Not The First Rodeo

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y a d i l oEVERY OTHER WEDNESDAY | OKLAHOMA’S INDEPENDENT BIWEEKLY | NOVEMBER 16, 2022 H FREE FREE EVERY eOTHER WEDNESDAY | OKLAHOMA’S INDEPENDENT BIWEEKLY | NOVEMBER 16, 2022 d i u G e! Insid

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The Cowboy Cup, Oklahoma's homegrown cannabis competition, returns to Stillwater for its fourth year. RUNOFF BALLOT INSIDE!


Fourth

Annual

December

2-3

cowboy cup.com

Oklahoma’s Premier Cannabis Championship & Arts Festival

TUMBLEWEED DANCE HALL & CONCERT ARENA - STILLWATER, OK 2

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INSIDE COVER

P36 The Cowboy Cup will wrangle its fourth set of cannabis industry winners in Stillwater the first weekend of December. Cover by Berlin Green

NEWS Citizen Spotlight: Rob Watkins COMMENTARY Robin Meyers 10 Chicken Fried News 5 8

EAT & DRINK 12 14

Canned cocktails Gazedibles

ARTS & CULTURE 17 18 19 23 24 26 27 29

Tenkiller streaming release Edmond VIBES Best of OKC ballot A Territorial Christmas Carol Holiday roundup Miracle on 23rd St. Mannheim Steamroller OKG picks

MORE THAN JUST A GAME

MUSIC Adam Hood Soundcheck: John Fullbright 35 Live music 33

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THE HIGH CULTURE 36 COVER Cowboy Cup 37

Strain reviews

FUN 38 39

Astrology Puzzles sudoku | crossword

VOL. XLIV NO. 23

VOTE FOR US AT

EDITOR & PUBLISHER Matt Dinger | mdinger@okgazette.com ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kelsey Lowe | kelsey.lowe@okgazette.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Berlin Green | bgreen@okgazette.com

BESTOFOKLAHOMACITY.COM

ADVERTISING advertising@okgazette.com 405-528-6000 CIRCULATION MANAGER Patrick Hanscom | phanscom@okgazette.com CONTRIBUTORS Jerry Bennett Brett Fieldcamp D. Collin Hudson Even Jarvicks Kendra Michal Johnson Robin Meyers Dave Gil de Rubio

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CITIZEN SPOTLIGHT

Rob Watkins AFTER EXPERIENCING HOMELESSNESS, ROB WATKINS FOUND A WAY TO CONNECT THOSE STILL STRUGGLING WITH THE RESOURCES THEY NEED TO SURVIVE LIFE ON THE STREETS. By Berlin Green

Helping doesn’t have to be complicated—sometimes the simplest of actions can have a substantial impact. Rob Watkins knows what it’s like to be on the street and how quickly a change in circumstances can land someone there. Rob found himself homeless in Oklahoma City after a difficult divorce was followed by the false promise of work in Dallas. It was the Homeless Alliance themselves that helped Rob get back on his feet. He worked as a Curbside Chronicle vendor before securing housing and loved the organization so much that they created a position for him. He now serves as a referral specialist at the Homeless Alliance. In his free time, Watkins started a Facebook group to help connect those struggling with homelessness find the resources they need often simply to survive. “I got here in July 2014 and was on the street and eventually got a job as a vendor with the Curbside Chronicle,” Watkins said. “I got housing in 2019, so I made the OKC Homeless Resource Group as a way to give back to the community that has given so much to me. Because one thing I found when I was homeless is there are a lot of resources here in the city, but a lot of people don’t know about them. So then they go away because nobody’s using them, and they aren’t using them because nobody knew about them. I just made this page as a way to help people network and get what they need.” It didn’t take long for the group to build a substantial following. Since its inception, nearly 3,000 have joined. Watkins has made connections with city and state agencies, council people and many of the grassroots organizations that work with the homeless in the metro area, allowing him to direct those in need to their services. “People make Facebook pages for all kinds of silly stuff. I thought this would be something that would be beneficial to anybody because the main focus is homeless people and those in need. If someone wants to know when they’re doing free meals or when the buses are free, they can

find it there. And it’s really grown. There’s almost 3,000 people that follow the group now. And they’re not all homeless people. There’s people from the city government, churches, people that work at DHS. What’s been great is times like when somebody has a question about food stamps or services, not all the time, but sometimes people from DHS or from Oklahoma housing or whatever will interact with these people. They’ll tell them, ‘Hey, if you have a question about your food stamps, here’s my name, here’s my Rob Watkins. | Photo by Berlin Green number, call me,’ and that’s been really helpful, especially when people open, people will be out with food, are looking for housing. We’ve got coats and sleeping bags and other people that own properties and reach resources and people need to know out and say, ‘Hey, I’m a landlord. Call about them.” me.’ And that was kind of always my More than just resources, the goal, I never wanted it to be about me. group allows Watkins and others I want it to be a community thing, for to help families keep tabs on people who need it.” members living in homelessness, The feedback Watkins receives giving them peace of mind that continues to fuel him and give him their loved one is okay, despite the some purpose. often very complicated and unfor“I have a lot of people that tell me, tunate circumstances. ‘Your page is really important, “When I was on the street, parents because people can go on there and would find out that I was friends with get connected with exactly what they their kids and they would reach out need’ and that’s how I wanted it to to me and be like, ‘I just want to be,” Watkins said. “I talked to Jared thank you for looking out for my son Shadid who is over the homeless or my daughter’ or whatever. And planning for all of Oklahoma City. about a month ago, I had a lady call He added me to their email list so looking for her son. Now her son is that I can tell people when the shellike, 35, but you would think he was ters are going to be open. Because 15 the way she was talking about him. 3,000 people is no joke. There are But I was able to tell her, ‘Your son is people from all kinds of agencies, so doing fine. I saw him two days ago at the people at the city level are startthe bus terminal. He came over to ing to see the value. I never would me, we talked and he hugged me and have thought a city or government he’s doing okay,’ which helped her agency would follow me. I was just because she’s been legitimately trying to create a central hub for worried about him because she homeless people. Because of the way hasn’t seen him in six months. So it’s it’s grown, if you’re new to the city good that I can have those relationor if you’re new to homelessness, you ships with people, if their parents or can just go there—it’s kind of a one family call I can let them know what’s stop shop. Someone is going to try to going on,” he said. help. You’ll know when the buses are Rob attends monthly meetings free. You’ll know when people are focused on homeless issues and giving away clothes, who’s having a works with city leaders to bring focus free meal, where and when. People to the needs of the homeless comare always sharing and posting stuff munity whenever possible. When on there. I talk to people almost every looking towards the future, Watkins day, especially when the cold weather sees instability in social media, so rolls in. The shelters are going to be he’s working on a website solely

dedicated to the cause. “With things like the layoffs, you don’t know what’s going on with Facebook from one day to the next, so I’m working on a website,” Watkins said. “It’s called OKCStreetSheet. com. I chose the name because it doesn’t reference homelessness, it doesn’t reference anything, so there’s no stigma attached. I haven’t really done a whole lot with it yet, but it’s there because eventually I’d kind of like to migrate off of Facebook. People need a way to share information. There needs to be an easy to access central hub where people in the community can know about what’s happening on the streets, where the feedings are and where to get clothes and when housing or jobs become available.” Rob’s actions show that helping doesn’t have to cost anything, just a bit of time. Simply taking action and doing what you can, when you can, that can create exponential reach. “I don’t have a lot of money. I don’t think I’ll ever be the guy that donates $100 million or whatever,” Watkins said. “But I can make a Facebook page where people can interact and share resources and help that way.” To connect with Rob and the OKC Homeless Resource Group visit their Facebook page.

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COMMENTARY

Thank you, poll workers THIS ELECTION SEASON, A TIP OF THE HAT IS IN ORDER TO ALL WHO DEDICATE THEIR TIME MAKING SURE OUR DEMOCRATIC PROCESS CONTINUES. By Robin Meyers

On the Friday before election day, I returned to my favorite place to vote, the Oklahoma County Election Board headquarters on Lincoln Boulevard. It conjured memories of standing in a long line with an ebullient crowd in 2008 to vote for Barack Obama. I was certain that the world was about to change, and that we would become a better country. Today I learned that a survey revea led that 88 percent of Americans fear political violence during this election and in the days that follow. Political violence? Are we talking about Venezuela? Brazil? Belarus? What happens if close election results are not accepted by election deniers? What if American democracy grinds to a halt under the weight of conspiracy theories spread by those with no regard for the truth? What if half of us won’t agree to lose? I remember John McCain’s gracious concession speech to President-elect Obama, even when some of his followers booed the idea of wishing him well. Repeatedly he stopped them, as if to say, No. This is not what we do. This is not who we are. Mr. Obama is our president now, and America’s strength and genius can only endure through the peaceful transfer of power. McCain let it be known that it was an historic election and that he was aware of how much it must mean to African Americans so long denied a seat at the table. Now all of us must do everything we can, he said, to make our new president, and America, successful. Go to YouTube and watch that speech. It’s just a few minutes long. It will remind you what virtue looks like. Remember virtue? Remember grace? On the day I voted, the atmosphere was different, with more police officers and more poll workers who looked nervous but resolute. They greeted everyone warmly, instructed us on how to retrieve our ballots, and then thanked each one of us as we left. 6

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I picked up my favorite accessory of all time, the “I VOTED” sticker, and wore it for days. It would be hard to overstate the debt we owe to those who work at the polls. Many are volunteers, many are elderly and, unfortunately, many have left their jobs over concern for their own safety. When a tornado tore through Idabel that same day and destroyed Trinity Baptist Church, the only polling place, it was moved by emergency decree to the Calvary Missionary Baptist Church across town because, well, this is America. The poll workers in Idabel packed up and moved their voter rolls, ballots, pencils and, of course, those iconic stickers as if there was nothing to it. Idabel took a d i rec t h it . Democracy did not. Standing inside that polling place on Lincoln Boulevard, I looked around the room and studied the faces of my neighbors: young, old, able, disabled, black, white, brown, straight, gay, rich, poor—you name it. Republicans and Democrats voting straight tickets. Independents making their independent choices. People trying to figure out who the judges were and whether they should be retained. Grandmothers smiling as they carefully fed their completed ballots into the scanning machines. There. Done. Now we’ll see if “We the People” can long endure. There. Done. Now I go home back to work or go home, knowing that I have done what I can, where I am, with what I have. None of this is possible without poll workers. What we should all do when we vote is to thank them, tell them how much we appreciate their service to our country. Put up a parking sign at Lowe’s that says, “RESERVED FOR POLL WORKERS.” Because, across all our differences, we know that nothing is more important than making our voices heard, even if we lose. Perhaps especially when we lose. Indeed, there was a strange and palpable joy that day as people


performed a simple but revolutionary act. As if they knew that it was the one thing that could not be taken away from them, especially from the poor, although we have tried, and we are still trying. Watching people from every walk of life mark a ballot and leave it behind to be counted—trusting those who count it because they have proven again and again to be trustworthy—this is the most powerful political act of all. This is our thunderous retort to the Divine Right of Kings. This is the exclamation mark for women so long denied the right to vote. This is part of Dr. King’s Dream, yet to be fully realized. This ritual, so easy to take for granted, is all that stands between all of us and a world full of authoritarian egomaniacs. We do not serve them. They serve us. Full stop. Thank you, thank you, thank you, poll workers. Our deep gratitude goes out to you—the amazing women and men who get up, make the coffee, bring the donuts, patiently explain how to vote, and then stay late to clean up. Because of you, we still have a democracy. Shame, shame, shame, everlasting shame on those who have made them afraid to report for duty. Our prayer is that you will not destroy what so many have

worked so long and hard to build and so many have died to defend. Go ahead, sing it… My country ‘tis of thee Sweet land of liberty Of thee I sing Land where my fathers died Land of the pilgrims’ pride From every mountainside Let freedom ring The Rev. Dr. Robin Meyers is pastor of First Congregational Church UCC in Norman and ret ired senior minister of Mayf lower Congregational UCC in Oklahoma City. He is currently Professor of Public Speaking, and Distinguished Professor of Social Justice Emeritus in the Philosophy Department at Oklahoma City University, and the author of eight books on religion and American culture, the most recent of which is, Saving God from Religion: A Minister’s Search for Faith in a Skeptical Age. Visit robinmeyers.com

BU Y T NO ICK W O ET PEN ST ! OD AY !

The Rev. Dr. Robin Meyers. | Photo provided

BY

CHARLES DICKENS • ADAPTED BY MICHAEL BARON • DIRECTED BY MICHAEL BARON & ASHLEY WELLS

Go from Humbug to Happy in One Magical Night!

Lyric’s Immersive, Outdoor Holiday Experience Returns to the Historic Harn Homestead! 1721 N. Lincoln Blvd. • Oklahoma City

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Civic Center Music Hall

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OKC Tree Lighting Festival

NOVEMBER 17 • 5-7PM • BRICKTOWN Kickoff the holiday season and Downtown in December at this year’s Oklahoma City Tree Lighting Festival! One of the season’s most anticipated events will take place in Bricktown on Thursday, November 17th, 2022, from 5-7pm on the Mickey Mantle Plaza of the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark. The festival, which is free and open to everyone, will include family-friendly activities such as photos with Santa Claus, face painting, caricatures, a Magic Elf, a Letters to Santa station, and a showcase of diverse holiday performances leading up to and following the countdown to the lighting of the Christmas tree by Mayor David Holt. For more information, visit downtownindecember.com.

Okc Tree Lighting Virtual Holiday Special PRESENTED BY HEARTLAND

NOV 25 • 5PM DEBUT • FOX 25 & ONLINE Following the festival, gather with your friends and family on Friday, November 25th, 2022, to watch the debut of the Oklahoma City Tree Lighting Virtual Holiday Special presented by Heartland. Experience the excitement of the tree lighting along with special program-only performances and guests. The program will have something for everyone, featuring much-loved, familiar sights as well as new favorites. It will be available for viewing on television on FOX 25, and streamed on the FOX 25 Facebook page, website, and On-Demand app, as well as Downtown OKC's YouTube channel, Facebook page, and Downtown in December website. For more information, visit downtownindecember.com.

Saints Santa Run PRESENTED BY SSM HEALTH - ST. ANTHONY

DECEMBER 3 • 8-11AM • MIDTOWN Grab your costumes and running shoes, the Saints Santa Run is coming to Midtown on Saturday, December 3rd, 2022! Our family-friendly winter run is bringing all ages, and even pets, to downtown Oklahoma City for a festive 5K. It is a great way to stay active and spread cheer during the holiday season. All are invited to enjoy free activities like face painting and balloon art, complimentary snacks and drinks, holiday music and more at our start/finish line celebration on the SSM Health – St. Anthony Hospital campus. The run also includes a free Kids’ Dash for kids 8 and under, a costume contest, and cash prizes! For more information, visit downtownindecember.com.

Lights On Broadway

DEC. 3 & 10 • 4-7PM • AUTOMOBILE ALLEY Cruise down historic Automobile Alley for the district’s holiday open house and experience its stunning light display during the 7th annual Lights On Broadway event! The fun returns for 2 Saturdays this season: December 3rd and December 10th, 2022. Each evening from 4-7pm, various retail shops and restaurants will feature buzz-worthy window displays, pop-up activities, special promotions, and giveaways. Attendees will also enjoy family-friendly programming along the sidewalks such as live music, balloon art, performances, photos with Santa Claus, and more. For more information, visit downtownindecember.com.

Merry Midtown

NOVEMBER 25 - DECEMBER 24 • MIDTOWN Midtown businesses are coming together to offer festive opportunities to eat, drink, and merry in their district this season. Beginning November 25th, 2022, make Midtown your destination for dining, holiday shopping, and general merriment with limited-time promotions and special holiday touches from one of your favorite local neighborhoods. MERRY MIDTOWN'S SANTA PAWS PHOTO OP | NOVEMBER 20 | 1-4PM Bring your pups to the Midtown Bocce Court on Sunday, November 20th, 2022, for free photos of Santa with your furry friends. Santa will be available for DIY photos from 1-4pm and attendees will need to bring their own phones or cameras. An attendant will be on site to help take photos which will be perfect for your holiday cards and greetings! For more information, visit midtownokc.com.

Devon Ice Rink

NOVEMBER - JANUARY • MYRIAD BOTANICAL GARDENS The Devon Ice Rink returns this season in the Myriad Botanical Gardens and will be open through the end of January. Gather at the Gardens for another great season of outdoor ice skating at Downtown in December’s premier attraction. Open seven days a week, the Devon Ice Rink hosts daily public skating, private parties, and special events all winter long. The Devon Ice Rink is located in the Myriad Botanical Gardens at 100 S. Robinson Ave. (at the corner of S. Robinson Ave. and Sheridan Ave.) Please call (405) 708-6499 with questions. For the full schedule, daily hours of operation, and contact information, visit downtownindecember.com.

OKC Ballet's The Nutcracker PRESENTED BY DEVON ENERGY

DECEMBER 10 - 18 • CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL Oklahoma City Ballet’s traditional version of The Nutcracker has been enchanting audiences for decades, and this year will feature all new choreography by Artistic Director Ryan Jolicoeur-Nye. Tchaikovsky’s spirited and familiar score evokes warm childlike memories in the most glorious way as this colorful and extravagant ballet takes the stage once again this holiday season. This holiday treat will include students from the OKC Ballet Yvonne Chouteau School, plus live music from Canterbury Voices and the Oklahoma City Philharmonic. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit okcballet.com or call (405) 848-8637.

Lyric's A Christmas Carol PRESENTED BY DEVON ENERGY

NOVEMBER 16 - DECEMBER 23 • HARN HOMESTEAD The outdoor production of Lyric’s A Christmas Carol returns for its 12th season beginning November 16th, 2022. In Charles Dickens’ timeless tale, three magical ghosts whisk the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge away on an unforgettable adventure of transformation and redemption. Jacob Marley, Bob Cratchit, Tiny Tim, The Fezziwigs and a host of unforgettable characters spring to life in Lyric’s spectacular production at the Harn Homestead, sparking the holiday spirit in audiences of all ages. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit lyrictheatreokc.com or call (405) 524-9312.

LifeShare WinterFest & Snow Tubing

NOVEMBER 25 - JANUARY 1 • CHICKASAW BRICKTOWN BALLPARK LifeShare WinterFest at the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark has returned and riding down the gigantic snow tubing slope is a thrill you won’t want to miss! From snow tubing and holiday movies on the video board, to sparkling lights and décor, these holiday festivities within the ballpark are perfect for creating memories for years to come. There’s something for the whole family, so bring everyone along for a ride in the snow, hot chocolate and snacks, and a festive holiday atmosphere. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit okcdodgers.com or call (405) 218-1000.

Holiday Pop-Up Shops

NOVEMBER 25 - DECEMBER 18 • CORNER OF 10TH & HUDSON Support local this holiday season by visiting the Holiday Pop-Ups, returning to Midtown in downtown Oklahoma City. With local shops rotating weekly, you are sure to find a gift for everyone on your list. Discover dozens of local shops each weekend, enjoy treats from Katiebug’s hot chocolate and The Big Friendly, or buy your Christmas tree from the Bishop John Carroll tree lot. The event also features live music, surprise visits from Santa and Curbside Chronicle wrapping paper. The shops are open Friday-Sunday from November 25th, 2022, to December 18th, 2022. They are located on the corner of NW 10th & Hudson. Parking is available throughout Midtown or hop off the streetcar stop at 10th & Hudson. For more information, visit okcpopups.com.

Riversport winter glow

NOVEMBER 25 - DECEMBER 30 • BOATHOUSE DISTRICT RIVERSPORT's unique holiday experience, Winter Glow, returns this season with tons of cold weather fun! The attraction features ice skating and curling on their new synthetic ice surfaces, five covered climbing experiences–a cavern wall, leap of faith, adventure climb, speed wall and simulated ice climbing–all wrapped up in a holiday theme. The Winter Glow pass includes Ski OKC, ice skating, curling and climbing. There are also toasty treats for purchase from Big Water Grill. For more information and to purchase passes, visit riversportokc.org.

Katiebug’s Winter Wonderland

NOVEMBER 25 – DECEMBER 31 • 12-6PM KATIEBUG’S SIPS & SWEETS You’ll feel like you stepped into a Hallmark movie at Katiebug’s Winter Wonderland! Sip on their famous hot chocolate & homemade marshmallows while enjoying a sweet treat or two. Grab a cookie decorating kit to take home, boxes of sweets to drop off to loved ones, or homemade treats to stuff your stockings. The Winter Wonderland is open 12-6pm Wednesdays through Saturdays this season. For more information, visit katiebugsokc.com

Canterbury Christmas

DECEMBER 4 • 7:00 PM • CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL An Oklahoma City holiday tradition, Canterbury will deck the halls and fill the Civic Center with joyful, holiday standards — with a visit from Santa and carols in the Civic Center lobby! Featuring John Rutter’s jubilant Gloria, this audience favorite will feature soloists Aubrey Chapin and Rod Porter, Canterbury Youth Voices Cantabile, members from the OKC Philharmonic and the Canterbury Chamber Voices. Celebrate the season with Canterbury on December 4th, 2022 at 7pm. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit canterburyokc.com.

Curbside Chronicle's Wrap Up Homelessness & Holiday Wreaths

Arts Council OKC's Opening Night

'Tis the Season at Scissortail Park

OKC Streetcar Free Weekend Rides

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER • DOWNTOWN-WIDE Make the holidays extra bright and positively impact your community by supporting Curbside Chronicle's Wrap Up Homelessness Campaign and Holiday Wreaths. Each year, Curbside Chronicle and Curbside Flowers employs individuals transitioning out of homelessness to sell the unique gift wrap packages and create gorgeous wreaths of varying sizes and price points for all to enjoy. The gift wrap will be available for purchase streetside through their Curbside vendors in green vests, during the Holiday Pop-Up Shops in Midtown, and online at wrapuphomelessness.com. Purchase a festive wreath in store at Curbside Flowers and online at curbsideflowers.com. Wrapping paper and wreaths will be available November through December. NOVEMBER 25 - JANUARY 1 • SCISSORTAIL PARK Celebrate the season at Scissortail Park November 26th, 2022, through January 1st, 2023, with holiday festivities including the Union Station Illumination, 'Tis the Season Market, Cocoa Cottage, holiday lights and tours, the Menorah Lighting, visits with Santa Claus, and more. Everyone is invited to bundle up, stroll the grounds, enjoy the lights and soak in the holiday spirit at Scissortail Park! For more information, visit scissortailpark.org.

DECEMBER 31 • 7PM - 12AM • BICENTENNIAL PARK Ring in the New Year at OKC’s largest family-friendly New Year’s Eve celebration, Opening Night 2023, as it returns to Bicentennial Park on December 31st, 2022, at 7pm. Wristbands cost just $8 in advance and grant access to live entertainment throughout the evening, including music, a mural competition, a children’s area, and the show-stopping midnight fireworks display.The finale begins about 20 minutes before midnight with live music, a light show, and plenty of excitement. You can kickstart the evening by participating in the Finale 5K at 3pm! For more information and to purchase wristbands, visit artscouncilokc.com.

NOVEMBER 18 - JANUARY 1 • DOWNTOWN-WIDE Enjoy complimentary fares on the OKC Streetcar on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays as you take in all the destinations, events, and attractions that Downtown in December has to offer. Warm up, shop local, and love the loops for free this holiday season!

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Illustrations by Jerry Bennett

Welp, that didn’t go quite as pollsters had predicted… On the positive side, voter turnout in this election was somewhat impressive, with just over half of registered voters turning out to the polls (nevermind that means that half of them didn’t). On the other hand, Kevin trounced Hofmeister, garnering nearly 200,000 more votes than she did and Ryan “Sactuary Cites” Walters taking Jena Nelson to task with more than 155,000 votes in his favor. Sen. James Lankford dominated Madison Horn two-to-one at the polls and Kendra Horn earned 300,000-plus fewer votes than Rep. Markwayne Mullin for the other U.S. Senate seat, and the U.S. House of Representative races followed a similar pattern, so it looks

like the expected national “red wave” was largely contained w ithin Oklahoma state lines. If there’s anything resembling a tsunami on our horizon moving forward, it’s educated Oklahomans (and pa r t ic u l a rly e duc ator s) kicking up dust as they make a race for the state lines. Kevin and Walters can rail about the “Biden party” and “radical leftists” all they want, but it’s been 12 years since Oklahoma had a Democrat as governor. The state Senate has been controlled by Republicans since 2004 and it’s been 18 years since Democrats had a House majority. Oklahoma Republicans can call

being a top ten state an aspirational goal all they want, but being stuck in the bottom ten and sinking is a reality that they’re

solely responsible for in this century.

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4525 N. Cooper Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73118 (405) 524-1111 marketsourceonline.com


Oklahoma has long held itself to be an oil and gas state, but that well seems to be running dry and the state is hanging its future energy hopes on a potential mirage. It’s old news that both Tesla and Panasonic have given a hard pass to the Sooner State, opting instead for Texas and Kansas, respectively, but that’s not stopping Oklahomans from dreaming of electric sheep. Canoo, which bills itself as “a leading high-tech advanced mobility company,” this month announced its plans to build a manufacturing facility in Oklahoma City, with claims that they intend to hire 500 people and push out

20,000 electric vehicles in 2023. “[Canoo] delivers on our plan to bring high-paying light-blue collar jobs to Oklahoma. The Oklahoma City facility has significant room for expansion and is a proven location for large scale production, with an established transportation ecosystem, including rail,” Chairman and CEO Tony Aquila wrote in a press release that just about every news agency in the state bought hook, line and sinker.

A n d while it would certainly be an unprecedented move for the state to actually be involved in a progressive business venture like EVs, Canoo has yet to produce a single vehicle, regardless of how many jobs they promise or vehicles Walmart pledges to buy in advance. Here’s hoping Oklahoma isn’t

trading its dependency on the oil industry for a future in the snake oil industry because it’s obvious that established companies want no part in this state’s promises from Republican leadership.

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LuckyStarCasino_11_00_2022.pdf

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10/26/22

3:21 PM

EAT & DRINK

Canned heat WITH THE HOLIDAYS BEARING DOWN ON US, THESE CANNED COCKTAILS COME IN HANDY WHEN YOU DON’T HAVE THE ENERGY LEFT TO MAKE ONE.

The KRAKEN With a spiced rum as strongly-flavored as The Kraken, their line of canned cocktails is much subtler on the palate than you might expect. The Cola variety doesn’t taste strongly like one of the large soda companies, with less sugar that pairs well with the rum’s undertones.

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N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM E AT & DRINK

The Ginger Beer is far less striking than ones you may have mixed at home with spiced rums, providing a subtle twist that’s cooling to the tongue. The Rum Punch is the loudest of the bunch with a bold fruit flavor that comes on strong without being cloying.


Jose Cuervo These slim 12-ounce cans come in stout with strong flavors and an 8 percent ABV. The Margarita is more lime than lemon and more sweet than sour, with a strong aftertaste that’s less acidic than you’d expect. The Paloma definitely has a hint of grapefruit but the sweetness keeps this from wandering into true-to-form cocktail material. The Rose Margarita is a fascinating twist, again strong with the sugary side of both the wine and the Triple Sec without much hint of the tequila

As Good As We Have Always Been!

The sweetest of them all is the Strawberry Margarita that also provides enough sour to balance out the flavor without needing a glass of water afterward.

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GAZEDIBLES

Toast, but make it French In the ranking of sweet breakfast dishes, French toast is always a winner. While syrup-soaked pancakes and waffles are great, a really good French toast knocks the rest out of the park. With National French Toast Day coming Nov. 28, it’s worth paying tribute to this brunch classic, so let your sweet tooth do the talking and check out the French toast at these seven spots. By Berlin Green Photos provided

Hopscotch

Hatch

Sunnyside Diner

405-286-4246 • 10909 N May Ave. hopscotchokc.com

405-286-2974 • 13230 Pawnee Drive hatchearlymoodfood.com

405-703-0011 • 824 SW 89th St. eatatsunnyside.com

Hopscotch certainly has a knack for serving up those childhood favorites. Their French toast is made the classic way with all the fixins that, well, bring out the kid in you — two slices of brioche topped with all the good stuff like a pudding glaze, fresh berries and whipped cream. It even comes with perfectly crisp potato puffs that add a bit more of a savory twist.

Forget waiting for brunch, at Hatch you can find a delightful French toast and an array of other delicious breakfast items seven days a week. Their French toast features soaked brioche with a cream cheese anglaise, topped with fresh berries and finished with powdered sugar and warm syrup for a super sweet treat.

At Sunnyside, you can go classic or get a little fancy. The classic is reminiscent of what grandma would make — thick wedges of brioche French toast with butter, syrup and a bit of powdered sugar. If you’re feeling fruity, go for the Specialty French Toast which is piled with toppings and whipped cream in flavors like strawberry Nutella, lemon blueberry and raspberry cream cheese.

November 26

For Small Business Saturday Exclusive Limited-Edition Pint Glass for $10

BUY THE BEER, KEEP THE GLASS At 36 participating breweries - while supplies last

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Syrup

The Harvey Bakery & Kitchen Hunny Bunny Biscuit Co.

Aurora

405-601-1354 • 1501 NW 23rd St. syrupbreakfast.com

405-898-8811 • 301 NW 13th St. STE 100 theharveybakery.com

405-605-4395 • 429 NW 23rd St. hunnybunnybiscuitco.com

405-609-1960 • 1704 NW 16th St. shinewithaurora.com

Syrup has become a popular spot for breakfast and brunch serving up delicious coffee and a thoughtfully curated menu. Here you’ll find a unique version of French toast worth stopping in for — the Crunchy French Toast features cornflake-dipped challah bread, topped with strawberries and powdered sugar for a divinely sweet breakfast treat.

The Harvey features an incredible assortment of pastries as well as sandwiches and salads, but you came here for the French toast. You’ll have to wait for the weekend, but their brunch menu features a baked French toast with berries and whipped cream then served with slab bacon. It seems simple enough, but it’s absolutely divine.

Hunny Bunny has made a name for itself making delicious meals all with a biscuit base including biscuit sandwiches, classic biscuits and gravy and more. That said, you won’t find your traditional French toast here. Instead their version features warm, fluffy, made-from-scratch biscuits topped with maple syrup, whipped cream, candied pecans, fresh berries and powdered sugar.

At Aurora, you’ll find an incredible made-from-scratch menu you can enjoy in a stylish and comfortable atmosphere nestled in the heart of the Plaza District. Their French toast is simple but delicious and made the classic way then topped with fresh berries and thick whipped cream. Add your choice of protein on the side for a filling brunch.

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N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM ART S & CULTURE

2201 NW 39th St. OKC, OK 73112


ARTS & CULTURE

Blood pact KARA AND JEREMY CHOATE STEP AWAY FROM THEIR FAMILY PHOTO GIG FOR THE DARK, GRITTY TENKILLER, WITH HELP FROM METAL MONSTERS CHAT PILE. By Brett Fieldcamp

Choate House’s portfolio is a stunning collection of wedding and family photography, but Blood Relative Films’ Tenkiller is a gritty and profanity-laden crime flick. Both entities were born from the minds of husband-and-wife duo Jeremy Choate and Kara Choate. The couple met in art school at Oklahoma University and Choate House was a way for them to explore a shared love of photography and support their own growing family with something creative and fulfilling. But it wasn’t enough. Kara kept prodding Jeremy to produce a script, and he wrote Tenkiller in about a month’s time, he said. Since then, the faucet hasn’t stopped running with a second feature already shot and a third slated to begin shooting next summer. A stack of unrealized scripts await them. “For Jeremy, this came out of his head,” Kara said. “And I have kind of a dark side too.” The COVID-19 pandemic provided an opportunity and principal photography on the 90-minute feature completed over the course of summer 2020. What crawled out of the dark side of their minds is a sobering look at small-town violence and grief propelled by an original soundtrack from Oklahoma’s own brutal buzzmakers Chat Pile. “We appreciate the beauty of things that are both dark and light, so this has just been a real opportunity. When you’re documenting other people’s lives, you’re not the creative director of what you’re shooting. You’re just capturing what ‘is.’ So really the movie world is the first time we’ve been able to create something from nothing. It’s just complete freedom,” Kara said. The couple’s first step into that complete freedom was to lock down the kind of gritty, unapologetic tonal character they envisioned for the story. And that meant Chat Pile. “Right after I had just started writing Tenkiller, I saw this little article about Chat Pile, and I got on their Bandcamp and listened

to them and just thought ‘Man, these guys are going to be huge.’ I told Kara that it would be so cool to get somebody local like that to do the score for this movie, and she was like, ‘Well, I’ll just DM

that comes from making your vision come to life against all conceivable odds.” In addition to finding that kind of tight, mutual creative partnership with the band, the Choates

A behind the scenes shot of the cast and crew of Tenkiller. | Photo provided.

them on Instagram,’” Jeremy said. To their surprise, the band was immediately interested and came out together to check out the script. “We had them come over to the house and they all sat in our living room and read it. That was probably the coolest part of the whole thing for me, just having them work with us,” Jeremy said. For the band, it was an opportunity to work with people that not only shared their uniquely skewed, cynical perspective – equal parts darkly comic and near-nihilistic – but that also shared a similar creative process. “ We really appreciate the Choates’ DIY attitude about making art and relate strongly to their ‘pick up a camera and make it work’ approach to getting things done,” Chat Pile bassist Stin said. “The results are raw and at times weird, but therein lies the beauty of what they’re able to do. There’s a scrappiness to their work ethic

also found an unexpected acting talent in singer Raygun Busch, who ended up clinching the role of Toy in the film. “He plays one of the bad guys, and he just took off. We really opened up that character because he’s just so much fun. Everyone loves him. Everyone is like ‘Oh my God, my favorite character is actually Toy,’” Kara said. Being so intimately and personally involved in a film is a rare experience for a band handling a score and soundtrack, but it offered the Chat Pile boys a chance to get deeper into the world of Tenkiller and to fine-tune the ominous musical mood throughout. “We wrote the song ‘Tenkiller’ for the movie and used the melodic structure of that song as a throughline for a good portion of the score,” Stin said. “But the movie relies heavily on improvised performances and we wanted to bring that same energy as a theme as

well. We spent weeks just improvising with wildly untraditional instrument arrangements and recording the room. It was really fun getting out of our dumb heavy metal box a little and doing something people may not necessarily expect from us. In traditional Chat Pile fashion, the results are still pretty unsettling.” Not content to ever pigeonhole themselves into an easy “metal” box, the band even strayed way outside of their comfort zone for the soundtrack cut “Lake Time.” “It’s a country song, and it’s hilarious,” Kara said. “The most fun we had was writing that song. We wrote the lyrics together in one setting and we were laughing until we were crying at points, particularly when we had to start Googling the Kid Rock discography,” Stin said. Add up all of these unexpected turns and contradictions – the family photographers embracing the buried darkness of their home state, the breakout noise-metal stars zeroing in on a refined tonal palette and country shenanigans, even the unhinged, howling frontman exploring his thespian side – and the result is undeniable. So undeniable, in fact, that the little micro-budget film struck streaming gold in its search for distribution, premiering on Amazon on Nov. 18 with the soundtrack hitting music streamers the same day. But now that the Choates are stepping into the bigger, more intimidating world of national streaming, distributor deals, and widespread, Chat Pile-led attention, they have no intention of playing it safe or toning down their weirdo, left-field tendencies for the masses going forward. “This next one that we’re working on is really wild and strange, so we’ll see what happens,” Kara said.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Members of the Edmond Ballet School perform at Edmond VIBES. | Photo by Kendra Michal Johnson.

Holiday VIBES DOWNTOWN EDMOND GEARS UP FOR ITS FIRST EVER WINTER ART WALK DEC. 1. By Kendra Michal Johnson

“I imagine kind of this crisp, cool, December first night with lots of people bundled up and out on foot with hot chocolate, or something stronger, in hand and walking up and down these cute streets and, you know, Christmas music in the background and lights in trees and light posts and just a pretty picturesque magical night,” Benjamin Nockels said. As the Owner of downtown Edmond Commonplace Books, Nockels’ has been participating in VIBES’ downtown Edmond art walks since the events began in April 2021. And this year VIBES’s organizers, Edmond Fine Arts Institute, are expanding the events’ usual schedule of monthly April-October art walks, to include the holiday season in a oneevening-only event, Dec. 1 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. “The holidays was a great time to have another VIBE, particularly to encourage people to shop local and shop artist-made as they’re planning out their seasonal gifts,” Edmond Fine Arts Institute Program Manager Savannah Whitehead said. “So with it falling on December the first, we’re like ‘That’s a great time and, you know, we’ll do that first Thursday.’” Performances scheduled for the event include saxophonist Vearl T, musical duo Five Year Gap, and the Sentimental Social Club trio, and the Edmond Youth Chorus will be caroling. “Come celebrate the season with the community and mark even the hardest person to shop for off your list,” Whitehead said. Approximately 30 local artists will have their work available for purchase 18

N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM ART S & CULTURE

including paintings, multi-media artwork and other forms. “We’ve got several jewelry makers. We have a leather artist, photographers, and several ceramicists that will be out there,” Whitehead said. She said she’s been happy to see the response to the new event from Edmond’s arts community. “This past year, each artist that set up averaged $350 of sales at each event which is pretty incredible—for four hours of their time,” Whitehead said. “We love to see that that money is going straight back into artists’ pockets that are working in our community. We don’t take any commission. They pay a one time application fee of $50, but really our goal is to help the arts thrive in our community.” More than a dozen local businesses are planning to join in on the festivities as well, and the timing of the event coincides with the Edmond Area Chamber of Commerce and Edmond Economic Development Authority’s holiday rebate program. According to the Chamber’s website, “For every $50 you spend (rounded down) from Nov. 25 through Dec. 4 at an Edmond restaurant or retailer, you will earn a $10 gift card to the business/businesses you support. This offer is good for up to $250 in spending, which results in a maximum of $50 gift card.” Whitehead said that the VIBES event becoming an annual event, “is definitely in the realm of possibility,” and may depend in part upon how this year’s holiday downtown festivities go. To submit receipts for the rebate, visit edmondchamber.com.


RUNOFF BALLOT Oklahoma City’s original and longest-running readers’ poll, Best of OKC, is back for its 38th year!

You nominated your favorites last month and we tallied them up, so now we need you to tell us who is the Best of OKC in print or at bestofoklahomacity.com until Monday, November 28th. STAY TUNED FOR THE RESULTS ISSUE PUBLISHING DECEMBER 14! BEST PIZZA PLACE

BEST MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT

BEST STEAKHOUSE

BEST INDIAN RESTAURANT

BEST SUSHI

BEST EASTERN ASIAN RESTAURANT

BEST SEAFOOD

BEST NEW RESTAURANT TO OPEN SINCE 8/1/21

EMPIRE SLICE HOUSE THE HALL’S PIZZA KITCHEN HIDEAWAY PIZZA PIZZERIA GUSTO THE WEDGE PIZZERIA

BEST LOCAL CRAFT BREWER ANGRY SCOTSMAN BREWING ANTHEM BREWING COOP ALE WORKS PRAIRIE ARTISAN ALES SKYDANCE BREWING COMPANY STONECLOUD BREWING CO.

BEST LOCAL TAP ROOM ANGRY SCOTSMAN BREWING PRAIRIE ARTISAN ALES SKYDANCE BREWING STONECLOUD BREWERY CO. VANESSA HOUSE BEER CO.

BEST COCKTAIL

THE CAFÉ MARGARITA, TED’S CAFÉ ESCONDIDO DISCO NAP, THE JONES ASSEMBLY FROZEN PAINKILLER, GOOD TIMES LUNCHBOX, EDNA’S WIZARD JUICE, ZUMA

BEST BREAKFAST

CAFÉ KACAO LATIN CUISINE HATCH EARLY MOOD FOOD JIMMY’S EGG NEIGHBORHOOD JA.M. SUNNYSIDE DINER

BEST BRUNCH

CHEEVER’S CAFE HATCH EARLY MOOD FOOD THE JONES ASSEMBLY KITCHEN NO. 325 NEIGHBORHOOD JA.M.

BEST LATE-NIGHT EATS BEVERLY’S PANCAKE HOUSE GOOD TIMES GUYUTES THE JONES ASSEMBLY THE PUMP BAR

BEST BURGER

THE GARAGE BURGERS & BEER LITTLE MIKE’S HAMBURGERS S&B’S BURGER JOINT SPARK TUCKER’S ONION BURGERS

BEST TACO

BIG TRUCK TACOS FUZZY’S TACO SHOP HACIENDA TACOS MEXICAN RADIO TED’S TACOS AND CANTINA

BEST SANDWICH SHOP

CITY BITES THE MULE ND FOODS NEPTUNE SUB SANDWICHES SOMEPLACE ELSE A DELI & BAKERY

BEST BARBECUE

BILLY SIMS BARBECUE CLARK CREW BBQ EARL’S RIB PALACE LEO’S BARBECUE WAGYU JAPANESE BBQ

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BEST RESTAURANT OR BAKERY WITH VEGAN, VEGETARIAN OR GLUTENFREE OPTIONS THE LOADED BOWL PICASSO CAFE PLANT THE RED CUP TAJ CUISINE OF INDIA

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BASIL MEDITERRANEAN CAFÉ MEDITERRANEAN IMPORTS & DELI NABATI ZAMZAM MEDITERRANEAN GRILL & HOOKAH ZORBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE BABA G. MEDITERRANEAN GRILL GOPURAM TASTE OF INDIA NAAN CUISINE OF INDIA SHEESH MAHAL TAJ CUISINE OF INDIA GRAND HOUSE ASIAN BISTRO PANANG THAI RESTAURANT PHO 54 PHO LIEN HOA THAI HOUSE RESTAURANT

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CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE OKGA Z ET TE .COM | N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 19


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COOKIE’S ON WESTERN EDNA’S THE FLEA THE WILSHIRE CLUB ZUMA

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BEST PUBLIC ART

HOME BY CARLOS BARBOZA, HOMELAND AT NE 36TH ST. & LINCOLN AVE. LIFE IN THE LIGHT BY DENISE DUONG, FILM ROW PLAZA WALLS, 16TH STREET PLAZA DISTRICT SKYDANCE BRIDGE, SCISSORTAIL PARK ZUMA WALL BY DUSTY GILPIN, ZUMA

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BEST MUSEUM

FIRST AMERICANS MUSEUM NATIONAL COWBOY & WESTERN HERITAGE MUSEUM OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART OKLAHOMA HISTORY CENTER SCIENCE MUSEUM OKLAHOMA

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ARTINI, ALLIED ARTS BOOTS & BALL GOWNS, INFANT CRISIS SERVICES BRAVE BALL, THE CARE CENTER MISFITS MASQUERADE, MUTT MISFITS ANIMAL RESCUE SOCIETY OKLAHOMA BORN & BREWED, OKLAHOMA HALL OF FAME

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ARTS & CULTURE

Christmas future THE POLLARD THEATRE COMPANY BRINGS BACK THEIR HOLIDAY STAPLE AFTER A THREE-YEAR HIATUS. By Adrienne Proctor

The Territorial Christmas Celebration, with the Pollard Theatre sitting right in the middle of historic downtown Guthrie, is the highlight of the city’s holiday season. In 1987, The Pollard Theatre’s original company sought to produce a Christmas play that would align with the territorial timeframe and Christmas festivities. They commissioned Oklahoma-based playwright Stephen P. Scott to produce something Oklahoma and Guthrie audiences would relate to, and above all, enjoy. Scott adapted Charles Dickens’ novella “A Christmas Carol” into a localized, statehood-era play, and thus A Territorial Christmas Carol was born. For 30 years, the play ran every holiday season on the Pollard stage. In this reimagined telling, a young settler family in Indian Territory is sitting down to a lonely Christmas Eve dinner. The setting is just four years after the Land Run of 1889, and Oklahoma is not yet a state. When a mysterious traveler knocks on their door, they welcome him in and offer him a meal in exchange for a story. The story he tells is one we all know. Ebenezer Scrooge, the would-be villain of his own tale, faces ghostly visitations and timely reparations as he is forced to look at his own life on a fateful Christmas Eve. The addition of the localized setting and the family on the prairie gives this production a unique and personal touch. Suddenly, Scrooge is not so far away, removed

from the audience in Victorian London. He is here, one of us. O r ig i n a l Pol l a r d company member James Ong played the role of Ebenezer Scrooge for 15 A performance of A Territorial Christmas Carol. | Photo provided. years. An entire generation of actors, technicians and theatre Blount promised a fresh take on patrons alike grew up with Ong as their most well-known production. their Scrooge and looked forward to “We’re pulling out all the stops his performance every year. Patrons and bringing the show into the 21st — more than 150,000 over the past century. We welcome families to see three decades — have traveled from this production and set a new tradiall over the state to make the perfortion; a tradition that honors what the mance part of their own family tradishow has always meant to our comtions. The untimely death of Ong in munity, while reaching a new level early 2018, followed by the death of of inspiration for our audience. We’re Scott later that same year, led The eager to bring Christmas back to the Pollard company members to put the territory,” he said. production on pause. An entirely new experience, com“We took a break after our final plete with a revamped set and new show in 2017 for many reasons, but costumes, is expected for their at the center of the decision was the biggest production of the play to date. passing of our dear friend, James “We had already been discussing Ong,” Pollard Artistic Director Jared revitalizing the show for several Blount said. years,” Timothy Stewart, The Pollard After over a thousand perforTheatre’s director of development, mances, the set also needed a reboot. said. “We asked ourselves, how can “The bells and whistles weren’t we improve it? What will serve the just dusty, they were falling apart, narrative? And how can we put the and one set was there for nearly all audience in Scrooge’s shoes? We of it.” Blount said. finally landed on a fresh concept we Now with a newly redesigned set believe will work,” Stewart said. and props, a new cast, and a freshly “A Territorial Christmas Carol has invigorated production team, been a staple in our community for Blount and company are ready to three decades.” said Pollard produce the play again for the 2022 Technical Director Michael Long. Christmas season. “We knew when we decided to bring

the show back, we not only had to do it justice, but we also needed to show the audience something they’ve never seen before,” he said. The new production is directed by Blount and Long, with costume design by The Pollard’s longtime costume designer Michael James. The show will also feature a new, original score by composer Louise Goldberg. The cast includes Richard Lemin stepping in to perform the iconic role of Scrooge. David Fletcher-Hall is Charles Dickens, while Jared Blount and Megan Montgomery are Mr. and Mrs. Cratchit. The month-long run of A Territorial Christmas Carol is midway through The Pollard’s 35th season. The jade season continues in March with the murder-mystery play Clue, followed by the musical comedy romp Little Shop of Horrors in June. Tickets are on sale for A Territorial Christmas Carol, which opens Nov. 25 and runs through Dec. 23. Visit thepollard.org

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ARTS & CULTURE

Christmas corral OKLAHOMA GAZETTE’S HOLIDAY ROUNDUP OF LOCAL FESTIVE EVENTS TO KEEP THE HOLIDAY CHEER GOING ALL SEASON.

Downtown in December Nov. 3 - Jan. 29 Downtown OKC Various Locations downtownindecember.com | 405-235-3500 Celebrate the holiday season in Downtown OKC with an assortment of events and attractions from the annual Tree Lighting Festival to the Devon Ice Rink, holiday pop-up shops to snow tubing at the Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark, Lights on Broadway and visits with Santa there is something for everyone to help make the season merry and bright.

Safari Lights features wildlife themed illuminated lantern light displays Nov. 12-Jan.1 at The Oklahoma City Zoo. | Photo Whitney Black / provided.

Oklahoma City’s annual Tree Lighting Festival celebrates the kickoff to the holiday season Nov. 17 in Bricktown. | Photo Downtown OKC / provided.

Safari Lights 5:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. Nov. 12 - Jan. 1 The Oklahoma City Zoo 2101 NE 50th St. okczoo.org | 405-424-3344 $15-$65 Walk or drive through this mesmerizing larger-than-life illuminated lantern light display featuring wildlife themed sculptures and animated displays showcasing sea turtles, pandas, peacocks and dinosaurs to name a few, along with a musical light show, interactive exhibits, festive treats and more.

Coming Home for Christmas 8 p.m. Dec. 2; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Dec. 3 Civic Center Music Hall 201 N. Walker Ave. okcphil.org | 405-842-5387 $27-$90 Enjoy an all-new festive program with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic as they perform holiday favorites with Grammy and Emmy nominee Michael Feinstein and special guest Susan Powell, a former Miss America and Oklahoma native, to bring the sounds of the season and lead us home for the holidays.

‘Tis the Season at Scissortail Park Nov. 25 - Jan. 1 Scissortail Park 300 SW 7th St. scissortailpark.org | 405-445-6277 Explore Scissortail Park all season long with holiday lights throughout the park including a 40-foot tree, a giant menorah and the Union Station Illumination synchronized music and light display, as well as the Cocoa Cottage, which will be serving up coffee, hot cocoa and other sweet treats, along with a holiday market on Dec. 3 filled with local business and artisans along with other various holiday festivities and activities. Union Station Illumination. | Photo provided.

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RACE Dance Company’s Hip-Hop Nutcracker 7 p.m. Dec. 2-3; 2 p.m. Dec. 10-11 Visual and Performing Arts Center Theater Oklahoma City Community College 7777 S. May Ave. racedance.com | 405-259-5050 $23-$28 Back for its tenth season, this remastered production of Tchaikovsky’s famous ballet has been brought to the modern age by Executive Director Hui Cha Poos through updated choreography, soundtrack and cast of dancers to tell the coming-of-age story of Carlos on his journey of self-discovery and purpose as he learns how love comes from the diverse community that surrounds him. Braum’s Holiday River Parade 6-8 p.m. Dec. 3 OKC Riversport 800 Riversport Dr. riversportokc.org | 405-552-4040 Free Start the holidays off enjoying an evening in the Boathouse District with family and friends to watch boats decked out in festive decor and water skiing elves travel the Oklahoma River with a firework show to wrap the show up in a nice bow; for those wanting to partake in ice skating, snowboarding, skiing and more, come early for Riversport’s Nordic holiday experience, Winter Glow. Canterbury Christmas 7 p.m., Dec. 4 Civic Center Music Hall 201 N. Walker Ave. canterburyokc.com | 405-232-7464 $23-$70 Canterbury Voices comes a-Wassailing with their annual holiday performance with an evening of holiday carols and traditional choral staples, beginning with the Canterbury Youth Voices caroling in the lobby before leading to the main event led by Artistic Director, Dr. Radni Van Ellefson, featuring Rutter’s Gloria, an expanded arrangement of Stroope’s Hodie and even a sing-along for the entire auditorium to join in on the season’s festivities.

Oklahoma City Ballet presents Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker Dec. 10-18 at Civic Center Music Hall. | Photo Janna Carson / provided.

Oklahoma City Ballet’s The Nutcracker 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., Dec. 10 and 17; 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Dec. 11 and 18; 6 p.m. Dec. 15; 7 p.m., Dec. 16 Civic Center Music Hall 201 N. Walker Ave. okcballet.org | 405-848-8637 $38-$100 An American holiday classic that tells the story of young Clara as she is taken on a magical journey by the Nutcracker Prince to The Land of Snow and The Land of Sweets after helping defeat the Mouse King and saving the Nutcracker army, featuring all new choreography by Artistic Director, Rayn Jolicoeur-Nye and students from the OKC Ballet Yvonne Chouteau School accompanied by live music from the Oklahoma City Philharmonic and Canterbury Voices.

Jane Austen’s Christmas Cracker Dec. 9-11, 15-18, 21-23 Oklahoma Shakespeare in the Park 2920 Paseo Dr. okshakes.org | 405-235-3700 $12 Adapted from the works of Jane Austen by Erin Woods, this interactive play encourages the audience to socialize and celebrate the holiday season with Austen and some of her cherished characters through dancing, singing, and sweet treat eating. Patrons are welcome to come dressed in their periodappropriate attire. Lyric’s A Christmas Carol cast performs on outdoor stage Dec. 16-23 at Harn Homestead. | Photo Miki Galloway / provided.

Lyric Theatre’s A Christmas Carol Dec. 16-23 Harn Homestead 1721 N. Lincoln Blvd. lyrictheatreokc.com | 405-524-9312 $40-$65 Experience the Charles Dickens holiday classic in a thrilling way this season as Lyric Theatre returns to Harn Homestead for an outdoor performance under the stars, where patrons are guided from scene to scene to see the tale of Ebenezer Scrooge unfold as he is visited by three ghost that take him on an adventure to his past, present and future to warn of what his life holds if he does not change his ways.

Canterbury Voices presents their annual holiday show, Canterbury Christmas 7 p.m. Dec. 4 at Civic Center Music Hall. | Photo Tapestry Photographs by Joy Neel / provided

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ARTS & CULTURE

Holiday cheers UPTOWN’S NEIGHBORHOOD BAR IS TRANSFORMING INTO A WINTER WONDERLAND THROUGH THE HOLIDAY SEASON. By Matt Dinger

YOUR DAILY INTEL BRIEFING

This holiday season, Ponyboy is transforming this season into an aggressively festive pop-up called Miracle on 23rd Street. The international concept was started by a popular barware brand held in high esteem in the bar service industry, Alex Larrea, food and beverage director, said. “Miracle got started as a way for them to program this bar called Mace in the Lower East Side in New York City in 2014, and it just kind of blew up and

Christmas cookies and a really bomb pot roast that my kitchen has been working on,” Larrea said. The music, which Ponyboy is also known for hosting, will also be programmed accordingly. “We’re going to do a Christmasthemed trivia, Christmas-themed karaoke. There’s going to be a really awesome charity event with the Humane Society on Dec. 2 to kick it off and this whole thing kind of gets us through the whole Christmas season

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Santa’s Little Helper. | Photo by Melissa Hom provided.

took off and they decided to give other bars around the country the opportunity to kind of franchise and do it,” Larrea said. “We’re going to be the only bar in Oklahoma City where you can get this experience. So Miracle is very much like Christmas Vacation. Really cheesy, awesome decorations. Everything’s a sight to behold. We’re gonna be making some awesome eggnog, mulled wine, snowball old fashioneds, all kinds of neat drinks…Not everybody likes to just sit at home with the family, they want to get out and look at lights and kind of experience whatever the holidays or Christmas means to them, and being the neighborhood bar that we are, we felt that this was a really good fit this year for us,” he said. In addition to the cocktail program, there will be holiday-themed food, including “a leftover Thanksgiving turkey sandwich with cranberry and cornbread dressing and some

all the way up until New Year’s and then we’ll go into our Uptown Getdown New Year’s Eve experience. “Ponyboy has gotten really known for its live music. We really want people to come in and just drink cocktails and enjoy the food and beverage as much as all the other stuff…Ponyboy’s here all year round, and wants to be your favorite neighborhood bar. That’s what we’re after. We know we do the dancing and the music better than a lot of people, but we still want people coming in for the drinks too,” Larrea said. Reservations for Miracle on 23rd St. are open online and are encouraged. “Seating will be limited in order to give people the full experience of a sitdown cocktail service with holiday food and all of that…We do recommend that people prepare to make their reservations ahead of time to ensure that they can get seated when they want to be seated,” Larrea said. Visit ponyboyokc.com


ARTS & CULTURE

Christmas crescendo THE MUSICAL JUGGERNAUT, KNOWN FOR ITS INTENSE HOLIDAY MUSIC PERFORMANCES, PLAY THE CIVIC CENTER MUSIC HALL NOV. 22. By Dave Gil de Rubio

If you were to be asked what artist is the best-selling Christmas artist, answers would invariably range from Elvis Presley and Bing Crosby to Mariah Carey, Josh Groban or Kenny G. But that honor actually goes to Mannheim Steamroller, whose dozen Christmas albums (and counting) have racked up 31.5 million sales worldwide to date. And while Mannheim sounds like the name of a German heavy equipment apparatus, it is actually the nom de plume of Chip Davis, an Omaha-based composer/producer who has been churning out neoclassical new age holiday and secular music under this stage name since 1974. Mannheim Steamroller plays the Civic Center Music Hall Nov. 22. Born Louis F. Davis, Jr., the Ohio native is a musical iconoclast and former child prodigy who went from writing his first piece of music at age six, eventually worked at an ad agency writing jingles before founding this musical persona after numerous labels shot down his neoclassical music pitch. “[Mannheim Steamroller] was just my notion of trying to create a sound that was different, but also at the same time had classical roots to it,” Davis said. “I see it as an eclectic mix of classical forms alongside modern-day rock and roll instruments and some older instruments from the 18th century like the harpsichord. [Those major label execs] said that there wasn’t a place on the shelf for something that was eclectic like that, but at the same time they wanted to know if I could send them a box of my debut album because they wanted to pass it around in their office.” While it may have been a daunting proposition to go forward on his own, Davis was already experiencing concurrent success via CW McCall, a country music persona created by ad agency client and late friend Bill Fries. With the latter providing the voice, concept and lyrics for McCall, Davis wrote the music. In addition to scoring a number of chart-topping country hits, the duo recorded the global number one hit “Convoy” (and earned Davis the 1976 SESAC

Country Music Writer of the Year). With the metaphorical wind blowing at his back, Davis founded the i n d e p e n d e nt label American Gramaphone and took the name of his new project from a play on the 18th-century musical technique known as the Chip Davis. | Photo provided. “Mannheim crescendo.” The first in the Fresh Aire series of music grew into a cottage industry records was released in 1975 at a time for Mannheim Steamroller, leading when the new age genre was coming to another 11 Noel releases. Further into being. Davis’ belief in Mannheim opportunities sprang up and includSteamroller found him taking out a ed performing at the White House loan to finance the first tour. for the National Christmas Tree “On that initial tour, the money Lighting Ceremony three times was used to cover the costs of playing under three different administrathose first three cities—Omaha, tions in addition to the Macy’s Denver and Salt Lake City,” he reThanksgiving Day Parade. Davis has called. “That was in 1975. Mannheim a lso produced Mannheim Steamroller was a five-piece with Steamroller holiday ice-skating two keyboards, a bass player that also shows involving other well-known doubled on lute and other fretted artists like the late Olivia Newton instruments. I was playing percusJohn, Martina McBride, Kristi sion and recorder and we had another Yamaguchi and Brian Boitano. percussionist. Then when we got to Currently, two traveling troupes a city, we’d hire a small orchestra to of Mannheim Steamroller perform play the orchestral parts that were across the country every holiday on the record. Ironically, the band season, with a third ensemble playing behind CW McCall are the same at Universal Orlando Resort during players that are the Mannheim the holidays. Hip surgery a decade Steamroller players.” ago means Davis has hung up his All this bootstrapping eventually touring shoes. led to Davis indulging his childhood “It’s very tiring. When we first adoration of the holiday season nearly started with the Fresh Aire tours, the a decade later via 1984’s Christmas. band was the crew,” Davis said. “We “I grew up in a pretty small town put the stage up and did everything. in Ohio of about 500 people when my It was exhausting.” grandmother was a piano teacher These days, Davis hangs out on his and my dad was a piano teacher at 150-acre farm just north of Omaha. the school there,” he said. “Christmas But rather than live the life of a music always had a special place in country gentleman, the 75-year-old my heart for all the seasonal things musician is still intimately involved that happened, which included my with the stage shows he promises grandmother’s fabulous cooking and will tap into the Christmas spirit fans all of that. I decided to find out where have come to expect. some of the roots of Christmas music “These tours are a combination of came from. Which is why on the first the live music and sound effects like Christmas, there’s a song called ‘The in some cases where there is a thunChristmas Sweet,’ which is a suite of derstorm happening with one of the four pieces. I took songs like ‘I Saw pieces,” he said. “There is also a mulThree Ships’ and went back to the timedia show that includes slides and origins and played it on instruments film. And then of course, the musithat would have been used at that cians and the live orchestra.” time. Being a wind player, I could Davis’ restless creative spirit has pretty much play all of those.” continued to yield musical fruit in the That fascination with Christmas past two decades ranging from

albums focusing on Disney music (1999’s Mannheim Steamroller Meets the Mouse) and American heritage (2003’s American Spirit) to amassing a notable catalog of natural sounds, from the Tucson desert to the full sonic span of all four seasons in the Midwest highlighted in his Ambience series. His latest creation is Exotic Spaces, a series that finds him casting his musical net rather widely. “What I did was I tried to musically describe places like the Taj Mahal, so that gave me an opportunity to write using sitars and other really cool instruments like tabla and those sorts of things,” he said. “Then one of my favorite cuts on it has me using hydrophones (microphones designed to be used underwater for recording or listening to underwater sounds). I’ve been a scuba diver since I was in my 20s and with the hydrophones, I actually recorded the song of the whales. I have one of the songs—I say it’s in the ‘key of sea.’ I use the whale song as the melody and it really is in the key of C. I wrote background stuff around the whale song and I had a really fun time doing that because it lined up so perfectly with what I was composing.” It’s just the latest leg in Davis’ lifelong journey of following his own musical star, a piece of advice he received from a Nashville lawyer many moons ago. “What I tell any budding young composer or musician is to follow your own star,” Davis said. “Don’t let anybody detract from what you’re doing because it’s you that’s doing it. It’s the only way I know how to do it.” Visit okcciviccenter.com

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Dance for the World of Entertainment

Holiday Spectacular

December 8-11, 2022

Thursday 8 pm Friday 8 pm Saturday 2 pm & 8 pm Sunday 2 pm Kirkpatrick Auditorium Oklahoma City University OCU Ticket Office: 405-208-5227 | okcu.edu/tickets 28

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OKG PICKS are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

BOOKS Read the West Book Club nonfiction and fiction Western author will be virtually joining the month’s book club to discuss her book, When Outlaws Wore Badges, as well as her inspiration and addition insight to some of the most famous outlaws and lawmen, 1-2:15 p.m.. Nov. 20. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. SUN, NOV 20 Rilla Askew Book Signing award-winning historical fiction author will be autographing her latest novel, Prize for the Fire that tells the story of 15-year-old Anne Askew who was forced into taking her dead sister’s place in an arranged marriage and must work to free herself from the abuse and harshness of her cruel marriage during the time of King Henry the VIII, 6:30-8 p.m., Nov. 17. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-8422900, fullcirclebooks.com. THU, NOV 17

FILM Aftersun (2022, United Kingdom, Charlotte Wells) As Sophie recalls a trip she took to the Turkish seaside resort with her father 20 years prior, memories both real and imagined begin to fill in the gaps as she tries to reconcile the father she knew with the man she did not, 5:30 & 8 p.m., Nov, 25; 2 & 8 p.m., Nov. 26; 12:30 & 3 p.m., Nov. 27. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. FRI-SUN, NOV 25-27 American Psycho (2000, USA, Mary Harron) wealthy investment banking executive, Patrick Bateman, has an alternate psychopathic ego that he hides from his co-workers and friends as he spirals deeper into his violent, hedonistic fantasies, 8 p.m., Nov. 17. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405235-3456. THU, NOV 17 Death Becomes Her (1992, USA, Robert Semeckis) after recovering in a psychiatric hospital from a mental break down from losing her husband to a movie star and former friend, Helen discovers an immortality treatment that makes her look radiant and begins planning her revenge against the now married couple, 6 p.m., Nov. 17. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. THU, NOV 17 Indigenous Film Series: Shorts Showcase features five short films followed by a Q&A with the filmmakers, 7 p.m., Nov. 23. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. WED, NOV 23 Stars at Noon (2022, France, Claire Denis) a young American journalist, who is stranded in pre-

sent-day Nicaragua, falls for an enigmatic Englishman who seems to be her best chance of escaping, however she realizes that he might be in greater danger than she is, 5:30 p.m., Nov. 18; 8 p.m., Nov. 19; 3 p.m., Nov. 20. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. FRISUN, NOV 18-20

HAPPENINGS Downs Family Christmas Lights a synchronized light display with over 280,000 lights, comprised of two mega trees that are 70 feet tall, 20-foot long arches and more, Nov. 24-Jan. 1. Downs Family Home, 2900 72nd Ave. SE, downsfamilychristmas. com. THU-SUN, NOV 24-JAN 1, 2023 Dungeons & Dragons & Brews join in on an afternoon of adventuring while playing the fantasy tabletop role-playing game and enjoying local craft beer, 1 p.m., Sundays. Vanessa House Beer Co., 118 NW 8th St., 405-517-0511, vanessahousebeerco. com. SUN, ONGOING Guthrie’s Territorial Christmas Events celebrate Christmas with historical authenticity and holiday festivities featuring a parade, Victorian-themed night walks, historic home tours and more, Sat., Nov. 26, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. & 6-9 p.m. Downtown Guthrie, Wentz and Oklahoma Ave., 405-638-8995, guthriesterritorialchristmas. com. SAT, NOV 26 Holiday Pop-Up Shops shop for seasonal gifts, treats, and more at this annual market with rotating vendors, Fridays-Sundays. through Dec. 18. Holiday Pop-Up Shops, 399 N.W. 10th St., 405-514-5205, okcpopups.com. FRI-SUN, THROUGH DEC 18 Luminance: Merry Marketplace browse through different vendors, partake in family fun, festive singing and stroll through the lighted Christmas displays, 4-8 p.m., Nov. 18 & Dec. 17. Mitch Park, 1501 W. Covell Road, 405-359-4630, edmondlights.com. FRI & SAT, NOV 18 & DEC 17 The Oddities & Curiosities Expo an expo featuring all things weird with vendors, dealers, artists and small businesses showcasing taxidermy, preserved specimens, original artwork, antiques, handcrafted oddities, quack medical devices, creepy clothing, odd jewelry, bones, funeral collectibles and much more, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Nov. 19. Oklahoma City Convention Center, 100 Mick Cornett Dr, Oklahoma City, OK 73109, 405-768-4037, odditiesandcuriositiesexpo.com. SAT, NOV 19 Oklahoma City Tree Lighting Festival kick off the holiday season with family-friendly activities, holiday performances and the countdown to the lighting of the Christmas tree by Mayor David Holt, Thu., Nov. 17, 5-7 p.m. Bricktown-Mickey Mantle Plaza, 2 S. Mickey Mantle Dr. THU, NOV 17 Red Earth Treefest features 16 Christmas trees

Crystal Bridge Conservatory Grand Re-opening guests will be able to explore the redesigned conservatory with new features like a reflecting pool, new waterfall feature, new collections of plants and new educational signage, exhibits and programs for the tropical plants, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Nov. 18-19; 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Nov. 20. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. FRI-SUN, NOV 20 Photo by Doug Hoke / provided decorated with handmade ornaments that showcase the different Native cultures of Oklahoma, Nov. 21-Dec. 30. BancFirst Tower, 100 N. Broadway Ave., redearth.org. MON-FRI, NOV 21-DEC 30 Retromania shop toys, games, comics, apparel, video games and more with special guests like Denise Crosby, Kenn Scott, Austin St. John and others, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Nov. 19-20. Tulsa Expo Square, 4145 E 21st Street, Tulsa. SAT-SUN, NOV 19-20 Stockyards City Tree Lighting gather in the historic Stockyards for the annual tree lighting with entertainment, Cowboy Santa and hot chocolate, 6 p.m., Nov. 18. Stockyards City, 1307 S. Agnew Ave., 405-235-7267, stockyardscity.org. FRI, NOV 18

FOOD Cocktail Masterclass learn how to make a classic cocktail using the evening’s featured liquor, dark rum, along with the Bradford’s twist on the drink, 6 p.m., Nov. 21. Bradford House, 1235 NW 38th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73118, 405-451-3693. MON, NOV 21 OKC Brew Tours jump on the bus and visit three local breweries within the OKC metro area with multiple tasters at each stop as well as take a behind the scenes tour and learn how beer is made, 6-9 p.m., Fridays and 2-5 p.m, Saturdays through Jan. 31. OKC Brew Tours, 701 W Sheridan Ave, 405-822-0285, okcbrewtour.com. FRI-SAT, THROUGH JAN 31

YOUTH Myriad in Motion: Jump and Shout recommended for ages 4-8, this morning class will teach kids different exercises to a fun playlist and the power of teamwork to complete relay races and an obstacle course, 8:30 and 9 a.m., Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-4457080, myriadgardens.com. SAT, ONGOING Peppa Pig’s Adventure join Peppa on an exciting camping trip in the winter woods full of singing, dancing, games and surprises with George and her school friends, including Pedro Pony, Suzy Sheep and Gerald Giraffe, 6 p.m., Nov. 16. The Tulsa Theater, 105 Reconciliation Way, Tulsa, 918-5827239, bit.ly/PeppaPigTul22. WED, NOV 16 Storytime with Miss Julie enjoy snacks, crafts and story time, 10:15-11:30 a.m., Saturdays, ongoing. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. SAT, ONGOING

PERFORMING ARTS

Oklahoma City The Polar Express Train Ride enjoy a magical

re-creation of the classic story with hot chocolate and a treat by dancing chefs, story time, a gift from Santa, caroling, activities and more, Fridays-Sundays. through Dec. 27. Oklahoma Railway Museum, 3400 NE Grand Blvd., 405-424-8222, okcthepolarexpressride.com. FRI-SUN, THROUGH DEC 27 Photo provided

Every Christmas Story Ever Told (And Then Some!) instead of the traditional holiday Dickens’ A Christmas Carol show, enjoy a performance of every Christmas story ever told, seasonal icons both new and old, traditions from around the world and, of course, every carol ever sung too, 7 p.m., Nov. 25-26, Dec. 2,3,9,10,16,17,22,23,29,30. The Boom, 2218 NW 39th St., 405-601-7200, theboomokc.com. FRI-SAT, THROUGH DEC 30

The Great Leap an American basketball team travels to Beijing for an exhibition game in 1989, for two men with a past and one teen with a future, the game is a chance to claim personal victories on and off the court, driven by rapid-fire dialogue, this perceptive new play explores the cultural and political risks of raising your voice and standing your ground, presented in partnership with OKC Rep, 8 p.m., Nov 17-19; 2 p.m., Nov 19-20. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-9510000, okcontemp.org. FRI-SUN, NOV 17-20 Hari Kondabolu a live stand-up comedy performance, 7 p.m., Nov. 17. Cain’s Ballroom, 423 N. Main St., Tulsa, 918-584-2306, cainsballroom.com. THU, NOV 17 Mannheim Steamroller Christmas experience the neoclassical musical group that has become a staple in the holiday music scene, 7 p.m., Nov. 22. Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., 405297-2264, okcciviccenter.com. TUE, NOV 22 Marlon Wayans a live stand-up comedy performance, Fri., Nov. 18, 8 p.m. River Spirit Casino Resort, 8330 Riverside Parkway, Tulsa, 918-299-8518, riverspirittulsa.com. FRI, NOV 18 Miss Bennet: Christmas At Pemberley a sequel to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, tells the story of middle-sister Mary Bennet who is tired of her role as the dutiful sister when an unexpected guest at the family Christmas party sparks her interest for independence, intelligence and maybe even love, 7:30 p.m., Nov. 18-19, 25-26 & Dec. 2-3; 2p.m., Nov. 20, 27 & Dec. 4. Jewel Box Theatre, 321 NW 36th St., 405-521-1786, jewelboxokc.com. FRI-SUN, NOV 18-20, 25-27, DEC 2-4 OKC Phil: Home Alone in Concert enjoy this 1990 comedy of an 8-year-old boy who gets accidentally left behind and must protect his home from two burglars at Christmas with the score performed live by Oklahoma City Philharmonic, 8 p.m., Nov. 26. Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., 405-297-2264, okcciviccenter.com. SAT, NOV 26 Pentatonix: A Christmas Spectacular a five person a cappella group performing classical songs of the holiday season, 7 p.m., Nov. 23. BOK Center, 200 S. Denver Ave.,Tulsa, 918-894-4200, bok.centertulsa.com. WED, NOV 23 Tootsie a laugh-out-loud love letter to the theater tells the story of Michael Dorsey, a talented but difficult actor who struggles to find work until one show-stopping act of desperation lands him the role of a lifetime., 7:30 p.m., Nov. 15-17; 8 p.m., Nov. 18; 2 p.m. & 8 p.m, Nov. 19; 1:30 p.m. & 7 p.m., Nov. 20. Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., 405594-8300, okcciviccenter.com. TUE-SUN Ukulele Open Jam a monthly jam session open to all to either participate or listen, hosted by Jeff Howard & the OKC Ukulele Group, third Saturday of every month, 1-4 p.m. through Dec. 17. American Banjo Museum, 9 E. Sheridan Ave., 405-604-2793, americanbanjomuseum.com. SAT, NOV 19 continued on page 30

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Christmas in the Park drive-thru, walk or ride the Santa Express Train through an almost three-mile light display featuring over five million lights and over 500 one-of-a-kind lighted displays, Nov. 19-Dec. 31. Yukon City Park, 2200 Holly Ave., 405-354-1895, yukonok. gov. SUN-SAT, NOV 19-DEC 31 Photo provided continued from page 29

ACTIVE Devon Ice Rink enjoy outdoor ice skating with seasonal food and beverage offerings, through Jan. 29, 2023, Nov. 11-Jan. 29. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, downtownindecember.com/devon-ice-rink. FRI-SUN, THROUGH JAN 29, 2023 Myriad in Motion: Tai Chi dress in your comfy clothes and flat shoes for an entry-level Tai Chi class led by Ling Miller, 4:30-5:30 p.m., every other Monday. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens. com. EVERY OTHER MON, ONGOING Myriad in Motion: Yoga bring your mat and water for an all-levels yoga class with instructors from YMCA, 6 p.m. Tuesdays and 9 a.m. Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUE & SAT, ONGOING Riversport Winter Glow participants will be able to enjoy Nordic adventures such as ice skating, curling, climbing walls, indoor skiing and more, all with a holiday theme, Nov. 25-Dec. 30. Riversport OKC, 800 Riversport Drive, 405-552-4040, riversportokc. org. FRI, NOV 25-DEC 30 Turkey Day 5K work up an appetite before a Thanksgiving meal in this annual 5K, Thu., Nov. 24. Norman High School, 911 W Main St, 405-837-8859, turkeyday5krun.com. THU, NOV 24 Wild About Health: Fit4Moms Stroller Strides a workout programmed for parents with kids in strollers comprised of strength training, cardio and core restoration, all while keeping the child entertained and content, 9-10 a.m., Nov. 20. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo. com. SUN, NOV 20

VISUAL ARTS Adult Night at Mix-Tape an after-hours event that allows those 18 and over a night to explore this immersive experience, third Thursday of every month, 7-10 p.m. through Dec. 15. Factory Obscura, 25 NW 9th St., factoryobscura.fun. THU, THROUGH DEC 15 Art of the Northwest Coast features the artistic work of the northwest coast known throughout the world for its style and vibrant colors that tell stories, teach family history and express cultural views though prints, glass, totem poles and more, Through May 1, 2023. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. SAT-TUE, THROUGH MAY 1, 2023 The Elevate at 21c a program that presents exhibitions for local artists in the community which currently features works by Virginia Sitzes and a collaboration between Denise Duong and Gabriel Friedman, through Jan. 31, 2023. 21c Museum Hotel,

900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels. com. THROUGH JAN 31 Exquisite Corpse Exhibition features work by 12 different artists who have carved three pieces of linoleum to create a corpse, each piece is then interchanged with the other artists to create a one of a kind collaborative piece, through Dec. 31. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE Third St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. SAT, THROUGH DEC 31 Highlights from the Rose Family Glass Collection this private curated collection showcases a broader look at the Studio Glass movement that began in the 1950s in America and continues to present date, through Jan. 15, 2023. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH JAN 15, 2023 Jose Dávila features sculptures in which the artist has balanced industrial materials in precarious ways off of fabricated construction, through May 2023. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org. THUSAT, THROUGH MAY 2023 Kiarostami: Beyond the Frame features a multimedia collection of artwork by Iranian filmmaker, photographer and visual artist, Abbas Kiarostami, through April 9, 2023. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. SAT-TUE, THROUGH APR 9, 2023 Leticia Galizzi/Jim Keffer/Stella Thomas an exhibition featuring works by three different artists, through Dec. 31. JRB Art at The Elms, 2810 N. Walker Ave., 405-528-6336, jrbartgallery.com. FRI-SAT, THROUGH DEC 31 Looking Through the Windows to the West expands on the permanent exhibit, Windows to the West, with Wilson Hurley’s never before seen prep materials such as test canvases, sketches, color studies and mathematical diagrams and formulas used to create the five large scale triptychs, through Feb. 19, 2023. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. FRI-TUE, THROUGH FEB 19, 2023 Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel: The Exhibition Rome viewers can get a face-to-face experience with a reproduction of the original work, Thursdays-Sundays, through Dec. 5. Sail & The Dock, 617 W. Sheridan Ave., chapelsistine.com/exhibits/ oklahoma-city. FRI-SUN, THROUGH DEC 5 Monthly Art Opening a solo show exhibition featuring works by local artist, Micha Wesley, through Dec. 4. DNA Galleries, 1709 NW 16th St., 405-525-3499, dnagalleries.com. THU-SUN, THROUGH DEC 4 Nevertheless, She Persisted: Great Women Artists in History a three-session lecture series that will focus on women artists in Europe between the 16th and 18th centuries, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Nov. 16. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. WED, NOV 16

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Of the Earth: Creating First Americans Museum view the architectural history of the museum being constructed from the stage of construction to the people involved in its creation, ongoing. First Americans Museum, 659 First Americans Blvd., 405-594-2100. ONGOING One Hundred Years of Revolution: French Art from 1850 to 1950 features works arranged in chronological order to show how the French artists changed from creating realistic depictions of the world to abstract compositions over a 100 year period, through Feb. 19, 2023. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH FEB 19, 2023 outLAWman showcasing the often thin-line between the lawmen and the outlaws in the American west featuring transcripts from the Osage murder trails, Virgil Earp’s Smith & Weston revolver, a purse allegedly belonging to Bonnie Parker and other items, Nov. 19 through May 7, 2023. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. MON-SUN, NOV 19 THROUGH MAY 7, 2023 Perception and Technique in Abstract Art features works covering two different techniques of abstract styles through various artists, through Jan. 15, 2023. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH JAN 15, 2023 Sahara Sea Monsters features fossilized specimens of several famous dinosaurs and reptiles from the ancient Sahara, including spinosaurus, mosasaurus and more, through Feb. 12, 2023. Sam Noble Museum, 2401 Chautauqua Ave., 405-325-4712, samnoblemuseum.ou.edu. SAT-TUE, THROUGH FEB 12, 2023 Selections from In Citizen’s Garb: Native Americans on the Southern Plains an exhibit displaying modern gelatin silver prints made from glass plate negatives of Indigenous people in the Lawton and Fort Sill area from 1889 to 1891, ongoing. Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, 405-521-2491, okhistory.org. TUE-MON, ONGOING Small Works XII an exhibit of 12 artists’ small works featuring paintings, photos, sculpting and other modes of art, through Dec. 17. The Depot, 200 S. Jones Ave., 405-307-9320, pasnorman.org. FRI-SAT, THROUGH DEC 17 Sombreros Texanas and Bosses of the Plains explore the evolution of the cowboy hat from the woven sombreros to today’s working cowboy hats and highly decorated hats of rodeo riders and entertainers featuring hats worn by John Wayne, Steve McQueen, Tom Selleck, Shirley Jauregui, Johnny Lee Wills and more, through Jan. 8, 2023. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. FRI-SUN, THROUGH JAN 8 The SuperNatural an exhibit features works from several artists focusing on a new world whose shape and matter will be determined by human activity. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com. THROUGH FEB 28, 2023 Traditional Cowboy Arts Exhibition and Sale a showcase of saddle making, bit and spur making, silversmithing and rawhide braiding, Sept. 30-Jan. 2. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum. org. FRI-SAT, THROUGH JAN 2 Visual Narratives: First American Photography features works by five First American photographers, Philip Busey Jr, Peggy Fontenot, Lester Harragarra, Kelly Langley and Jim Trosper who represent different tribes, including Cherokee, Chickasaw, Patawomeck, Kiowa and Otoe-Missouria, through Feb. 2023. Exhibit C, 1 E. Sheridan Ave., 405-767-8900, exhibitcgallery.com. MON-SUN, THROUGH FEB 2023

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Hood makes good

WEDNESDAY NOV 23 The 2nd Annual

Graham Colton Homecoming

THE INFLUENTIAL SONGWRITER PLAYS BELLE ISLE BREWING CO. DEC. 10. By D. Collin Hudson

TUESDAY JAN 31

St. Paul & the Broken Bones You may not be too familiar with Adam Hood just yet, but these days, a lot of movers and shakers in Nashville have come to know him well. He started performing live shows at just 16 years of age in his hometown of Opelika, Ala., and hasn’t stopped writing, touring and recording music. For two decades, among fans of independent Te x a s and Oklahoma Red Dirt and the larger Americana and outlaw countr y scenes, Hood has built up his fan base and earned the respect of both fans and peers. He performs Dec. 10 at Belle Isle Brewing Co. with Jason Eady. In Januar y 2015, Rolling Stone mentioned Adam Hood in a list of top ten artists their readers should know. Now highly in demand as a songwriter—having recently co-written a song with Jason Boland—he has had his songs cut by established artists like Little Big Town, Miranda Adam Hood | Photo provided. Lambert, Travis Tritt, The Oak Ridge Boys, Whiskey night,” he said. Myers, Cody Jinks, Ashland Craft, It turned out to be the beginning Muscadine Bloodline, Drake of a great professional working W hite, Anderson East, Josh relationship for both, since Abbott Band and Lee Ann Womack, country music is about both what among others. you know as well as who. And one He also spent three years as the meeting lead to another for Hood, opening act for Leon Russell and who also met Brent Cobb through recently made his debut at the famed Nashville producer Frank Grand Ol’ Opry Oct. 22. Liddell. Liddell had already pro“It was the fulfillment of the duced records for his wife, Lee Ann dream of a lifetime,” Hood said. Womack, and Lambert. He has Hood had already met Lambert worked closely with David Nail, “in 2006 or so,” he said, at Tavern Eli Young Band, and album credits on the Gruene in New Braunfels, include Brandi Carlile, Jewel and Texas by accident one night. Her Kellie Pickler. van broke down, so she was stuck “I was writing for Carnival, there for the night. Frank’s company, and Brent [Cobb] “She came in right around the was being courted. I was his first middle of our show and she just co-write and we wrote ‘Go Outside hung around for the rest of the & Dance’ together,” Hood said.

Cobb is a Georgia native who has toured the nation as a solo performer and he has had artists like Luke Bryan, Kenny Chesney, Lambert, Womack and Little Big Town cut his songs. Hood recently released his fifth studio a lbum, Bad Days Better, which was released in September. The record was recorded at the famed Capricorn Studios in Macon, Ga., which has put out some of the greatest Southern rock records in history. In fact, Capricorn Records and Capricorn Studios are known for building the Southern Rock genre. The single “Harder Stuff’’ from the new record features Miranda Lambert on vocals. “Miranda came in the studio to record her vocal parts and she just took the song to another level,” Hood said. Bad Days Better was produced with the help of members of Blackberry Smoke with Cobb in the producer’s chair. The album offers ten new songs for Hood’s fans. “It’s southern music,” Hood said. “That’s what it represents; the soulful side of southern music, the country side of Southern music, the genuine side of Southern culture, and the way I grew up. One of the T-shirts I sell at every show simply says ‘Southern songs,’ and that’s a good summary of what I do. It’s what I’ve always done.” Visit belleislerestaurant.com

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Since its release at the end of while, actually, but it also estabSeptember, John Fullbright’s longlishes that The Liar is John awaited The Liar has carried avid Fullbright at his funniest and word of mouth amongst loyal fans and genre listeners. Its 12 songs have gotten good marks in online music magazines, and the consensus is clear. Even though it’s been eight years since his last album, a practical eternity in the music industry, Fullbright still has it. His songwriting is sharp, his performances staggering, and his lyrics as ruminating as ever. All of the boxes are checked, but something in Fullbright has changed, something that sees him forking farther away from a music industry that has likewise moved on without him. It isn’t that Fullbright took a vacation, per se. The recording process behind The Liar reveals that he has Cover art for The Liar by John Fullbright| Photo provided. been building strong relationships in the Tulsa music comloosest. Rather than subvert songmunity while taking on a series of writing tropes in meticulously sewn supporting roles. Featuring a who’s verbal threads like usual, he shows who of area players, this is easily all of his seams here, joking about the most collaborative record of his his preference for the white keys on career. That it was recorded ena piano because they are easier to tirely in four days further indicates play. He quips about the key he is that he has kept his chops up all playing in, and when the song modthis time. Nonetheless, he has ulates to prove a point, its punchline stepped from the spotlight in the would smack like a novelty song years following his early 2010’s were it not so sparing and concise. breakthrough, which saw a It’s uproarious, yet it still completeGrammy nomination for his debut ly works in the context of its theme studio LP, From the Ground Up, and of pragmatic art. significant chart numbers on his His former self would probably acclaimed follow-up, Songs. find it somewhat on the nose, He is still a big name, as proven though. While some songs are by his sold-out back-to-back shows perfect little boxes that stand apart at The Blue Door in OKC in celebrafrom their musical treatment — the tion of The Liar’s release. He could gorgeous “Stars,” for instance, have easily booked a bigger venue, could easily be covered in a variety but he didn’t. His tour schedule is of ways as a new standard -- others also somewhat light on dates this find their way out with the aid of season, at least by industry stanmore indulgent arrangement, indards. This echoes one of the big cluding some inspired use of acchanges between 2014’s Songs and cordion. This approach makes for 2022’s The Liar. He is more relaxed incredibly memorable musical and it shows. moments, from the show stopping, Opening track “Bearden 1645” is choir-backed refrain of “Safe to a beautifully succinct bit of lyricism Say” to the out-of-left-field turn about why artistic cliches are worththat is “Poster Child,” which barely

34 N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM MUSIC

gets 30 seconds in before going full Cab Calloway call-and-response. From the Ground Up this is not. Like the messaging in its opening track, The Liar admits to convention, and perhaps that is one interpretation of the title. Since its announcement, writers have struggled to make sense of its meaning, suggesting that Fullbright calling himself a liar could be some new commentary on the truthfulness of his stories. However, his songs have always mused the consequence of dishonesty. It isn’t a new concept for him. Rather, it could be that his great rise to relevance in the 2010s found him trying to fill shoes for which he didn’t ask. It could be that his strict adherence to songwriting rules and concise expression led him to sacrifice his instincts. One aspect of The Liar that, for all of its praises in recent weeks, has not been a point of conversation is that the album is decidedly not compressed. Audio compression is almost universally used in every contemporary music style of the modern industry in the mastering process to maximize everything to the listener’s ear. It is a trend to which the public has grown accustomed. Where waveforms of most music appear as a mostly uninterrupted wall of sound, Fullbright’s final cuts are full of peaks and valleys. This is a conscientious choice. It implies that John Fullbright isn’t so concerned with industry expectations and is content with his Grammy nomination resting in the attic instead of staring at him from the mantle. The Liar is, for all of its undeniable entertainment value and down-to-earth good humor, a subversion. With the help of some new friends, it digs deep within Fullbright’s artistic methodology to rediscover what he has always been — independent. Visit johnfullbrightmusic.com


WRITER Kyle Earhart/Chloe Beth/Jake Renick Simpson/Levi Walker/Kenna, Rodeo Opry. SINGER/SONGWRITER

FRIDAY, NOV. 25

The Odyssey, The Vanguard, Tulsa. ROCK

Alaska Thunderfuck, Tower Theatre. POP

Peter Cincotti, UCO Jazz Lab. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Big G/Bart Wielburg Band, Blue Note. BLUES

Braden Jamison, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY

SATURDAY, NOV. 19

Brent Giddens, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY

Edgar Cruz, Bedlam Bar-B-Q. ACOUSTIC Flickerstick, Beer City Music Hall. ALTERNATIVE Garrett “Big G” Jacobson, UCO Jazz Lab. BLUES

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16

Pecos & the Rooftops with Logan Jahnke, Tumbleweed Dancehall. COUNTRY Shelly Phelps and The Storm, Bourbon Street Bar. BLUES Short & Broke/The BlueRays/JL Jones, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES

Borderline with Kristen Stehr, Belle Isle Restaurant & Brewing Company. ROCK

The Damn Quails, The Deli. FOLK

Chris Bower, Core4 Brewing. SINGER/SONGWRITER

These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

Short & Broke/The BlueRays/JL Jones, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES

McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ

Shelly Phelps and The Storm, Belle Isle Restaurant & Brewing Company. ROCK

man. INSTRUMENTALISTS

Shelly Phelps and The Storm, Bourbon Street Bar. BLUES

The Get Down, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. PARTY Hosty, The Deli. ELECTRIC Intocable, Civic Center Music Hall. REGIONAL MEXICAN Joel Forlenza, Othello’s Italian Restaurant, Tulsa. INSTRUMENTALISTS

Erik Oftedahl, Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. FOLK Jason Boland & the Stragglers/Tanner Usrey, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. COUNTRY Joel Forlenza, Othello’s Italian Restaurant, Norman. INSTRUMENTALISTS King Cabbage Brass Band/The Odyssey/ Johnny Manchild and the Poor Bastards, Beer City Music Hall. COVER McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ MidWave/Brujo/Dayeater, The Deli. ROCK Scott Keeton, Remington Park. ROCK Taker/Caliber/Tell Lies/Gadgets Sons/KickdHopeless, The Vanguard, Tulsa. METAL

Spencer Crandall, Beer City Music Hall. COUNTRY

Jon Wolfe/Cody Hibbard, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Jazz Night, Bradford House. JAZZ

FRIDAY, NOV. 18

McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ

Sunset Patio Bar Karaoke Night, Sunset Patio. KARAOKE

Between Me and the Plants, Core4 Brewing. REGGAE

My So Called Band, The Vanguard, Tulsa. COVER

Andy Adams, Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Kendrick McKinney Trio, 51st Street Speakeasy. JAZZ

Big As Love, VZD’s Restaurant & Bar. ROCK

Owen Pickard/Kelcie Pickard/Jake Simpson/ Haylie Bagwell/Cameron Randol/Zoey Butcher, Rodeo Opry. COUNTRY

Casey West, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY

Drayton Farley, Ponyboy. COUNTRY

Led Zeppelin IV, Tower Theatre. TRIBUTE Sarafina Byrd, The Deli. SINGER/SONGWRITER Trett Charles, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY The Wednesday Band, The Deli. COUNTRY

THURSDAY, NOV. 17 Cory Wong, Tower Theatre. FUNK Country Music Group Therapy/Biscuits & Groovy, The Deli. COUNTRY Dion Warlocke/Bailey Boy/Vehicles/Aztec Milk Temple, Blue Note. ROCK Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge Karaoke Night, Dust Bowl. KARAOKE

Blake Turner, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY Cody Canada & the Departed/Dirty Roses/ Waves, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. ROCK Denise Hoey, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. VARIETY Eli Young Band, Riverwind Casino. COUNTRY Emo Night Brooklyn, Beer City Music Hall. DJ Golden Hour: Hannah Edmondson, Ponyboy. ALTERNATIVE

Patrick Winslett, Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Tulsa. ROCK Paul Benjaman Band/Adam Faucett/William Blackart, Blue Note. AMERICANA Puscifer, The Tulsa Theater, Tulsa. ROCK RedGrass String Band, Hollywood Corners. BLUEGRASS The Southern Accents, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY

SATURDAY, NOV. 26

G20 Funk, Belle Isle Brewery. COVER Giovannie and the Hired Guns, Tower Theatre. COUNTRY GloRilla, The Criterion, Tulsa. RAP Jessica Audiffred, The Vanguard, Tulsa. ELECTRIC Joel Forlenza, Othello’s Italian Restaurant, Norman. INSTRUMENTALISTS Local Man Ruins Everything, The Deli. ROCK

Heartbreak Rodeo, Grand Casino Hotel & Resort, Shawnee. ROCK

Starcrawler, Tower Theatre. ROCK Zach Williams, The Criterion. CHRISTIAN

McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ

In Her Own Words/Capstan/Cherie Amour/Shallow Pools, 89th Street—OKC. ROCK

SUNDAY, NOV. 20

Stunna, Blue Note. ROCK

Indigo Girls, The Tulsa Theater, Tulsa. FOLK

Cloakroom/cursetheknife, 89th Street—OKC. ROCK

Edgar Cruz, UCO Jazz Lab. ACOUSTIC

Jessica Tate, The Deli. INSTRUMENTAL

Guy Forsyth, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Joel Forlenza, Othello’s Italian Restaurant, Norman. INSTRUMENTALISTS

Joel Forlenza, Othello’s Italian Restaurant, Nor-

K.C. Clifford, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONG-

Hosty, The Deli. ELECTRIC Jazz Night!, Blue Note. JAZZ Judas Priest, Paycom Center. METAL No Whiners Aloud, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES Starcrawler, The Vanguard, Tulsa. ROCK Tin Can Gramophone/Hosty, The Deli. FOLK

MONDAY, NOV. 21 The Aints/Bailey Gilbert & Friends, The Deli. AMERICANA

TUESDAY, NOV. 22 Bruce Benson & Studio B, 51st Street Speakeasy. BLUES Caleb McGee, The Deli. BLUES

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23

Texas Hippie Coalition/Aranda, Cain’s Ballroom, Tulsa. METAL Twiggs, Beer City Music Hall. ROCK Weekend All Stars, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. DANCE

SUNDAY, NOV. 27 Alabama, Red River Music Hall. COUNTRY Hosty, The Deli. ELECTRIC Jazz Night!, Blue Note. JAZZ No Whiners Aloud, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES Tin Can Gramophone/Hosty, The Deli. FOLK

MONDAY, NOV. 28 The Aints/Bailey Gilbert & Friends, The Deli. AMERICANA Mental Mondaze, Hubbly Bubbly Hookah & Café. EXPERIMENTAL

Alaska Thunderfuck, The Vanguard, Tulsa. POP

TUESDAY, NOV. 29

Graham Colton, The Jones Assembly. ALTERNATIVE

Bruce Benson & Studio B, 51st Street Speakeasy. BLUES

Jazz Night, Bradford House. JAZZ

Caleb McGee, The Deli. BLUES

Sunset Patio Bar Karaoke Night, Sunset Patio. KARAOKE Kendrick McKinney Trio, 51st Street Speakeasy. JAZZ Nikki Jackson, The Deli. SINGER/ SONGWRITER Trett Charles, River Spirit Casino Resort, Tulsa. COUNTRY

The Hunt Brothers Band From a young age, brothers Jonathan and Andrew

Hunt always wanted to create music together. This dream became a reality after moving to Oklahoma where they met their musical and personal mentors and eventually their current guitarist, Samuel Grounds. Officially forming their acoustic bluegrass band earlier this year, they will be recording the band’s first full length album live on Nov. 19 at Byron Berline’s Double Stop Fiddle Shop & Music Hall, 211 E. Oklahoma Ave., Guthrie, huntbrothersband. com. SAT. NOV. 19 Photo provided

The Wednesday Band, The Deli. COUNTRY

THURSDAY, NOV. 24 Country Music Group Therapy/Biscuits & Groovy, The Deli. COUNTRY Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge Karaoke Night, Dust Bowl. KARAOKE Joel Forlenza, Othello’s Italian Restaurant, Norman. INSTRUMENTALISTS

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Visit okgazette.com to submit your lisitngs or email listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS! MUSIC OKGA Z ET TE .COM | N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 35


THE HIGH CULTURE

Buckle up THE FOURTH COWBOY CUP TAKES OVER THE TUMBLEWEED DANCE HALL IN STILLWATER FOR ITS LARGEST ITERATION YET ON DEC. 2 AND 3. By Matt Dinger

Cannabis competitions have come and gone, but The Cowboy Cup gains horsepower each year. Before medical cannabis was legal here, Daniel Lewis had a vision for a competition in his home state. He traveled the country to see how other medical and recreational states handled their festivals and competitions, handpicking some best practices and trimming things he didn’t think would fit in the Sooner State. “We work really hard to make it big enough and have enough different experiences that you want to stick around. Eventually, I want it to be like Disneyland. You can’t get through it all in one day,” founder and “THCEO” Lewis said. This year’s Cowboy Cup will have multiple stages and lounges with live music along with more than 100 vendors participating, from cannabis growers and processors, dispensaries, grow supply stores, testing laboratories, doctors, lawyers, insurance agents, banks, seed and fertilizer companies as well as government organizations. For this year’s competition, he created two tiers of judging. The first round will occur as usual, with local judges hand-selected by Lewis analyzing and ranking their top picks in the various categories that include multiple competitions for flower, concentrates and edibles as well as other products vying for a coveted “cup,” or in this instance, belt buckle. Once the local winners are selected, a group of “Ganjiers” will be flying into the state to take the top finalists in the categories and put them to a rigorous and multifaceted test to determine the best of the best. “A Ganjier is kind of in the essence of a wine sommelier, a chocolatier, a cigar aficionado, line of thinking…They have put together this program to start to train students to become certified,” Lewis said. After online courses and quizzes, potential Ganjiers travel to Humboldt County for a weeklong training session that involves live training and a final evaluation before becoming certified.

Instead of looking at overall aspects of the flower for the judging, they’ll be breaking each entry down further and judging by their own expanded criteria. “Appearance, for example, you’re looking at trichome coverage, trichome density, trichome intactness, tri(Left) Daniel Lewis and SMO emcee the 2021 Cowboy Cup. (Above) A Cowboy Cup sign lights up a vendor area at the 2021 event. | Photos by Berlin Green.

chome fullness and brightness. You get into aroma, you’re talking complexity, intensity, things of that nature,” Lewis said. He is one of only two people living full-time in Oklahoma that has been certified, he said, so he knows how strict the standards are. “It’s really good for the competition, because not only does it put the judging in the hands of arguably the people that are best equipped to judge cannabis, but the judging is taken away from Cowboy Cup again, so it’s this third-party blind verification that we didn’t get paid for you to win my competition. We’ve said it from the beginning—you can’t buy our buckle. We’re going to hold fast to that forever and I think without that, we really don’t have anything. It’s good for us for those reasons, but it’s also good for Ganjier because I think it gives them a good platform to put their skills to the test,” Lewis said. “I think what that does, by having the Oklahoma patient judges, it gives us an idea of market trends. What are people looking for? What are the terpene profiles people are looking for in cannabis now? Did all the judges

36 N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM HIGH CULTURE

really like the fruity? Did they like the GMO? Do they like the gas? We also want to know the con su mer side of it too, what are the consumers looking for.” T h e awards ceremonies will be split across two nights, with edibles, tinctures and topicals being awarded their buckles at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 2. Flower, concentrates, vape cartridges and prerolls will be announced at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 3, Lewis said. After the awards ceremonies, bands will take the main stage inside the Tumbleweed, with Stoney Banks with SMO playing Friday night and AC/DC tribute band OKCDC wrapping up the Saturday festivities. But there will be music running throughout the duration of the event, Lewis said, with live music beginning at noon and running until the awards ceremonies each night on the Oklahoma Shirt Company Festival Stage. Additionally, the Herbage Magazine/Lettuce Smoke Stage will feature 14 acoustic artists over two days. If electronic music is more of your jam, the Smokin BRIXX Saloon Stage and DIME VIP Tent will be featuring DJs through the duration of the event. In addition to the cannabis competition and live music, there will be a glassblowing competition with more than 15 artists participating.

Glassblowers will bring their rigs and marbles to be judged, but the best pipe will be made and judged during the competition. There will also be a pool tournament and a joint/blunt rolling contest. In addition to all the entertainment, there will be seminars ongoing throughout the weekend as well as eight food trucks on site to curb the munchies. For the second year, The Cowboy Cup will also feature its own on-site dispensary, The Lettuce Smoke Box. “We took a 52-foot shipping container and partnered with the Tumbleweed, but we’re going to have a dispensary there on site,” Chet Tucker, owner of the Lettuce Smoke Canna Co., which includes The Lettuce Bar in Choctaw where the judges pick up their packages for the competition. “It’s a separate address, so we’re good there, right where the entrances to the ticket booth and the waiting line are. We’re going to carry anybody that’s part of the cup that wants in and give the patients and the people that are attending the cup some really smoking deals,” Tucker said. “This year, what we’ve done is we’ve reached out to all the vendors and sponsors that wanted to get in that dispensary…Basically you can get $10 eighths, two for $5 prerolls, $5 infused prerolls, $10 For edibles, $10 for ice water hash, whatever they put in there. It’s award-winning stuff too, so you could literally go buy an eighth of ALTVM for 10 bucks out the door. An $80 ounce of ALTVM? Come on. Give me a break,” Lewis said. Visit cowboycup.com


THE HIGH CULTURE Grown by: D-Luxe Farms Acquired from: D-Luxe Dispensary (Classen) Date acquired: Nov. 9

relaxing but not too heady so you can definitely go about your errands and tasks. It will make the perfect sidekick for all those ‘safety meetings’ you might need to take while getting through the fanfare of the holidays.

Y AR

Strain name: Gelato Cake

D I S E PEN S O R S N

ED E

STRAIN REVIEWS

Physical traits: frosted light green and orange Bouquet: gassy and citrusy

$2 100MG EDIBLE DAILY DEAL

Review: Formerly The Classen Collective, the dispensary rebranded under the D-Luxe umbrella earlier this year. Selected the Gelato Cake from the house grow, which uses Korean Natural Farming techniques. KNF relies on microorganisms instead of herbicides and pesticides to cultivate organic cannabis. This flower hits the nose with a gassy aroma before producing a rich smoke, ripe with hints of citrus. This indica leaning strain produces more of a lighter feeling—its effects are

Strain name: Mint Doobie Grown by: Stingers Cannabis Co. Acquired from: WeedzStock Date acquired: Nov. 9

(RESTRICTIONS APPLY)

$20-1G CURED ROSIN $30- 1G LIVE ROSIN

PRE-ROLLS

BUY 3, GET 1 FOR A PENNY

DABS

ride. This Mint Doobie will lift you up before sinking way down into a lazy, hazy high. You’ll want to save this one for those lazy nights when you want to completely veg out and watch mindless television.

ALL PRICES ARE TAX-INCLUDED! OFFERS EXPIRE NOVEMBER 1, 2022.

NOW WORKING WITH

Physical traits: green and orange

BELLE'S KITCHEN!

Bouquet: floral and earthy Review: When you step into the lime-green lobby of WeedzStock Dispensary, you’ll be met with vintage vending machines filled with soda and games. The mom-and-pop shop places a great deal of emphasis on both patient and industry education. Its owner, Eddie Earnest, has tested everything in the shop personally. Being unfamiliar with infused flower and Stingers, I decided to give the Mint Doobie a shot. Stingers reportedly uses a thermal infusion process to open and expand the pores of the plant then infuse it with concentrate. With a strong aroma reminiscent of Mountain Dew, the dense buds break down into a fluffy bowl with smooth smoke. Be prepared though— this one will take you for a hell of a

5G- $25 • 28G- $125 4 FOR $40 CARTS 20% OFF FLOWER AFTER 10PM 10% OFF EDIBLES & DABS AFTER 10PM

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HIGH CULTURE OKGA Z ET TE .COM | N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 37


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY WEEK OF NOVEMBER 17 Homework: Is there something sad that you could ultimately become grateful for? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19)

Virginia Woolf wrote a passage that I suspect will apply to you in the coming weeks. She said, “There is no denying the wild horse in us. To gallop intemperately; fall on the sand tired out; to feel the earth spin; to have — positively — a rush of friendship for stones and grasses — there is no getting over the fact that this desire seizes us.” Here’s my question for you, Aries: How will you harness your wild horse energy? I’m hoping that the self-possessed human in you will take command of the horse and direct it to serve you and yours with constructive actions. It’s fine to indulge in some intemperate galloping, too. But I’ll be rooting for a lot of temperate and disciplined galloping.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

“The failure of love might account for most of the suffering in the world,” writes poet Marie Howe. I agree with that statement. Many of us have had painful episodes revolving around people who no longer love us and people whose lack of love for us makes us feel hurt. That’s the bad news, Taurus. The good news is that you now have more power than usual to heal the failures of love you have endured in the past. You also have an expanded capacity to heal others who have suffered from the failures of love. I hope you will be generous in your ministrations!

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

Many Geminis tell me they are often partly awake as they sleep. In their dreams, they might work overtime trying to solve waking-life problems. Or they may lie in bed in the dark contemplating intricate ideas that fascinate them, or perhaps ruminating on the plot developments unfolding in a book they’ve been reading or a TV show they’ve been bingeing. If you are prone to such behavior, I will ask you to minimize it for a while. In my view, you need to relax your mind extra deeply

and allow it to play luxuriously with non-utilitarian fantasies and dreams. You have a sacred duty to yourself to explore mysterious and stirring feelings that bypass rational thought.

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

Here are my two key messages for you. 1. Remember where you hide important stuff. 2. Remember that you have indeed hidden some important stuff. Got that? Please note that I am not questioning your urge to lock away a secret or two. I am not criticizing you for wanting to store a treasure that you are not yet ready to use or reveal. It’s completely understandable if you want to keep a part of your inner world off-limits to certain people for the time being. But as you engage in any or all of these actions, make sure you don’t lose touch with your valuables. And don’t forget why you are stashing them.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

I know I don’t have to give you lessons in expressing your sensuality. Nor do you need prods and encouragement to do so. As a Leo, you most likely have abundant talent in the epicurean arts. But as you prepare to glide into the lush and lusty heart of the Sensuality Season, it can’t hurt to offer you a pep talk from your fellow Leo bon vivant, James Baldwin. He said: “To be sensual is to respect and rejoice in the force of life, of life itself, and to be present in all that one does, from the effort of loving to the breaking of bread.”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Many Virgos are on a lifelong quest to cultivate a knack described by Sigmund Freud: “In the small matters, trust the mind. In the large ones, the heart.” And I suspect you are now at a pivotal point in your efforts to master that wisdom. Important decisions are looming in regards to both small and large matters. I believe you will do the right things as long as you empower your mind to do what it does best and your heart to do what it does best.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Social media like Facebook and Twitter feed on our outrage. Their algorithms are designed to stir up our disgust and indignation. I confess that I get semi-caught

Never Gonna Give You Up

...

Rick Astley

What If We Give It Away

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R.E.M.

Give It Away

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Red Hot Chili Peppers

You Get What You Give

...

New Radicals

Give

...

Missing Persons

Give It To Me Baby

...

Rick James

Give A Little Bit

...

Goo Goo Dolls

Kind & Generous

...

Natalie Merchant

YOUR #GIVINGTUESDAY PLAYLIST There’s no reason to wait! Give today at donate.kosu.org!

38

N OV EM B ER 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM

in their trap. I am sometimes seduced by the temptation to feel lots of umbrage and wrath, even though those feelings comprise a small minority of my total emotional range. As an antidote, I proactively seek experiences that rouse my wonder and sublimity and holiness. In the next two weeks, Libra, I invite you to cultivate a focus like mine. It’s high time for a phase of minimal anger and loathing—and maximum reverence and awe.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

Scorpio author Sylvia Plath had a disturbing, melodramatic relationship with romance. In one of her short stories, for example, she has a woman character say, “His love is the twenty-story leap, the rope at the throat, the knife at the heart.” I urge you to avoid contact with people who think and feel like that—as glamorous as they might seem. In my view, your romantic destiny in the coming months can and should be uplifting, exciting in healthy ways, and conducive to your wellbeing. There’s no need to link yourself with shadowy renegades when there will be plenty of radiant helpers available.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

I like Sagittarian healer and author Caroline Myss because she’s both spiritual and practical, compassionate and fierce. Here’s a passage from her work that I think will be helpful for you in the coming weeks: “Get bored with your past. It’s over! Forgive yourself for what you think you did or didn’t do, and focus on what you will do, starting now.” To ensure you make the most of her counsel, I’ll add a further insight from author Augusten Burroughs: “You cannot be a prisoner of your past against your will—because you can only live in the past inside your mind.”

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

How would you respond if you learned that the $55 t-shirt you’re wearing was made by a Haitian kid who earned 10 cents for her work? Would you stop wearing the shirt? Donate it to a thrift store? Send money to the United Nations agency UNICEF, which works to protect Haitian child laborers? I recommend the latter option. I also suggest you use this as a prompt to engage in leisurely

meditations on what you might do to reduce the world’s suffering. It’s an excellent time to stretch your imagination to understand how your personal life is interwoven with the lives of countless others, many of whom you don’t even know. And I hope you will think about how to offer extra healings and blessings not just to your allies, but also to strangers. What’s in it for you? Would this bring any selfish benefits your way? You may be amazed at how it leads you to interesting connections that expand your world.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

Aquarian philosopher Alfred North Whitehead wrote, “The silly question is the first intimation of some totally new development.” He also said, “Every really new idea looks crazy at first.” With these thoughts in mind, Aquarius, I will tell you that you are now in the Season of the Silly Question. I invite you to enjoy dreaming up such queries. And as you indulge in that fertile pleasure, include another: Celebrate the Season of Crazy Ideas.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

We all love to follow stories: the stories we live, the stories that unfold for people we know, and the stories told in movies, TV shows, and books. A disproportionately high percentage of the entertainment industry’s stories are sad or tormented or horrendously painful. They influence us to think such stories are the norm. They tend to darken our view of life. While I would never try to coax you to avoid all those stories, Pisces, I will encourage you to question whether maybe it’s wise to limit how many you absorb. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to explore this possibility. Be willing to say, “These sad, tormented, painful stories are not ones I want to invite into my imagination.” Try this experiment: For the next three weeks, seek out mostly uplifting tales.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes / daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.


PUZZLES NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE | SENDING A MESSAGE By Addison Snell | Puzzles Edited by Will Shortz | 1106

ACROSS 1 7 13 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

27

Flight path? Pain in the neck? Wish Climbed, as 1-Across TV-schedule info Early online forum Pacific harbinger of wet West Coast weather Some tiki bar orders Out in the sun too long, maybe English computer scientist who pioneered the breaking of ciphers generated by the 98-Across Driver of some engines

29 Bind 30 Part of a seat assignment 31 Observed during 33 ____-Seltzer 35 Ready to blow 37 Leaf producer 40 2014 movie portraying the work of 25-Across, with “The” 44 Fission locales 46 Set of clubs 47 “The Merchant of Venice” character who favors wordplay 48 Brazilian jiu-____ 50 Prey for a lion 52 Fitting

53 Connect with on social media, maybe 54 How some popcorn is popped 55 Gradually slid (into) 57 Lead-in to dermis 60 Location of the Chair of St. Peter within St. Peter’s Basilica 61 Thin porridges 63 Modern prefix with health 64 Appearance 66 “My dear man .?.?. “ 67 Civil rights leader Medgar 69 Troublesome engine sound

71 Hoover, for one 74 One way to segment demographic data 76 Tibia’s place 77 Sly plan 80 Space-oriented engineering discipline, informally 82 What “ .?.?. “ sometimes means 84 Troublesome engine sounds 86 Arrive at, as an idea 87 Ones without owners 89 What a “Wheel of Fortune” contestant might buy when looking for __NSP__RAT__ON 91 Startled squeal 92 Forthrightly asserts 93 Genghis Khan, notably 94 Herbert Hoover’s middle name 96 Many a maid of honor 98 W.W. II-era encoding device 101 Currant-flavored liqueur 103 Itsy-bitsy 104 Santa ____ (desert winds) 105 Wear for a Sufi scholar 107 Hello in S‹o Paulo 109 One with an inside job 111 Takes seemingly forever 114 Sort of encoded message found in this puzzle’s grid [SEE NOTE] 117 From long, long ago 119 Express momentary uncertainty over 121 Classified cost? 122 Icon to click for more icons 123 Eeyore’s creator 124 Tidy 125 Radial patterns 126 Failed to maintain a poker face, perhaps 127 Figure the worth of

2 3

DOWN

58 59

1

Curse

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 20 26 28 32 34 36 38 39 41 42 43 45 48 49 51 56

Rat out Longtime media figure suspected of being the inspiration for “The Devil Wears Prada” Have ____ for Wilbur is one, in “Charlotte’s Web” Like some insurance benefits Designer Versace It’s for paper shapers Cousin of Gomez Addams Some quincea–era giftgivers Send off Moves from a table to a booth, say Dunderhead Ending with legal or Senegal ____-service Implies Go over, as a cold case When you should be off, in brief Cosette, to Marius, in “Les Misérables” Pull out Comedian Wong Soapbox rant Polar expedition attire Out of juice Frequent victim of Calvin’s pranks in “Calvin and Hobbes” Crew vessel Add chocolate sauce and a cherry to, say Pre-deal payment Come to ____ Rude way to break up with someone Celebratory dances Letters on a crucifix One accepting the terms and conditions Transports from Midway Airport to the Loop Nose-dives Na+, for one

62 65 68 69 70 71 72 73 74

75 76 78 79 80 81 83 85 87 88 90 94 95 97 99 100 102 106 108 110 112 113 115 116 117 118 120

Its in French Rubber-stamps Migration formation Ho ____ Minh Word after party or date Worsen significantly Emotion felt con el coraz—n ____ Wearhouse (retail chain) Alvin ____, first African American to be elected Manhattan’s district attorney Cellist who performed at the Biden-Harris inauguration Attitude Some back-and-forths They generate a lot of buzz Makes right Pulitzer Prize-winning W.W. II correspondent Class for which trig is a prereq Mountain cover Bird of the Baltic Runs down, in a way “I’m good, thanks” Honeydew relatives One of 14 in a fist Carlos in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame End of Q1, on co. reports Bank run, perhaps Some writing surfaces Memory part Affirmations from the congregation Sci-fi character who was originally a puppet before C.G.I. Rock subgenre associated with David Bowie and Elton John ____ Valley, Calif. Laudatory works French for “fat” O’er and o’er Side in checkers Love of soccer?

Note: This completed puzzle contains a 114-Across, comprising the eight shaded answers. Put these in order, one after the other. Then use the following key to get a line spoken by 25-Across in “The 40-Across”: A = R, B = I, C = J, D = P, E = A, G = H, I = O, J = C, K = L, L = U, N = T, O = Z, P = Y, R = M, S = E, T = D, U = S, V = G, X = N, Y = K.

Stumped? Call 1-900-285-5656 to get the answers to any three clues by phone ($1.20 a minute).

SUDOKU MEDIUM | N° 18410 Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3-by-3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9. www.printmysudoku.com

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS Puzzle No. 1023 which appeared in the November 2nd issue.

Grid n°18410 hard

7

4 8

3 4

5

5 6 8 6

3

3 9 5 2 7 7 4 5 9 8 4 6 7 5 7

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