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FREE EVERY WEDNESDAY | METRO OKC’S INDEPENDENT WEEKLY | MAY 22, 2019

A SEASONAL GUIDE TO CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

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INSIDE COVER P. 19 It is getting hot in Oklahoma,

and not just the temperature. Oklahoma Gazette’s annual Summer Guide delivers the best events statewide for beating or joining the summer heat.

By Gazette staff Cover by Tiffany McKnight Photos by Alexa Ace, James Banks, Riversport Adventures, ULI Oklahoma and bigstock.com

NEWS 4 CITY MAPS 4 considerations

6 CITY Sisu Youth now only OKC

youth shelter

8 METRO OU names interim president 10 CHICKEN-FRIED NEWS

JUNE 14 8pm

EAT & DRINK 13 REVIEW El Majahual

14 FEATURE 3Sixty Restaurant & Bar’s

new menu

start at $60

16 GAZEDIBLES cool for the summer

ARTS & CULTURE 19 COVER Summer Guide 27

Star Spangled Salute Air Show program

Parking Garage mural

39 ART Denise Duong’s West Village

41 THEATER Disaster! at Pollard Theatre

MUSIC 42 EVENT Rocklahoma

43 REVIEW FREQ Work by Changing

Frequencies

44 LIVE MUSIC

THE HIGH CULTURE

july 26

46 CANNABIS Cannabis Aid closes 47 CANNABIS The Toke Board

51 CANNABIS Nature’s Key THC Edibles 53 CANNABIS strain review

FUN 54 PUZZLES sudoku | crossword 55 ASTROLOGY OKG CLASSIFIEDS 55

COMING SOON

billy bob thornton & the boxmasters august 22-24

ep expo

october 25-27

native ink tattoo festival

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I-40 EXIT 178 | SHAWNEE, OK | 405-964-7263 O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9

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NEWS

CIT Y

Road MAPS

Presentations and discussions on proposed MAPS 4 projects are set to begin this summer with a finalized package expected in early September. By Miguel Rios

Oklahoma City Council will soon start hearing presentations and discussing MA PS 4 project ideas, which Oklahomans have been submitting since October. Mayor David Holt expects to lay out a schedule of public discussions happening throughout the summer by the end of May. While some ideas are buildings and facilities, some are more abstract and deal with investments into residents’ quality of life. Holt said there is an inherent compromise to MAPS votes since OKC residents vote on the package rather than individual projects. “I don’t think it’s in the best interest of the city for any one group to get exactly the MAPS that they want or any person to get exactly the MAPS that they want. I think the only proper approach is one of compromise,” he said. “As I’ve tried to preview for everybody, I very sincerely and strongly believe that this MAPS is going to tilt towards the neighborhood and human needs of our city, way beyond anything it ever has in the past. That’s just my read of where the compromise is going to lie this time.” Despite an expected shift to address neighborhood and human needs and challenges facing citizens daily, Holt said there could still be room for more entertainment-oriented projects.

Packaging ideas

A finalized MAPS package is expected in early September and will call a special election before the end of the year. “That’s kind of the deadline we’re kind of working with here. If you hold an election at the end of the year, you got to finalize the package around Labor Day, which gives us basically the next three and a half months to have those public discussions and kind of a public airing of the concepts at hand,” Holt said. “We’re at the end here of that phase where we make sure that every concept still being considered has got enough meat on the bone that you can even intelligently discuss it.” Holt announced a list of about 20 ideas gaining traction during his State of the City speech in January. He said the list had not changed much since then. The list was composed of an aerospace job training center, animal welfare facilities, a downtown aquarium, an art museum endowment, city beautification, mental health investments, education investments, a facility or endowment to address homelessness, investments to the innovation 4

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district, investments to Oklahoma River, a new Palomar facility, parks investments, more senior wellness centers, a multipurpose soccer stadium, a new State Fair coliseum, upgrades to Chesapeake Energy Arena, investments to public transit, more bike and walkability infrastructure and investments in the city’s youth. Holt said improvement to public transit was the most common suggestion. “Ninety-five percent of what’s still being discussed was probably on that list in January. There hasn’t been a lot of huge wild cards,” he said. “There’s some of those things that haven’t necessarily found any champion since then on the council or otherwise, so they might’ve drifted off the list, I suppose. But that’ll be more clear, I think, by the end of May.” Some projects have received more attention than others due to individuals or organizations promoting their own ideas. For example, renderings have been created for some proposed projects like the soccer stadium and the new State Fair coliseum.

I very sincerely and strongly believe that this MAPS is going to tilt towards the neighborhood and human needs of our city, way beyond anything it ever has in the past. David Holt “You have projects that have external champions and a lot of presentation behind them, but that’s why it’s important over the summer to have these public discussions in front of the council about all the projects,” Holt said. “So no project receives less attention simply because it doesn’t have the budget for a PR firm. Not every project is championed by an entity that’s got the resources for that kind of campaign, but a lot of those kinds of projects that don’t have those resources are pretty important to the future of our city as well. … From our perspective, all kinds of things are going to get equal attention.” Holt emphasized transparency and community input and said those things will continue being important pillars for MAPS 4.

“The bottom line is we want this to be an inclusive and transparent process, and I don’t want any project to be making its debut on the day that we announce what’s in MAPS 4,” he said. “I would concede that in the past, maybe that’s sometimes been the case, but I think there’s just a higher expectation for transparency. Transparency is something I’ve always believed in as a public servant, so I want a public process over the summer where, by the time that package is finalized and put before the voters of Oklahoma City for their consideration, there’s no real surprises left.”

Polling projects

Former Ward 2 councilman Ed Shadid paid SoonerPoll for a study to gauge where OKC residents’ stand on certain ideas. SoonerPoll collected 406 responses between April 24 and May 9 with a 4 percent margin of error. Greater Oklahoma City Chamber of Commerce conducts its own poll on MAPS project ideas, but it has historically never released the results. Shadid said he wanted people to have an idea of how much support certain projects had in order to hold city leaders accountable. Holt was not aware of the SoonerPoll study but did say he would be willing to say no to a project if a majority of residents were against it. “Public opinion polling is a factor in all of this for sure. You know, different people sometimes have different data so that can be a point of contention,” he

Oklahoma City mayor David Holt said there are many possible ideas that could be included on the MAPS 4 ballot later this year. | Photo Alexa Ace

said. “Some polls are a little more scientific than others, so not being able to really see what you’re talking about, what questions are asked, it’s hard for me to comment on specific poll results that are purported to exist. … If something is truly opposed by a large majority of the city, that’s a different question. But to say that one thing is supported 80/20 and one thing is supported 70/30 and therefore the 70/30 is unpopular, well that’s not true.” According to SoonerPoll, which polled residents on nine different projects as well as other MAPS-related questions, a soccer stadium has the least support, while facilities for mental health and substance abuse have the most. “There is no way for a city of 650,000 people to move forward without compromise. ... I can’t tell you what that compromise looks like because I still need to see what — through the course of the summer — see what’s important, what we’re hearing, what the feedback is from council members, what the feedback is from citizens we interact with, what the feedback is through truly scientific polling,” Holt said. “I know that in the end, it’s going to reflect a compromise amongst all these different geographic parts of our city, different political ideologies, different socioeconomic priorities.” Visit okc.gov/government/maps-4.


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CIT Y

NEWS

Youth crisis

Sisu Youth Services is now the only emergency youth shelter not requiring documents in Oklahoma City. By Miguel Rios

Sisu Youth Services has seen the number of drop-in clients nearly double since the closure of another nonprofit organization. Sisu has offered resources for individuals since 2010 and last year started offering overnight shelter every night. “It’s with a heavy heart that Be the Change announces the closing of our youth shelter. We have encountered financial issues that made this decision necessary,” reads a May 10 post on Be the Change’s Facebook page. “Please consider donating to Sisu Youth Services, as they are now dealing with an unexpected increase of youth needing their services.” With the recent closure of Be the Change, Sisu Youth has become the only overnight emergency shelter serving unaccompanied youth in Oklahoma City.

Basic toiletries and self-care supplies are in continual need at Sisu Youth Services. | Photo Alexa Ace

“We are a no-barrier shelter. There is another shelter, Pivot, that serves youth. There are some differences in the services that we provide,” said Jamie Caves, Sisu assistant director. “Pivot focuses on [Office of Juvenile Affairs] and [Department of Human Services] youth, so occasionally, they might have an opening that they might serve a street homeless youth, but that is not typical. Also, they only serve youth up to 18. … They’re serving minors, and we’re serving more transition-age youth.” Sisu provides shelter for 15- to 22-year-olds and drop-in services for 15- to 24-year-olds. The shelter’s overnight capacity is 16, but it was temporarily increased to 19. Despite the increase, it has been at capacity for weeks. “We don’t have a capacity for drop-in services,” Caves said, “so the youth that aren’t able to access the shelter are still able to come and get dinner and some 6

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resource connection and go to the clothing closet and the food pantry, take a shower and do laundry, those sorts of things.” While Sisu staff continues to work hard to provide resources to youth seeking help, Caves said its case managers’ loads have doubled, making it more difficult to provide the same level of care. “Be the Change closing has had a pretty direct and significant impact on Sisu. For example — I know the numbers from [May 8] off the top of my head — we had an 82 percent increase in our drop-in clients,” Caves said. “Obviously, it’s putting stress on the staff at Sisu. We’re doing the best we can, but that significant of an increase overnight makes it difficult to provide a level of care and support for the youth that we would really like to as far as resource connection goes. They’re safe, but we like to help them work on overcoming barriers, recovering documents, getting into mental health appointments, counseling, support groups and any medical appointments that they may need to go to as well as just working on getting back in school and permanency planning to help them get to a place where they can be stably housed.” According to a study on homelessness by Oklahoma City Planning Department, unaccompanied youth made up 4 percent of the total OKC homeless population in 2018, though the methods to find that number do “not accurately capture the number of youth experiencing homelessness, as they tend to make greater effort not to be located.” The report also states unaccompanied homeless youth are exposed to higher rates of violence, involvement in illegal activities, sexual assault and physical illness. They are also more likely to experience severe anxiety and depression. “It’s different than adults because they’re not really getting back on their feet,” Caves said. “Our average age is 18, so they haven’t really ever been on their feet alone. They haven’t had to pay bills or cook dinner; these things are new skills for a lot of them.” About 40 percent of Sisu’s youth identify as LGBTQ+, with family rejection being the main reason for their homelessness. Additionally, 40 percent have been in or aged out of DHS custody foster care, and roughly 25 percent have severe Sisu maintains a clothing closet for youth who enter its system. | Photo Alexa Ace

mental health diagnoses. “Almost all have experienced some sort of trauma,” Caves said. “Some of them grew up in great, wonderful homes; they just maybe weren’t receiving the care they needed for a mental health condition or maybe they came out to their parents or maybe they ended up with an addiction issue, and so they ended up in this situation where they didn’t have any place else to turn and they’re in need of support. More likely, they are in a situation where they didn’t have the support at home … and maybe just didn’t get the experience and the tools that they need in order to succeed on their own.” Because the organization deals with youth who might not have support systems, Caves said there is a lot of teaching and mentoring that has to be done to help prevent them from being chronically homeless. Fortunately, Caves said they have been getting additional help from other organizations. “The City of Oklahoma City does a pretty good job with our coordinated case management, so we had a meeting yesterday,” she said. “The Homeless Alliance has been a huge blessing, working with us and supporting us. They’re actually coming out … to help process our kids faster, so that we can get a few housed and open up a few beds, so they’re working with us in a great capacity. Catholic Charities has reached out and offered some support with item donation. Of course, we always work closely with Pivot and referrals.”

How to help

Sisu currently needs more volunteers, money and resources to provide homeless youth. While the organization has supplies, it goes through them at a much faster rate with such an increase in drop-in clients, making it harder to keep up with demand. Those interested in volunteering can

Jamie Caves is assistant director of Sisu Youth Services. | Photo Alexa Ace

apply at the organization’s website. A Sisu official will follow up with information needed to do a background check and go through training. “We do run 95 percent volunteer, so volunteering is a huge need,” Caves said. “That’s a great way to connect directly with the youth and be a positive role model and provide some mentorship and support for them. Additionally, we need money. It’s the most important item that we need right now. If we could increase our staff hours, if we could increase our care coordination, then we could provide better support for our youth. So that’s absolutely the number one priority. Additionally, we need drinks and we’re completely out of men’s underwear, so things like that; things like laundry detergent and drinks. We try to send the kids out with a sack lunch every day, so food that they can take with them to eat during the day.” Monetary donations can be made online or in person. Clothing, food or cleaning supplies can be dropped off in person 4-7 p.m. Sundays, Mondays and Wednesdays and 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturdays at 3131 N. Pennsylvania Ave. Visit sisuyouth.org.


Our Chickasaw Warrior stands proudly and beautifully captures our Chickasaw spirit.

MEMORIAL CELEBRATION WEEKEND TRIBUTE AND FESTIVITIES

Your Chikasha Poya Exhibit Center journey begins in the colorful Mosaic Room.

Chickasaw warriors have always been fierce and unyielding. Today, many still serve and fight for our country. On MAY 25 and 26, we honor their valor and sacrifice with the Memorial Celebration. We invite you to join us for traditional games, stomp dance demonstrations and a variety of cultural activities.

Enjoy beadwork and weaving demonstrations, and learn how we create traditional stickball equipment.

Free shuttles to the Artesian Arts Festival!

SULPHUR, OK

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NEWS

The Chickasaw Nation Arts & Humanities Division

METRO

100 West Muskogee Street - Sulphur, OK

For more information, or to enroll, call the ARTesian Gallery & Studios at (580) 622-8040.

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News from the Oklahoma Legislative Session

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With KGOU’s Dick Pryor & eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley

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Presidential rebound

OU regents named an interim president, but community members continue to demand transparency when choosing the next permanent leader. By Miguel Rios

University of Oklahoma Board of Regents named an interim president less than a week after James Gallogly announced his retirement. The decision came around 2 a.m. May 17 after an executive session that lasted nearly six hours. Joseph Harroz Jr., current dean of OU College of Law and director of its law center, will be interim president effective immediately and for at least 15 months — five months longer than Gallogly’s tenure. Harroz will also be eligible for the permanent position. “On behalf of the Board of Regents, I am pleased to announce tonight that OU College of Law dean Joseph Harroz Jr. has been appointed as interim president of the University of Oklahoma,” chairwoman Leslie Rainbolt-Forbes said in an statement. “The regents were well aware of Harroz’s capabilities from the thorough vetting done by the presidential search committee last year. It was through that process we were reminded how contagious his passion and enthusiasm are and how seriously he takes accountability and responsibility.” Harroz, an OU graduate, served as legal counsel to former OU president David Boren when he was a senator. At 12 years, he also holds the longest tenure in OU history as the university’s general counsel — all under Boren’s leadership. Some commend the regents’ pick, as Harroz has led the college of law since 2010, but others disagreed with the appointment of Boren’s former legal counsel. Jess Eddy, who accused Boren of sexual misconduct, said he is disappointed in the appointment of Harroz, especially as the Boren investigation OU graduate Jess Eddy said the board of regents should be elected by the campus community rather than appointed by the governor. | Photo Alexa Ace

is still ongoing. “It’s just unbelievable; I’m beyond disbelief. The regents are exposing that they’re compromised by gross conflicts of interest,” he told Oklahoma Gazette. “There’s nobody closer to president Boren than Joe Harroz professionally, personally — Joe was Boren’s protege. Additionally, Joe’s been Boren’s attorney for decades. … Everybody knows Boren’s predatory behavior has been ongoing for decades as well. The idea that you put a guy who can protect himself from telling the truth about David Boren through attorney-client privilege — somebody who knows where the bodies are buried, how to dig them up and move them — in a position over Title IX who can have direct influence in those proceedings, I mean, inappropriate is an understatement. It’s unethical. It’s immoral. … It’s a testament to how powerful the Boren donors are.” Professor Suzette Grillot, former dean of OU College of International Studies, echoed Eddy’s sentiment, telling Gazette the appointment of a “Boren crony” was disgraceful. Both Grillot and Eddy were at the board of regents meeting. Rainbolt-Forbes was asked during the announcement if it was problematic that Harroz would be overseeing Title IX processes, as is the responsibility of the president. She did not say whether or not Harroz would be involved in the Boren investigation. “Rainbolt fumbled around for an answer, looking at the other regents, looking for confirmation of what she should say, and said, ‘Well, the regents will be in charge of the investigation,’” Grillot said. “I can confirm for you that it was an awkward exchange and she was very unsure of her answer. It’s not just a matter of her words; it’s how she


answered it — she was very unsure. I can also say that I don’t believe it, and I think most of us don’t believe it.”

Regent institution

The regents’ announcement comes after a May 15 press conference at which several members of the OU community urged the board for transparency, inclusion and thoughtfulness in selecting the next president. Several current and former students and employees, an NAACP representative and a victim’s advocate and activist spoke at the event. They also spoke as representatives of LGBTQ+ and other minorities to emphasize that the university must do better to serve members of marginalized groups.

We have no choice but to keep the pressure up and keep bringing this information to light, shining a light, exposing the past indiscretions. Suzette Grillot “Representatives from the community got together, requested transparency, asked for transparency, spelled out why — we had reasons why. The reasons are good ones; we spelled them out last year, outlined all the reasons why last year, and you can see what the search resulted in last year; it was a disaster,” Grillot said. “To ignore that once again just really tells you something about this very insular, arrogant board of regents that they don’t listen at all to the members of the community that they serve and work for.” Eddy said the regents’ actions illustrate the fact that they do not listen to the campus community. “It’s a slap in the face. Clearly, they do not care what we think,” he said. “I’m taken aback that they continue to double down and just engage in the same pattern of conduct with which there’s been so much outcry and public criticism for. They just don’t care, and really that’s the problem with the institutions of the regents. They’re not accountable to anyone. They’re not accountable to any of the people that they serve, so there’s no enforcement

OU professor Suzette Grillot urges the board of regents May 15 to avoid past mistakes and conduct an open, inclusive presidential search. | Photo Alexa Ace

mechanism that really inclines them to care.” Because of their actions and their doubling down on the lack of accountability and transparency, Eddy said some — if not all — of the regents should step down. He said many students he advocates for diversity, inclusion and transparency with have begun conversations on the general institution of the regents. “We’re at the point of seeking constitutional reform to how the regents are as an institution with the desire of making it more democratic so [students] have some formal avenues to engage and influence the regents,” he said. “The regents aren’t elected. The strongest proposal is that the regents need to be elected by the students, faculty and staff in some way, shape or form, but this notion of affluent almost all white people getting appointed as gubernatorial favors is just not going to work anymore.” Grillot said members of the community must keep the pressure up to make change. “We need to continue to show up. People have been showing up at rallies, at regents meetings, and so we’ve got to keep after these people to do what is right by those that they serve and not solely what’s in their own self-interest,” she said. “We have no choice but to keep the pressure up and keep bringing this information to light, shining a light, exposing the past indiscretions, past corruption and wrongful processes that these regents have selected in doing their work. We can’t back down.” Gallogly announced his plans to retire in a May 12 statement. “Unfortunately, a false narrative has been created that the explanation of the university’s financial condition, the disclosures of improper gift reporting, and changes to various people serving in the administration were somehow intended to diminish the legacy of our past president,” the statement read. “That false narrative is now also being used to question the motives and propriety of the ongoing investigation of alleged misconduct by person(s) yet to be disclosed by the university.”

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chicken

friedNEWS

Snake eyes

Doorbell cameras are an important line of home security, allowing people to see who is at the door even when they are not at home. When doorbell camera footage makes the news, it is often for something weird like that guy in California who licked a doorbell for a few hours and then walked away. What was up with that? Sometimes there are frantic Nextdoor posts about people offering liquid drugs in solo cups that merely turn out to be partygoers with the wrong address, but the doorbell camera viral video game took a turn toward shocking last week when footage from Lawton did for ringing doorbells what Lethal Weapon 2 did for going to the bathroom: make the routine terrifying. Video shows Jerel Heywood dropping by to visit his friend Rodney Copeland in Lawton, but as Heywood opens the front door, a snake that had been coiled around a porch light reaches out and bites Copeland just above his right eye. “Take me to the hospital,” Copeland can be heard saying immediately after the bite. Copeland is fine. The snake was not venomous, and the wound did not require stitches. The snake might have gotten flashbacks from its ancestors in getting banished from Ireland by St. Patrick, if that were actually true and snakes had some sort of Shirley MacLaine-esque connections to past lives. After screams attracted a neighbor to the commotion, the neighbor brought over a hammer and pummeled the 5-foot-5inch snake to death, according to CNN. Copeland told CNN that he plans to keep any potential uninvited guests away by spraying the yard with sulfuric acid. We hear that works for snakes and doorbell-lickers.

Hold the phone

Countless hands have been wrung raw over the negative influence the everpresent cellphone has on modern life, but Oklahoma Department of Corrections is worrying about them more than the Momo challenge. Earlier this month, The Oklahoman reported that the department has confiscated nearly 1,800 contraband phones from inmates since the beginning of the year and more than 48,500 since 2011, and according to department representatives, prisoners are not using them to play Pokémon Go. “It is the cornerstone of communication to the outside, where gangs run their criminal enterprises,” corrections director Joe M. Allbaugh told The Oklahoman, adding that “shot-callers” heading the more than 100 gangs known to operate in Oklahoma prisons can use contraband phones to “call out hits” and “threaten families.” To decisively to take away inmates’ screentime privileges, corrections department officials say they need the federal government to allow them to jam cellphone signals inside the prison, a measure that is currently illegal without permission from Federal Communications Commission (FCC), which warns that jamming can interfere with law enforcement communications by diluting radio signals and preventing emergency calls. Critics such as

Ben Levitan, who serves as an expert witness in telecommunications cases, said allowing prisons to jam phone signals is a “very slippery slope.” “Once that door is opened, we can never turn back,” Levitan told Vice last year. Officials say phones are smuggled into prison by staff, thrown over the walls by outside accomplices to be collected later, and even delivered by drones. Others, which The Oklahoman reported are “marked as hazardous” after confiscation “because the inmates hid them on their bodies or stored them in unsanitary places,” are presumably snuck in through good oldfashioned keistering. It’s nice to see that, even in the digital age, some things never change.

Teacher strikes

While everybody was abusing the new “gender swap” filters, a Del City High

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School teacher was captured on Snapchat taking down a student. The video shows a student wearing a mask opening a classroom door and spraying the unsuspecting teacher with Silly String as part of what is a very uncreative, untimely and insensitive prank. Unfortunately for the prankster, the teacher has been paying attention to countless tragedies happening at schools across the country, so he jumped into action to pin the student down. We commend the teacher for his quick action, self-defense skills, general badassedness and commitment to keeping his students safe, but apparently not all parents feel the same. “There was no reason to physically put your hands on a child over silly string,” said an anonymous parent who submitted the video to News9. The parent, who has no relation to the student in the video, was asked what she would say to those who believe teachers can

never be too careful about school safety in today’s environment. “I would say they might be able to use an excuse like that if they didn’t have prior knowledge that this was happening,” she said, referring to the fact that some knew the senior prank would include Silly String. “If the teacher did not know this was happening, still I think he could have had a different recourse.” With all due respect to the parent, read the room. We are confident in saying most people would much rather a masked student prankster be harmlessly disabled than have another tragedy on our hands. Teachers should not have to worry about defending students from unidentified masked intruders, especially for a prank. Thankfully, the Mid-Del School District released a statement supporting the teacher’s actions: “A Del City teacher acted to remove the potential threat from his classroom. … We take all threats seriously.” The student will face additional punishments besides going semiviral for getting taken down by his teacher.

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Shown above center: “SOUTHEASTERN POTTERY” by JOANNA UNDERWOOD, Chickasaw OKA' CHOKMASI in Sulphur, Oklahoma

Featuring over 100 premier Native American artists

Saturday, May 25 • 10 a.m.-6 p.m. DOWNTOWN SULPHUR, OKLAHOMA • 580-272-5520 • #VisitChickasaw Free parking and shuttle from the Chickasaw Cultural Center!

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Sushi, noodles, cocktails and happiness.

10-lane bowling alley with fullservice bar and food.

An astounding selection of beer and pub classics.

German-inspired beer hall with housemade sausages and a huge beer garden.

Chisholm Creek

Midtown OKC

Midtown OKC

Midtown OKC

W W W. M C N E L L I E S G R O U P.C O M

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REVIEW

EAT & DRINK

Salvadoran specialty El Majahual serves up Oklahoma City’s best pupusas. By Jacob Threadgill

El Majahual 3301 SW 29th St.| 405-602-2661 WHAT WORKS: Pupusasas and horchata are some of the best in the city. WHAT NEEDS WORK: The carne asada is tasty but tough. TIP: Weekend soup sells out by 12:30 p.m.

SW 29th Street has Oklahoma City’s highest concentration of taquerias, both of the brick-and-mortar and taco truck variety, but on SW 29th Street west of Interstate 44, El Majahual is becoming an institution for the El Salvadorian staple pupusas. About three years ago, Raul Tevez and his wife Olga purchased the building at 3301 SW 29th St. a few years after moving to Oklahoma City from Southern California. “I saw a lot of Mexican restaurants, but there wasn’t an El Salvadorian restaurant here,” Tevez said. “I told my wife, ‘You know what? Let’s buy this building.’ We didn’t know what to do with it [at first], so we decided to open a Salvadorian restaurant. We’ve got a lot of people coming. On the weekends, it’s usually full.”

El Majahual opens 9 a.m. TuesdaySunday and serves breakfast all day. A huge pile of hash browns remain on the flattop, awaiting the next order throughout the day, as they can be paired with fried plantains, eggs, beans and thick tortillas. The unquestioned star of El Majahual’s menu and of El Salvadoran food culture is the pupusas, and while the dish is similar to other dishes in Central America like arepas and gorditas, it is intrinsically tied to the ancestors of the region. Archeologists have traced pupusas back nearly 2000 years to the Pibil culture of El Salvador, where pupusas cooking implements have been preserved in volcanic ash in Joya de Cerén. Pupusas have spread to neighboring countries like Venezuela and Guatemala, and you can find their interpretation at Café Kacao, 3325 N. Classen Blvd., and the other Salvadoran restaurant in the city, Pupuseria El Buen Gusto, 6062 S. Western Ave. Salvadoran culture did not begin to make a foothold in the United States until the 1980s as immigrants and refugees fled a violent Civil War that owes its most

violent moments to the actions of U.S.-trained military groups. At its height, the U.S. poured a million dollars a day into El Salvador’s right-wing military dictatorship and remains a tragic consequence of the Cold War’s anti-communist proxy wars thousands of miles away from the Soviet Union. Most famously in the village of El Mozote in 1981, Salvadoran military forces descended on the town and began to wantonly murder women and children. The civilian casualty count is estimated to be between 800 and 1,200 people, a number that sadly can’t accurately be reported after years of cover-ups by our own government. Just like pressure creates diamonds, the impact of cultures that harness pain into something beautiful can be found throughout human history. Much in the same way U.S. soul food does not exist without the horrors of the slave trade to combine new regional ingredients with African methods and spices, the collective trauma inflicted on the people of El Salvador from Spanish colonization to U.S. intervention has helped create something truly delicious. Unfortunately, something as beautiful as a pupusa does nothing to make up for all of those people lost in the El Mozote massacre and the survivors who carry their memory today. The UN reports that more than 75,000 people died during the Salvadoran Civil War between 1979 and 1992. The pupusa is truly a dish worth experiencing. While arepas and gorditas typically use regular corn meal for masa, pupusas traditionally use nixtamal, which soaks the corn kernels and causes them to puff up before being grinded into meal. While they are allcorn-meal flatbreads stuffed or topped with beans, meat and cheese, there is an unmatched consistency that I crave from a pupusa that you cannot get from ingredients stuffed in an arepa or gordita. The ability of experienced cooks like those at El Majahual to perfectly stuff a pupusa so the fillings don’t spill onto the griddle make it hard to replicate in a home kitchen without months or years of practice. El Majahual offers pupusas for $2.25 each, and they can be filled with beans, cheese and chicharron — not to be confused with the Mexican variety, crispy pork skin — which is braised pork cooked in toCarne asada plate at El Majahual | Photo Jacob Threadgill

Pupusas topped with curtido, a marinated cabbage slaw in vinegar and chile | Photo Jacob Threadgill

matoes, onions and spices. You can get them filled with any combination of the three items and try squash and cheese or loroco flowers and cheese. Pupusas are served with curtido, a lightly fermented cabbage slaw in red wine vinegar and chile, and a thin tomato sauce. I had a hard time choosing a favorite between the revuelta with cheese, beans and chicharron and the variety with squash and cheese. Pupusas are filled with a Salvadoran cheese called quesillo that is very similar to mozzarella, which I enjoyed as a larger showcase in the squash and cheese version. The menu at El Majahual isn’t very large. Choose from breakfast selections, plates of rice, beans and salad with the meat of your choice and pupusas. I visited on a Tuesday, and the kitchen didn’t have chicken tamales or empanadas available, but Tevez said they’re served Wednesday-Sunday. The black beans are a standout and should be ordered with every plate. I also tried the carne asada plate ($10), and I liked the flavor on the steak, but it was thin and cooked to a near-leather texture. El Majahual makes all of its food from scratch, including drinks like horchata that has a hint of cocoa and marañon, a sweet and sour drink made with the imported fruit of the cashew tree (the same one that provides the ubiquitous nut). Chicken and beef stews are available on the weekends, but you have to act quickly. “We finish them around 11 [in the morning], and the soup is usually gone by 12:30 p.m.; it goes quick,” Tevez said. El Majahual serves the city’s best pupusas and does so with friendly service that is amiable to non-Spanish speakers. It’s worth a trip the next time you head toward SW 29th Street in the mood for something other than tacos.

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EAT & DRINK

Support the 1 in 5 Oklahomans affected by skin cancer at this family-friendly event. Enjoy live music, a silent auction, dinner, and more! Purchase tickets now:

F E AT U R E

5 / 31 / 19 | 6 - 10PM ROCKY'S BRICKTOWN EVENT HALL

Founders view

Atop Founders Tower, 3Sixty introduces a new menu to balance the old and the new. By Jacob Threadgill

www.mamok.org

In a space that is one of the most unique and historic in Oklahoma City, the owners of 3Sixty Restaurant & Bar, 5900 Mosteller Drive, want to balance the pull of nostalgia by tapping into market trends of the present. Owners John Curtis, Johnny Yi and Sean Crowe opened the restaurant atop Founders Tower in 2017, and after two successful years of a concept that is more relaxed than previous iterations, debut a new menu this week. “We’re building on what we’ve established,” said Curtis, who has a background at Hal Smith Restaurant Group and is the operating partner of 3Sixty. “We wanted an upscale, casual vibe. It’s a place where you can relive old memories of proms, graduations and proposals but do it in a more relaxed atmosphere. You can come in and feel great in jeans and a T-shirt, but you can still wear a suit and tie for a celebration. I think the new menu is going to make it more appealing.” The new menu features nine new dishes: two appetizers, three “bar bites,” three entrees and a turkey and arugula salad with peppers and zucchini ($16). The menu retains popular holdovers like its dry-rubbed prime pork chop with brown butters ($24), beef stroganoff ($24), 12-ounce New York strip ($36), 14-ounce rib-eye ($38) and 8-ounce filet ($42). Curtis and Yi think the addition of confit-fried chicken thighs might challenge the pork chop for best-selling item. The thighs are confit-ed in olive oil — a process that is similar to deepfrying but done at a much lower temperature for a longer time to increase its moisture level and ability to be preserved for long periods of time. After the thighs are cooked in olive oil, they get a tempura batter with A new wild boar burger at 3Sixty Restaurant | Photo Jacob Threadgill

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spices and rosemary for a quick deepfry for crunchiness and are finished with a sweet and savory tomato jam. The thighs are stacked like a tower over a bed of mashed potatoes, a move that ownership hopes makes a memorable impression for diners as well as being tasty. “It allowed us to broaden our base and appeal to new people. I think we were missing some things with the younger crowd,” Yi said. “The younger crowd, they like the interesting dishes, stuff that you can’t find elsewhere.” 3Sixty hopes the addition of a burrata melon salad that pairs fruit, prosciutto and cheese with orange blossom vinaigrette ($15).

Younger people are looking for an experience and not just good food. John Curtis Many restaurants serve ahi tuna just as the way 3Sixty used to — seared tuna steaks with miso and sesame — but ownership is hoping the new tempura ahi fishsticks ($14) with miso honey and jalapeño offer something that generates an Instagram post and word-of-mouth recommendations. Wild boar makes two appearances on the menu, which ownership said is hard to find at other restaurants in the city. The boar makes up the restaurant’s only burger ($15), and its gaminess mingles with an herby pesto, melted mozzarella, greens and crispy bacon. It also makes an appearance in a pasta dish as a wild boar ragu with onion, garlic and basil ($20).


MEMORIAL

DAY

“I never would’ve dreamed to serve wild boar,” Yi said. “I was skeptical at first, but both dishes are home-runs, and it’s something unique.” The turmeric-crust on the mahi-mahi imbues a unique yellow hue that is served over Kalamata olives and sun-dried tomato orzo pasta ($24), which is also a new addition as a side dish. According to a 2018 study issued by SevenRooms, a restaurant reservation and guest management platform, customers are enticed to try a restaurant for the first time through word-ofmouth. The study showed that 53 percent of consumers dine at a new restaurant after a recommendation from friends and family. Social media posts to Facebook (23 percent) and Instagram (10 percent) represent a growing number of referrals. “Younger people are looking for an experience and not just good food, which is important, but they’re looking for something unique,” Curtis said. “Everyone is into something they can document on social media or talk about with a friend. I think we do that with the food and the views and unique location.” When Founders Tower opened in 1964, it was Oklahoma City’s first skyscraper outside downtown and the area around

Confit fried chicken thighs finished in tomato jam are a new menu addition at 3Sixty Restaurant & Bar. | Photo Jacob Threadgill

it was largely undeveloped. As the building has gone through numerous changes over the decades, its location that once represented a landmark of developmental sprawl north of downtown now stands in the middle of Oklahoma City’s northward expansion. The restaurant atop Founders Tower, perched 20 stories above the city, has long been a site for celebration and highend steak dinners, regardless of the concept. Chandelle Club existed when the building opened, and it became the second restaurant in the country to offer a rotating view, after Seattle’s Space Needle. The space operated as Eagle’s Nest and Nikz at the Top before it sat empty until the opening of The George Prime Steakhouse in 2013, which installed pillars in the restaurant that impeded its ability to rotate. 3Sixty’s ownership group purchased the space late in 2016. “We thought it could be something really neat, so we took the plunge,” Curtis said. “Hopefully [the new menu] opens it up to a larger demographic that hasn’t come into contact with us and builds on the momentum we’ve already established. We want to open it up to the people that might get engaged here in the future, not just the ones who already did.” Curtis said the menu will be overhauled twice per year to include more seasonal ingredients with heavier fare set for the fall. Visit 3sixtyokc.com.

MAY 27 11AM - 3PM | 5PM - 9PM GRANDRESORTOK.COM I-40 EXIT 178 I SHAWNEE, OK I 405-964-7263

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GAZEDIBLES

EAT & DRINK

Beat the heat

We’re only days away from the temperatures getting to unbearable levelas. In this issue dedicated to all things summer, these are seven places that will help you beat the heat. By Jacob Threadgill with photos Gazette / file and provided

Poké Loco

Flint

Enjoying a nice poke bowl or sushi burrito is one of the best ways to get a healthy protein that is also refreshing. Poké Loco offers both options, and you can choose from signature bowls and burritos wrapped in seaweed or customize your own. Choose from tuna, salmon, shrimp, tofu or crispy chicken and pair them with a variety of sauces.

A great way to get refreshed in the summer is to get an entrée item that will not weigh you down. The harissa-roasted cauliflower does just that with its spicy chili mix on the surprisingly nutritious vegetable that gets a boost from tart cherries, kale, almonds and farro, a grain that is an excellent source of fiber and protein.

14600 N. Pennsylvania Ave. gopokeloco.com | 405-607-0035

15 N. Robinson Ave. flintokc.com | 405-605-0657

Refresqueria Las Delicias 1107 SW 59th St. facebook.com/lasdeliciasok 405-702-0016

This south side neveria is home to a huge selection of on-site fresh ice cream, but it is also where you can get a variety of fruit-based refreshments like the Super Mangonada that blends the sweetness of mango with syrup that gets a kick from chili spices. The same family also owns Snack Attack in Yukon, which is the same concept.

PARK HARVEY

$2 STREET TACOS

SUSHI & WINE BAR

EVERY THURSDAY

Happy Hour

3-7pm Wed -Sun Deep Deuce 322 NE 2nd Street 405.673.7944 whiskeybiscuitokc.com

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LUMPYSSPORTSGRILL.COM 16

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Vast

Babble

Ned’s Starlite Lounge

Dolci Paradiso

This new halibut dish at Vast embraces seasonal spring ingredients, so it will satisfy your hunger and keep you light on your toes. The delicately cooked halibut is placed on a bed of snap peas and spring pea risotto with heirloom tomatoes and a gremolata butter topping. Also be sure to check out its lunch table offerings that change weekly and will make you rethink the concept of a buffet.

This build-your-own boba concept puts the power of choice into the customer’s hands. They get to select the type of tea or caffeine-free fruit drinks they want to pair with a bevy of boba varieties, jellies and other refreshing inclusions. While you are there, also get Braum’s ice cream paired with a sweet waffle for a unique sweet treat.

The décor inside Ned’s is a retro throwback. The restaurant that opened in 2018 feels like stepping into a time portal to the 1970s with its shag carpeting on the bar and textured wallpaper, but certain menu items like this watermelon salad with mint, goat cheese and chili oil are a little more contemporary.

This new European bakery and gelato shop on the border of south Oklahoma City and Moore is a shot in the arm for those who live there and enjoy sweet treats made with care. Fresh gelato is made daily. Dolci serves a cornucopia of special flavors, but one of its top sellers is the mixed berry sorbet that will cool you down without any of the cream-based guilt.

333 W. Sheridan Ave. vastokc.com | 405-702-7262

6909 W. Hefner Road, Suite B12 letsbabble.com | 405-792-7421

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

7301 N. May Ave. nedsstarlitelounge.com 405-242-6100

10740 S. May Ave., Suite 116 dolciparadiso.com | 405-254-5070

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O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9

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A SEASONAL GUIDE TO CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

20

May events

20

June events

23

parks

24

July events

24

concerts

INSIDE!

31

meals worth driving for

34

August events

35

summer weed

36

September events

36

art experiences


SUMMER GUIDE

MAY

As Oklahoma emerges from its rainy spring, May starts to get super-hot — the kind of hot that turns most automobiles into rolling ovens. Fortunately, there are plenty of cool things happening to take everyone’s mind off all the sweltering. Basic Wire Wrapping Workshop learn to create a handmade pendant at this hands-on workshop taught by Teresa Gabrish from The Copper Feather, 6-9 p.m. May 22. The Craft Room, 3017 N. Lee Ave., Suite F, 817-455-2972, craftroom.us. Beillevaire Tasting an ambassador from traditionalist French cheese producer Beillevaire will lead a special cheese and wine tasting, 6:45-8:45 p.m. May 22. Forward Foods-Norman, 2001 W. Main St., Norman, 405-321-1007, forwardfoods.com. Rookie of the Year after his broken arm heals into a powerful pitching arm, a young baseball fan (Thomas Ian Nicholas) lives his dream of playing for the Chicago Cubs; screening features Nicholas in person, 7 p.m. May 22. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-585-3504, circlecinema.com. Ansel Adams and the Photographers of the West an exhibition of nature photographs by Adams and several of the photographers he inspired, through May 26. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. Testimony: The Life and Work of David Friedman an exhibition of portraits, landscapes and more by the artist and Holocaust survivor, through May 26. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., 405-325-3272, ou.edu/fjjma. Silk Sensations of Color an exhibition of handpainted silk art presented by Silk Painters Guild of Oklahoma, through May 27. Paseo Art Space, 3022 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.com. She Persisted an exhibition of works by six female artists presented by Red Earth Art Center, through May 28. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Kathy J. Martin and Pat Gurley an exhibition of porcelain art including Martin’s series Women Who Survive, through May 31. Porcelain Art Museum, 2700 N. Portland Ave., 405-521-1234, wocp.org. Back Roads and Dirt Roads an exhibition of Linda Guenther’s photographs of rural landscapes, through June 2. Contemporary Art Gallery, 2928 Paseo St., 405-601-7474, contemporaryartgalleryokc.com. Beautiful Minds: Dyslexia and the Creative Advantage an exhibition of artworks created by people with dyslexia including students from Oklahoma City’s Trinity School, through July 14. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

Stars and Stripes Spin Jam a weekly meetup for jugglers, hula hoopers and unicyclers, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Stars & Stripes Park, 3701 S. Lake Hefner Drive, 405-297-2756, okc.gov/parks. Co-ed Open Adult Volleyball enjoy a game of friendly yet competitive volleyball while making new friends, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., Yukon, 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov. Iron Horse Open Mic and Showcase perform music on stage at this show open to all experience levels, 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Iron Horse Bar & Grill, 9501 S. Shields Blvd., 405-735-1801. Open Mic at The P share your musical talent or just come to listen at this weekly open mic, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. The Patriarch Craft Beer House & Lawn, 9 E. Edwards St., Edmond, 405-285-6670, thepatriarchedmond.com. VZD’s Open Mic Night a weekly music mic hosted by Joe Hopkins, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. VZD’s Restaurant & Bar, 4200 N. Western Ave., 405-6023006, vzds.com. Red Dirt Open Mic a weekly open mic for comedy and poetry, hosted by Red Dirt Poetry, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Sauced on Paseo, 2912 Paseo St., 405-521-9800, saucedonpaseo.com. Divine Comedy a weekly local showcase hosted by CJ Lance and Josh Lathe and featuring a variety of comedians from OKC and beyond, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St., 405-463-0470, 51stspeakeasy.com. Sanctuary Karaoke Service don a choir robe and sing your favorite song, 9 p.m.-midnight Wednesdays and Thursdays. Sanctuary Barsilica, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., facebook.com/sanctuarybarokc.

SATURDAYS Photo bigstock.com

Chicago Steppin Class learn how to do the popular dance at this free weekly class, 7-9 p.m. Thursdays. L & G’s on the BLVD, 4801 N. Lincoln Blvd., 405-524-2001, facebook.com/landgsontheblvd.

Storytime Science the museum invites children age 6 and younger to hear a story and participate in a related scientific activity, 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

Early Explorers toddlers and preschoolers can participate in fun scientific activities they can repeat later at home, 10-11 a.m. Thursdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. World Culture Music Festival a celebration of hip-hop music and culture featuring performances by Jabee, Original Flow, Larry June, Dex Kwasi, Cutty Forever and more, May 24-26. The Brady Arts District, 17 W. Brady St., Tulsa, thebradyartsdistrict.com.

Brunching with Books a book club meeting every other week, with reading selections chosen by group preference, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays. Buttermilk Paseo, 605 NW 28th St., 405-605-6660, buttermilkokc.com.

Trivia Night at Matty McMillen’s answer questions for a chance to win prizes at this weekly trivia night, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Matty McMillen’s Irish Pub, 2201 NW 150th St., 405-607-8822, mattymcmillens.com.

Don Quixote Open Mic a weekly comedy show followed by karaoke, 7:30-9 p.m. Fridays. Don Quixote Club, 3030 N. Portland Ave., 405-947-0011.

Paper Sack Project prepare sack lunches to pass out to people on the streets at this event hosted by Debate Night OKC, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Sunday of the month. NE OKC Community & Cultural Center, 3815 N. Kelley Ave., 405-401-3350.

Othello’s Comedy Night see professionals and amateurs alike at this long-running weekly open mic for standup comics, 9 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us.

Board Game Brunch play board games while enjoying a variety of food and beverage options, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. last Sunday of the month. The R & J Lounge and Supper Club, 320 NW 10th St., 405-602-5066, rjsupperclub.com.

Weekly Jams bring an instrument and play along with others at this open-invitation weekly jam session, 9:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesdays. Saints, 1715 NW 16th St., 405-602-6308, saintspubokc.com.

Shelly Phelps Blues Revue a monthly variety show featuring music, comedy, performance art, drag and more, 7-10 p.m. Sundays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-602-2030, facebook.com/frankiesokc.

Triple’s Open Mic a music and comedy open mic hosted by Amanda Howle, 7:30 p.m. every other Wednesday. Triple’s, 8023 NW 23rd St., 405-789-3031.

The Skirvin Jazz Club a monthly live jazz show presented by OK Sessions, 7:30 p.m. third Friday of every month. Park Avenue Grill, 1 Park Ave., 405-7028444, parkavegrill.com. Paseo Farmers Market shop for fresh food from local vendors at this weekly outdoor event, 9 a.m.noon Saturdays, through Oct. 19. SixTwelve, 612 NW 29th St., 405-208-8291, sixtwelve.org.

ToddlerPalooza meet PinkFong and Baby Shark and characters from Paw Patrol, Peppa Pig, Sesame Street, and The Incredibles at this family event that also features, inflatables, balloon twisting, face-painting and more, noon-6 p.m. May 25. Lost Lakes Waterpark and Amphitheater, 3501 NE 10th, 405-702-4040, lostlakesamp.com.

Joel Forlenza: The Piano Man the pianist performs variety of songs made famous by Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra and of course Billy Joel, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-701-4900, othellos.us. Reading Wednesdays a weekly story time with hands-on activities, goody bags and reading-themed photo ops, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com.

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Wheeler Criterium a weekly nighttime cycling event with criterium races, food trucks and family activities, 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, okc.gov.

OKC Improv performers create original scenes in the moment based on suggestions from the audience, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Oklahoma City Improv, 1757 NW 16th St., 405-456-9858, okcimprov.com.

Life Imagined: The Art and Science of Automata see examples of mechanical proto-robots from 1850 to the modern day, through Sept. 29. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

Welcome Home: Oklahomans and the War in Vietnam explores the impact of the war on Oklahoma families as well as the stories of Vietnamese families relocated to Oklahoma, through Nov. 6. Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, 405-521-2491, okhistory.org.

Chisholm Creek Rooftop Hop a variety of musicians perform on the rooftops and patios of businesses at this weekly concert, 6-10 p.m. May 21. Chisholm Creek, 13230 Pawnee Drive, 405-728-2780, chisholmcreek.com.

Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405445-7080, myriadgardens.com.

African Liberation Day an annual day raising awareness of the social, political and economic struggles in African country; dressing in African garb encouraged, noon-8 p.m. May 25. Nappy Roots, 3705 Springlake Drive, 405-896-0203, facebook.com/pg/ nappyrootsbooks.

Seeing Now an exhibit of multimedia art works by Hank Willis Thomas, Ken Gonzales-Day, Travis Somerville, Paul Rucker, Graciela Sacco, Terence Hammonds and Michael Waugh, through Dec. 31. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com.

Botanical Balance an all-levels yoga class in a natural environment; bring your own mat and water, 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays and 8 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com.

585-3504, circlecinema.com.

Open Badminton hit some birdies in some morning pick-up games of badminton with friends, 10 a.m.noon Saturdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., Yukon, 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov.

From the Golden Age to the Moving Image: The Changing Face of the Permanent Collection view portraits painted by Kehinde Wiley, Anthony van Dyck, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and George Bellows, through Sept. 22. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com.

Red Dirt Dinos: An Oklahoma Dinosaur Adventure learn about regional prehistoric reptiles at this hands-on exhibit featuring three interactive robotic dinosaurs, through Sept. 2. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

Pooches on the Patio Itching to bring your best friend to happy hour, but unfortunately, your best friend is covered in fur and barks a lot? Cafe 501 has solved your problem with its Pooches on the Patio events. Dog lovers can enjoy drink specials, free appetizers and live music with their furry friends, and the dogs can revel in the excitement of being around lots of people and other dogs while they snack on free treats from Hollywood Feed. Luckily, this event happens 4-7 p.m. every Saturday at Café 501 Classen Curve, 5825 NW Grand Blvd. Call 405-844-1501 or visit cafe501.com.

Bad Granny’s Bazaar Out of this World 10th Anniversary celebrate a decade of Bad Granny with food by Atomic Dog Hot Dogs, live music from Space Cowboy and tarot card readings by Maeve, 6-10 p.m. May 25. Bad Granny’s Bazaar, 1759 NW 16th St., 405-528-4585, facebook.com/badgrannysbazaar. Poetry Extravaganza: Eargasms & Eruptions local and regional poets including Kenyetta, Poetic Cupid, Jus Courtney and more, as well as MC Lotto are scheduled to perform, 7-10 p.m. May 25. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., 405-208-4240, iceeventcentergrill.eat24hour.com. Queer Film Continuum a series of screenings highlighting the work of lesbian directors with a brief introduction and a post-film discussion, 7 p.m. May 25. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 3000 General Pershing Blvd., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org. Queen Mariah’s Variety Show a monthly stage show featuring various drag performers, 10:30 p.m. Saturdays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-6022030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. Paseo Arts Festival view paintings, photographs, ceramics, sculpture jewelry and more at this arts festival, which also features live music and children’s activities, May 25-27. Paseo Arts District, 3022 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org.

Moore Chess Club play in tournaments and learn about the popular board game at this weekly event where all ages and skill levels are welcome, 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Moore Library, 225 S. Howard Ave., Moore. Public Access Open Mic read poetry, do standup comedy, play music or just watch as an audience member at this open mic hosted by Alex Sanchez, 7 p.m. Sundays. The Paseo Plunge, 3010 Paseo St., 405-315-6224, paseoplunge.org.

The World of Bob Dylan an international conference covering Dylan’s music and art, featuring lectures from experts from around the globe and an exhibition of material from the Bob Dylan Archive, May 30-June 2. University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Drive, Tulsa, 918-631-2000, utulsa.edu. Rocketman (2019, UK, Dexter Fletcher) a musical fantasy film reimagining Elton John’s rise to pop-star fame, May 30-June 13. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-585-3504, circlecinema.com.

Board Game Day enjoy local craft beer while playing old-school board and arcade games with friends, 5-8 p.m. Sundays. FlashBack RetroPub, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-633-3604, flashbackretropub.com.

Story Time with Britt’s Bookworms enjoy snacks, crafts and story time, 10:30-11:30 a.m. first and third Thursday of every month. Thrive Mama Collective, 1745 NW 16th St., 405-356-6262.

Monday Night Group Ride meet up for a weekly 25-30 minute bicycle ride at about 18 miles per hour through east Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Mondays. The Bike Lab OKC, 2200 W. Hefner Road, 405-603-7655.

OK Country Cafe Open Mic show off your singing talent, 6 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of every month. OK Country Cafe, 6072 S. Western Ave., 405-602-6866, okcountrycafe.com.

Twisted Coyote Brew Crew a weekly 3-mile group run for all ability levels with a beer tasting to follow; bring your own safety lights, 6 p.m. Mondays. Twisted Spike Brewing Co., 1 NW 10th St., 405-3013467, twistedspike.com.

Connect: Collect Print as Object a print exhibition and exchange featuring works by emerging and midcareer artists, 5-7 p.m. May 31. Oklahoma City University School of Visual Arts, 1601 NW 26th St., 405-208-5226, okcu.edu/artsci/departments/visualart.

Monday Night Blues Jam Session bring your own instrument to this open-stage jam hosted by Wess McMichael, 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us.

Fuzzy Friday a monthly happy hour meet-andgreet hosted by the Bears of Central Oklahoma, 5:30 p.m. Fridays. Apothecary 39, 2125 NW 39th St., 405-605-4100.

What Rhymes With Reason benefit show musicians Jabee and Brianna Gaither are scheduled to perform a kick-off event for the crowdfunding campaign for feature-length film What Rhymes With Reason, 5:30-8:30 p.m. May 28. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-708-6937, towertheatreokc.com. Jimi Hendrix: Electric Church a documentary featuring unseen footage of Hendrix’s influential appearance at the 1970 Atlanta Pop Festival, 7 p.m. May 28. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-

JUNE

The first official month of summer, June is the time when Oklahoma lakes are the temperature of bath


cial Early BreirupdyoSurpsyestem,

HEADQUARTERS FOR water. Whenever possible, leave the pool and check out performances like Steve Martin and Martin Short at Civic Center Music Hall or hit a patio with a good misting system. Paseo Farmers Market shop for fresh food from local vendors at this weekly outdoor event, 9 a.m.noon Saturdays, through Oct. 19. SixTwelve, 612 NW 29th St., 405-208-8291, sixtwelve.org. Junk Utopia shop for antiques and handmade, retro and vintage goods from boutique vendors, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. June 1. Centennial Building, Oklahoma State Fairgrounds, 609 Kiamichi Place, 405-948-6700. Goth Prom dance to an expansive selection of gothic music in your gloomiest finery, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. June 1. Angles Event Center, 2117 NW 39th St, 405-525-0730. Pump Up the Volume Patio Party an ’80s, ’90s and ’00s-themed dance party featuring pop and hip-hop hits from the past 30 years, 9 p.m. June 1. The Pump Bar, 2425 N. Walker Ave., 405-702-8898, pumpbar.net. Back Roads and Dirt Roads an exhibition of Linda Guenther’s photographs of rural landscapes, May 3-June 2. Contemporary Art Gallery, 2928 Paseo St., 405-601-7474, contemporaryartgalleryokc.com. Life Imagined: The Art and Science of Automata see examples of mechanical proto-robots from 1850 to the modern day, through Sept. 29. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

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43rd Annual Paseo Arts Festival

MAY 25, 26 & 27, 2019 MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND

Red Dirt Dinos: An Oklahoma Dinosaur Adventure learn about regional prehistoric reptiles at this hands-on exhibit featuring three interactive robotic dinosaurs, through Sept. 2. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

ARTS

FESTIVAL

Seeing Now an exhibit of multimedia art works by Hank Willis Thomas, Ken Gonzales-Day, Travis Somerville, Paul Rucker, Graciela Sacco, Terence Hammonds and Michael Waugh, through Dec. 31. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com.

OVER 90 JURIED ARTISTS, LIVE MUSIC & GREAT FOOD!

The World of Bob Dylan an international conference covering Dylan’s music and art, featuring lectures from experts from around the globe and an exhibition of material from the Bob Dylan Archive, May 30-June 2. University of Tulsa, 800 S. Tucker Drive, Tulsa, 918-631-2000, utulsa.edu.

ARTS

Rocketman (2019, UK, Dexter Fletcher) a musical fantasy film reimagining Elton John’s rise to pop-star fame, May 30-June 13. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-585-3504, circlecinema.com.

Sat & Sun 10 am - 8 pm Music until 10 pm Mon 10 am - 5 pm

FESTIVAL

Storytime Science the museum invites children age 6 and younger to hear a story and participate in a related scientific activity, 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

Children’s Area: Sat & Sun 11 am - 6 pm Mon 11 am - 5 pm

Botanical Balance an all-levels yoga class in a natural environment; bring your own mat and water, 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays and 8 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-4457080, myriadgardens.com.

Paseo Arts Festival Featured Artwork By Denise Duong

FREE PARKING & SHUTTLE SERVICE AT FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 36TH & N. WALKER

OKC Improv performers create original scenes in the moment based on suggestions from the audience, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Oklahoma City Improv, 1757 NW 16th St., 405-4569858, okcimprov.com. Pooches on the Patio bring your best friend to this dog-friendly happy hour with drink specials, appetizers and free pet treats, 4-7 p.m. Saturdays. Café 501 Classen Curve, 5825 NW Grand Blvd., 405844-1501, cafe501.com.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION GO TO

THEPASEO.ORG

Steve Martin & Martin Short: Now Your See Them, Soon You Won’t an evening with the comedic performers, 8-11 p.m. June 2. Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., 405-297-2264, okcciviccenter.com. Oklahoma Voices hear featured poets read from their works at this monthly event, 2 p.m. the first Sunday of every month. IAO Gallery, 706 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-232-6060, iaogallery.org.

— GOLD —

Thank You SPONSORS:

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Public Access Open Mic read poetry, do standup comedy, play music or just watch as an audience member at this open mic hosted by Alex Sanchez, 7 p.m. Sundays. The Paseo Plunge, 3010 Paseo St., 405-315-6224, paseoplunge.org. Rap and Jam Salon learn new musical skills in a variety of genres from local musicians at this monthly workshop, 4-6 p.m. first Sunday of every month. Your Mom’s Place, 919 N. Virginia Ave.

— BRONZE —

— PAT R O N —

Board Game Day enjoy local craft beer while playing old-school board and arcade games with friends, 5-8 p.m. Sundays. FlashBack RetroPub, 814 RICHARD TURMAN

continued on page 23

DAVID NEFF & SUZANNE PECK

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SUMMER GUIDE

SUMMER GUIDE continued from page 21 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-633-3604, flashbackretropub.com. The Audience a National Theatre Live presentation of this Tony Award winning play featuring Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II, 7 p.m. June 3. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-585-3504, circlecinema.com.

Twisted Coyote Brew Crew a weekly 3-mile group run for all ability levels with a beer tasting to follow; bring your own safety lights, 6 p.m. Mondays. Twisted Spike Brewing Co., 1 NW 10th St., 405-301-3467, twistedspike.com. Monday Night Blues Jam Session bring your own instrument to this open-stage jam hosted by Wess McMichael, 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us. Urban Pioneer Awards a ceremony honoring the influence of Leslie and Dan Batchelor and Shannon Calderon Primeau in Oklahoma City, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. June 4. OCU Sarkey Law Center, 800 N. Harvey Ave. Starting & Financing Your Business a free seminar conducted by the U.S. Small Business Association, 6-8 p.m. June 4. Nappy Roots, 3705 Springlake Drive, 405-896-0203, facebook.com/pg/ nappyrootsbooks. Comedy Open Mic Night try doing standup and/or watch other aspiring comics hone their acts, 10 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-701-4900, othellos.us. Chisholm Creek Rooftop Hop a variety of musicians perform on the rooftops and patios of businesses at this weekly concert, 6-10 p.m. May 21. Chisholm Creek, 13230 Pawnee Drive, 405-728-2780, chisholmcreek.com.

with others at this open-invitation weekly jam session, 9:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesdays. Saints, 1715 NW 16th St., 405-602-6308, saintspubokc.com. Paramount Open Mic show off your talents at this open mic hosted by musician Chris Morrison, 7 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. VHS and Chill: Blockbusted Video riff along with comedians and film fans at this monthly movie screening where audience participation is encouraged, 7-9 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. Open Mic at The Deli hosted by Jarvix, this monthly show offers anyone the opportunity to sing or perform, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Deli, 309 White St., Norman, 405-3293934, thedeli.us. Reading Wednesdays a weekly story time with hands-on activities, goody bags and reading-themed photo ops, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. Stars and Stripes Spin Jam a weekly meetup for jugglers, hula hoopers and unicyclers, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Stars & Stripes Park, 3701 S. Lake Hefner Drive, 405-297-2756, okc.gov/parks. Co-ed Open Adult Volleyball enjoy a game of friendly yet competitive volleyball while making new friends, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., Yukon, 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov. Iron Horse Open Mic and Showcase perform music on stage at this show open to all experience levels, 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Iron Horse Bar & Grill, 9501 S. Shields Blvd., 405-735-1801.

Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405445-7080, myriadgardens.com.

Open Mic at The P share your musical talent or just come to listen at this weekly open mic, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. The Patriarch Craft Beer House & Lawn, 9 E. Edwards St., Edmond, 405-285-6670, thepatriarchedmond.com.

Trivia Night at Matty McMillen’s answer questions for a chance to win prizes at this weekly trivia night, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Matty McMillen’s Irish Pub, 2201 NW 150th St., 405-607-8822, mattymcmillens.com.

VZD’s Open Mic Night a weekly music mic hosted by Joe Hopkins, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. VZD’s Restaurant & Bar, 4200 N. Western Ave., 405-6023006, vzds.com.

Weekly Jams bring an instrument and play along

Red Dirt Open Mic a weekly open mic for comedy

2019 Native American New Play Festival Oklahoma Indigenous Theatre Company’s Native American New Play Festival, which features plays written by indigenous playwrights, is now in its 10th year. 2019’s featured play is Anishinaabe writer Jo MacDonald’s Neechi-Itas, about four women who go out for a night on the town and end up in jail for … reasons. This year’s festival includes staged readings of works by Carolyn Dunn and Tara Moses. Feast your eyes June 20-22 and 27-29 at University of Central Oklahoma’s Mitchell Hall Theatre, 100 N. University Drive. Tickets are $20-$25. Visit okindigenoustheatre.com. JUNE 20-22 AND 27-29 Photo provided

and poetry, hosted by Red Dirt Poetry, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Sauced on Paseo, 2912 Paseo St., 405-521-9800, saucedonpaseo.com. Divine Comedy a weekly local showcase hosted by CJ Lance and Josh Lathe and featuring a variety of comedians from OKC and beyond, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St., 405-463-0470, 51stspeakeasy.com.

ANNUAL

Lumpy’s Open Mic Night play a song of your own or just listen to the performers at this weekly show hosted by John Riley Willingham, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. Lumpy’s Sports Grill, 12325 N. May Ave., 405-286-3300, lumpyssportsgrill.com. Sanctuary Karaoke Service don a choir robe and sing your favorite song, 9 p.m.-midnight Wednesdays and Thursdays. Sanctuary Barsilica, 814 W.

WE’RE SOCIAL.

FE S T I V A L M E M O R I A L D AY W E E KE ND M AY 25 – 26 10 :0 0 A. M . – 4 :0 0 P . M . Join us for a fun-filled family weekend. For more information, visit

nationalcowboymuseum.org/chuckwagon

$15 Admission Children 12 & Under Free $5 Off for Last Frontier Scouts (wear your uniform)

1700 Northeast 63rd Street Oklahoma City, OK 73111 (405) 478-2250 • nationalcowboymuseum.org

22

M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

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CO M M U N I T Y

Panoramic parks

Parks around the state feature scenic views and fun activities for the summer. By Miguel Rios

While Oklahoma City awaits the grand opening of downtown’s 70-acre Scissortail Park, which is slated for late September, other parks around the state are ready for summer business. These parks feature beautiful scenery and a variety of activities for the whole family — a perfect combination for your Instagram page.

1. With three different campgrounds, various trails, a fishing pond and group picnic shelters, there is plenty to do while enjoying the views. | Photo Mike Klemme / provided

Natural Falls State Park

2650 S. John Williams Way E, Tulsa gatheringplace.org A “world-class riverfront park,” Gathering Place boasts 100 daily experiences, 100 acres of land, park trails and dining options. Visitors can play on swings, the adventure playground and the sports court or keep cool in the interactive water mountain. Those wanting to relax can wind down in one of the many lush gardens and lawns, enjoy a 3-acre pond featuring a beach or check out unique art in Cabinet of Wonder. | Photo Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department / provided

Beavers Bend State Park

4350 S. OK-259A, Broken Bow travelok.com/state-parks Nestled in southeast Oklahoma along mountains and pine tree forests, Beavers Bend offers several activities surrounded by beautiful scenery. This state park boasts hiking, rafting, horseback riding, water skiing, swimming and nature center activities. Trout streams stocked year-round also make for a great place to fish. | Photo Mike Hicks / provided

Red Rock Canyon Adventure Park 116 Red Rock Canyon Road, Hinton redrockcanyonadventurepark.com Red Rock Canyon was shaped by natural forces over 260 million years. Now, with 310 acres of cliffs, canyons and a rich ecosystem, it is a popular location for camping and hiking. While the foliage’s fall colors in October and November complement the canyon’s natural redness, tourists can enjoy the scenic views all year round — not to mention the seasonal swimming pool that is open from Memorial Day weekend through Aug.

1732 NW. 16th St., 405-606-2030, oakandore.com.

D-Day Remembered a commemoration of the anniversary of the Allied invasion of Normandy featuring D-Day memorabilia and 60-minute film about the importance, 2 and 6 p.m. June 6. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-585-3504, circlecinema.com.

Creativity Camp for Littles children 4-8 years old can explore the connection between artistic expression and creative movement at this camp; comfy play clothes recommended, 10-11:30 a.m. June 10-13. Sweet Yield Studio, 629 W. Sheridan Ave., Suite 103, 405-615-2141.

ww deadCenter Film Festival see documentaries, short films and features of nearly every genre at Oklahoma’s largest film festival, June 6-9. Downtown OKC, 211 N. Robinson Ave., 405-235-3500, downtownokc.com.

Rolling Thunder: A Bob Dylan Story (2019, USA, Martin Scorsese) a documentary chronicling Dylan’s legendary tour; presented by the Bob Dylan Center, 8 p.m. July 11. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-585-3504, circlecinema.com.

The Comedy of Errors Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park presents the Bard’s chaotic comedy of mistaken identities; directed by D. Lance Marsh, June 6-29. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com.

Film Row Trivia Night test your cinematic knowledge at this monthly competition hosted by VHS and Chill, 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com.

Bearadise a weekend of pool parties, bar crawls, and other special events presented by the Sooner Bears, June 28-30. Habana Inn, 2200 NW 40th St., 405-528-2221. Paseo Arts District’s First Friday Gallery Walk peruse art from over 80 artists with 25 participating business for a night of special themed exhibits, refreshments and a variety of entertainment opportunities, 6-10 p.m. first Friday of every month. Paseo Arts District, 3022 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org.

| Photo Shane Bevel / provided

Gathering Place

Sheridan Ave., facebook.com/sanctuarybarokc.

US Highway 412 West, Colcord travelok.com/state-parks Natural Falls features two picturesque vantage points for its 77-foot waterfall and unique rock formations. The views are so beautiful, it was the filming place for some scenes from the 1974 movie Where the Red Fern Grows. Visitors can hike to the observation platforms, relax at one of the various picnic tables and grills and play disc golf, volleyball horseshoes or basketball. | Photo Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department / provided

Rebels & Royals Drag King Show hosted by former Mister USofA Damian Matrix-Gritte, this monthly show features local drag kings and special guests 10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Fridays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-602-2030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. Red Earth Festival a celebration of Native American culture featuring children’s activities, entertainment, food trucks, a parade, art market, a pow wow and more, June 7-9. Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, 405-602-8500, coxconventioncenter.com. SoonerCon 28 a sci-fi, fantasy, anime, gaming and pop culture convention featuring comic creators, a costume contest, art shows, live music and more, June 7-9. Embassy Suites Conference Center, 2501 Conference Drive, Norman, 405-364-8040. Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition & Sale an annual exhibition and art sale featuring more than 300 Western paintings and sculptures by contemporary Western artists of landscapes, wildlife and illustrative scenes, June 7-July 8. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. Don Quixote Open Mic a weekly comedy show followed by karaoke, 7:30-9 p.m. Fridays. Don Quixote Club, 3030 N. Portland Ave., 405-947-0011.

Black Mesa State Park & Nature Preserve

State Highway 325, Kenton travelok.com/state-parks At 4,973 feet above sea level, Black Mesa’s nature preserve is home to the highest elevation in the state. Visitors can make the trek to the top of the plateau and take in vast scenic views. This state park is also home to some of the darkest nighttime skies on publicly accessible land, which makes it an ideal place for stargazing. Though the state park does not boast countless activities, it does have the basics covered — hiking, fishing and a playground — and is a great location for wildlife watching with golden eagles, Pinyon jays, mountain lions and antelope. | Photo Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department / provided

Crystal Beach Park

108 Temple Houston Drive, Woodward visitwoodward.com Crystal Beach is “an oasis of escapism” in Woodward “with activities to suit everyone.” Designed to entertain people of all ages, it features mini-golf, a Kiwanis train, paddleboats and a band shell amphitheater for live music. The family aquatic center is perfect for summer, with a large swimming pool, water slides and all types of hoses and water spouts to keep you cool.

The Skirvin Jazz Club a monthly live jazz show presented by OK Sessions, 7:30 p.m. third Friday of every month. Park Avenue Grill, 1 Park Ave., 405702-8444, parkavegrill.com. The Painted Box — Cultura Cookies learn to create elaborately decorated cookies at this workshop taught by Angela Niño, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. June 8. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405887-3327, theparamountroom.com. Zine Fest a celebration of DIY print publications featuring live music, readings, a potluck and vendor displays, 4-10 p.m. June 8. Resonator, 325 E Main St., Norman, resonator.space. Comedy Night an evening of standup comedy featuring Jeremy “The Mighty Jer-Dog” Danley, 7-10 p.m. June 8. Off the Wall Club, 3007 SE 44th St., 405-672-2994, facebook.com/offthewallclub. OKC Drag Queen Story Hour children and their families are invited to a story and craft time lead by Ms. Shantel and followed by a dance party, 4 p.m. second Saturday of every month. Sunnyside Diner, 916 NW Sixth St., 405-778-8861. The Taste on 36th a monthly gathering of food trucks from throughout the state featuring live music, noon-6 p.m. second Saturday of every month. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., 405-208-4240, iceeventcentergrill.eat24hour.com. Brunching with Books a book club meeting every other week, with reading selections chosen by group preference, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays. Buttermilk Paseo, 605 NW 28th St., 405-605-6660, buttermilkokc.com. Heartland Husky Rescue Adoption enjoy alcoholic beverages and spend time with puppies and adult dogs in search of forever homes, noon-3 p.m. June 9. The Bleu Garten, 301 NW 10th St., 405879-3808, bleugarten.com.

Mid-Oklahoma Writers a meetup for local writers featuring guest speakers and literary discussions, 7-9 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month. Eastside Church of Christ, 916 S. Douglas Blvd., 405-732-0393. Triple’s Open Mic a music and comedy open mic hosted by Amanda Howle, 7:30 p.m. every other Wednesday. Triple’s, 8023 NW 23rd St., 405-789-3031. Story Time with Britt’s Bookworms enjoy snacks, crafts and story time, 10:30-11:30 a.m. first and third Thursday of every month. Thrive Mama Collective, 1745 NW 16th St., 405-356-6262. OK Country Cafe Open Mic show off your singing talent, 6 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of every month. OK Country Cafe, 6072 S. Western Ave., 405-602-6866, okcountrycafe.com. The Dead Don’t Die (2019, USA, Jim Jarmusch) a small-town battles a zombie horde in a horror comedy starring Bill Murray, Adam Driver and Chloë Sevigny, opens June 14. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-585-3504, circlecinema.com. LIVE! on the Plaza join the Plaza District every second Friday for an art walk featuring artists, live music, shopping and more, 6-10 p.m. second Friday of every month. 16th Street Plaza District, 1618 N. Gatewood Ave., 405-426-7812, plazadistrict.org. The Trailer-Hood Hootenanny join Rayna Over and friends for a night of comedy, music and drag performances, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. the second Friday of every month. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-6022030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. Boot Camp to Brunch a 45-minute outdoor workout led by trainer Stephanie Fowler followed by a champagne brunch, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. June 15. The Bleu Garten, 301 NW 10th St., 405-879-3808, bleugarten.com. Book Writing Workshop aspiring authors can learn about sending query letters, copyright laws, branding and more at this workshop, 2-4 p.m. June 15. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., 405208-4240, iceeventcentergrill.eat24hour.com. Pests, Prevention and Annihilation learn how to prevent and repel pest infestations using nonchemical means at this gardening class, 2-3 p.m. June 15. TLC Garden Center, 105 W. Memorial Road, 405-751-0630, tlcgarden.com. Las Sandinistas (2018, Nicaragua. Jenny Murray) a documentary chronicling the women who led rebel troops in Nicaragua’s 1979 Sandinista Revolution, 6-8:30 p.m. June 15. Church of the Open Arms, 3131 N. Pennsylvania Ave., 405-525-9555, openarms.org. Summer Soiree enjoy live music, local craft-brew beer and wine and heavy hors d’oeuvres at this Roaring ’20s-themed fundraiser for Preservation Oklahoma, 7-10 p.m. June 15. Overholser Mansion, 405 NW 15th St., 405-525-5325, overholsermansion.org. Say Anything... (1989, USA, Cameron Crowe) Lloyd Dobbler (John Cusack) attempts to woo Diane Court (Ione Skye) in spite of her overprotective father; the screening features a Q&A with Cusack, 7:30 p.m. June 15. Cox Business Center/Tulsa Convention Center, 100 Civic Center, Tulsa, 918-894-4506, coxcentertulsa.com. Yard Party sample a variety of locally brewed beers, outdoor games and music at this event benefitting Children’s Hospital Foundation, 5:30-8:30 p.m. June 20. The Yard, 21 NW Seventh St., 405-290-7080. Jazz in June an annual outdoor jazz festival now in its 36th year, June 20-22. Brookhaven Village, 3700 W. Robinson St., Norman, 405-321-7500, brookhaven-village.com.

Second Sunday Poetry hear the works of a variety of local poets, 2 p.m. second Sunday of every month. The Depot, 200 S. Jones Ave., Norman, 405307-9320, pasnorman.org.

The Gravest Showman solve a circus-themed murder at this interactive play presented by Whodunit Mystery Dinner Theater and catered by Cracker Barrel, 6:15-9:15 p.m. June 21. Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, 1309 S. Agnew Ave., 405-236-0416, cattlemensrestaurant.com.

Blue Sunday a monthly blues tribute show hosted by Powerhouse Blues Project,6-8 p.m. the second Sunday of every month. Friends Restaurant & Club, 3705 W. Memorial Road, 405-751-4057, friendsbarokc.com.

Outdoor Movie Series: The Greatest Showman (2017, USA, Michael Gracey) a musical based on the life of P.T. Barnum, 7-10 p.m. June 21. Lions Park, 450 S. Flood, Norman, 405-366-5472.

Art of Rap hosted by Jim Conway, this monthly rap battle pits local MCs against one another for a cash prize, 9 p.m. Mondays. Hubbly Bubbly Hookah & Café, 2900 N. Classen Blvd., Suite K, 405-609-2930.

Weird Al Yankovic: Strings Attached Tour the comedic musician performs parodies and originals with a symphony orchestra, 8-11 p.m. June 21. The Zoo Amphitheatre, 2101 NE 50th St., 405-602-0683,

The Friend Zone: Speed-Friending make new friends five minutes at a time at this platonic meetup, 7 p.m. second Monday of every month. Oak & Ore,

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continued from page 23 thezooamphitheatre.com. Wheeler Summer Music Series enjoy live music, food trucks, craft beer and pop-up shops at this monthly event, 7 p.m. third Friday of every month through Sept. 20. Wheeler Ferris Wheel, 1701 S. Western Ave., 405-655-8455, wheelerdistrict.com/ferris-wheel.

Red Coyote Love Run a rainbow-themed run for runners of all abilities and experience levels benefitting HeartLine, an organization providing health information and suicide awareness and prevention help, 8-10 a.m. June 22. Louie’s Grill & Bar, 9401 Lake Hefner Parkway, 405751-2298, louiesgrillandbar.com. Oklahoma City Pride Parade and Festival celebrate the LGBTQ+ community and commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots with live music, activities for adults and families and a parade, noon-midnight June 22. OKC Pride, 2242 NW 39th, 405-351-2228. Pooch Ice Cream Social have ice cream with your best friend at this pet-friendly event with ice cream for people and dogs; proceeds benefit the Pet Food Pantry of Oklahoma City, 3-5 p.m. June 22. Fassler Hall, 421 NW 10th St., 405-609-3300, fasslerhall.com. Queen Mariah’s Variety Show a monthly stage show featuring various drag performers, 10:30 p.m. Saturdays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-6022030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. Shelly Phelps Blues Revue a monthly variety show featuring music, comedy, performance art, drag and more, 7-10 p.m. Sundays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-602-2030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. Singin’ in the Rain a musical comedy celebrating Hollywood’s golden age, June 25-30. Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., 405-297-2264, okcciviccenter.com. Summer Canine Olympics dogs compete in obedience, agility, dock diving training and more, June 26-30. Bennett Event Center, State Fair Park, 3101 Gordon Cooper Blvd., 405-948-6700. Wags to Riches a craft fair benefitting 1 Day Ranch animal rescue in Bethel Acres, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. June 15. Cole Community Center, 4400 Northwest Expressway, 405-418-7636, okcfirst.com. Fuzzy Friday a monthly happy hour meet-and-greet hosted by the Bears of Central Oklahoma, 5:30 p.m. Fridays. Apothecary 39, 2125 NW 39th St., 405-605-4100. Bricktown Canal 20th Anniversary a familyfriendly event featuring live music, art sales and more commemorating the anniversary of Bricktown Canal, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. June 29. Bricktown Beach, 2 S. Mickey Mantle Drive, 405-235-3500, downtownokc. com/bricktown-beach. Juneteenth Celebration a celebration of the anniversary of the abolition of legal slavery in the United States with a special presentation by the National Association for Black Veterans, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. June 30. New Bethel Baptist Church, 1844 E. Madison St., 405-427-2171. Oklahoma Summer Bash a car and bike show featuring hot rods, lowrider, classic cars and more, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. June 30. Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, 405-602-8500, coxconventioncenter.com. Paper Sack Project prepare sack lunches to pass out to people on the streets at this event hosted by Debate Night OKC, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Sunday of the month. NE OKC Community & Cultural Center, 3815 N. Kelley Ave., 405-401-3350. Board Game Brunch play board games while enjoying a variety of food and beverage options, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. last Sunday of the month. The R & J Lounge and Supper Club, 320 NW 10th St., 405-6025066, rjsupperclub.com.

JULY

This is the month to wave the flag, hear the fireworks and eat as many hot dogs as Takeru Kobayashi. Celebrate all the things that make America great while they last. Beautiful Minds: Dyslexia and the Creative Advantage an exhibition of artworks created by people with dyslexia including students from Oklahoma City’s Trinity School, through July 14. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. From the Golden Age to the Moving Image: The Changing Face of the Permanent Collection view portraits painted by Kehinde Wiley, Anthony van Dyck, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and George Bellows, through Sept. 22. Oklahoma City Museum of

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Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. Life Imagined: The Art and Science of Automata see examples of mechanical proto-robots from 1850 to the modern day, through Sept. 29. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Red Dirt Dinos: An Oklahoma Dinosaur Adventure learn about regional prehistoric reptiles at this hands-on exhibit featuring three interactive robotic dinosaurs, through Sept. 2. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

MUSIC

SUMMER GUIDE

SUMMER GUIDE

Hello, Oklahoma!

Oklahoma City and Tulsa are getting inundated with concerts this summer. By Jeremy Martin

Seeing Now an exhibit of multimedia art works by Hank Willis Thomas, Ken Gonzales-Day, Travis Somerville, Paul Rucker, Graciela Sacco, Terence Hammonds and Michael Waugh, through Dec. 31. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com. Welcome Home: Oklahomans and the War in Vietnam explores the impact of the war on Oklahoma families as well as the stories of Vietnamese families relocated to Oklahoma, Nov. 6. Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, 405-521-2491, okhistory.org. Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition & Sale an annual exhibition and art sale featuring more than 300 Western paintings and sculptures by contemporary Western artists of landscapes, wildlife and illustrative scenes, through July 8. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. Monday Night Group Ride meet up for a weekly 25-30 minute bicycle ride at about 18 miles per hour through east Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Mondays. The Bike Lab OKC, 2200 W. Hefner Road, 405-603-7655. Twisted Coyote Brew Crew a weekly 3-mile group run for all ability levels with a beer tasting to follow; bring your own safety lights, 6 p.m. Mondays. Twisted Spike Brewing Co., 1 NW 10th St., 405-3013467, twistedspike.com. Monday Night Blues Jam Session bring your own instrument to this open-stage jam hosted by Wess McMichael, 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us. Comedy Open Mic Night try doing standup and/or watch other aspiring comics hone their acts, 10 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-701-4900, othellos.us. Storytime Science the museum invites children age 6 and younger to hear a story and participate in a related scientific activity, 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Botanical Balance an all-levels yoga class in a natural environment; bring your own mat and water, 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays and 8 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. Wheeler Criterium a weekly nighttime cycling event with criterium races, food trucks and family activities, 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, okc.gov. Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405445-7080, myriadgardens.com. Trivia Night at Matty McMillen’s answer questions for a chance to win prizes at this weekly trivia night, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Matty McMillen’s Irish Pub, 2201 NW 150th St., 405-607-8822, mattymcmillens.com. Othello’s Comedy Night see professionals and amateurs alike at this long-running weekly open mic for standup comics, 9 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us. Weekly Jams bring an instrument and play along with others at this open-invitation weekly jam session, 9:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesdays. Saints, 1715 NW 16th St., 405-602-6308, saintspubokc.com. Paramount Open Mic show off your talents at this open mic hosted by musician Chris Morrison, 7 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. VHS and Chill: Blockbusted Video riff along with comedians and film fans at this monthly movie screening where audience participation is encouraged, 7-9 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com. Reading Wednesdays a weekly story time with hands-on activities, goody bags and reading-themed photo ops, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. Stars and Stripes Spin Jam a weekly meetup for jugglers, hula hoopers and unicyclers, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Stars & Stripes Park, 3701 S. Lake Hefner Drive, 405-297-2756, okc.gov/parks.

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“Weird Al” Yankovic performs with a full orchestra June 21 at The Zoo Amphitheatre. | Photo provided

Not long ago, a roundup of notable concerts hitting Oklahoma in a given summer would have been depressingly Tulsa-heavy. Our neighbor to the northeast is well-represented on the list below, but at the risk of jinxing an encouraging trend, fans of music in many genres can get their concert fix without ever leaving the OKC metro. Now if we can just shed the reputation for loudly talking through shows… Oklahoma-centric music fans will not want to miss Arlo Guthrie, Carter Sampson and John Fullbright at the 22nd annual Woody Guthrie Folk Festival July 10-14 in Okemah; the stacked lineup of Broncho, Colourmusic and reunited Deerpeople July 12 at Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St.; or former Chainsaw Kittens frontman Tyson Meade Aug. 2 at Tower Theatre. Electronic music buffs should stock up on glow sticks now for The Crystal Method June 7 at IDL Ballroom, 230 E. First St., in Tulsa and Liberty & Lasers July 4 at Lost Lakes Amphitheatre, 3501 NE 10th St. In fact, just keep an eye on both of those venues as well as promoters Subsonix because there seems to always be a beat just about to drop. If you like indie rock (whatever that means), Father John Misty returns to Oklahoma, this time with Jason Isbell June 29 at BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave., in Tulsa; oddly punctuated Portugal. The Man plays July 19 at The Criterion, 500 E. Sheridan Ave.; Pedro the Lion and mewithoutYou get the party angry and sad Aug. 8 at Tower Theatre; This Will Destroy You keeps it instrumental Aug. 14, also at Tower; Vampire Weekend jams Aug. 16 at The Criterion; and Glen Hansard does the thing he does Sept. 16, also at Tower. Fans of warped pop music salute Twenty One Pilots June 25 at Chesapeake Energy Arena, 100 W. Reno Ave., and Cuco July 2 at Tower Theatre.

Hip-hop and R&B heads enjoy an embarrassment of riches this summer with Juice Wrld and Ski Mask the Slump God June 11 at The Criterion, Thundercat June 13 at Tower Theatre, 21 Savage and Dababy July 10 at The Criterion, Khalid July 19 at Chesapeake Energy Arena, Cardi B July 23 at BOK Center in Tulsa, Bone Thugs-nHarmony Aug. 7 at Tower Theatre, and Devin the Dude Aug. 15 at Tower. Children of the ’90s will no doubt be stoked to learn that Big Head Todd & the Monsters and Toad the Wet Sprocket play June 23 at Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa; Built to Spill plays July 22 at Tower Theatre; Nelly hopefully does not weirdly serenade any underage girls June 26 at Diamond Ballroom, 8001 S. Eastern Ave.; and Interpol is totally the next Joy Division Sept. 17 at The Criterion. You can bet your boots concertgoers keeping it country will be chomping at the bit to see James McMurtry June 2 at Mercury Lounge, 1747 S. Boston Ave., in Tulsa; Marty Stuart (paired a little improbably with Steve Miller Band) June 15 at River Spirit Casino, 8330 Riverside Parkway, in Tulsa; Son Volt June 18 at The Jones Assembly, 901 W. Sheridan Ave.; Wynonna (as in Judd) & the Big Noise July 12 at Riverwind Casino, 1544 OK-9, in Norman; and Alan Jackson Sept. 14 at Chesapeake Energy Arena. Classic rock fans can bid farewell to retiring Peter Frampton June 18 at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, 777 W. Cherokee St., in Catoosa; holy dive into the uncanny valley with Dio’s hologram June 20 at The Criterion; throw up the horns for Alice Cooper and Halestorm July 28 at The Zoo Amphitheatre, 2101 NE 50th St.; say goodbye to what is left of Lynyrd Skynyrd Aug. 10 at Chesapeake Energy Arena; gather in

Extraordinary bassist Thundercat plays June 13 at Tower Theatre. | Photo Motormouth Media / provided


Pumpkinville at Myriad Botanical Gardens runs Oct. 5-21. | Photo Andy Rine / Myriad Botanical Gardens / provided

A hologram performance by the late Ronnie James Dio will project for audiences June 20 at The Criterion. | Photo P.G. Brunelli / provided

their masses just like witches at black masses for Zakk (As in Wylde) Sabbath Aug. 26 at Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa; and carry on now, wayward son, with Kansas Aug. 30 at Riverwind Casino in Norman. If you like your rock a little bit louder/ angrier, get your earplugs ready for Full of Hell and Primitive Man June 5 at 89th Street — OKC, 8911 N. Western Ave.; Jawbreaker June 25 at Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa; X July 1 at Tower Theatre; and MDC and Verbal Abuse Aug. 6 at 89th Street — OKC. For concert experiences that are too awesome and/or insane to fit into one of the above classifications, check out Ani DiFranco June 1 at Tulsa Performing Arts Center, 110 E. Second St., in Tulsa; “Weird Al” Yankovic with a symphony orchestra June 21 at The Zoo Amphitheatre; Man Man with Rebecca Black July 8 at Opolis, 113 N. Crawford Ave., in Norman; Béla Fleck & the Flecktones July 24 at Tower Theatre; and Flying Lotus Aug. 18 at Tower.

Experimental hip-hop act Flying Lotus performs at Tower Theatre Aug. 8. | Photo Renata Raksha / provided

Fans of easy punchlines should be pleased to note Insane Clown Posse will be attempting to figure out magnets June 1 at Diamond Ballroom, former Creed frontman Scott Stapp will take us higher with arms wide open July 14 at Tower Theatre, Nickelback will be Nickelbacking Aug. 16 at River Spirit Casino in Tulsa, and Jimmy Buffett will be wasted away again with a crowd of boat-shoe millionaires June 4 at BOK Center in Tulsa. But if after reading this whole concert rundown, the best thing you can think of to spend your money on is irony, it is your own damn fault.

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SUMMER GUIDE

SUMMER GUIDE continued from page 25 Iron Horse Open Mic and Showcase perform music on stage at this show open to all experience levels, 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Iron Horse Bar & Grill, 9501 S. Shields Blvd., 405-735-1801. Open Mic at The P share your musical talent or just come to listen at this weekly open mic, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. The Patriarch Craft Beer House & Lawn, 9 E. Edwards St., Edmond, 405-285-6670, thepatriarchedmond.com.

36th St., 405-602-2030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. OKC Improv performers create original scenes in the moment based on suggestions from the audience, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Oklahoma City Improv, 1757 NW 16th St., 405-4569858, okcimprov.com. Don Quixote Open Mic a weekly comedy show followed by karaoke, 7:30-9 p.m. Fridays. Don Quixote Club, 3030 N. Portland Ave., 405-947-0011. The Skirvin Jazz Club a monthly live jazz show presented by OK Sessions, 7:30 p.m. third Friday of every month. Park Avenue Grill, 1 Park Ave., 405-7028444, parkavegrill.com.

a.m.-2 p.m. July 8. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo.com. Hamlet actor Benedict Cumberbatch portrays the title role in Shakespeare’s classic tragedy in a National Theatre Live presentation, 7 p.m. July 8. Circle Cinema, 10 S. Lewis Ave., Tulsa, 918-585-3504, circlecinema.com. The Friend Zone: Speed-Friending make new friends five minutes at a time at this platonic meetup, 7 p.m. second Monday of every month. Oak & Ore, 1732 NW. 16th St., 405-606-2030, oakandore.com. Film Row Trivia Night test your cinematic knowledge at this monthly competition hosted by VHS and Chill, 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com.

VZD’s Open Mic Night a weekly music mic hosted by Joe Hopkins, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. VZD’s Restaurant & Bar, 4200 N. Western Ave., 405602-3006, vzds.com.

Paseo Farmers Market shop for fresh food from local vendors at this weekly outdoor event, 9 a.m.noon Saturdays, through Oct. 19. SixTwelve, 612 NW 29th St., 405-208-8291, sixtwelve.org.

Red Dirt Open Mic a weekly open mic for comedy and poetry, hosted by Red Dirt Poetry, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Sauced on Paseo, 2912 Paseo St., 405-521-9800, saucedonpaseo.com.

Open Badminton hit some birdies in some morning pick-up games of badminton with friends, 10 a.m.noon Saturdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., Yukon, 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov.

Divine Comedy a weekly local showcase hosted by CJ Lance and Josh Lathe and featuring a variety of comedians from OKC and beyond, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St., 405-463-0470, 51stspeakeasy.com.

Pooches on the Patio bring your best friend to this dog-friendly happy hour with drink specials, appetizers and free pet treats, 4-7 p.m. Saturdays. Café 501 Classen Curve, 5825 NW Grand Blvd., 405844-1501, cafe501.com.

Lumpy’s Open Mic Night play a song of your own or just listen to the performers at this weekly show hosted by John Riley Willingham, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. Lumpy’s Sports Grill, 12325 N. May Ave., 405-286-3300, lumpyssportsgrill.com.

Brunching with Books a book club meeting every other week, with reading selections chosen by group preference, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays. Buttermilk Paseo, 605 NW 28th St., 405-605-6660, buttermilkokc.com.

Sanctuary Karaoke Service don a choir robe and sing your favorite song, 9 p.m.-midnight Wednesdays and Thursdays. Sanctuary Barsilica, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., facebook.com/sanctuarybarokc.

Oklahoma Voices hear featured poets read from their works at this monthly event, 2 p.m. the first Sunday of every month. IAO Gallery, 706 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-232-6060, iaogallery.org.

OK Country Cafe Open Mic show off your singing talent, 6 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of every month. OK Country Cafe, 6072 S. Western Ave., 405-602-6866, okcountrycafe.com.

Liberty & Lasers an electronic-dance-music festival concluding with a fireworks display, 4-10 p.m. July 4. Lost Lakes Waterpark and Amphitheater, 3501 NE 10th, 405-702-4040, lostlakesamp.com.

Moore Chess Club play in tournaments and learn about the popular board game at this weekly event where all ages and skill levels are welcome, 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Moore Library, 225 S. Howard Ave., Moore.

Early Explorers toddlers and preschoolers can participate in fun scientific activities they can repeat later at home, 10-11 a.m. Thursdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org.

Public Access Open Mic read poetry, do standup comedy, play music or just watch as an audience member at this open mic hosted by Alex Sanchez, 7 p.m. Sundays. The Paseo Plunge, 3010 Paseo St., 405-315-6224, paseoplunge.org.

LIVE! on the Plaza join the Plaza District every second Friday for an art walk featuring artists, live music, shopping and more, 6-10 p.m. second Friday of every month. 16th Street Plaza District, 1618 N. Gatewood Ave., 405-426-7812, plazadistrict.org.

Toastmasters Meeting hone public speaking and leadership skills in a move-at-your-own-pace environment, 7-8:30 p.m. Thursdays. McFarlin United Methodist Church, 419 S. University Drive, Norman, 623-810-0295.

Rap and Jam Salon learn new musical skills in a variety of genres from local musicians at this monthly workshop, 4-6 p.m. first Sunday of every month. Your Mom’s Place, 919 N. Virginia Ave.

Paseo Arts District’s First Friday Gallery Walk peruse art from over 80 artists with 25 participating business for a night of special themed exhibits, refreshments and a variety of entertainment opportunities, 6-10 p.m. first Friday of every month. Paseo Arts District, 3022 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org.

Board Game Day enjoy local craft beer while playing old-school board and arcade games with friends, 5-8 p.m. Sundays. FlashBack RetroPub, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-633-3604, flashbackretropub.com.

Rebels & Royals Drag King Show hosted by former Mister USofA Damian Matrix-Gritte, this monthly show features local drag kings and special guests 10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Fridays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW

Art of Rap hosted by Jim Conway, this monthly rap battle pits local MCs against one another for a cash prize, 9 p.m. Mondays. Hubbly Bubbly Hookah & Café, 2900 N. Classen Blvd., Suite K, 405-609-2930. World Oceans Day learn about helping conserve and protect the world’s oceans and waterways, 10

Mid-Oklahoma Writers a meetup for local writers featuring guest speakers and literary discussions, 7-9 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month. Eastside Church of Christ, 916 S. Douglas Blvd., 405-732-0393. Newsies a family-friendly musical based on the New York City Newsboy Strike of 1899, adapted from the Disney film, July 9-14. Lyric Theatre, 1727 NW 16th St., 405-524-9310, lyrictheatreokc.com. Triple’s Open Mic a music and comedy open mic hosted by Amanda Howle, 7:30 p.m. every other Wednesday. Triple’s, 8023 NW 23rd St., 405-789-3031. Story Time with Britt’s Bookworms enjoy snacks, crafts and story time, 10:30-11:30 a.m. first and third Thursday of every month. Thrive Mama Collective, 1745 NW 16th St., 405-356-6262.

The Trailer-Hood Hootenanny join Rayna Over and friends for a night of comedy, music and drag performances, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. the second Friday of every month. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-6022030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. Oklahoma City Tattoo Arts Convention a gathering of local, national and international tattoo artists, sideshow-style entertainment and vendors selling jewelry, clothing, artwork, July 12-14. Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, 405-602-8500, coxconventioncenter.com. Tulsa Punk Rock Flea Market shop for records, clothing, accessories, artworks and more, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. July 13. The Bond, 608 E. Third St., Tulsa, 918442-2993, bondtulsa.com. The Black Foodie Summit sample cuisine from a variety of culinary artists, chefs and restaurants at this event sponsored by Oklahoma Black Eats, noon-6 p.m. July 13. Bistro 46, 2501 NE 23rd St., 405595-3904, bistro46okc.com. The Taste on 36th a monthly gathering of food trucks from throughout the state featuring live music, noon-6 p.m. second Saturday of every month. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., 405-208-4240, iceeventcentergrill.eat24hour.com. Run for Recognition participate in a 5K or 1-mile fun run to benefit Special Olympics Oklahoma, 7-9 p.m. July 14. Run for Recognition, 708 N. Broadway, dlamprecht@mtmrecognition.com, runforrecognition.com. Second Sunday Poetry hear the works of a variety of local poets, 2 p.m. second Sunday of every month. The Depot, 200 S. Jones Ave., Norman, 405307-9320, pasnorman.org. Blue Sunday a monthly blues tribute show hosted by Powerhouse Blues Project,6-8 p.m. the second Sunday of every month. Friends Restaurant & Club, 3705 W. Memorial Road, 405-751-4057, friendsbarokc.com. Asian District Night Market Festival a community cultural event featuring food trucks, merchants and vendors, children’s activities, a pho-eating contest and more, 6 p.m.-midnight June 15. Military Park, 1200 NW 25th St., 405-297-3882. The Life Cycle of a Butterfly a recovering alcoholic comes to terms with her history of sexual abuse and the psychological damage it has caused in her life in this play by La’Charles Purvey and produced by African-American Artistic collective The Vanguart, July 18-21. Heritage Hall Middle School Howard Theatre, 1800 NW 122nd St., 405-749-3000, heritagehall.com.

New World Comic Con 5 Oklahoma has a storied history with comic books, from Pawnee native and Dick Tracy creator Chester Gould to Tulsa’s Sterling Gates, who currently writes for The CW’s The Flash. More homegrown talent will be on display at New World Comic Con 5, where comic book enthusiasts can shop for new or classic titles, meet local comic creators, participate in some competitive cosplay and other activities 10 a.m-7 p.m. July 27 at State Fair Park, 3220 Great Plains Walk. Visit facebook.com/newworldcomicsokc or call 405-721-7634. OCT. 31-NOV. 4 Photo provided 26

M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

Wheeler Summer Music Series enjoy live music, food trucks, craft beer and pop-up shops at this monthly event, 7 p.m. third Friday of every month through Sept. 20. Wheeler Ferris Wheel, 1701 S. Western Ave., 405-655-8455, wheelerdistrict.com/ferris-wheel. Nightfall Haunted Territory’s Horror Con a convention for horror fans, featuring celebrities, costume contests, haunted walkthroughs and more, noon-8 p.m. July 20. Centennial Building, Oklahoma State Fairgrounds, 609 Kiamichi Place, 405-948-6700. BrickUniverse LEGO Fan Convention a meetup for plastic-building-block enthusiasts featuring live

Oklahoma City Drag Queen Story Hour The only thing more fun than a regular storytime is Oklahoma City Drag Queen Story Hour. This extraspecial storytime also features craft time and a dance party led by drag queen Ms. Shantel. June’s book is Red: A Crayon’s Story, about staying true to yourself, by Michael Hall; July’s book is Julián Is a Mermaid, a book about Julián (who loves mermaids) and his abuela, by Jessica Love; August’s book is Strictly No Elephants, about a boy and his elephant who befriend others with unusual pets, by Lisa Mantchev; and September’s book is Spork, about a spork just trying to belong, by Kyo Maclear. Drag Queen Story Hour is 4 p.m. the second Saturday of every month at Sunnyside Diner, 916 NW Sixth St. Visit facebook.com/ OKCDQSH or call 405-778-8861. JUNE 8, JULY 13, AUGUST 10, SEPTEMBER 14 Photo Kelli Dupuy / Oklahoma City Drag Queen Story Hour / provided

builds, model exhibitions, challenges, and a Star Wars Zone, July 20-21. Cox Convention Center, 1 Myriad Gardens, 405-602-8500, coxconventioncenter.com. Titanic a musical based on the real-life stories of the passengers on the ill-fated ship, July 23-28. Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., 405-297-2264, okcciviccenter.com. Fuzzy Friday a monthly happy hour meet-andgreet hosted by the Bears of Central Oklahoma, 5:30 p.m. Fridays. Apothecary 39, 2125 NW 39th St., 405-605-4100. Queen Mariah’s Variety Show a monthly stage show featuring various drag performers, 10:30 p.m. Saturdays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-6022030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. George Lopez and DL Hughely the standup comics and television personalities will perform, 7-10 p.m. July 28. Riverwind Casino, 1544 W. State Highway 9, Norman, 405-322-6000, riverwind.com. Paper Sack Project prepare sack lunches to pass out to people on the streets at this event hosted by Debate Night OKC, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Sunday of the month. NE OKC Community & Cultural Center, 3815 N. Kelley Ave., 405-401-3350. Board Game Brunch play board games while enjoying a variety of food and beverage options, 11

continued on page 34


TINKER AIR FORCE BASE JUNE 1-2•2019

The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.

SPONSORED PROGRAM

FREE ADMISSION•FREE ADMISSION•FREE ADMISSION•FREE ADMISSION


SPONSORED PROGRAM

THE STAR SPANGLED SALUTE US NAVY BLUE ANGELS The mission of the Blue Angels is to showcase the pride and professionalism of the United States Navy and Marine Corps by inspiring a culture of excellence and service to country through flight demonstrations and community outreach. Since 1946, the Blue Angels have performed for more than 500 million fans. 2019 is the team’s 73rd anniversary and marks the Blue Angels’ 33rd year flying the Boeing F/A-18 Hornet. Blue Angel pilot #6, LCDR Andre Webb is from Lawton, OK.

WINGS OF BLUE The United States Air Force Academy Parachute Team, Wings of Blue, is composed of 50 elite parachutists who are highly successful in intercollegiate parachuting competitions and worldwide demonstrations! The team displays aerial skills with high speed maneuvers in free fall, as well as precision canopy flight.

JELLY BELLY Kent Pietsch has been performing aerobatic routines since 1973 in more than 400 shows across the U.S. Kent is best known for his hilarious in-flight comedy act that features a detached aileron (wing flap) and a mesmerizing wingtip-scraping pass down the runway that you must see to believe! PRESENTED BY COX COMMUNICATIONS

ADAM BAKER Oklahoma City’s own Adam “Shakenbake” Baker is one of the premier airshow performers in the circuit today. He performs out of this world, extreme aerobatics with a rare combination of flawless heartpounding precision in the Playful Extra 330. This along with unmatched performer approachability makes him a favorite among airshows! PRESENTED BY PHIL PIPPEN PROPERTIES

AERIAL OPERATIONS

ANNOUNCER

AIR BOSS GEORGE CLINE

ROB REIDER

Since 1969, George Cline has safely coordinated many diverse aerial operations and events. Both experience and personality make him the leading professional air show AirBoss in North America.

A former Midwest television personality, Rob Reider is one of the most sought-after announcers on the North American air show circuit.

PRESENTED BY BOEING

PRESENTED BY BOEING

FREE ADMISSION•FREE ADMISSION•FREE ADMISSION•FREE ADMISSION


F-16 VIPER DEMO TEAM The Air Combat Command F-16 Viper Demonstration Team at Shaw AFB, S.C., performs precision aerial maneuvers to demonstrate the unique capabilities by one of the Air Force’s premier multi-role fighters, the F-16 Fighting Falcon. The team also flies in Air Force Heritage Flight formations along with a P-51 and an A-1 aircraft. The F-16 Viper exhibits professional qualities the Air Force develops in the people who fly, maintain and support these aircraft.

VIETNAM REENACTMENT Based on widely recognized actual Vietnam events like the “BAT 21” pilot rescue, Cavanaugh Flight Museum’s “Vietnam Combat Search and Rescue!” airshow re-enactment features spectacular PYRO by the Blastards, para-rescue jumpers, dramatic live narration, and many Vietnam-era aircraft including crowd favorite the Bell Huey, two Douglas Skyraiders, the De Havilland Caribou, O-2 and many others! PRESENTED BY OG&E

MICRO JET Piloted by Justin Lewis, the Micro Jet has been deemed “The World’s Smallest Jet.” Thrilling audiences all over the world with its physics-defying flight routing the Micro Jet is one of the most sought-after aerial performances in the airshow circuit! PRESENTED BY PRATT AND WHITNEY

MIG 17F Randy Ball’s restored MiG-17F is one of only a handful of vintage jets flying the North American air show circuit. It has an authentic paint job and is the only MiG available for ground display with fully restored guns. With its famous heritage and great maneuverability, it makes one of the best air show jets in the world!

JACK LINKS The Jack Link’s Jet wako ‘Screamin Sasquatch has been completely redesigned and structurally reinforced using modern-day engineering and materials. This plane achieves feats other stunt planes are unable to do and reaches speeds up to 250 mph. Snap rolls, spins, barrel rolls and the hover are among the list of breathtaking maneuvers this aircraft can perform. PRESENTED BY GREATER OKLAHOMA CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

STARSPANGLEDSALUTEOKC.COM

SPONSORED PROGRAM

AIR & SPACE SHOW•JUNE 1-2


SPONSORED PROGRAM

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO TO THE STAR SPANGLED SALUTE AIR AND SPACE SHOW

Getting to the Airshow Plenty of FREE parking will be available at the Tinker Aerospace Complex, formerly the GM Plant, on SE 74 between Air Depot and Douglas boulevards. Easy access is available from Interstate 240. Busses will circulate continuously on Saturday and Sunday beginning at 8 a.m. from the TAC to Tinker AFB. An average bus trip will be less than 15 minutes and will deliver passengers to the security checkpoint. All visitors should be prepared for inspection of belongings as they enter the military installation. Over 40 busses will be transporting guests. This IS your best way to get to the Air Show with the least amount of walking. Strollers ARE permitted.

What NOT to Bring All guests are subject to search by security forces while on the installation and will NOT be allowed to pass through security with any of the following items. If you can’t take it on a plane, you probably can’t take it on base. „„ Weapons of any kind, including pocket

knives, pocket tools, scissors, box cutters, billy clubs, large heavy chain-link jewelry or belts, mace and pepper spray. „„ Firearms of any type „„ Toys that resemble firearms, weapons or bombs „„ Fireworks „„ Spray paint or silly string „„ Glass containers „„ Alcohol „„ Illegal drugs „„ Bicycles „„ Skateboards, heelies, roller skates, roller blades or scooters

„„ Coolers „„ Large umbrellas/portable tents „„ Back packs, ruck sacks „„ Pets (service dogs permitted) „„ Drones of any kind

Kid Zone area will have inflatables and fun activities planned throughout the day. Parents can purchase a wrist band for their children that will be good all day long. There is a tent near the children’s area for lost parents.

Note

STEM CITY Hangar

Strollers and diaper bags are OK.

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) exhibits will be in an Air Force Hangar that will be filled with STEM, activities (many of which are hands-on for kids), robotics, drones and Tinker AFB displays that families and children can enjoy. STEM CITY is a free activity that is put on by local community groups, schools, aeronautic/aviation companies such as Northrop Grumman, Spartan and Boeing, just to name a few.

No Smoking or Vaping There is no smoking allowed anywhere on the air show event ramp.

Motorcycles Motorcycle riders are reminded that they (and any passengers) must be wearing full personal protective equipment (helmet, gloves, long-sleeved shirts and full-length pants as well as enclosed, hard-soled footwear) to enter Tinker AFB.

What You CAN and SHOULD Remember to Bring „„ Hearing Protection (especially for infants

and small children) „„ Sunscreen „„ Comfortable shoes „„ Water bottle/canteen (free water available) „„ Binoculars „„ Handheld camera or camcorder „„ Small purses „„ Strollers/smaller diaper bags „„ Folding chairs permitted

Kid Zone There will be several activities and attractions geared toward a younger audience. The

EVENT SCHEDULE SATURDAY, JUNE 1ST 8am: Gates open 8am –5pm: Vendors available 9am –4pm: STEM City Hangar 11am –4pm: Aerial demonstrations 8am –5pm: Ground demonstrations/static aircraft

Afterburner Chalet

5pm: Gates closed to public

While the Air Show is free to attend, the Afterburner Chalet caters to guests looking for an upgraded experience. With an exclusive lounge and private seating, fans can relax and have “front-row” access to view the air acts. A ticket to the Chalet also comes with coffee and light breakfast snacks from 10–11a.m., a private bar including complimentary beer and wine, a full lunch buffet, afternoon snacks and activities for children. To purchase tickets go online to starspangledsaluteOKC.com.

SUNDAY, JUNE 2ND 8am: Gates open 8am –5pm: Vendors available 9am –4pm: STEM City Hangar

Food and Drink Food, drink, and novelty concessions will be available at various locations throughout the show areas. Free water will also be available to the public at clearly marked stations.

The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.

STARSPANGLEDSALUTEOKC.COM

11am –4pm: Aerial demonstrations 8am –5pm: Ground demonstrations/static aircraft 5pm: Gates closed to public


FOOD

SUMMER GUIDE

Destination meals No matter the direction you’re heading, there is a meal worth seeking out. By Jacob Threadgill

The summer doesn’t just mean planning trips to visit the great outdoors or family members; there are plenty of meals in small-town Oklahoma worth their own trip or to make a detour when headed out of state.

North of Oklahoma City

Ree Drummond of Pioneer Woman fame has helped transform the small town of Pawhuska into one of Oklahoma’s biggest tourist attractions. The Pioneer Woman Mercantile, 532 Kihekah Ave., in Pawhuska, a 25,000 square-foot, two-story building featuring a full-service bakery and restaurant, standalone coffee shop and retail store, attracts an average of 6,000 customers per day to a town of just under 3,500 residents, according to Country Living. The Drummonds’ imprint in Pawhuska also includes an eight-room designer hotel, The Boarding House, which features a steakhouse and saloon, and a standalone wood-fired P-Town Pizza concept. Kumback Lunch, 625 Delaware Ave., in Perry is an icon of the town of Perry (population 5,126) since 1926 and still carries an interesting art deco “Eat” sign and message board. The lounge specializes in down-home comfort food like chicken-fried steak, club sandwiches and huge yeast rolls, and its walls lined with 90 years of memorabilia make the restaurant a de facto museum and time portal.

West of Oklahoma City

If you’re on your way to Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, consider a detour to the town of Medicine Park, near the park’s entrance. With an ideal river running through town, it is one of the most scenic spots in the western part of the state. The Old Plantation Restaurant, 140 E. Lake Drive, is located in a structure that dates to the early 1900s, and the res-

A rib-eye at Ole Plantation Restaurant in Medicine Park | Photo provided

taurant has seen a renaissance over the last decade since a renovation in 2008. Its food will hit all of the comfort notes and offer a great view of Medicine Creek.

East of Oklahoma City

There is no more important food-only destination in small-town Oklahoma than Krebs, which is the state’s own Little Italy. Pittsburg County is home to a high confluence of Italian restaurants between Krebs and McAlester. Pete’s Place, 120 SW Eighth St., is a destination that also houses Choc Beer, the oldest brewery in the state. Isle of Capri, 150 SW Seventh St., offers Italian classics in a 1950s setting. Lovera’s, 95 NW Sixth St., provides the chance to see how the cheese that supplies much of the state is made and to get a great deli sandwich.

South of Oklahoma City

The Artesian Hotel, Casino and Spa in Sulphur is a destination for its all-inone luxury hotel, restaurant and casino. Its restaurant, Springs at The Artesian, 1001 W. First St., offers homestyle classics as well as nods to Chickasaw cuisine, like the shrimp and pashofa, sautéed shrimp, fried pickled okra, onion jam and stewed hominy. On a much more accessible note, Baker’s Pizza, 501 Ash St., in Maysville has earned its reputation as one of the state’s best pizza joints. Its buttery crust straddles the line between deepdish and thin-crust pizza. McGehee’s Catfish Restaurant, 13401 McGehee Road, in Marietta provides the opportunity to scope out the rolling hills of southern Oklahoma while dining on catfish and all the fixings in a unique setting: an abandoned airport.

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9

31


3

Taqueria El Dolar

2900 SW 44th 2040 NW 10th St. 405-628-5926 This southside location at the southeast corner of SW 44th Street and May Avenue can be seen from yards away with its mural of the Virgin Mary near the order window. Taco price: $1.25, cash only Available meats: carne asada, chicken, al pastor, tongue, carnitas, tripe, barbacoa, buche (pork stomach) and cabeza (slow-cooked cow head)

Despite their mobility, taco trucks generally have set locations unless they are heading out for catering or private events. They are the best way to get a tasty meal that is not filled with the processed items found at the drive-thru. Oklahoma Gazette has compiled a list of trusty neighborhood trucks that are open rain or shine at least five days per week.

by Jacob Threadgill

1

Taqueria Sanchez

4011 NW 10th St. 405-520-3553

Other items: Burritos, quesadillas, tortas and tostadas are $5. An order of two mulitas, sopes or tostadas with ceviche is $6. Must-try: Tacos are your best bet, and sample the carnitas that get fried on the flattop before being added to tacos or get adventurous with slow-cooked tongue or buche.

4

Taco Loco

2117 39th St. 405-595-1582 This truck, open for breakfast daily and late on the weekends, is in the parking lot of Angles nightclub. Taco price: $1, cash only

This 10th Street institution remains the city’s best. With a permanent sign and nearperpetual line, it is hard to miss the blue truck.

Available meats: carne asada, al pastor, tongue, barbacoa, tripe, chicken

Taco price: $1, cash only

Must-try: The corn tortillas for tacos are on the small side, but they are generously filled with crispy carne asada or complex al pastor. The real winners of the truck are the burritos that envelope meat, rice, lettuce and a soft cheese in a layer of refried beans.

Available meats: carne asada, al pastor, tongue, barbacoa, tripe, chicken

Other items: chilaquiles, tortas, burritos ($5), mulitas ($2), quesadillas, tostadas, sopes and enchiladas

Other items: mulitas ($2); quesadillas, tortas and burritos are $5 Must-try: When going to the best taco truck in the city, stick with the tacos or mulitas (mini quesadillas made with corn tortillas), but its tender barbacoa (beef cheek) and marinated chicken are among the best available meats.

2

Speedy Tacos

2520 SW 29th St. 405-885-6305 This little truck in the parking lot of a car wash has a bench for eating from its surprisingly large menu. Taco price: $1.25, cash only Available meats: al pastor, carne asada, chicken, chorizo, chicharron, barbacoa, ham, tripe, carnitas, fish, shrimp, milanesa Other items: regular and sauce-covered burritos, shrimp fajitas, guizado rojo or verde, hamburgers, gorditas and ceviche tostada; specials for birria, barbacoa, pozole, grilled chicken, menudo and salads Must-try: The guisado verde plates include rice and beans for $8.50, but the surprise is its well-executed ceviche tostada ($3). It includes huge chunks of shrimp and fish in a marinade of tomato, lime, onion and cilantro topped with avocado.

5

PereĚ z Truck

4400 S. Western Ave. 405-830-3880 facebook.com/ pereztruckokc This truck with a focus on unique marinades for tacos and tortas is set up in the Sears lot near Integris Southwest Medical Center. It has the widest variety of any truck in the metro. The owners recently opened a brick-and-mortar location at 2416 NW 23rd St. Taco price: $1.35, takes cards Available meats: carne asada, chicken, campechanos (layered meat mix), barbacoa, tongue, chicharron (crispy pork skin), carnitas, cochinita pibil and salchicha (sausage), al pastor Other items: 14 types of regular tortas ($6.99), including ham, chorizo, milanesa (breaded steak) and 10 types of tortas specialties ($8.99). It also offers sincronizadas, queso with chorizo, flautas, mulitas and sopes. Must-try: Order the cochintia pibil in either a taco or torta. The sweet and spicy citrus marinade is not as ubiquitous as al pastor, but it is very tasty. The house rojo sauce packs a punch.


8 S Penn

S Western

16 12

15

Taqueria Express No. 3

S Shields

N Porter

NF d

loo

N Sheridan 36th Ave NW

21 E Alameda

W Main

S Flood

24th Ave SW

W Lindsey

E Lindsey OU

22

169

44

66 E 11th

25 29

26

N Porter

W Main

E Robinson

20 E Main

S 129th E S Flood

64

d

S Garnett 24th Ave SW

NE 23rd

S Mingo

N Western

N Penn

N May

N Portland

N Meridian

N MacArthur

E

NE 36th

235

Acres

21 E Alameda

W Lindsey

E Lindsey OU

9

E 91st

S NW 36th

27

22

364 W

36th Ave NW

N24

W Robinson

64

E 81st

77 44

S Memorial

E Britton

51

35

S Sheridan

S Yale

S Harvard

Tacos Los Arellano

S Lewis

18

E 71st

E 41st

loo NF

E 51st

44

E 61st

75

E 31st

26

44

NW Britton

NW 23rd

E Robinson

20 E Main

Acres

244

28

64 35

62

44

4

S Air Depot

S Walker

244

El Refugio Azteca

44

W Robinson

E 21st

Expr essw ay 10401 E. 31st St.

13 14

SE 59th

51

74

NW 39th Expressway

N Walker

75

74 facebook.com/tacoslosarellano 3 918-607-8755

66

E Admiral

S Peoria

Kilpatrick Turnpike

29

SE 44th

9

51

2405 E. Admiral Place facebook.com/pollosmty 918-951-8691 NW

N Yale

El Ranchero

Lake Hefner

7

TULSA

Pollos Asados Al Carbon44

Taqueria El Rincon

400 W. Britton Road 405-549-8168

35

W Covell

9705 E. 61st St. 918-625-7662

Tacos Emmanuel

6

10

11

Kilpatrick Turnpike

5125 S. Western Ave. 405-802-1888 18

S Western

Taqueria Express

28

17

N Western

W Coffee Creek

Arkansas River

2109 SW 29th St. elparienteco.com 405-601-0447

27

35 SE 29th

17

N Harvard N Sooner

Taqueria Mr. Dollar

El Pariente

23

W Sorghum Mill

10822 E. 41st St. 918-951-7859 64 6388 E. 31st St. 981-955-8584 rancherofoodtrucks.com

740 SW 29th St. taqueriamrdollar.com 405-889-7796 16

S Penn

15

26

40

NORMAN 240

N ColtraneN Lewis

4843 NW 23rd St. 405-210-5401

E Reno

5

1738 S. Garnett Road 918-313-5585

Tacos La Vecindad

NE 10th

35

ay N Broadw

25

62 35

SW 59th

N Bryant N Peoria

4900 NW 23rd St. 405-400-4948 14

El Samborsito

8700 S. Lewis Ave. 918-884-4845

Taqueria La Fondita

W Waterloo N Santa Fe

13

24

NE 23rd

EDMOND 62

E

NE 36th

W Simmons

TULSA 44

1437 SW 29th St. 405-476-8963

15

44

Will Rogers Airport

6805 N. Broadway facebook.com/ littleknightstruck 405-657-6537

Taqueria El Jiro

S May

El Taco Express

16 12

3 SW 44th

23

4912 NW 10th St. 405-889-7117 12

152

Little Knight's Taco Truck

W

8 8

2

SW 29th

EDMOND

5700 S. Shields Blvd. 405-549-5497

3

W Reno

S Portland

Mister Dolar Taco Truck

N 44240

235

40

El Taco Loco

SE 59th

NW 36th

NW 10th

9

1728 24th Ave. SW 405-600-8658

10

77

NW 23rd

19

1

S Meridian

22

44

11

S MacArthur

154 S. MacArthur Blvd. 405-885-3514

11

Taqueria San Tadeo

E Britton

S

4

13 14

401 S. Porter Ave. 405-365-5125

La Pin~ata

74

SE 44th

10 N Penn

21

17

NW 39th Expressway

329 N. Porter Ave. 405-977-8459

7 18

N Portland

La Sombra66 Taco Truck 20

1120 S. Western Ave. Weekends 1012 NW First St. Tuesdays taconationokc.com 405-456-9090 9

E44 xpre sswa y

3

NORMAN

Taco Nation

5

NW Britton

Hefner SW 59th

N Meridian

8

Will Rogers Airport

N MacArthur

Taqueria La Placita

1098 SE 44th St. 405-551-1607

OKLAHOMA CITY

44th 3 SW Lake NW

6 SE 29th

N May

Corner of Portland Avenue and NW Liberty Street in Reed Park 405-300-3933

2301 S. Air Depot Blvd. Midwest City 7

Taqueria Marielita's152

35 S Shields

6

19

Kilpatrick Turnpike

OKLAHOMA CITY

S Walker

S May

S Portland

S Meridian

S MacArthur

2

SW 29th

44

40

S Air Depot

40


SUMMER GUIDE SUMMER GUIDE

continued from page 31 a.m.-5 p.m. last Sunday of the month. The R & J Lounge and Supper Club, 320 NW 10th St., 405-602-5066, rjsupperclub.com. Hamilton the groundbreaking musical about Founding Father Alexander Hamilton with a score blending hip-hop, jazz, blues and R&B, July 30-Aug. 18. Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., 405-297-2264, okcciviccenter.com.

AUGUST

School starts up again, but summer marches on. Find ways to keep everyone happy and cool on the weekends as Oklahoma City enters the blast furnace portion of the season. From the Golden Age to the Moving Image: The Changing Face of the Permanent Collection view portraits painted by Kehinde Wiley, Anthony van Dyck, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and George Bellows, through Sept. 22. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. Life Imagined: The Art and Science of Automata see examples of mechanical proto-robots from 1850 to the modern day, through Sept. 29. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Red Dirt Dinos: An Oklahoma Dinosaur Adventure learn about regional prehistoric reptiles at this hands-on exhibit featuring three interactive robotic dinosaurs, through Sept. 2. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Seeing Now an exhibit of multimedia art works by Hank Willis Thomas, Ken Gonzales-Day, Travis Somerville, Paul Rucker, Graciela Sacco, Terence Hammonds and Michael Waugh, through Dec. 31. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com.

Welcome Home: Oklahomans and the War in Vietnam explores the impact of the war on Oklahoma families as well as the stories of Vietnamese families relocated to Oklahoma, Nov. 6. Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, 405-521-2491, okhistory.org. Sanctuary Karaoke Service don a choir robe and sing your favorite song, 9 p.m.-midnight Wednesdays and Thursdays. Sanctuary Barsilica, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., facebook.com/sanctuarybarokc. Early Explorers toddlers and preschoolers can participate in fun scientific activities they can repeat later at home, 10-11 a.m. Thursdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Paseo Arts District’s First Friday Gallery Walk peruse art from over 80 artists with 25 participating business for a night of special themed exhibits, refreshments and a variety of entertainment opportunities, 6-10 p.m. first Friday of every month. Paseo Arts District, 3022 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org. Rebels & Royals Drag King Show hosted by former Mister USofA Damian Matrix-Gritte, this monthly show features local drag kings and special guests 10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Fridays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-602-2030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. OKC Improv performers create original scenes in the moment based on suggestions from the audience, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Oklahoma City Improv, 1757 NW 16th St., 405-4569858, okcimprov.com. Don Quixote Open Mic a weekly comedy show followed by karaoke, 7:30-9 p.m. Fridays. Don Quixote Club, 3030 N. Portland Ave., 405-947-0011. The Skirvin Jazz Club a monthly live jazz show presented by OK Sessions, 7:30 p.m. third Friday of every month. Park Avenue Grill, 1 Park Ave., 405-7028444, parkavegrill.com. Paseo Farmers Market shop for fresh food from local vendors at this weekly outdoor event, 9 a.m.noon Saturdays, through Oct. 19. SixTwelve, 612 NW 29th St., 405-208-8291, sixtwelve.org. Ron White the standup and former Blue Collar Comedy Tour comic, aka Tater Salad, performs, 7-10 p.m. Aug. 3. Riverwind Casino, 1544 W. State Highway 9, Norman, 405-322-6000, riverwind.com. Storytime Science the museum invites children

age 6 and younger to hear a story and participate in a related scientific activity, 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Botanical Balance an all-levels yoga class in a natural environment; bring your own mat and water, 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays and 8 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. Pooches on the Patio bring your best friend to this dog-friendly happy hour with drink specials, appetizers and free pet treats, 4-7 p.m. Saturdays. Café 501 Classen Curve, 5825 NW Grand Blvd., 405844-1501, cafe501.com. Brunching with Books a book club meeting every other week, with reading selections chosen by group preference, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays. Buttermilk Paseo, 605 NW 28th St., 405-605-6660, buttermilkokc.com. Oklahoma Voices hear featured poets read from their works at this monthly event, 2 p.m. the first Sunday of every month. IAO Gallery, 706 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-232-6060, iaogallery.org. Moore Chess Club play in tournaments and learn about the popular board game at this weekly event where all ages and skill levels are welcome, 1-4 p.m. Sundays. Moore Library, 225 S. Howard Ave., Moore. Board Game Day enjoy local craft beer while playing old-school board and arcade games with friends, 5-8 p.m. Sundays. FlashBack RetroPub, 814 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-633-3604, flashbackretropub.com. Monday Night Group Ride meet up for a weekly 25-30 minute bicycle ride at about 18 miles per hour through east Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Mondays. The Bike Lab OKC, 2200 W. Hefner Road, 405-603-7655. Twisted Coyote Brew Crew a weekly 3-mile group run for all ability levels with a beer tasting to follow; bring your own safety lights, 6 p.m. Mondays. Twisted Spike Brewing Co., 1 NW 10th St., 405-3013467, twistedspike.com. Monday Night Blues Jam Session bring your own instrument to this open-stage jam hosted by Wess McMichael, 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us.

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There is only a short window — as little Summer strains offer relief when temperatures rise. | Photo bigstock.com as a few weeks — between the days of moderate temperatures interspersed with violent severe weather and the For patients who want to ramp up scorching heat of the seemingly endless their activity levels, a strain like XJ-13 Oklahoma summers. might be better suited. The sativa-domIn that brief period, Oklahomans inant hybrid produces a long-lasting, would be advised to pack in as energetic high that will keep pamany outdoor activities as tients on the move for extended periods. A good they can before surrenquality cultivar of the dering to the heat. strain combines a Now that the state’s strong citrus scent medical cannabis with an earthy pine program is in full aroma. In other bloom and the humidity levels can words, if it smells like quickly lead to dehysomeone dumped Pine-Sol on your dration even when Lavender Jones from Craft Cannabis Co. weed, you found temperatures have | Photo Alexa Ace some of the good barely spiked 80 degrees, it might be well stuff. This strain would be best advised to pack a pre-roll or two instead for moderately high-energy activities of the beer cooler on those day trips. like a ride around the 9.4-mile bike trail There will be plenty of days for of Lake Hefner that has a paved and which the “couch-lock” of a heavy mostly even terrain or, for the more adindica in front of a fan is perfect, but venturous types, a brisk ride on the Lake until the thermometer hits that Stanley Draper mountain bike trails. For the nights, patients might want century mark, we recommend some to pick a strain like Lavender Jones to summertime strains. Orange Cookies is a potent add a little euphoria to after-dark strain that produces a nice activities. This strain is a cross high to keep a smoker between Purple Urkle and going instead of stopCasey Jones. Its parents ping. The cross of are apparent in the Orange Juice and color of the buds, which are a cross of Girl Scout Cookies green and purple. produces a hybrid flower that, for Another hybrid, this many patients, feels strain tends to produce highs that more sativa-domiOrange Cookies from BCC Collective nant. The scent, tend to be on the calm, | Photo Alexa Ace which does not mellow and euphoric belie the strain’s ends of the scale. This name, provides for a good, even strain would pair well with stargazsmoke that will keep patients lifted but ing. Oklahoma City Astronomy Club, not edgy. This strain would pair well for example, meets on the second Friday with a nice urban hike in places like of the month at Science Museum Martin Park Nature Center or Oklahoma. The events are free and open Stinchcomb Wildlife Reserve. to the public.

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continued from page 34 activities, 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, okc.gov. Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com.

Trivia Night at Matty McMillen’s answer questions for a chance to win prizes at this weekly trivia night, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Matty McMillen’s Irish Pub, 2201 NW 150th St., 405-607-8822, mattymcmillens.com. Othello’s Comedy Night see professionals and amateurs alike at this long-running weekly open mic for standup comics, 9 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us.

Art of Rap hosted by Jim Conway, this monthly rap battle pits local MCs against one another for a cash prize, 9 p.m. Mondays. Hubbly Bubbly Hookah & Café, 2900 N. Classen Blvd., Suite K, 405-609-2930. The Friend Zone: Speed-Friending make new friends five minutes at a time at this platonic meetup, 7 p.m. second Monday of every month. Oak & Ore, 1732 NW. 16th St., 405-606-2030, oakandore.com. Film Row Trivia Night test your cinematic knowledge at this monthly competition hosted by VHS and Chill, 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com. Mid-Oklahoma Writers a meetup for local writers featuring guest speakers and literary discussions, 7-9 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month. Eastside Church of Christ, 916 S. Douglas Blvd., 405-732-0393. I Love the ’90s 5K a ’90s-themed evening race through Oklahoma City, 8-11 p.m. Aug. 23. Fassler Hall, 421 NW 10th St., 405-609-3300, fasslerhall.com.

Weekly Jams bring an instrument and play along with others at this open-invitation weekly jam session, 9:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesdays. Saints, 1715 NW 16th St., 405-602-6308, saintspubokc.com.

Queen Mariah’s Variety Show a monthly stage show featuring various drag performers, 10:30 p.m. Saturdays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-6022030, facebook.com/frankiesokc.

VHS and Chill: Blockbusted Video riff along with comedians and film fans at this monthly movie screening where audience participation is encouraged, 7-9 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com.

Homegrown Volume I a concert featuring local musicians and hosted by Terry Ware and Kyle Reid, 7:30 p.m. Aug. 25. Lions Park, 450 S. Flood, Norman, 405-366-5472.

Reading Wednesdays a weekly story time with hands-on activities, goody bags and reading-themed photo ops, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. Stars and Stripes Spin Jam a weekly meetup for jugglers, hula hoopers and unicyclers, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Stars & Stripes Park, 3701 S. Lake Hefner Drive, 405-297-2756, okc.gov/parks. Iron Horse Open Mic and Showcase perform music on stage at this show open to all experience levels, 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Iron Horse Bar & Grill, 9501 S. Shields Blvd., 405-735-1801. VZD’s Open Mic Night a weekly music mic hosted by Joe Hopkins, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. VZD’s Restaurant & Bar, 4200 N. Western Ave., 405-6023006, vzds.com. Triple’s Open Mic a music and comedy open mic hosted by Amanda Howle, 7:30 p.m. every other Wednesday. Triple’s, 8023 NW 23rd St., 405-789-3031. Divine Comedy a weekly local showcase hosted by CJ Lance and Josh Lathe and featuring a variety of comedians from OKC and beyond, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St., 405463-0470, 51stspeakeasy.com. Lumpy’s Open Mic Night play a song of your own or just listen to the performers at this weekly show hosted by John Riley Willingham, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. Lumpy’s Sports Grill, 12325 N. May Ave., 405-2863300, lumpyssportsgrill.com. The Book of Will playwright Lauren Gunderson’s dramatization of the compilation of William Shakespeare’s First Folio; presented by Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park and directed by Rex Daugherty, Aug. 8-31. Shakespeare on Paseo, 2920 Paseo St., 405-235-3700, oklahomashakespeare.org. OK Country Cafe Open Mic show off your singing talent, 6 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday of every month. OK Country Cafe, 6072 S. Western Ave., 405-602-6866, okcountrycafe.com. LIVE! on the Plaza join the Plaza District every second Friday for an art walk featuring artists, live music, shopping and more, 6-10 p.m. second Friday of every month. 16th Street Plaza District, 1618 N. Gatewood Ave., 405-426-7812, plazadistrict.org. The Trailer-Hood Hootenanny join Rayna Over and friends for a night of comedy, music and drag performances, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. the second Friday of every month. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-6022030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. Hurts Donut ’80s Run a 5K run open to all ages and skill levels, with a costume contest and Hurts Donuts waiting at the finish line, 10 a.m.-noon Aug. 10. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, okc.gov. OKC Drag Queen Story Hour children and their families are invited to a story and craft time lead by Ms. Shantel and followed by a dance party, 4 p.m. second Saturday of every month. Sunnyside Diner, 916 NW Sixth St., 405-778-8861. The Taste on 36th a monthly gathering of food trucks from throughout the state featuring live music, noon-6 p.m. second Saturday of every month. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., 405-208-4240, iceeventcentergrill.eat24hour.com. Second Sunday Poetry hear the works of a variety of local poets, 2 p.m. second Sunday of every month. The Depot, 200 S. Jones Ave., Norman, 405307-9320, pasnorman.org. Blue Sunday a monthly blues tribute show hosted by Powerhouse Blues Project,6-8 p.m. the second Sunday of every month. Friends Restaurant & Club, 3705 W. Memorial Road, 405-751-4057, friendsbarokc.com.

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S E P T E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 8 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

Paper Sack Project prepare sack lunches to pass out to people on the streets at this event hosted by Debate Night OKC, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. last Sunday of the month. NE OKC Community & Cultural Center, 3815 N. Kelley Ave., 405-401-3350. Board Game Brunch play board games while enjoying a variety of food and beverage options, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. last Sunday of the month. The R & J Lounge and Supper Club, 320 NW 10th St., 405-6025066, rjsupperclub.com. Shelly Phelps Blues Revue a monthly variety show featuring music, comedy, performance art, drag and more, 7-10 p.m. Sundays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-602-2030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. Fuzzy Friday a monthly happy hour meet-andgreet hosted by the Bears of Central Oklahoma, 5:30 p.m. Fridays. Apothecary 39, 2125 NW 39th St., 405-605-4100.

SEPTEMBER

Other places up north start to cool down, but the digital thermometer on the dashboard has other thoughts. Summer is extended in Oklahoma, but so is the fun. Oklahoma Voices hear featured poets read from their works at this monthly event, 2 p.m. the first Sunday of every month. IAO Gallery, 706 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-232-6060, iaogallery.org. Monday Night Group Ride meet up for a weekly 25-30 minute bicycle ride at about 18 miles per hour through east Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Mondays. The Bike Lab OKC, 2200 W. Hefner Road, 405-603-7655. Twisted Coyote Brew Crew a weekly 3-mile group run for all ability levels with a beer tasting to follow; bring your own safety lights, 6 p.m. Mondays. Twisted Spike Brewing Co., 1 NW 10th St., 405-3013467, twistedspike.com. Monday Night Blues Jam Session bring your own instrument to this open-stage jam hosted by Wess McMichael, 7-9 p.m. Mondays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-7014900, othellos.us. Comedy Open Mic Night try doing standup and/ or watch other aspiring comics hone their acts, 10 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-701-4900, othellos.us. Storytime Science the museum invites children age 6 and younger to hear a story and participate in a related scientific activity, 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Saturdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Botanical Balance an all-levels yoga class in a natural environment; bring your own mat and water, 5:45 p.m. Tuesdays and 8 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. Wheeler Criterium a weekly nighttime cycling event with criterium races, food trucks and family activities, 5-8 p.m. Tuesdays. Wheeler Park, 1120 S. Western Ave., 405-297-2211, okc.gov. Yoga Tuesdays an all-levels class; bring your own water and yoga mat, 5:45 p.m.-7 p.m. Tuesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405445-7080, myriadgardens.com.

continued on page 38

ART

SUMMER GUIDE

SUMMER GUIDE

Art adventures

Think visually as Oklahoma galleries and museums prepare for summer visits. By Jeremy Martin

From about-to-get-a-Van-Gogh-exhibit Oklahoma City Museum of Art to soon-to-be-relocated Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center and Factory Obscura’s new space Mix-Tape and the numerous other arts organizations that we unforgivably omitted from this list just now, Oklahoma City is rife with enriching art experiences, but if you’re fortunate enough to be able to take a day or a weekend trip this summer, why not expand your horizons? The following museums and art galleries offer unique experiences outside the OKC metro, and a few of them are — gasp — even outside Tulsa.

108 Contemporary

108 E. Mathew B. Brady St., Tulsa 108contemporary.org 918-895-6302 This fine craft gallery in the renovated Mathews Warehouse complex always offers something unexpected. Start driving now and, depending on when you’re reading this, you might still catch Beth Lipman: Accidental Vestiges (through Sunday), an exhibition of intricately crafted glassworks made to look like the refuse of everyday life. If this weekend is already booked, check Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Refuge | Photo provided

out Todd Sanders: Roadside Neon (June 7-July 21), a luminous Route 66-inspired exhibit. And if you find reclaimed materials romantic, Building on the Body (Aug. 2-Sept. 22) — an exhibition of jewelry made out of building materials including cement, corrugated cardboard, copper mesh and steel — might be the perfect place to put a ring on it.

ahha

101 E. Archer St., Tulsa ahhatulsa.org 918-584-3333 Combining galleries, arts education programs and multimedia studios, ahha, formerly known as Arts & Humanities Council of Tulsa, helps foster Tulsa’s art scene. Through the end of the year, you can experience The Experience, an immersive, interactive multimedia art installation. The arts center also features more traditional art exhibitions including Into the Land of Spectres (Aug. 2-Sept. 22) featuring eerie large-scale drawings; Stillness/ Movement (June 7-July 21) a collaboration with Korean Cultural Center of Los Angeles; and Together/Apart (Aug. 2-Sept. 22), featuring works by New Mexico art collective The Lady Minimalists Tea Society.

Chickasaw Cultural Center

867 Cooper Memorial Drive, Sulphur chickasawculturalcenter.com 580-622-7130 The Chickasaw people tell their own story at this expansive cultural center, which features fine art, reenactments, interactive history exhibits, a traditional village and more. The Removal Corridor allows visitors to trace the route Native Americans took following the Indian Removal Act passed by Andrew Jackson in 1830, and the Spirit Forest celebrates the sacred connection between


JUNE 22, 2019 | 8AM-8PM MAIN STREET, SHAWNEE, OK

A young visitor is mesmerized by Daniel Sutliff’s video animation in The Experience. | Photo Ahha / provided

humans and the natural world around them. The fine art galleries feature traditional and contemporary works in rotating exhibits. Aprons: Tying Together Chickasaw Kitchens (through Sept. 1) chronicles the traditional role of women in Chickasaw households, and Portraits of Elders (through Dec. 31) showcases 20 of artist Mike Larsen’s paintings of Chickasaw elders.

Gilcrease Museum

1400 N. Gilcrease Museum Road, Tulsa 918-596-2700 Featuring items from indigenous people in North and South America and archeological artifacts dating back to 12,000 BCE, Thomas Gilcrease Institute of American History and Art features paintings, sculptures and other artworks in its permanent collection, and rotating exhibits offer even further insight into the American West. Bob Dylan: Face Value and Beyond (through Sept. 15) is the temporary home for The Bob Dylan Center’s collection of the singer/songwriter’s paintings, drawings, writings and personal effects. Pulitzer Prize Photographs (through July 14) offers exactly what the title suggests, and the ongoing exhibition Americans All! showcases cultural contributions made by immigrants.

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Philbrook Museum of Art

2727 S. Rockford Road, Tulsa philbrook.org 918-749-7941 Set amidst a 25-acre garden complete with a full-scale log cabin on permanent display, the Philbrook would be a sight to see even without its extensive art collection, which includes works by Robert Henri, Frederick Carl Frieseke and Kehinde Wiley. Wondrous Worlds: Art & Islam Through Time & Place (through Oct. 6) celebrates the global cultural impact of Islamic art, and judging by the un-wondrous state of our own world, it seems this exhibit couldn’t come at a better time and place.

June 25 - 30, 2019 HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR THAT SWEEPS YOU OFF YOUR FEET! Celebrate Hollywood’s Golden Age with this romantic, musicalcomedy classic! Your entire family will dance, laugh and sing along to a memorable song score featuring a full orchestra and splashy production numbers...all while it magically rains on the entire Civic Center Stage! Book by Harvey Fierstein Music by Alan Menken Lyrics by Jack Feldman Directed by Ashley Wells

July 9 - 14, 2019 “SEIZE THE DAY” AND CHANGE YOUR WORLD! Incredible dancing and rousing anthems raise the roof in this thrilling story of the New York City Newsboy Strike of 1899. A spirited crew of rag-tag orphans “Seize the day” and win the hearts of a nation in this unforgettable Disney musical. Great fun for the entire family!

Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve

1925 Woolaroc Ranch Road, Bartlesville woolaroc.org 918-336-0307 But if you are judging museums by their acreage, it would be hard to beat Woolaroc, a 3,700-acre wildlife preserve featuring buffalo, elk, longhorn cattle and other animals as well as a museum of Western art and artifacts including Native American baskets, pottery, blankets and clothing. The museum’s collection includes paintings by Western art masters such as Frederic Remington, Charles M. Russell and Thomas Moran; heroic-sized sculptures; vintage colt firearms; saddles; and other cowboy gear. If nothing sparks your interest here, you might just be living in the wrong state.

Music and Lyrics by Maury Yeston Book by Peter Stone Directed by Michael Baron

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SUMMER GUIDE

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9th Annual

continued from page 37 Trivia Night at Matty McMillen’s answer questions for a chance to win prizes at this weekly trivia night, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Matty McMillen’s Irish Pub, 2201 NW 150th St., 405-607-8822, mattymcmillens.com. Othello’s Comedy Night see professionals and amateurs alike at this long-running weekly open mic for standup comics, 9 p.m. Tuesdays. Othello’s Italian Restaurant, 434 Buchanan Ave., Norman, 405-701-4900, othellos.us.

Weekly Jams bring an instrument and play along with others at this open-invitation weekly jam session, 9:30 p.m.-midnight Tuesdays. Saints, 1715 NW 16th St., 405-602-6308, saintspubokc.com. Paramount Open Mic show off your talents at this open mic hosted by musician Chris Morrison, 7 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-887-3327, theparamountroom.com. VHS and Chill: Blockbusted Video riff along with comedians and film fans at this monthly movie screening where audience participation is encouraged, 7-9 p.m. first Wednesday of every month. The Paramount Room, 701 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-8873327, theparamountroom.com. Reading Wednesdays a weekly story time with hands-on activities, goody bags and reading-themed photo ops, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. Stars and Stripes Spin Jam a weekly meetup for jugglers, hula hoopers and unicyclers, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Stars & Stripes Park, 3701 S. Lake Hefner Drive, 405-297-2756, okc.gov/parks. Co-ed Open Adult Volleyball enjoy a game of friendly yet competitive volleyball while making new friends, 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays. Jackie Cooper Gymnasium, 1024 E. Main St., Yukon, 405-350-8920, cityofyukon.gov. Iron Horse Open Mic and Showcase perform music on stage at this show open to all experience levels, 7-10 p.m. Wednesdays. Iron Horse Bar & Grill, 9501 S. Shields Blvd., 405-735-1801. Open Mic at The P share your musical talent or just come to listen at this weekly open mic, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. The Patriarch Craft Beer House & Lawn, 9 E. Edwards St., Edmond, 405-285-6670, thepatriarchedmond.com. VZD’s Open Mic Night a weekly music mic hosted by Joe Hopkins, 7 p.m. Wednesdays. VZD’s Restaurant & Bar, 4200 N. Western Ave., 405-6023006, vzds.com. Triple’s Open Mic a music and comedy open mic hosted by Amanda Howle, 7:30 p.m. every other Wednesday. Triple’s, 8023 NW 23rd St., 405-789-3031.

A SEASONAL GUIDE TO CENTRAL OKLAHOMA

There is a lot to see and do throughout Autumn, and Gazette gives its readers direction on where to find the best festivals, shows, foods and more! FEATURING A 3 MONTH CALENDAR along with expanded editorial content

PUBLISHING WED. SEP 18, 2019

AD DEADLINE TUES. SEP 10, 2019 ADVERTISING@OKGAZETTE.COM

405.528.6000

SUBMIT CALENDAR EVENTS AT OKGAZETTE.COM OR EMAIL TO LISTINGS@OKGAZETTE.COM 38

M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

Red Dirt Open Mic a weekly open mic for comedy and poetry, hosted by Red Dirt Poetry, 7:30-10:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Sauced on Paseo, 2912 Paseo St., 405-521-9800, saucedonpaseo.com. Divine Comedy a weekly local showcase hosted by CJ Lance and Josh Lathe and featuring a variety of comedians from OKC and beyond, 9 p.m. Wednesdays. 51st Street Speakeasy, 1114 NW 51st St., 405463-0470, 51stspeakeasy.com. Early Explorers toddlers and preschoolers can participate in fun scientific activities they can repeat later at home, 10-11 a.m. Thursdays. Science Museum Oklahoma, 2020 Remington Place, 405-602-6664, sciencemuseumok.org. Story Time with Britt’s Bookworms enjoy snacks, crafts and story time, 10:30-11:30 a.m. first and third Thursday of every month. Thrive Mama Collective, 1745 NW 16th St., 405-356-6262. Paseo Arts District’s First Friday Gallery Walk peruse art from over 80 artists with 25 participating business for a night of special themed exhibits, refreshments and a variety of entertainment opportunities, 6-10 p.m. first Friday of every month. Paseo Arts District, 3022 Paseo St., 405-525-2688, thepaseo.org. Rebels & Royals Drag King Show hosted by former Mister USofA Damian Matrix-Gritte, this monthly show features local drag kings and special guests 10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. Fridays. Frankie’s, 2807 NW 36th St., 405-602-2030, facebook.com/frankiesokc. OKC Improv performers create original scenes in the moment based on suggestions from the audience, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Oklahoma City Improv, 1757 NW 16th St., 405-456-9858, okcimprov.com. Don Quixote Open Mic a weekly comedy show followed by karaoke, 7:30-9 p.m. Fridays. Don Quixote Club, 3030 N. Portland Ave., 405-947-0011. VegFestOKC a festival celebrating an entirely plant-based lifestyle with cooking demonstrations, fitness classes, guest speakers and more, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 7. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com.

OKC 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb On Sept. 11, 2001, 343 firefighters died during rescue and recovery efforts at the World Trade Center. To honor the fallen and raise funds for Oklahoma Firefighters Association, view the multi-story OKC 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb up BancFirst Tower, the second-tallest building in Oklahoma City, 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Sept. 7 at The Petroleum Club, 100 N. Broadway Ave. Only firefighters may participate in the climb; registration is $40. Visit okcstairclimb.com. SEPT. 7 Photo bigstock.com

Blue Sunday a monthly blues tribute show hosted by Powerhouse Blues Project,6-8 p.m. the second Sunday of every month. Friends Restaurant & Club, 3705 W. Memorial Road, 405-751-4057, friendsbarokc.com. Art of Rap hosted by Jim Conway, this monthly rap battle pits local MCs against one another for a cash prize, 9 p.m. Mondays. Hubbly Bubbly Hookah & Café, 2900 N. Classen Blvd., Suite K, 405-609-2930. RuPaul’s Drag Race: Werq The World see live performances by Michelle Visage, Aquaria, Kameron Michaels, Asia O’Hara, Kim Chi and Naomi Smalls, 8-11 p.m. Sept. 12. Rose State College, 6420 SE 15th St., Midwest City, 405-733-7673, rose.edu. Disney on Ice: Mickey’s Search Party several of Disney’s most popular characters, including Moana, Tinker Bell, Elsa, Aladdin and more, team up to follow Captain Hook’s treasure map in this figure skating performance, Sept. 12-16. Oklahoma State Fair Arena, 333 Gordon Cooper Blvd., 405-948-6700, okstatefair.com. LIVE! on the Plaza join the Plaza District every second Friday for an art walk featuring artists, live music, shopping and more, 6-10 p.m. second Friday of every month. 16th Street Plaza District, 1618 N. Gatewood Ave., 405-426-7812, plazadistrict.org. OKC Drag Queen Story Hour children and their families are invited to a story and craft time lead by Ms. Shantel and followed by a dance party, 4 p.m. second Saturday of every month. Sunnyside Diner, 916 NW Sixth St., 405-778-8861. The Taste on 36th a monthly gathering of food trucks from throughout the state featuring live music, noon-6 p.m. second Saturday of every month. Ice Event Center & Grill, 1148 NE 36th St., 405-208-4240, iceeventcentergrill.eat24hour.com.

Submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail them to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.


ART

ARTS & CULTURE

Big picture

Denise Duong’s “Life in the Light” mural adorns a new high-rise parking garage in West Village. By Jeremy Martin

Visual artist Denise Duong compared painting a mural on the side of a parking garage to cliff diving. Before adorning two walls of the roughly 40-feet-tall West Village Parking Garage, 927 W. Sheridan Ave., with her vivid murals titled “Life in the Light,” Duong had never worked on a project of that scale, but she said she does not shy away from new experiences. “I’m one of those people that, when I get up the cliff, I’m like, ‘Well, I’m just gonna jump,’” she said. “I don’t stand there like, ‘Oh my god! This is so high up!’ I just do it. So that’s how I kind of how I approached this one. I was kind of like, ‘Well, it’s gigantic. I don’t know how the hell I’m going to do this, but I’m going to do it.’” Scaling a mountainside is an apt metaphor for the mural, which was the first artwork that required Duong to wear a safety harness and withstand the strong Oklahoma winds while standing in an elevated lift. “I painted it in wintertime, and oddly enough, it wasn’t the snow or the rain — they set me off for a couple days — but the hardest part was that wind rocking that thing back and forth,” Duong said. When Duong saw the open call for artist proposals for a mural on West Village Parking Garage, she saw the chance to challenge herself, but she did not expect to be chosen. “I saw the opportunity available and I was like, ‘Oh, man! What an amazing space to be able to create the biggest piece of your life on,’” she said. “‘What a challenge that would be.’ There’s so many amazing muralists in Oklahoma, I didn’t really go in thinking that I would get it.”

The project’s magnitude required her to reconsider her usual loosely structured and improvisational approach to art. “I have a general idea of what I’m doing, but I don’t really have, like, everything planned out,” Duong said. “I kind of wing it most of the time whenever I’m doing murals, but this one, because I needed to get a gauge of scale so I had the idea of where I wanted the bigger figures … it was basically the same process but a little more technical, I would say. I’m still learning, I feel like, because I’m like, ‘I don’t know what the hell I’m doing.’” While she had to carefully plot and position the larger figures in the mural, she was still able to add smaller pieces as she thought of them. “I was comparing what I originally had planned to do and then the addition to it,” Duong said, “and it was substantial, very substantial because I sketched out the large-scale figures; I didn’t sketch out all the tiny little stories within them. Things, once I’m up there, kind of make a life of their own, and then I’m like, ‘Well, I’ve just added two more weeks to my project because I added this many figures to it, but it was worth it. I love it. I loved working on it.’”

Size matters

Sometimes the new figures, which were not as carefully mapped out, needed some size adjustments. “Going to the bathroom is when you realize you’ve made mistakes, scalewise,” Duong said, “because I’d go across the street to the Taco Bell bathroom or the convenience store bathroom and be

like, ‘Oh, god. She has, like, T. rex arms compared to her head. I’ve got to go back and fix her arms.’” Even with the additional time spent painting and adjusting new figures and time lost to inclement winter weather, Duong finished the project in a little more than two months, ahead of schedule and without help.

Things, once I’m up there, kind of make a life of their own, and then I’m like, ‘Well, I’ve just added two more weeks to my project because I added this many figures to it, but it was worth it. I love it. I loved working on it.’ Denise Duong “I was told, ‘How does it feel to be the fastest muralist in Oklahoma?’” Duong said. “And I was like, ‘I didn’t know this,’ but I would say that I did accomplish a lot more than I thought in the time that I had. I was recommended to get a group of people to help me, but then I realized I don’t know how to have a group help me whenever I don’t even know what I’m doing up there because I’m just kind of winging [it with] so many characters and things happening that I didn’t know how to delegate jobs. I would be the most annoying person to work for because I don’t know what I’m going to do in, like, the next five minutes.” Duong drew inspiration from Film Row’s history of industry, film and music as well as its present as the home of The Jones Assembly and deadCenter Film Festival. She was also inspired by the birth of a friend’s child and Oklahoma’s

Denise Duong’s “Life in the Light” mural recently went up on West Village Parking Garage. | Photo Alexa Ace

unique weather and landscape. “Oklahoma skies are just incredible,” Duong said. “You have the sunrise and the sunset, and it’s just like nothing you’ve experienced anywhere in the world. It’s just gorgeous. … One evening, we had those orange skies, and some mornings you’ll have this crazy neon pink-purple sky. … I love it.” When Duong said Oklahoma skies are like nothing in the world, she was speaking from experience. She has exhibited her work in Seoul, South Korea, and is currently working on a series of paintings inspired by a trip to New Zealand and a hike around Lake Havasu in Arizona. A 2018 episode of PBS’ art show Gallery America discussed her travels in Asia and Africa and a hitchhiking trip across the United States. However, Duong has only seen a screenshot of the episode. “A friend sent me a picture because I hadn’t seen it yet,” Duong said, and I was like, ‘Oh, wow! They acquired a picture of me smoking hash. Cool. My family will be so proud.’” With the completion of “Life in the Light,” Duong has not only created art on a scale she had previously never attempted; she has added a new tool to her artist’s kit. “I learned how to drive and move the lift, and once I felt more comfortable controlling it, I was like, ‘This is amazing,’” Duong said. “It was great. I could move wherever I wanted. I mean, I had to stay away from the electrical lines. … I had no idea how to run the thing, but I learned very fast. … I don’t look at lifts the same. I’ll drive by and look and be like, ‘Oh, that’s the Genie S85.’ Then I’m like, ‘Oh, god. I’m a lift nerd.’” Duong’s art can also been seen at her Little D Gallery, 3003A Paseo St. Visit deniseduongart.com.

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Join the

oklahoma history center

Tuesday, May 28th ­ ®­ 7-8:30 pm for a live performance of the

navy band southwest during Navy Week to be held in the Devon Great Hall at the Oklahoma History Center. Free and open to the public!

For more information call 405.522.0765 or visit okhistory.org 800 Nazih Zuhdi Dr. Oklahoma City, OK 73105 40

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T H E AT E R

ARTS & CULTURE

Musical threats

Pollard Theatre Company performs a musical that pairs songs with unfortunate situations to encourage laughter. By Jeremy Martin

Guthrie’s Pollard Theatre Company is following its production of Beehive: The ’60s Musical by leaping ahead a decade to ensure the 2018-2019 season ends in Disaster! While both productions are called “jukebox musicals” because their scores consist of popular songs, Disaster!, written by Seth Rudetsky and Jack Plotnick, is a larger production. The show runs June 7-29 at Pollard Theatre, 120 W. Harrison Ave, in Guthrie. Tickets are $15-$30. “Beehive is really a revue,” said Pollard artistic director W. Jerome Stevenson. “It’s a series of songs with a narrator kind of tying the show together and guiding you through the era. Disaster! is an actual book musical, but it’s very unique in that it’s not original songs for the show. What they’ve done is they’ve taken a comedy that spoofs disaster films from the ’70s and they decided for the score, they would use music from the era, and then, which I thought was kind of a stroke of genius, they said, ‘You know what we should do instead of just putting a random song here? We should allow all of those ’70s hits to somehow advance the plot.’ So part of the joke becomes, ‘How are they going to use this song in their story?’ ... And it’s everything from ‘Hot Stuff’ to ‘25 or 6 to 4’ to ‘When Will I Be Loved.’ It’s all a big, silly joke. … You just find yourself waiting for them to get the next song in or for the next death to take place, and even those are kind of like, ‘Oh, for the love of God.’” Though the subject matter is silly, Matthew Sipress, the musical’s director, said he wants the actors to deliver their lines with a straight face. “I think the best comedy works is if everyone plays it like it’s totally serious,” Sipress said. “Is it funny to the audience? Absolutely, but for these people, these are real problems.” As a child born in 1971, Sipress said he was not laughing at the kind of onscreen disasters depicted in films such as Airport 1975, the film that served as a primary inspiration for the classic spoof Airplane! “I wasn’t actually going to the theater to see Karen Black land that airplane, but I can appreciate it,” Sipress said. “I was going to the movie theater to see Superman, which I guess is pretty close to a disaster film. I had to be removed from the theater when I freaked out when Lois Lane got her car eaten by the earthquake and dirt was falling in her mouth and I completely fell apart.” Though Disaster! includes an earthquake as well as a fire, man-eating rats and piranhas, a capsized ship and more,

Stevenson said the musical’s threats are “so innocuous and kind of PG-13” that children will enjoy it, too. “It is a big, broad, silly, campy musical, and so one of the challenges becomes, ‘How do you do this idea of The Poseidon Adventure and The Towering Inferno and Jaws and Piranha without it becoming frightening and still guarantee the laughs?’” Stevenson said. “Every joke, every disaster element, we had to figure out a way to do it so that the audience knew what was happening but that it was a funny way in which we did that, so when parts of the ship collapse or the boat capsizes or there’s a tidal wave or the piranhas get loose, it had to be still funny and inherently jovial and not, ‘Oh my god! That piranha’s going to eat that guy! And that’s not funny.’ That was really the challenge, ‘How do you maintain the tone of the piece and still spoof all these really serious things?’ because, of course, the tone of those films from the ’70s was serious. The Towering Inferno was a fire, and The Poseidon Adventure, the ship’s underwater, and all of that stuff was horrific with the right tone; but the minute you camp it up and have a fun time with it, it makes people laugh. That’s the goal with this piece, to make sure that the audience enjoys the music and is vibing to the music but also laughs real hard.” Another challenge, of course, is creating an effects-heavy period piece on a small stage and budget. “The element that you kind of focus on is making sure that you can evoke the quality of the ’70s on a budget,” Stevenson said, “because with so much of that stuff, you could take it to the extreme and build everything from scratch and make it all original fabrics, and all that stuff becomes costly, and it doesn’t necessarily lend you more funny.” So how do you depict a boat capsizing onstage without spending a lot of money? Sipress refuses

to tell. “You’re going to have to see,” Sipress said. “It’s super-duper low-tech, and it’s super-duper funny. It’s going to be great.” Though the musical contains very specific sendups of ’70s disaster film tropes and characters, Sipress said most of the humor is broad enough to appeal to people who are not aware of the movies. “There’s two characters in the show which are essentially Shelley Winters and the other guy [Jack Albertson] from Poseidon Adventure,” Sipress said. “I don’t know if people are going to get that joke, but … you don’t have to get every reference at all because it gets to a point of ridiculousness by the end.” The cast of the Broadway production featured a critic-baffling number of awardwinning stars, including Jennifer Simard, who earned a Tony nomination for portraying gambling addict nun Sister Mary. Stevenson said Pollard has similarly put together a cast of Oklahoma all-stars including Matthew Alvin Brown, Brenda Williams, De’Vin Lewis, Erin Heatly in a double role and Odra Chapman, who plays Sister Mary. “We were able to assemble this cast that

we just couldn’t imagine being able to get together in one show,” Stevenson said. “Every time we made a call, they went, ‘Yeah, I’d love to do it. … Sign me up. It’s hysterical.’” Sipress said a cohesive cast is essential to the comedy’s success. “The show has to be played at a certain level, and we all need to make sure that we’re all in the same play together so that we’re not playing three different kinds of comedy,” Sipress said. “I think we’re all, literally, in the same boat, and we’ve all got to stay in that same high-stakes place so that, as it gets more and more ridiculous, the audience just comes along with us.” Visit thepollard.org.

Disaster! June 7-29 Pollard Theatre 120 W. Harrison Ave., Guthrie thepollard.org | 405-282-2800 $15-$30

from left Emily Pace and Seth Paden star in Pollard Theatre Company’s production of Disaster! | Photo Pollard Theatre Company / provided

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EVENT

MUSIC

Fan service

Rocklahoma features a diverse array of musicians performing classic hits as well as new material. By Jeremy Martin

Contrary to what you might have seen online in recent months, Ace Frehley said he does not believe his former bandmates Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley have ever tried to kill him. In January, Simmons told an interviewer that Frehley and Peter Criss could never return to being full-time members of Kiss because they are not dependable, and Frehley fired back on Facebook, calling Simmons “an asshole and a sex addict.” Frehley’s longterm girlfriend Rachael Gordon also weighed in with a Facebook comment of her own, alleging that the band “tried to have Ace killed” in the ’70s by “sending him to a so called ‘private party’ in the Bahamas.” In a phone interview with Oklahoma Gazette, Frehley — playing Sunday at Rocklahoma, 1421 W. 450 Road, in Pryor — clarified the comment, which has been the subject of speculation on music blogs and message boards. “She got that confused with an incident that happened when I left Kiss the second time around in 2001 or 2002,” Frehley said. “After I finished my Australian leg of the tour, I decided to quit the band for a second time, and then some time went by and then I got offered to perform at a wedding in the Bahamas. It just seemed kind of weird because they had already used Tommy Thayer to take my place, but they were insisting this guy who’s getting married wanted the original guitar player, and they offered me $100,000 and I said ‘No,’ and they upped it to $125,000, and then I looked Tech N9ne plays Rocklahoma on Saturday. | Photo provided

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up who was getting married and it was like a Russian mob guy, so the whole thing seemed to be a little fishy to me. I didn’t feel comfortable. I had already left the group, and it just seemed odd. I’m not pointing the finger, and I would never accuse anybody of doing any wrongdoing, but in retrospect, I felt uncomfortable with the situation, and I think you can understand why. … My instincts are usually correct because I grew up in the streets of the Bronx and I belonged to street gangs and I’ve hung out with mobsters and I know how things go. … It seems a little paranoid, but I was using drugs at the time. I wasn’t sober, but I’ve been sober 13 years. I look back on it, and I’m sure probably nothing would have happened, but it was just a matter of you’ve got to feel comfortable in the situation you’re in.” Though Frehley might not always be on the best terms with some of his former bandmates, he said he always considers fans when making playlists for his live shows and typically includes his 1978 hit single “New York Groove” along with “a couple of Kiss classics” and newer songs from his more recent solo albums. “I can’t please all the people all the time, but I can please most people most of the time,” Frehley said. “You only have a certain allotted time to play, and obviously there’s songs that other people in the audience might want to hear, but I have to think of what the majority of the audience wants to hear because they’re paying for a service.” Frehley’s latest solo album Spaceman, which features a guest appearance by

Simmons, was released in 2018. Recorded in Frehley’s home studio, the album, like his setlists, combines old and new elements by “using vintage equipment in conjunction with Pro Tools,” but Frehley said his selftaught playing method has remained largely the same. “Every time I meet a guitar player, probably 90 percent of the time, they tell me they picked up the guitar because of me, so I must be doing something right,” Frehley said. “If it isn’t broke, don’t fix it. … I’ve taught myself how to play, but it’s because I copied some of the greatest guitar players in the world: ... Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Pete Townshend ... The Beatles and The Stones. You pretty much are being taught by some of the best guitar players and songwriters in the world, so why would I want to sit down with a guitar teacher? He’s not going to teach me anything.”

Tech N9ne

Tech N9ne, scheduled to play Rocklahoma Saturday, said he also developed his singular style by studying the iconic artists that came before him. “Those were the people that taught me,” Tech N9ne said of the hip-hop artists who played shows in his hometown of Kansas City, Missouri, when he was growing up. “Public Enemy taught me to do power music. LL Cool J taught me how to do a show. Eric B and Rakim taught me lyrics and depth in music. I learned from the old school.” The independent MC and Strange Music label head said he is also influenced by classic rock. “How can you not like Led Zeppelin?” he said. “How can you not like Jimi Hendrix? How can you not like The Grateful Dead? My family was eccentric and eclectic when it came to music, and they had good taste, so I had gospel in the house. I had rock. I had rap. I had R&B. I had everything.” He had the chance to collaborate with some of his idols on “Strange 2013,” which sa mples Jim Morrison’s vocals from “Strange Days” and features instrumental contributions from surviving members of The Doors. “That was a milestone because it’s not written in blood that a young black boy from the hoods of Kansas City, Missouri, would be inspired by a rock band and then later on get to work with all of them,” Tech N9ne said. “We even had Jim Morrison on the chorus. People have to say yes. Like four different people had to say yes. It took awhile, but they did it.” But 20 years after his debut Calm Before the

Ace Frehley plays Rocklahoma on Sunday. | Photo Jay Gilbert / provided

Storm, Tech N9ne’s biggest motivator is topping his own previous releases. “Every album, I have to out-rap myself, and that’s hard to do,” he said. “I don’t know how I’m going to do it on my next album, but I’m going to try. The music is there. I choose the beats that motivate me to go as hard as I can on each and every song I do.” His latest album, N9NA, was released last year, but Tech N9ne’s said concerts are artists’ true legacy. “They can try to take away vinyl,” he said. “They can take away CDs. They can take away mini-discs or whatever the new thing is, but the one thing they’ll never be able to take away are the live shows. Those are forever. Even after you pass, you can still do shows as a hologram.” Tickets are $99.50-$199. Visit rocklahoma.com.

Rocklahoma Friday-Sunday 1421 W. 450 Road, Pryor rocklahoma.com $99.50-$199


Changing Frequencies speaks truth to power on afrofuturistic FREQ Work. By George Lang

NO W M

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O .C C K O N W TO N W O D

the “present-day Trump effect.” While “We the People” unleashes a phalanx of vitriol, CF offers a salve with “Heavenly Mother Heavenly Father,” a gorgeous, string-laden backpack hip-hop paean to spirituality in which “all things seek balance.” This warm embrace of motherly love sets the tone for the more confrontational “Godessence,” in which James Brown’s “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World” gets recontextualized as the last gasp of the patriarchy and CF fires back at the incels and he-man woman haters with verbal tough love. CF is at the center of FREQ Work, but swirling around her is the brilliant production work of Joey Sativa, who blends the complementary strains of futuristic bleeps and bloops with the lush, classic R&B samples that powered Kanye West and Common records in the mid-2000s. The tranquil jazz that gathers around utopian “Paradise” helps illustrate CF’s idealized world powered by wisdom, respect and peace. His sonic acuity gets its best workout on the closing tracks, “Water” and “Balance,” in which the subject of the former (“Water is my element”) literally creates the musical backbone for the latter as dripping water establishes the beat and a rain shower dominates the mix as CF extols the virtues of “Balance.” FREQ Work is a debut fueled by real confidence, but Changing Frequencies proves she possesses the verbal fluidity and intellect to go hard at evil and broadcast the signals we desperately need to hear.

!

Changing Frequencies worked with rapper/producer Joey Sativa on FREQ Work. | Photo Bandcamp / provided

PE

Further solidifying Oklahoma’s reputation as a germination pool for thoughtful, high-consciousness hip-hop, Changing Frequencies’ (CF) debut album FREQ Work is a full-length mission statement — not only for the Tulsa rapper, but for her society’s future. In no way does FREQ Work demand to be graded on a local-statewide curve; CF is ready to take her place with FKA Twigs and Solange in the vanguard of Afrofuturism and speak truth. FREQ Work starts hard with exceptionally flowing “Bandito,” in which CF lays out her belief structure, ideals, a work list for the woke world and prima facie proof of her verbal ability as Incredible Bongo Band horns push her forward. “Mind Flex” and “Freq Work” explore both the cranial and the carnal. “Soul flow is infinite, my daughters the continuum / they hold the key, my grandbabies existing in their ovaries,” CF spits on the title track, speaking to female empowerment, the strength of the matriarchy and the importance of setting up future generations with a good world. Beginning with “Candela,” FREQ Work hits its progressive marks on four central tracks that address degradation of discourse, political strife, spirituality and women’s culture. “Anybody want to take us off the earthly plain / from above and below, let the fire rain,” CF rhymes as a warning against malevolent forces, leading into the album’s most incendiary track, “We the People (Oh No).” A spiritual cousin to A Tribe Called Quest’s “We the People,” the song paints a brutal and realistic picture of a “society ruled by the insane” in which 400 years of oppression lead to militarized policing in African American neighborhoods in

O

REVIEW

Hard Work

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LIVE MUSIC District. COUNTRY/HIP-HOP/ROCK

These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

Kings Kaleidoscope, 89th Street-OKC. EXPERIMENTAL

Metalachi, Tower Theatre. ROCK

MONDAY, MAY. 27

WEDNESDAY, MAY. 22

Famous Last Words/At My Mercy, 89th Street-OKC. HARDCORE/METAL

Amigo the Devil/JoeMyside, 89th Street-OKC. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Jason Hunt, Sean Cumming’s Irish Restaurant. FOLK

Josh P & The Czechbooks/Noah Engh, The Deli.

TUESDAY, MAY. 28

ROCK

THURSDAY, MAY. 23

The Decomposed/Some Kind of Nightmare, Blue Note Lounge. PUNK

Ariana Grande, Chesapeake Energy Arena. POP

Innerwave/Claud, Opolis. ROCK

Flux Pavilion/Conrank, OKC Farmers Market. ELECTRONIC

Wood Willow, VZD’s Restaurant & Bar. FOLK

FRIDAY, MAY. 24 Atom Ray Funktet, 51st Street Speakeasy. FUNK Benj Heard/Katrina Stone/The Odds, ACM @ UCO Performance Lab. POP/ROCK Jordan Law, Sanctuary Barsilica. SINGER/SONG-

WRITER

Marc Broussard, Tower Theatre. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Vince Lepeltier, The Deli. ELECTRONIC

SATURDAY, MAY. 25 Adam & Kizzie, Tower Theatre. HIP-HOP/ JAZZ9thWorship/40sMantra/Tanzzho, Resonator. HIP-HOP

Jabee/Brianna Gaither, Tower Theatre. HIP-HOP/POP

The Lemonheads Following a few years in the wilderness, The Lemonheads are ascendant once again with Evan Dando appearing on a recent episode of old classmate Adam F. Goldberg’s sitcom The Goldbergs and releasing a new covers collection, Varshons 2. Led by Dando, the group scored multiple alternative rock hits in the ’90s, including “It’s a Shame About Ray,” “My Drug Buddy,” “Into Your Arms,” “Alison’s Starting to Happen” and the band’s cover of Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson” that always prompts a fit of steeringwheel percussion from Dad. Come on, feel the Lemonheads with Replacements royalty Tommy Stinson opening 8 p.m. May 29 at Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St. Tickets are $24-$37. Visit towertheatreokc.com.

The Classless, VZD’s Restaurant & Bar. PUNK

Jbenji, 89th Street-OKC. HIP-HOP

Creepenstein, 89th Street-OKC. HIP-HOP

SUNDAY, MAY. 26

Grivo/Lust/Laine, Opolis. POP

Steve Crossley & Jerry Wilson, Louie’s Grill & Bar. ACOUSTIC

Buddy South/Original Flow/Mad Honey, Paseo Arts

tuesday wednesday thursday friday saturday ringsidemedical.com

cannabis dispensary open monday - saturday

M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

Andy Hedges, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITER

MAY 29 Photo RAM Entertainment / provided

Monday

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WEDNESDAY, MAY. 29

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Fax your listings to 528-4600 or e-mail to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

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O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9

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CANNABIS

THE HIGH CULTURE

Closing time

Cannabis Aid was one of the first Oklahoma City dispensaries to offer cannabis flower for sale. Now it is one of the first to close its doors. By Matt Dinger

One of the first dispensaries to sell cannabis in Oklahoma City has closed its doors. Cannabis Aid, 1612 NE 23rd St., weighed its last flower sale May 9. The dispensary previously sold CBD products but was one of the first shops in the city to sell raw cannabis flower on Oct. 26, the first day sales became legal. It was doing $10,000 per day in business during opening weekend, coowner Sam Hill Sr. said. But on Jan. 6, co-owner Elijah Mothershed Bey, his partner Carnesha Powell and her 15-year-old daughter Roshawna Stevens were found slain inside their home in northeast Oklahoma City. No one has been arrested or charged in connection with their murders more than four months later. Hill said their deaths changed the course of the business. “Ever since Elijah passed away — he controlled 95 percent of the company, him and his wife, so the books, the inventory, all that type of stuff — so when he passed away, me and the family tried to pick up pieces to the puzzle we didn’t have all the pieces to,” he said. But a discrepancy between what Cannabis Aid’s owners thought they owed Oklahoma Tax Commission and the amount the tax commission de46

M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M

manded resulted in them immediately closing the business. Instead of trying to resolve the situation, they chose to close the dispensary to focus on other business ventures.

We’ve been slowly trying to get ourselves out of this hole and were kicking the can down the road as best we can to keep things balanced with the little bit of income we’re generating from the store and just couldn’t. Sam Hill Sr. Xavier Schucker, Elijah’s 24-year-old son, had been at the business every day since his father’s funeral, often running the dispensary from open to close. Shortly before Cannabis Aid finally locked the doors, Schucker suffered a medical incident at work and rushed himself to OU Medical Center. What felt like a heart attack ultimately might have

THC

been a panic attack, but he will have more blood work done next month to make sure it’s not a larger health issue. He was also the one who found the crime scene, something he had not taken the time to fully process. “I can say even before this happened, when I came down to help him, I knew I was going to be under a lot of stress being in the cannabis industry, running the shop, all that, but I still didn’t really fully comprehend it until I was knee-deep in it,” Schucker said. “So then, at that point, it was just adapting and changing. That’s what I’ve always been able to do my whole life, and that’s why I’ve been able to do things and get through a lot more stuff than people would normally say they’d be able to get through, because I’m always able to adapt and overcome it. And so when this happened in January, it definitely was life-changing. That goes without doubt. It definitely changed things. It just made me really have to sit back and process everything. Taking this almost two weeks now, God, I feel so lazy, like I haven’t been down there in a week almost. This whole week, really, I’ve just been really processing, relaxing, getting a lot of sleep in, I’ll be honest with you, because before, I was not sleeping a lot.”

Competitive market

Despite long hours, no employees and offering deals on flower that put Cannabis Aid in the red, nothing worked after Elijah’s death. “We’ve been slowly trying to get ourselves out of this hole and were kicking the can down the road as best we can to keep things balanced with the little bit of income we’re generating from the store and just couldn’t,” Hill said. He said after the deluge of patients

Sam Hill Sr. recently closed Cannabis Aid, one of the first cannabis dispensaries opened in Oklahoma City. | Photo Alexa Ace

from being one of the first dispensaries selling flower died off, Cannabis Aid was making scraps. “We always tried to be competitive, but we even went to the point of having prices too low to even be self-sustainable for a while to try to drive traffic to see if that could get a rebound going. Nine dollars, tax included; we can’t really beat that,” Hill said. “Plus you’re dealing with all the emotional, which, don’t even want to go there, with lack of sleep and then trying to deal with business relationships. Elijah’s connections for half the stuff, so I don’t even have half their numbers or when they would come to contact me, they’d be like, ‘Yeah, we’ll be in touch,’ and then never be back in touch type of situation. With all the public support you saw after his initial death, after that vacuum, there was nothing, supportwise. “It went from being $1,000 a day to a $100, $200 a day. Rent’s $2,000, electric bill’s $1,000, gas bill’s $1,000, Cox for internet, security system, alarm system was $700 a month for everything. Hell, the software for compliancy for the point-of-sale system was $400 a month, and that was the cheap option, so you’re looking at $8,000 a month total roughly expenses before you’re talking payroll, before you’re talking supply. That’s just the building, the lights, compliancy. And you’re making $4,000 a month.” Another investor might take over the location as a dispensary, but Hill said they are more interested in focusing on their venture next door, Lion’s Den Lounge. It is a patient-friendly hookah bar that is currently open on weekends and for special events. And Schucker is more interested in focusing on marketing their processing arm than being behind a dispensary counter anyway. He plans to keep focusing on that brand, Sooner Gold, starting with its vape cartridges. “Sales is always something I’ve been good at,” Schucker said. “I’ve worked for insurance companies, I’ve done retention, I’ve done sales, I’ve sold cars. Selling things … I’m very good at talking to people. I make the product myself. I’m going to put out a product that’s not just good, it’s going to be great because it’s going to be something I’m going to actually put all my time, energy and I’m not going to cut corners; I’m going to make sure it’s a good product, and not everyone is like that. “If you’re not in the industry for the right reason, you’re not going to last. There’s so many people that are just looking at the dollar signs, and I’m looking at these patients that come in here and they’re getting off opioids because they’re smoking cannabis or they’re eating edibles or taking tinctures and just seeing the life come back to these people, the color return to their faces. I mean, that’s the whole thing.”


List your event in

MON-SAT 10-7 SUN 11-7 1015 NW 1ST 405-992-0558

Our research shows that:

THE COOL PEOPLE SHOP AT BCC COLLECTIVE FOR THEIR QUALITY CANNABIS PRODUCTS Submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible.

C

ool people in every district of Oklahoma City agree that BCC Collective is the best dispensary in the city to acquire high quality cannabis products. The atmosphere, budtenders, and vast fire options keep customers coming back day after day. Come experience the difference in service and product at the only place that actually knows what they’re doing. The products at BCC Collective are tried and tested. Quality is never compromised for the utmost flavor and experience. Test results are available for every product sold. Find BCC Collective across from Stonecloud Brewery on NW 1st in Oklahoma City. If you are a BCC Collective patient, the quality will hardly surprise you. If you’re not—well, try BCC Collective now.

Everyday

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Submit your listings online at okgazette.com or e-mail them to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

1015 NW 1ST • 405-992-0558 O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9

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M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9 | O KG A Z E T T E . C O M


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CANNABIS

THE HIGH CULTURE

THC

Candied cannabis

Nature’s Key was one of the first edibles companies to put its product on shelves. Six months later, the company’s future is getting sweeter. By Matt Dinger

Tucked inside a nondescript, labyrinthine building on the northwest side of Oklahoma City, bakers and confectioners are hard at work inside a commercial kitchen. It is Nature’s Key, a prominent edibles manufacturer and wholesaler that supplies roughly 300 dispensaries across the state. At its heart is Lynn Key, who retired from her previous job to follow her dream. At that point, even she was uncertain what form that dream might take. First, she sold essential oils. Then someone mentioned getting involved in the cannabis industry. “I called my sister and said, ‘Hey, I think I’m gonna get the backing for a dispensary. I think I’ve found my niche,’” Key said. While they started selling edibles in late December to a handful of dispensaries, the growth has been explosive, even though it does not feel that way to Key. It started with $10,000 of THC distillate acquired on a short-term loan. “We paid it back in two increments of $5,000, and it took us about 35 days to do it,” Key said. Those financial worries have since dissolved. “It’s all going really, really well. I don’t have any worries about finances or anything like that,” she said. “I don’t really worry about the government or anything like that. I feel like we tried to do everything right. If the government says to change it, we try to change it right on the spot. If the government says that

A pan of THC-infused crispy treats being packaged at Nature’s Key | Photo Alexa Ace

you’ve got until May, it’s like, ‘I don’t care. I’m going to get it done now.’” Just inside the kitchen door sits a large machine capable of pumping out 10,000 candies per hour. Behind it, two women are hard at work processing and packaging chocolates. “We mold them up and let them dry or get hard, and then we package them and hand-seal them, so we make sure everything is good quality, that the products are all up to standard and ensure that they look beautiful,” Kate Erk said. “Right now, we have dark, milk and white varieties and cookies and cream. We’re talking about launching a new one today or tomorrow. We’ve talked about doing a chocolate caramel or cherry chocolates or like an Almond Joy with coconut and almond. So just look for it. We’re going to launch a new one probably in the next couple of weeks.” “I’ve always been interested in green medicine,” Shannon Palmer said. “The last 20 years, I’ve said, ‘It’s going to come, it’s going to come,’ so I was glad I got my foot in the door here. I worked a little bit as a budtender at a dispensary from January until I started here about a month ago. I have my cake business that I have, and I’ve had some candy-making, chocolatier-type experience for a background.” On the far side of the kitchen, behind a rack filled with backing goods, several continued on page 52

O KG A Z E T T E . C O M | M AY 2 2 , 2 0 1 9

51


THE HIGH CULTURE

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more employees are hard at work portioning off brownies, crispy treats, cereal bars and cakes.

Delicious research

Jonna Nowakowski has been with Nature’s Key since the beginning and handles research and development for the baking products. “I started baking with THC about two years ago. I was a featured chef at Williams Sonoma for four years. My love of baking and my mom had cancer, and so I just married the two. I wanted to give her something because she loves sweets and that would give her comfort,” she said. “When we come in during the day, I’ll decide what we need to make. If we need to do six pans of brownies, five pounds of potluck, whatever our orders are. And then we do our beginning weight of the THC, and then we have a formula to decide how many grams go in each batch. I do pad it just a little bit, in case it cooks out. But I think that’s why everybody loves our stuff, because I put a little extra in there.” Nowakowski said the key to creating quality edibles is consistency in dosing across batches. Nature’s Key uses THC distillate and has it tested before it starts using it in their edibles. Then, after calculating the formula for the batch based on the THC content they are working with, she adds an additional gram of THC to make sure patients are getting everything that they have paid for. In order to ensure that the THC is evenly distributed across the baked good or candy, a lot of stirring is involved. “We inject our oil into the butter. We do a slow roll for probably 15-20 minutes. We just kind of let that butter — not a high heat or anything — just kind of let it meld with the oil. And then we stir, stir, stir, stir. So we’ll pour this into the brownies and then we have a five-minute stirring process and then, when he takes that pot off, we put it up

THC distillate being warmed for use in sweets at Nature’s Key | Photo Alexa Ace

here. We stir three or four minutes longer, just so if any settles. So then when we pour it in the pan, we stir and smooth more. Our brownies are coming out about 70 milligrams per package,” Nowakowski said. “You really want that oil to bond with the butter, and my secret is 85 percent butter fat. I found that THC bonds with that really well. If you use some of the lower butter fats like 30 percent, 40 percent, the THC doesn’t bond to it as well. That THC oil really loves fat. I think the problem some people have is they quit mixing after a certain point and they don’t get that. So you have a clump here or a clump here.” She is currently working on a THCinfused bacon jam that will be rolling out this summer. All of the hard work has paid off. Nature’s Key now employs 14 people, and the number of dispensaries that carry its products are on the rise. Key has made her dream come true.

Jonna Nowakowski, who develops the baking recipes at Nature’s Key, packages THC-infused treats for patients. | Photo Alexa Ace


THC

FLOWER REVIEW

Black Jack from Craft Cannabis Company. | Photo Alexa Ace

BLACK JACK Strain name: Black Jack Grown by: Craft Cannabis Company Acquired from: Craft Cannabis Company Date acquired: May 14

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THC/CBD percentages: Not available (flower was not tested) Physical traits: Mid-tone green with dull orange stigmas throughout. Moderate trichomes. Buds are compact and dry, but they leave a sticky residue on fingers when pulled apart. Bouquet: Fruity with hints of citrus and pepper that become more prominent when the flower is ground. Review: As a patient, I prefer to purchase cannabis that is lab-tested, but Craft’s reputation preceded it not only by word of mouth but on Reddit, so I gave it a shot. The owner informed me that Black Jack is a cross between Black Domina and Jack Herer. I meant to take only a hit or two at first, but the taste was fantastic and I consumed more than planned. The Jack Herer lineage was apparent, with an immediate energy rush followed shortly by a strong body buzz. A word of caution to those sensitive to sativa-dominant strains: That jittery feeling of having one cup of coffee too many was replicated by the couple of extra hits, and I ended up taking a walk to burn it off. That melted after about half an hour into a sharp euphoria that lasted uncharacteristically long considering my tolerance. (I was still extremely high for about 75-90 minutes after smoking.) I’m very curious about the actual THC content of this crop, but I suspect it is on the higher end. It’s definitely better suited to a low-energy morning than the evening, unless you have things to get done. Cannabis effects vary wildly from patient to patient based on a multitude of factors, including THC tolerance, brain chemistry and personal taste. This review is based on the subjective experience of one patient.

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PUZZLES NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE CROSSWORD PUZZLE MUSICAL REMIXES | 0526 By el Fagliano Puzzles edited by Will Shortz ACROSS

1 Paintball sound 6 City between Turin and Genoa 10 Padlocks lock them 15 Nothing, slangily 19 Spot check? 20 ____ Air 21 Egg producer 22 Drivetrain part 23 Alternative band that sounds like every other alternative band? 25 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 23-Across 27 Check time 28 “Wicked Game” singer Chris 30 Showroom display 31 Documentarian Morris 33 They’re new to the family 36 Mystery writer Deighton 38 Deli order 41 Like some drinks and emotions 43 “Nonsense!” 44 Full of frills 45 Invitation for musical plagiarism? 48 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 45-Across 51 Like first editions, often 52 Quirk 54 Cell in a 21-Across 55 Frilly trim 57 Rebels’ school 58 Remote possibility? 59 “… ____ other name would smell as sweet”: Juliet 60 Cellar setup 62 Good deal 63 Carrier letters 66 Greeting to a conductor? 68 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 66-Across 71 Till bill 72 Turn to mush 73 Acrylic container 76 Welcome to the fold? 77 Tide type 79 Enormous 80 Coffeehouse entertainers 82 Excite 85 Oil change, brake test, etc. 86 Performance often in Italian 87 Friendly music genre? 89 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 87-Across 93 Spellbound 94 It’s often set at night 96 Kimchi is its national dish 97 See 124-Across 98 Botanist Gray 99 Alternative to an Oscar 102 Pepper ____, Iron Man’s love interest 104 Family Guy baby 106 Mythical weeper 108 Sea creatures with beaks 112 Part of a hospital playlist? 115 #1-selling artist that’s an anagram of 112-Across 117 Play thing 118 Emmy-nominated FX comedy 119 “Ohhh, O.K.” 120 Ready for use 121 Count (on) 122 Punch in

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SKULLDUGGERY LANE By Ingvard Ashby

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A U M L S O E S S X S O O C C T U R E A T A L M B O M S T I S S E E D A A H S U I T I N F E C T I A K E S T T I A D I N G E R G E W E E D

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY Homework: Make up a secret identity for yourself. What is it? How do you use it? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com

In the coming weeks, I suspect you will have the wisdom to criticize yourself in constructive ways that will at least partially solve a long-standing problem. Hallelujah! I bet you will also understand what to do to eliminate a bad habit by installing a good new habit. Please capitalize on that special knowledge! There’s one further capacity I suspect you’ll have: the saucy ingenuity necessary to alleviate a festering fear. Be audacious!

CANCER (June 21-July 22) “People will choose unhappiness over uncertainty,” writes Cancerian author and entrepreneur Timothy Ferriss. He doesn’t do that himself, but rather is quite eager to harvest the perks of dwelling in uncertainty. I presume this aptitude has played a role in his huge success; his books have appeared on bestseller lists and his podcasts have been downloaded more than 300 million times. In telling you this, I’m not encouraging you to embrace the fertile power of uncertainty 24 hours a day and 365 days of every year. But I am urging you to do just that for the next three weeks. There’ll be big payoffs if you do, including rich teachings on the art of happiness.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

What standards might we use in evaluating levels of sexual satisfaction? One cruclal measure is the tenderness and respect that partners have for each other. Others include the ability to play and have fun, the freedom to express oneself uninhibitedly, the creative attention devoted to unpredictable foreplay, and the ability to experience fulfilling orgasms. How do you rate your own levels, Taurus? Wherever you may currently fall on the scale, the coming months will be a time when you can accomplish an upgrade. How? Read authors who specialize in the erotic arts. Talk to your partners with increased boldness and clarity. While meditating, search for clues in the depths.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

If there were a Hall of Fame for writers, Shakespeare might have been voted in first. His work is regarded as a pinnacle of intellectual brilliance. And yet here’s a fun fact: The Bard quoted well over a thousand passages from the Bible. Can you imagine a modern author being taken seriously by the literati if he or she frequently invoked such a fundamental religious text? I bring this to your attention so as to encourage you to be Shakespeare-like in the coming weeks. That is, be willing to draw equally from both intellectual and spiritual sources; be a deep thinker who communes with sacred truths; synergize the functions of your discerning mind and your devotional heart.

Many eighteenth-century pirates were committed to democracy and equality among their ranks. The camaraderie and fairness and mutual respect that prevailed on pirate ships were markedly different from the oppressive conditions faced by sailors who worked for the navies of sovereign nations. The latter were often pressed into service against their will and had to struggle to collect meager salaries. Tyrannical captains controlled all phases of their lives. I bring this to your attention, Leo, with the hope that it will inspire you to seek out alternative approaches to rigid and hierarchical systems. Gravitate toward generous organizations that offer you ample freedom and rich alliances. The time is right to ally yourself with emancipatory influences.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Don’t wait around for fate to decide which decisions you should make and what directions you should go. Formulate those decisions yourself, with your willpower fully engaged. Never say, “If it’s meant to be, it will happen.” Rather, resolve to create the outcomes you strongly desire to happen. Do you understand how important this is? You shouldn’t allow anyone else to frame your important questions and define the nature of your problems; you’ve got to do the framing and defining yourself. One more thing: don’t fantasize about the arrival of the “perfect moment.” The perfect moment is whenever you decree it is.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

According to Popular Mechanics magazine, over three million sunken ships are lying on the bottoms of the world’s oceans. Some of them contain billions of dollars’ worth of precious metals and jewels. Others are crammed with artifacts that would be of great value to historians and archaeologists. And here’s a crazy fact: fewer than one percent of all those potential treasures have been investigated by divers. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I hope it might inspire you to explore your inner world’s equivalent of lost or unknown riches. The astrological omens suggest that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to go searching for them.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

“Some days you need god’s grace,” writes poet Scherezade Siobhan. “On other days: the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire.” I’m guessing, Sagittarius, that these days you might be inclined to prefer the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire. But according to my astrological analysis, those flashy phenomena would not motivate you to take the corrective and adaptive measures you actually need. The grace of god—or whatever passes for the grace of god in your world—is the influence that will best help you accomplish what’s necessary. Fortunately, I suspect you know how to call on and make full use of that grace.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Capricorn poet William Stafford articulated some advice that I think you need to hear right now. Please hold it

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close to your awareness for the next 21 days. “Saying things you do not have to say weakens your talk,” he wrote. “Hearing things you do not need to hear dulls your hearing.” By practicing those protective measures, Capricorn, you will foster and safeguard your mental health. Now here’s another gift from Stafford: “Things you know before you hear them—those are you, those are why you are in the world.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

“Love is an immoderate thing / And can never be content,” declared poet W. B. Yeats. To provide you with an accurate horoscope, I’ll have to argue with that idea a bit. From what I can determine, love will indeed be immoderate in your vicinity during the coming weeks. On the other hand, it’s likely to bring you a high degree of contentment—as long as you’re willing to play along with its immoderateness. Here’s another fun prediction: I suspect that love’s immoderateness, even as it brings you satisfaction, will also inspire you to ask for more from love and expand your capacity for love. And that could lead to even further immoderate and interesting experiments.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

You will know you are in sweet alignment with cosmic forces if you have an impulse to try a rash adventure, but decide instead to work on fixing a misunderstanding with an ally. You can be sure you’re acting in accordance with your true intuition if you feel an itch to break stuff, but instead channel your fierce energy into improving conditions at your job. You will be in tune with your soul’s code if you start fantasizing about quitting what you’ve been working on so hard, but instead sit down and give yourself a pep talk to reinvigorate your devotion and commitment.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes /daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll regularly give yourself to generous, expansive experiences. I hope you’ll think big, funny thoughts and feel spacious, experimental emotions. I hope you’ll get luxurious glimpses of the promise your future holds, and I hope you’ll visualize yourself embarking on adventures and projects you’ve been too timid or worried to consider before now. For best results, be eager to utter the word “MORE!” as you meditate on the French phrase “joie de vivre” and the English phrase “a delight in being alive.”

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