top of Google. I knew that our biggest competitors were going to be the Weedmaps and the Leaflys, so considering that we spend one 100th of what they’re spending on search engine optimization and stuff, and yet we still go head to head with them for those keywords, it’s a pretty cool feeling to see that.” Initially, The Peak was open to partnerships with dispensary owners who wanted to use the brand, some of whom are still in business under their umbrella, but it is shying away from that model now. “Early on, I started talking to some

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Corbin Wyatt, founder of The Peak | Photo Alexa Ace

The Peak has also just launched its line of house one-gram cartridges that retail for $40 and will be selling flower that it grows by the end of the year. “Whenever you’re in a new market that didn’t exist until a week before, and whenever there’s hardly any people growing or producing and even less people that are producing quality product, it’s kind of hard to be able to do a mass-scale operation when there’s just not enough supply. Kind of makes me wish we would have started with the growing and the processing side. I figured we needed to go bottom to top and start with dispensaries because you can always open and grow and you can always open a processing facility, but you can’t always get a retail client base,” Wyatt said. “There are a lot of people that reach out to me that are other dispensary owners or processors and growers, and since we’ve been here for so long, one of the original people still standing in the market, I get people all the time asking me, ‘Hey, in other industries, August is a little slower for retail. Is that the case here?’ And I’m like, ‘Guys, I haven’t been open in August before. This is my first August. I don’t know much about August. When we get back to November, I can kind of speak to that. Let me get back on my home turf.’ It is crazy that there are so many people that I think see The Peak as having been around forever now, just because we’ve been here for so long, but we’re just as fresh-faced as everybody else and learning right alongside them. It’s weird how much as a person I’ve grown and matured in the past year. It’s been one of the most odd years in my entire life, to say the least.” Visit thepeakok.com.

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Review: After a scent test of a number of Lotus Gold strains, this one immediately called out to me. I generally have the best cannabis experiences with chemovars that contain limonene. Whether they are supposed to be sativas, indicas or hybrids, I always get a great, clear-headed energy boost, so I have learned to follow my nose. I was not led astray. It ground up rather easily, and while the smoke did provide a bit of a burn, it was not enough to make me cough. A small amount provided a

Chupacabra from Lotus Gold | Photo Alexa Ace

bit of focus and lifted my mood, but after finishing the bowl, I was ready to start burning through a to-do list that I had only made small advances on in the hours preceding. This is definitely a strain I will be keeping around for those days when talking myself out of bed proves particularly difficult. While Leafly contend that this 50/50 hybrid cross of Hawaiian Romulan and Island Sweet Skunk “looks like a sativa and acts like an indica,” I found the opposite to be true for the effects of this batch of Chupacabra. Cannabis effects vary wildly from patient to patient based on a multitude of factors, including THC tolerance, brain chemistry and personal taste. This review is based on the subjective experience of one patient.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Homework: Poet Muriel Rukeyser said, “The world is made of stories, not atoms.” I’d add, “You are made of stories, too.” What’s your favorite story that you’re made of? FreeWillAstrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19)

It’s not cost-efficient to recycle plastic. Sorting and processing the used materials to make them available for fresh stuff is at least as expensive as creating new plastic items from scratch. On the other hand, sending used plastic to a recycling center makes it far less likely that it will end up in the oceans and waterways, harming living creatures. So in this case, the short-term financial argument in favor of recycling is insubstantial, whereas the moral argument is strong. I invite you to apply a similar perspective to your upcoming decisions.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

African American slaves suffered many horrendous deprivations. For example, it was illegal for them to learn to read. Their oppressors feared that educated slaves would be better equipped to agitate for freedom, and took extreme measures to keep them illiterate. Frederick Douglass was one slave who managed to beat the ban. As he secretly mastered the art of reading and writing, he came upon literature that ultimately emboldened him to escape his “owners” and flee to safety. He became one of the nineteenth century’s most powerful abolitionists, producing reams of influential writing and speeches. I propose that we make Douglass your inspiring role model for the coming months. I think you’re ready to break the hold of a certain curse—and go on to achieve a gritty success that the curse had prevented you from accomplishing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

For twenty-five years, businessman Don Thompson worked for the McDonald’s fast food company, including three years as its CEO. During that time, he oversaw the sale and consumption of millions of hamburgers. But in 2015, he left McDonald’s and became part of Beyond Meat, a company that sells vegan alternatives to meat. I could see you undergoing an equally dramatic shift in the coming months, Gemini: a transition into a new role

that resembles but is also very different from a role you’ve been playing. I urge you to step up your fantasies about what that change might entail. CANCER (June 21-July 22) “The learning process is something you can incite, literally incite, like a riot,” wrote author Audre Lorde. As an astrologer I would add this nuance: although what Lourde says is true, some phases of your life are more favorable than others to seek deep and rapid education. For example, the coming weeks will bring you especially rich teachings if you incite the learning process now.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

The American idiom “stay in your lane” has come to mean “mind your own business,” and usually has a pejorative sense. But I’d like to expand it and soften it for your use in the coming weeks. Let’s define it as meaning “stick to what you’re good at and know about” or “don’t try to operate outside your area of expertise” or “express yourself in ways that you have earned the right to do.” Author Zadie Smith says that this is good advice for writers. “You have to work out what it is you can’t do, obscure it, and focus on what works,” she attests. Apply that counsel to your own sphere or field, Leo.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

them. A thorough knowledge of the night sky’s stars was a crucial aid. Skill at reading the ever-changing ocean currents always proved valuable. Another helpful trick was to take birds on the ships as collaborators. While at sea, if the birds flew off and returned, the sailors knew there was no land close by. If the birds didn’t return, chances were good that land was near. I bring this to your attention, Libra, because I think it’s an excellent time to gather a number of different navigational tools for your upcoming quest. One won’t be enough.

how he described his relationship with his non-rational way of knowing. He said, “It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It’s my partner.” I bring this up, Capricorn, because the coming weeks will be a favorable time to celebrate and cultivate your own intuition. You may generate amazing results as you learn to trust it more and figure out how to deepen your relationship with it.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

What do you want from the allies who aren’t your lovers? What feelings do you most enjoy while you’re in the company of your interesting, non-romantic companions? For instance, maybe you like to be respected and appreciated. Or perhaps what’s most important to you is to experience the fun of being challenged and stimulated. Maybe your favorite feeling is the spirit of collaboration and comradeship. Or maybe all of the above. In any case, Scorpio, I urge you to get clear about what you want—and then make it your priority to foster it. In the coming weeks, you’ll have the power to generate an abundance of your favorite kind of non-sexual togetherness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Yisrael Kristal was a Polish Jew born under the sign of Virgo in 1903. His father was a scholar of the Torah, and he began studying Judaism and learning Hebrew at age three. He lived a long life and had many adventures, working as a candle-maker and a candy-maker. When the Red Army liberated the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1945, Kristal emerged as one of the survivors. He went on to live to the age of 113. Because of the chaos of World War I, he had never gotten to do his bar mitzvah when he’d turned thirteen. So he did it much later, in his old age. I foresee a comparable event coming up soon in your life, Virgo. You will claim a reward or observe a milestone or collect a blessing you weren’t able to enjoy earlier.

As the CEO of the clothes company Zappos, Sagittarius entrepreneur Tony Hsieh is worth almost a billion dollars. If he chose, he could live in a mansion by the sea. Yet his home is a 200-square-foot, $48,000 trailer in Las Vegas, where he also keeps his pet alpaca. To be clear, he owns the entire trailer park, which consists of 30 other trailers, all of which are immaculate hotbeds of high-tech media technology where interesting people live. He loves the community he has created, which is more important to him than status and privilege. “For me, experiences are more meaningful than stuff,” he says. “I have way more experiences here.” I’d love to see you reaffirm your commitment to priorities like his in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. It’ll be a favorable time to do so.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Sailors have used compasses to navigate since the eleventh century. But that tool wasn’t enough to guide

Medical researcher Jonas Salk developed a successful polio vaccine, so he had a strong rational mind. Here’s

Aquarian environmentalist Edward Abbey once formulated a concise list of his requirements for living well. “One must be reasonable in one’s demands on life,” he wrote. “For myself, all that I ask is: 1. accurate information; 2. coherent knowledge; 3. deep understanding; 4. infinite loving wisdom; 5. no more kidney stones, please.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now would be an excellent time for you to create your own tally of the Five Crucial Provisions. Be bold and precise as you inform life about your needs.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

“We may be surprised at whom God sends to answer our prayers,” wrote author Janette Oke. I suspect that observation will apply to you in the coming weeks. If you’re an atheist or agnostic, I’ll rephrase her formulation for you: “We may be surprised at whom Life sends to answer our entreaties.” There’s only one important thing you have to do to cooperate with this experience: set aside your expectations about how help and blessings might appear.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes /daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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1 Share on social media 5 Blackens 10 Screen org.? 13 William H. Bonney ____ Billy the Kid 16 Mathematician taught by Bernoulli 18 Most populous nation not in the U.N. 19 Best Actress winner of 1999 and 2004 22 It’s just part of the act 23 Surname of Princess Leia 24 Midwest college town 25 “Curiouser and curiouser …” 28 Bother 29 Grand onstage 30 Place to swim or work out, informally 31 Business that has cut prices 32 Entertaining 34 Went over the limit, say 36 Major name in petrol 39 Language from which “jackal” and “jasmine” come 40 La Traviata composer 41 Jeer 43 Bit on a book jacket 46 Part of a three-in-a-row 47 Greasy in the Pro Football Hall of Fame 49 In-group at school 52 Preach the gospel 55 Rip off 56 Longtime All Things Considered host Robert 57 Screenwriter Ephron 58 Anchor, e.g. 59 Chinese liquor made from sorghum 62 “Consequently …” 63 Verbal alternative to a shoulder tap 65 Beginnings of ideas 66 Internet content typically viewed alone 68 Italian scooter brand 71 What 1-Down has that 1-Across lacks 73 Part of the resistance? 74 Some pickup info on rideshare apps: Abbr. 78 Stir 80 Man’s name that means “my God” 81 What’s depicted by the circled letters in 41-/49-Across 84 … in 52-Across 87 Rehearse a play from start to finish, in theater lingo 88 Swimmer in a Himeji Castle moat 89 Nursery floor hazard 90 Unfamiliar with 91 Informal “What if …?” 93 Alter, as a manuscript 95 Bird’s home 96 Bird’s home 97 Places for speakers 98 Common people 102 Close up, say 104 Stylish ballroom dance 105 Investigation 106 … in 25-Across 112 Brown powder 114 French cake 115 Nashville university, familiarly 116 … and in 19-Across

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