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INSIDE COVER P. 30 One year after nearly 57 percent

BILLY BOB THORNTON

of voters approved State Question 788, Oklahoma politicians, caregivers and activists assess how the state has adjusted to medical cannabis and explore what must still be done on behalf of patients.

By Matt Dinger Cover by Kimberly Lynch Photos by Alexa Ace

NEWS Crown Heights United Methodist Church 6 CITY MAPS 4 meetings 8 CITY maintenance sales tax 4 CITY

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CHICKEN-FRIED NEWS

EAT & DRINK 11 REVIEW Fonda K-Tratcha

12 FEATURE Chuanyu Fusion

14 GAZEDIBLES restaurant fast food

ARTS & CULTURE 17 ART Between the Isms: The

Oklahoma Society of Impressionists and Selected Expressionists at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art

An Original Music Docuseries

18 ART Heart Studios and

International Art Lovers Group

Center Music Hall

19 THEATER Singin’ in the Rain at Civic

S T REA M O N L I N E

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21 COMMUNITY Spokies Dash

22 OKG LIFESTYLE Allie Shinn 23 CALENDAR

streaming JULY 25

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CIT Y

NEWS

Open hearts

An Oklahoma City church is the latest to affirm its support for members of the LGBTQ+ community. By Miguel Rios

Crown Heights United Methodist Church is the latest Oklahoma church to join Reconciling Ministries Network (RMN). An organization primarily made up of United Methodist organizations and individuals, RMN seeks to affirm and find justice for “people of all sexual orientations and gender identities.” Crown Heights is the fourth church in the state to join RMN, in addition to Mosaic United Methodist Church (UMC), St. Stephens UMC and St. Paul’s UMC. Along with the four churches, 17 other groups in Oklahoma are affiliated with Reconciling Ministries Network. “After the United Methodist Church’s General Conference in late February, where the direction of the denomination reinforced and strengthened the penalties against gay marriage and gay ordination, my church had a strong reaction,” said Rev. Trina Bose North, Crown Heights senior pastor. “Many within my church worried about calling this United Methodist Church their home when it didn’t feel so comfortable anymore.” United Methodist Church delegates from around the world voted 53 to 47 percent to adopt the Traditional Plan, which doubles down on and enforces the church’s historical stance against homosexuality and closes loopholes that allow for LGBTQ+ clergy. “When the denomination came out against gay marriage and gay ordination, many in my church felt like they had to speak out in order for our church to remain inclusive and open to all people,” North said. “We had this reconciling group within our church who invited the larger church into this conversation of becoming a reconciling church, and that really started a lot of conversation.” Crown Heights’ reconciling group sent out a letter March 27 to the rest of the church. In the following two months, the congregation came together through Bible studies, open sharing and meetings to discuss inclusion and affiliating with RMN. Lane Neal, chairman of the church’s board of trustees and its reconciling group, said it felt important to take a position on the issue. “I have been a lifelong Methodist,” he said. “I was always raised with the belief that Methodism was a denomination that was open to everyone, and as I got older ... learned that that’s not the case. I, like so many people, have LGBT family and friends. The direction that the larger church was taking was inconsistent with the way our local church was operating and with my own personal beliefs. … We just felt like it was 4

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important, not only for us as a congregation to take on the issue, but also to make sure that our friends and neighbors in the Oklahoma City community knew where Crown Heights stood on the issue. “‘Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors’ — that’s the slogan of the United Methodist Church. … A large part of my life attending Methodist churches have been led by women pastors, which I know other denominations don’t allow. When it comes to communion, our communion table at every United Methodist Church in the world, it is open to everyone. So that’s kind of the backdrop of most people’s experience with the United Methodist Church. When the church reinforced its position on not ordaining LGBT people and not allowing Methodist ministers to preside over LGBT weddings, it really exposed something that I think a lot of us have just not paid attention to because that’s not the experience we were having at Crown Heights.”

Reconciling faith

Crown Heights held two votes at a May 19 church conference. One vote was to adopt a statement of inclusivity, which passed with 97 percent support, and one vote was to join RMN, which passed with 84 percent support. “It was emotional, and it was not a unanimous decision,” North said. “There were people opposed to joining RMN for a couple of good, legitimate reasons. For example, there was hesitation for our church to affiliate with any outside organization at all; we’ve never done that in our history. … The biggest worry people had in affiliating was associating with an outside group, that RMN would then speak for us, that whatever they did became our voice. But we are still Crown Heights United Methodist Church. Our church did not change overnight by joining RMN. We are still the same

people. Who we were yesterday is who we are today. This church has always been a church where people of all sorts of different backgrounds feel welcome.” The church’s statement of inclusivity officially affirms those beliefs. “Crown Heights United Methodist Church is dedicated to personifying inclusion and equality for ALL children of God,” the statement reads. “We welcome people of every sexual orientation, gender identity, age, race, class, nationality, and mental or physical ability to be in ministry with us. We want our community to recognize Crown Heights as a safe haven where all people are welcomed, affirmed, loved, and supported by the members of our congregation. We call our church members to be the extended hand of God.” Despite the church’s statement on inclusivity and affiliation with RMN, it is still limited by the rules of the UMC. That means it cannot conduct same-sex weddings or ordain LGBTQ+ people. But Neal said it was still crucial to take a stance. “As a church congregation, you develop close personal relationships with other people in the congregation. And through our ministries, we work with a whole lot of programs in the Oklahoma City community. We didn’t want to lose that,” he said. “The alternative for a lot of people was looking for different congregations and basically leaving Crown Heights Church. Adopting the statement and affiliating with the Rev. Trina Bose North wants all people to feel welcome at Crown Heights United Methodist Church while working to impact change within the church. | Photo Alexa Ace

Crown Heights United Methodist Church is the fourth Oklahoma church to join Reconciling Ministries Network, a group of churches working for full inclusion of LGBTQ+ people. | Photo Miguel Rios

Reconciling Ministries Network basically allowed us to stay together in the congregation, to keep as many people as we could together while making sure that everyone who walks in our door and everyone who engages with our congregation knows that we’re committed to full inclusion for all people.” North hopes people will see Crown Heights standing in solidarity with the LGBTQ+ community as it also works to impact change within the denomination. “If we don’t make it known that we are a church who welcomes all, then our community won’t know that. If all you know about the United Methodist Church is that we don’t ordain gay and lesbian people, then we don’t think anyone in our community would feel safe to come in, that anybody in the LGBTQ community would feel safe to even walk through our doors,” she said. “So we want our church to be known as a place where people are safe to enter. Our goal is to pass on the love of God to everyone. … What’s truly at stake here is a message of God’s love for everyone. The reason why it’s important for Crown Heights to send this message out to the LGBT community is because we want to make sure that gay, lesbian, trans people are hearing the good news that God loves them.” A group of Crown Heights members represented the church in the Oklahoma City Pride parade last Saturday. Visit crownheightsumc.org.


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O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9


NEWS

CIT Y

Oklahoma City Council approved four special meetings to hear presentations and discuss the various proposed projects for MAPS 4. | Photo Miguel Rios

Meeting agendas

A series of presentations and public discussions on potential MAPS 4 meetings are scheduled for July and August. By Miguel Rios

Oklahoma City residents will have opportunities to voice their opinions on MAPS 4 projects through a series of public meetings. Oklahoma City Council approved four special meetings to hear presentations and discuss specific projects. Each meeting begins at 9 a.m. on the third floor of City Hall, 200 N. Walker Ave. Those who want to speak on specific topics must sign up at the meeting ahead of time to make sure they get time on the microphone. “The format of the meetings would be, you probably always start with some proponent of this potential project talking about what it is,” Holt said. “So it’s going to be different people in different cases. In some cases, it might be a more external presenter; in some cases, it might be a city staff representing because it might be more internally driven. … It’ll be presentations for informational purposes and then obviously opportunities for councilmembers to ask questions and then also opportunities for members of the community to comment.”

Presenting projects

The first meeting July 9 will include presentations on Palomar Family Justice Center; parks, sidewalks, bike lanes, trails and streetlights; and Freedom Center. Palomar provides support for victims and children who suffer from trauma due to stalking, domestic violence, sexual assault and child and elder abuse. It is seeking funds for a new facility to expand its capabilities. Officials will provide a T-shirt and bracelet to proponents who arrive at 8:45 a.m. 6

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Councilmembers James Cooper and JoBeth Hamon will present on the topics of sidewalks, bike lanes, trails and streetlights, which have been packaged into one agenda item. Leonard Benton, chairman of Freedom Center’s board of directors, said they are hoping MAPS 4 funds can help restore the building and provide enough money to create a new Clara Luper Civil Rights Center. “Our architects have all of the required input they need from us. They will have prepared a package, a proposal that will be submitted,” he said. “We have about 30 minutes of which we will have some short introductory information with the majority of time given to the formal presentation of the proposal and certainly with adequate time for Q&A.” Benton said using MAPS 4 funds to honor the legacy of Clara Luper and revitalize a historic building in northeast Oklahoma City would benefit more than just the city. “[We want] to take it to a new level with the construction of a brand-new 8 to 10,000 square-foot Oklahoma City Clara Luper Civil Rights Center that would be designed in a manner that would be special, that it would have modern technology,” he said. “We can see school buses and kids coming from throughout the district, throughout Oklahoma. We see busloads of tourists coming to that site. We see educators and history students, students who come there to do research, to participate in the work of the center. We envision that site as being a very important destination for the people of

Oklahoma City, for the state of Oklahoma, for the region and the nation.” July 11 presentations are on youth centers, senior wellness centers, beautification, a new State Fair coliseum and a new animal shelter. State Fair officials argue the park needs a new arena, as Jim Norick Arena continues to get more expensive to maintain. The fair’s website states a new coliseum “is expected to cost $95 million, and plans call for keeping the Norick Arena open during the process.” Project Animal Welfare Shelter (PAWS) recently sent out a press release citing “crisis conditions” at the city’s municipal animal shelter. The press release states the project would truly benefit “every neighborhood and neighbor.” “Our municipality can do better for the animals in Oklahoma City,” said Louisa McCune, PAWS for MAPS 4 education director, in the press release. “The shelter staff and citizen volunteers are doing the best they can with what they are given to work with. But the facility we have today is inadequate for our city’s needs. … Building this new facility will be transformational for our city, its residents and our animals.” Transit and homelessness, two topics gaining a lot of traction, are set for July 31. Holt spoke at the State of Homelessness address, where he said the city could do a lot better at addressing the issue and dealing with people experiencing homelessness. Chesapeake Energy Arena enhancements and the diversion hub will be presented the same day. The final meeting Aug. 6 includes presentations on mental health, a multipurpose stadium and the Innovation District. District 1 county commissioner Carrie Blumert is expected to give the presentation on mental health. Blumert began a career in public health as a behavioral therapist before working at Oklahoma City-County Health Department, where she oversaw programs related to mental health, substance abuse and nutrition. “The entire idea is around providing a mental health and addiction treatment facility that diverts people from going to jail. I’m still hashing through what exactly it’s going to look like and which partners are going to be involved, but we do know that over half of people that interact with our jail have some sort of mental illness or substance use disorder,” she said. “I see the center as a way to bring treatment providers and other partners together to better serve people. ... I feel very confident that the voters are supportive of using their tax dollars to pay for services like this because they’re needed.” Any other projects councilmembers might want to bring up will also be presented in the final meeting. Holt said he wanted councilmembers to have an option of bringing up other projects that might come up before Aug. 6. An over-

view of MAPS 4’s format, timing, revenue and design will also be presented. “It’s really just there at that last meeting as one last chance basically,” he said. “Realistically, something has to have gotten adequate traction in the community and among the councilmembers by this point, but I didn’t want to foreclose the ability for councilmembers to feel invited to bring something forward that maybe didn’t appear in the agenda when we approved it in June. “It shows a broad spectrum of issues that we can address through MAPS 4. I’m proud of the process; we’ve never had anything like this in the past — public meetings where projects are presented before final adoption of the plan by the council. … There should be no surprises when [the package is unveiled]; everything should have been vetted through a public meeting, and that’s what we’re doing.” The final MAPS 4 package is expected to be finalized in early September with a special election expected in December.

MAPS 4 public meetings 9 a.m. various dates Oklahoma City Hall 200 N. Walker Ave. okc.gov

July 9 • Palomar Family Justice Center • Parks • Sidewalks, bike lanes, trails and streetlights • Freedom Center

July 11 • Youth centers • Beautification • State Fair coliseum • Senior wellness centers • Animal shelter

July 31 • Transit • Homelessness • Chesapeake Energy Arena and NBA enhancements • Diversion Hub

Aug 6 • Mental Health • Multipurpose stadium • Innovation District • Other councilmembers’ projects • MAPS 4 overview


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CIT Y

NEWS

Park money

Oklahoma City voters could decide whether to pass a new excise tax to fund the city’s Parks & Recreation department. By Miguel Rios

An initiative petition to establish a dedicated fund for neighborhood parks was filed last week. Led by former councilman Ed Shadid, the petition would enact a 1/8th of a cent excise tax earmarked for park programming, capital improvements and operations. If passed, the tax would generate about $14 million in additional funding for Parks & Recreation’s $32.8 million budget. It could be used to fund the replacement and addition of trees and plants; park programs like athletic leagues, exercise classes and other outdoor activities; capital improvements, but only for new restrooms, athletic infrastructure and bleachers; and operational expenses. “The tax is earmarked for parks, so it would be a dedicated sales tax for parks,” said attorney Eric Groves, who filed the petition. “The gist of it is to provide more money to the parks department to spend on new programs, innovative programs.” Shadid is calling his petition campaign Basics First because of his strong emphasis on the “building blocks of services a city should provide” rather than the “wants such as soccer stadiums, new arenas and economic development handouts.”

lulled to sleep to think that it’s normal to only have restrooms in 1 percent of city parks. … That’s not normal, and it’s not acceptable. It’s time to take care of our needs before our wants.” Of the 160 parks in the city, Doug Kupper, director of OKC Parks & Recreation, said there are “maybe 10 [parks with] fully functioning restrooms.” “Some of the rest of the parks have port-a-potties, and not all of the parks have port-a-potties. Obviously, a little neighborhood park, you don’t want a port-a-potty sitting right across the street from somebody’s house,” he said. “And our 100 miles of trails, unless that trail goes through one of those 10 parks that has a restroom … there are no restrooms available. … The addition of restrooms is only second to walking paths and trails within our parks.” The tax would not fund mowing grass in parks, and it would not “benefit directly or indirectly” any foundation-managed parks like Boathouse District, Myriad Botanical Gardens or Scissortail Park. “We don’t want this source of funds to go to foundations that have other sources of funding that aren’t transparent, that aren’t subject to open meetings and open records,” Shadid said. “We want these monies to be fully transparent, for the taxpayers to know exactly where their dollars are going, and that’s just not possible with these private foundations. Not only is it that we want the neighborhood parks to be the recipient of these funds; we also want maximum transparency.” Foundations fundraise on behalf of the parks they manage and accept donations. For example, Love’s Travel Stops recently donated $2 million to Scissortail Park for the naming rights of its great lawn. Additionally, the city subsidizes Scissortail Park for $3.4 million and Myriad Botanical Gardens for $1.8 million, which is about 15 percent of the parks budget for 87 of the city’s 6,000 park acres.

Basics first Doug Kupper, director of Parks & Recreation, said the additional money would allow for more robust, education-based programming. | Photo provided

“Because city government has so rigidly restricted the MAPS program to capital projects without having a plan for how to pay for the operations or maintenance, it’s resulted in the chronic underfunding of basic city services to the point that the people of Oklahoma City are asked to sacrifice basic services,” Shadid said. “For example, we’ve been 8

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In May, Shadid released a SoonerPoll he paid for. With 406 individuals surveyed and about a 4 percent margin of error, people were asked if they would support a “1/8-cent sales tax to support the operations and maintenance of our 6,000 acres of city parks.” Nearly 70 percent of respondents supported the measure. “I think it’s great that the public sees the need for improving the park system. They’re starting to understand the value of quality of life, and that excites me a lot,” Kupper said. “From a programming perspective, we want to be

able to offer more robust, recreational offerings for all of our children across the city at a free or reduced fee. That’s exciting that we might get a shot in the arm for our recreation division that has struggled for quite a few years. … So that’s exciting that we would be able to employ quality artists to teach art in our recreational centers.” When it comes to programming for children, particularly during school breaks or vacations, Kupper is happy about the prospect of focusing on education. “We should try to be more educationbased in our summer programming because a lot of teachers have to do remedial work when a kid’s been out of school for 10 or 12 weeks,” he said. “They got to make sure the kids haven’t forgot what they learned, so if we can have more education-based summer programming to offer our parents to keep these kids occupied, they can stay up with their current level so that when they go into that next grade, the teacher can pretty much just start right into that next grade’s curriculum without a lot of remedial.” Despite the petition not allowing for money to be spent on mowing lawns, which Kupper said takes up the largest part of the budget, staff could still alleviate the issue and improve parks’ beautification. “If we can create planting groves of new trees that may reduce our mowing in any specific park but at the same time add a great deal of beautification, then we can benefit from this 1/8-cent sales tax since it’s allowing for planting to occur,” he said. “Right now, we are able to mow the majority — it doesn’t happen

Currently, 15 percent of Parks & Recreation’s budget is subsidized for 87 acres of the city’s 6,000 park acres. | Photo Alexa Ace

all the time, especially this spring since it’s rained so much — but almost all of our parks are mowed twice a month, every two weeks.” Kupper said the additional funding would also help strengthen neighborhoods, which would strengthen the city. “It’s a proven fact that any house that is within two blocks of an existing wellkept park, the property value goes up quite high,” he said. “It’s all about neighborhoods. A strong city has to have strong neighborhoods, and I think neighborhoods are stronger with highquality, open spaces and recreational opportunities to bring that community together. They watch out better for each other, so there’s even a lot of crime prevention from that perspective. And if we can start catching kids to be associated with our programs or any of the youth-based programs at an earlier age, the less likely they might be to join a gang or get into criminal activity.” In order to appear on the December ballot, along with the MAPS 4 package, the initiative petition needs about 6,500 signatures within 90 days of the filing date, June 20. Shadid does not think they will have issues collecting the required signatures. He hosted a volunteer training session that he said about 50 people attended, and he plans to host more in the future. Shadid and Groves plan to file another similar initiative petition that would create a 1/8-cent tax to support public transit. Visit basicsfirstokc.com.


chicken

friedNEWS

H2OMG

Sick vape, bruh

Welcome to another hilarious edition of Oklahoma’s Wackiest Criminals. This week, we bring you the weird tale of the Warr Acres “water worshipper,” a man KFOR reported has allegedly been entering businesses and churches for more than a decade, turning on the water and leaving — LOL, WTF. Most recently, the man reportedly walked into Mario Williams’ front yard and turned the hose on and then entered the garage without permission but left after Williams’ wife threatened to call the police. Williams told KFOR police officers said they were familiar with the alleged trespasser and that “he suffers from a mental health issue.” Well, that is just kind of a bummer, to be honest, but not too surprising considering journalism nonprofit The Frontier reported last year that the number of Oklahomans seeking psychiatric crisis care increased by 21 percent between 2015 and 2018 and that “because resources are limited and service providers must treat the sickest people first, Oklahomans in need of mental health services are regularly turned away because they are not sick enough” and “as a result, people in need of services often don’t get care until they are in the midst of a crisis.” While Williams said police told him the “water worshiper” is not dangerous, he argued that entering people’s homes without their permission is inherently dangerous and “he could easily be harmed or shot from people being self-defensive.” Jeez. Turns out wacky crimes are way funnier without all that pesky context. According to Oklahoma Policy Institute, 97,000 Oklahomans could access needed mental health or addiction treatment if the state would accept the billions of dollars in funding provided under the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion, but then those Oklahomans might have a legit reason to say, “Thanks, Obama,” unironically. A petition to put the Medicaid expansion on the 2020 ballot was recently unsuccessfully challenged in court by conservative “think tank” Oklahoma Council for Public Affairs, presumably because they hate to spoil a good joke.

Sculpted by Angel

Donald Trump officially announced his bid for re-election with all the expected bells and dog-whistles on the border wall, the “witch hunt” and the “angry, left-wing mob.” He even went back to his roots, obsessing over Hillary Clinton and prompting “Lock her up” chants. While Trump lied to the public about being tough on Russia — among several other things — Oklahoma Republican Party unveiled a sculpture of the president created by McAlester artist Brenda Angel. Like her surname might imply, she began sculpting after dreaming of Jesus. “I was dreaming and all the sudden, I was in the air and I was watching Jesus being crucified. I never saw him die, but when he raised up and took a deep breath and yelled out, 'Eli, Eli lama Sabachthani,' then I’d wake up. When I'd wake up, I'd hear, 'Sculpt what you just saw,’” she told KTUL. "I didn’t even know where to buy clay. It took like three weeks to find out even

where to buy clay. That was my first piece." “Eli, Eli lama Sabachthani,” is what Jesus cried out while dying on the cross, according to the Bible. It translates to “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?” which is exactly what the Chicken-Fried News staff exclaimed when reading about this sculpture. Angel calls the sculpture “The President Who Loves America,” which is definitely not what we would call it, but we can respect her hard work. And, yes, having a Trump sculpture in Oklahoma makes us disappointed, not surprised, but at least it does not actually look like him. She definitely nailed Trump’s crow’s feet, but it looks more like Alec Baldwin as Trump. Bigly.

The offices at Chicken-Fried News are constantly inundated with many of those lists that rank the 50 states, and Oklahoma’s position is usually the same: near the bottom of the good ones and at the top of the bad ones. According to two different studies released this year, Oklahoma ranks as the country’s top consumer of e-cigarettes. We’re No. 1! Break out your Juul and start sucking to celebrate; maybe get creative with your smoke like that scene in The Lord of the Rings. We all know that there is nothing cooler than blowing a thick smoke ring, bruh. Excuse me while we clean up the mess from the sarcasm meter that just exploded all over the office, much like those battery-powered vaping tanks are wont to do. The study from New York University School of Medicine provided the correlation between lax tobacco laws and high amounts of e-cigarette user, which shouldn’t come as a particular surprise. In the most recent Legislative session, Oklahoma made no changes to the state tobacco laws. It did, however, ban vaping at public schools, which doesn’t exactly restrict access to minors, but rather cuts down on the likelihood of becoming YouTube famous for blowing some sick rings in the principal’s face. Lobbyists for the vaping industry will argue that it is much safer than smoking, which is true in the sense that we don’t

have the years of scientific research into the vaping liquid as we do for traditional tobacco smoke. It’s like replacing fried chicken thighs with fried chicken tenders in your diet. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that smoking costs Oklahomans $1 billion annually for health care-related bills, and we doubt that number will be reduced once the vapers come of age. At least Gov. Stitt has a good jump on his “Top 10 state” plan.

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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Enemy For The People. The free press has once again been lazily labeled “enemy of the people” in an outburst that we’d consider boring if it wasn’t so dangerous. But, sure, we’ll admit to being an enemy. An enemy of dishonesty and corruption. An enemy of disinformation. And we’ll keep fighting to enlighten our readers with ethical, responsive journalism for the benefit of all Oklahomans.

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REVIEW

EAT & DRINK

Honduran grill

Fonda K-Tracha is a Honduran meal for any occasion with all-day breakfast and dinner seven days per week. By Jacob Threadgill

Fonda K-Tracha 3001 N. May Ave. facebook.com/fondaktracha | 405-673-7678 WHAT WORKS: Chimichurri on grilled pork chops is a hearty meal. WHAT NEEDS WORK: The black beans need more flavor. TIP: Don’t sleep on a breakfast order for dinner.

When I drive down May Avenue, just past Northwest Classen High School, the restaurant Fonda K-Tracha, 3001 N. May Ave., always catches my attention, partly because of its neon blue lettering and partly because it is such an interesting name. The sign advertises Latin food, but the menu is full of Honduran classics. What Cafe Antigua and Cafe Kacao have done for popularizing Guatemalan cuisine in Oklahoma City Fonda K-Tracha and Mi Tierra Restaurant Sabor Catracho, 3043 NW 16 St., are doing for Honduran cuisine on a much smaller scale. Another restaurant, El Patio Mexican Food, 12000 N. Interstate 35 Service Road, has a hybrid menu of Mexican and Honduran classics that reflect the background of its owners. I reviewed Mi Tierra last October and found a quaint family-run restaurant that offers excellent fried chicken. Fonda K-Tracha opened last year, and I was told by a waitress that the name roughly translates to “people of Honduras,” after I couldn’t find an answer on Google. Open every day — 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m.-7 p.m. on Sunday — Fonda K-Tracha is a restaurant for any occasion, offering all-day breakfast and a full-service bar for liquor and bottled beer. It becomes a karaoke and

burlesque performance hotspot a few nights per week. Breakfast options begin with baleadas, a thick, oversized flour tortilla filled with refried beans and cheese with the option of adding eggs, avocado and chicken or beef, which are a popular street food in Honduras, and it’s easy to see why; they’re very portable. It continues with an omelet ($10.99) with peppers, onion, cheese and ham. La Fonda breakfast ($9) is eggs, refried beans, fried plantains, avocado, cheese and cream. The campesine breakfast ($12.99) is beef, eggs, refried beans, fried plantains, corn tortillas, cheese and cream. I saw this brought to the table next to me during my second trip and had an immediate reaction of order envy.

It has been a while since I have had a pork chop grilled over an open flame, and I forgot how much of a difference it makes. Available appetizers include a dip trio with beans, chorizo with cheese and habanero with cheese. It also offers a fried shrimp basket and crab served in salsa (both $12). I tried the pastelitos maiz ($5), a fried empanada in a cornbased dough. It is filled with ground beef and perfectly cooked rice and served with a thin tomato sauce, orange coleslaw topped with queso fresco and pickle cabbage. It was a nice appetizer, but I think I prefer flour-based empanada dough, which is basically pie crust with vinegar. Before the appetizer, each meal begins

with freshly fried corn tortilla chips with a black bean dip topped with queso fresco. They are not my favorite black beans — especially in comparison to El Majahual and Cafe Antigua — but I had little problem polishing them off. The Honduran version of queso fresco is olancho, which is quite sour and took a few bites to get accustomed to. After trying the fried chicken at Mi Tierra, I had a pretty good idea that Fonda K-Tracha offered an excellent one, as well. It appeared to be one of the most popular plates as stuff carried them out to customers. I wanted to branch out on the menu. On my first trip, I went with the grilled pork chop plate ($14.99) that includes fried green bananas — I am still not sure if they are unripe bananas or plantains; they are awfully big to be bananas but a great side all the same. The pork chop dish is a massive portion with three chops slathered in chimichurri and kissed by the flames on the grill before being covered in the same white and red sauces found on the fried chicken. Some of my favorite bites of the two meals came by combining the pickled cabbage and pico de gallo with the grilled pork chops. It has been a while since I have had a pork chop grilled over an open flame, and I forgot how much of a difference it makes. While I prefer a steak cooked in a cast-iron skillet for a perfect sear, I love a grilled pork chop, and Fonda K-Tracha’s version is excellent. Its pineapple drink appeared to be the beverage of choice among other customers, and Yelp has a few negative comments on its horchata, which is surprising. On a second trip to the restaurant, I ran into a double case of order envy. I Three pork chops marinated in chimichurri and covered in sauce atop green bananas | Photo Jacob Threadgill

Fish with onions and peppers served with casamiento, fried yucca and pico de gallo over cabbage and pickled cabbage | Photo Jacob Threadgill

ordered the fish fillet ($11.99), which I was hoping would be grilled like the pork chops, but it is instead cooked in a tomato sauce with peppers and onions. It was tasty, and the fish tasted like tilapia, but the person next to me ordered the fried fish ($13.99), which is served whole, with the head still on. It made me want to order it the next time I wander into the restaurant. The star of my dish was the casamiento, a mixture of red beans, rice and red pepper cooked with coconut milk or oil. It has a unique flavor and is far superior to its refried black beans. I had a lot of fun dipping the fried yucca into the rice and beans. Yelp is full of recommendations for the shrimp brochette, which is also served with casamiento. I also tried a few bites of my wife’s carne asada, which was a little overcooked for my preference but had plenty of the chimichurri, which I liked very much. I would be interested in the restaurant’s preparation of the tri-tip ($16.99), which is not a cut of beef I see very often. If you are with a big group of very, very hungry people, the parrillada is meant for four people and includes chicken, baby back ribs and sausages with sides for $60. I was a little disappointed to see the restaurant does not offer anything in the way of dessert, but it breaks out three types of soup on the weekend that its Facebook page advertises as a great hangover cure. While Cafe Kacao has lines out the door, head on over to Fonda K-Tracha for different Central American all-day breakfast and entrée options.

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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New Sichuan

Chuanyu Fusion offers traditional Sichuanstyle recipes that balance spice with unique peppercorns. By Jacob Threadgill

The experience of dining on Sichuanstyle cuisine (often stylized as Szechuan) is defined by the Mandarin phrase mala, which translates to “numb-spiciness.” The combination of spicy chilies with the Sichuan peppercorn, the latter of which creates a numbing sensation scientifically proven to produce an electric sensation in the mouth, is vastly different than the Cantonese style of food that serves as the basis for many Americanized Chinese dishes. Oklahoma City lost one of its traditional Sichuan restaurants when Tsubaki Szechuan, 1117 NW 25th St., surprisingly closed in March, despite being very popular. A new Sichuan-style restaurant entered the fold in May as Chuanyu Fusion opened at 7011 W. Hefner Road in an old Sam’s Southern Eatery location. Chuanyu Fusion is a partnership among three people, including Ken Wang, who said they wanted to bring authentic Chinese food to Oklahoma City. “I’ve worked at many different restaurants like sushi and Sichuan-style for almost 10 years,” Wang said. “We looked at many places [in Oklahoma City], but we couldn’t find the right one. We finally got this location. It’s kind of hard to see from [Hefner Road], but business has been getting better.” Tucked in a shopping center behind a doughnut shop and a couple of banks, Chuanyu Fusion still has the blue, red and white paint from Sam’s Eatery, but a “now open” banner flaps in the wind, welcoming guests.

LUNCH 320 NW 10TH ST. OKC, OK 73103

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Guizhou diced chicken at Chuanyu Fusion | Photo Alexa Ace

Nets still hang on the walls from its days as Sam’s, but the rest of the interior has gone though a redesign as modern tile and woodwork line the front counter. Some of its most popular dishes include the dry spicy “tasty” beef ($13.99); the beef is dry-fried with a coating and finished with chili peppers and peanuts. Wang said freshly made pork buns and crispy eggplant are the most popular appetizers. “The outside [of the eggplant] is crispy, and the inside is tender,” Wang said. “It is kind of like French fries but spicy.” The menu is large and filled with plenty of traditional Sichuan-style offerings that dominate the offerings alongside a few Americanized classics like orange chicken and sesame beef.

Sichuan peppercorns are an integral part of dishes that appear on many Chinese menus in the U.S. Maoxuewang (23.99) is a dish from southwest China that includes ham, tripe, pork’s blood curd and intestine in a chili oil that is filled with Sichuan peppercorn. It is one of many traditional items on the menu filled with the peppercorn that produces an in-


OKLAHOMA teresting reaction when eaten. Despite its resemblance to black peppercorn, the Sichuan peppercorn has a lemony aroma and produces a numbing and buzzing sensation when eaten thanks to the active ingredient sanshool, which causes enough vibration to be measured at 50 Hertz, according to a 2013 study from University College London. “They produce a strong, tingling, buzzing, numbing sensation that is something like the effect of carbonated drinks or of a mild electric current (touching the terminals of a 9-volt battery to the tongue). Sanshools appear to act on several different kinds of nerve endings at once, induce sensitivity to touch and cold in nerves that are ordinarily nonsensitive, and so perhaps cause a kind of general neurological confusion,� food chemist Harold McGee wrote in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. Sichuan peppercorns are an integral part of dishes that appear on many Chinese menus in the U.S. like mapo tofu and kung pao chicken, but for decades, the peppercorn was banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), meaning those dishes became popular without the signature sensation. From 1968 to 2005, the FDA imposed a ban on Sichuan peppercorns due to science of the time that said it might carry a citrus canker that could

Dry spicy tasty beef at Chuanyu Fusion features plenty of the Sichuan peppercorn that creates a unique numbing sensation | Photo Alexa Ace

infect citrus trees. Restaurants in large cities like New York City and Los Angeles were able to smuggle in the peppercorn, but the lift of the ban has likely played a role in the reason Sichuan-style restaurants have begun to open in the rest of the country. The ban was lifted under the stipulation that the peppercorn be heated to 140 degrees Fahrenheit to destroy any potential canker bacteria. No other imported peppercorn must go though such a process, and according to a Slate story, chefs complain that the heating method robs the peppercorn of some of its effects, but a blind taste test proves otherwise. The irony is that a FDA report in 2016 revealed that although some Sichuan pepper trees are canker-infected, it is not the kind that can affect citrus. At Chuanyu Fusion, the peppercorn makes appearances in dishes like guizhou diced chicken ($12.99) with green onions in a sauce that is finished with Chinese wine. Green peppercorns produce a fresher taste with a vegetal aroma compared to citrus of the red variety. The green peppercorns are paired with fish ($18.99) braised in chili oil. Visit facebook.com/chuanyufusion.

Fried yolk fish at Chuanyu Fusion | Photo Alexa Ace

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O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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GAZEDIBLES

EAT & DRINK

Elevated drivethru

The city is full of drive-thru and grab-and-go options for tacos, burgers and fried chicken, but what happens when you’ve got a night on the town planned but still want to indulge in those fast-food delights? By Jacob Threadgill with photos Gazette / file and provided

The Press

1610 N. Gatewood Ave. thepressokc.com | 405-208-7739

If it’s Sunday morning and you’ve got a craving for Chick-fil-A biscuit but the pious fast-food chain isn’t open, head on over to 16th Street Plaza District, where The Press will satisfy. Even if it is not Sunday, The Press offers brunch every day, where it tops a biscuit sandwich with house-made pickles and honey-roasted barbecue sauce.

Walk-ins Welcome

The Drum Room

4309 N. Western Ave. drumroomokc.com | 405-604-0990

Raising Cane’s and Golden Chick have not cornered the market on fried chicken tenders because the desire for boneless battered bird is unending. Head on over to The Drum Room, which fries everything in extra-crispy breading, and get the added bonus of enjoying those tenders and sides with a nice, cool beer, which you can’t get through a window.

Barrios Fine Mexican Dishes

1000 N. Hudson Ave. barriosmexicanokc.com 405-702-6922

For when you’re craving tacos but you want some more than what can be found at your neighborhood taco truck or at a drive-thru, Barrios offers pork cheek carnitas with tomato chipotle sauce and pineapple salsa, lamb barbacoa with salsa verde, carne molida in a crispy shell and a fish taco in a blue corn tortilla.

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The Garage Burgers & Beer

1117 N. Robinson Ave. eatatthegarage.com | 405-602-6880

The Theta burger is as much a part of Oklahoma City’s history as the desire to tear down historic buildings. Many restaurants emulate the Theta burger, which traces its history back to the original Split-T in the 1950s, but The Garage is one of the best casual places to get it, especially with the loss of Irma’s Burger Shack.

Osteria

Magasin Table

The Loaded Bowl

Instead of picking up a pizza at Little Caesar’s, head over to Osteria, where its wood-fired oven bakes six varieties, including the Prosciutto, which finishes the pie with cured pork and fresh arugula that blends the acidity of the tomato sugo with basil, savory prosciutto and the pepperiness of the arugula. Also try the Tartufi, which is a mushroom lover’s dream, or the Gamberetti with fresh, wild Gulf shrimp that is shipped in overnight.

The concept by way of New Orleans puts an elevated spin on the great family Vietnamese classics available in the Asian District. A trip to 8th Street Market allows guests to get things like short rib pho and overstuffed bao, but its excellent crab Rangoon — a staple at takeout and drive-thru windows like Egg Roll King — make it a must-visit when you’re in the mood.

Thursday is Burger Day at The Loaded Bowl, Oklahoma City’s favorite comfort vegan spot. Choose from a chicken burger made with soy protein and topped with pickles and a savory sauce or get a version of a fast food burger cooked with love and care without the guilt of eating beef.

6430 Avondale Drive, Nichols Hills osteriaokc.com | 405-254-5058

3 NE Eighth St., Suite 120 405-212-2751

1211 SW Second St. theloadedbowlokc.com 405-820-9599

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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Submit your listings online at okgazette.com or e-mail them to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

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ART

ARTS & CULTURE

Art work

An exhibit at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art explores the threads between impressionism and expressionism. By Jeremy Martin

Art is work. “Everybody says it’s so easy, but it’s not,” said impressionist painter Jody Ellison, recalling her time as an art student at the University of Oklahoma. “I took the life drawing; I took perspective; I took art history, art structure. It was really hard.” Ellison’s work is included in the exhibit Between the Isms: The Oklahoma Society of Impressionists and Selected Oklahoma Expressionists on display at the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave. in Norman, through Sept. 8. Ellison — a founding member of Oklahoma Society of Impressionists, which formed at a workshop in Taos, New Mexico, in 1987 — said she worked for several years to get the exhibit in the museum.

“The Open Window (Saint-Emilion, France)” by Nick Berry | Photo provided

“Before my husband died, he said, ‘I sure hope you get that show because it’s so important to you,’” Ellison said of her husband, former federal district Judge James O. Ellison, who died in 2014. Nick Berry, another Oklahoma impressionist included in the exhibit, said he was first drawn to the artistic style when he “was just a little boy.” “My parents had a coffee table book on [Pierre-Auguste] Renoir in their living room, and every time I’d pass it, I’d sit down and study it and became very taken with the work and didn’t know it was called impressionism,” Berry said. “But I just admired the style and the work, and then at the age of 15, I started painting and just was drawn more into the direction of impressionist style.” Having his portrait painted by

Muskogee artist Gloria Schumann was a formative experience. “When I was sitting for her, I really admired how her work evolved,” Berry said. “She spoke to me a lot of religion and faith associated with painting, and her work, I would say, was a little on the side of impressionist, and I admired just that whole process of watching her paint and her philosophies.” Schumann painted many notable portraits, including the official inaugural portrait of President Richard Nixon, a copy of which Nixon presented to Queen Elizabeth II, but her artistic philosophy rooted in spirituality made the biggest impression on Berry’s painting career. “I’ve intermingled my desire to paint with my religious feelings,” he said. “I feel that everyone is given a god-given talent, and if you’re lucky enough to know what it is, how great. I just feel like my talent is to paint, so with each painting, I feel like I grow spiritually. I don’t know if I grow in quality of work, but I certainly grow in spirituality. It makes me want to move on to the next piece and somehow do something good with it, help the viewer in some way … through inspiration, something that would trigger an emotion with the viewer, and maybe make them remember something in their own past or present that the viewers can relate with, something that’s personal.” A painter, Berry said, “should never stop evolving.” Though the exhibit was organized by Oklahoma Society of Impressionists, he said abstract expressionist artists have also been included because the style represents an evolution in painting. “The expressionists just went a step further than the impressionists,” Berry said, “the impressionists being looser than the artists before them and not as confined by rules. And I think the expressionists just went that much further than the impressionists, and they weren’t afraid to push the boundaries.”

Studying abstraction

Expressionist painter Beth Hammack, whose work is also included in the “Frontal” by Beth Hammack | Photo provided

exhibit, said expressionism and impressionism share many of the same roots, and leaving an element of mystery for the viewer to interpret is the “common denominator.” “There’s an emotional element that’s hard to explain, but it’s there, and humanity likes it when it’s not too simple to read,” Hammack said. “I think an important thing is most of the expressionist artists started out, obviously, with realism. We’re not naive; we do know how to do still lifes, and my case, I did a lot of early portraits of people and figure drawing. I’m speaking a lot for myself, but I feel like you have to know the basics. … I always use [Pablo] Picasso as an example, His early work when he was 16, 18 was superb as far as realism goes, but once you kind of think you conquered it and you’ve got that, there is this magic. I’ve been told you’re either born an abstract painter or you’re not, but there is a hunger to say, ‘I’m going to take it to the next level,’ and that’s kind of what the Ism show is about, taking art in general to the next level.” Hammack, whose abstract work draws inspiration from nature, said Claude Monet’s series of oil paintings of the water lilies in his garden are an important link between impressionism and expressionism. “To me that is straight abstraction, in truth,” Hammack said. “That’s a lot of brushstrokes about one little miniscule section of a big painting. If you’re born to be an abstract painter, that talks to you — a lot of colors, lots of layers, and most importantly, it’s freedom to go any way you want to go with it. ... You have realism as your core, but you’re free to put whatever paint, whatever pattern, whatever color you want to put in it. But ultimately, you have to have good composition.”

“Garden Gems” by Jody Ellison | Photo provided

A common criticism of expressionist painting, Hammack said, is “My thirdgrader can do it,” but creating an engaging work with no real-life reference point is more difficult than non-artists realize and increasingly important in a world in which high-resolution photography is so ubiquitous. “There’s no set of trees and mountains or a still life, like a lemon and lime and a banana, to paint, so you’re coming up with it from scratch,” Hammack said. “Why would you want to try to replicate what can be done so much better, computerized or digitized? Abstraction is a 180 from all that tight, fixed, pixel mindset.” Ellison said that in order to be meaningful, expressionist art needs to be more than just a decoration. “People are buying big, ugly abstracts, but they don’t have any structure,” Ellison said. “I don’t know how to describe a good design, but you’ve got to have a center of interest. … It can’t just be paint slapped on the canvas like most people are doing now. It’s a scam. … People just do whatever the gallery owner or interior decorator tells them and then people come into my studio and want me to match the sofa. Well that’s not where it’s at. You don’t match the sofa.” Admission is free, but museum hours have recently been reduced due to budgetary concerns at the university. The new hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. TuesdaySaturday and 1-5 p.m. Sundays. Visit ou.edu/fjjma.

Between the Isms: The Oklahoma Society of Impressionists and Selected Expressionists through Sept. 8 Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art 555 Elm Ave., Norman ou.edu/fjjma | 405-325-3272 Free

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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ARTS & CULTURE

ART

Erica Nkechi leads a paint party at her studios. | Photo provided

parties are such a fun thing to do.” Nkechi said there are different ways to organize paint parties. The artist can provide a pre-sketched canvas and refer specific colors, like paint by numbers, but she prefers the people participating to have more freedom. “I like [the paint by numbers] concept and it might be something we do in the future, but I like the coloring sheet canvas because it allows people to express themselves a little bit more; they’re not tied to a specific color,” Nkechi said. Nkechi’s artwork combines inspiration from her personal experience relating to family in the U.S. and Africa. Her personal website features work dedicated to her Nigerian heritage as well as U.S. figures like Martin Luther King Jr., Sandra Bland, Trayvon Martin and Angela Davis. “I’m half Nigerian and half white American. I have my family all over the world, and a lot of my work is inspired by growing up in America and being disconnected with my family in Africa and reconnecting with them,” she said. “My work can seem activist-centered, and it is in many ways, but in real life, I’m really not the type to speak out about different issues. I’m very passionate, and I feel like my art is my way of speaking out.”

Art party

Paint parties help introduce adults to their creative side while funding projects for children.

By Jacob Threadgill

Edmond-based artist and business owner Erica Nkechi has hosted paint parties at Heart Studios, 1605 E. Second St., in Edmond to fund scholarship programs to provide art classes to children from low-income families. Now Nkechi partners with another series of adult-themed paint parties to expand the reach of her mission to help kids while also helping adults tap into their creative side. “Paint parties are such a great place for beginners to come if you want to get into painting,” Nkechi said. “It gives you motivation and inspiration to go home and continue painting, but they’re set up so that all levels can enjoy a good party; I even enjoy attending paint parties, and I’ve been painting for a decade.” Nkechi has hosted paint parties featuring pre-sketched works devoted to the Beatles and Beyoncé, among others, at her studios but is joined by International Art Lovers Group (IALG), which hosts paint parties at Reasons: An Exclusive Lounge, 1140 N. MacArthur Boulevard, allowing guests to have access to food and alcohol while they paint. Friday, the art lovers group hosts a paint and plate with culinary art instructor Tina Best, allowing people to paint with food. Saturday, it hosts a 18

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Nipsey Hussle paint party honoring the slain entrepreneur, community activist and hip-hop artist. It also has paint parties scheduled for Cardi B, Barack and Michelle Obama and a monthly paint party dedicated to trap music. “From here on out, working with them is going to be really good because we can continue to do paint parties on a larger scale and it keeps our studio focused on the kids,” Nkechi said. Heart Studios offers group art classes and private art classes for children, including summer art camp July 8-12 and July 22-26. It also hosts Women of Color Art Showcase every two months, with the next one scheduled for August. While Nkechi’s primary focus is providing lessons for kids, she has noticed an impact on adults who have participated in paint parties. “There have been people who have come to my paint parties and then later that next week, they’ll tag me to show me what they’ve painted and say that I inspired them,” she said. “It’s really fun, and I enjoy that. A lot of people have that creative side, but they don’t necessarily have that outlet or space to express themselves. It’s why paint Nkechi’s work is inspired by her dual American and Nigerian heritage. | Photo provided

Community parties

IALG organizer Ushindi Spears participated in community paint parties for two years when he lived in Maryland and decided to create IALG when he recently moved back to Oklahoma City. Spears is among a group organizing a monthly water balloon fight at Will Rogers Gardens and a free kids party the last Sunday of every month. “I used to do those when I lived in Oklahoma City,” Spears said. “I just want to provide a fun thing to do that isn’t normal. You don’t normally have someone throwing a big water balloon fight.” The kids parties are meant to be a community-minded positive activity,

and he sees the same atmosphere when organizing paint parties for adults. “It’s a sense of bringing people together,” he said. “The energy is going to be so vibrant that it is going to be infectious. You’re going to leave out of there excited that you made the decision to come. You paint a masterpiece that looks like you’ve done it. You’ll be looking like you’ve been painting for years. It’s as user-friendly as possible. You get an experience with the artist; it is almost like getting a class without paying class prices.” Supplies are provided in the price of the tickets, which are $35 and can be purchased the day of the event. Canvas sizes range from 14-by-17 inches to 16by-20 inches. Artist CeCi Williams of Art Craft Love Creative space designed the Nipsey Hussle sketch. Spears, who grew up in South Central Los Angeles as it descended into neighborhoods dominated by gang violence in the 1980s, wanted to organize a paint party in honor of Nipsey Hussle — who was killed outside one of his communityfocused businesses in March — to keep the memory of his positive work for the African American community alive. “You can expect the sense of unity right out of the gate and the sense of love, being able to fellowship with people,” Spears said. “I believe in fellowship and unity above almost everything else. I believe in all races and cultures coming together. You’ve seen more people trying to do things that are contributing to the community, much more valiant efforts by people of color [since his death]. The rest of society has noticed it and wanted to contribute more because it’s helped people see things differently.” Visit heartstudiosllc.com and iartlovers.com.

Nipsey Hussle Paint Party 7-10 p.m. Saturday Reasons: An Exclusive Lounge 1140 N. MacArthur Blvd. iartlovers.com | 405-774-9991 $35


T H E AT E R

Looking for a fun and productive summer activity?

Legendary Rain

Lyric Theatre brings world-renowned musical Singin’ in the Rain to the stage at Civic Center Music Hall. By Jeremy Martin

The most indelible image from the 1952 film Singin’ in the Rain is probably that of star Gene Kelly fulfilling the title’s promise while swinging himself around a lamppost, but Richard Riaz Yoder, watching as a child, was always mesmerized by comedic support Donald O’Connor. “My eyes were completely fixated on him the whole time,” Yoder said. “I think it was the way that he moved. I kind of don’t know how to describe it, but I’m going to try to. Gene Kelly, he’s one of the best dancers and he’s so athletic, but there was something about Donald O’Connor. He’s not fixated on himself at all. He is all about performing; he’s all about giving to the audience; he’s all about giving to the other characters onstage. And I think there’s a quality of movement. … Even though he’s not super tall, he has that lanky, fun movement quality to him, and I just remember looking at him, and I was like, ‘Oh, I want to do that.’” Yoder will when he plays Cosmo Brown — the role O’Connor originated — in Lyric Theatre’s production of Singin’ in the Rain Wednesday through Sunday at Civic Center Music Hall’s Thelma Gaylord Performing Arts Theatre, 201 N. Walker Ave. Yoder — who previously played Brown in a 2016 production at Marriott Theatre in Lincolnshire, Illinois — said the role helps him reconnect with his younger, sillier self. “I was always a goofball as a child, and I was always talking,” Yoder said. “I was always making people laugh, and then when I got to high school and

Richard Riaz Yoder, Tatum Grace Ludlam and Jeremy Benton star in Lyric Theatre’s production of Singin’ in the Rain through Sunday at Civic Center Music Hall’s Thelma Gaylord Performing Arts Theatre. | Photo Lyric Theatre / provided

college, I kind of reverted into myself a little bit, just because of everything that’s happening in high school. Doing this role sometimes kind of helps me bring me out of myself just because it’s all about just being as big as you possibly can and really taking a lot of the importance off of yourself and putting it more on other people and making sure other people are having a lot of fun, because I tend to get very in my head, in life and while performing. With this, you can’t really do that. If you’re in your head and thinking about, ‘Oh, so and so’s thinking about this,’ or I’m thinking, ‘Somebody’s thinking that I’m not good,’ or whatever like that, then you’re not doing what you should be doing in this role. This role calls for somebody to really put a lot of love and care and fun into everybody else. It really kind of helps me snap out of that.” Singin’ in the Rain — a musical set in Hollywood during the uncertain transition from silent films to “talking pictures” — also stars Jeremy Benton as leading man Don Lockwood, Lyn Cramer as studio head RF Simpson, Lexi Windsor as vocally challenged leading lady Lina Limont and Tatum Grace Ludlam as Kathy Seldon, a ringer musical director Brown brings in to serve as Limont’s singing voice. continued on page 20

J U N I O R C U R ATO R C A M P

Monday - Friday July 15-19 ­

This program is for students ages eight to twelve. Registration is $130 for OHS members and $150 for the general public. Registration opens June 3 and closes July 10. For more information please email education@okhistory.org or call 405-522-0765. For more information call 405.522.0765 or visit okhistory.org 800 Nazih Zuhdi DR, OKC

The Oklahoma History Center is a division of the Oklahoma Historical Society and is an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, National Archives and is an accredited member of the American Alliance of Museums.

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Yoder said serving as the dance captain under choreographer Kelli Barclay in a production of the musical helped him through a difficult transition period in his own life following the death of his mother, who he called his “biggest cheerleader.” “It kind of took me out of my funk, and it kind of took me out of my sad place,” Yoder said. “And so this show, no matter what or how I perform in it, or what I do, it will always have a special place in my heart.”

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Yoder, who studied theater at Oklahoma City University, said Lyric Theatre also holds a special place in his heart as the first professional theater he ever worked in, and he hopes he does a better job in the role of Brown than he did for Marriott Theatre. “The last time that I did it, which was also my first time I did it, I came to the first day of rehearsal; I had everything memorized; I packed my lunch early; I did everything that you could possibly think of,” Yoder said. “And I was like, ‘This is exactly how I’m going to say it, and this is exactly how I’m going to do it.’ And then you realize that once you start doing that so much, it kind of takes the life out of the character. … Going back and looking at some of the videos, I was

very proud of the work that I did, but I was a little stiff. And so I’m excited this time around that I have it under my belt to kind of enjoy it a little bit more and know that I don’t need to pressure myself.”

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Jeremy Benton plays Don Lockwood in Lyric Theatre’s production of Singin’ in the Rain. | Photo Lyric Theatre / provided

In his review of the 1952 film, Roger Ebert called “Make ’em Laugh,” featuring O’Connor as Brown, “one of the most amazing dance sequences ever filmed.” “He wrestles with a dummy, runs up walls and does backflips, tosses his body around like a rag doll, turns cartwheels on the floor, runs into a brick wall and a lumber plank and crashes through a backdrop,” Ebert wrote. Yoder was originally afraid he would not be able to give audiences that same kind of joy. “I started getting nervous,” Yoder said, “because I was like, ‘Wait. What if they don’t think I’m funny enough? What am I going to do? What if I say a joke and nobody laughs?’ and things like that. Then that just makes it worse. And then you’re tentative when you’re going out there and you’re in your head a lot. I’ve learned that you just kind of got to let it go because not everybody’s going to think you’re funny all the time. … All you can do is try your best and see what works. Sometimes there are things that definitely do not work, and a good comedian is somebody that can edit.” Working in the ensemble for the recent Broadway revival of Hello, Dolly! and having the opportunity to watch Bette Midler in the title role taught Yoder an important lesson about making ’em laugh. “One thing that I’ve noticed is that everything is steeped within truth,” Yoder said. “Even if it’s big, it’s still truth.” Tickets are $42-$95. Visit lyrictheatreokc.com.

Singin’ in the Rain Wednesday-Sunday Thelma Gaylord Performing Arts Theatre Civic Center Music Hall 201 N. Walker Ave. lyrictheatreokc.com | 405-524-9312 $42-$95


Spokies Dash bikes can be picked up in districts like Uptown 23rd and The Paseo Arts and dropped off anywhere within the service area. | Photo Embark / provided

of massive growth like Oklahoma City is experiencing now,” DeLozier said via email. “Although we still have many more improvements to make, adding more bicycles should have a very positive impact on our city becoming truly multi-modal and being more comfortable for cyclists.”

CO M M U N I T Y

Cycling improvements

Spokies to-go

Oklahoma City’s bike-share program adds Spokies Dash, dockless bikes with a larger service area. By Jo Light

If you’ve spent any time in downtown Oklahoma City’s flourishing Bricktown, Midtown or surrounding entertainment districts, chances are you’ve caught sight of the Spokies bike-share stations. Spokies is currently the only bikeshare program in the city and has been operating in downtown OKC since May 2012. It has changed management a couple of times through the years and is now under the purview of Embark transit services, which also manages the Oklahoma City streetcar and Oklahoma River Cruises. This month, Spokies added 25 new smart bikes to its fleet as part of its Dash program. Spokies Dash is the third generation of the bike-share initiative. The new Spokies Dash bicycles are smart bikes, meaning they include a touch screen on the handlebars where riders can get turn-by-turn directions, see how long they have spent on their ride and even learn how many calories they’ve burned. Unlike the classic, second-generation bikes, the Dash bicycles are dockless and can be left at any bike rack within a service area encompassing an impressive slice of the urban core. The area now includes 16th Street Plaza District, The Paseo Arts District and University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. It is approximately 8 square miles. “It’s pretty large, comparing that to our much smaller ridership area that it

was before,” said Josh Vaught, general manager of the Spokies program. “It was a little over a square mile.” The 25 new bikes were purchased using a Congestion Mitigation & Air Quality grant through Association of Central Oklahoma Governments (ACOG). The Spokies bike-share program contributes to a larger goal of improving air quality and encouraging Oklahomans to use forms of transportation other than their cars. Uptown 23rd District, Downtown Oklahoma City Partnership and Colony Partners provided matching funds for the Dash program. “Uptown 23rd is excited to be a part of the new Spokies Dash dockless bikes program,” said Christian Cox, marketing director of Uptown 23rd, via email. “It’s a great way to open up our city and encourage movement across districts. It will be so easy to hop on a bike in the Paseo and ride down Shartel to Uptown or from Uptown to Midtown and so on.” Jill DeLozier, vice president of Downtown Oklahoma City Partnership, pointed to the importance of multiple transportation options in the fast-growing downtown area. “Adding more forms of quick, safe and legal transportation is very important to any community, especially during times

Both Spokies Dash and classic bikes can be located through the BCycle app on a phone. The app also allows users to check out the bikes. Alternately, bikes can be checked out using a Spokies fob, which is available with monthly, and annual pass programs or by using a credit card at the classic stations. The classic Spokies bicycles are available for checkout from eight stations in the downtown OKC area. They must be returned to one of the stations at the end of a ride. The cost for the dockless bikes and classic bikes is $1 to unlock a bike and then 12 cents per minute for single-use riders. Monthly and annual pass-holders get unlimited 15-minute rides and are then charged 10 cents per minute for longer rides. There is also an Explorer’s Pass option that offers three hours for $9 and 12 cents per minute after that. To end a ride on a Spokies Dash bike, the user only needs to use the provided lock to secure the bicycle to a rack within the service area. Classic bikes have to be returned to a Spokies station, the front wheel securely docked. The dock will beep, and the rider will receive a text confirmation that the ride has ended. Riders who leave bikes outside the service area will be charged a $40 fee. Vaught acknowledged that Spokies is in direct competition with the dockless Lime scooters that have been available downtown since last year. His program even contemplated adding motorized scooters too, but they decided that bikes were a safer option.

“We briefly considered operating scooters,” Vaught said. “If they’re the new thing and they’re micro-transit and they get people out of cars and they’re riding in the bike lanes anyway, why don’t we operate them? And we thought, ‘Well, if they were safer, we would.’ But they’re too dangerous. We didn’t want to be responsible for that.” This month, two of the classic Spokies stations were relocated to the Intermodal Hub at Santa Fe Station, 100 S. E.K. Gaylord Blvd., and the Boathouse District, SE Sixth Street and Lincoln Boulevard. Placing a station near Riversport Adventures was highly requested, so the program is experimenting with that location. “Theoretically, lots of people could ride from Bricktown to Riversport and back,” Vaught said. He pointed out that the Spokies bikes are perfect for events like the monthly Full Moon Bike Ride, which takes place from May to October. Participants can get half off a Spokies Explorer’s Pass for the event. Vaught hopes to expand the Spokies Dash program to include more smart bikes or perhaps motorized bikes. When nearby Scissortail Park opens partially later this year, Spokies will likely move a station closer to the location and add Dash bikes. He is also hopeful that MAPS 4, the next initiative of the city improvement program, will soon make Oklahoma City an even friendlier environment for bike riders. “We’re really looking forward to MAPS 4 hopefully bringing us protected bike lanes,” Vaught said, “because I commute by bike almost daily. Most people that don’t cycle, it’s because they don’t feel like they’re safe riding in this traffic.” DeLozier echoed Vaught’s wish for safer opportunities for cyclists. “We just really need those who use cars in these busy areas to slow down and share the road,” DeLozier said via email. Spokies riders must be 16 years old or older, and helmets are recommended but not required. Visit spokiesokc.com.

Spokies Dash bike rides are completed when the bicycles are locked to any bike rack in the approximately 8 square-mile service area. | Photo Embark / provided O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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OKG Lifestyle

Around OKC EAT sushi burrito at Poké Loco WATCH Making It (NBC) LISTEN Okie Geek Podcast READ The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty LOVE Word Cookies! app EXPERIENCE Angry Scotsman Brewing’s patio

Outside OKC Cazadorez Restaurant & Grill in Seminole EAT Killing Eve (BBC America) WATCH Ologies with Alie Ward (podcast) LISTEN Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes READ Nutter, Witch by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman Melona mango ice cream bars LOVE Beavers Bend State Park EXPERIENCE

Allie Shinn’s Picks EAT Gorō Ramen WATCH movies with LGBTQ+ characters LISTEN Oklahoma City Pride playlist READ anything Ben from Commonplace

Books hands me

LOVE Oklahoma’s LGBTQ community EXPERIENCE Factory Obscura

Allie Shinn is a lifelong activist, a passionate lover of community, a proud queer Oklahoman and executive director of Freedom Oklahoma.

MAKING IT | PHOTO NBC / PROVIDED • WORD COOKIES! | PHOTO BITMANGO / PROVIDED • ANGRY SCOTSMAN PATIO | PHOTO ALEXA ACE GOOD OMENS | IMAGE HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS / PROVIDED • OLOGIES WITH ALIE WARD | IMAGE OLOGIES WITH ALIE WARD / PROVIDED • MELONA MANGO | PHOTO PROVIDED COMMONPLACE BOOKS | PHOTO JACOB THREADGILL • GORŌ RAMEN | PHOTO GAZETTE / FILE • FACTORY OBSCURA | PHOTO THUMY PHAN / PROVIDED 22

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CALENDAR These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

A League of Their Own (1992, USA, Penny Marshall) with many men fighting in World War II, baseball teams begin recruiting women players in this sports comedy, 8-11 p.m. June 26. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. WED

BOOKS

VHS and Chill: Blockbusted Video riff along with comedians and film fans at this monthly movie screening where audience participation is encouraged, 7-9 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com. WED

Britt Johnson book launch the author will share from her poetic memoir Stardust & Skin: Poetry of an Old Soul, followed by a performance by musician Chelsey Cope, 6:30-9 p.m. June 30. Commonplace Books, 1325 N. Walker Ave., 405-534-4540, commonplacebooksokc.com. SUN Last Sunday Poetry Reading a poetry reading followed by an open mic, 2 p.m. last Sunday of every month. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. SUN

HAPPENINGS African American Men’s Health Summit medial professionals provide free cancer screenings and glucose, cholesterol, stroke, blood pressure and lung function testing, and a pancake breakfast will be provided, 9 a.m.-noon June 29. Metro Technology Center, 1900 Springlake Drive, 405-844-8324, metrotech.edu. SAT

Estate Sale of renowned artist

Regina Murphy one of six who established the Studio Six gallery in the Historic Paseo Arts District.

JACK INGRAM June 28 THEO VON -SOLD OUT June 29 X July 1 CUCO - SOLD OUT July 2 REEL BIG FISH AQUABATS July 11 BRONCHO COLOURMUSIC DEERPEOPLE July 12 TICKETS & INFO AT TOWERTHEATREOKC.COM @TOWERTHEATREOKC 405-70-TOWER 425 NW 23rd Street OKC

The house is packed—jewelry, sterling, home studio with signed art, map cases, dental case, drafting table, and more! Sale by Foxes’ Den. JUNE 28-29 ® 9am – 4 pm 1104 GLENWOOD AVE NICHOLS HILLS, OK 73116

Forensic Night Alas, poor Yorick, how well do you know him? Learn how investigators study human skulls to determine age, sex and trauma at this event featuring replica skulls and real-life cases. You can also have the chance to participate in a scavenger hunt and tour the museum’s unnervingly extensive skeleton collection. It will be just like that TV show Bones but with possibly even more bones. Get a head 6-7:30 p.m. Friday at Museum of Osteology, 10301 S. Sunnylane Road. Tickets are $25. Call 405-814-0006 or visit skeletonmuseum.com. FRIDAY Photo bigstock.com

Poetry Workshop learn to write poetry at this workshop including a writing exercise, guided meditation, and an open mic, 7-8:30 p.m. June 27. Planned Parenthood, 619 NW 23rd St. THU

FILM From Here to Eternity (1953, USA, Fred Zinnemann) romantic and personal drama is overshadowed by the imminent bombing of Pearl Harbor in this classic World War II film presented as part of OETA’s Movie Club, 9 p.m. June 29. SAT Late Night (2019, USA, Nisha Ganatra) a late-night talk show host (Emma Thompson) gets more than she bargained for when she adds a woman (Mindy Kaling) to he all-male writer’s room, through June 27. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. FRI-THU

All Things Heavy a dance night featuring vinyl selections from DJ JP Lovecraft, 9 p.m. June 27. Blue Note Lounge, 2408 N. Robinson Ave., 405600-1166, thebluenotelounge.com. THU avid Hotel Open House celebrate the opening of a new hotel with a food truck festival, games, prizes and and a grand tour, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. June 28. avid Hotel, 4621 SW 15th St., 405-609-3443, ihg. com/avidhotels. FRI Bearadise a weekend of pool parties, bar crawls, and other special events presented by the Sooner Bears, June 28-30. Habana Inn, 2200 NW 40th St., 405-528-2221. FRI-SUN

continued on page 24

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O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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CALENDAR C A L E N DA R

continued from page 23 Board Game Brunch play board games while enjoying a variety of food and beverage options, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. last Sunday of the month. The R & J Lounge and Supper Club, 320 NW 10th St., 405-602-5066, rjsupperclub.com. SUN Board Game Day enjoy local craft beer while playing old-school board and arcade games with friends, 5-8 p.m. Sundays. FlashBack RetroPub, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-633-3604, flashbackretropub.com. SUN

Bricktown Canal 20th Anniversary a family-friendly event featuring live music, art sales and more commemorating the anniversary of Bricktown Canal, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. June 29. Bricktown Beach, 2 S. Mickey Mantle Drive, 405-2353500, downtownokc.com/bricktown-beach. SAT Chicago Steppin Class learn how to do the popular dance at this free weekly class, 7-9 p.m. Thursdays. L & G’s on the BLVD, 4801 N. Lincoln Blvd., 405-5242001, facebook.com/landgsontheblvd. THU Circle Artist Show artist Chris Cargill will create an artwork live by painting a claw foot tub, which will be auctioned to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 4-6 p.m. June 27. Expressions Home Gallery, 501 NE 122nd St., Suite C. THU Cocktail Cruise see the Boathouse District, the Wheeler Ferris wheel and more on this sunset cruise with a full cash bar, Fridays and Saturdays through Sept. 28. Regatta Park Landing, 701 S. Lincoln Blvd., 405-702-7755, okrivercruises.com. FRI-SAT Coffee with Real Estate Investors network over coffee and discuss topics such as real estate investing, building a successful business and chasing the American dream, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. Starbucks, 5800 W. Memorial Road, 405-722-6189, starbucks.com. WED Conversational Spanish Group Meetup an opportunity for all experience levels to practice speaking Spanish, 7 p.m. Tuesdays. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. TUE Date Night at the Zoo couples 21 and older can explore the zoo at night and enjoy dance lessons, karaoke beer and wine tastings and more, 6-10 p.m. June 27. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo.com. THU Downtown Recyclers Toastmasters practice your public speaking skills at this ongoing weekly meeting, noon-1 p.m. Wednesdays. Department of Environmental Quality, 707 N. Robinson Ave., 405702-0100, deq.state.ok.us. WED Fuzzy Friday a monthly happy hour meet-andgreet hosted by the Bears of Central Oklahoma, 5:30 p.m. Fridays. Apothecary 39, 2125 NW 39th St., 405-605-4100. FRI Governor’s Club Toastmasters lose your fear of public speaking and gain leadership skills by practicing in a fun and low-stakes environment, noon-1 p.m. Wednesdays. Oklahoma Farm Bureau Building, 2501 N. Stiles Ave., 405-523-2300, okfarmbureau.org. WED Juneteenth Celebration a celebration of the anniversary of the abolition of legal slavery in the United States with a special presentation by the National Association for Black Veterans, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. June 30. New Bethel Baptist Church, 1844 E. Madison St., 405-427-2171. SUN Kick the Dust Up line dance class learn this popular boot scootin’ country-and-western dance at this class taught by Nancy Pellow, 8-9 p.m. June 19 and 26. Chisholm’s Saloon, 401 S. Meridian Ave., 405949-0423, facebook.com/ChisholmsSaloon. WED

International Mud Day As a kid, one surefire way to know an activity is going to be fun is if your parents/legal guardians have to sign a waiver for you to participate. Case in point: this International Mud Day celebration, where children can mold clay figurines to take home but more importantly cake their hands/feet/faces/whathaveyou in squishy, wet dirt, just like adults are always telling them not to. Protective goggles and a wash-up station will be provided, but it should probably go without saying that this ain’t a time for Sunday finery. Get your hands dirty 9 a.m.-noon Saturday at Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave. Admission is $5-$10. Call 405-445-7080 or visit myriadgardens.org. SATURDAY Photo bigstock.com

Red Dirt Dinos: An Oklahoma Dinosaur Adventure learn about regional prehistoric reptiles at this hands-on exhibit featuring three interactive robotic dinosaurs, through Sept. 2. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. THU-MON Red, White and Boom the Oklahoma City Philharmonic Orchestra will perform a free concert which climaxes with a fireworks display, 8:30 p.m. July 3. Oklahoma State Fair Park, 3220 Great Plains Walk, 405-948-6700, okstatefair.com. WED Reiki/Energy Share learn about reiki healing and share good vibes at this community get-together, 6 p.m. Fridays. Beautifully Connected, 13524 Railway Dr., Suite J, 262-753-6852, beautifullyconnectedwellness.com. FRI Stars & Stripes River Festival watch rowing and whitewater raft races followed by a fireworks display, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. June 29. RIVERSPORT Rapids, 800 Riversport drive, 405-552-4040, riversportokc.org. SAT

Moore Chess Club play in tournaments and learn about the popular board game at this weekly event where all ages and skill levels are welcome, 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Moore Library, 225 S. Howard Ave. SUN

Summer Canine Olympics dogs compete in obedience, agility, dock diving training and more, June 26-30. Bennett Event Center, 3101 Gordon Cooper Blvd, 405-948-6700. WED-SUN

The Office Trivia take a team of friends and show off your knowledge of the Dunder Mifflin crew, 7-9 p.m. June 26. Nashbird, 1 NW Ninth St., 405-6009718, nashbirdchicken.com. WED

Toastmasters Meeting hone public speaking and leadership skills in a move-at-your own pace environment, 7-8:30 p.m. Thursdays. McFarlin United Methodist Church, 419 S. University Drive, 623-810-0295. THU

Oklahoma Summer Bash a car and bike show featuring hot rods, lowrider, classic cars and more, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. June 30. Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, 405-602-8500, coxconventioncenter.com. SUN

Trivia Night at Black Mesa Brewing test your knowledge at this weekly competition hosted by BanjoBug Trivia, 6:30 p.m. June 18. Black Mesa Brewing Company, 1354 W Sheridan Ave., 405-778-1865, blackmesabrewing.com. TUE

Paper Sack Project prepare sack lunches to pass out to people on the streets at this event hosted by Debate Night OKC, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Sunday of the month. NE OKC Community & Cultural Center, 3815 N. Kelley Ave., 405-401-3350. SUN

Trivia Night at Matty McMillen’s answer questions for a chance to win prizes at this weekly trivia night, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Matty McMillen’s Irish Pub, 2201 NW 150th St., 405-607-8822, mattymcmillens.com. TUE

Pooches on the Patio bring your best friend to this dog-friendly happy hour with drink specials, appetizers and free pet treats, 4-7 p.m. May 11. Café 501 Classen Curve, 5825 NW Grand Blvd., 405-844-1501, cafe501.com. SAT

Uncle Grumpy’s Green Retreat enjoy live music, swimming, a scavenger hunt and more at this 420-friendly event, June 28-29. Lost Lakes Waterpark and Amphitheater, 3501 NE 10th St., 405702-4040, lostlakesamp.com. FRI-SAT

Pop Culture Trivia test your knowledge in a variety of subjects, 8:30 p.m.-midnight June 29. Opolis, 113 N. Crawford Ave., Norman, 405-673-4931, opolis.org. SAT

Water/Ways a traveling exhibit created by the Smithsonian Institution illustrating the many ways water impacts human life and civilization, June 29-Aug. 18. Norman Public Library East, 3051 Alameda St., 405-217-0770, pioneerlibrarysystem.org. SAT-SUN

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FOOD Paseo Farmers Market shop for fresh food from local vendors at this weekly outdoor event, 9 a.m.noon Saturdays, through Oct. 19. SixTwelve, 612 NW 29th St., 405-208-8291, sixtwelve.org. SAT

YOUTH Early Explorers toddlers and preschoolers can participate in fun scientific activities they can repeat later at home, 10-11 a.m. Thursdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. THU Fairy Ball a children’s costume ball where imaginative, homemade costumes are encouraged and can be embellished with woven flower crowns and leafy wings added on-site, 7-9 p.m. June 29. First Christian Church, 3700 N. Walker Ave., 580-225-7801, ecdisciples.org. SAT OKC Zoo Camp children age 4-15 can learn about a variety animals at these weeklong themed camps, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays through Aug. 9. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-4243344, okczoo.com. MON-FRI Reading Wednesdays a weekly story time with hands-on activities, goody bags and reading-themed photo ops, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. WED Story Time with Britt’s Bookworms enjoy snacks, crafts and story time, 10:30-11:30 a.m. first and third Thursday of every month. Thrive Mama Collective, 1745 NW 16th St., 405-356-6262. THU Storytime Science the museum invites children age 6 and younger to hear a story and participate in a related scientific activity, 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. TUE

PERFORMING ARTS 145th Army Band the National Guard big band, which celebrated its 100th anniversary last year, will perform, 7:30-9 p.m. June 30. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. SUN

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS!

Clever Little Lies family secrets and betrayals are exposed in this dark comedy by playwright Joe DiPietro, June 28-July 20. Carpenter Square Theatre, 806 W. Main St., 405-232-6500, carpentersquare.com. FRI-SAT The Comedy of Errors Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park presents the Bard’s chaotic comedy of mistaken identities; directed by D. Lance Marsh, through June 29. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. THU-SAT Divine Comedy a weekly local showcase hosted by CJ Lance and Josh Lathe and featuring a variety of comedians from OKC and beyond, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St., 405-463-0470, 51stspeakeasy.com. WED Don Quixote Open Mic a weekly comedy show followed by karaoke, 7:30-9 p.m. Fridays. Don Quixote Club, 3030 N. Portland Ave., 405-947-0011. FRI Iron Horse Open Mic and Showcase perform music on stage at this show open to all experience levels, 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Iron Horse Bar & Grill, 9501 S. Shields Blvd., 405-735-1801. WED Joel Forlenza: The Piano Man the pianist performs variety of songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra and, of course, Billy Joel, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., 405-701-4900, othellos.us. TUE-WED

LibertyFest an annual Fourth of July celebration, now in its 69th year, featuring a concert featuring patriotic and popular songs, 7:30 p.m. June 28. Mitchell Hall Theatre, 100 N. University Drive, Edmond, 405-974-2000, uco.edu. FRI Lumpy’s Open Mic Night play a song of your own or just listen to the performers at this weekly show hosted by John Riley Willingham, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. Lumpy’s Sports Grill, 12325 N. May Ave., 405-286-3300, lumpyssportsgrill.com. WED Monday Night Blues Jam Session bring your own instrument to this open-stage jam hosted by Wess McMichael, 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, Norman, 434 Buchanan Ave., 405-7014900, othellos.us. MON OK Country Cafe Open Mic show off your singing talent, 6 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of every month. OK Country Cafe, 6072 S. Western Ave., 405-602-6866, okcountrycafe.com. THU


OKC Improv performers create original scenes in the moment based on suggestions from the audience, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Oklahoma City Improv, 1757 NW 16th St., 405-4569858, okcimprov.com. FRI Oklahoma Indigenous Theatre Company New Play Festival see staged readings of several new plays and a full production of Jo MacDonald’s Neechi-Itas at this festival, now in its 10th year, June 27-29. Mitchell Hall Theatre, 100 N. University Drive, Edmond, 405-974-2000, uco.edu. THU-SAT Triple’s Open Mic a music and comedy open mic hosted by Amanda Howle, 7:30 p.m. every other Wednesday. Triple’s, 8023 NW 23rd St., 405-789-3031. WED

Open Mic at The P share your musical talent or just come to listen at this weekly open mic, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. The Patriarch Craft Beer House & Lawn, 9 E. Edwards St., Edmond, 405-285-6670, ThePatriarchEdmond.com. WED Othello’s Comedy Night see professionals and amateurs alike at this long-running weekly open mic for standup comics, 9 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us. TUE

The Skirvin Jazz Club a monthly live jazz show presented by OK Sessions, 7:30 p.m. third Friday of every month. Park Avenue Grill, 1 Park Ave., 405-7028444, parkavegrill.com. FRI

Stars and Stripes Spin Jam a weekly meetup for jugglers, hula hoopers and unicyclers, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Stars & Stripes Park, 3701 S. Lake Hefner Drive, 405-297-2756, okc.gov/parks. WED

The Sorcerer & The Comedian an evening combining comedy and magic featuring performances by John Shack and Alex Sanchez, 8-10 p.m. June 26. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com. WED

Twisted Coyote Brew Crew a weekly 3-mile group run for all ability levels with a beer tasting to follow; bring your own safety lights, 6 p.m. Mondays. Twisted Spike Brewing Co., 1 NW 10th St., 405-3013467, twistedspike.com. MON

Theo Von the comic and podcast host stops in OKC on his Dark Arts tour, 6-9 p.m. June 29. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-708-6937, towertheatreokc.com. SAT

Wheeler Criterium a weekly nighttime cycling event with criterium races, food trucks and family activities, 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, okc.gov. TUE

United We Stand In Laughter comics Julie Drake, Madison Woodcock, Zack Ishikawa, Joshua Clark, Velly Vel Harris, Lenny Van Horn and DJ Speccs are scheduled to perform, 8 p.m. June 29. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. SAT

Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUE

VZD’s Open Mic Night a weekly music mic hosted by Joe Hopkins, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. VZD’s Restaurant & Bar, 4200 N. Western Ave., 405-6023006, vzds.com. WED Weekly Jams bring an instrument and play along with others at this open-invitation weekly jam session, 9:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesdays. Saints, 1715 NW 16th St., 405-602-6308, saintspubokc.com. TUE

VISUAL ARTS Alicia Saltina Marie Clark a solo exhibition featuring the work of the Oklahoma based artist, through July 7. DNA Galleries, 1709 NW 16th St., 405525-3499, dnagalleries.com. THU-SUN

ACTIVE

Beautiful Minds: Dyslexia and the Creative Advantage an exhibition of artworks created by people with dyslexia including students from Oklahoma City’s Trinity School, through Aug. 4. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. FRI-SUN

Public Access Open Mic read poetry, do standup comedy, play music or just watch as an audience member at this open mic hosted by Alex Sanchez, 7 p.m. Sundays. The Paseo Plunge, 3010 Paseo St., 405-315-6224, paseoplunge.org. SUN

Botanical Balance an all-levels yoga class in a natural environment; bring your own mat and water, 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays and 8 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. SAT-TUE

Dancing Around the Edges an exhibition of KB Kueteman’s abstract acrylic paintings, through June 30. Contemporary Art Gallery, 2928 Paseo St., 405-601-7474, contemporaryartgalleryokc.com.

Red Dirt Open Mic a weekly open mic for comedy and poetry, hosted by Red Dirt Poetry, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Sauced on Paseo, 2912 Paseo St., 405-521-9800, saucedonpaseo.com. WED

Co-ed Open Adult Volleyball enjoy a game of friendly yet competitive volleyball while making new friends, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., Yukon, 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov. WED

Paramount Open Mic show off your talents at this open mic hosted by musician Chris Morrison, 7 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. WED

Rhyme in Reasons share your talent or just watch other artists perform at this weekly open mic, 7:30-10 p.m. Thursdays. Reasons Lounge, 1140 N. MacArthur Boulevard, 405-774-9991. THU Sanctuary Karaoke Service don a choir robe and sing your favorite song, 9 p.m.-midnight Wednesdays and Thursdays. Sanctuary Barsilica, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., facebook.com/sanctuarybarokc. WED

Monday Night Group Ride meet up for a weekly 25-30 minute bicycle ride at about 18 miles per hour through east Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Mondays. The Bike Lab OKC, 2200 W. Hefner Road, 405-603-7655. MON Open Badminton hit some birdies in some morning pick-up games of badminton with friends, 10 a.m.noon Saturdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., Yukon, 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov. SAT

WED-SUN

From the Golden Age to the Moving Image: The Changing Face of the Permanent Collection view portraits painted by Kehinde Wiley, Anthony van Dyck, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and George Bellows, through Sept. 22. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. FRI-SUN

Life Imagined: The Art and Science of Automata see examples of mechanical proto-robots from 1850 to the modern day, through Sept. 29. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. SUN Maurice Sendak Exhibition view original works by the author and illustrator of Where the Wild Things Are and In the Night Kitchen, through July 9. Ronald J. Norick Downtown Library, 300 Park Ave., 405-231-8650, metrolibrary.org. SAT-TUE Patrick Riley: A Retrospective an exhibit of drawings, jewelry, sculpture and other artworks created by the artist and educator, through Aug. 29. Gaylord-Pickens Oklahoma Heritage Museum, 1400 Classen Drive, 405-235-4458, oklahomaheritage.com. THU Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition & Sale an annual exhibition and art sale featuring more than 300 Western paintings and sculptures by contemporary Western artists of landscapes, wildlife and illustrative scenes, through July 8. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. FRI-MON

Seeing Now an exhibit of multimedia art works by Hank Willis Thomas, Ken Gonzales-Day, Travis Somerville, Paul Rucker, Graciela Sacco, Terence Hammonds and Michael Waugh, through Dec. 31. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com. THU-MON Van Gogh, Monet, Degas: The Mellon Collection of French Art from the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts a traveling exhibition of a collection of works by influential European painters including Van Gogh, Monet, Manet, Picasso, Rousseau and many more, through Sept. 22. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. SAT-SUN

Welcome Home: Oklahomans and the War in Vietnam explores the impact of the war on Oklahoma families as well as the stories of Vietnamese families relocated to Oklahoma, through Nov. 6. Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, 405-521-2491, okhistory.org. MON

Karl Brenner/Jeff Dodd/Brenda Kingery an exhibition featuring works by three painters, through June 30. JRB Art at The Elms, 2810 N. Walker Ave., 405-528-6336, jrbartgallery.com. FRI-SUN

Woodstock: Three Days that Defined a Generation “By the time we got to Woodstock, we were half a million strong,” sang Joni Mitchell, who actually skipped the legendary music festival to appear on The Dick Cavett Show. This 2019 documentary features previously unseen footage of the over-attended, poorly planned and incredibly unsanitary 1969 concert that might have gone down as the predecessor to the disastrous Fyre Festival if not for once-in-a-lifetime performances by The Who, Janis Joplin, Santana and, uh, the guy who sang the theme song to Welcome Back, Kotter. The most mind-blowing moment came courtesy of Jimi Hendrix before he even started playing. Addressing the hundreds of thousands in the crowd, Hendrix laughed and said, “I see we meet again.” Beware the brown acid FridayJuly 3 at Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive. Tickets are $5-$9. Call 405-236-3100 or visit okcmoa.com. FRIDAY-JULY 3 Photo Elliot Landy/Jason Laure/Doug Lenier/Gary Geyer/Henry Diltz provided

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS!

Submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail them to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

For OKG live music

see page 29

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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Forever Spinster

Local indie rock act Spinster celebrates the release of its debut album at what was supposed to be a farewell show. By Jeremy Martin

The difference between The Annie Oakley and Spinster — according to Jo Babb, who writes songs for both — mostly comes down to whether or not her guitar is plugged in. “I know when I’m writing a song which band it’s going to go towards because Annie Oakley is formed around harmonies and mostly softer music and Spinster is solely written on electric guitar,” Babb said. “So if I pick up my electric and start writing, I’m probably going to end up using it in Spinster.” Oklahoma City indie-rock act Spinster celebrates the release of its self-titled debut 8-11 p.m. Friday at Opolis, 113 N. Crawford Ave., in Norman. While Babb wrote all eight songs on Spinster, she said her twin sister Sophia is the primary songwriter for folk trio The Annie Oakley. Babb wrote and cowrote songs on The Annie Oakley’s 2018 Spinster features members of Swim Fan, Mad Honey and The Annie Oakley. | Photo Alexa Ace

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full-length Words We Mean, but she said her attempts at moving the band’s Americana-inspired acoustic sound into more rock-driven territory were ultimately not right for the band. “‘Good Things,’ that was on our last record, that definitely should have been a Spinster song,” Babb said. “It should have had bass and drums, and I just wasn’t aware of the possibilities for creating a new band, so I was trying to get Annie Oakley to go in a direction that, ultimately, it will never go. So now I feel more comfortable writing songs, knowing that they’re appropriate for the project that I’m writing them for.” When her sister left to study in Germany, Babb saw a chance to explore music outside the band she has been a part of since she was a teenager. The Annie Oakley released its first EP in 2013, and in an interview with Oklahoma Gazette last year, the sisters recalled singing to each other in the crib. “I had been wanting to play some of my solo songs apart from Annie Oakley for awhile, and I didn’t really have the time or anyone to play with,” Babb said. “But then my sister decided to do an internship and then study abroad for nine months out of the year. I had plenty of time to be on my own.” She met Spinster’s lead guitarist Spenser Powers and drummer Tremaine Wade at a show with their other band Swim Fan and bassist Branden Palesano (who also plays in Mad Honey) while working at Classen Coffee Company. Spinster played its first show about a year ago. Though the band originally started as an outlet for Babb’s solo songwriting, she said Spinster is increasingly becoming a group effort. “All of us together are growing into the sound of what Spinster is,” Babb said. “I came to the band with so many songs already written, and they added their part, but now we’re thinking about, What can we do together as a group?” In addition to their decidedly more ampli-

fied sound, Babb said Spinster’s songs tend to have a noticeably different feel and approach than the ones she writes for The Annie Oakley. “I think I have a different attitude, for sure — a little bit more energy, and also I might be a little bit more pissed off,” Babb said. “I don’t know why, but you can just let out your frustration when you play really loud on an electric guitar. It’s not quite the same with angrily strumming an acoustic.” But, she added, Spinster’s songs are not all fueled by rage. “They’re not necessarily angry,” Babb said. “They’re more just brooding about breaking up and shit like that.” Apart from Babb’s unmistakable vocals, Spinster’s lead singles “Achilles” and “Sisyphus” are noticeably distinct from The Annie Oakley songs, and Babb said two other tracks on the album — “Temptation” and “For Danica,” recorded in a bedroom studio by Normanbased producer Lennon Bramlett, who makes electronic music under the name Bronte — point to a possible future direction for her newer band. “I think those two will stand out as being a little bit more organic and a little more of what’s to come with Spinster,” Babb said. “It captured the music that I’ve been more recently writing because the first six were written around two years ago, and I think I’ll be recording a lot with Lennon in the future.” Though Friday’s Opolis appearance was initially announced as the last Spinster show before Babb moved out of state, she has since changed her plans and will remain an Oklahoman for at least a while longer. “I thought I was moving to Colorado with Sophie, and I was so sad because I was going to say farewell to Spinster, but I was going to really jump in with Annie Oakley,” Babb said. “But then the housing situation changed and Sophie got engaged and her and her fiancé want to live alone. It just made more sense for me to stay here rather than moving to Colorado and living alone, and I decided, Why not jump into Spinster more? … Annie Oakley is playing shows throughout the fall, so we’ll meet up for that, but Spinster is going to get all my attention, at least for a minute.”

Spinster celebrates the release of its selftitled album Friday at Opolis. | Photo Alexa Ace

Babb said the band’s name might also point to a plan for her own personal future. “I always loved the idea of being an old, single lady with no kids,” Babb said. “I just think that idea is one that used to be really taboo — the old, cranky spinster — but more and more, I feel like my friends and myself included kind of look to that idea as like, ‘Oh, yeah. I can do that. I can go my whole life avoiding marriage and children.’ My grandma always told me, ‘Man, I was so close to becoming a spinster, and then I met your grandfather and now look where I am.’ That word has always kind of made me smile.” She laughed at the contrast between her twin sister’s intended future as a bride-to-be and her own playing pissedoff guitar rock in a band called Spinster, but she added an important clarification. “I’m so happy doing it,” she said. Admission is $10-$12. Charlotte Bumgarner and Maddie Razook share the bill. Visit opolis.org.

Spinster, featuring singles “Achilles” and “Sisyphus,” will be released Friday. | Photo Madi Rae Jones / provided

Spinster album release 8-11 p.m. Friday Opolis 113 N. Crawford Ave. opolis.org | 405-230-0311 $10-$12


O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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X factor

The original members of L.A. punk band X reconvene and find new meaning in their music. By Jeremy Martin

In More Fun in the New World: The Unmaking and Legacy of L.A. Punk, John Doe compared touring with his band X in the 1980s to a kind of selfcentered mission trip. “We felt a duty to spread the gospel we thought we were,” Doe recalled in the book, published in June. “Some nights we probably sucked, but some we outplayed even ourselves.” In the book, Doe proceeds to describe how the pressures of touring and recording as one of LA’s most revered if not most commercially successful punk bands began to break up both X and his marriage to bandmate Exene Cervenka, but the band’s original lineup has since reunited and plays 8 p.m. Monday at Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St. In a phone interview with Oklahoma Gazette, Doe said X has overcome the obstacles that originally caused the band, responsible for classic punk albums Los Angeles and Wild Gift, to split up. “People say that a band is like a family, and families are complicated,” Doe said. “But we like each other, and we’re cool. All the bullshit’s been settled, so it’s good.” Though he and Cervenka remain romantic exes, Doe said he still considers her his creative soulmate. “We just share something that’s a little bit different,” Doe said. “When we sing together, we kind of know where each other’s going. If one improvises, the other one picks up on it really quickly and can go there with them. And we’ve been through a lot. We still write songs together, and that’s another kind of connection that is difficult to come by. That’s one of the reasons that we tried to be adults and didn’t blow the whole band apart because we weren’t married anymore. It’s kind of ancient history.” Their unique vocal interplay (often described as “off-kilter”) took time to develop, Doe said, and they continue to work at the dynamic. “We worked at it for two or three years before it really started taking shape,” Doe said, “and it still can be a challenge when we work on new songs. Exene has an unconventional way of singing, which is really unique in the harmonies that she chooses. We learned how to sing together like that. So it wasn’t immediate, but it just developed organically. It wasn’t preconceived.” Working on the memoir More Fun in the New World — which also includes chapters authored by other LA music icons including Keith X, reunited with its original lineup, plays 8 p.m. Monday at Tower Theatre. | Photo Gary Leonard / provided

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Morris (Black Flag, Circle Jerks), Louie Pérez (Los Lobos) and Jane Wiedlin (The Go-Gos) — gave Doe more perspective on his life, making him reevaluate some of his decisions and behavior. “I had to admit to not being the best person I hoped to be,” Doe said. “I think we were all pretty vulnerable, pretty honest about the past and didn’t try to make ourselves out as the hero. Although, we survived, so that was good. You don’t want to be too full of yourself. If you’re honest, you find out something about yourself, and there were a lot of aha moments.” In the book, Doe described how he “could be quite a mess.” “Exene began to feel bullied by my constant work ethic and stifled by our constant ‘John and Exene’ identity, losing her sense of self,” Doe wrote. “How I wish I could have given her more time to herself and not been insecure, demanding or needing a 24-hour, sevendays-a-week partnership. … Really, it was too much to ask of two people to spend every day, all day working, playing, partying and socializing. … Exene and I also began to argue, which I now realize was initiated by my expectations of what I thought Exene should be doing. I was so foolish.” The passage of time has also caused Doe to reconsider some of X’s song lyrics, recontextualizing them. “Unless you inhabit a song and then

live in the moment while you’re singing, then that’s what’s called phoning it in,” Doe said. “The lyric that’s changed the most is ‘I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts,’ which was written around the time of Reagan and our involvement in El Salvador and the new romantics from England kind of taking over the radio and things like that. There was a lot of kind of negative stuff going on, but we had the chorus, ‘I must not think bad thoughts,’ which was kind of sarcastic I think. Here’s all this bad stuff, but you have to be happy. … Now it’s more of a wish and trying to keep yourself above the negativity. Trying to rise above rather than get dragged down by all the day-to-day things that can make you feel like crap.” Doe said X is able to fully recreate the song — along with “Dancing With Tears in My Eyes” and “Poor Girl” — live after adding multi-instrumentalist Craig Packham, who plays rhythm guitar on some songs to recreate the kind of multi-tracking lead guitarist Billy Zoom recorded in the studio. Packham also plays drums, freeing drummer DJ Bonebrake to play vibes on some songs and allowing the band to “stretch out a little bit” and experiment with the arrangements.

Remaining relevant

In “The New World,” Doe and Cervenka sing, “It was better before they voted for what’s his name / This was supposed to be the new world.” The song, released in 1983, still sounds relevant today. Doe said he is “not a political analyst,” but some of the problems X were discussing then have only gotten even worse. “As negative as the way Reagan made the country feel, it’s nothing like now, nothing as divisive as it is now,” Doe said. “I don’t think it’s the end of the world,

but it’s messed up. I think that there’s a lot of hate that’s stirred up, and people react to that one way or the other.” The music business, though now controlled by streaming services, continues to be bullshit, Doe said, but older bands remain relevant and newer bands such as X’s sometimes tourmates Skating Polly are still managing to make meaningful music. “There’s this really, really good music, and the music business is all destroyed because of streaming and Pandora and Spotify,” Doe said. “But, you know, you’ve got to find a way to make it through. Everybody does; you will eventually. Luckily, I think people are getting paid a little bit better. Not much, though. Those companies are still reaping the lion’s share. I don’t care whether they they’re showing a profit or not, but I know that when I get a statement from ASCAP for streaming and I get 100th of a cent per play, there’s 20,000 plays, and they’ll say, ‘Here’s 20 bucks.’ That’s 20,000 3-minute segments of content that they’ve used, and they give me $20 for that. So that’s pretty much like the old days, when people got their publishing stolen. Having said that, I think that there are bands that are from our era and later that are still touring that people want to see, and there’s new people that are picking up that mantle.” Tickets are $30-$40. Austin duo Folk Uke are scheduled to open. Visit towertheatreokc.com.

X 8 p.m. Monday Tower Theatre 425 NW 23rd St. towertheatreokc.com | 405-708-6937 $30-$40


LIVE MUSIC Stephen Salewon, Othello’s Italian Restaurant. SINGER/SONGWRITER

These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

SUNDAY, JUN. 30 The Appleseed Cast, 89th Street-OKC. ROCK Poorboy, Your Mom’s Place. ROCK

WEDNESDAY, JUN. 26

The Shelby Phelps Band, Frankie’s. BLUES/ROCK

I Am/Orthodox/Boundaries, 89th Street-OKC. METAL

MONDAY, JUL. 1

Nelly, Diamond Ballroom. HIP-HOP

Jason Hunt, Sean Cumming’s Irish Restaurant. FOLK

Optional Hypocrisy/Darren Cipponeri, Sauced on Paseo. ROCK

TUESDAY, JUL. 2

THURSDAY, JUN. 27 Aaron Newman, Angry Scotsman Brewing. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Isaac McClung, Black Mesa Brewing Company. BLUES

Justin Pruitt, COOP Ale Works Tap Room. SINGER/SONGWRITER

FRIDAY, JUN. 28 Every Mother’s Nightmare/Doxy/Halo on Fire, Oklahoma City Limits. METAL Gabriel Maaliq, 89th Street-OKC. R&B/SOUL

Making Movies Co-written by Rubén Blades and Lou Reed in the late ’80s, “Delilah,” which tells the story of a lover caught while trying to cross the border to meet the titular temptress, could have been penned last week. “I was beaten, fingerprinted, deported for the love of Delilah,” laments the narrator in the song, a single from Making Movies’ ameri’kana, released in May and featuring guest appearances by Blades, Los Lobos’ David Hidalgo, Frankie Negrón and Flor de Toloache. Comprising two sets of brothers — Diego and Enrique Chi from Panama and Juan-Carlos and Andres Chaurand from Mexico — Kansas City, Missouri-based Making Movies mixes Latin music with psychedelic rock, creating a sonic argument against xenophobic separatism at least as strong as any lyrics might express. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at Lions Park, 450 S. Flood Ave., in Norman. Admission is free. Visit normandepot.org. SUNDAY Photo provided

Cuco, Tower Theatre. POP Kyle Reid, Scratch Kitchen & Cocktails. SINGER/

SONGWRITER

WEDNESDAY, JUL. 3 Adam Aguilar & the Weekend All Stars, Sidecar Barley & Wine Bar. COVER

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

Grayson Capps, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Jabee, Legacy Park. HIP-HOP Jack Ingram, Tower Theatre. SINGER/SONGWRITER

SATURDAY, JUN. 29 Ali Harter, Othello’s Italian Restaurant. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Audio Book Club/Twiggs, 51st Street Speakeasy. ROCK

Charley Crockett, Cain’s Ballroom. BLUES/COUNTRY Kap G/Yella Beezy/OMB Peer, Bricktown Events Center. HIP-HOP

Pet Shark/Hidden Agenda, Oklahoma City Limits. ROCK

Perseus/KOA/Another Round, Blue Note Lounge. METAL/ROCK Sincere Engineer/Heart Attack Man, 89th StreetOKC. ROCK

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS!

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THE HIGH CULTURE

Green state

June 26 is the one-year anniversary of the vote to legalize medical cannabis. Oklahoma Gazette looks back at the first year and glances toward the future for the cannabis plant in the state. By Matt Dinger

On June 26, 2018, more than 892,000 Oklahomans flooded the polls. They chose Kevin Stitt as the Republican gubernatorial candidate and Drew Edmondson as the Democratic one. An item on the ballot was State Question 788, which read in part, “This measure amends the Oklahoma State Statutes. A yes vote legalizes the licensed use, sale, and growth of marijuana in Oklahoma for medicinal purposes. A license is required for use and possession of marijuana for medicinal purposes … Shall the proposal be approved?” With 100 percent of precincts reporting, 507,582 Oklahomans, or 56.86 percent, marked “yes,” changing the course of state history and making Oklahoma the 30th state to offer medical cannabis. The ballot measure included provisions to ensure swift implementation of the voters’ will. After a short battle with the state health department, voters got their way and Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Authority began issuing licenses to patients and businesses. Four months to the day of its passage, it became legal for patients to purchase and possess cannabis products containing THC. “We’ve certainly exceeded my expectations, in terms of the number of patients we’ve onboarded, in terms of the number of licenses granted, the amount of retail sales that have occurred over the course of just the first half of 2019,” said attorney J. Blake Johnson, founder of Climb Collective and a partner at Overman Legal Group. “The amount of taxes and fees that have been collected by this state and the amount of economic impact that the industry has had, in general, has surpassed even my very optimistic expectations. We’re going to crush everyone’s projections and estimates.” Johnson was formerly the co-chair of Crowe & Dunlevy’s Cannabis Industry Practice Group and projected that the ballot initiative would pass even in one of the country’s most conservative states. He spent the past year assembling a broad and deep roster of cannabis industry clients across all areas of the industry. He said that cannabis victories and failures in other states have provided a road map for Oklahoma’s program. “The industry was already quite mature outside of Oklahoma, and I think we benefited from a lot of sort of institutional experience that we could rely on outside of our own borders in terms of industry expertise,” Johnson 30

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said. “A lot of solutions are available to us that weren’t available five years ago in terms of payment solutions, in terms of tax strategies, legal infrastructure, et cetera, so I think we benefited from that. And then, in addition, in terms of how it’s happened so quickly in Oklahoma, I think that’s a product of the way the law was written. It is, I think, one of the more, if not the most, easy to access medical marijuana systems, both from the perspective of a patient or an industry participant. So it’s not shocking to me, in light of how robust and enormous this industry has become outside of Oklahoma, to see a very industry-friendly infrastructure, once in place, foster an initial explosion of economic momentum.” In the year since medical cannabis became the law of the land, Oklahoma has seen a green rush unprecedented in any other medical state. OMMA projected 80,000 patients in its first year of licensing, or by Aug. 26. The state is on course to double that projection in less than a year. As of June 17, 2019, 144,018 patients, 1,118 caregivers and 5,838 businesses have applied for licenses. More than 95 percent of both patients and businesses have already been approved. Many of the remaining 5 percent have not been denied but are still being processed. As of June 20, OMMA had collected more than $7.1 million in revenue from patient licenses and more than $11 million in commercial licenses, according to OK.gov. In sales taxes alone, cannabis generated more than $6 million in the first five months of 2019. After SQ788 was affirmed by voters, Gov. Mary Fallin released the following statement: “I respect the will of the voters in any question placed before them to determine the direction of our state. It is our responsibility as state leaders to look out for the health and safety of Oklahoma citizens. As I mentioned in previous public comments, I believe, as well as many Oklahomans, this new law is written so loosely that it opens the door for basically recreational marijuana. I will be discussing with legislative leaders and state agencies our options going forward on how best to proceed with adding a medical and proper regulatory framework to make sure marijuana use is truly for valid medical illnesses.” Fallin chose not to hold a special session to address industry infrastruc-

ture and regulation, which allowed the industry to boom with very limited oversight and supervision. Millions upon millions were invested by Oklahomans, and an influx of other cannabis businesses with experience in medical or recreational cannabis laws from other states were open by the time the legislative session began in February.

We’ve certainly exceeded my expectations, in terms of the number of patients we’ve onboarded, in terms of the number of licenses granted, the amount of retail sales that have occurred over the course of just the first half of 2019. J. Blake Johnson In the four months of the session, a number of bills regulating the industry were passed, including House Bill 2612, or the “unity bill,” and House Bill 2601, or the “cleanup bill.” Both created a more comprehensive, though limited framework for the industry. “I would give the overall session a B+ to an A- when it comes to [SQ]788 and upholding the will of the voters,” House majority floor leader Rep. Jon Echols (R-Oklahoma City) said. “There was some stuff that happened that I wasn’t too fond of, but that’s the legislative process. But I think overall, we did a

Oklahoma House majority floor leader Jon Echols | Photo Alexa Ace

really good job implementing what the voters told us to implement. And I think that is best evidenced by most medical marijuana bills; most 788 bills that went on the floor this year had pretty broad bipartisan support, which I think goes to show that everybody was engaged from the Democrat side to the Republican side and everybody was trying their best to work together. “What I’m most proud of is something we didn’t do, something we refrained from doing. I’m most proud that we didn’t go in and push back the enactment date. Because when the people spoke, they said they wanted a quick enactment, and I’m most proud, while there was pressure and there were groups that wanted to do that, I’m proud that we didn’t. I personally think we went too far on safety-sensitive jobs, but there are a lot of members that think we didn’t go far enough. I’m really proud, in [HB]2612, that we did not put caps on how many growers there could be or how many dispensaries there could be. I think that’s anti-free markets, and as a Republican, I’m still a capitalist and I think people should have that opportunity. And when we brought in the drafters, and it was a broad coalition that drafted [SQ]788, they all said the same thing. Their vision was people would have an opportunity to go see what they can do. So overall, I say it was a really good product. That’s part of the legislative process. Instead of one side or the other side, the House or the Senate or the Republicans just ramming it down somebody’s throat, we kept trying to find that point of comprocontinued on page 32


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mise, where nobody got everything that they wanted but we all got enough that we could say, ‘Okay; we’re for this.’ Because as a legislator, if you hold out for the perfect, you’re never going to be for anything. Everybody has 101 different opinions. But overall, I think it was pretty good.” The safety-sensitive provisions of HB2612, which prevent some patients from possessing licenses while they labor in certain occupations, has been legally challenged. Leslie Collum, a registered nurse, medical cannabis patient and dispensary owner, argues that the new legislation runs counter to the aims of SQ788. The first hearing in her case regarding the matter is set for July 26 in Oklahoma County District Court.

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Cannabis activists

Activist Chris “Uncle Grumpy” Moe has also been on the front lines of medical cannabis in the state. He drove back and forth between the state Capitol and his home in Muskogee County, a 250-mile, four-hour round trip, to defend the spirit of SQ788 during the legislative session. “This is not about selling weed in Oklahoma,” Moe said. “This is about medical choice, about me being able to medicate my house for the things that I have to address so that I can go out in that world and succeed without fear of my door Under SQ788 provisions, Oklahoma adopted some of the most progressive medical cannabis laws in the nation. | Photo bigstock.com

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getting kicked in and me being prosecuted for wanting to be like everybody else. That’s all I want to do is be like everybody else. Cannabis helps me do that.” Moe has been using cannabis to quell anxiety and treat pain from a broken spine that has resulted in seven surgeries over the past 15 years. His story is not uncommon among medical cannabis patients. “Throughout my life, I have had a lot of struggles, and I have gone back in these last couple years since I’ve learned how it really is medicine. I’ve gone back and looked at my life and looked at when things were going good, when things were going bad. But things were going good when I stopped listening to the naysayers and the reefer madness, and I used my cannabis in the dark of my room before going out in public and nobody knew where I could be normal like everybody else. And so I started to figure out that it was all these other drugs I was mixing in, the alcohol mostly, that was destroying my life, and the only time I had good normal relationships was when I use cannabis on a regular basis because I was capable of it then,” he said. “The doctors were giving me pills after pills after pills. I got up to 9,855 pills a year. 9,855 pills a year, stack that up. I started using cannabis all the time, microdosing all day. I quit all those pills. For 90 days, I was in too much pain and too miserable to not go back on some pain medicine. To this day, I take less than 2,000 pills a year, including my blood pressure medicine. You think, ‘Wow. 2,000 is a lot.’ Did you hear that in the first number? 9,855 pills a year; less than 2,000 is


Did you know... Cannabis was America’s number one analgesic for 60 years before the rediscovery of aspirin around 1900. From 1842-1900 cannabis made up nearly half of all medicine sold, with virtually no fear of its high.

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nothing, and I’m only alive because of that cannabis. My issues were not just the pain. The doctors had to give me Xanax and Valium and antidepressants and pills to get me up and pills to put me to sleep because I was missing something, and it was all in that cannabis plant. Because when I was using cannabis in my life, I did not need all those pills. But if I went to the doctor and said, ‘I’m having a really hard time this week,’ he would up my Valium or he would up my Xanax on top of my pain pills. I was on more pain medicine than an amputee, and I quit it all because of cannabis. This has literally saved my life.” Norma Sapp was right beside Moe during much of the legislative session. A lifelong activist, Sapp has actively campaigned for the legalization of hemp and cannabis for more than 30 years. “A majority of our legislators get it after seeing that the miracles that we’ve seen with CBD, and it’s been out a couple, three years now,” Sapp said. “They understand it is a medicinal plant. But we had some holdouts in the Senate, and I’m not gonna name names, but those people will come up for election in 2020.” She said that while one fight has been won, the battles continue today and will continue tomorrow, but she has not given up on the original reason she joined the cannabis movement: hemp. In addition to industrial products and other commercial applications, hemp also rejuvenates soil and is called a “superfood” by many. “I am very, very excited for next

Cannabis activist Chris “Uncle Grumpy” Moe | Photo Alexa Ace

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Gazette’s weekly section, The High Culture, explores Oklahoma’s new medical cannabis industry, including the social, medical and economical impact as it unfolds across the metro.

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Oklahoma Gazette and Guyutes team up to bring readers a twist on the national dish of Peru: a cannabis-infused ceviche taco. By Jacob Threadgill and Matt Dinger

Oklahoma summers are known for being hot and humid, but a cool meal is a good way to beat the heat. Oklahoma Gazette has teamed up with Guyutes owner Jarrod Friedel and chef Matt Pryor to bring readers cannabisinfused recipes that medicate as well as delight. This month, they try their hand at the national dish of Peru: ceviche. Ceviche is a raw seafood dish cured in citrus juices. Friedel and Pryor have steeped cilantro in cannabis-infused olive oil to take the meal in a medicated direction. The oil is blended into the rest of the dish with a sweet, tart slaw that goes atop the mixture and is served in a tortilla. Pryor recommends fresh shrimp for the recipe. “I like to use fresh,” he said. “You can use frozen also, especially if you don’t really want to peel the shrimp and devein, but I’m just used to it. So that’s what I like using, fresh. As fresh as possible, just because I think it makes the ceviche taste better.” The slaw is used to balance out the citrus of the ceviche. “I wanted to go with something super sweet, super different. Because this is going to have such a citrusy taste, I wanted something to kind of block that a little bit, take it away,” Pryor said. “I was either going to do that or I was going to go with something super hot, but not everybody is very big on spicy.” After making the oil, Pryor chopped up about a quarter cup of cilantro and left it in a sachet inside the oil in the fridge overnight before removing the bundle and pouring the oil into the dish. “You don’t have to mince it or anything. I just like a rough chop so it breaks its oils down a little bit faster,” he said. Using True Glue from Sage Cannabis Co. / Sage Wellness that tested at 28.3 percent, the oil should contain about 70.75 mg of THC per tablespoon, which works out to about 11.79 mg per taco.

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Ingredients of the ceviche are mixed together with cannabis-infused cilantro olive oil to create the medicated taco. | Photo Alexa Ace

Ceviche taco 1 pound cooked shrimp, peeled and deveined 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice from about two lemons 1/4 cup fresh lime juice from about 3 limes 1/2 cup fresh squeezed orange juice 4 whole plum tomatoes, seeds removed and diced 2 whole jalapeño peppers, seeds and vein removed, diced 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro 1/4 cup finely chopped red onion 1 avocado, pitted and diced kosher salt and fresh ground pepper 3 teaspoons cilantro cannabis-infused oil Chop the shrimp into 1/2-inch pieces and transfer it to a bowl. Set it aside. In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon, lime and orange juice to combine. Pour 1/2 cup of the citrus juice over the shrimp and toss it to combine. Allow the shrimp to marinate in the juice for 15 minutes. Add the tomato, jalapeño, cilantro and red onion to the shrimp. Toss the ingredients to combine them and allow the mixture to marinate for an additional 10 minutes. Stir in the avocado, oil and remaining juices. Season the ceviche with salt and pepper to taste.

continued on page 38

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CANNABIS

Review

Ceviche is one of my favorite dishes. My parents like to tell the story of the time my grandmother thought for sure I would get worms because 2-year-old me was joyously shoveling “raw” fish into my mouth. The acid in citrus juice doesn’t quite cook fish, but it does change the protein structure. I’m used to having ceviche as raw fish fillets, but cooked shrimp is great too and is welcome for anyone who might be squeamish for the raw variety. The sweetness of the apple and papaya balanced well with the acidity of the citrus juice in the ceviche. After having a few of the previous cannabisinfused dishes from Guyutes that were high in THC content, it was nice to eat a composed dish. I was surprised that it had no residual cannabis flavor from the oil, but the cilantro paired well to mask any of the cannabis. I ate a single taco after warming up the corn tortilla over the flame on my kitchen range for a few seconds, and the subtle effect began to hit about 45 minutes after consumption. The effects were very light, and if I was feeling particularly anxious, I would recommend two tacos. The ceviche itself certainly reminded me of some of my favorites I ate in my youth. —Jacob Threadgill

Papaya slaw

Infused cilantro oil

1/4 cup mayonnaise 1/4 cup orange juice 2 teaspoons distilled white vinegar 2 teaspoons agave nectar 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 ripe papaya (about 1 pound), peeled and shredded 2 apples, peeled and julienned 1 head red cabbage

1 cup olive oil 4 grams decarbed cannabis 1/3 cup cilantro

Combine the mayonnaise, orange juice, agave nectar and salt and pepper and whisk the ingredients. Julienne the papaya, apples and the red cabbage. Add the dressing and toss.

Add water to a saucepan and heat it to 140-160 degrees Fahrenheit using a thermometer. Add 1 cup of oil to a mason jar. Place the top of a mason jar lid at bottom of saucepan for a double boil setup Place 4 grams of decarbed cannabis into a cheesecloth sachet and tie it off with butcher string.

Place the sachet into the oil and place the jar in the saucepan. After 30 minutes, add a sachet of cilantro to the oil. Let the entire batch steep for 1 1/2-2 hours, making sure the heat does not exceed 200 degrees Fahrenheit. Carefully remove both sachets from the oil. Do not squeeze them. Discard the sachets. Store the oil in the refrigerator. The shelf life is lessened due to the cilantro.

Completed cannabis-infused ceviche tacos topped with sweet slaw | Photo Alexa Ace

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Homework: What were the circumstances in which you were most vigorously alive? FreeWillAstrology.com. ARIES (March 21-April 19)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Discipline your inner flame. Use your radiance constructively. Your theme is controlled fire. AUGUST: Release yourself from dwelling on what’s amiss or off-kilter. Find the inspiration to focus on what’s right and good. SEPTEMBER: Pay your dues with joy and gratitude. Work hard in service to your beautiful dreams. OCTOBER: You can undo your attractions to “gratifications” that aren’t really very gratifying. NOVEMBER: Your allies can become even better allies. Ask them for more. DECEMBER: Be alert for unrecognized value and hidden resources.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: If you choose to play one of life’s trickier games, you must get trickier yourself. AUGUST: Shedding irrelevant theories and unlearning old approaches will pave the way for creative breakthroughs. SEPTEMBER: Begin working on a new product or project that will last a long time. OCTOBER: Maybe you don’t need that emotional crutch as much as you thought. NOVEMBER: Explore the intense, perplexing, interesting feelings until you’re cleansed and healed. DECEMBER: Join forces with a new ally and/or deepen an existing alliance.

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Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: It’s time to take fuller advantage of a resource you’ve been neglecting or underestimating. AUGUST: For a limited time only, two plus two equals five. Capitalize on that fact by temporarily becoming a two-plus-two-equals-five type of person. SEPTEMBER: It’s time and you’re ready to discover new keys to fostering interesting intimacy and robust collaboration. OCTOBER: The boundaries are shifting on the map of the heart. That will ultimately be a good thing. NOVEMBER: If you do what you fear, you’ll gain unprecedented power over the

fear. DECEMBER: What’s the one thing you can’t live without? Refine and deepen your relationship to it. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Acquire a new personal symbol that thrills your mind and mobilizes your soul. AUGUST: Reconfigure the way you deal with money. Get smarter about your finances. SEPTEMBER: It’s time to expedite your learning. But streetwise education is more useful than formal education. Study the Book of Life. OCTOBER: Ask for more help than you normally do. Aggressively build your support. NOVEMBER: Creativity is your superpower. Reinvent any part of your life that needs a bolt of imaginative ingenuity. DECEMBER: Love and care for what you imagine to be your flaws and liabilities.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Transform something that’s semiugly into something that’s useful and winsome. AUGUST: Go to the top of the world and seek a big vision of who you must become. SEPTEMBER: Your instinct for worthy and constructive adventures is impeccable. Trust it. OCTOBER: Be alert for a new teacher with a capacity to teach you precisely what you need to learn. NOVEMBER: Your mind might not guide you perfectly, but your body and soul will. DECEMBER: Fresh hungers and budding fascinations should alert you to the fact that deep in the genius part of your soul, your master plan is changing.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: I’d love to see you phase out wishywashy wishes that keep you distracted from your burning, churning desires. AUGUST: A story that began years ago begins again. Be proactive about changing the themes you’d rather not repeat. SEPTEMBER: Get seriously and daringly creative about living in a more expansive world. OCTOBER: Acquire a new tool or skill that will enable you to carry out your mission more effectively. NOVEMBER: Unanticipated plot twists can help heal old dilemmas about intimacy. DECEMBER: Come up with savvy plans to eliminate bad stress and welcome good stress.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Say this every morning: “The less I have to prove and the fewer people I have to impress, the smarter I’ll be.” AUGUST: Escape an unnecessary limitation. Break an obsolete rule. Override a faded tradition. SEPTEMBER: What kind of “badness” might give your goodness more power? OCTOBER: You’re stronger and freer than you thought you were. Call on your untapped power. NOVEMBER: Narrowing your focus and paring down your options will serve you beautifully. DECEMBER: Replace what’s fake with the Real Thing.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Stretch yourself. Freelance, moonlight, diversify, and expand. AUGUST: Having power over other people is less important than having power over yourself. Manage your passions like a wizard! SEPTEMBER: Ask the big question. And be ready to act expeditiously when you get the big answer. OCTOBER: I think you can arrange for the surge to arrive in manageable installments. Seriously. NOVEMBER: Dare to break barren customs and habits that are obstructing small miracles and cathartic breakthroughs. DECEMBER: Don’t wait around hoping to be given what you need. Instead, go after it. Create it yourself, if necessary.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Can you infuse dark places with your intense light without dimming your intense light? Yes! AUGUST: It’s time for an archetypal Sagittarian jaunt, quest, or pilgrimage. SEPTEMBER: The world around you needs your practical idealism. Be a role model who catalyzes good changes. OCTOBER: Seek out new allies and connections that can help you with your future goals. NOVEMBER: Be open to new and unexpected ideas so as to get the emotional healing you long for. DECEMBER: Shed old, worn-out self-images. Reinvent yourself. Get to know your depths better.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the

months ahead. JULY: You have an enhanced capacity to feel at peace with your body, to not wish it were different from what it naturally is. AUGUST: You can finally solve a riddle you’ve been trying to solve for a long time. SEPTEMBER: Make your imagination work and play twice as hard. Crack open seemingly closed possibilities. OCTOBER: Move up at least one rung on the ladder of success. NOVEMBER: Make yourself more receptive to blessings and help that you have overlooked or ignored. DECEMBER: You’ll learn most from what you leave behind—so leave behind as much as possible.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: I’ll cry one tear for you, then I’ll cheer. AUGUST: Plant seeds in places that hadn’t previously been on your radar. SEPTEMBER: You may seem to take a wrong turn, but it’ll take you where you need to go. OCTOBER: Open your mind and heart as wide as you can. Be receptive to the unexpected. NOVEMBER: I bet you’ll gain a new power, higher rank, or greater privilege. DECEMBER: Send out feelers to new arrivals who may be potential helpers.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

Here are your fortune cookie-style horoscopes for the months ahead. JULY: Your creative powers are at a peak. Use them with flair. AUGUST: Wean yourself from pretend feelings and artificial motivations and inauthentic communications. SEPTEMBER: If you want to have greater impact and more influence, you can. Make it happen! OCTOBER: Love is weird but good. Trust the odd journey it takes you on. NOVEMBER: If you cultivate an appreciation for paradox, your paradoxical goals will succeed. DECEMBER: Set firm deadlines. Have fun disciplining yourself.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes /daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | J U N E 2 6 , 2 0 1 9

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PUZZLES NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE CROSSWORD PUZZLE NOT IN SO MANY WORDS | 0630 By Joel Fagliano Puzzles edited by Will Shortz ACROSS

1 It was first officially designated in a 1966 Lyndon Johnson proclamation 11 Holders of tiny mirrors 19 Apple Store purchase 20 What studies show that men do more than women, conversationally 22 It might require a quick check 23 Star treatment 25 Male swan 26 Static, as an exercise 28 Access with a password 29 “Lord, show me ____” 31 World’s largest cosmetics company 32 Post office? 33 Oscar winner Jared 34 Kitchen cabinet 35 Major academic achievements 36 “Yeah, whatever” 37 Having locks 39 Cocktail of tequila and grapefruit soda 41 Load 42 Specious arguer 45 Risk taker 47 One taking the bait 49 Like Earth’s orbit 51 2019, zodiacally 56 Mine entrance 57 Calle ____, landmark street in Miami’s Little Havana 59 Arcade game based on a film of the same name 60 “You listening?” 61 NYU’s ____ School of the Arts 63 Got by 66 Traces left by burning candles 67 Complete fool 69 Call of the wild 70 Catch a break? 72 Promote 73 Deli machine 76 Auditorium section beneath the balcony 78 Word before web or chocolate 79 Bundle 81 Heather has two, in a children’s book title 82 Onetime U.S. soccer prodigy Freddy 85 Dates not found on the calendar 87 Hot sauce 89 Bank takeback 91 Great work 92 Without profit 93 Kid around 97 Owing 99 Greek goddess of the moon 100 Police, slangily 101 Negatively charged 102 Oppositely 104 Internet ____ 105 Weapon with a distinctive hum 107 Classic play with a Delphic oracle 109 It’s seen near Pennsylvania Avenue 110 Bright shade of red 111 Casino attraction 112 Buzzer beater?

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SKULLDUGGERY LANE By Ingvard Ashby

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32 Org. for the Vegas Golden Knights 34 Sauce traditionally prepared in a mortar 35 Repeats mindlessly 38 Embarrassing sound when bending over 39 Fruits baked in wine 40 Tapped, as a cigarette 42 Delta Air Lines hub 43 Getting up there 44 Puckered fabric 46 Many a local volunteer 48 Ticker symbol? 50 Meanspirited person 52 Best 53 A ____ (based on logic) 54 Sinful 55 Brave deeds celebrated in verse 58 They’re found among the reeds 62 Attacks vigorously 64 Goldman ____ 65 An Emmy is awarded for the best one 68 Many action-movie villains 71 White coat 74 Face-to-face interaction? 75 Recite from memory 77 Cable inits. for cinephiles 80 Muslim niqab, e.g. 82 Standard Windows typeface 83 Co-owner of Paddy’s Pub on It’s

OPERATIONS & MARKETING MANAGER Kelsey Lowe

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Always Sunny in Philadelphia 84 Not loose 86 Afrique du ____ 88 Desiccated 90 “Pick me! Pick me!” 92 Agency created after the Manhattan Project 94 No longer interested 95 Placid 96 Scam artist 98 Between: Fr. 99 Begets 100 The birds and the bees, e.g. 102 Clothes-dryer attachment 103 Gush 106 Part of a Twitter page 108 Private instructor: Abbr.

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SUDOKU VERY HARD | N° 515

Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3-by-3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9. www.printmysudoku.com

Joel Fagliano, 26, is the digital crossword editor of The New York Times and creator of the paper’s daily Mini. Born and raised in Philadelphia, he often sneaks references to the city into his puzzles, such as 83-Down here. This puzzle is unthemed, which means, without preset answers that constrain the fill, it has a more open pattern of fresher, livelier vocabulary — all clued with wit and a fitting level of challenge. According to our records, it ties for the fewest number of answers (124) ever to appear in a Sunday Times crossword. — W.S. NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS

Puzzle No. 0623, which appeared in the June 19 issue. M A F I A

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