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INSIDE COVER As temperatures rise, Oklahomans are looking for new ways to beat the heat in the comfort of air conditioning. By Matt Dinger Cover by Berlin Green

NEWS 5 6

COMMENTARY Robin Meyers

Chicken Fried News

EAT & DRINK 9 10

Summer cocktails Gazedibles

ARTS & CULTURE 13

Art Moves

14 COVER Art exhibits

16 COVER Local booksellers 20 COVER Movies 21

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MUSIC Bans Off Our Bodies The Black Crowes 26 Old Blood Pedals 27 Jabee Williams EP 28 Live music 24 25

THE HIGH CULTURE 29 30

Guyutes recipe Strain reviews

FUN 30 31

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VOL. XLIV NO. 16 EDITOR & PUBLISHER Matt Dinger | mdinger@okgazette.com

AUGUST 27

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kelsey Lowe | kelsey.lowe@okgazette.com CREATIVE DIRECTOR Berlin Green | bgreen@okgazette.com ADVERTISING advertising@okgazette.com 405-528-6000 CIRCULATION MANAGER Patrick Hanscom | phanscom@okgazette.com CONTRIBUTORS Jerry Bennett Brett Fieldcamp Robin Meyers Dave Gil de Rubio

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COMMENTARY

Dear Oklahoma weathercasters: Please tell us the truth THE STATE’S SLATE OF WEATHER CELEBRITIES OWE IT TO THEIR VIEWERS TO CONTEXTUALIZE THE PHENOMENA WE’RE ALL LIVING THROUGH. By Robin Meyers

Most of us watch the local news for the weather, so to say that meteorology has come a long way would be an understatement. We have corporately-sponsored helicopters whose pilots are heroes, storm chasers with household names and gazillion-watt radar systems dueling with other stations to be the most precise, powerful and fantastic. In Oklahoma, hyping the weather is an industry, and when tornadoes are possible, watching your regular TV schedule is not. And although the histrionics are often over-thetop, there is no doubt that advance warning saves lives. Yet for all the information that is shared in real time by the most popular and well-paid people in local media, the most important truth of all is never spoken: more and more extreme weather is the result of global climate change. In fact, over nearly four decades of living in Oklahoma, I’ve never heard the phrases, “climate change” or “global warming,” or most accurately now, “global climate emergency,” uttered by a single local weathercaster. The regular news that surrounds the forecast, however, is the truly terrifying proof: wildfires, floods, super hurricanes, record-breaking cold and heat, melting polar ice and rising sea-levels — often without any mention of what almost all scientists (and now, most meteorologists) know is causing it. This is true, even though weathercasters are local and well-liked celebrities who are better equipped to explain climate change than anyone. So why don’t they? Everyone knows the answer. The very mention of climate change is considered a political act. Conservatives say liberals worry about it because they hate oil and gas and want everyone to drive an electric car. Liberals say conservatives dismiss it as a leftwing conspiracy to destroy our

carbon-based way of life. Like everything else in our Disunited States of America these days, the most dangerous realities we dismiss are the ones that have the least to do with politics. The Earth could care less about how you vote. A perishing planet is the ultimate by-partisan killer. When it comes to weathercasters and climate change however, things are rapidly changing — except in Oklahoma. A decade ago, most TV forecasters did not mention climate change or had their doubts about it. Now the vast majority do. In fact, they have decided that their position is unique and their relationships to viewers is highly credible. As the New York Times reported, “Once considered comic relief to anchors, television meteorologists are making it clear to viewers that they are covering a crisis in real time … For decades, the men and women taking their best educated guess about the weather provided a respite from grim news reports, often playing a comic foil to the anchors. Before Willard Scott became the most prominent weatherman of the 1980s on NBC’s ‘Today Show,’ he had played Ronald McDonald and Bozo the Clown.” But this is no joke. Of course, people often dismiss extreme weather as having always been around when they were a kid, but extreme weather is hardly what it used to be. A warming planet has trapped more water vapor in the atmosphere, fueling storms that far exceed our previous definition of extreme. Weathercasters across the country now feel a moral responsibility to tell us the truth because the science is overwhelming and more of their viewers are experiencing climate change in real and often deadly ways. This is not about beating people over the head with a reality they often feel helpless to change but rather being honest about what

The Rev. Dr. Robin Meyers, photo provided.

the science says and helping people to confront what is happening in ways that transcend politics. Local stations market weathercasters as heroic figures who help save lives. But climate change is killing people — lots of people whose lives also matter. Have they been told by station management not to mention it? Is it bad for ratings? Probably, but what is a drop in ratings compared to the sixth great extinction? Years ago, it was a meteorologist at MIT who coined what we paradoxically call “chaos theory.” Edward Lorenz stumbled onto a remarkable discovery when he was trying to create early algorithms to better predict the weather. When he made a miniscule change in the data input to speed up his calculations, the results turned out to be the difference between a blue sky and a monsoon. Why? Because apparently there are no variables too small to affect complex systems. His memorable question was as haunting then as it is timely now, “Does the flap of a butterfly’s wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas?” Now that global temperatures have risen nearly 2 degrees Fahrenheit since 1900, we are no longer dealing with butterflies. Climate variables are multiplying

exponentially, and we need the people we trust every evening to predict the weather to also tell us the truth about why the weather is changing. This is not a conspiracy. This is life and death. This is about our grandchildren and the land we say is grand. It is also about the creation we say is a gift and the sacredness of the only home we have. Dear Oklahoma weathercasters: Please, please, please join the national movement among meteorologists to share what you know about the reality of global climate change. Wouldn’t that be the true Oklahoma Spirit? The Rev. Dr. Robin Meyers is pastor of First Congregational Church UCC in Norman and retired senior minister of Mayf lower Congregational UCC in Oklahoma City. He is currently Professor of Public Speaking, and Distinguished Professor of Social Justice Emeritus in the Philosophy Department at Oklahoma City University, and the author of eight books on religion and American culture, the most recent of which is, Saving God from Religion: A Minister’s Search for Faith in a Skeptical Age. Visit robinmeyers.com

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Illustrations by Jerry Bennett

Is the heat keeping everyone home or is it the air conditioning? Given, everyone is exhausted from the unrelenting heat and the scheduling chaos that comes as summer starts to wind down. Factoring in the extra costs associated with back-to-school season even in the most temperate of years makes it worse, but this year is especially taxing thanks to OG&E. Walk into any of your favorite spots since the July electric bills rolled in and you can expect to immediately find a seat. Bet you can find at least one person there grumbling about how their electric bill is higher than it’s ever been, with many — most, even — complaining that it’s twice or more than the highest one they’ve ever paid.

But, as your family is wrung dry of every spare cent this season, you can rest easy knowing that OG&E’s shareholders are seeing returns on their investments that are approaching their pre-pandemic heights. The top four owners of the “public utility” own more than $2 billion in stock, according to OGE Energy Corp’s profile on CNNBusiness. And not one of those who own more than a percentage point of OG&E — BlackRock Fund Advisors, The Vanguard Group, State Street Global Advisors and Fidelity Management & Research — is based in Oklahoma. In fact, individual shareholders represent 1.4 percent of ownership.

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The party that wants to keep politics out of the classroom sure is funneling its politics into the state’s education board. Tulsa Public Schools — the largest school district in the state — had its accreditation downgraded to “accredited with warning” after a “teacher from Memorial High School in Tulsa complained to the Oklahoma Department of Education in February that a staff training from August 2021 violated state law HB1775, which restricts conversations on race and racism. (HB1775 is sometimes known as the anticritical race theory law.) The law wasn’t in place at the time of the training,” Education Week reported. Their infraction, according to Education Week, was in part that training included unpleasant (but uncontested) facts like Black students were suspended two and three times more than white students

“and that teachers hold lower expectations (explicitly or implicitly) for Black and Latino children as compared to White peers.” Mustang Public Schools received the same treatment after it told on itself. “The incident in question involved a middle school teacher conducting a Cross-the-Line activity, which allows students to see the ways they’re similar to and different from each other by taking a step back or forward depending on how they respond to questions. The larger the gap, the bigger the difference. The question that Mustang deemed unlawful was ‘If you have ever been called names regarding your race, socioeconomic class, gender, sexual orientation, or phys-

ical/learning disability and felt uncomfortable, take one step back,’” Education Week reported. If there’s one thing that shouldn’t be taught in schools, it’s empathy, a

quality that administrators ruling over school districts with an iron fist also seem to lack.

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EAT & DRINK

Cooling cocktails AS TEMPERATURES STAY HOT AND THE KIDS RETURN TO SCHOOL, HERE ARE A PAIR OF COCKTAILS TO COOL YOU DOWN AND LIFT YOUR SPIRITS UP.

El Abrazo

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GAZEDIBLES

Step outside the border When you’re craving flavors that Tex-Mex can’t fix, Oklahoma City is home to a number of locally and nationally beloved Latin-American establishments that offer a variety of authentic dishes from areas across the map. Here are seven places serving a myriad of dishes from countries south (and east) of the border. By Berlin Green

Photos provided.

Cafe Kacao

Carican Flavors

Cafe DO Brasil

405-602-2883 • 3325 N Classen Blvd. cafekacao.com

405-424-0456 • 2701 N Martin Luther King Ave. caricanflavors.com

405-525-9779 • 440 NW 11th St #100 cafedobrazilokc.com

Cafe Kacao has developed a national reputation for its homestyle Latin cuisine, and for many, it’s considered both a culinary embassy and a starting point for novice diners. This family-ow ned restaurant has managed to stay at the top of its game for more than a decade, still serving lines that stretch out the door each week. The menu is loaded with traditional Guatemalan classics plus an assortment of gourmet pancakes.

A Caribbean soul food spot on the city’s northeast side has solidified itself as a popular go-to, offering explosive tropical flavors in dishes like oxtail, goat, lamb and chicken prepared curried or jerk style. Each dish is served cafeteria style alongside traditional sides like rice and beans and fried plantains. For an extra dose of Caribbean flair, diners can chill out with their choice of freshly squeezed fruit juices and smoothies or an imported soda.

Oklahoma City isn’t exactly overflowing with Brazilian restaurants but Cafe DO Brasil more than makes up for the shortcoming. Whether you stop in for lunch or dinner, the menu is packed with authentic dishes labeled with their area of origin, including the Feijoada Brasileira, the national dish of Brazil. This rich stew of black beans, roasted pork and calabresa sausage, with rice, collard greens, orange slices and a pork belly farofa will become your new favorite comfort food.

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Cafe Antigua

La Brasa

El Fogón de Edgar

Naylamp Peruvian Restaurant South

405-602-8984 • 1903 N Classen Ave. cafeantiguaok.com

405-524-2251 • 1310 NW 25th St. labrasaokc.com

405-602-6497 • 7220 S. Western Ave. facebook.com/ElFogonDeEdgar

405-676-0836 • 2106 SW 44th St. facebook.com/naylamprestaurante

Cafe Antigua, the colorful Guatemalan restaurant located in the Victoria building along Classen Boulevard since 2007, offers a traditional menu for breakfast and lunch alongside selections of perfectly roasted coffee. It’s one of the best places in town to find traditional dishes like huevos motuleños, a handmade corn tortilla with refried black beans, eggs any way you like them and your choice of proteins like chicken, asada, chorizo and longaniza.

To dine at La Brasa is not only to enjoy Peruvian-style cuisine, but a full sensory experience. The decor is anything but casual with its thick floral accents and vibrant pops color and the food is meticulously constructed. The menu showcases piquant ceviches, flavorful sea bass and the lomo saltado — a traditional Chinese-Peruvian dish of stir-fried beef, tomatoes, and french fries — gets a major upgrade with diced filet mignon, smoked cherry tomatoes and crispy potato strings.

One of Oklahoma City ’s only Colombian restaurants, El Fogón de Edgar offers a traditional menu that will take you on a journey. Break out the stretchy pants for Bandeja Paisa, the national dish of Colombia, a big platter full of grilled sirloin steak, chicharron, Colombian sausage, sweet plantains, arepa, avocado and rice and beans, then topped with a fried egg. If you’re not quite up for such an elaborate spread, try the mouthwatering empanadas.

Whether you’re craving a seafood packed dish like Arroz con Mariscos, the Peruvian version of jambalaya or the Papa Rellena, a giant deepfried potato and meat bomb, this traditional Peruvian restaurant has it covered, but the real sleeper hit is the tender and flavorful rotisserie chicken smothered in Peruvian spices that pairs perfectly with a housemade chicha morada, a spiced purple corn drink.

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ARTS & CULTURE

All the right moves ARTS COUNCIL OKC’S ART MOVES PROGRAM BRINGS PERFORMANCE RIGHT TO THE PEOPLE WHEREVER THEY ARE. By Brett Fieldcamp

We tend to think of art existing in certain intended spaces. Paintings are meant to hang in art galleries and museums, films are meant to be seen inside specialized theaters and live music is meant to take place on a stage inside of a bar or music venue. But why can’t any space be an artistic space? Why can’t you take a musician or a painter and drop them into an area where people are already milling about? More importantly, how does the space itself change when you suddenly introduce live music or painting or dance into an environment where that kind of creative energy is normally absent? These questions formed the basis of Arts Council Oklahoma City’s long standing Art Moves program, a daily showcase of artists of all stripes, from singers to string quartets to live painters and visual artists, in often unexpected locations all over town, demonstrating their crafts openly for flash audiences and passersby. According to Art Moves Director Chase Kerby, the only criteria to be included is creativity. “If it’s art, I try to put it out there,” he said. “We’ve had street art, musicians, jugglers, everything. I’ve had a dance company come out and tie aerial things to the rafters in Leadership Square and do spin dance. It’s pretty wild.” Since taking over as director for Art Moves in 2017, Kerby’s mission has been to expand not only the program’s already enormous roster of artists and musicians, but also the diversity of city locations from which to host the daily show. “For the longest time, it was predominantly happening downtown,” he said, “and one of the things I’ve been saying a lot is that we’re the Oklahoma City Arts Council, not just the Downtown Arts Council. So one of the things I’m really trying to do lately is to have Art Moves represented in places like The Plaza or during First Friday in The Paseo. The idea is to look at places where we have a rapport, but also where there’s a guaranteed audience.” That search for new and diverse

audiences has taken Art Moves into some unexpected and surprisingly receptive spaces over the years. “I actually got us into St. Anthony’s,” he said. “I just went in and met with the marketing director there and she Visual artist Jasmine Jones (above), cellist Sam Kahre(left) and magician Michael King (bottom) share their talents during Art Moves. Photos by Chase Kerby.

space like a hospital, but generally deterring audiences and gatherings across the board. During that time, as with most other aspects of life, the program went virtual. “I think we actually only missed one day because of COVID,” Kerby explained. “The day that everything really shut down, I think we had to cancel that performance, but then we got everything set up to go virtual really quickly and we kept it going every day.” As the world still tentatively limps back toward some sense of public normalcy, Kerby has begun attempting to not only get Art Moves back into all of those former public spaces, but also to ramp up the proloved the idea. She showed me different locations all over the hospital and we ended up having singers performing in a walkway next to the cafeteria, and it was great. I’d really like to get us back into St. Anthony again, actually.” COVID-19 threw a wrench into Kerby’s efforts to significantly expand Art Moves around the city, not only making it impossible to invite performers into a delicate

gram’s expansion into more diverse and widespread locations across the whole of the city.

As longtime Arts Council Executive Director Peter Dolese steps down and newly-announced Executive Director Angela Cozby establishes herself in the role, all hands in the organization are focused on carrying ACOKC into the future and dramatically widening the scope of the city’s arts community. For programs like Art Moves, that means figuring out the best balance between virtual and in-person daily performances, but also looking at the changing dynamics of the city and its various different neighborhoods and audiences. “We’ve started doing things like jazz at Eastside Pizza and Culture Coffee, and I’m looking into things that we could do around Capitol Hill,” Kerby told me. “I really want this to be for the whole city.” No matter what, Kerby says his goal – and his daily challenge – is always just to figure out the right combination of artist and area. “The number one philosophy I go by is to always make sure that the performance is additive to the spot, never subtractive or obstructive,” he explained. “When it’s good for the artists, when you can pair them with a venue that makes sense, then you know that it’ll be good for the people passing by as well.” To keep up with the schedule of daily artist showcases and where they’ll be performing around OKC, or to submit for your own chance to perform your art publicly as part of Art Moves, visit artscouncilokc.com/ art-moves.

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ARTS & CULTURE

Living rooms ART MUSEUMS ARE KNOWN FOR KEEPING GALLERIES PARTICULARLY COOL TO PRESERVE THE WORKS CONTAINED THEREIN.

Oklahoma Contemporary Destination Oklahoma As America’s crossroads as well as originally being considered “Indian Territory” until 1907, Oklahoma is a unique cross-section situated inside the nation’s larger melting pot, which results in some fantastic cultural Love Garden / Down by River by Skip Hill juxtapositions. Black artist Skip Hill returned from traversing the globe the (above). Baba/Father, to call the state — specifically Tulsa — home once again and has reimag- 2022. Stoneware with rose petals by ined Dust Bowl-era imagery through his own prism. Indigenous artist dried Ghazal Ghazi. (right) America Merideth combines her heritage with pop culture. Ghazal Ghazi Photos by Berlin Green mixes traditional Persian styles with modern portraits and September Dawn Bottoms presents her own generational trauma through photography that is both evocative and eerie after calling the West Coast home for many years while Đan Lynh Pham combines her experience of being born in Vietnam and its traditional folk art with her own assimilation into the country that she now calls home. Destination Oklahoma provides a glimpse into the diverse meaning of what it means to be both an American and, more specifically, an Oklahoman, whether by birth or adoption. Also, John Newsom’s Nature’s Course closes Aug. 15 in the Eleanor Kirkpatrick Main Gallery.

Oklahoma City Museum of Art The Perfect Shot: Walter Iooss Jr. and the Art of Sports Photography Even if you don’t recognize Walter Iooss Jr. by name, you’ve almost certainly encountered at least one of his sports portraits over the years unless you’ve been living under a rock (Iooss’ work is so iconic that you’re likely to recognize at least one image from this curated gallery even if you’ve never witnessed a sporting event live once in your life). In addition to his well-documented relationship with basketball legend Michael Jordan and the resulting book of photographs Rare Air, Iooss (pronounced “YŌS”) has documented Muhammad Ali, LeBron James, Joe Namath and Arnold Palmer among many other icons over his more than half a century shooting for Sports Illustrated. This exhibit closes Sept. 4, so these are your last few weeks to experience it before it’s gone. Also, One Hundred Years of Revolution: French Art from 1850 to 1950 opens Aug. 20 and will be on display until Feb. 19. From the Golden Age to the Moving Image will also be on display until the end of the year.

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Visitors view the exhibit (left.) An Iooss 1987 Sports Illustrated cover on display. Portrait of Walter Iooss Jr. (right) Photos by Berlin Green.


MZ Icar Collective works on their mural during the Sunny Dayz Mural Festival. Photo by Berlin Green

If you must go outside… Downtown Edmond now has 31 new murals thanks to the Sunny Dayz Mural Festival held earlier this month. Stop by and take in an eyeful of 42 freshly-painted works from female and non-binary artists from Oklahoma and beyond. Oklahoma Contemporary recently installed Breve historia del tiempo (2020), or Brief History of Time in the Campbell Art Park facing Broadway Avenue. On loan from La Colección Jumex in Mexico City, the piece is a suspended Plymouth Duster that appears to be on the verge of breaking the surface of the water’s surface immediately beneath it. The first of a Guadalajara art exhibit arriving late September in the Eleanor Kirkpatrick Main Gallery, it has to be seen in person to be experienced fully.

Breve historia del tiempo (2020) by Gonzalo Lebrija Photo by Berlin Green.

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COVER STORY

Reading rooms AS BOOK READERS BECOME FEWER AS TIME WEARS ON, LOCAL BOOKSTORES DOUBLE DOWN ON INVENTORY AND PROVIDING EXPERIENCES TO THEIR CLIENTELE. Deer Clan Books 3905 N. College Ave. (Bethany) Boasting a huge collection of Oklahoma and Native writers of both fiction and non-fiction, owner Claudette Robertson is a Muscogee citizen of the eponymous Deer Clan. A former high school social studies teacher and college history professor, her advanced degrees have informed the selection at this unassuming bookstore along College Avenue just south of the Southern Methodist University campus. In addition to hosting book signings on the second and fourth Fridays of each month at 6 p.m., Deer Clan hosts a children’s program on the first and third Saturdays of each month at 1 p.m. Oklahoma authors Kent McInnis and Joan Jenkinson will be on hand for Deer Clan’s second anniversary on Aug. 26 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Robertson is a descendent of Col. William Robison and has named the event space inside the store (which is available for rental) after her ancestor. If you’re looking for books on all things Oklahoma, drop in and choose titles from more than 50 Oklahoma authors and counting. Deer Clan Books. Photo by Berlin Green.

Literati Press Bookshop 3010 Paseo What began as Literati Press Comics and Novels more than a decade ago expanded into a bookstore in 2016 as one facet of the Paseo Plunge, a multi-use building that also contains an art gallery as well as Holey Rollers, a donut and coffee shop (among other menu items). The bookstore is a labor of love, beginning as a pair of bookshelves and expanding into more and more space in the building as interest and stock increases. In addition to the ever-expanding list of in-house titles, the selections are all curated by the staff, which is headed by local writer Charles Martin, but includes selected picks from each staff member. Literati Press also carries its own line of comics of which multiple titles are ongoing (stay tuned for more info on these in an upcoming issue of Oklahoma Gazette). The labyrinthine building is also home to several artist studios and there’s a weekly meetup for artists to work alongside each other, making this bookstore a thriving hive of creative collaboration. Visit literatipressok.com Literati Press Bookstore. Photo by Berlin Green.

Best of Books 1313 E. Danforth Road (Edmond) An Edmond mainstay for nearly four decades, Best of Books is as much a children’s bookstore as it is for adults, with more than half of the store’s space devoted to catering to young readers and an 11 a.m. storytime each Saturday. For the grown-ups, there are regular free readings and book signings attended by local writers in addition to added perks like registering your book club with the store to get 15 percent off the title and the free “book club card,” which gets you a discounted or free book after you purchase a dozen others (the credit amount is determined on the average price of the 12 items previously purchased). Additionally, Best of Books also hosts larger events off-site, including an upcoming ticketed talk and signing with Veronica Roth, author of the Divergent series, to be held at the nearby University of Central Oklahoma. Visit bestofbooksok.com Best of Books. Photo by Berlin Green.

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Full Circle Bookstore 1900 Northwest Expressway What kind of introduction does the largest independent bookstore in the state really need? Full Circle Bookstore recently celebrated more than 50 years in business, with a history that spans multiple locations and expansions over the decades and has seen in-store visits from the likes of David Grann (author of Killers of the Flower Moon) and Ree Drummond, “The Pioneer Woman.” A rescheduled spring appearance by Kristin Chenoweth is supposed to happen this winter (stay tuned for that announcement). In the meantime, drop in to peruse the titles at your leisure, as Full Circle boasts an in-store catalog of more than 60,000 volumes. Visit fullcirclebooks.com

Full Circle Bookstore. Photo by Berlin Green.

Oklahoma Books HERE ARE FOUR RECENTLY PUBLISHED BOOKS THAT COME FROM OKLAHOMA WRITERS OR HAVE THE SOONER STATE AS THEIR SETTING. Oklahoma Beer: A Handcrafted History Brian Welzbacher This little tome is short but stout, beginning with a brief history of prestatehood brewing and continuing into the craft beer boom that we’re currently experiencing. Of course there are sections dedicated to Prohibition as well as the Krebs Brewing Co. (and Choc beer), but the chapters about the myriad number of defunct brewers are perhaps the most enlightening, at least until you get to the present day. The latter part of the book tends heavily towards the beer brands that we’ve all started taking for granted like COOP Ale Works, Anthem Brewing and Roughtail Brewing Co., but there are sections dedicated to some smaller but influential operations like Battered Boar Brewing. Having just been published this year, this book will lend itself to a revised and expanded edition in a few years as the nascent industry continues its ascent.

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Half Outlaw Alex Temblador As much a road novel as it is a crime story, Alex Temblador spent three years here while she earned her Masters in Fine Arts from the University of Central Oklahoma, so while the book begins in Los Angeles, a portion of Half Outlaw is set in Oklahoma City along with a brief appearance in Tulsa. The heroine, Raqi, goes to live with her outlaw motorcyclist uncle after her parents’ death as a child. Now a successful lawyer, the novel alternates between her childhood and the present as she goes on a “Grieving Ride” for the uncle who raised her. Temblador made a name for herself as a young adult writer but her debut adult novel is certainly a standout for fans of motorcycle culture, strong female characters and magical realism.

YOUR DAILY INTEL BRIEFING

ON-AIR, ONLINE AND ON-DEMAND

Walking Through Needles Heather Levy Levy’s debut novel certainly made a splash upon publication last summer, w ith the likes of CrimeReads, L.A. Times, The New York Times and Publishers Weekly singing its praises. Now available in paperback, Walking Through Needles tells the story of Sam Mayfair, abused as a teen and now coming to learn that the man has been murdered 15 years later. Her stepbrother is accused of his murder and the rural Oklahoma setting serves as the backdrop to one of the darkest and challenging debuts in recent memory. Levy has proven herself as a capable and fearless writer who goes where few writers dare to tread.

When Stars Come Out Scarlett St. Clair To say local fantasy writer Scarlett St. Clair is prolific is still selling it short. When Stars Come Out is her first young adult excursion and the second of three books the USA Today bestselling author has already published in 2022 (with the third slated to arrive in December). A fan of Greek mythology, this updated version of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth centers around a girl named Anora and her ability to see dead people and transform spirits into gold coins, this dark fantasy novel is quick-paced and a fascinating read.

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Now in cinemas

IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR A CHEAP SEAT IN A COOL ROOM WITH AN ADDED DOSE OF NOSTALGIA, HARKINS BRICKTOWN 16 IS BRINGING ITS 80s FILM SERIES TO THE SCREEN FOR THE NEXT MONTH. A COMBINATION OF SOME OF THE FREAKIEST FLICKS AND THE BEST COMEDIES TO GRACE THE SCREEN DURING THE DECADE, EACH MOVIE PLAYS TWICE ON WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS. TICKETS ARE $5.

Aug. 13 and 17 The Breakfast Club (R) Gremlins (PG)

Aug. 27 and 31 Little Shop of Horrors (PG-13) Risky Business (R)

Aug. 20 and 24 The NeverEnding Story (PG) Pretty in Pink (PG-13)

Sept. 3 and 7 Labyrinth (PG) National Lampoon’s Vacation (R)

My Old School

Alan Cumming in My Old School, a Magnolia Pictures release. Photo courtesy of Magnolia Pictures.

If you’re a fan of topsy-turvy, twisting and curving narratives, My Old School is right up your alley. Billed as a documentary but containing animated rather than human reenactments and the protagonist being portrayed by Alan Cumming rather than the real “Brandon Lee,” this flick will keep your eyes wide through its 110-minute duration. An extra layer of weirdness is added to the production if you know the filmmaker was a classmate of Brandon Lee, who lets the story unfold with expert pacing. But that’s what the movie is, not what it’s about. The official synopsis from Magnolia Pictures: “In 1993, 16-year-old Brandon Lee

Not the first rodeo

Rodeo Cinema is going above and beyond normal screenings with added elements to create a more immersive moviegoing experience.

Cat Video Fest This year’s Cat Video Fest will not take place at Myriad Gardens but inside Rodeo Cinema’s Stockyards location. If two hours of adorable cats and kittens is your thing, then drop by one of three showings on Aug. 13 or two on Aug. 14. A portion of the proceeds go to feline-benefitting causes.

OH HAI, Greg

Greg Sestero so enjoyed his last visit to Oklahoma City that he’s returning on Aug. 25 to lead a double feature of The Room and an early look at his new 88-minute feature Miracle Valley, reportedly also the first film to shoot Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water.

Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, A Journey, A Song Jeff Buckley, John Cale and Bob Dylan are among just some of the performers that shine light on one of the most popular and widelyinterpreted songs of the century. Each showing Aug. 10-12 will be accompanied by acoustic music in the lobby by Michael Todd.

The Unusual (Calling of) Charlie Christmas Adam Hampton rolls out his local hit from 2012’s deadCenter Film Festival that went on to successful runs elsewhere. From IMDB: “A socially awkward high school janitor still haunted by the loss of his father finds strength and purpose after receiving mysterious spiritual instruction to become a costumed vigilante in Oklahoma.” Enough said. One showing only, 8 p.m. Aug. 12.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari The date has yet to be announced, but there will be an encore performance of Blake O’s live scoring of a screening of Robert Wiene’s seminal German expressionist silent film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920). The soundtrack includes looped string instruments that continuously swell as the film progresses. The next film to be scored live by Blake O. is F.W. Murnau’s Nosferatu (1922), another German horror film from the same period.

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enrolled at Bearsden Academy, a secondary school in a well-to-do suburb of Glasgow, Scotland. What followed over the next two years would become the stuff of legend. Brandon had been privately tutored in Canada while he accompanied his mother, an opera diva, on tour before her tragic death. The preternaturally bright student surprised teachers by blazing toward his goal of entering medical school, displaying a wealth of knowledge beyond his years.” There’s more to the story than that, but press releases like trailers say too much these days. Finding out the rest is up to you. My Old School opens Aug. 12 at AMC Quail Springs Mall 24.


OKG PICKS are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

BOOKS David Maraniss book signing biography author will be autographing his book, Path Lit by Lightning, about the life of Jim Thorpe, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Tue., Aug. 23. Full Circle Bookstore, 1900 Northwest Expressway, 405-842-2900, fullcirclebooks.com. TUE, AUG 23 D.D. Shaputis, Vicky Wedel, and Mark McCraw book signing authors will be signing copies of their books, Burned by D.D., The Messy Narrow Road: A Fellow Traveler’s Tips and Encouragement by Vicky, and Did You Come Home for Lunch? by Mark, Noon-2 p.m., Sat. Aug. 13. Best of Books, 1313 E. Danforth Road, 405-340-9202, bestofbooksok.com. SAT, AUG 13

FILM Ali & Ava (2021, United Kingdom, Clio Barnard) a British Pakistani landlord and a single mother of five each having troubles of their own are drawn to each other after bonding through their love of music despite their many differences, Aug. 20-21. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. SAT-SUN, AUG 20-21 Sonic Summer Movies: Sing 2 (2020, USA & Japan, Garth Jennings & Christophe Lourdelet) Buster Moon dreams of going to the big time but, when a talent scout dismisses his theatre company Moon devises a plan with his performers to sneak into the talent audition to prove that they have what it takes to make is big, 7:30 p.m., Wed., Aug. 10. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. WED, AUG 10 Soundtrax - The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari watch and listen as Blake O gives sound by creating live compositions and sound effects to the 1920 silent horror film, 7 p.m. Sat., Aug. 20. Rodeo Cinema, 2221 Exchange Ave., 405-235-3456. SAT, AUG 20

HAPPENINGS Asian Night Market Festival learn about the art, fashion and cuisine of Asian cultures with vendors, food trucks, martial-arts demonstrations, a pho eating contest and kids’ activities, Sat., Aug. 20. Military Park, 1200 NW 25th St., 405-297-3882. SAT, AUG 20

Beaded Earrings learn the basics of creating beaded earrings with Suzie Loveless, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat., Aug. 13. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE 3rd St., 405815-9995, 1ne3.org. SAT, AUG 13 Beer City Block Party celebrate live music and community with two stages, indoor and outdoor, featuring performances by Vandoliers, Jason Scott and the High Heat, Calliope Musicals, Stepmom, Conway Chitty, and more, including a secret music artist, 4 p.m., Sat., Aug. 13. Beer City Music Hall, 1141 NW 2nd St, 405-708-6937, beercitymusichall.com. SAT, AUG 13 Bees and Beekeeping learn about the art of beekeeping and the importance of bees and other pollinators, 9-11 a.m., Sat., Aug. 20. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SAT, AUG 20

Buggin’ Out! learn about different Oklahoma insects and their impact on gardens and ecosystems, 9-11 a.m., Sat., Aug. 13. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SAT, AUG 13 Cocktail Cruise see the Boathouse District, the Wheeler Ferris wheel and more on the sunset cruise with a full cash bar, Fridays and Saturdays through Sept. 30. Regatta Park Landing, 701 S. Lincoln Blvd., 405-7027755, okrivercruises.com. FRI, THROUGH SEPT. 30 Cule! at the Cowboy a western-themed live action version of the board game in which players must solve a murder, 7-9 p.m., Fri., Aug. 12. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. FRI, AUG 12 Dancing in the Gardens a monthly event of dancing on the Seasonal Plaza with local groups demonstrating the moves for the night’s theme, 7-10 p.m. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. FRI, AUG 19 Dust Bowl Dolls Burlesque the local burlesque troupe performs, 8 p.m., Tue., Aug. 23. Blue Note, 2408 N. Robinson Ave., 405-600-1166, thebluenotelounge.com. TUE, AUG 23 Farmers Market at Scissortail Park a morning market featuring local sourced options such as, pasture-raised meats, fresh produce and cultivated mushrooms, plants, eggs, raw honey, breads and baked goods, assortments of specialty prepared food and beverage producers, as well as highquality artisan from almost 60 vendors., Saturdays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. through Oct. 29. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. SAT, THROUGH OCT 29

Fiesta Friday on the 3rd Friday of the month all summer, enjoy Fiesta Friday, a monthly block party is held in the Historic Capitol Hill District featuring local vendors and food as well as live music and performances., third Friday of every month. through Aug. 19. Historic Capitol Hill, 319 SW 25th St., 405632-0133, historiccapitolhill.com. FRI, AUG 19 Guided Garden Explorer Tour free tour of the Gardens led by the horticulture team focusing on flowering perennials, shrubs, and trees, 1 p.m. every second Friday and 10 a.m. every last Saturday of the month. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-4457080, myriadgardens.com. FRI & SAT, AUG 13 &27 Heard on Hurd a family friendly evening featuring food trucks, children’s activities and live music from a variety of local artists with proceeds benefiting nonprofit organizations, every third Saturday through October, third Saturday of every month. through Oct. 22. Citizens Bank of Edmond, 32 N. Broadway, 405-341-6650, citizensedmond.com.

Kirby-Smith Machinery, Inc. is currently looking for an Energy Services Account Specialist at our Oklahoma City, OK location. Must have 5 yrs. exp. in heavy equip., energy service and pipeline industries. Nationwide travel 80% of time. Email applications to: Angela Brewer at ABrewer@kirby-smith. com.

SAT, THROUGH OCT 22

Hot Bingo Nights grab a drink at the bar and head to the patio for a free weekly bingo night with USADWEB Spec Ad.indd 1 prices spanning from gift cards to merchandise to concert tickets with a $1,000 blackout jackpot, 8 Low overhead p.m., Thursdays through August. The Jones Assembly, 901 W. Sheridan Ave., 405-212-2378, thejonesassembly.com. THU, THROUGH AUG

RAY ELECTRIC

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LIVE! on the Plaza join the Plaza District every second Friday for an art walk featuring artists, live music, shopping and more, 6-10 p.m. second Friday of every month. Plaza District, 1618 N. Gatewood Ave., 405-426-7812, plazadistrict.org. FRI, AUG 12 The Lost Ogle Trivia for ages 21 and up, test your knowledge with four rounds of free trivia play, Mondays, 7-9 p.m. through Sept. 12. Bar Cicchetti, 121 NW 2nd St., 405-795-5295, barcicchettiok.com. MON, THROUGH SEPT. 21

Make Ready Market an outdoor monthly featuring locally-made clothing, jewelry, art, and pottery with live music and food trucks, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Sat. Aug. 27. Make Ready Buildings, 220 NW 13th St., 405-399-0097. SAT, AUG 27 Needle Felting Succulents learn about the supplies, tools and methods to needle-felting by creating a felted succulent in a terra cotta pot, Sat., Aug. 20. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. SAT, AUG 20 Renovation & Landscape Show a three day expo featuring experts in remodeling, building and continued on page 22

Free Estimates JEFF RAY

405. 820.7466

RAYELECTRICOKC.COM SUNDAY, AUGUST 14

TULSA TIME TRAVELERS VINTAGE EXPO FRI & SAT, AUGUST 26 & 27

BLUE WHALE COMEDY FESTIVAL SUNDAY, AUGUST 28

SCHOOL OF ROCK SUMMER CONCERT FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

GRANGER SMITH with EARL DIBBLES JR.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

THE QUEENS DRAG SHOW SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18

BUILT TO SPILL

with THE FRENCH TIPS & ORUÃ

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 19

GWAR with LIGHT THE TORCH, CROBOT, AND NEKROGOBLIKON WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

DINOSAUR JR. with RYLEY WALKER FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23

THE FRONT BOTTOMS with MOBLEY SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24

JUDAH & THE LION with SMALLPOOLS SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

HENRY ROLLINS

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

MUSCADINE BLOODLINE with JAMES TUCKER

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1

Flux Gourmet (2022, United Kingdom, Hungary, USA, Peter Strickland) in a world where food is the music of love, a band is accepted

into an institute for culinary and alimentary performance but quickly find themselves in power struggles, artistic vendettas and even gastrointestinal disorders, 9 p.m., Aug. 16-20. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. TUE-SAT, AUG 16-20 Photo provided

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR MORE LISTINGS

COLE SWINDELL

with ASHLEY COOKE, DYLAN MARLOWE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5

BIG HEAD TODD & THE MONSTERS SUNDAY, OCTOBER 9

THE MIDNIGHT with NIGHTLY

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OKG PICKS

continued from page 21 landscaping for residential homes, homeowners will be able to learn about the latest treads in floorings, windows, cabinetry, smart home automation and much more, Aug. 12-14. Cox Pavilion State Fairgrounds, 3001 General Pershing Blvd., 405-9486700, okstatefair.com. FRI-SUN, AUG 12-14 Sip and Stroll guests 21 and over can explore the Zoo, pet stingrays, feed giraffes, partake in six different themed cocktails and more, 6-10 p.m. Aug. 18. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo.com. THU, AUG 18

Sunday Twilight Concert Series features a different music genre from local and regional acts every Sunday during the summer concert series presented by Arts Council OKC and The Chickasaw Nation, Sundays. through Aug. 28. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, artscouncilokc. com/twilight. SUN, THROUGH AUG 28 Tulsa Time Travelers a pop-up vintage expo with vendors selling clothing, accessories, home goods, handmade items. records, and more, , 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun., Aug. 14. Cain’s Ballroom, 423 N. Main St., 918584-2306, timetravelersexpo.com. SUN, AUG 14 Wheeler Summer Concert Series enjoy a night of live music and food trucks under the lights of the Ferris Wheel, third Friday of every month, 7-10 p.m. through Sept. 23. Wheeler Ferris Wheel, 1701 S. Western Ave., 405-655-8455, wheelerdistrict.com/ ferris-wheel. THIRD FRI, THROUGH SEPT 23

FOOD Veggie Dinner at Picasso Cafe join Picasso Cafe for a four to five-course menu featuring a fresh and creative take on vegetarian-inspired fare with the option to have a wine pairing. Third Tuesday of every month. Picasso Cafe, 3009 Paseo St., 405605-2022, picassosonpaseo.com. TUE, AUG 16 Eastside Fresh Market a weekly farmer’s market with vendors selling fresh produce, homemade desserts, plants and other unique products, Tuesdays, through Nov. 1. Oklahoma County OSU Extension Center, 2500 NE 63rd St., 405-713-1125, okiemgs. okstate.edu. TUE, THROUGH NOV 1 Midtown Cool Down participating restaurants and bars in the Midtown District will create specialty drinks for this Cool Down event that are over-thetop, tropical, or fruit-forward, third Wednesday of every month. through Aug. 17. Midtown OKC, NW 8th St., 405-235-3500, midtownokc.com. WED, AUG 17

YOUTH Myriad in Motion: Jump and Shout recommended for ages 4-8, this morning class will teach kids different exercises to a fun playlist and the power of teamwork to complete relay races and an obstacle course, 8:30 and 9 a.m., Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-4457080, myriadgardens.com. SAT, THROUGH AUG Perked Up Playdate children can explore the playground and participate in a craft activity while making new friends, refreshments will be provided for both adults and kids, 10 a.m.-noon Aug. 16. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. TUE, AUG 16 Weekly Walkups each day has a different theme from crafts, reading, scavenger hunts and more, 10 a.m.-noon, July 4-Aug. 12. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. MON-FRI, JULY 4- AUG 12

PERFORMING ARTS Ben Creed stand-up comedy performance, 8 p.m., Aug. 17-19; 7p.m. & 9:30p.m., Aug. 20. Loony Bin Comedy Club, 8503 N. Rockwell Ave., 405-2394242, loonybincomedy.com. WED-SAT, AUG 17-20 Cyrano de Bergerac a story of a famous swordsman and poet who is in love with his cousin but lacks the self-confidence to tell her so due to rather large nose until he devises a plan to tell her indirectly, Aug. 20-21. 3rd Act Theatre Company, 12040 N May Ave., 405-593-8093, 3rdacttheatreco.com. FRI-SUN, AUG 20-21 Gabriel “Fluffy” Iglesias live performance by famous stand-up comedian, 8 p.m., Thu., Aug. 18. River Spirit Casino Resort, 8330 Riverside Parkway, 918-299-8518, riverspirittulsa.com. THU, AUG 18 The Golden Girls Gone

Wild! enjoy an evening of laughs with dinner and a show spoofing the 1980s TV show with an all male cast, 5:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays, through Aug. 13. The Boom, 2218 NW 39th St., 405-601-7200, theboomokc.com. FRI-SAT, THROUGH AUG 13 Graham Kay stand-up comedy performance, 8p.m., Aug 10-12; 7p.m. & 9:30p.m., Aug 13. Loony Bin Comedy Club, 8503 N. Rockwell Ave., 405-2394242, loonybincomedy.com. WED-SAT, AUG 10-13 Kevin Hart a live stand-up comedy performance from the famous actor and comedian, 7 p.m., Sun., Aug. 14.. Paycom Center, 100 W. Reno Ave., 405602-8700, paycomcenter.com. SUN, AUG 14 Lizzie a rock musical by Cameron King that tells the story of what really happened the day of the Borden murders in 1892, 8 p.m., Aug. 18-19. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-7086937, southernplainsproductions.org/lizzie. THU-FRI, AUG 18-19

Pretty Women: The Musical a story of a wealthy businessman who hires a Hollywood Boulevard hooker to be his escort for a week but eventually falls head over heels for her instead, based on the 1990 film, Aug. 16-21. Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker Ave., 405-297-2264, okcciviccenter. com. TUE-SUN, AUG 16-21 Roughtail Comedy Night a homegrown comedy show alongside some homegrown brews, 8-10 p.m., third Saturday of the month. Roughtail Brewing Company, 320 W Memorial Rd, 914-432-2662. SAT, AUG 20

Ukulele Open Jam a monthly jam session open to all to either participate or listen, hosted by Jeff Howard & the OKC Ukulele Group, third Saturday of every month, 1-4 p.m. through Dec. 17. American Banjo Museum, 9 E. Sheridan Ave., 405-6042793, americanbanjomuseum.com. THIRD SAT THROUGH DEC 17

Venus in Fur adapted from a 1870 novel, this play-within-a-play tells the story of a discouraged director searching for the perfect actress to be the lead role when a late, last minute audition might just be what he is after, July 29-Aug. 13. Oklahoma Shakespeare’s Black Box Theater, 2920 Paseo St., 405-235-3700, oklahomashakespeare.org. FRI-SAT, JULY 29-AUG 13

WEIRDlesque by Terre Rouge a burlesque show themed on all things nerd and pop culture, attendees are encouraged to wear their favorite cosplay outfit, 7 p.m., Sat., Aug. 13. Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23rd St., 405-708-6937, towertheatreokc.com. SAT, AUG 13 Who Shot the Sheriff? a western-themed dinner theatre murder mystery from Whodunit Dinner Theater, Fri., Aug. 19. Cattlemen’s Steakhouse, 1309 S. Agnew Ave., 405-236-0416, cattlemensrestaurant. com. FRI, AUG 19 Zane Lamprey a stand-up comedy performance, 6:30 p.m., Sun., Aug. 21. Anthem Brewing Company, 908 SW Fourth St., 405-604-0446, anthembrewing.com. SUN, AUG 21

ACTIVE Discover Kayak Class a 90-minute class that teaches the basic strokes, maneuvering techniques, and general safety rules for recreational paddling, 6-7 p.m. Weds.; 10-11 a.m. Sat. Rivesport OKC, 800 Riversport Drive, 405-55-24040, riversportokc.org. WED-SAT Discover Ski Class first-time skiers learn the basics of turning, slowing, and stopping on the slopes all on a customized surface that replicates the feel of snow, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Weds. and Sun.; 10-11 a.m. Sat. Rivesport OKC, 800 Riversport Drive, 405-5524040, riversportokc.org. WED-SUN Discover Surf Class learn to surf in less than two hours from bodyboarding to full standing, once the basics are down then it is onto techniques, turning, balancing and wiping out, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Weds. and Sun.; 10-11 a.m. Sat. Rivesport OKC, 800 Riversport Drive, 405-5524040, riversportokc.org. WED-SUN Free Yoga in the Park an all-levels class on the Devon Lawn; bring your own water and yoga mat, 6 p.m., Tuesdays and 6 p.m., Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUE & SAT Full Moon Bike Rides bring your bike or rent one from OKC Ride for a leisurely ride as the sun sets, lights and helmets are required to participate, Fri. Aug. 12,

Cookies & Cocktails try treats and cocktails made with Girl Scout cookies at this

fundraising event benefiting Girl Scouts Western Oklahoma’s leadership programming for girls, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Fri., Aug. 12. Camp Trivera, 2508 NE 50th St., 405-528-4475, gswestok. org. FRI, AUG 12 Photo Shutterstock 8:30 p.m. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. FRI, AUG 12

25 NW 9th St., factoryobscura.fun. THIRD THURS,

Myriad In Motion: Hip Hop Cardio geared towards beginners, this class will get your heart rate up and tone the body through music and controlled movements led by instructors from YMCA, 10 a.m., Saturdays through July. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens. com. SATS, THROUGH JULY

Blue: Nature’s Rarest Color features works from 16 different artists exploring the color blue and its instances in nature, through Aug. 21. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-4457080, myriadgardens.com. THROUGH AUG 21

Myriad in Motion: Yoga bring a mat and water for an all-levels yoga class with instructors from YMCA, 6 p.m., Tuesdays and 9 a.m., Saturdays. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405445-7080, myriadgardens.com. TUE & SAT Myriad in Motion: Zumba grab your gym clothes and shoes for a cardio Latin-inspired dance workout led by Evelin Pino with YMCA, 6:45 p.m., first and third Thursdays of the month through Oct. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405445-7080, myriadgardens.com. FIRST & THIRD THUS, THROUGH OCT

OKC Touch Rugby Practice an evening of playing touch rugby for beginning to advanced players on the Love’s Travel Stops Great Lawn, 6:30-8:30 p.m. , Wednesdays, through Oct. 26. Scissortail Park, 300 SW 7th St., 405-445-7080, scissortailpark.org. WEDS, THROUGH OCT 26 Oklahoma City Dodgers vs Round Rock Express baseball game, Aug.10-14. Chickasaw Bricktown Ballpark, 2 S. Mickey Mantle Drive, 405218-1000, okcballparkevents.com. TUE-SUN

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Bricklive Animal Paradise features statues of endangered animals with the entire installation being made of almost two million toy building blocks, through Oct. 30. The Oklahoma City Zoo, 2000 Remington Place, 405-424-3344, okczoo.com. THROUGH OCT 30

Chihuly Then and Now: The Collection at Twenty an exhibition celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Chihuly collection at OKCMOA showcasing five decades of glass and painting telling the story of his groundbreaking career featuring never before seen works in Oklahoma City, through June 18, 2024. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH JUNE 18, 2024

Destination Oklahoma features works from five different Oklahoma artists throughout the state, depicting the distinct cultural backgrounds in various media types, such as ceramics, photographs, video, painting and more, through Oct. 17. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org. THROUGH OCT 17

Sunset Kayak Experience a sunset paddling excursion with a guided tour through the Stinchcomb Wildlife Refuge, 8-9 p.m., every other Wednesday. Lake Overholser Boathouse, 3115 E. Overholser Drive, 405-552-4040, riversportokc.org/ lake-overholser. EVERY OTHER WED

Early Influencers: How Anna Overholser & Henry Ione Overholser Perry Set the Style for Oklahoma City Women an exhibit featuring fashion and accessories worn and inspired by Anna and Henry Ione showcased by a fashion timeline with photos of the Overholser women and other trendsetters of the time, through Aug. 31. Overholser Mansion, 405 NW 15th St., 405-525-5325, overholsermansion.org. THROUGH AUG 31

Wheeler Crit cheer on Oklahoma’s top cyclists at this weekly race around the Wheeler District, 5:30 p.m., Tuesdays, through Nov. 4. The Big Friendly Brewery & Taproom, 1737 Spoke St., 405-492-3785, thebigfriendly.com. TUES, THROUGH NOV 4

Intro to Linocut Printing participants will learn reduction, lino carving, and printing techniques with Theresa Hultberg, 11 a.m.-4 p.m, Sat., Aug. 20. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE Third St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. SAT, AUG 20

Yoga at the Wheel a class for all levels led by This Land Yoga, all that is required is a mat, third Sunday of every month, 10-11 a.m. Wheeler Ferris Wheel, 1701 S. Western Ave., 405-655-8455, wheelerdistrict.com/ferris-wheel. SUN

The Light features paintings by Eliseo Casiano that combine family history with symbolism to showcase his cultural lineage, Aug. 20-Sept. 24. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE Third St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3. org. AUG 20 THROUGH SEPT 24

Zumba at Scissortail Park participate in a weekly free class at the Sky Rink Event Pavilion, 9-10 a.m., Saturdays, through Oct. 29. Scissortail Park, 300 SW Seventh St., 405-4457080, scissortailpark.org. SAT, THROUGH OCT 29

Nature, Sweet Nature comprised of two installations by Maren Hassinger constructed with galvanized wire rope, “Garden” and “Paradise Regained” will each stand in rows at relative human scale; one near the entrance to the art center and the other within the Sculpture Garden, through Aug. 31. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org.

VISUAL ARTS Adult Night at Mix-Tape an after hours event that allows those 18 and over a night to explore this immersive experiences, third Thursday of every month, 7-10 p.m. through Dec. 15. Factory Obscura,

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR MORE LISTINGS 22

THROUGH DEC 15

THROUGH AUG 31


OKG PICKS Nature’s Course features artwork over the last 20 years from John Newsom with large-scale, richly textured, oil on canvas paintings of flora and fauna.. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org.

Second Friday Art Walk a free celebration of arts & creativity held monthly in the Walker Arts District of Downtown Norman, second Friday of every month, 6 p.m. Downtown Norman, 122 E. Main St., 405-637-6225, downtownnorman.com. FRI, AUG 12

THROUGH AUG 15

Selections from In Citizen’s Garb: Native Americans on the Southern Plains an exhibit displaying modern gelatin silver prints made from glass plate negatives of Indigenous people in the Lawton and Fort Sill area from 1889 to 1891, ongoing. Oklahoma History Center, 800 Nazih Zuhdi Drive, 405-521-2491, okhistory.org. TUE-MON, ONGOING

Of the Earth: Creating First Americans Museum view the architectural history of the museum being constructed from the stage of construction to the people involved in its creation, ongoing. First Americans Museum, 659 First Americans Blvd., 405-594-2100. ONGOING OKLA HOMMA the signature exhibition of the museum, features works of art, interactive media, and film from all 39 tribes in Oklahoma as of today depicting stories with ancestral origins, collective histories, sports and more, ongoing. First Americans Museum, 659 First Americans Blvd., 405-594-2100. ONGOING

Shaved Portions configured specifically for the Campbell Art Park by Chakaia Booker, this sculpture is created from reassembled tires that are looped, stacked and linked together to allow guests the ability to enter the artwork. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org. THROUGH AUG 31

One Hundred Years of Revolution: French Art from 1850 to 1950 features works arranged in chronological order to show how the French artists changed from creating realistic depictions of the world to abstract compositions over a 100 year period. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH FEB 19, 2023

Signature Tours feature works from Albert Bierstadt, Frederic Remington and Charles Russell along with ethnographic materials from mountain men and Native Americans and the evolution of the working cowboy. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, 1700 NE 63rd St., 405-478-2250, nationalcowboymuseum.org. SAT-SUN, THROUGH AUG 31

Perception and Technique in Abstract Art features works covering two different techniques of abstract styles through various artists, through Jan. 15, 2023. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH JAN

The SuperNatural an exhibit features works from several artists focusing on a new world whose shape and matter will be determined by human activity. 21c Museum Hotel, 900 W. Main St., 405-982-6900, 21cmuseumhotels.com. THROUGH FEB 28, 2023

15, 2023

The Perfect Shot: Walter Iooss Jr. and the Art of Sports Photography features over 80 sports photographs from all types of sports taken over 5 decades of Iooss’ career, through Sept. 4. Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch Drive, 405-236-3100, okcmoa.com. THROUGH SEPT 4 Rea Baldridge/Joseph Mills/Suzanna Owens an exhibition featuring works by three artists, two paints and a photographer, through Aug. 30. JRB Art at The Elms, 2810 N. Walker Ave., 405-528-6336, jrbartgallery.com. THROUGH AUG 30

Synesthesia Factory Obscura’s newest immersive art experience focusing on color and textural elements while guests open their senses to discover what colors sound and smell like. Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, 555 Elm Ave., 405-325-3272, ou.edu/ fjjma. THROUGH JUNE 4, 2023 Thursday Night Workshop a weekly class featuring a different artist instructor that teaches how to create the art piece for the evening, Thursdays. through Aug. 25. Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center, 11 NW 11th St., 405-951-0000, oklahomacontemporary.org. THU, THROUGH AUG 25 Tipsy Artist a paint class where guests learn to paint the themed artwork for the session in which they can take home afterwards, Saturdays, through July 30. Tipsy Arts Studio, 117 W. Harrison Ave., 405822-0481, tipsyartist.com. SAT, THROUGH JULY 30

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The Lettuce Bar - Dispensary 12007 NE 23rd St. Choctaw, OK 73020 (Just 15 minutes east of the state capitol building)

Traces in Time features work from Norman Kary and Marilyn Jolly using scavenged materials that they incorporate into their work to represent humor or pathos in the human condition, through Sept. 3. Artspace at Untitled, 1 NE 3rd St., 405-815-9995, 1ne3.org. THROUGH SEPT 3 WINIKO: Life of an Object, Selections from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian reflecting on the Native belief that their cultural materials hold the spirt of their makers and those who wore or used them this exhibit features of over 100 items that have been returned to the 39 tribes of Oklahoma after being taken from them in the early 1900s, ongoing. First Americans Museum, 659 First Americans Blvd., 405594-2100. ONGOING

INSIDE INFORMATION When it’s triple digits outside, turn your thermostat down and your radio to 91.7 for a refreshing mix of cool music and cold, hard facts only available on KOSU & The Spy.

Fall Vegetable Gardening learn

to plant a fall garden from concept to harvest as well as tips to possibly extend the growing season once temperatures begin to lower and days become shorter, 10-11 a.m., Sat., Aug. 13. Myriad Botanical Gardens, 301 W. Reno Ave., 405-445-7080, myriadgardens.com. SAT, AUG 13 Photo Shutterstock

Visit okgazette.com/Events/AddEvent to submit your event or email them to listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted. Submissions must be received by Oklahoma For OKG Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday live music fourteen days before the see page 28 desired publication date. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible.

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WHO’S THE

MUSIC

BEST?

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YOU TELL US!

While the lineup is comprised primarily of women for the Bans Off Our Bodies fundraiser show, it wasn’t by design. “We were like, ‘Is it weird that it’s all women? It’s fine. Let’s just do it,’” co-organizer Kris Dahlgren said. “That was not intentional, but it is all kind of very accessible, nice, fun, kind of dreamy, poppy music. We want this

OKG OKG OKG

LOCAL BANDS WILL BE PUTTING ON A FUNDRAISER CONCERT TO SUPPORT ACCESS TO REPRODUCTIVE HEALTHCARE. By Matt Dinger

percent of the cut to The Roe Fund also, so almost all of the money from the event is going directly to The Roe Fund, which is awesome.” “We value the importance of access to healthcare for all Americans and are proud to host this abortion access benefit show at Beer City Music Hall. Abortion is healthcare,” Whitehead said.

Stepmom performs at the 2021 Sunny Dayz Mural Festival. Photo by Berlin Green

OKG OKG OKG NOMINATE YOUR FAVORITE OKC BUSINESSES BEGINNING SEPT. 7 AT

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event to be really fun, because we know this issue is really depressing and we don’t need to remind anyone of how depressing it is. We want everyone to come and raise money and have a really good time, and I think all of these bands are things that you can dance to and are enjoyable to I would say just about anybody.” Labrys, Stepmom, Nia Mone, Maddie Razook and Keathley are scheduled to play the event Aug. 21 at Beer City Music Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. The event was suggested by Laal Shams and Don Eisenberg has also helped organize. “Laal has been raising money for The Roe Fund for several years now by selling these T-shirts that say, ‘Keep abortion safe and legal,’ so this event really got started with her,” Dahlgren said. “Between me and Laal and Don, we just made a list of like 15 local bands that we were interested in and their availability and narrowed it down to these five people, so yeah, just kind of our favorite local bands,” she said. “We reached out to Beer City and Chad [Whitehead] was super on board. Beer City’s actually donating their 30

A large number of raffle items have already been donated, which along with the T-shirts, will also be used to raise money. Emergency contraceptives, like Plan B, will be distributed free of charge, Dahlgren said. The American Civil Liberties Union, Freedom Oklahoma, Out of Harm’s Way, Period OKC and The Roe Fund will all have tables at the fundraiser. Proceeds will benefit The Roe Fund, which provides financial and emotional assistance for reproductive services as well as provides connections to other health resources and Indigenous Women Rising, who provide resources to Native and Indigenous women. There are no additional fundraiser shows the trio has planned at the moment. “Since Roe fell, it’s been pretty sad, but there have just been so many awesome benefits happening for abortion access, so I feel like this is just one of many happening in our state, which is exciting. So even if we’re not going to carry it on, I know that many other people in our state will,” Dahlgren said. Tickets are $10 in advance and $12 day of show. Visit beercitymusichall.com


MUSIC

As the Crowes fly A COUPLE OF YEARS BEHIND SCHEDULE DUE TO THE PANDEMIC, THE BLACK CROWES ARE CELEBRATING THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF THEIR DEBUT ALBUM WITH A TOUR. By Dave Gil de Rubio

When Chris and Rich Robinson made the November 2019 announcement that The Black Crowes were reuniting, it represented a reconciliation between the siblings after the band was blown up in 2015. The plan was to launch a lengthy reunion tour in 2020 commemorating the 30th anniversary of the group’s 1990 debut album Shake Your Money Maker. Then COVID-19 struck and the touring industry. along with the rest of the world, ground to a halt. The 2020 tour was pushed back a year, and now The Black Crowes are doing more shows this summer celebrating that debut album. For guitarist Rich Robinson, this unexpected respite turned out to be a mixed blessing, allowing him to get some perspective, while quarantining at home with his family in Nashville. “For 31 years, I’ve never not toured, played music with other people, been in the studio or done something to that effect for over a year,” he said. “That’s been interesting and a little tough because it becomes a part of you as a person just to have that feeling “But on the flipside, the positive of it was to be able to spend time unfettered with my children and be able to do that for 15 months without having to leave. Also being able to see them every day and experience all the joys of home schooling while trying to figure out how to use Zoom.” But while it might seem simple for the brothers Robinson to pick up where they left off, reconnecting involved rebuilding a relationship that crumbled to the point where neither had been in touch with each other for several years. It was bad enough that Chris had never met Robinson’s two youngest children and Rich had been just as disconnected from nephew Ryder and niece Cheyenne. And while both went on to other projects, Chris with the Chris Robinson Brotherhood (CRB) and As The Crowe Flies, and Rich with The Magpie Salute, both were on the same page in terms of mending fences. For the younger Robinson,

it was even more apparent given the direction The Magpie Salute was headed. “The financial and a lot of the creative burdens [in The Magpie Salute] were on my shoulders and it was reaching a point where it was untenable,” he admitted. “I don’t feel like we were growing as fast as we would have liked. It was a much longer road for us and I don’t know if everyone was ready to take the sacrifice and really give it five or 10 years to get to a certain level. So alongside that, I’d written a bunch of songs and one of my main things is that I always wrote for Chris. It had been seven years since I’d talked to him and I just kind of missed my writing partner. We brought these two [perspectives] to the table when we wrote these songs together. I remember saying to a mutual friend, ‘I wrote these songs and I really miss Chris.’ It wasn’t a pitch or anything — just a passing comment. Our friend said that Chris said the same thing to him the other day. We were kind of on a similar page.” With the pandemic-enforced downtime, the Robinsons were able to reconvene with George Drakoulias, who discovered the band, produced their first couple of albums and was a mentor during the band’s formative years when the struggling musicians didn’t have a manager, lawyer or record deal. The trio dove into the vaults and emerged with a 30th anniversary, multiformat Shake Your Money Maker reissue. It includes three unreleased studio tracks (including the first single “Charming Mess”), B-sides, demos and a 14-song unreleased live recording from a 1990 two-night Atlanta homecoming stand after the album had gone platinum. While much of that time was a blur for Rich Robinson, he was pleasantly surprised at what was found on the cassette demos Drakoulias had saved and pulled out for this project. “I was 19 at the time, and I think we were so excited just to be able to make an album,” he recalled. “We never thought about the future or where it was going. We just knew we were making a record

Rich Robinson (left) and Chris Robinson of the Black Crowes. Photo by Josh Cheuse.

in a studio with gear. That was about as far as we were looking forward and once it was done, we never looked back at Shake Your Money Maker. From the first show on, we were throwing in new songs, covers and it was almost like we were so excited to get to the next record that we never took stock in what [Shake Your Money Maker] meant to us and what a great record it is. I haven’t listened to that record in literally decades. Listening to the old stuff is just not my thing. So to listen to that record and have this tour be the focus of it and have all of this extra stuff and artwork—I’m really happy with how the process turned out. Everyone involved did a stellar job and I’m really happy with it.” The Black Crowes have returned to the road this summer having released an EP, 1972, with covers of songs released 50 years ago by the Rolling Stones, David Bowie, T. Rex, Rod Stewart, Little Feat and the Temptations. The band’s touring lineup is rounded out by guitarist Isaiah Mitchell, keyboardist Joel Robinow, Brandi Carlile drummer Brian Griffin and background singers Mackenzie Adams and Leslie Grant. The one former band member returning to the fold is Sven Pipien, who was the bassist from 1997 until The Black Crowes splin-

tered in 2015. Founding member/ drummer Steve Gorman, who penned 2019’s memoir Hard To Handle: The Life and Death of the Black Crowes: A Memoir, was not asked back, and when asked about the reunion tour during 2019 Variety interview opined “I don’t begrudge anybody that goes to see it, but it’s sad … it’s always gonna be sad.” For Rich Robinson, who said he hadn’t read Gorman’s book, getting a fresh start with his older sibling is the key. “Steve was one of the incredibly negative and manipulative forces in the band that (we) really didn’t want to deal with,” he said. “In order to get back, we really had to do this very specific purge where we focus on the two of us and let this be something that will be positive. We can be in charge of our own triggers, but if you have other people around that have an agenda, which a lot of the older people around did, it’s just going to crash and burn. We didn’t look at this as a one-time thing. We want to focus and do it right for ourselves as human beings. For ourselves as brothers. For ourselves as writing and creative partners as well as the other reasons.” Visit thezooamphitheatre.com

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MUSIC

Violent delights THE NEW SCREEN VIOLENCE EFFECTS PEDAL FROM OLD BLOOD NOISE ENDEAVORS SEES THE OKC LOCALS COLLABORATING WITH INTERNATIONAL SYNTH STARS CHVRCHES. By Brett Fieldcamp

The continually exploding guitar effects pedal industry – which has something of a surprising epicenter in Oklahoma City with some of the world’s biggest and most respected manufacturers based here – has a long and lucrative history of major artist collaborations. Superstar guitarists and aficionado heroes alike regularly partner with pedal builders to create loads of little stompboxes that help players to dial in their signature sounds and guitar tones, with even locals like Keeley Electronics producing fan-favorite artist collab pedals with the likes of Andy Timmons and Ariel Posen. But the one thing that connects all of these signature guitar pedals is that they’re normally done with, well, guitarists. OKC’s Old Blood Noise E nde a v or s (OBN E ), already known and beloved for their insistence on doing things way outside the box, are rethinking the signature effects pedal with their first ever artist collab project, the Screen Violence, created alongside the decidedly not guitaroriented CHVRCHES. The pedal is on sale now. Known for their wild, glittery, sometimes sinister synth-pop and electronics, CHVRCHES are definitely the kind of sonic explorers that are always searching for newer, crazier textures, but though they do employ some guitars in their sound, they’re far from the kind of six-string virtuosos or bluesmen normally associated with signature guitar tech. So how did this new Screen Violence pedal (named after the band’s 2021 album) find its way into the world? “They actually reached out to us in the first part of 2020,” said Brady Smith, founder and co-owner of Old Blood. “Quarantining had already started, and I know that Martin

[Doherty, multi-instrumentalist for the band] had started working on the music that would become their new album. He had apparently been using a lot of our pedals and he’d actually been getting into building his own DIY pedals, just like as a little downtime

Brady Smith. (above) The Screen Violence pedal (left) Photos provided.

hobby. So I think he just had the idea that they could do a pedal project for their album release, so they reached out.” Having never done a collaborative pedal with a major musical artist, the decision to partner for their very first with an act like CHVRCHES seems very “Old Blood,” seemingly intentionally turning the concept of the signature guitar pedal on its head. Or maybe not? “I don’t think it was as intentional as that, but I like it,” Smith said. “Internally, we were just like ‘let’s try, and if we’re going to do this, let’s do it with somebody that’s unexpected, that’s, you know, not

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guitar-oriented.’” Yo u ’d n e v e r know by his chill, relaxed demeanor that Smith helped create and oversee a company building technologies used by worldclass musicians all over the globe. The crew of OBNE love being the outsiders, nonchalantly ex plor ing t heir whims and curiosities and turning them into some of the coolest, and in some cases weirdest, little effects boxes on the market. The Screen Violence itself, for example, is an oddity no matter what instrument is running through it. The “Violence” footswitch controls a gnarly, fuzzy distortion, perfect for adding some serious sharp edges to a synth line. The other footswitch, the “Screen,” activates a “modulation engine,” whereby turning a single knob creates a wide range of unexpected echoes, reverberations, and swirling, psychedelic effects. The ability to stack and manipulate the two effects means its possibilities are nearly endless, with countless online reviewers exploring its ca-

pabilities with guitar, keyboards, vocals, and even drum treatments. W hether their work with CHVRCHES is a signal of a new, larger-scale era for the company, or a harbinger of more artist collaborations to come, Smith’s answer equally mysterious as the sounds the company creates. “Maybe,” he said easily. “It would depend on the artist and on the idea.” Even with the company’s success, and even with the rousing reception for the Screen Violence, Smith’s vision for Old Blood Noise Endeavors remains focused more on creativity and experimentation than on expansion or chasing the market. Even now, still hot on the heels of the high-profile, international collaboration that spawned the Screen Violence, the company is already working on some new pedals that will push the limits of weird, wild effects even further. “From the beginning of Old Blood, it’s been very much like we get something done, we do it, and we go,” Smith said. “We don’t think too much about it. It’s not precious.” Visit oldbloodnoise.com


MUSIC

Therefore he AM OKC’S RESIDENT RAP SUPERSTAR JABEE CONFRONTS HIS OWN SELF-DOUBT ON FIRST PART OF MULTI-EP PROJECT By Brett Fieldcamp

There is another pandemic coming hot on the heels of the ongoing one we’ve all come to know and loathe. A pandemic of doubt. In addition to the tragic and continuing toll that COVID-19 has taken on our world, it’s also left a number of lingering and demoralizing questions in its wake, especially for artists and creators. What is the value or meaning of creating collaborative, communal art and entertainment if our communities are so fragile, if the entire industry can grind to a halt? When there is so much to fear from one another, can we still aim for connection and understanding without being doubted or becoming irrelevant? Or as Jabee puts it, AM I GOOD ENOUGH? That’s the central question that stands to resonate throughout Jabee’s recently announced fourpart conceptual EP project, with the first installment, AM, set to drop on his birthday, Aug. 12. He headlines a release show that night alongside a genre-straddling lineup including Sarafina Byrd, Stringsmen and Brandon Birdwell at Tower Theatre. With this project, Jabee says he’s confronting his own overwhelming COVID-corrupted confidence head-on by re-examining his life and his journey alongside four different producers, four different musical approaches and an ever-expanding roster of guests and collaborators. Each EP is said to be inspired by different elements and periods of Jabee’s life, and AM, fittingly, sees him exploring his own mind and his own existence, not only in the present tense, but in the concepts, environments, and circumstances that informed the life he lives today. Kicking off with the self-realization anthem “Find Yourself,” this installment’s stylistic approach announces itself clearly. Backed by producer Derek Minor, known primarily for his own more gospel-influenced hip-hop, Jabee

i m bu e s t he entire record with the formative music of his youth, from the passionate gospel singalongs to the old-school piano loops and funky breakbeats of Golden Age rap. T h e r e ’s a nostalgic optimism and idealism at play here that recalls a bit of childlike naivety, but the messages aren’t sugar coated or Album art for AM by Jabee. Photo provided. softened, espemostly it’s a shockingly delicate cially when getting real about the and wistful look into the heart of city he calls home. the community and both the love When considering his own and the shared turmoil that has status as Oklahoma City’s reigning kept it together. king of the game on standout track AM is a remarkable and poten“Aquimibee,” he offers “Your tially even risky way to launch whole connection is the stolen this “AM I GOOD ENOUGH” essence,” understanding that the project. It’s musically dense and culture and history that he upholds creatively melodic in ways that is exactly the element that the city you don’t find in a lot of mainhas worked to erase and pave over stream rap lately, but more than for decades. On gospel-tinged that, the six tracks on this EP all protest track “How Many More,” feel connected by something that he opens with, “Somebody asked you don’t often see or hear in how I became an activist. I don’t hip-hop at all: sadness. know. Someone asked a question, It might be safe to say that and I answered it.” The implicaJabee has crafted the genre’s first tions of the nature of truth and the serious look at the nature of the rebelliousness of honesty speak game post-COVID and maybe for themselves. even the first real antidote to the Which brings us to this first inencroaching pandemic of doubt. stallment’s finale, “Eastside with Because if he can doubt himself Love,” both a love letter to eastside and still produce something this OKC and a lamentation of its conhonest and strong, then maybe we tinuing dismissal by the city. all still can. Joined by a host of eastside talents, Tickets are $15-$20. each telling their own homegrown Visit towertheatreokc.com stories in the form of namedropped streets and hyper-local references, this track is as much a community-defining anthem as any chart-topper about NYC or LA. As with every track on AM, there are quick moments of fun and hints of defiant posturing, but

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McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ

Country Music Group Therapy/Biscuits & Groovy, The Deli. COUNTRY

Mountain Smoke, UCO Jazz Lab. BLUEGRASS

Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge Karaoke Night, Dust Bowl. KARAKOE

The Odyssey/Future Tapes/The Flycatchers/Babies On A Halfpipe, The Vanguard, Tulsa. ROCK Some Other Moon, Hollywood Corners. COVER Spunk Adams, Angry Scotsman Brewing. JAZZ Touch of Groove, Bedlam Bar-B-Q. ROCK Dr. Pants, Full Circle Bookstore. ACOUSTIC

SUNDAY, AUG. 14 Chase Atlantic, The Criterion. ALTERNATIVE

These are events recommended by Oklahoma Gazette editorial staff members. For full calendar listings, go to okgazette.com.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 10 Amy LaVere and Will Sexton, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITER Jazz Night, Bradford House. JAZZ

Short & Broke/The BlueRays/JL Jones, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES

FRIDAY, AUG. 12 Evan Phillips, Hollywood Corners. COUNTRY

Otherwise, The Vanguard, Tulsa. ROCK

Garrett Jacobson, UCO Jazz Lab. JAZZ

Tin Can Gramophone/Hosty, The Deli. FOLK

Jabee, Tower Theatre. HIP-HOP

Kendrick McKinney Trio, 51st St. Speakeasy. JAZZ

John Riley Coyote, Core4 Brewing. SINGER/ SONGWRITER

Patick Winsett, Hollywood Corners. AMERICANA The Wednesday Band, The Deli. COUNTRY

THURSDAY, AUG. 11 96 Bitter Beings/Howling Giant, 89th Street— OKC. ROCK

MONDAY, AUG. 15 The Aints/Bailey Gilbert & Friends, The Deli. AMERICANA

TUESDAY, AUG. 16

McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ

Bruce Benson & Studio B, 51st St. Speakeasy. BLUES

Mike Ryan, Beer City Music Hall. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Caleb McGee, The Deli. BLUES

The Odyssey, Ponyboy. ROCK Oliver Tree/Jawny/Huddy, The Criterion. ALTERNATIVE

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 17 Estreromance, Ponyboy. POP Gunpowder Junkies, Hollywood Corners. ROCK

Taranis, VZD’s Restaurant & Bar. ALTERNATIVE

Jazz Night, Bradford House. JAZZ

Vince Gill, Civic Center Music Hall. COUNTRY

Sunset Patio Bar Karaoke Night, Sunset Patio. KARAOKE

Alpha Virus/Mausoleum/Gangar, Blue Note. METAL

Will Gaines, Chisholm Creek. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Country Music Group Therapy/Biscuits & Groovy, The Deli. COUNTRY

SATURDAY, AUG. 13

Dust Bowl Lanes & Lounge Karaoke Night, Dust Bowl. KARAOKE

Brian Lynn Jones and the Misfit Cowboys, Remington Park. COUNTRY

Josh Roberts, The Jones Assembly. POP

Clancy Jones/Caleb McGee, Blue Note. AMERICANA

Shelly Phelps and The Storm, Bourbon Street Bar. BLUES

Jared Lee Cross, Hollywood Corners. COUNTRY Local Natives/Jordana, The Jones Assembly. ALTERNATIVE

Jason Scott, Vanessa House Beer Co. SINGER/ SONGWRITER

Kenny Pitts, Bandee’s Barbecue. ACOUSTIC

Hosty, The Deli. ELECTRIC

Dax Perrier Band, The Vanguard, Tulsa. ALTERNATIVE

Sunset Patio Bar Karaoke Night, Sunset Patio Bar. KARAOKE

Kennedy Fine, The Jones Assembly. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Greet Death/Mad Honey/Charlotte Bumgarner/Glitch, The Sanctuary. ALTERNATIVE

Dana Cooper, The Blue Door. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Kendrick McKinney Trio, 51st St. Speakeasy. JAZZ The Lumineers, BOK Center, Tulsa. ROCK The Wednesday Band, The Deli. COUNTRY

THURSDAY, AUG. 18 Billy Don Burns/Jared Deck, Blue Note. SINGER/SONGWRITER

Shelly Phelps and The Storm, Bourbon Street Bar. BLUES Short & Broke/The BlueRays,/JL Jones, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES Slightly Stoopid, The Zoo Amphitheatre. ROCK

FRIDAY, AUG. 19 Brad Fielder, Core4 Brewing. FOLK Husbands, Scissortail Park. POP Isaac McClung, Chisholm Creek. INDIE Jessica Tate, The Deli. INSTRUMENTAL McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ Noogy/Grandpa Vern, Blue Note. PUNK Randy Cassimus, Full Circle Bookstore. AMERICANA Stephen Day, Ponyboy. ALTERNATIVE Triston Marez, Beer City Music Hall. COUNTRY Tyler Lee Band, Hollywood Corners. ROCK

SATURDAY, AUG. 20 Amanda Miguel and Ana Victoria Verdaguer, Rose State College Hudiburg Chevrolet Center. LATIN POP Cobra Jab/Big Find/Turbo Wizard, Blue Note. ROCK Gasolina, Beer City Music Hall. REGGAETON Howard Brady, Full Circle Bookstore. BLUES Jane Mayes, Bedlam Bar-B-Q. POP McKee Brother Jazz Band, Bourbon Street Bar. JAZZ Miss Brown to You, UCO Jazz Lab. JAZZ My Chemical Romance/Coheed and Cambria/Dilly Dally, Paycom Center. ROCK My So Called Band, The Vanguard, Tulsa. COVER Sisteria/Glitch, Ponyboy. SINGER/SONGWRITER Soft Hands, Tower Theatre. COVER Vibro Kings, Hollywood Corners. ROCK

SUNDAY, AUG. 21 Homegrown III, Lions Park. SINGERS/SONGWRITERS Hosty, The Deli. ELECTRIC Jessica Tate, Full Circle Bookstore. INSTRUMENTALIST No Whiners Aloud, Mojo’s Blues Club. BLUES Telekinetic Yeti/White Hills, 89th Street — OKC. ROCK Tin Can Gramophone/Hosty, The Deli. FOLK

MONDAY, AUG. 22 The Aints/Bailey Gilbert & Friends, The Deli. AMERICANA

TUESDAY, AUG. 23 Bruce Benson & Studio B, 51st S. Speakeasy. BLUES Caleb McGee, The Deli. BLUES Kevin Gates, Paycom Center. RAP PJ Morton, Tower Theatre. SINGER/SONGWRITER $uicideboy$, The Zoo Amphitheatre. RAP

... And You Will Know Us by the Trail of Dead/New Candys co-founding members, Conrad Keely and Jason Reece,

took inspiration from several 70s bands, Pink Floyd and Yes to name a couple, to create their alternative rock punk band that quickly became known for their grand gestures and energetic concerts. Currently on tour promoting their 11th album, XI:Bleed Here Now released on July 15, grab a ticket for their show with New Candys at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14 at 89th Street-OKC, 8911 N. Western Ave. Tickets are $20. Call 405-463-9203 or visit 89thstreetokc.com. SUN, AUG 14 Photo provided/Dave Creaney

GO TO OKGAZETTE.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS! 28 AU GU S T 1 0 , 2 0 2 2 | OKGA Z ET TE .COM MUSIC

Live music submissions must be received by Oklahoma Gazette no later than noon on Wednesday seven days before the desired publication date. Late submissions will not be included in the listings. Submissions run as space allows, although we strive to make the listings as inclusive as possible. Visit okgazette.com to submit your lisitngs or email listings@okgazette.com. Sorry, but phone submissions cannot be accepted.


THE HIGH CULTURE

Beeting the heat THE GUYUTES CHEFS HAVE CRAFTED THE PERFECT TREAT TO COMBAT THIS SUMMER’S SWELTERING TEMPERATURES. By Matt Dinger

You scream, I scream, we all scream for ice cream. But the screaming is certain to stop once the infusion kicks in. Combining two favorites — chocolate cake and ice cream — the chefs at Guyutes have prepared a summer dessert to get everyone through the remaining dog days. “It’s kind of a take on a deconstructed version of a red velvet cake. It’s a flourless cake though, so more of a chocolate torte,” Matt Pryor said. Additionally, cream is used instead of butter for this recipe. “Technically, you could do it either way. You can use butter or you can use cream, which is what I prepped for this purpose because it takes away some of the heat element. It

takes about 30 minutes to bake and it’s going to be the only time that it’s actually going to touch heat and maybe have a chance of losing some of its potency,” he said. The ice cream flavor, however, is very untraditional. “For the ice cream, we did a beet ice cream. Very different, very interesting. You take two pounds of beets and, if you have a juicer, just put them through a juicer. Keep the two cups of beet juice,” Pryor said. The juice later goes into the ice cream while the beets themselves will be cooked into chips that go along with candied walnuts for the finished product. Guyutes infused chocolate cake with beet ice cream and a toasted walnut sauce.. Photo Berlin Green.

CHOCOLATE CAKE WITH BEET ICE CREAM AND TOASTED WALNUT SAUCE Red beet ice cream 2 pounds red beets peeled and quartered 2 cups of infused cream 2 cups of milk 3/4 cup sugar 8 large egg yolks Put the beets through a vegetable juicer (if you don’t have a juicer you can use a blender), reserving the pulp. You should have two cups of juice. Place the juice in a saucepan and reduce over low heat. Skimming as necessary, to about 1/4 cup. Strain the liquid into a container, cover, and place in the refrigerator. In a saucepan, combine the reserved beets with the infused cream and milk. Bring to a simmer, cover, and remove from the heat for 30 minutes. Strain the liquid and measure out 3 cups (discard any extra). Return it to the saucepan, add half the sugar and bring to a simmer while stirring to dissolve the sugar. Whisk the egg yolks with the remaining sugar in a bowl until they have thickened slightly and lightened in color. Gradually whisk about one third of the hot liquid into the yolks to temper them. Return the mixture to the saucepan and heat, stirring with a wooden spoon until the custard has thickened and coats the back of the spoon. Pour the custard into a bowl set in an ice bath and let cool.

Strain the cooled custard in a container, cover and refrigerate for a few hours until cold or overnight for the best texture. Stir the reduced beet juice into the custard and freeze in an ice cream machine. Remove the ice cream to a covered container and store for at least two hours. Walnut syrup and candied walnuts 2 cups of poaching liquid 8 ounces of walnut halves toasted and excess skins rubbed off 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt Poaching liquid 750 milliliters of dry white wine 3 cups of water 2 cups of sugar 1 juice of a lemon Bring the poaching liquid to a boil in a medium saucepan and add the walnuts. Lower the heat and simmer until the syrup is reduced to 2/3 cup. Strain the walnut syrup into a container, cover, and refrigerate. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Spread the walnuts on the baking sheet and sprinkle salt. Toast in the oven for about 30 mins. To test, remove a walnut and let cool — it should be crunchy. If not, continue baking a little longer, then let cool on the baking sheet.

Chocolate cakes 8 ounces of bittersweet chocolate 8 tablespoons (4 ounces) unsalted butter 3 large eggs 2 teaspoons sugar 1/4 cup of infused cream whipped to soft peaks Preheat the oven to 350. Spray ten 4-ounce souffle molds or foil cups with nonstick spray. Melt the chocolate with the butter in a bowl set over a pot of hot water. Remove mixture cool to room temperature. Whisk the eggs with the sugar in a metal mixer bowl over the hot water until the sugar is dissolved. Place the bowl on the mixer stand and whip until eggs are cooled and have tripled in volume. Fold in the cooled melted chocolate and then the whipped cream. Spoon the batter (about 2 ounces each) into the prepared molds. Place the molds in a baking pan, and pour hot water into the bottom third of the molds. Bake for 10 minutes, then cover loosely with foil. Bake for another 15 to 20 minutes or until the tops or set. Beet chips Canola oil for deep frying Flour for dusting 2 to 3 small red beets sliced paper thin on a mandoline Kosher salt

Powder sugar in a shaker In a pot add oil and heat to 275 degrees. Dust your beet slices with flour and then add them to the oil. Once the bubbles stop and the chip starts to sink remove the chips and set them onto a tray with paper towels to dry. Lightly season with salt. Infused cream Pour the decarbed cannabis into a saucepan with 2 cups of heavy cream. Set the heat between medium and low. The cream should be just below a simmer. Do not scorch the cream. Stir the mixture every 10-15 minutes. Let it steep for one hour. Place a cheesecloth over a mason jar and strain the heavy cream. Place the lid tightly on the jar and refrigerate. Use the expiration date on the original cream. Dosage calculation 14g x 24.48 percent 14g x 244.8 milligrams (converted to decimal) 3427.2 x .088 (decarbing loss) 301.59 x .80 (loss in infusion process) 241.27 divided by 32 tablespoons 7.53 milligrams per tablespoon 7.53 x 20 tablespoon 150.79 milligrams divided by 8 servings 18.84 milligrams per serving

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THE HIGH CULTURE STRAIN REVIEWS

Strain name: Bickett OG Grown by: The Territory Cannabis Co. Acquired from: Goodies Ganja Express Date acquired: Aug. 4

ing flavors. All of them. As a side note, Goodies Ganja Express is a cannabis consumer’s paradise, with not only an absurd number of flower strains but an insane collection of glassware, paraphernalia and exotic snacks on hand just a hop east on NW 63rd from the original bodega.

Physical traits: light green with wiry stigmas and frosted trichomes

Strain name: Smoked Out Grown by: Nature’s Cure Acquired from: Nature’s Cure (NW Expressway)

a bubble bath for the ultimate selfcare evening. Nature’s Cure is also a new favorite for both their wide selection as well as some unbeatable flash sales.

Date acquired: Aug. 5 Physical traits: dark green and orange Bouquet: sweet, woody and lemony

Bouquet: earthy, gassy, sweet and salty

Review: Learned about this upcoming strain while eating at Smoked Out BBQ for the summer barbecue issue. Grown in honor of Jacque Lucas, the late founder of the adjacent restaurant, this exclusive flower just hit the shelves. Jacque certainly had good taste — this cross between White Widow Extreme and the lesser known RC-99 creates a heavy hybrid that offers a smooth and flavorful smoke sesh. Offering both a strong head high and an incredibly relaxing body high, it’s perfect for when you want to relax, zone out and ease some aches and pains. Pair it with

Review: Having never heard of the Bickett OG strain, it took one whiff to know definitively that this one definitely had some GMO genetics, but the back end was familiar, yet unplaceable immediately. The cross with Cherry Pie makes this one especially pungent but hard to pin down. The effects are equally mysterious. Relaxed? Invigorated? Giddy? Sleepy? Yes, yes, yes and yes. The Territory Cannabis Co. out of Ada made a name for themselves growing strains like the Terpee Slurpee so it’s apparent that they’re chas-

FIND MORE STRAIN REVIEWS AT OKGAZETTE.COM/THEHIGHCULTURE

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY WEEK OF AUGUST 11

information and teachings in the coming weeks.

Homework: Imagine what you will be doing exactly one year from today. Newsletter. FreeWillAstrology.com

CANCER (June 21-July 22)

ARIES (March 21-April 19)

Tips to get the most out of the coming weeks: 1. Exercise your willpower at random moments just to keep it limber. 2. Be adept at fulfilling your own hype. 3. Argue for fun. Be playful and frisky as you banter. Disagree for the sport of it, without feeling attached to being right or needing the last word. 4. Be unable to understand how anyone can resist you or not find you alluring. 5. Declare yourself President of Everything, then stage a coup d’état. 6. Smile often when you have no reason to. 7. If you come upon a “square peg, round hole” situation, change the shape of the hole.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20)

If I had to choose a mythic deity to be your symbolic helper, I would pick Venus. The planet Venus is ruler of your sign, and the goddess Venus is the maven of beauty and love, which are key to your happiness. But I would also assign Hephaestus to you Tauruses. He was the Greek god of the metalworking forge. He created Zeus’s thunderbolts, Hermes’ winged helmet, Aphrodite’s magic bra, Achilles’ armor, Eros’ bow and arrows, and the thrones for all the deities in Olympus. The things he made were elegant and useful. I nominate him to be your spirit guide during the next ten months. May he inspire you to be a generous source of practical beauty.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

To be a true Gemini, you must yearn for knowledge— whether it’s about coral reefs, ancient maps of Sumer, sex among jellyfish, mini-black holes, your friends’ secrets, or celebrity gossip. You need to be an eternal student who craves education. Are some things more important to learn than others? Of course, but that gauge is not always apparent in the present. A seemingly minor clue or trick you glean today may become unexpectedly helpful a month from now. With that perspective in mind, I encourage you to be promiscuous in your lust for new

Cancerian drummer Ringo Starr is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Though he has received less acclaim than his fellow Beatles, many critics recognize him as a skillful and original drummer. How did he get started? At age 13, he contracted tuberculosis and lived in a sanatorium for two years. The medical staff encouraged him to join the hospital band, hoping it would stimulate his motor skills and alleviate boredom. Ringo used a makeshift mallet to bang the cabinet near his bed. Good practice! That’s how his misfortune led to his joy and success. Is there an equivalent story in your life, Cancerian? The coming months will be a good time to take that story to its next level.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)

One of the inspiring experiments I hope you will attempt in the coming months is to work on loving another person as wildly and deeply and smartly as you love yourself. In urging you to try this exercise, I don’t mean to imply that I have a problem with you loving yourself wildly and deeply and smartly. I endorse your efforts to keep increasing the intensity and ingenuity with which you adore and care for yourself. But here’s a secret: Learning to summon a monumental passion for another soul may have the magic power of enhancing your love for yourself.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

Musician Viv Albertine has recorded four albums and played guitar for the Slits, a famous punk band. She has also written two books and worked as a TV director for 20 years. Her accomplishments are impressive. Yet she also acknowledges that she has spent a lot of time in bed for many reasons: needing to rest, seeking refuge to think and meditate, recovering from illness, feeling overwhelmed or lonely or sad. She admiringly cites other creative people who, like her, have worked in their beds: Emily Dickinson, Patti Smith, Edith Sitwell, and Frida Kahlo. I mention this, Virgo, because the coming days will be an excellent time for you to seek sanctuary and healing and creativity in bed.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)

Libran author Katherine Mansfield wrote, “The mind I love must have wild places, a tangled orchard where dark damsons drop in the heavy grass, an overgrown little wood, the chance of a snake or two, and a pool that nobody’s fathomed the depth of.” Be inspired by her in the coming weeks, Libra. I suspect you will flourish if you give yourself the luxury of exploring your untamed side. The time is ripe to wander in nature and commune with exciting influences outside your comfort zone. What uncharted frontier would you enjoy visiting?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

When you are functioning at your best, you Scorpios crave only the finest, top-quality highs. You embrace joys and pleasures that generate epiphanies and vitalizing transformations. Mediocre varieties of fun don’t interest you. You avoid debilitating indulgences that provide brief excitement but spawn long-term problems. In the coming weeks, dear Scorpio, I hope you will embody these descriptions. It’s crucial that you seek gratifications and delectations that uplift you, ennoble you, and bless your future.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

“Wish on everything,” advises Sagittarian author Francesca Lia Block. “Pink cars are good, especially old ones. And first stars and shooting stars. Planes will do if they are the first light in the sky and look like stars. Wish in tunnels, holding your breath and lifting your feet off the ground. Birthday candles. Baby teeth.” Your homework during the next two weeks, Sagittarius, is to build a list of further marvels that you will wish on. It’s the Magic Wish season of the year for you: a time when you’re more likely than usual to encounter and generate miracles. Be proactive! Oh, and very important: What are your three top wishes?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

Author Aldous Huxley wrote, “That people do not learn much from the lessons of history is the most important lesson that history has to teach.” While his observation is true much of the time, I don’t think it will be so for you in the coming weeks. I suspect you will triumph over past

patterns that have repeated and repeated themselves. You will study your life story and figure out what you must do to graduate from lessons you have finally, completely learned.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

In the film I Origins, a scientist says this to a lover: “When the Big Bang happened, all the atoms in the universe were smashed together into one little dot that exploded outward. So my atoms and your atoms were together then . . . my atoms have always known your atoms.” Although this sounds poetic, it’s true in a literal sense: The atoms that compose you and me and everyone else were originally all squeezed together in a tiny space. We knew each other intimately! The coming days will be an excellent time to celebrate your fundamental link with the rest of the universe. You’ll be extra receptive to feeling connection. You’ll be especially adept at fitting your energy together with others’. You’ll love the sensation of being united, merged, blended.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)

My Piscean friend Luna sent me a message that sums up how I feel about you these days. I’ll repeat it here in the hope it will inspire you to be perfectly yourself. Luna said, “Every time I meet someone who was born within like two weeks of my birthday, I end up with the impression that they are the loopiest and wisest person I’ve met in a long time. They are totally ridiculous and worthy of profound respect. They are unhinged and brilliantly focused. They are fuzzy-headed dreamers who couldn’t possibly ever get anything practical accomplished and they are lyrical thinkers who charm me with their attunement to the world’s beauty and impress me with their understanding of how the world works. Hahahahaha. Luckily for me, I know the fool is sacred.”

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes / daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.


PUZZLES NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE | GOING SOMEWHERE? By Jessie and Ross Trudeau | Puzzles Edited by Will Shortz | 0731

ACROSS 1 6 10 13 16 17 18 19 22 25 27 28 29

Yankee Stadium has 24 of these In the thick of Org. with X-rays Shape of a heron’s neck Bit of publicity Bag for a diamond Yellowfin tuna Cheney and Harris, informally One prone to idol thoughts Marsh birds Clubs often require them, for short Pool locales That: Sp.

30 31 33 36 38 40 41 42 43 46 48 50 51 53

“Never you worry” Moor Call into question Bouquet Break up clods Bol’var who was known as the Liberator Evening, to Yves Reggae-like genre One looking for missing persons Singer White with the 1991 No. 1 hit “Romantic” Actress de Matteo Inits. on some handbags Two-colored Model world

55 End-of-semester form: Abbr. 57 Flick, as a cigarette, informally 58 Disappearing sculpture medium 59 Big name in Jet Skis 60 Gumption 62 ____ hall 63 Stylish flair 65 Square type 66 Necessities for drug approvals 68 English landing spot 71 Seat for the Queen? 73 Egyptian symbol of life 74 Stick with it!

76 John Cho’s role in “Star Trek” films 77 Level 78 Spill the tea 79 Hits high notes in high places 82 Suit 85 Setting of two Shakespeare plays 87 Some coding statements 88 Edith Wharton’s “ruin of a man” 91 Nautical agreement 94 Bearer of roses, maybe 95 Word with American or amber 96 Whiz 97 Aunt ____ (role on “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air”) 98 Habitual fear of being exposed as a fraud 105 N.F.L. star Elliott, to fans 106 Edify 107 Rikishi’s sport 108 “Don’t be that ____” 109 Part of a skin-care routine 110 First pope to be called “the Great” 111 Dillydallies 114 “In Search of Lost Time” novelist 115 Aphorism that’s visually depicted five times in this puzzle’s grid 119 Pros with floors 120 Unit of cauliflower 121 Split, then come together? 122 Ultimate needs 123 Parched 124 Apply (to)

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Rosebud ravager Latin for “I believe” Some black-and-white pictures Prone to brooding, say Scatters Stacey of Georgia politics Easternmost leg of I-90, familiarly Suffix with fool or fiend Opus ____ Dance shoe attachments Bundles

12 13 14 15 20 21 23 24 26 30 32 34 35 37 39 43 44 45 47 49 52 54 56 59 61 64 67 69 70 72 74 75 80 81 83 84 86 89 90 92 93 94

Put on Home of the Simpson and Flanders households Rocker Bob with 10 Top 10 albums Casper competitor One side of D.C.’s Federal Triangle iPhone app with a graph in its icon Nail-polish brand Where all the people that come and go stop and say “hello,” in a 1967 hit It’s a huge deal State ____ Former N.Y.C. mayor Ed Actress Thurman Locale for a rock climber Noted shopping mecca More like an empty old mansion at night, say Transport on the slopes Stop lying Celebrity chef DiSpirito Point in a network Profess Combines, in a way Fictional documentarian from Kazakhstan Provider of a ball of thread, in myth Like some cars and kisses ____ Club Neighbor of Cura ao Theater rebuke Scratch (out) Botch You might be advised to do this for yourself Memo opener, often “That’s rough” Downwind locales for ships “Now!” Home of Nobel Peace Prize winner Shirin Ebadi Spilled the tea “Listen!” in Le—n Cherry and peach Combined “Uh-oh!” Turn inside out Of whom Celine Dion said, “If God would have a singing voice, he must sound a lot like .?.?. “

96 ____ Schneider, winningest woman in “Jeopardy!” history 98 “____ the economy, stupid!” 99 Got together in 100 White as a sheet 101 Paul who was People magazine’s 2021 Sexiest Man Alive 102 Tremendous success 103 Squawked in pain 104 Coup result 105 Member of Gen Z, jocularly 109 Busy businesswoman in a rom-com, e.g. 112 Loved 113 Title on Netflix’s “Bridgerton” 114 Univ. V.I.P. 116 Any of the Uruk-hai in “The Lord of the Rings” 117 Word with half or hard 118 Fútbol cry

Stumped? Call 1-900-285-5656 to get the answers to any three clues by phone ($1.20 a minute).

SUDOKU HARD | N° 2147455574 Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3-by-3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9. www.printmysudoku.com Grid n°2147455574 hard

5 6

7 1

8

2 4

1 8

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS Puzzle No. 0724 which appeared in the July 27 issue. VOL. XLIV NO. 16

4

8 1 5 2 2 8 5 6 4 3 4 7 6 2 3 5

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size matters al l n ew KIA SPO RTAG E WI T H BEST-I N-C LASS CARG O SPAC E