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INSIDE COVER P.15 Current news can create a certain

amount of ambivalence around the Fourth of July, but it is possible to view the nation’s birthday as an opportunity to celebrate the country’s better attributes and take comfort in the rockets’ red glare at multiple metro events. By Jeremy Martin Cover by Tiffany McKnight Photo by Alexa Ace

NEWS 4 CITY We Got This: A Fundraiser for

An Original Music Docuseries

S T R EA M O N L I N E

PLAYITLOUDSHOW.COM

Kids at the Douglass Recreation Center

6 CITY elementary school STEM centers 8 CITY Oklahoma City Boulevard

intersection moving

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CHICKEN-FRIED NEWS

BILLY BOB THORNTON

EAT & DRINK 10 REVIEW Olde Orchard Restaurant

11 FEATURE Black Foodie Summit at

Bistro 46 Restaurant & Grille

12 GAZEDIBLES patriotic food

ARTS & CULTURE 15 COVER Fourth of July events

16 ART Oklahoma City Tattoo Arts

Convention at Cox Convention Center 17 COMEDY Stand Up Science

18 OKG SHOP Posh Beauty Bar & Lash

18

Studio

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19 OKG LIFESTYLE Andy Moore 20 CALENDAR

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THE HIGH CULTURE 28 CANNABIS Top Shelf Health &

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CIT Y

NEWS

Summer recreation

Jabee hosts a concert to raise money for Douglass Recreation Center. By Miguel Rios Jabee Williams feels called to use his platform to stand up for issues when others might not be able to speak out. That is why he hosts a fundraising concert Sunday to help cover the cost of recreational programming for children in northeast Oklahoma City. Jabee spoke with Ward 7 councilwoman Nikki Nice about summer programs at Douglass Recreation Center that went from free to $5-$10 per month. Though Parks & Recreation officials told Oklahoma Gazette that prices did not increase this year, community members still worry about families, particularly those with multiple children, being able to pay for summer programs.

Jabee Williams hosts a concert to raise money for an OKC recreation center. | Photo Alexa Ace

“I went over to Douglass Center and talked to the director there and got more information on the programs and what was needed. And I was like, ‘Why do we need to sit down and get upset? Let’s just get the money so kids can go,’” Jabee said. “They work really hard, and I just want them to be able to stay focused on providing and getting those programs for those kids and not stressing over if they have the resources to do it.” Jabee talked with other members in the community and scheduled We Got This: A Fundraiser for Kids at the Douglass Center. Starting at 7 p.m. at Tower Theatre, the concert features Jabee, Poetry & Chill, Tony Foster Jr., L.T.Z., Trip G, NO_DNA, Malorey Rose, K 2 E U C E and various DJ sets. Grand Gentlemen is one of the sponsors, Malcolm Tubbs and J Poe will 4

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host and mayor David Holt and councilwoman Nice will also make appearances. “Those are all people in the community who are doing stuff, and so the sponsorship is more or less just everybody getting together and pooling resources where we need it,” Jabee said. “It just makes sense to pool our resources together and do it together. One of the guys from the Grand Gents, he actually works at Douglass Center, so that was just a perfect fit to get them on board to get help with spreading the word.” Admission to the concert is free with any donation, and Jabee is hopeful the event will reach his goal of $5,000.

Recreation programs

Jabee remembers going to recreation centers “all the time during the summer.” “It’s just important for kids to have things to do in the summertime, and a lot of activities that they have are really state of the art,” Jabee said. “They have a film class where they teach kids how to make short films, they have art class, creative writing classes — all these things that, if they had whenever I was around, I might be a whole lot further by now. I just think it’s a great opportunity for these kids to get plugged in to something that’s really productive and be around people who care about them and love them and have a lot of great things for them to do because that’s what they got over there.” The city’s 14 recreation centers provide programs throughout the year, but Stacey Hamm, Parks & Recreation marketing and public information manager, said prices have not increased. She said recreation centers are free and open to the public during their specific business hours, but structured programming has always had a cost per month. “We actually have a summer program called Kidz Rock, and yes, it is $10 a month for kids to participate,” she said. “They have organized activities, structured activities for the kids to do while they’re there. We do have parents fill out paperwork to go along with this program because we provide lunch and a snack, so we need to know if the kids are allergic to anything. … The kids are checked in when they come in every day, and they also check out when they leave at the end of the day with their parent and/or guardian. So that $10 basically guarantees the parent a little bit more security.” Children who attend recreation centers and are not enrolled in programming are free to come and go and are allowed to use the facility. However,

children enrolled in a program follow structured activities and must be checked in or out by a parent or guardian. Hamm is unsure why people think the prices were increased but thinks there was some miscommunication with community members. However, she said the department is excited to work with Jabee to ensure the money raised is used in the best way. “It would be wonderful for Douglass Recreational Center and the community. We always welcome any individuals who would like to make donations toward programming for kids at any recreation center,” she said. “Let’s say Jabee wants that $5,000 to go towards the Kidz Rock program only. It’s $10 a month, so that is 500 kids. … We would work with Jabee to determine specifically how he would like to see those monies be used.” Hamm said the Parks & Recreation fall activities guide will be available online Aug. 5 with a hard copy available Aug. 12 at all recreation centers. It will include listings of all free programs and activities as well as programming with fees. Visit okc.gov/parks.

Standing up

An outspoken activist for racial and social justice, Jabee said his platform allows him to advocate for things he believes in. “There’s just so much going on and there’s so many people sitting back not doing anything or saying anything. And if I have a platform or a voice or if I’m able to say something, then I’m going to say it,” he said. “The cool thing is I don’t really have to answer to anybody. I don’t have to worry about, ‘Well, if I say this or I tweet this, then my job could be in jeopardy.’ I don’t have that problem, so I can really speak my mind and really stand up for some things that a lot of people aren’t able to stand up to even if they want to.”

Douglass Recreation Center is free and open to the public 12:30-6 p.m. weekdays this summer, but some programming has a fee. | Photo Alexa Ace

He said he sees things happening throughout the city that he just cannot ignore. Recently, Jabee has been outspoken about the killing of Isaiah Lewis, an unarmed black teenager shot by an Edmond police officer. He criticized Edmond police again for being able to arrest a white man who was shooting at them while on LSD. “There are things ... going on in our city with schools and racism and just so much crap. It’s like, how can you ignore it? How can you not say something? How can you not be somebody who wants to see things change and wants to see things be better for the kids in your community? It’s so important,” he said. “That’s the only way I know to be; that’s how my mama raised me.” Despite his community activism, Jabee does not see a future in politics. He would much rather bring people together to educate them on the importance of voting than campaign for their vote. “People always ask me that, but I don’t think that’s my lane. I can’t tell the future, but … I want to be able to say what I want to say and not worry about losing my job,” he said. “I just feel like where I’m at right now is a good place to be. I am getting older and those things can come up, but today, nah, not at all.” To make a donation, visit towertheatreokc.com.

We Got This: A Fundraiser for Kids at the Douglass Center 7 p.m. Sunday Tower Theatre 425 NW 23rd St. towertheatreokc.com | 405-708-6937 Free with donation


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NEWS The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools hopes to install STEM centers in all 33 elementary schools, providing students access to technology like 3D printers. | Photo Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation / provided

CIT Y

Strong STEM

The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools wants to place science, technology, engineering and mathematics centers in all 33 elementary schools. By Miguel Rios

The Foundation for Oklahoma City Public Schools (FOKCPS) is seeking community partners to help place science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) centers in all of the district’s elementary schools before classes start Aug. 14. Though foundation partners have contributed more than half the money needed, there is still a significant gap to fill. The initiative is part of Pathway to Greatness, a plan to consolidate and reorganize the district’s schools to provide more educational equity. “It also started when the foundation worked to connect employers and funders who are really interested in STEM education with Oklahoma City Public Schools (OKCPS) and trying to figure out how to connect our partners with what the district’s greatest priorities are,” said FOKCPS president Mary Mélon. “Oklahoma City Public Schools said to us, ‘STEM education is critically important to start in elementary school because we need to give our kids early and consistent and frequent exposure to STEM education to get them passionate and interested as they get older.’” Initially, the foundation planned to take on the project and acquire or develop anything needed to set up the STEM centers, but then they found out about Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation, a Maryland-based nonprofit with various programs to help at-risk youth throughout the country. “Our mission is to help provide opportunities to at-risk kids to help enable 6

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them to become successful, productive, contributing, healthy adults,” said Steve Salem, Ripken Foundation president. “In today’s world, STEM is, especially for young people, a key component of that. Included in that is helping to provide opportunities for careers, to make a living and to have skills necessary to do so. STEM is important, just as nutrition is important and fitness, which are some other initiatives we have.” Ripken Foundation developed an initiative that provides everything needed for a STEM center, and in partnership with Devon Energy, already placed a center at Mark Twain Elementary. Through that connection, Mélon and OKCPS superintendent Sean McDaniel formed a partnership with Ripken. “It was exactly what we needed, and so we formed a partnership. They provide not only all of the materials and furniture and storage and all of the product that’s needed for the STEM centers, they have developed curriculums and they have developed professional development that’s for our teachers. So it’s just the perfect solution,” Mélon said. “It fits with Pathway to Greatness because it’s a trade-up for all of our schools, and it fits with their focus on equity, which is making sure that all of our kids have equitable opportunities because every school will have the same thing. There won’t be one side of town that has someMary Mélon hopes to close the gap on fundraising as soon as possible to have STEM centers in every elementary school by the first day of classes. | Photo Miguel Rios

thing different than the other side of the district, which is really important.” FOKCPS and the school district committed to pay $30,000 for each of the 33 elementary schools to Ripken Foundation. As of last week, they raised $540,000, so they want to close the $450,000 gap as soon as possible. “They’re not the funder; they’re the solution provider, but they’re giving us so much value added. So really, it’s probably closer to $50,000 worth of value that we’re getting [per school], but the cost to us is $30,000,” Mélon said. “We really wanted to push out the exciting announcement about this partnership in hopes of hitting some people to say, ‘Oh we want to help with that.’” So far, Tinker Air Force Base, Chesapeake Energy, Devon Energy, Inasmuch Foundation and Boeing, among others, have made “generous commitments.” Mélon said some of those partners will have naming rights for the centers.

Future workforce

Before the partnership with FOKCPS, Salem said Ripken placed about 20 STEM centers throughout the country in places like Maryland, Virginia and Texas. However, this partnership will mark the first time Ripken places STEM centers in an entire school district. Salem said this was always the foundation’s STEM initiative goal and hopes other school districts can emulate the model. “Our goal is to positively impact as many kids as we can help to make their lives a little better, and these are kids who come from some tough circumstances. In too many areas, these kids have been left behind. Whether it’s access to STEM or nutrition, these kids aren’t given the same opportunities,” Salem said. “That’s what we’re trying to provide. We’re not trying to do it as a one-off or a two-off, but that’s some-

times what it takes. … We’re just trying to help these kids the best we can while we can, and we hope the Oklahoma City model will lead to other school systems.” Ripken Foundation has cultivated its STEM initiative throughout its inception, so Salem said it is able to handle everything necessary. “We’re able to, from soup to nuts, put in a STEM center with all the necessary training, with 3D printers, furniture … including travel, installation, training, all the hardware and software,” he said. “We do it all, so it’s a nice service we’re able to provide. In Oklahoma City, I think what attracted them to us was not just the pricing … but that we take care of everything. We work will all the vendors. We oversee the shipping and the delivery. Everything is covered.” OKCPS elementary schools’ STEM centers will be furnished with a workbench, several tables and colorful stools and chairs. They will also each receive six Chromebooks, a 3D printer and various robotics like circuits, several kinds of programmable robots, programmable computer chips and electronic building blocks. Additionally, each school will get a $100 Home Depot gift card to purchase storage that best suits each center. “Anyone that has employers that work in those kinds of fields — science, technology, engineering or math — they care about the workforce of the future, and Oklahoma City Public School is huge — 46,000 kids. We need to be doing everything we can to make sure that they have every opportunity to be successful,” Mélon said. “Even if they don’t choose science, technology, engineering or math, being part of the STEM centers crosses all curriculum. It helps kids learn to read better, it’s really important for kids to use as a creative outlet, it very much develops their ability to work as a team and collaborate because a lot of the projects are team-based, and it also develops their critical thinking skills. … It doesn’t matter what workforce you’re developing; you want people that can think critically and be independent thinkers.” Visit okckids.com/donate.


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NEWS

CIT Y

The current Oklahoma City Boulevard intersection in Bricktown is being moved to the west of U-Haul. | Photo Alexa Ace

Boulevard crossroads An Oklahoma City Boulevard intersection is being moved, and city officials are seeking the most efficient way to reconfigure streets. By Miguel Rios

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sponse, the city offered us just over $1 million. Essentially asking a business to spend its own money — let alone almost $4 million — to accommodate a city-requested project that would hurt business and inconvenience U-Haul customers is mindboggling. And wrong.” The city then filed eminent domain proceedings but withdrew them before fair market value was determined.

New plans

Now, the city plans to move the Oklahoma City Boulevard intersection west of the U-Haul facility and find a way to connect it to Reno Avenue. Miller said one of the options is to rebuild Oklahoma Avenue directly north to a new intersection on Reno Avenue. “We have two or three different options, and there have been no decisions made on that,” she said. “[Another option] is we can connect it to Second Street and take out a couple of the turns — but you’d still have to turn on Second — and leave Oklahoma Avenue where it’s at. ... The other is possibly extending Oklahoma [Avenue] all the way up and leaving that portion of Oklahoma [Avenue] in place for the condo owners. There are a lot of options; we just don’t have anything definite yet.” The city signed a contract in May with engineering firm Smith Roberts Baldischwiler for planning and construction up to $1.4 million to move the interThe current Oklahoma Avenue will be replaced by parking lots, and the new Oklahoma Avenue will connect Reno Avenue with the boulevard on the west side of U-Haul. | Image Smith Roberts Baldischwiler / provided

Reno Avenue Oklahoma Ave

The Oklahoma City Boulevard intersection in lower Bricktown is being moved. City officials are also weighing various options to make it more efficient for drivers, which could include relocating Oklahoma Avenue. Both reconfigurations would cost the city up to $1.4 million. Originally, officials planned to extend Oklahoma Avenue straight through the U-Haul Moving & Storage of Bricktown parking lot to connect with the original boulevard intersection. The city was to acquire the parking lot property but did not do so before the intersection was constructed. Currently, drivers must detour around the U-Haul facility, 100 SE Second St., to reach Oklahoma Avenue. “When [Oklahoma Department of Transportation] was in plan development, they moved that intersection to there. They had to construct it; they couldn’t wait on it to get the right-ofway,” said Debbie Miller, assistant Public Works director. “It was on their schedule. We wanted to extend Oklahoma from the boulevard all the way up to Reno, and a portion of Oklahoma Avenue is constructed there at Second Street, which is north of U-Haul. We had gone through negotiations to purchase their parking lot, and things fell through. So since it fell through, we’re trying to find a different route that will still work.” U-Haul representatives previously told media they were negotiating with the city for two years but hit a roadblock when it came to discussing money. “Construction costs for what the city is asking of our store will approach $5 million,” wrote a U-Haul representative in a 2017 letter to Public Works. “In re-

section and relocate Oklahoma Avenue. “Oklahoma Avenue south from Reno Avenue to Oklahoma City Boulevard is impaired by the location of private property,” reads the resolution passed by Oklahoma City Council in May. “This project will provide for the relocation of Oklahoma Avenue through the exchange of property and easements, closing and construction of public streets, and the relocation of drives and access to Reno Avenue and Oklahoma City Boulevard.” Conceptual renderings by Smith Roberts Baldischwiler show the current Oklahoma Avenue replaced by parking lots. The new Oklahoma Avenue would connect Reno Avenue with the boulevard on the east side of U-Haul. However, The Centennial Lofts Owners Association expressed opposition to the proposal and hired attorney Eric Groves to send a letter to the city with their concerns. The letter states the street reconfiguration would force residents to enter their property through Reno Avenue, which gets congested during events. “The taking away of S. Oklahoma Avenue would be unsafe in their minds and inconvenient to say the least. They were never consulted about this by anybody,” Groves told Oklahoma Gazette.

“The conceptual plan was done without consultation with the association or its representatives, so they’re not happy about that. … I’m retained to investigate the manner, make recommendations to the association, and we have that underway right now.” At least one meeting with Centennial homeowners association members and Public Works officials has taken place since the city’s plans were released. Groves was not there but said the association “did not come away from that meeting with a totally comprehensive and clear understanding of what’s going on.” Miller also said they have been in conversations with them but have not made any concrete decisions. “We haven’t really gotten to that point yet,” she said. “We have recently found out that they were involved in this, and so we’ve kind of put the brakes on until we get them pulled in and take care of their issues. … We really haven’t decided on which direction to go because we do like to work with all the property owners and take their concerns into account.” Miller said they have no definite schedule on the project but want to focus on moving the intersection to finish the ongoing landscaping project in that area. The project is funded by a 2007 general obligation bond for street reconstruction with an authorized amount of $2.5 million. “We have to use 85 percent or use a portion of it and have the project declared complete,” Miller said. “We would use the amount that we could, and if the project is complete, we can declare it complete and the remaining money would be surplus.” Surplus money would go to another bond project of the same type. Miller said they could technically consider the project complete once the intersection is moved, but they feel the need to put more work and make the connection to Reno Avenue more efficient.

New Intersection

CENTENNIAL CONDOS

New Oklahoma Ave U-HAUL New Intersection

HARKINS THEATRES

Current Intersection Oklahoma City Blvd.


chicken

friedNEWS

Fine, fine

G.O.A.T. lawn care

If you have been avoiding paying fines for traffic violations in Oklahoma City for two years or more, congratulations — your strong-arm negotiation tactics are finally paying off. Beginning this month, an Oklahoma City Council-approved amnesty program will allow drivers to resolve old citations and court fees, including failure to appear charges, for less than the original fine in some cases. Drivers citing financial difficulties might be eligible to have their costs waived or reduced after a hearing with a judge. “People who have dragged their feet to pay a basic traffic ticket or show up for court will be able to settle for $155, a reduction from $613,” The Associated Press reported. “The cost of the same ticket for someone who pays on time is $172.” If you are a non-foot-dragger prone to paying your traffic tickets on time, you might be feeling like a sucker right now, unless you consider not having a warrant out for your arrest for two years worth $17. If you have spent the past two years either riding the bus or riding dirty, you might be tempted to think this is some kind of trap, but according to the City of Oklahoma City’s website, municipal court administrator LaShawn Thompson said the amnesty program is simply intended to allow Oklahoma drivers to get back on the road and on with their lives. “Beyond encouraging compliance with enforcement of our ordinances, this makes sure an old speeding ticket isn’t the reason someone has trouble getting to work or to school,” Thompson said. “People can close the case and it won’t be hanging over their head anymore.” You can pay tickets or request a financial difficulty hearing by calling 405297-3898 or visiting the Municipal Court Customer Service Window, 701 Couch Drive, 7 a.m.-7 p.m. every day but holidays, and on behalf of the millennial-ish members of the Chicken-Fried News staff, we need everyone to keep this same live-and-let-live energy when discussing student loan forgiveness.

Kings road

There very well might come a day in our future where you are hailing a rideshare app on Kings of Leon Lane in downtown Oklahoma City. Mayor David Holt has submitted the proposal to honor the rock band, which opens Scissortail Park Sept. 27 with a free concert, by renaming a stretch of E. California Avenue, according to The Oklahoman. This section of the street sits between two other celebrity-named thoroughfares that honor World Series hero Joe Carter and guitarist Charlie Christian and runs in front of Bricktown Events Center, where the band played two sold-out performances before returning to Oklahoma City in 2017 to play Chesapeake Energy Arena. The days of guitar-based rock bands rising to the level of fame needed to play arenas are dwindling. Hip-hop and R&B have long passed the genre in popularity, and while many other rock bands are cloistered in subcategories once reserved for jazz fans, the Followills—brothers Caleb, Jared and Nathan and cousin Matthew—have retained their crossover appeal. Their connection to Oklahoma was documented in the documentary Talihina Sky: The Story of Kings of Leon, which premiered at deadCenter Film

Festival, and Caleb Followill discussed the brothers’ early years that included only have enough money for a single pair of pants. Holt pointed out on Twitter that the band was quick to hold a benefit concert for relief efforts following the May 2013 tornadoes and Oklahoma City is the band’s adopted home. That is all well and good; Kings of Leon should be commended for its success and work it has done for the community, but is the city skipping hometown heroes Color Me Badd to honor them?

Oklahoma City’s most unusual, cutest and — face it — coolest employees are back in action. That’s right; our very own goat herd lawn crew is back to clearing out overgrowth at Hefner Canal. The city posted on Twitter that its “little grass munchers” were clearing out invasive species along the canal that transports water from Lake Overholser to Lake Hefner. The goats, which are fairly popular on their Facebook and Twitter pages, are able to climb steep areas and clear out vegetation and plants that would be dangerous for humans. Frankly, we are not completely surprised goats make better city employees than some humans. Sure, they can be a little stubborn and grumpy, but they work for the government. Can you blame them? “Our first herd we leased from @LangstonU as a trial,” the city wrote in a tweet. “Two years later, the City puchased [sic] its own herd and has been managing them ever since. Lots of perks to this job: allyou-eat buffet and naps!”

The city started out with 19 goats from Langston University, but it now owns 61 goats and two goat-herding bodyguard donkeys that keep predators away. We hate to be jealous of goats and donkeys, but all 63 animals receive more adequate health care — getting tended to daily and regular veterinary checkups — than many Oklahomans. Honestly, besides having to eat grass and poison ivy, this actually sounds like a pretty good gig. We have to hand it to OKC; it found an environmentally friendly, chemicalfree way to tend to overgrown grass in a difficult area to control. And it continues to develop the herd in an environmentally conscious and animal-friendly way. This time we are surprised but not disappointed.

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REVIEW

EAT & DRINK

Comfort Orchard

Celebrating 45 years, Olde Orchard in Bethany delivers from-scratch comfort food and terrific pie. By Jacob Threadgill

Olde Orchard Restaurant 7339 NW 23rd St., Bethany 405-787-3332 WHAT WORKS: Service is quick and friendly and everything is made from scratch. WHAT NEEDS WORK: Don’t mess with tradition. TIP: Save room for dessert.

In honor of our issue that releases the week of the country’s celebration of independence, I wanted to find a restaurant serving American classics from scratch. I lucked out, and all I had to do was take a trip west on 23rd Street until I got to Bethany. Celebrating 45 years in service, Olde Orchard Restaurant, 7339 NW 23rd St., in Bethany is a classic family-run restaurant done right. Founded by Richard Conrady as a place where his seven kids could eat and eventually get some experience, it has stayed in the family. Youngest daughter Amy Franklin is Olde Orchard’s operating owner. “We put our heart into it,” Franklin told Discover Oklahoma. Open 6 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday-Saturday, Olde Orchard makes its meals fresh, and service could not be swifter. Before I left for my first trip to Olde Orchard, and I believe my first Bethany experience, I wasn’t sure how long it would take to get out there. I realized it’s a lot closer than anticipated. Once you’re in the Windsor District of Oklahoma City, you’re basically almost to Bethany. There’s something heartening about pulling into the parking lot and looking at the sign to

find a burned-out “a” in Orchard and missing “u” in Restaurant. It tells me it’s the kind of place that doesn’t need fancy signage to attract customers. Stepping foot into the restaurant really does feel like going to your grandparent’s house—minus Fox News blaring in the corner. There are a lot of kitschy knickknacks lining the booth, but I found the fact that they’ve hung a lot of historic Oklahoma pictures from the state’s founding fascinating.

I understand both sides of the great mayonnaise debate, but there are certain dishes in which it’s necessary. Guests seat themselves, and I cozied into a booth that displayed a photo of downtown Guthrie in 1893 while it was still the territorial capital. I temporarily got lost in thought as I looked at a photo that showed a crowd of people teeming for a market, and I wondered how exactly they built those buildings just a few years after the land run. The waiter bringing our orders to the table awakened me from my daydream. Hadn’t I just placed the order a few minutes before? I did, but that’s how quick service is at Olde Orchard. The restaurant doesn’t sacrifice quality for speedy service. I expected everything might be frozen, but the fries

that came with my burger were handcut and warm and crispy. Franklin told Discover Oklahoma that they don’t use frozen beef for burgers. My wife enjoyed the burger while I munched on a few of her fries; she gave them extra points for using mustard as the only condiment, which I also like. The acidity of the vinegar in the mustard cuts through the greasy burger. I had a craving that day, and the only thing that could fill that void was a turkey club sandwich. Sometimes called a clubhouse sandwich, it is thought the double-decker sandwich cut into quarters originated at Union Club of the City of New York, which is still operational, in 1889—the same year sooners got the jump on the Oklahoma Land Run. I understand both sides of the great mayonnaise debate, but there are certain dishes in which it’s necessary. I prefer to make an oil-based coleslaw or use yogurt when making tuna salad, but I’ve got to have mayo on a club sandwich. Olde Orchard delivered the Goldilocks ratio of mayonnaise on the sandwich — not too much and not too little. Combined with crispy bacon and thick-cut turkey — I wouldn’t surprise me if is cooked in-house — my craving was more than filled. I opted for potato salad instead of fries with the sandwich and was happy to see I also got a side of potato chips. The potato salad was freshly made, if slightly sweet from the relish, but the potato crumbled for easy bites that went down cool on a hot day. Olde Orchard serves breakfast all day, in true diner fashion. Its breakfast offerings are somewhat nondescript. It has six kinds of omelets alongside egg

A turkey club sandwich with potato salad and chips | Photo Jacob Threadgill

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top A cheeseburger with french fries at Olde Orchard Restaurant bottom Reese’s Pie with peanut butter and chocolate layers with housemade pie crust | Photos Jacob Threadgill

plates that offer grilled Polish sausage, grilled pork loin and chicken-fried steak to go with hashbrowns, home fries, fruit or grits, biscuits and gravy or toast. It has recently added a thick Belgian waffle to the menu with pancakes and French toast. One of the restaurant’s signature items appears to be stuffed baked potatoes, which are only available Monday-Friday. Fried catfish, which is cut and battered in-house, is another popular entrée, and Olde Orchard offers all-you-can-eat catfish 5-8 p.m. Fridays for $10.99. Smothered liver and onions is a dish I’ve never actually tried, but there must be a reason it has stood the test of time. If you’re looking for an alternative to chicken-fried steak, I’d recommend the breaded pork loin. There are certainly restaurants where dessert isn’t necessary. I’d urge you to save room for some of Olde Orchard’s homemade pie. I’m staunchly in the pie over cake corner because I love crust. When I was a kid, I’d eat all of the filling from a double-crust pie just so I could save the crust for last. I tried a piece of the Reese’s Pie, which features a peanut butter layer topped by a chocolate cream one and whipped cream, and it was excellent. The crust was so light that it almost melted in my mouth. I could feel the individual flakes of pie crust hitting my tongue one at a time. Now that I know Olde Orchard is a lot closer than I realized, I look forward to returning and might just order dessert first.


F E AT U R E

Conversation starter

Black Foodie Summit showcases black-owned businesses and puts proceeds to work. By Jacob Threadgill

For OKC Black Eats founder Apollo Woods, gathering over a meal is only the means to start a discussion. This year has brought a new opportunity for Woods, who took the leap of leaving a corporate job in the oil and gas industry to devote his efforts full-time to OKC Black Eats, a marketing and consulting company focused on increasing the circulation of dollars in the black community. Woods’ research over the past year has uncovered 45 black-owned brickand-mortar restaurants in the metro, 11 culinary trained chefs, 19 black-owned food trucks and 31 home-based caterers. “The perception is that OKC Black Eats is only for black foodies, but it’s for black-owned restaurants and food trucks to elevate their exposure. … I think about, How do I make this dining experience a melting pot so that you don’t even think about the black in OKC Black Eats? You just think about the fact there is some really good food or that it’s a nontraditional place to go,” Woods said. He works with businesses to increase their online and social media presences and organizes a variety of community events, from participating in Northeast OKC Renaissance group’s developers’ conference that sold out Tower Theatre earlier this year to health seminars and brunch events designed to increase the business for restaurants. He was particularly proud of a brunch event in February that brought 200 people to Carican Flavors, 2701 N. Martin Luther King Ave., including 50 people who had never eaten at the Caribbean restaurant before.

“[Carican Flavors owner] Miss Sharon [McMillan] said it was the busiest they’d ever been. That’s a great feeling,” Woods said. “You introduce so many new people to the restaurant, and the restaurant gets to know that it’s possible to be that busy all the time.” He has also started hosting a “lunch date, no date” brunch series every other month in which he takes his brunch crew to a non-black-owned restaurant to introduce people from different backgrounds to restaurants with which they might not have been familiar. “I want worlds to come together, and there is a lot of great stuff coming up in Oklahoma City, and I want people to visit all four quadrants [of the metro],” he said. On July 13, OKC Black Eats hosts the second annual Black Foodie Summit at Bistro 46 Restaurant & Grille, 2501 NE 23rd St. The event is expanding in its second year, hosting a free pre-party event July 12, a meet-and-greet with Texas-based chef Ja’Nel Witt (winner of season 11 of Gordon Ramsay’s reality cooking show Hell’s Kitchen), who is participating in a panel discussion and cooking demonstration. “I’ve known Ja’Nel since we met at the University of Houston,” Woods said. “[On Saturday,] she’ll be cooking something great and share her experience as a minority chef traveling across the world.” Black Foodie Summit also includes a bartender competition and a cocktail experience called Adventurous Bartender in which participants roll dice to mix and match creative cocktails.

There are also 17 black-owned vendors that will showcase their food and products. “We want it to have different layers of experiences, so it’s food, games and a photo booth and video,” Woods said. “It’s a huge, interesting dining experience.” General admission tickets to the event are $10, which includes access to samples from all vendors. OKC Black Eats uses proceeds from the event to fund OKC Black Eats’ charitable foundation. Woods wants to expand healthy cooking demonstrations through the foundation using proceeds from the Foodie Summit. “It means teaching people how to take things from their pantry, very simple things, and make something that’s healthy,” he said. “What we understand about processed foods is that with all of the salt, fats and sugar, you’re going to eat it and be hungry again within an hour. Now the meal that you thought was inexpensive [ends up costing more], and you could’ve taken that same money and gotten whole foods and really healthy grains.” He referenced a recent event filled with soul food classics catered by chef Kendall Curry of Chef Curry to Go where he made vegan macaroni and cheese that was so popular guests did not realize there were no dairy products. “We went through three pans and they had no idea,” Woods said.

There will be 17 black-owned food vendors at Black Foodie Summit. | Photo provided

“We’re getting away from the stigma that healthy food can’t taste good or that the only vegetarian option is a salad. This is special and different this time. I was excited last year, but I see something else coming. I want it to become like some of the other larger scale cultural events that we have, and that it gives me an opportunity to put black culinarians in front of an audience and say, ‘This is not just for African Americans to participate in.’” Woods also wants the foundation to facilitate a “farmers match” program that will connect local farmers with restaurants to increase the availability of locally grown produce for restaurant guests. As Black Foodie Summit expands this year, Woods is focusing on continued growth and takes inspiration from the popular Asian District Night Festival as a cultural event for the city. He wants to provide a similar showcase for blackowned restaurants and businesses. “I was excited last year, but I see something else coming,” Woods said. “We’ve got Juneteenth and the MLK parade, but there’s nothing highlighting African culture that people from across the city are participating in and gives us a chance to show our culture is beautiful.”

Black Foodie Summit noon-6 p.m. July 13 Bistro 46 Restaurant & Grille 2501 NE 23rd St.

Vesa’s Soul Food will be a food vendor at the second Black Foodie Summit. | Photo provided

okcblackeats.com | 405-283-3806 $10

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O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

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GAZEDIBLES

EAT & DRINK

Stateside surprises

Apple pie is from England and ketchup was invented in China, so two foods that are associated with the U.S. are not from here. To celebrate the country’s independence, we are highlighting foods that are actually from the good ol’ U.S. of A. By Jacob Threadgill with provided photos

Scottie’s Deli

427 NW 23rd St. scottiesdeliokc.com | 405-604-8940

While mixed meat sandwiches are certainly a staple of Cuban cuisine, the combination of roast pork, ham, pickles, Swiss cheese and mustard on a baguette loaf was invented by a Cuban immigrant cigar maker in Key West and then perfected in Tampa. Scottie’s Deli makes everything from scratch, including the meat and bread, and its take on the Cuban sandwich was featured on the television show Cheap Eats.

e h t o d s u t e L tonight!

Yokozuna

13230 Pawnee Drive, Suite 100 yokozunasushi.com | 405-500-1020

The spicy tuna roll is one of the most popular options at sushi restaurants in the U.S., but the combination doesn’t originate from Japan. The addition of spicy mayonnaise to the roll is disputed between Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo and Seattle, but either way, it’s an American invention. Yokozuna has a vast array of U.S.-style rolls, in addition to nigiri, sashimi and other entrees, including ramen.

destination

Grilled Barbeque Glazed Chicken Sandwich

Patrono Italian Restaurant

305 N. Walker Ave. patronookc.com | 405-702-7660

In traditional Italian culture, meatballs are served separately as either an appetizer or entrée. Pasta is served on its own with flecks of meat in the sauce, depending on the region and style, but the first known recipe for spaghetti and meatballs likely came from Italian immigrants to the U.S. and was published in our country’s The Macaroni Journal in the 1920s.

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La Baguette Bistro

Chelino’s Mexican Restaurant

7408 N. May Ave. labaguettebistro.com | 405-840-3047

Despite the name, the German in German chocolate cake does not reference its country of origin but rather its creator, Samuel German, an English-born baker who worked for Baker’s Chocolate Company in Massachusetts. He called the cake Baker’s German sweet chocolate, and the recipe went national when it was published in The Dallas Morning News in 1957. La Baguette Bistro stocks the cake with its coconut-pecan topping.

1605 N. Meridan Ave. chelinos.net | 405-947-5611

The deep-fried burrito is a happy accident. Legend has it that Monica Flinn, owner of Tuscon, Arizona’s El Charro Café, accidentally dropped a burrito in the fryer and covered up a curse word by exclaiming “Chimichanga!” which translates to “thingamajig.” Chelino’s serves them to-order with your choice of beef or chicken topped with cheese sauce.

Kitchen No. 324

324 N. Robinson Ave. kitchen324.com | 405-763-5911

The “French” in French dip refers to the style of bread, and its invention is traced to two competing Los Angeles restaurants in the early 20th century: Cole’s Pacific Eclectic Buffet and Philippe the Original. Kitchen No. 324 serves it Philippe’s way as it tops handcarved beef with Gruyère and offers a single or double dip with a side of au jus.

Cafe 501

5825 NW Grand Blvd. hrgok.com/cafe-501-classen-curve 405-844-1501

What we call English muffins in the States is a variation on the British crumpet. English immigrant Samuel Bath Thomas opened a New York bakery in the late 19th century where he created the toaster crumpet, which he designed to be split and browned under a broiler. In the U.K., they are simply referred to as muffins, but regardless of the name, Cafe 501 offers them to-go from the bakery or as an appetizer.

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COV E R

ARTS & CULTURE

Rocket launch Explosions in the sky on the Fourth of July offer a respite from America circa 2019. By Jeremy Martin

Last week, Highlights magazine (yes, that one) issued a “statement about human decency, plain and simple” calling for the U.S. government to cease the “unconscionable” practice of separating immigrant children from their families. “Moral courage means standing up for what we believe is right, honest and ethical — even when it is hard,” Highlights chief executive officer Kent Johnson wrote. “Let our children draw strength and inspiration from our collective display of moral courage. They are watching.” Meanwhile, Associated Press reported that children separated from their families and detained at a Border Patrol facility with “inadequate food, water and sanitation” near El Paso were supervising one other. If your own children are intent on watching fireworks, or if you still want to celebrate the Fourth of July for whatever reason — possibly just for the chance to once again experience something that feels safe and normal in relation to America — we, as always, have you covered. But please note that many of the events below are free, should you want to save your money to donate to organizations such as American Immigration Council (americanimmigrationcouncil.org), Las Americas Immigrant Advocacy Center (las-americas.org) or Families Belong Together (familiesbelongtogether.org) that are working to hold America accountRed, White & Boom features a free concert by Oklahoma City Philharmonic followed by fireworks 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at State Fair Park. | Photo provided

able to the ideals of freedom and equality we are supposed to be celebrating.

Bethany Freedom Festival

City of Bethany’s annual Fourth of July celebration featuring live music, food trucks and a patriotic parade is now in its 60th year. The parade begins 10 a.m. Thursday near the intersection of NW 39th Street and College Avenue and proceeds to Rockwell Avenue before ending at Eldon Lyon Park, 7400 NW 36th St., in Bethany, where the rest of the festivities take place beginning at 4 p.m. Fireworks start around 9:45 p.m. Admission is free. Visit cityofbethany.org.

A Celebration in the Heartland

Visitors will find food trucks, vendors, live music, helicopter rides, activities and inflatables for children and craft beer and wine for adults at Moore’s annual Independence Day event. Festivities begin 8 a.m. Thursday at Buck Thomas Park, 1903 NE 12th St., in Moore, and fireworks start around 9:45 p.m. Admission is free. Call 405793-5090 or visit cityofmoore.com.

Fourth of July Kickoff BBQ Blues Festival

Get an early start with food trucks, kids’ games and, of course, live blues music at this family-friendly event hosted by DJ Country Fresh. The festival takes place 7-11 p.m. Wednesday at NE 30th Street and Schroeder Lane in Forest Park. Admission is free. Visit facebook. com/djcountryfreshyall.

Liberty & Lasers

Funky electronic acts The Floozies, SoDown, Maddy O’Neal and more perform at this Fourth of July dance party. All ages will be admitted, but ear protection is required for children under 13. The show starts 4 p.m. Thursday at Lost Lakes Entertainment Complex, 3501 NE 10th St. Tickets are $15-$55. Visit lostlakesamp.com.

LibertyFest

More than 50,000 people are expected to watch this parade featuring marching bands, vintage automobiles, clowns and floats. Post-parade activities include a 60-foot obstacle course and Mickey Park Playland as well as barbecue, snow cones and watermelon. Children can create their own patriotic Frisbees, and the fireworks display to follow all this family fun is billed as the largest in the Oklahoma City metro area. The

parade begins 9 a.m. Thursday on a 1.5mile route through downtown Edmond beginning at the corner of Ayers Street and University Drive, and after-parade activities are 4-6 p.m. at Mitch Park, 2901 Marilyn Williams Drive. Fireworks start 9:30 p.m. at Hafer Park, 1034 S. Bryant Ave. Admission is free. Visit libertyfest.org.

Norman’s July Fourth Celebration

Norman’s Fourth of July festivities include pony rides, cornhole, baby and toddler races, sand volleyball and more familyfriendly fun as well as live music from One Two Ten, Jabee and My So Called Band with fireworks to follow. The festivities begin at 4 p.m., and the fireworks start at 9:45 p.m. Thursday at Reaves Park, 2501 Jenkins Ave., in Norman. Admission is free. Visit normanok.gov.

OKC 4th Fest

Celebrate Fourth of July on the banks of the Oklahoma River. Enjoy discounts from nearby Bricktown restaurants and bars, rent a pontoon boat from Riversport Adventures or just bring a blanket or lawn chair and watch the fireworks from anywhere in the Boathouse District. Festivities begin at 4 p.m. at Riversport Rapids, 800 Riversport Drive. Admission is $39.99$79.99. Fireworks begin 9:45 p.m. and will be visible in Bricktown and on the north side of the Oklahoma River. Visit downtown4thfest.com.

Oklahoma City Dodgers vs. Round Rock Express

As though baseball itself is not quintessentially American enough, the Fourth of July game will be followed by an Independence Day celebration featuring a fireworks display. The game begins 7:05 p.m. Thursday at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark. 2 S. Mickey Mantle Drive. Tickets are $13-$26. Visit milb. com/oklahoma-city.

Piedmont’s Flashback Freedom Fest

Play ’80s-themed games, ride carnival rides or a real live pony, touch a fire truck, get your face painted, watch a live graffiti mural painting and end it all with a fireworks show. Events begin 5 p.m. at the corner of First Street and Monroe Avenue in Piedmont. Fireworks begin at 9:45 p.m. Admission is free. Visit piedmont-ok.gov.

Oklahoma City Dodgers play Red Rock Express 7:05 p.m. Thursday at Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark, followed by Fourth of July fireworks. | Photo Cody Roper/OKC Dodgers / provided

Red, White & Boom

Alexander Mickelthwate conducts Oklahoma City Philharmonic in a familyfriendly concert featuring a variety of music and followed by a fireworks display. The concert starts 8:30 p.m. Wednesday at State Fair Park, 3001 General Pershing Blvd., and the fireworks begin 10 p.m. Admission is free. Visit okcphil.org.

Tribute to Liberty

Meet Captain America (or someone dressed like him), hear live music by singer/songwriter Stephen Salewon and Dr. Irv Wagoner’s Concert Band and watch the all-new Patriotic Pups fashion show featuring sharply dressed dogs, all of which Midwest City promises will be taken to a safe space before the fireworks begin. The event begins 6 p.m. Thursday at Joe B. Barnes Regional Park, 8700 E. Reno Ave., in Midwest City, and fireworks are scheduled to start at 9:45 p.m. Admission is free. Visit midwestcityok.org.

We Are the Metal Heads of Oklahoma Fourth of July Picnic

Rock out to the brutal sounds of Perseus, We All Bleed and Deity and enjoy free hot dogs, hamburgers and soda (while supplies last) at this annual all-ages picnic, now in its third year. The gate opens 6 p.m. Thursday at 1604 SW 67th St. Search “We Are the Metal Heads of Oklahoma” on Facebook.

Yukon Freedom Fest

Enjoy live music, a car show, children’s crafts, free custard and swimming or compete in a hot dog eating contest or obstacle course at this two-day event featuring a double dose of fireworks. Festivities begin 5 p.m. Wednesday at Chisholm Trail Park, 500 W. Vandament Ave., in Yukon, culminating in a fireworks show beginning at 10 p.m. Festivities continue 8 a.m. Thursday at Yukon City Park, 2200 S. Holly Ave., and then move back to Chisholm Trail Park at 5 p.m., ending in the grand finale fireworks show beginning at 10 p.m. Admission is free. Visit yukonok.gov.

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

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ARTS & CULTURE More than 100 tattoo artists will be at Oklahoma City Tattoo Arts Convention. | Photo provided

living room as their parents watch the reality shows, and it becomes family time. They’re the next generation of tattoo artists and collectors.”

ART

New art

Ink celebration

Once the last state to legalize tattoos, Oklahoma hosts a tattoo arts convention. By Jacob Threadgill

In 2006, Oklahoma became the last state in the country to legalize tattoo parlors, joining South Carolina and the city of Milwaukee in the same year. As tattoos in Oklahoma went from underground and backwoods parlors to mainstream, their increased popularity mirrors a national explosion of acceptance of the ancient art form that as recently as a few decades ago was seen as something only for gang members and sailors. Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, welcomes the first Oklahoma City Tattoo Arts Convention July 12-14 sponsored by Villain Arts. The event features tattoo artists from around the country, including multiple artists featured on the Paramount Network reality series Ink Master and many prominent local artists. Tickets are $20 per day or $40 for a three-day pass. “In the first five years [after Oklahoma and South Carolina legalized tattoo parlors], there was a big difference where you had a population that was never exposed to the culture of it and people didn’t have tattoos as much as everywhere else, but now I think it is pretty caught up to the rest of the country,” said Philadelphia-based artist and Villain Sideshow and burlesque performers will be onstage during the three-day convention. | Photo provided

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J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

Arts owner Troy Timpel, who has expanded the footprint of the convention to 22 cities over the last 20 years. More than 100 tattoo artists, including James Vaughn, Anwon “Boneface” Johnson, Kyle Dunbar, Al Fliction and Janelle Hanson from various seasons of Ink Master will be at the convention. Annette LaRue of Vice’s Tattoo Age and artists from VH1’s Black Ink Crew will be available to convention attendees. Artists are listed on the Villain Arts

website, and people can contact them through their social media pages to set up appointments, but they are not required. Event organizers encourage people to walk around from booth to booth to find styles in which they’re interested. Prices are negotiable, depending on the parameters of the desired work. “It’s kind of like a consumer lifestyle show. It is quite the eyeful to see; there’s a lot going on,” Timpel said. “If you’re interested in tattoo culture or come check out the weird assortment of stuff we have going on, it is a great weekend to check it out. It’s an all-ages show, and kids 12 and under are free. You can bring the kids, take a lap and have fun.” The convention features daily tattoo contests where attendees can be part of an award-winner created the day, but Saturday and Sunday also features ones for best tattoo designs created anytime, anywhere. There are also appearances by sideshow performers like The Enigma, who has undergone body modification like horn implants and had a full-body jigsaw puzzle tattoo. The Enigma has been featured on The X-Files, National Geographic, The Guinness Book of World Records and Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Burlesque performer Marlo Marquise performs Friday and Saturday while The Olde City Sideshow and The Captain’s Sideshow will be featured all three days. “We try to provide stage entertainment so people have something to do if they’re not getting a tattoo,” said the event’s host and emcee Chris Murray, who performs as Dr. Carl Blasphemy. “We’re big on that so parents don’t have to pay for a babysitter. [Kids] are already watching the tattoo experience in their

Nearly 1 in 3 Americans had a tattoo in 2015, which was an increase from 1 in 5 just three years earlier, according to Vox. It’s a number that is higher among younger generations. A 2016 Harris poll found that 47 percent of millennials (people born between 1982 and 2004) have a tattoo. According to Vox, the number of Americans with a tattoo has doubled since the introduction of Instagram in 2010. “The TV shows have done a really good job of showing what tattoos are capable of getting done these days,” Timpel said, “being able to see the quality and craftsmanship that’s capable in the medium now. Whereas 20 years ago it wasn’t as much of a fine art form that it has evolved into now, and I think the TV shows and social media have done a really good job in showcasing the talent in the medium. Because of that, more people have gravitated to tattooing and more people are interested in getting tattoos than ever before.” In the first half of the 20th century, sideshows helped showcase the artistry of American tattoo culture, according to Vox. Before the intricate work displayed by artists and performers in the sideshow culture, tattoos were predominately seen in the relatively rudimentary work done with sailors, who use different markings to symbolize travel marks and distance. In the 1970s, Life Magazine featured a two-page spread on the artistry of tattoos, and the launch of MTV in 1981 put tattooed performers in music videos on television sets around the world. Timpel said the art style of tattoo artists has become more intricate in the last 20 years. Sacred geometry—a motif that uses geometry to showcase patterns with ties to the natural world and religion—is becoming increasingly popular, as are photorealism and dotwork. “There are a lot of styles and textures that people are getting now that really replicate fine art,” Timpel said. Visit villainarts.com.

Oklahoma City Tattoo Arts Convention July 12-14 Cox Convention Center 1 Myriad Gardens villainarts.com | 1-800-745-3000 $20-$40


CO M E DY

Smart jokes

Shane Mauss’ Stand Up Science merges comedy with curiosity. By Jeremy Martin

Your high school teacher, probably wearing a wacky bowtie, might have told you all the good chemistry jokes “argon,” but comic and podcast host Shane Mauss thinks science can be funny. Mauss tackles heady topics with a sense of humor in his touring show Stand Up Science 8-11 p.m. Sunday at Opolis, 113 N. Crawford Ave., in Norman. The show, a spin-off of Mauss’ podcast Here We Are, pairs standup comedy with scientific discussions lead by local experts. “Basically, this show is the combination of my two different worlds,” Mauss said. “In my stand-up, it’s mostly comedy with a little bit of science sprinkled in, and then in my science podcast Here We Are, it’s mostly science with a little bit of comedy sprinkled in. Stand Up Science is exactly 50 percent comedy and 50 percent science. I’ve engineered the show so it’s exactly that way, and I really like it because it shifts people’s perspective quite a bit. Because the science talks are only, like, 12 minutes, it’s nice and digestible and accessible and easier to kind of take in and pay attention to, and then it’s broken up with some laughs.” The formula for scientifically minded comedy can be a little more complicated than a standard stand-up set, Comic and podcast host Shane Mauss presents Stand Up Science 8-11 p.m. Sunday at Opolis. | Photo Bruce Smith / provided

Mauss said. Delivering jokes can take longer when they require the comic to convey complex information to set them up, but “the payoff can be a lot bigger.” “There are laughs to be had at all kinds of levels of information and thought, for sure,” Mauss said. “I think that intelligence correlates quite a bit with sense of humor too, so I think the two things really go hand in hand quite nicely. And the show is meant to be half science, half comedy, so I don’t ask my scientist to do comedy, and I don’t ask the comedian to do science material, either. It’s just a way of combining two really different ways of communicating information.”

It’s done in a way that, if this is how school was for me growing up, I would have paid attention a whole lot more. Shane Mauss Stand Up Science, Mauss said, is not “a 100 percent comedy show,” and it seems to be more successful when he keeps that in mind. “I usually make sure that there’s laughs spaced appropriately, but I find that the less I obsess over punchlines

the better the show ends up being,” Mauss said, “because a lot of times it’s easier to just deliver a quick punchline and get the cheap laughs and not really explore any big ideas, so I try to resist that urge quite a bit.” A brief discussion of a scientific topic can be easier to sit through than a lengthy lecture, Mauss said, but too much comedy can also grow monotonous. “Everything can kind of get repetitive when you hear it for long enough,” Mauss said. “It doesn’t matter if you’re the funniest person in the world; if you’re doing stand-up for three hours or whatever, that’s a really long time for people to be listening to the same person talking, so it’s just a great way of mixing things up.”

Expanding stand-up

Part of the show’s purpose is to give Mauss — who has performed more traditional stand-up on Conan, Comedy Central and his hour special Mating Season — a platform for discussing ideas that would not necessarily play as well in a comedy club. “It’s a really nice outlet for me to express some of the bigger concepts that I really just find fascinating and don’t necessarily have jokes for, just things that I think are important information to get out there,” Mauss said. “Then, also, it’s really just a way of doing much more cerebral material and higherlevel jokes in front of an audience that’s receptive to that.” But he also wants to introduce intellectual topics to an audience that might find scientific journals too dry or intimidating. “I think that the public really can benefit from being a little more connected with scientific thinking, and I

think having local scientists on the show helps engage people and engage that kind of thinking a little bit more, and it’s done in a little bit more digestible way,” Mauss said. “It’s done in a way that, if this is how school was for me growing up, I would have paid attention a whole lot more. I’m just kind of hoping to make it easier for people to learn things.” While he tries to make sure everyone gets the basic information they need for an introduction to unfamiliar topics, curious audience members might find themselves with homework, but independent study is conducive to continued learning. “I wouldn’t be surprised if sometimes there’s a couple of words that an audience member would have to look up, but I think that when you’re trying to get new information, that’s going to be inherent within the process,” he said. “I’m constantly having to look up new words when I’m reading and taking classes and stuff. I think that can be fun for people in a certain way when you hear a new word used and you kind of guess the context a little bit but you want to know specifically what it is. I think that almost can engage people even more sometimes.” The show concludes with the guest comic and scientists joining Mauss onstage for an audience Q&A with “a free-flowing panel vibe.” As an experiment with many variables, sometimes including “an academic that’s really not used to having to speak in front of people because they just do their field research” and “a comedian asking really dumb or inappropriate questions,” Stand Up Science does not always work as intended, but Mauss said the unpredictability makes things more interesting. “That’s part of the fun of the show; it’s a real mixed bag,” Mauss said. “The show is meant to put everyone out of their comfort zone a little bit. I’m not used to hosting a show, for example, and this is a different style of show too. My set is completely a hybrid of information and comedy, and the academics are usually used to giving talks in front of people, but this a different context and a different environment, and the other comic on the show is usually nervous they’re going to sound dumb because they’re not used to performing to such smart people, and the audience doesn’t quite know what to expect either. Usually, how that works out is it brings a really nice little bit of almost nervous energy in a way, an excitement that kind of keeps people on their toes and slightly off balance and keeps them guessing a little bit.” Tickets are $15-$22. Visit opolis.org.

Stand Up Science 8 p.m. Sunday Opolis 113 N. Crawford Ave., Norman opolis.org | 405-230-0311 $15-$22

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

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ARTS & CULTURE

O KG S H O P

Posh Beauty Bar & Lash Studio offers both classic and volume lashes as well as lash lifts, microblading and powdered brow services. | Photo Alexa Ace

Eye witnesses

Posh Beauty Bar & Lash Studio offers a broad menu of modern beauty services to Oklahoma City clients. By Jo Light

Shellica Jordan and Micah Lauren are passionate about beauty. Together, they run Posh Beauty Bar & Lash Studio, 1933 NW 142nd St., a salon where clients can receive a variety of modern and trendy beauty treatments. The salon is near the busy Quail Springs Mall area but is tucked away on a quieter street between residential developments. Inside, a pink velvet couch invites guests to sit in a bright, airy waiting room. Owners and business partners Jordan and Lauren are both licensed estheticians as well. Jordan began her career as a makeup artist, attended esthetician training to start doing lashes and opened Posh Beauty Bar in March 2015. Lauren has been working for three years in the industry. She began as a client of Jordan while in college and decided to join her after esthetician

training. She started out renting a booth in Jordan’s salon and then joined her for a brief stint at a partnered Chisholm Creek location. “We already owned a laser business together, so we knew that we worked well together,” Lauren said. “So I went to an extreme training, and then I liked how she did the lashes, so she trained me on how she does them specifically. And she just mentored me through this business.” The previous co-owned business she referred to is their medical spa, Posh Body Sculpting, which they continue to operate. Jordan paints a similar picture of their cooperation through the years. “We decided, ‘OK; let’s just do this together,’” Jordan said. “‘We’re doing the lasers; we work well. Let’s do the lashes and stick together.’ Because it was just so hard.” In October 2018, Posh Beauty Bar

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moved to its current location. “We advertised and marketed ourselves, and now we’re a packed house,” Jordan said. “There [are] no empty spaces.” Posh Beauty Bar has seven employees including five lash artists. “What makes this salon different is [that] I feel like we have everything beauty,” Lauren said. Indeed, numerous services are offered at Posh Beauty Bar, starting with lash extensions, lash lifts, lash and brow tints, microblading and permanent makeup. Lash extensions involve an esthetician gluing individual false lashes to each natural eyelash at the root. It is a process that takes about two hours for a full set and requires regular appointments for replacement lashes, or fills, every two to three weeks. Those appointments are shorter, at about an hour. Lauren said she has had lash extensions for around four or five years. “As long as you keep up with your fills, you never have to get the full set again,” Lauren said. Posh Beauty Bar has two options for lash extensions: classic lashes or volume lashes. Jordan and Lauren said the voluminous lashes are incredibly trendy with their clients right now. “For the most part, it’s just girls wanting to come in and look naturally pretty when they wake up,” Lauren said of their clientele. “That’s a good way to explain it,” Jordan said. “Having lashes, it still makes you look naturally pretty with no makeup on. So if you don’t want to wear makeup and not look dead …” “You still feel put together,” Lauren said. For clients who want a less timeconsuming option, lash lifts are like perms for the eyelashes that provide a natural-looking curl. Lash lifts last six to eight weeks. Microblading is the process of handdrawing individual hairs onto the skin to shape and fill the eyebrows. It’s a slightly more natural look than fully filled eyebrows. This treatment takes two hours

metalmorphosis JULY FEATURED ARTIST

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Meet the Artist at Paseo First Friday, July 5, 5-8pm

Featuring artwork from 20 artists’ in clay, metal, glass, wood and more. www.cmgartgallery.com ¡ 405.256.3465 1104 NW 30th St, Oklahoma City, OK 73118 Thursday – Saturday ¡ 11am – 5pm

as well and lasts about two years. To offer this service, Jordan went through Oklahoma’s medical micropigmentation certification program and is now a certified medical micropigmentologist. Microblading is semipermanent, unlike traditional permanent eyebrows (which are also called powdered or machine brows). Jordan said she thinks the perfect look is a combination of the two techniques. “Microblading plus the powder brow is my favorite,” Jordan said. “Because it allows you to have the strokes naturally, the natural look up front, and then powder towards the end. Gosh, it’s so beautiful.” Posh Beauty Bar also provides traditional salon services, including hair blowouts, hair extensions, braiding and bridal hair and makeup, as well as waxing and spray tans. As mentioned, Jordan and Lauren still own and operate Posh Body Sculpting, which is on the second floor of the salon. On that side, in addition to Botox and lip injections, they offer laser lipolysis and a nonsurgical sculpting service for buttocks called “butt cupping.” “It makes your butt larger and more firm,” Lauren said. Butt cupping is a form of vacuum therapy, which is exactly what it sounds like — vacuum cups are applied to the buttocks to shape and plump them. Lauren also runs a clothing boutique out of the salon called London Wardrobe. Near the front entry, guests can browse floral tops, lace dresses and distressed jeans. Lauren said it is perfect for clients to shop between appointments. They can also shop online at londonwardrobe.shop. The pair is continuing to innovate and grow the business, and they plan to start a training program to teach estheticians their lash-extension techniques this year. They will also release their own lash extension line in the volume style. “The value we’re offering in our training is that for a two-day course, you’re going to learn classic lashes and volume,” Jordan said. Previously, estheticians had to learn the two lash styles separately. Visit poshbeautyok.com.

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OKG Lifestyle

Around OKC EAT Brisket Burnt Ends Tacos at Oso on Paseo WATCH The Bold Type (Freeform) LISTEN “You Can Feel Sad” by Carly Gwin and the Sin READ November Road by Lou Berney LOVE

Fireworks (Archives) by Apichatpong Weerasethakul at Oklahoma City Museum of Art

EXPERIENCE Bricktown Beach

Outside OKC La Duni in Dallas EAT Hilda (Netflix) WATCH Dissect podcast LISTEN Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi READ Terrace House (Netflix) LOVE IKEA EXPERIENCE

Andy Moore’s Picks EAT rice bowl with grilled shrimp

at Magasin Table

WATCH The West Wing reruns on Netflix LISTEN “Good Kisser” by Lake Street Dive READ The Missing Piece Meets the Big O

by Shel Silverstein

LOVE Old Forester Statesman bourbon EXPERIENCE The King’s Mouth at Factory Obscura Andy Moore is executive director of Freedom of Information Oklahoma and founder and executive director of Let’s Fix This.

THE BOLD TYPE | PHOTO FREEFORM / WALT DISNEY TELEVISION / PROVIDED • BRICKTOWN BEACH | PHOTO DOWNTOWN OKC PARTNERSHIP / PROVIDED • NOVEMBER ROAD | IMAGE HARPER COLLINS PUBLISHERS / PROVIDED • HOMEGOING | IMAGE PENGUIN RANDOM HOUSE / PROVIDED • HILDA | IMAGE NETFLIX / PROVIDED • DISSECT | IMAGE DISSECT / PROVIDED THE WEST WING | PHOTO NBC / PROVIDED • THE MISSING PIECE | IMAGE HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS / PROVIDED • OLD FORESTER | PHOTO OLD FORESTER / PROVIDED O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

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CALENDAR are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

BOOKS Brunching with Books a book club meeting every other week, with reading selections chosen by group preference, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays. Buttermilk Paseo, 605 NW 28th St., 405-605-6660, buttermilkokc.com. SAT Mid-Oklahoma Writers a meetup for local writers featuring guest speakers and literary discussions, 7-9 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month. Eastside Church of Christ, 916 S. Douglas Blvd., 405-732-0393. TUE Oklahoma Voices hear featured poets read from their works at this monthly event, 2 p.m. the first Sunday of every month. IAO Gallery, 706 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-232-6060, iaogallery.org. SUN What Lies Between Us journalist and activist Ayanna Najuma leads a discussion of Dying of Whiteness: How the Politics of Racial Resentment Is Killing America’s Heartland by Jonathan Metzl, 6:30 p.m. July 9. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. TUE Young Adult Book Club Meet-Up discuss The Princess Bride by William Goldman with other young readers, 5-6:30 p.m. July 10. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. WED

FILM 48 Hour Film Premiere Screenings see the debut of several locally produced films created from scratch over a single weekend, 4-10 p.m. July 6. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-708-6937, towertheatreokc.com. SAT The Biggest Little Farm (2018, USA, John Chester) after being evicted from their LA apartment, John and Molly Chester move to a 200-acre farm and attempt to operate it in coexistence with its surrounding environment in this documentary, through July 4. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. FRI-THU VHS and Chill: Blockbusted Video riff along with comedians and film fans at this monthly movie screening where audience participation is encouraged, 7-9 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com. WED

Videodrome Either a scathing commentary on graphically violent entertainment or a five-star example of it or both, David Cronenberg’s Videodrome requires actor-turned-Twitter-troll James Woods to really stretch to portray a sleazebag cynically exploiting people’s worst impulses via mass media as TV executive Max Renn. Obsessed with the literal torture porn he begins seeing broadcast on a pirate TV station, Renn becomes increasingly untethered from reality. Since this is Cronenberg, the film’s all-too-literal depiction of the way watching violence warps the mind will forever be burned into your own brain. The screening, presented by Oklahoma Film Society, is 7-10 p.m. Tuesday at The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave. Admission is free. Call 405-887-3327 or visit theparamountroom.com. TUESDAY Photo provided

Filmrow Trivia Night test your cinematic knowledge at this monthly competition hosted by VHS and Chill, 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com. TUE

Saturday Night Shennanigans make your own rose bowl terrarium for succulents at this craft night with wine, 7-9 p.m. July 6. Put A Cork In It Winery, 115 E. California Ave., 405-605-6656, putacorkinitwinery.com. SAT

Early Explorers toddlers and preschoolers can participate in fun scientific activities they can repeat later at home, 10-11 a.m. Thursdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. THU

The Friend Zone: Speed-Friending make new friends five minutes at a time at this platonic meetup, 7 p.m. second Monday of every month. Oak & Ore, 1732 NW. 16th St., 405-606-2030, oakandore.com. MON

Toastmasters Meeting hone public speaking and leadership skills in a move-at-your own pace environment, 7-8:30 p.m. Thursdays. McFarlin United Methodist Church, 419 S. University Drive, 623-810-0295. THU

Families Explore: Astronauts enjoy crafts, activities and stories centered around the space program at this family-friendly event, 11 a.m.-noon July 6 and 20. Moore Library, 225 S. Howard Ave., Moore. SAT

Governor’s Club Toastmasters lose your fear of public speaking and gain leadership skills by practicing in a fun and low-stakes environment, noon-1 p.m. Wednesdays. Oklahoma Farm Bureau Building, 2501 N. Stiles Ave., 405-523-2300, okfarmbureau.org. WED

Trivia Night at Black Mesa Brewing test your knowledge at this weekly competition hosted by BanjoBug Trivia, 6:30 p.m. June 18. Black Mesa Brewing Company, 1354 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-778-1865, blackmesabrewing.com. TUE

Furry Fiction hear a story about compassion toward animals and meet adoptable pets, 10-10:30 a.m. July 5. Oklahoma Humane Society, 7500 N. Western Ave., 405-286-1229, okhumane.org. FRI

Art & Victory: Making a Living as an Artist a discussion panel about how to support yourself while pursuing your creative passion, 6:30-8:30 p.m. June 8. Resonator, 325 E Main St., Norman, resonator.space. MON

Guthrie Maker Days learn a new crafting skill at this arts event with a variety of make-and-take activities, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. July 6. Downtown Guthrie, Wentz Street and Oklahoma Avenue, 405-282-0197, offbeatoklahoma.com. SAT

Trivia Night at Matty McMillen’s answer questions for a chance to win prizes at this weekly trivia night, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Matty McMillen’s Irish Pub, 2201 NW 150th St., 405-607-8822, mattymcmillens.com. TUE

Board Game Day enjoy local craft beer while playing old-school board and arcade games with friends, 5-8 p.m. Sundays. FlashBack RetroPub, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-633-3604, flashbackretropub.com. SUN

Ladies Love Trap & Paint Party drink, paint and listen to trap music; canvas and materials provided, 7 p.m. July 6. Reasons Lounge, 1140 N. MacArthur Blvd., 405-774-9991. SAT

Water/Ways a traveling exhibit created by the Smithsonian Institution illustrating the many ways water impacts human life and civilization, through Aug. 18. Norman Public Library East, 3051 Alameda St., Norman, 405-217-0770, pioneerlibrarysystem.org. SAT-SUN

Junior Forensics a family-friendly hands-on workshop demonstrating how experts study human skulls to determine age, sex, trauma and more, 2-3:30 p.m. July 6. Museum of Osteology, 10301 S. Sunnylane Road, 405-814-0006, museumofosteology.org. SAT

Cocktail Cruise see the Boathouse District, the Wheeler Ferris wheel and more on this sunset cruise with a full cash bar, Fridays and Saturdays through Sept. 28. Regatta Park Landing, 701 S. Lincoln Blvd., 405-702-7755, okrivercruises.com. FRI-SAT

Moore Chess Club play in tournaments and learn about the popular board game at this weekly event where all ages and skill levels are welcome, 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Moore Library, 225 S. Howard. SUN

World Oceans Day learn about helping conserve and protect the world’s oceans and waterways, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. July 8. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo.com. MON

OKC Emo Night: The Boys of Summer a dance party with emo music and videos from 1998-2010, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. July 6. 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St., 405-463-0470, 51stspeakeasy.com. SAT

Yappy Hour a dog-friendly meet up with craft beer and pet treats, 5-7 p.m. July 10. The Patriarch Craft Beer House & Lawn, 9 E. Edwards St., Edmond, 405285-6670, thepatriarchedmond.com. WED

Woodstock: Three Days that Defined a Generation (2019, USA, Barak Goodman and Jamila Ephron) a documentary chronicling the famous 1969 concert with previously unseen footage, 7:30-9 p.m. July 3. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. WED

HAPPENINGS Afro Beats a dance party featuring hip-hop, Caribbean, dancehall and more with DJ Sinz, 11 p.m. July 5. Glass Lounge, 5929 N. May Ave., 405-835-8077, glasshouseokc.com. FRI

Coffee with Real Estate Investors network over coffee and discuss topics such as real estate investing, building a successful business and chasing the American dream, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. Starbucks, 5800 W. Memorial Road, 405-722-6189, starbucks.com. WED Conversational Spanish Group Meetup an opportunity for all experience levels to practice speaking Spanish, 7 p.m. Tuesdays. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. TUE Dancing in the Gardens: ’90s Hip-Hop take a hip-hop dance lesson taught by RACE Dance Company, then stick around for a ’90s-themed dance party, 7-10 p.m July 5. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. FRI Downtown Recyclers Toastmasters practice your public speaking skills at this ongoing weekly meeting, noon-1 p.m. Wednesdays. Department of Environmental Quality, 707 N. Robinson Ave., 405702-0100, deq.state.ok.us. WED Fandom Fridays celebrate some of your favorite sci-fi and fantasy characters with crafts and activities, 11 a.m.-noon Fridays through July 26. Moore Library, 225 S. Howard Ave, Moore. SAT

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J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

PFLAG OKC Presents: Dr. Hal Scofield the endocrinologist will explain the American Academy of Clinical Endocrinologist’s guidelines for transgender treatment, 6-8 p.m. July 9. Oklahoma City University, 2501 N. Blackwelder Ave., 405-208-5000. TUE Pooches on the Patio bring your best friend to this dog-friendly happy hour with drink specials, appetizers and free pet treats, 4-7 p.m. May 11. Café 501 Classen Curve, 5825 NW Grand Blvd., 405-844-1501, cafe501.com. SAT

Yes! Science! a talk show profiling women and minorities in STEM fields with live experiments, panel discussions and reading recommendations, 1:30-3:30 p.m. July 6. Project 3810, 3810 N. Tulsa Ave., 405-474-8378. SAT

FOOD Paseo Farmers Market shop for fresh food from local vendors at this weekly outdoor event, 9 a.m.noon Saturdays, through Oct. 19. SixTwelve, 612 NW 29th St., 405-208-8291, sixtwelve.org. SAT

Red Dirt Dinos: An Oklahoma Dinosaur Adventure learn about regional prehistoric reptiles at this hands-on exhibit featuring three interactive robotic dinosaurs, through Sept. 2. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. THU-MON

The Rosé Soriée enjoy sparkling rosé paired with light appetizers, 6-8 p.m. July 10. The Merret, 6464 Avondale Drive, 405-848-6464, themerret.com. WED

Renegade Poker compete in a 2-3 hour tournament with cash prizes, 3 p.m. July 7. Bison Witches Bar & Deli, 211 E Main St., Norman, 405-364-7555, bisonwitchesok.com. SUN

America’s Rice Krispie Treats kids cooking class children will learn to create Fourth of Julythemed snacks at this cooking class, 4-5 p.m. July 8. Supermercado Buy For Less, 2701 SW 29th St., 405-685-7791, buyforlessok.com. MON

YOUTH

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS!

Mac Attack kids cooking class children can learn to prepare individual portions of macaroni and cheese at this cooking class, 4-5 p.m. July 9. Supermercado Buy For Less, 2701 SW 29 St., 405685-7791, buyforlessok.com. TUE OKC Zoo Camp children age 4-15 can learn about a variety animals at these weeklong themed camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays through Aug. 9. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-4243344, okczoo.com. MON-FRI Reading Wednesdays a weekly storytime with hands-on activities, goody bags and reading-themed photo ops, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. WED STEM Camp children in grades 6-8 will learn about the ways experts in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics helped in the aftermath of the Oklahoma City Bombing, July 8-12. Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum, 620 N. Harvey Ave., 405-235-3313, oklahomacitynationalmemorial.org. MON-FRI Storytime Science the museum invites children age 6 and younger to hear a story and participate in a related scientific activity, 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. TUE-SAT

PERFORMING ARTS Art of Rap hosted by Jim Conway, this monthly rap battle pits local MCs against one another for a cash prize, 9 p.m. Mondays. Hubbly Bubbly Hookah & Café, 2900 N Classen Blvd. Suite K, 405-609-2930. MON


Bang Bang Gets Sauced! see drag and burlesque performances from Pyxis Deodara, Kadabra, Nova Cane and more at this show hosted by Misty Snatch, 10:30-2:30 a.m. July 6. Sauced on Paseo, 2912 Paseo St., 405-521-9800, saucedonpaseo.com. SAT Divine Comedy a weekly local showcase hosted by CJ Lance and Josh Lathe and featuring a variety of comedians from OKC and beyond, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St., 405-463-0470, 51stspeakeasy.com. WED

Nichols Hills Band the 35-piece band continues its 37th season of outdoor concerts, performing jazz, pop, rock and more, 9 a.m. July 4. Kite Park, 1301 Camden Way. THU OKC Comedy Open Mic Night get some stage time or just go to listen and laugh, 7 p.m. Mondays. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405887-3327, theparamountroom.com. MON

Don Quixote Open Mic a weekly comedy show followed by karaoke, 7:30-9 p.m. Fridays. Don Quixote Club, 3030 N. Portland Ave., 405-947-0011. FRI

OKC Improv performers create original scenes in the moment based on suggestions from the audience, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Oklahoma City Improv, 1757 NW 16th St., 405-4569858, okcimprov.com. FRI-SAT

Iron Horse Open Mic and Showcase perform music on stage at this show open to all experience levels, 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Iron Horse Bar & Grill, 9501 S. Shields Blvd., 405-735-1801. WED

Triple’s Open Mic a music and comedy open mic hosted by Amanda Howle, 7:30 p.m. every other Wednesday. Triple’s, 8023 NW 23rd St., 405-7893031. WED

Joel Forlenza: The Piano Man the pianist performs variety of songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra and, of course, Billy Joel, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-701-4900, othellos.us. TUE-SAT

Open Mic at The P share your musical talent or just come to listen at this weekly open mic, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. The Patriarch Craft Beer House & Lawn, 9 E. Edwards St., Edmond, 405-285-6670, thepatriarchedmond.com. WED

Lumpy’s Open Mic Night play a song of your own or just listen to the performers at this weekly show hosted by John Riley Willingham, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. Lumpy’s Sports Grill, 12325 N. May Ave., 405-286-3300, lumpyssportsgrill.com. WED

Open Mic Competition local comics compete for the top price, 8 p.m. July 3 and 7. Loony Bin Comedy Club, 8503 N. Rockwell Ave., 405-239-4242, loonybincomedy.com. WED-SUN

Monday Night Blues Jam Session bring your own instrument to this open-stage jam hosted by Wess McMichael, 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us. MON

Opolis Sessions Too see Oklahoma comedians including CJ Lance, TJ Clark, Julie Drake, Jenny Godwin and more recording showcase sets, 9-10:30 p.m. July 5. Opolis, 113 N. Crawford Ave., Norman, 405-673-4931, opolis.org. FRI

Newsies a family-friendly musical based on the New York City Newsboy Strike of 1899, adapted from the Disney film, July 9-14. Lyric Theatre, 1727 NW 16th St., 405-524-9310, lyrictheatreokc.com. TUE-SUN

Othello’s Comedy Night see professionals and amateurs alike at this long-running weekly open mic for standup comics, 9 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us. TUE

Clever Little Lies Making its area premiere at Carpenter Square Theatre, playwright Joe DiPietro’s Clever Little Lies finds gently biting humor in infidelity, conflicting familial obligations, parental meddling, poorly kept secrets and other reasons Thanksgiving dinner is always so quiet and awkward at our house. Rhonda Clark directs Chris Crane, Mary Sue Backus, Pat Meirick and Katy Hughes in a play where the attempt to save a marriage might be the only thing more damaging than an affair. The play runs July 11-20 at Carpenter Square Theatre, 800 W. Main St. Tickets are $5-$25. Call 405-232-6500 or visit carpentersquare.com. JULY 11-20 Photo provided Paramount Open Mic show off your talents at this open mic hosted by musician Chris Morrison, 7 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. WED Poetry & Chill Open Mic poets, rappers, comics, singers and all other performers are invited to take the stage at this show with a live band and featured performer, 8-11 p.m. July 5. Glass Lounge, 5929 N. May Ave., 405-835-8077, glasshouseokc.com. FRI Rebels & Royals Drag King Show hosted by former Mister USofA Damian Matrix-Gritte, this monthly show features local drag kings and special guests 10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Fridays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-602-2030, facebook.com/ frankiesokc. FRI Red Dirt Open Mic a weekly open mic for comedy and poetry, hosted by Red Dirt Poetry, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Sauced on Paseo, 2912 Paseo St., 405-521-9800, saucedonpaseo.com. WED Rhyme in Reasons share your talent or just watch other artists perform at this weekly open mic, 7:30-10 p.m. Thursdays. Reasons Lounge, 1140 N. MacArthur Boulevard, 405-774-9991. THU Sanctuary Karaoke Service don a choir robe and sing your favorite song, 9 p.m.-midnight Wednesdays and Thursdays. Sanctuary Barsilica, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., facebook.com/sanctuarybarokc. WED-THU

Stars and Stripes Spin Jam a weekly meetup for jugglers, hula hoopers and unicyclers, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Stars & Stripes Park, 3701 S. Lake Hefner Drive, 405-297-2756, okc.gov/parks. WED Twisted Coyote Brew Crew a weekly 3-mile group run for all ability levels with a beer tasting to follow; bring your own safety lights, 6 p.m. Mondays. Twisted Spike Brewing Co., 1 NW 10th St., 405-3013467, twistedspike.com. MON Wheeler Criterium a weekly nighttime cycling event with criterium races, food trucks and family activities, 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, okc.gov. TUE Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUE Yoga with Art workout in an art-filled environment followed by a mimosa, 10:30 a.m. Saturdays. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com. SAT

VISUAL ARTS

The Skirvin Jazz Club a monthly live jazz show presented by OK Sessions, 7:30 p.m. third Friday of every month. Park Avenue Grill, 1 Park Ave., 405-7028444, parkavegrill.com. FRI

Alicia Saltina Marie Clark a solo exhibition featuring the work of the Oklahoma based artist, through July 7. DNA Galleries, 1709 NW 16th St., 405525-3499, dnagalleries.com. THU-SUN

VZD’s Open Mic Night a weekly music mic hosted by Joe Hopkins, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. VZD’s Restaurant & Bar, 4200 N. Western Ave., 405-6023006, vzds.com. WED

Beautiful Minds: Dyslexia and the Creative Advantage an exhibition of artworks created by people with dyslexia including students from Oklahoma City’s Trinity School, through Aug. 4. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. FRI-SUN

Weekly Jams bring an instrument and play along with others at this open-invitation weekly jam session, 9:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesdays. Saints, 1715 NW 16th St., 405-602-6308, saintspubokc.com. TUE

ACTIVE

Paseo First Friday Gallery Walk There is always something new to see at The Paseo Arts District’s monthly gallery tours, but this month looks particularly worth the wear on your vegan shoe leather. Check out the fifth annual Print on Paseo juried printmaking exhibition featuring works such as “Orange Moon” by Elizabeth Richards and “The Journey Begins” by Kathleen Blake; hear live music by Skyy Webster, who recently released the album Driving Me Wild; and get burgers, snow cones and craft beer from local vendors. The event is 6-9 p.m. Friday in The Paseo Arts District. Admission is free. Visit thepaseo.org. FRIDAY Image provided

Run the Alley a three-mile social run for athletes of all abilities ending with beers at The Yard, 6:30 p.m. Thursdays. OK Runner, 708 N. Broadway Ave., 405-702-9291, myokrunner.com. THU

Brenda Kingery: A Retrospective an exhibition of 23 paintings by the Chickasaw artist and Oklahoma City native, through Sept. 6. Oklahoma City University, 2501 N. Blackwelder Ave, 405-208-5000. SAT-FRI

Botanical Balance an all-levels yoga class in a natural environment; bring your own mat and water, 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and 9 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. SAT-THU

Estate Paintings view “Tree Arbor” by Nan Sheets and “Standing Nude Female” by Charles Apt, through July 31. JRB Art at The Elms, 2810 N. Walker Ave., 405-528-6336, jrbartgallery.com. THU-WED

Co-ed Open Adult Volleyball enjoy a game of friendly yet competitive volleyball while making new friends, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov. WED

From the Golden Age to the Moving Image: The Changing Face of the Permanent Collection view portraits painted by Kehinde Wiley, Anthony van Dyck, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and George Bellows, through Sept. 22. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com.

Monday Night Group Ride meet up for a weekly 25-30 minute bicycle ride at about 18 miles per hour through east Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Mondays. The Bike Lab OKC, 2200 W. Hefner Road, 405-603-7655. MON Open Badminton hit some birdies in some morning pick-up games of badminton with friends, 10 a.m.noon Saturdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov. SAT

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS!

FRI-SUN

Life Imagined: The Art and Science of Automata see examples of mechanical proto-robots

continued on page 22

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

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C A L E N DA R

VAPE SHOP

Try Improv If you have ever seen improvised comedy and thought, “Big deal. I could do that,” you are most likely very wrong, but that does not mean you should not try anyway. Probably. Learn about the art of making it up as you go along at this introductory workshop 7-9 p.m. July 10 at OKC Improv, 1757 NW 16th St. Admission is free. Call 405-456-9858 or visit okcimprov.com.

continued from page 21

Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, 405-521-2491, okhistory.org. MON

from 1850 to the modern day, through Sept. 29. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. SUN

Woman Revealed an exhibition of paintings by Oklahoma City artist Rebecca Wheeler featuring women working, playing, dancing and completing other activities, July 5-31. JRB Art at The Elms, 2810 N. Walker Ave., 405-528-6336, jrbartgallery.com.

Maurice Sendak Exhibition view original works by the author and illustrator of Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen, through July 9. Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library, 300 Park Ave., 405-231-8650, metrolibrary. org. SAT-TUE

Paseo Arts District’s First Friday Gallery Walk peruse art from over 80 artists with 25 participating business for a night of special themed exhibits, refreshments and a variety of entertainment opportunities, 6-10 p.m. first Friday of every month. Paseo Arts District, 3022 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org. FRI Patrick Riley: A Retrospective an exhibit of drawings, jewelry, sculpture and other artworks created by the artist and educator, through Aug. 29. GaylordPickens Oklahoma Heritage Museum, 1400 Classen Drive, 405-235-4458, oklahomaheritage.com. THU Print on Paseo a juried printmaking exhibition featuring traditional and contemporary styles, July 5-27. Paseo Art Space, 3022 Paseo St., 405-5252688, thepaseo.com. FRI-SAT Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition & Sale an annual exhibition and art sale featuring more than 300 Western paintings and sculptures by contemporary Western artists of landscapes, wildlife and illustrative scenes, through July 8. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. FRI-MON

Seeing Now an exhibit of multimedia art works by Hank Willis Thomas, Ken Gonzales-Day, Travis Somerville, Paul Rucker, Graciela Sacco, Terence Hammonds and Michael Waugh, through Dec. 31. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com. THU-MON Tuesday Night Print Series: Drypoint Etching with Emma Difani learn the printmaking technique at a workshop with an emphasis on teaching it in your own classroom, 5:30-8 p.m. July 9. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE Third St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. TUE Van Gogh, Monet, Degas: The Mellon Collection of French Art from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts a traveling exhibition of a collection of works by influential European painters including Van Gogh, Monet, Manet, Picasso, Rousseau and many more, through Sept. 22. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. SAT-SUN

More than 1,000,000 impressions each month! Contact: advertising@okgazette.com 22

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FRI-WED

Vikki McGuire: Vision an exhibition of the Norman artist’s abstract acrylic paintings created using brushes, palette knives, stencils and stamps, July 5-28. Contemporary Art Gallery, 2928 Paseo St., 405-601-7474, contemporaryartgalleryokc.com. FRI-SUN Welcome Home: Oklahomans and the War in Vietnam explores the impact of the war on Oklahoma families as well as the stories of Vietnamese families relocated to Oklahoma, through Nov. 6.

Submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail them to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

For OKG live music see page 25

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS!


EVENT

MUSIC

This machine

Singer-songwriters performing at the annual Woody Guthrie Folk Festival are continually inspired by the folk music icon. By Jeremy Martin

Radoslav Lorković was first introduced to Woody Guthrie when the father of modern American folk music made him cry at a Minnesota summer camp. “It’s a common story,” Lorković said. “I’m learning how to speak French at a summer camp. I’m little, and my parents came to get me. At the closing ceremony, we all sang such a spirited ‘This Land Is Your Land,’ and I remember I was just moved to tears by it. I thought it was the coolest thing I’d ever heard.” In high school, Lorković, who came with his parents to the U.S. at the age of 6, found himself similarly struck after hearing the Byrds’ cover of Guthrie’s “Deportee (Plane Wreck at Los Gatos),” a song about a 1948 crash that killed 28 migrant farm workers. “It just really connected with me as an immigrant and now a citizen coming from Croatia,” Lorković said. “Coming from the former Yugoslavia, our family was pretty devastated when the communists came in. I think there was always that kind of issue, the ‘I ain’t got no home’ kind of thing.” As he has every year since 2005, Lorković, a classically trained pianist and accordion player, performs at Woody Guthrie Folk Festival July 10-14 in Okemah, where the singer-songwriter was born in 1912. Lorković first began playing the festival with singer-songwriter Jimmy LaFave, who played the festival from its first year 1998 until he died in 2017. “He’d been doing the Woody Fest forever,” Lorković said,” and he goes, ‘Hey, Rad. It’s not a big deal. It’s just a little jamming in a motel and showcases playing on the main stage. You’ll probably like it.’ I go, ‘Sounds good,’ and left Carter Sampson top middle Krishna Guthrie Band bottom middle Red Dirt Rangers right Serena Guthrie | Photos provided

we show up there and it was the best time I’ve ever had in my life.”

Educational activism

Annie Burns said she and her sister Marie, a folk duo from Ithaca, New York, that has performed as The Burns Sisters since 1986, had a similar experience when LaFave invited them to play at the festival. “We just fell in love with Okemah and the Guthries and the extended family, all the kids and grandkids,” Burns said. “And all the people who go to the Woody Guthrie Festival are just so, so interesting because they’re of all walks of life, they’re of all political backgrounds and they’ll come together for this message of hope.” In addition to performances by artists including Arlo Guthrie, Annie Guthrie, The Annie Oakley, Butch Hancock, Carter Sampson and many more, the festival features presentations such as Pete Seeger & Saving The Hudson River: The History of Environmental Activism in Music and a protest music panel titled Something to Say: Making Music That Matters. While media chair Maddie Gregory said the festival itself is apolitical, it provides a platform for musicians to express their own beliefs. “Our purpose is to preserve and encourage artists,” Gregory said. “I think we’re allowing them to speak and use their talents to educate, and I think right now is a time that education is really necessary.” Burns said folk music’s plainspoken messages can be a more effective means of communicating than preaching, which she would rather “leave to the preachers.” “If you look at Woody Guthrie and what he did with his life, he just traveled with his guitar and spoke his truth to power,” Burns said. “I think reaching people through music and words is a way to heal the country. … Through song and through

left Arlo Guthrie top middle Folk Uke bottom middle David Amram right Annie Guthrie | Photos provided

stories, we can reach people about what’s the right thing to do, especially in this day and age. … The way to get through to people is to say we’re all the same. We all have the same problems. … If you just think of all of us as mothers and fathers and children and brothers and sisters, then we have a way of reaching each other.” In “Woody Sez,” the recurring column he wrote for the progressive newspaper People’s Daily World in the 1930s, Woody Guthrie explained his musical philosophy. “I hate a song that makes you think you are not any good,” he wrote. “I hate a song that makes you think that you are just born to lose. Bound to lose. No good to nobody. No good for nothing. Because you are too old or too young or too fat or too slim. Too ugly or too this or too that. Songs that run you down or poke fun at you on account of your bad luck or hard traveling. I’m out to fight those songs to my very last breath of air and my last drop of blood. I am out to sing songs that will prove to you that this is your world and that if it has hit you pretty hard and knocked you for a dozen loops, no matter what color, what size you are, how you are built, I am out to sing the songs that make you take pride in yourself and in your work. And the songs that I sing are made up for the most part by all sorts of folks just about like you.”

Family tradition

The festival also features youth songwriting workshops hosted by festival performers, a kids’ harmonica class and a songwriting contest for musicians 16 years old and younger. Gregory said honoring Guthrie’s occasionally overlooked legacy as a children’s entertainer and educator is also important. “He was a really avid writer of children’s songs and encouraging children to learn and sing and play,” Gregory said. “We want to try to provide different entertainment for families with people who, if they have grown up going to the festival, can bring their children or their grandchildren with them and they’ll be entertained. … You won’t just be hauling them around in the hot sun.” Children often learn “This Land Is Your Land” — written as a response to Irving Berlin’s “God Bless America” — in school, but Gregory said even a song as silly and simple as “Riding in My Car (Car

left Radoslav Lorković right The Burns Sisters | Photos provided

Song),” though not typically discussed in the same way as “Pastures of Plenty” or “Pretty Boy Floyd,” offers an example of Guthrie’s power as a songwriter. “It’s very fun and carefree,” Gregory said. “I think that whenever you hear that song, you remember what it’s like to be 5 or 6 years old and not really having a care in the world.” Guthrie himself counseled that adults could learn from children. “Watch the kids,” Guthrie advised. “Do like they do. Act like they act. Yell like they yell. Dance the ways you see them dance. Sing like they sing. Work and rest the way the kids do. You’ll be healthier. You’ll feel wealthier. You’ll talk wiser. You’ll go higher, do better, and live longer here amongst us if you’ll just only jump in here and swim around in these songs and do like the kids do. I don’t want the kids to be grownup. I want to see the grown folks be kids.” Lorković, first moved to tears as a child by Guthrie’s work, said the songwriter’s legacy is if anything more relevant to life in 2019. “Now,” Lorković said, “we need Woody more than ever.” Passes are $40-$120, but some events are free to attend. Visit woodyfest.com.

Woody Guthrie Folk Festival July 10-14 Okemah woodyfest.com $40-$120

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EVENT

MUSIC

Picher Pile

A local band releasing its debut EP gets its inspiration from a Superfund site in Picher. By Jeremy Martin

One of the primary sources for lead mined to make the bullets fired in World Wars I and II, Picher, Oklahoma, now sits ruined and mostly empty. Environmental Protection Agency declared it a Superfund site in 1983 and began capping thousands of mine shafts and digging a deeper aquifer for the city’s water source, but blood tests taken in the mid ’90s showed 63 percent of the children there had lead poisoning. The police force and government disbanded in 2009, and the 2010 census counted a population of 20. Watching The Creek Runs Red, a 2006 documentary about Picher, Chat Pile bassist Austin Tackett could relate to the town’s few remaining residents. “They show all these small-town folks who refused to leave,” said Tackett, “because they love it and that’s all they know. And I feel like there’s kind of a theme like that to the music we make where the things that you love are ulti-

Chat Pile is named for heavy metal waste. | Photo provided

mately going to kill you.” Oklahoma City’s Chat Pile, named for the mountains of heavy metal waste contaminating the air and water in Picher, plays its first live show July 11 at 89th Street — OKC. Tackett, a member of the music collective Dust House Studio who has played in Purple Church and Found Footage, said Chat Pile is “a little more confrontational” than his previous bands. “We definitely knew we wanted to do something kind of heavy and gross,” Tackett said. “There’s no compromise. We are making what we would consider to be an expression of the true nihilistic terror that we all feel in the current state of affairs that we all live in right now. There’s no attempt to make it appealing to anybody. It’s just us making the ugliest 24

J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

kind of music we can make.” Vocalist and lyricist Randy Heyer said Chat Pile’s metallic noise rock gives him the chance to write about subjects he has never covered in his work as solo singer/songwriter. “I’m a big horror movie fan, and I’ve never made music before that explores those kinds of themes,” Heyer said. “For this, I’ve been very much encouraged by my bandmates to just be crazy and write disgusting, violent stuff.” The characters populating This Dungeon Earth, the band’s debut EP released in May, are “speaking from a defeatist standpoint” with a “nihilistic attitude,” Heyer said. “Rat Boy” sounds like paranoia personified; “Crawlspace” is a psychotically unhinged monologue about animal mutilation and “mass extinction” delivered by an Oklahoma City police officer; and on “Rainbow Meat,” Heyer screams “send my body to Arby’s/ cut me into thin slices.” “I guess that, of all the songs, is sort of the autobiog raphical song,” Heyer said. “That’s just sort of my reaction every time I read the news and some idiot has gone and shot like 20 people in a fucking bar or some shit. I’m just like, ‘Fuck it. I’m ready to go.’ We are just sinking into a hellscape right now, and it’s very, very scary. … I feel like if you’re an artist today in 2019 and your art doesn’t reflect what’s happening in the world, you’re not making anything that’s worthwhile at all.” Tackett said the album is inspired by “the inescapable realization that we’re all doomed.” “Global ecological collapse is imminent,” Tackett said. “Probably, from a political and infrastructure standpoint, the horizon doesn’t look very good. … For me, and I think probably for the other guys too, it’s the idea of feeling so claustrophobic and helpless about the way things are going. … You have all this pent-up fear and rage. You kind of feel like an animal backed into a corner, and the music is a way of just vomiting all that negativity out.” The album also features guitarist Griff S. and Tackett’s brother Aaron playing a Yamaha DTXplorer electron-

ic drum set to facilitate a more “cold, mechanical approach” to music making. “The joke around the Chat Pile offices is that we have to face the fact that we’re a metal band,” Tackett said. “I think that to some extent, we’re trying to recontextualize all kinds of what I would consider the type of music that Beavis and Butthead would watch.” Though Chat Pile intentionally set out to make ugly, uncompromising music, Tackett said the album is “easily more popular” than any other project he has played on, based on the number of times it has been streamed on Bandcamp. “There’s a niche audience for it, but that niche seems to be relating to it,” Tackett said. “People who are into that kind of ’90s, noise rock sound definitely seem to be on board. … I’ve had so many people kind of come out of the woodwork to tell me that they really like what we’re doing, and I’ve never really had that happen before. So it’s a great feeling. … It just kind of goes to show that if you just do what you want to do, it connects with people better.” Heyer said he has had a similar experience. “Different people have come to me who I’ve been friends with forever but never really complimented my music that are like, ‘Oh, I love this,’” Heyer said. As a solo artist, Heyer typically plays an acoustic guitar while sitting down, and he is excited to front Chat Pile live. “I can’t wait to perform without anything in my hands so I can stalk the stage or whatever,” Heyer said. “There’s no opportunity to take my shirt off that’s not weird in my acoustic set. I can’t wait.” Tackett is interested to see how Chat Pile is received live because most of the OKC noise enthusiasts he knows are in the band with him. “Here’s the problem that we kind of deal with locally,” Tackett said. “We’re too weird and eclectic for maybe your traditional Hesher metal fans, but we’re too heavy and mean for maybe your more DIY punk rock fan. We kind of live in this sort of middle ground that alienates all of our potential audience. … In the past

Chat Pile plays its first live show July 11 at 89th Street – OKC. | Photo provided

bands that we’ve been in, we’ve spent so much time and effort trying to promote locally, and it’s just such a masturbatory dead end. With this band, we’re definitely setting our sights more on a national level. ... Don’t get me wrong; I love the local music scene. But as far as the music we make, I just don’t know if there’s really a whole lot of an audience. I would love to be proved wrong.” Heyer — whose vocal performance is inspired by the screams of Scratch Acid’s David Yow, Pixies’ Black Francis and Bad Brains’ H.R., who Heyer called “maybe the greatest vocalist that ever lived” — said he is primarily concerned with avoiding sore throats and laryngitis. “I guess my main goal here is not losing my voice or just destroying my voice, but I’m working on it,” Heyer said. Tickets are $10-$12. Street Sects and Zusammenbruch share the bill. Visit 89thstreetokc.com.

This Dungeon Earth, Chat Pile’s debut EP, was released in May. | Image provided

Chat Pile 7 p.m. July 11 89th Street – OKC 8911 N. Western Ave. 405-463-9203 $10-$12


LIVE MUSIC These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Adam Aguilar & the Weekend All Stars, Sidecar Barley & Wine Bar. COVER John Carlton & Kyle Reid, The Winston. SINGER/SONGWRITER

MXMS/The Guidance/Visions in Black, 89th StreetOKC. POP

Johnny Black & the Highway Walkers, Triple’s. ROCK Kyle Rainer, Remington Park. COUNTRY Mauno, Opolis. ROCK Miss Brown to You, Full Circle Bookstore. JAZZ/FOLK Shaun Suttle, Othello’s Italian Restaurant. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Wink Burcham, Bedlam Bar-B-Q. FOLK

SUNDAY, JULY 7 Carter Sampson, The Blue Door. COUNTRY Cowboy Jones, Arcadia Round Barn.

COUNTRY

THURSDAY, JULY 4

Equilibrium, Myriad Botanical Gardens. SOUL/JAZZ

Hot House Band, Othello’s Italian Restaurant. JAZZ

Hosty, The Deli. FOLK/ROCK

Pool Kids/Mover Shaker, 89th Street-OKC. ROCK

Restless Heart, Riverwind Casino. COUNTRY

Rachel Lynch, Black Mesa Brewing Company.

Superfreak, Newcastle Casino. COVER

SINGER/SONGWRITER

Shelly Phelps & Dylan Nagode, Jazmo’z Bourbon St. Café. ACOUSTIC Trifecta/Carol Morgan, The Deli. ROCK

MONDAY, JULY 8 Jason Hunt, Sean Cumming’s Irish Restaurant. FOLK Man Man/Rebecca Black, Opolis. EXPERIMENTAL/POP

21 Savage Let us get this out of the way first: 21 Savage is coming to OKC, but mercifully, not with “rockstar” co-star Post Malone. That stock photo up there is from the 2018 Billboard Music Awards, and it was all we had to use after Savage’s press people ignored our requests. But considering Shéyaa Bin Abraham-Joseph, aka 21 Savage, has spent the year fighting U.S. Immigration Customs and Enforcement (ICE) over an expired visa and recently donated $25,000 to Southern Poverty Law Center to help other immigrants obtain legal help, we will let it slide just this once, even if it means we have to make you look at Facetat McBedhead. Sorry. Fortunately DaBaby is actually scheduled to share the bill. The show starts 8 p.m. July 10 at The Criterion, 500 E. Sheridan Ave. Tickets are $55. Call 405-840-5500 or visit criterionokc. com. JULY 10 Photo bigstock.com

FRIDAY, JULY 5

TUESDAY, JULY 9

Air Supply, WinStar World Casino. POP

David Amram & Friends, The Blue Door.

Erick Taylor Duo, Othello’s Italian Restaurant. ACOUSTIC

Janice Francis-Smith, Full Circle Bookstore. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Jessica Tate & John Rouse, Bossa Nova Caipirinha Lounge. JAZZ Kyle Rainer, Remington Park. COUNTRY The Sugar Time Band, Arcadia Round Barn. COUNTRY

THANK YOU FOR YOUR NOMINATIONS. STAY TUNED FOR THE RUNOFFS!

SINGER/SONGWRITER

Kyle Reid, Scratch Kitchen & Cocktails. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Stitched Up Heart/9ELECTRIC, 89th Street-OKC. ELECTRONIC

Young the Giant/Fitz & the Tantrums/COIN, The Zoo Amphitheatre. POP

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10

RUNOFF BALLOTS PUBLISH JULY 17 & JULY 24 RESULTS PUBLISH AUGUST 21 OFFER UP THANKS PUBLISH AUGUST 28

21 Savage/DaBaby, The Criterion. HIP-HOP

Tandem, Redrock Canyon Grill. COVER

SATURDAY, JULY 6 4-H Music Corps, Arcadia Round Barn. COUNTRY Brad Fielder, Lazy Circles Brewing. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Cody Canada & the Departed, Riverwind Casino. COUNTRY DJ Litebrite, Fassler Hall. ELECTRONIC Dustin Welch/HalleyAnna/Curtis McCurty, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

Janice Francis Smith, APCO Med. SINGER/SONGWRITER

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS!

B E S T O F O K L A H O M AC I T Y. C O M

CALL TODAY 405.528.6000 OR EMAIL US AT ADVERTISING@OKGAZETTE.COM O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

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CANNABIS

THE HIGH CULTURE

Shelf life

THC

Legal struggles have not stopped Top Shelf Health & Wellness from expanding. By Matt Dinger

The staff at Top Shelf Health & Wellness, 2518 N. Meridian Ave., have been waiting a year to get paid what they are owed from a CBD isolate deal gone awry, but that is already in the rearview for the rapidly expanding business. As previously reported by Oklahoma Gazette, Top Shelf OKC sued Hi-Tunes Distribution, LLC in Oklahoma County District Court on Feb. 14 over the deal, which occurred in 2018. On May 24, district judge Susan Stallings awarded them $72,600, the full amount requested, in a default judgment, according to the order. “Defendant was required to appear and defend this action … and that no appearance has been made by said defendant, nor has any motion or pleading been filed on its behalf,” Stallings wrote. “We gave him plenty of time to bring the isolate back, give us the money. And, The owners of Top Shelf Health & Wellness recently won a lawsuit against Hi-Tunes Distribution, LLC regarding a CBD isolate deal gone awry. | Photo Alexa Ace

I mean, we’re getting more than what he owed us out of the deal, so that’s that, really. No hard feelings towards him or anything, but business is business,” said Top Shelf co-owner Reed Mitchell. “We had come in contact through another partner of ours, and we were going to do something when Hempfest was coming to Oklahoma, and that never seemed to come to fruition.” Another lawsuit involving Oklahoma Hempfest and Hi-Tunes is still being litigated, but Top Shelf is not a plaintiff in that action. The terms of the original deal were in exchange for the money, Top Shelf expected to receive 8 kilograms, or 17.6 pounds, of CBD isolate within 10 days and $12,000 in cash within 30 days. The deal was also supposed to include a direct line of communication to the supplier of the CBD isolate. A clause in the contract provided for a full refund if Hi-Tunes failed to meet its end of the bargain. “Hi-Tunes failed to perform all or

nearly all of its obligations under the Contract,” the petition states. “The CBD isolate it delivered to Top Shelf was of insufficient weight and/or inferior quality to be sold at fair-market value. Hi-Tunes did not pay Top Shelf $12,000, or any amount, within 30 days of the Contract’s execution. And, Hi-Tunes never provided any proof of purchase or put Top Shelf in communication with the CBD isolate’s source.” Top Shelf was refunded $4,000 in September with the promise that the rest was to follow. The petition states it never did. In February, Hi-Tunes founder Scott McKinley acknowledged that he still owed Top Shelf $8,000, which Mitchell said still had not been paid before the judgment in Top Shelf’s favor. Ultimately, Mitchell said, the deal ended up costing the business between $15,000 and $20,000. “It got to the point where we got too busy here and had to let the attorneys

Reed Mitchell, co-owner of Top Shelf Health & Wellness | Photo Alexa Ace

handle it,” he said. “We kind of got in trouble with the investors for a second, but once weed came in and the store started turnkeying, they were more than happy,” said co-owner Jacob Gorman. “Since then, we got flower and business is booming. We haven’t looked back yet,” Mitchell said. “Reed and I knew each other in high school, and then I had moved out to Colorado. Life goes by. He brings up CBD. I’m like, ‘That’s a great idea.’ I knew my buddy here, good business guy. We all got together and started with a white board,” Gorman said. The “good business guy” is co-owner Andrew Jackson. “We saw an opportunity,” Jackson said. “I don’t think we knew that medical was going to be so soon upon us, but we still saw the opportunity, thought we

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could run with CBD until the time came, and the time came sooner than expected.” “We wanted to be our own bosses and work together,” Gorman said. Top Shelf opened its doors in June 2018. “Whenever we started, we were broke. No money,” Mitchell said. “All we got were questions. People would just come in and ask questions,” Jackson said. But just a few weeks later, Oklahoma voters approved a medical cannabis industry that would be kick-started just a few months down the road.

We’d never thought about doing medical marijuana or owning more than one store or a grow or a processing facility, so it’s definitely a lot bigger than what we’d ever planned. Reed Mitchell Mitchell and Jackson are both 26 years old, but Gorman turned 25 on July 2. The minimum age to operate a cannabis business is 25 years old, according to state law, so Gorman just squeaked by. “We applied a month after that,” Gorman said. They did not even realize the age requirement until they saw the application. “At that point, you’d have to have another LLC that I would be a part of and then another LLC that applied for the license, which makes it way more complicated. Now we have nine LLCs,” Gorman said. “We got lucky,” Mitchell said. But it is not all luck. Their business prowess has provided enough return that they are set to open another location next month at 1114 W. Hefner Road. Then they plan on opening third and fourth stores, Mitchell said. In addition, they already have one small grow, approximately 1,500 square feet, operating, and the first of five 10,000 square-foot facilities is currently being built. And they will also be debuting their line of processed cannabis produced under the name Naked Extracts. Mitchell said the extraction facility should be built by the end of the month. “We’d never thought about doing medical marijuana or owning more than one store or a grow or a processing facility, so it’s definitely a lot bigger than what we’d ever planned,” Mitchell said. “It was a long, stressful year there for a while, a lot of money being spent. Finally, towards the end, we started to see some you got some good numbers. And hopefully by the end of the year, you know, we’ll really be moving on down the road.” Visit topshelfokc.com. O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U LY 3 , 2 0 1 9

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Glass magic TaMike McCloud is returning to his love of glassblowing, opening a new gallery Aug. 2 and doing a live glassblowing demonstration this month. By Matt Dinger

TaMike McCloud incidentally witnessed a glassblower practicing his craft about five years ago and quickly fell in love with the art. It has been a bumpy ride, but he is entering a new era for his business. “It’s not that I just focus on pipes. I’m a glass artist. The main thing that I do is make marbles. I can make pipes. I can make pendants. I do chandeliers, goblets, all of that, but my thing is marbles,” McCloud said. “I opened up a smoke shop. Went out to a trade show and there were a bunch of glassblowers there. Spent more time around the glassblowers than I did in the trade show.” McCloud got his start about five years ago and learned from a glassblower who goes by the name of Earl Jr. from Grey Area Studios in Arlington, Texas. “He took me under his wing, and I just started learning from there. We would talk by phone,” he said. “I didn’t

TaMike McCloud, at work fashioning a piece of glass art, opens his new shop, Centered Glass Gallery, in Oklahoma City next month. | Photo Alexa Ace

know which equipment to buy. I basically gave them access to my account. He built my cart, ordered everything I needed. He talked to me by phone, how to hook everything up, started me on YouTube videos, which videos to order, all this other stuff. And then after about three or four months, I went down there and actually was able to kick it with them for a little bit.” McCloud opens Centered Glass Gallery, 6226 N. Meridian Ave., on Aug. 2. “We will be opening up a glass gallery that’s nothing but high-end art pieces,” McCloud said. They will also be selling pipes, a fact continued on page 33

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THE HIGH CULTURE continued from page 31

CANNABIS

that is a little more surprising if you know about the trouble selling glass pieces previously brought him. The trial about The Friendly Market selling glass pipes in Norman was highly publicized, but not as many know about McCloud’z Pipes. “Most people aren’t familiar with McCloud’z. That was the first one in Norman, and I was down there for two years before all of that happened. I had a glass gallery down there. My pipes started at about three dollars, but they went up to about five, six thousand dollars. The majority of my pipes were a hundred dollars and over. And over, it was, I think, over 70 different artists throughout the U.S. I had and three from out of country. Had murals of local artists throughout the place and all this other stuff,” he said. “But, long story short, got raided simply because I was selling glass. Fought that for two and a half years. Oklahoma became legal. The DA called me up and said, ‘We’ll drop all the charges if we get to keep all your stuff.’ I was like, ‘Yeah, keep my stuff.

But once you’ve been burned, it’s hard to feel good doing it again. TaMike McCloud Drop charges.’ And then I’m just building back up again at this point.” The confiscated pieces totaled between $60,000 and $80,000. “I had first-edition pieces that you wouldn’t get anywhere else. You had pieces from Bob Snodgrass, LaceFace. There’s so many artists to where, for instance, for the Snodgrass piece that I picked up back in the day for $100, it sells for $1,000 today,” McCloud said. “That’s the type of glass that I deal with, and that’s what was down there.” The entire debacle lasted more than three years. “A couple of friends have contacted me to kind of do some things, and I’ve been kind of picky about what I want to do because the whole glass scene, everybody knows me for what type of glass I carried,” he said. “I really would like to get back into it. But once you’ve been burned, it’s hard to feel good doing it again. That raid really took the joy of blowing glass away from me, and that’s the biggest thing out of everything that happened. It was the joy of blowing glass that I hate the most that was taken.” He has been working for a dispensary and blowing glass in Seminole and decided to jump back into the glass scene. However, he will not be doing glassblowing inside the new gallery. “When I first started the shop down in Norman, I set up a glassblowing

studio, thinking that all the stores around the U.S. did it. And then I had glassblowers coming up and it was like, ‘You have one of the top stores in the country,’” McCloud said. “The type of store that we want to do in Oklahoma City, we won’t have a glassblowing studio, but we will be able to do a lot more without that studio being there.” Since State Question 788 was passed, a lot of freedom and opportunities have opened for McCloud, but some things have not changed for him. “Honestly, I don’t like calling a water pipe a bong because, for me, ‘bong’ is still related to drug paraphernalia. That’s kind of ingrained there,” he said. “This is coming from a business standpoint and ownership standpoint and a personal standpoint, but I sell glass for a lot of guys out of Dallas, guys and gals out of Dallas, so when I come up here and I’m like, ‘Hey, you know, I have this American glass,’ and I go to a dispensary and I’m like, ‘Yeah, would you all be interested in this?’ For them to turn around and say no, you know, and not even look at it simply because of price. Like, do you not understand what these people have been going through strictly to try to support themselves? ... They’re just hustling day in and day out just trying to provide for their families. It’s not like they’re even out just smoking and getting high all day, which is what most people think. It’s a true job for these folks. On one side of it, I understand the price, but on the other side, everybody’s screaming, ‘Buy American! Buy American!’ Here’s an opportunity. I know how much a dispensary makes because I work within one, and when you have an opportunity to buy American, you turn it down and say no. Now that we can do this, can you support some of the people who have been supporting this industry before the way it is now?” McCloud performs a live glassblowing demonstration at Lucky’s Grow Supply’s 710 celebration July 13. The event is noon-5 p.m. and also features other glass vendors, a giveaway and a cookout sponsored by Schwab Meat Co. Its 710 bus will be parked on the property for on-site consumption by Oklahoma-licensed patients. “It’s going to be a good time for all. We realize it’s not 710, but you know, we all have poor short-term memory, so maybe we can all forget,” Lucky’s co-owner John Degerness said.

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FLOWER REVIEW

GLAZED APRICOT GELATO Strain name: Glazed Apricot Gelato Grown by: Robot Pharmer Acquired from: Top Shelf Health & Wellness Date acquired: June 25 THC/CBD percentages: 25.7 percent/.23 percent (per Green Country Testing, Inc.) Physical traits: Bright green with an abundance of bright orange stigmas with moderate to dense trichomes Bouquet: Sweet, strong citrus

Gazette’s weekly section, The High Culture, explores Oklahoma’s new medical cannabis industry, including the social, medical and economical impact as it unfolds across the metro.

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Review: This indica-dominant hybrid between Gelato #1 and Legend Orange Apricot is among the most potent strains I have had from Oklahoma’s cannabis market this year. The first hit immediately relaxed me, the second put me further down and, during the coughing fit that erupted after the third hit and the dry mouth that ensued immediately, I knew I was in for a ride. Within minutes, I went

Glazed Apricot Gelato from Robot Pharmer | Photo Alexa Ace

from being in gear to firmly in park, with a heavy high that lasted nearly two hours and a tapering period that was just as lengthy. I have been hearing the name Robot Pharmer in quite a few circles lately, and for good reason. They are one of a handful of independent growers that have already established themselves as reputable brands for quality cannabis. Top Shelf OKC co-owner Reed Mitchell said that the shop carries as many Robot Pharmer strains as they can, and now I see why. Clear your schedule before taking on Glazed Apricot Gelato. Cannabis effects vary wildly from patient to patient based on a multitude of factors, including THC tolerance, brain chemistry and personal taste. This review is based on the subjective experience of one patient.


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1 Word in Facebook and Disney Channel’s original names 4 Ninny 8 Subj. of a National Historic Site outside Wall, S.D. 12 Ditties 17 Bridge component 19 Previously owned 20 Upshot of a story 22 Wolf howls, maybe 23 Org. concerned with grades 24 Certain warriors in Magic: The Gathering 25 One of three properties in Monopoly 26 Silver 27 Don at the Met 29 Cream and others 30 Attire that flaps in the wind 31 E, B, G, D, A or E 32 B-team 34 Sports-team employee 36 Shell station? 38 Using without paying royalties, say 41 ____ amis (my friends: French) 42 Part of QED 43 Like a swished basketball shot 45 ____ volente (God willing: Lat.) 46 Aspire 47 Paroxysm 49 It “isn’t so bad when you consider the alternative,” per Maurice Chevalier 50 Designed to minimize drag 51 Cooked up 53 Being 55 What you will always be (but he or she isn’t)? 57 Provincial capital south of a lake with the same name 59 Recurrent theme 60 Indication of good taste? 61 Famed furrier 62 Clip 64 Low-quality 66 Major name in network hardware 70 ____ Tin Tin 72 “If you can’t imitate him, don’t copy him” speaker 74 Introduce oneself 76 Fruit that, surprisingly, is slightly radioactive 79 Supporting role 81 Kind of spring found in a mousetrap 82 Reassuring words after an accident 83 Attacks 85 Fortitude 87 It’s replicated during mitosis 88 URL ending 89 Winner’s wreath 90 Product from the Royal Small Arms Factory 91 Sound while being tickled 92 Warm winter wear 94 Beatrix Potter’s Mrs. Tiggy- winkle, for one 97 Pulse 98 “All ____ is but art, unknown to thee”: Alexander Pope 101 Deeply ingrained habit 104 Leaning 105 Nails a test 107 Geniuses, informally

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15 Suffix with defer or insist 16 About 5:00, directionally: Abbr. 18 Ray or Dave of the Kinks 21 Doris who won the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature 28 “Gimme ____!” (Alabama cheerleader’s repeated call) 29 Author Harte 33 Walk with a firm, heavy step 35 Staring a bit too long, perhaps 37 Bad tumble 38 Objects spinning in an orrery 39 Model for a bust at the Musei Capitolini 40 Continue 41 Knee-covering skirts 43 Nonwinner 44 Drug treatment for Muhammad Ali 46 Competitor of Sanyo and Bose 47 Add to the mix 48 Animation 49 Subject of a statue outside Boston’s TD Garden 50 The two sides in chess, essentially 52 Arctic wear 54 Never to be forgotten 56 Trick-taking game 58 Talkaholics 63 What movie trailers do 65 What cibophobia is the fear of

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67 Specialty of Muddy Waters and Blind Willie Johnson 68 Copy 69 Actress Chaplin of Game of Thrones 71 1998 Winter Olympics host 73 Teller? 75 Poetic direction 76 Majors 77 One way to run 78 New brother or sister 80 Flower for a 20th wedding anniversary 84 Bush 86 Bust supporter 89 Stieg who wrote The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo 90 Out of business 91 Somewhere to chill, paradoxically 93 Tricorder go-with 95 Nice finish, maybe 96 Sarcastic syllable 98 Gets warmer, so to speak 99 Jerks 100 Quaint contradiction 102 Eponymous cup maker 103 Thomas Cromwell, Earl of ____ 104 Musical miscue 106 ____ eyes on (see) 108 Four-letter U.S. city with the highest population 109 Ruler units: Abbr. 111 Five Georges

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Homework: “Know thyself—or else! Follow your dreams—or else!” Please comment. Truthrooster@gmail.com. ARIES (March 21-April 19)

When the universe began 13.8 billion years ago, there were only four elements: mostly hydrogen and helium, plus tiny amounts of lithium and beryllium. Now there are 118 elements, including five that are key components of your body: oxygen, carbon, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus. All of those were created by nuclear reactions blazing on the insides of stars that later died. So it’s literally true to say that much of your flesh and blood and bones and nerves originated at the hearts of stars. I invite you to meditate on that amazing fact. It’s a favorable time to muse on your origins and your ancestry; to ruminate about all the events that led to you being here today— including more recent decades, as well as the past 13.8 billion years.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

Most American women couldn’t vote until a hundred years ago. Women in Japan, France, and Italy couldn’t vote until the 1940s. Universal suffrage has been a fundamental change in how society is structured. Similarly, same-sex marriage was opposed by vast majorities in most countries until 15 years ago, but has since become widely accepted. African American slavery lasted for hundreds of years before being delegitimized all over the Western world in the nineteenth century. Brazil, which hosted forty percent of all kidnapped Africans, didn’t free its slaves until 1888. What would be the equivalent of such revolutionary transformations in your own personal life? According to my reading of the astrological omens, you have the power to make that happen during the next twelve months.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

Gemini musician Paul Weller is famous in the UK, though not so much elsewhere. According to the BBC, he is one of Britain’s “most revered music writers and performers.” To which I say: revered, maybe, but mentally healthy? Not so much. He bragged that he broke up his marriage with his wife Dee C. Lee because “things were going too

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well, we were too happy, too comfortable, everything seemed too nice.” He was afraid that “as a writer and an artist I might lose my edge.” Don’t you dare allow yourself to get infected with that perverse way of thinking, my dear Gemini. Please capitalize on your current comfort and happiness. Use them to build your strength and resilience for the months and years to come. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Cancerian voice actor Tom Kenny has played the roles of over 1,500 cartoon characters, including SpongeBob SquarePants, Spyro the Dragon, Jake Spidermonkey, Commander Peepers, and Doctor Octopus. I propose that we make him your role model in the coming weeks. It will be a favorable time for you to show your versatility; to demonstrate how multifaceted you can be; to express various sides of your soulful personality.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

Leo author Donald Miller reminds us that fear can have two very different purposes. On the one hand, it may be “a guide to keep us safe,” alerting us to situations that could be dangerous or abusive. On the other hand, fear may work as “a manipulative emotion that can trick us into living a boring life.” After studying your astrological indicators for the coming weeks, Leo, I have come to the conclusion that fear may serve both of those functions for you. Your challenge will be to discern between them; to know which situations are genuinely risky and which situations are daunting but promising. Here’s a hint that might help: trust your gut feelings more than your swirling fantasies.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Why do flocks of geese fly in a V-formation? Because to do so enhances the collective efficiency of their travel. Each bird generates a current that supports the bird behind it. Let’s make this phenomenon one of your power metaphors for the coming weeks. What would be the equivalent strategy for you and your tribe or group as you seek to make your collaborative efforts more dynamic and productive? Unforeseen help will augment any actions you take in this regard.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

“A conversation is a dialogue, not a monologue,” mused Libra author Truman Capote. “That’s why there are so few good conversations: due to scarcity, two intelligent talkers seldom meet.” That cynical formulation has more than a few grains of truth in it, I must admit. But I’m pleased to tell you that I suspect your experience in the coming weeks will be an exception to Capote’s rule. I think you have the potential to embark on a virtual binge of rich discussion and intriguing interplay with people who stimulate and educate and entertain you. Rise to the challenge!

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

In accordance with astrological rhythms, you are authorized to make the following declarations in the next two weeks: 1. “I refuse to participate further in this situation on the grounds that it might impinge on the expansiveness of my imagination.” 2. “I abstain from dealing with your skepticism on the grounds that doing so might discourage the flights of my imagination.” 3. “I reject these ideas, theories, and beliefs on the grounds that they might pinch, squash, or deflate my imagination.” What I’m trying to tell you, Scorpio, is that it’s crucial for you to emancipate your imagination and authorize it to play uninhibitedly in the frontiers of possibilities.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Dear Sagittarius: I invite you to make a copy of the testimonial below and give it to anyone who is in a position to support your Noble Experiment. “To Whom It May Concern: I endorse this Soulful Sagittarius for the roles of monster-tamer, fun-locator, boredom-transcender, elation-inciter, and mountaintop visionary. This adroit explorer is endowed with charming zeal, disarming candor, and abundant generosity. If you need help in sparking your enthusiasm or galvanizing your drive to see the big picture, call on the expansive skills of this jaunty puzzle-solver.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Life will conspire to bring you a surge of love in the coming weeks—if you can handle it. Can you? Will you be able to deal adeptly with rumbling love and icy hot love and mostly sweet but also a bit sour love? Do you possess the

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resourcefulness and curiosity necessary to have fun with funny spiritual love and running-through-the-labyrinth love and unexpectedly catalytic love? Are you openminded and open-hearted enough to make the most of brilliant shadowy love and unruly sensitive love and toughly graceful love?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

I don’t endlessly champion the “no pain, no gain” theory of personal growth. My philosophy holds that we are at least as likely to learn valuable lessons from pleasurable and joyful experiences as we are from difficult and taxing struggles. Having said that, I also think it’s true that our suffering may lead us to treasure if we know how to work with it. According to my assessment, the coming weeks will bring one such opening for you. To help you cultivate the proper spirit, keep in mind the teaching of Aquarian theologian and author Henri Nouwen. He said that life’s gifts may be “hidden in the places that hurt most.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

The Japanese word “wabi-sabi” refers to an interesting or evocative imperfection in a work of art that makes it more beautiful than if it were merely perfect. “Duende” is a Spanish word referring to a work of art that gives its viewers the chills because it’s so emotionally rich and unpredictably soulful. In the coming weeks, I think that you yourself will be a work of art with an abundance of these qualities. Your wabi-sabi will give you the power to free yourself from the oppressive pressures of seeking too much precision and purity. Your duende can give you the courage you need to go further than you’ve ever dared in your quest for the love you really want.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes /daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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