Page 1

Saw you in the Ojo

1


2

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013


Saw you in the Ojo

3


PUBLISHER

Richard Tingen

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Alejandro Grattan-Domínguez Tel: (01376) 765 3676, 765 2877 Fax: (01376) 765 3528 Associate Publisher David Tingen Graphic Design Roberto C. Rojas Sandra Hernandez Special Events Editor Sandy Olson Associate Editor Jim Tipton Contributing Editor Mark Sconce Drama Critic Michael Warren Art Critic Rob Mohr Roving Correspondent Dr. Lorin Swinehart Sales Managers Omar Medina Bruce Fraser OI¿ce Secretar\ Rocio Madrigal ADVERTISING OFFICE Av. Hidalgo # 223, Chapala Mon. thru Fri. 9am - 5pm Sat. 9am - 1pm Tel. 01 (376) 765 2877, 765 3676 Fax 01 (376) 765 3528 Send all correspondence, subscriptions or advertising to: El Ojo del Lago http://www.chapala.com ojodellago@prodigy.net.mx Ave. Hidalgo 223 (or Apartado 279), 45900 Chapala, Jalisco Tels.: (376) 765 3676, Fax 765 3528 PRINTING: El Debate El Ojo del Lago aparece los primeros cinco días de cada mes. (Distributed over the ¿rst ¿ve da\s oI each month) Certi¿cado de Licitud de Título 3693 Certi¿cado de Licitud de Contenido 3117.

Index...

FEATURE ARTICLES

8

COVER STORY

Mel Goldberg writes up a very special event soon to occur at Lakeside. An internationally acclaimed jazz band is coming to Ajijic!

12 AMERICAN HISTORY Dr. Lorin Swinehart gives us a different (but historically more accurate) version of a hallowed American tradition— Thanksgiving!

18 BOOK REVIEW Herbert Piekow reviews Rob Mohr’s Shadow Love, subtitled “Poems of Life and Love,” and ¿nds that the poems “reveal the tender soul of a wise man who has known love, hurt and hope.”

24 MISCONCEPTIONS Rosamaria Casas, formerly an editor of the Ojo, writes of the annoying habit some ex-pats have in thinking there is such a thing as a “typical Mexican.”

32 COMPARISONS Maggie Van Ostrand compares her new home, Taos, to her old one, Ajijic— and ¿nds much to admire (and chuckle) about both of these unique places.

46 OBITUARY Mikel Miller sums up the life of Roberto Moulun, one of the most accomplished men ever to have called our beloved little corner of Mexico his home. A subtitle might well have been: “A Life Lived to its Absolute Hilt.”

Reserva al Título de Derechos de Autor 04-2011-103110024300-102 Control 14301. Permisos otorgados por la Secretaría de Gobernación (EXP. 1/432 “88”/5651 de 2 de junio de 1993) y SEP (Reserva 171.94 control 14301) del 15 de enero de 1994. Distribución: Hidalgo 223 Chapala, Jalisco, México. All contents are fully protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without the written consent of El Ojo del Lago. Opinions expressed by the authors do not necessarily reÀect the views of the Publisher or the Editor, nor are we responsible for the claims made by our advertisers. We welcome letters, which should include name, address and telephone number.

4

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

COVER STORY

z DIRECTORY z

8

&2/80167+,60217+ 6

Editor’s Page

10

Dear Portia

14

Front Row Center

15

Uncommon Sense

16

Imprints

20

Anyone Train Dog

22

Child of Month

26

Wondrous Wildlife

27

Profiling Tepehua

38

Lakeside Living

50

Bridge by Lake

60

Joyful Musings

69

LCS Newsletter

LAKESIDE LIVING

VOLUME 30 NUMBER 3

38

42


Saw you in the Ojo

5


Editor’s Page B\ AleMandro Grattan-Domingue] The Little Lady Who Made Publishing History

I

t started with a phone call from a middle-aged attorney in Atlanta to a top editor with the Macmillan Publishing Company in New York City. The caller had heard that the editor was planning to tour the South in search of interesting manuscripts, and would be stopping in Atlanta for a few days. Seems the lawyer was married to a woman who had been writing a novel for the past several years, and had become so obsessed with it that he feared the effort had become detrimental to her health. Would the editor meet with her just long enough to politely reject the book, and thus grant the lady some long-sought-after peace of mind? The publishing executive agreed on one condition: he would meet the woman only in the lobby of a hotel in Atlanta, rather than up in his room, where it might be difficult to get rid of her. Some days afterward, the lady was sitting primly on a bench, waiting for what she hoped would be her rendezvous with destiny. Years later, the editor would recall, “She could not have been even five feet tall, for her shoes fell far short of touching the floor. Next to her was a manuscript in several cardboard boxes which rose a full foot off of the bench. It totaled, she told me, more than 2000 pages! Dismayed, I was preparing my exit speech when she began to talk in the most shy, but melodious and lyrical manner. Her southern graciousness so impressed me that I agreed to have a porter take the boxes up to

6

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

my suite, telling the lady I would read it. I planned, however, to just skim through a few pages and then leave the manuscript with the hotel, along with a polite note of rejection for its charming author.” That night, the editor began to read the manuscript, noting that many of its first pages were tainted with what seemed coffee stains and even cigarette burns. When his train finally pulled into New Orleans, the last stop on his southern search for new literary talent, he was still reading it. One day later, placing a call to NYC— and in what must have been a “Stop the Presses” clarion call—he advised his company that he had found a book that might make literary history. Oh, yes, the name of the author? Margaret Mitchell . . . and the book was something called Gone with the Wind. The original press run was a modest 10,000 copies, but when the novel was selected by the Book of the Month Club, then received glowing full-page reviews in The New York Times and New York Herald Tribune, the press run was upped to 40,000 copies. Two printing companies were working three eight-hour shifts to meet the demand as the novel was selling more than 4,000 copies a day. In 1936, the American Booksellers Association named it “The Most Distinguished Novel of the Year,” and soon thereafter it would win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. By the end of 1937, Gone with the Wind had sold 1,375,000 copies—and this in a nation with a population of only about one third of what it is today! With such mind-blowing acclamation, could Hollywood be far behind? Of course not—and again Margaret Mitchell got lucky, for in a ferocious


bidding war between all the major studios, Producer David O. Selznick was the eventual winner. When the film finally held its world premiere in Atlanta in 1939, the author tearfully gave great credit to Selznick, and Vivian Leigh, who would win an Oscar for her performance as “Scarlett O‘Hara.” In time, the film became the most financially successful motion picture ever made, as well as one of the most honored, while the book itself became a huge international best-seller, eventually published in no fewer than three dozen foreign languages. To close on a personal note, some-

time after my mother died, I found, in going through her personal possessions, a copy of Gone with the Wind in Spanish, its pages literally falling away from the book’s tattered binding. Apparently, like millions of women all over the world, she had been deeply touched by an indomitable heroine who would never settle for anything less than all she could give nor all that she could ever become. Alejandro Grattan

Saw you in the Ojo

7


ACCLAIMED JAZZ BAND TO PERFORM B\ Mel Goldgerg

J

azz! Its fans are passionate about it, and many others are drawn to what is different and exciting about this music. Don’t miss the thrilling performances of an internationally acclaimed jazz band coming to the Auditorio in Ajijic for two concerts on January 11 at 7:30 PM and January 12 at 2:30 PM. This caliber of jazz is unprecedented at Lakeside. Audiences are in for stimulating performances of cool, sophisticated music. Members of the Guido Basso quartet and special guest singer Molly Johnson have performed with many of the biggest names in jazz. The quartet is composed of Guido Basso on flugelhorn, Steve Wallace on bass, Mike Murley on soprano and tenor sax, and Reg Schwager on guitar. Vocalist Molly Johnson’s interpretations of jazz and blues music has delighted audiences throughout the world. GUIDO BASSO Guido Basso is a legendary Montreal-born arranger and composer whose

work on the flugelhorn astounds audiences. He began playing the trumpet when he was nine years old and was recognized as a prodigy when he studied at the Conservatiore de Musique du Québec. As a teenager, he toured with Vic Damone and spent 1958 - 1960 touring with Pearl Bailey and her husband Louis Bellson before he moved to Toronto and joined the studio and television scene. As one of the biggest names in Canadian Jazz, he organized concerts with Dizzy Gillespie, Quincy Jones, Woody Herman, Benny Goodman, Duke Ellington, and Count Basie.

He has recorded with Buddy Rich and Diana Krall and has been a music director for TV and radio shows. Performing in Toronto with his own small groups, he brought together jazz and Latin music. He has been credited with the theory that one attacks the trumpet but makes love to the flugelhorn. In 2004 he earned a Juno in the Traditional Jazz Category for “Lost in the Stars.” Guido plays with a quiet passion and has a rare ability to communicate on a very personal level. His playing is full of subtle, dynamic shadings with constantly shifting colors. As a mainstay in Rob McConnell’s Boss Brass band, he drew rave reviews from critics around the world. He continues to amaze audiences with his sensitive interpretations of songs from The Great American Songbook. STEVE WALLACE Born in Toronto in 1956, Steve Wallace has been called the most powerful bass player in Canada. In April 2013 he won a Juno Award for Best Traditional Jazz Album for “Test of Time,” with Mike Murley and Ed Bickert. He has recorded and toured with Oscar Peterson, Oliver Jones, Rosemary Clooney, Mel Torme, Rob McConnell, and Fraser MacPherson. In 1985 he toured Europe, Japan, and Australia with Woody Herman and in the 1990s he toured as a member of

Trio. He is also an the Oscar Peterson Trio accomplished blogger with his postings on wallacebass.com. MIKE MURLEY Mike Murley has earned several Juno awards for his soprano and tenor sax playing. In 2013 he earned a Juno in the category of Best Traditional Jazz

8

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

Album when he was featured on “Test of Time.” Called one of Canada’s finest jazz artists with impressive international credentials, he often collaborates with David Occhipinti and has recorded and played with Randy Brecker, Jack McDuff, and Norma Winstone. His latest releases include “The Melody Lingers On” with saxophonist Tara Davidson and “Day and Night” with the Dave Liebman/Mike Murley Quartet. REG SCHWAGER Reg Schwager was born in the Netherlands in 1962. When he was three his family moved to New Zealand where he studied Suzuki violin. Although he

recorder, flute flute, and piano when studied recorder his family moved to Ontario in 1968, he decided that the guitar would be his main instrument. By the time he was fifteen he was playing jazz with large bands and small groups and eventually became one of Canada’s leading jazz guitarists. He has toured with George Shearing and Diana Krall and recorded with Gary Burton and Mel Torme and earned “Guitarist of the Year” for four consecutive years from 2005 - 2008. He maintains a blog devoted to news about Brazilian music (bmth.blogspot. com). MOLLY JOHNSON Molly has earned a reputation as one of Canada’s greatest voices. She has rocked standing-room only audiences in nightclubs and bars from coast to coast. She made history at the Toronto Downtown Jazz Festival by becoming the first Canadian female vocalist in the festival’s history to sell out a show on the main stage. Although she was a child star, she did not release her first solo album until 2000. Since then, she has released three more, the last in 2008 called Lucky, a collection of standards, which won her a Juno for Best Vocal Jazz Album of the Year in 2009. In that year she also won the National Jazz Award for Best Female Vocalist. Uninterested in romantic or religious ballads, the through-line of her artistic career has always been, “Be strong and


true to yourself. Listen to yourself.” Her parents met in Switzerland where her mother, Suzanne, was part of a wealthy American family and her father, John, was an African-American World War II GI who returned to Europe because American Universities had a color quota. Like her mother, Molly is also a social activist, acknowledging, “I have this responsibility thing.” She started the Kumbaya Foundation which has raised over one million dollars for people living with HIV/AIDS. JUNO AWARD A Juno Award, the Canadian equiva-

lent of a Grammy, is presented annually to Canadian musical artists and bands to acknowledge their artistic and technical achievements in all aspects of music. The Juno Awards are named in honor of Pierre Juneau, the first President of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and former President of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. WHAT IS JAZZ? While Jazz is difficult to define, improvisation is one of its major elements and is the creative expression and interaction between composer and performer. Improvisation developed enormously over the history of the music. In early New Orleans and Dixieland jazz, performers took turns playing the melody, while others improvised countermelodies. During the Big Band era, the reliance turned more toward arranged music while individual soloists improvised within the arrangements. With the shift back towards small groups, the melody was stated briefly at the start and end of a piece, but the core of the performance was a series of improvisations. Unlike symphonic music, which is played without ever varying a single note, skilled jazz performers interpret music in individual ways, never playing a composition exactly the same way twice. The performer’s mood and

personal experience, interactions with other musicians, or even members of the audience, may alter melodies, harmonies or even time signature. The jazz genre originated at the beginning of the 20th century within the African-American communities of the Southern United States. It combined European harmony and form elements with African-based music, evident in its use of blue notes, improvisation, polyrhythms, syncopation and swing. From its early development until the present day, jazz has also incorporated elements from popular music, especially American. As the music developed and spread around the world, it drew on many different musical cultures, giving rise to distinctive styles, like New Orleans jazz, bebop, Afro-Cuban jazz, avant-garde jazz, Latin jazz, jazz fusion, and other ways of playing the music. These performances will raise much-needed funds for Niños Incapacitados. Very generous sponsors have contributed sufficient money to cover all major expenses for the musicians’ visit, which means that all money raised by the concerts will go directly to help the children in the Niños Incapacitados program. TICKET INFORMATION Tickets are only 300 pesos and are available in Ajijic at Colecciones Diane

Pearl (Colon #1) and Mostly Chocolate (Constitución #39). Tickets are also available at the Auditorio de la Ribera on the following Fridays: November 15, 22, and 29 from 10:30AM to 12:30PM, by phone at 766-3651, 766-1937 or email at jazz.ppni@gmail. com. To hear examples of the Guido Basso quartet and Molly Johnson, go to http://www. jazzgreatsplayajijic. com. Mel Goldgerg

Saw you in the Ojo

9


DEAR PORTIA

Advice to the Lovelorn the Overfed and the Deeply Disgruntled

excess pounds become space travelers and leave my body in the middle of the night. God, how I hate being fat! Please help. Doubly Frustrated Dear Doubly Frustrated: First, stop acting like your life is a Greek tragedy. Then find yourself a friend who appreciates “special handles.” Besides, no diet will remove all your fat because the brain itself is entirely fat. Without it, you might look slimmer, but all you could do then is run for the U.S. Congress.

Dear Portia: Financial advice is probably not your forte, but I am turning to you as a last resort. Since moving here in 1987, I have gone through tens of thousands of my late husband’s hard-earned dollars, chasing one investment dream after another. My business guru in Guadalajara now suggests I invest in a company that plans to market frozen rattlesnake meat. He says I can’t lose, as the meat is not only tasty, but could be a cure for cancer, as well. What do you think? Going Broke in Paradise Dear Going Broke: Sounds like your investment coun-

10

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

selor is in serious need of counseling. I doubt there’s much market for frozen rattlesnake, either as meat or medicine. Buy land. They ain’t making any more of it. When the polar ice caps meet, there will be even less. DEAR PORTIA: I have been dating a very lean and attractive man for the past several years, but we have yet to “consumate” our relationship. He says he won’t entertain the idea of a physical relationship until I lose at least 75 pounds. Yet, though I have joined a health club and try one diet after another, my excess weight clings to me like a barnacle. I have a recurring dream in which all my


Veterans’ Day B\ Bob Dr\nan

Korean War Memorial, Washington D.C.

A

patrol moves silently through the perimeter. The darkness shrouds their movement and the cascading rain muffles their progress. It’s a large patrol, a dozen men, led by a sergeant who has been in the line for eight months. Occasionally lightning in the distance glints off the shinny surfaces of their rain gear. They still move single file, led by the point man that has been on patrols for the past year, and knows his way through the mine field by rote. Back in the file, a man shifts his weapon to the opposite hand and takes the arm of the soldier in front of him, a newcomer to the unit, and guides him through the process of avoiding the deadly defensive weapons. They emerge from the mine field and enter a new danger zone. The sergeant taps the man in front, signals him to stop and pass the word on, puts a hand on his radioman to halt him and moves back through the patrol signaling them to spread out. He reaches the newbie and notes the hand of the veteran on his arm, nods and moves on. The sergeant returns to the middle of the formation and whispers loudly, “Move out.” Each man has assumed his rehearsed position, knows his areas of responsibility in the tactical sweep. Knows where the next man is located, the location of the men who will cover his back, and that of the men whose back he will cover. They all rely on the point man’s ability to spot trouble and on the rearmost to cover their back trail. This is an infantry patrol. It could be Virginia in 1863, Mindanao in 1901, the Argonne in 1918, Guadalcanal in 1942, Korea in 1950, Vietnam in 1968 or Afghanistan in 2013. Small unit tactics change, adapt to technology, geography, and idiosyncrasies of the adversary. But one thing has never changed. The members of the patrol develop a deep sense of cohesion; each member relies on the others, as the others rely on him. The story could be of fighter pilots and wingmen. It could be AA gunners

on warships. It could be a radar technician, or an electronics specialist in a CIC. It could be a supply sergeant or an armorer in a support role. It could be a nurse in a field hospital. Wherever, whenever, they were rigorously trained and perhaps at some time subjected to the stresses of the real thing, the varmint. But most important each received a responsibility the failure of which could have catastrophic consequences for those depending upon him; and consequences for him, if others upon whom he depended failed in their responsibilities to him. That experience changed all of them forever. *** At coffee one morning in Ajijic, a poll among American retirees produced the following results: 4 served in the Army, 2 in the Marine Corps, 1 in the Navy and 2 in the Air Force. One did not serve in our military, but he had held a critical job with access to nuclear secrets, prohibiting his exposure to military service. In our Lakeside community for a large share of our male population and many of our women, the preceding anecdote, in training, or within reach of the varmint, was a seminal event. It reflected in the remainder of our lives: the workplace, among friends, in the way we raised our children. Salute our veterans on November 11th. Their freedoms are not just a birthright; they have earned them.

Saw you in the Ojo 11


NATIVE GIFTS B\ Dr. Lorin SZinehart Thanksgiving Comes but Once a Year—Credit Where Credit is Due

T

hanksgiving should be a time to remember Native Americans for the cornucopia of foods and medicines that we take for granted in our daily lives. We have all been regaled with the story of the “Indians” teaching the so-called Pilgrims to grow corn. Corn is only part of the story. The traditional Thanksgiving feast consists of roast turkey, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkin pie and a selection of tortured concoctions composed of cranberries. None of these were familiar to the first European arrivals. Our medieval ancestors, subsisting on coarse bread and a few garden vegetables, were typically invited into the manor house annually at hog-butchering time, where the choice cuts went to the nobleman and the organ meat, the “umbles,” was chopped up and baked into a pie for the serfs, creating the term humble pie. Nutrition improved as a result of contact with Native Americans. The Inca, whose highly advanced civilization was destroyed by small pox and Spanish treachery, were the first to cultivate potatoes and sweet potatoes. Squash and pumpkins were also Native American crops. Algonquian peoples harvested cranberries from northern bogs. The main course, the turkey, was a strictly American bird. The Inca also gave us the tomato, now a vital ingredient in everything from soup to salsa. Imagine pizza, brought to Italy from Palestine by Roman legionnaires, or spaghetti, brought to Europe from China by Marco Polo, without tomato sauce. The Aztecs of Mesoamerica were the first to brew chocolate as a stimulant, much as we would a strong cup of coffee. The Spanish added sugar. Native Americans gave us peppers, maple syrup, popcorn, peanuts, avocados, vanilla, grits, sassafras, blackberries, elderberries, blueberries, currants, raspberries, wild rice, black beans, pinto beans, lima beans, snap beans, pole beans, cassava, pineapple, tapioca, hominy, succotash, zucchini, persimmons, artichoke, papaya, allspice, tamales, tortillas, salsa, jerky, quinoa, potato chips, crackerjack, walnuts, cashews, Brazil nuts, farina and that “noxious weed,” tobacco. The nutritional gifts of Native Americans are nearly equaled by their medical treatments. During the winter of 1535,

12

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

Jacques Cartier’s expedition to explore Canada was frozen in the St. Lawrence River. Soon, his men developed symptoms of scurvy. Fifty died. Aware that the locals were unaffected, Cartier consulted Dom Agaya, son of a Huron chief, who prescribed tea brewed from the bark of white cedar, high in vitamin C. Within eight days, the crew had recovered. At the time of first contact, Native American treatments were far more effective than European medicine. They gave us witch hazel and petroleum jelly for rashes and quinine for malaria and yellow fever, ailments that arrived with enslaved Africans. The ingredient in Ipecac was used to treat dysentery and iodine from kelp to prevent goiter. Salicin, the ingredient in aspirin, was extracted from willow bark, to treat aches and fevers. They invented the tourniquet to stop bleeding, and sutured wounds with bone needles and human hair. Curare, applied to the tips of arrows of rain forest hunters, is used yet to relax abdominal muscles during surgery and has been used to treat lockjaw. Coca leaves, from which Novacain is derived, were chewed by the Inca to provide energy at high altitudes. Native Americans set broken bones using casts made of feathers and clay, and discovered herbal remedies for everything from constipation to labor pains. Borrowing from the Iroquois confederacy, Benjamin Franklin recommended the concepts of federalism, separation of powers, impeachment, and decorum in discourse to the Constitutional Convention. We owe much to the first peoples of this land, and Thanksgiving is a time to remember their many contributions. Alas, we have repaid beneficence with cruelty and destruction throughout most of our history. Cartier showed his gratitude to Dom Agaya by kidnapping him, along with his father the chief and other family members, and dragging them back to France where they subsequently died homeless. Lorin Swinehart


Saw you in the Ojo 13


FRONT ROW CENTER B\ Michael Warren Local Hero Original Screenpla\ b\ Bill Fors\th Adapted for the stage and Directed b\ Neal ChecNoZa\

L

ocal Hero was a cult movie, starring Burt Lancaster, written and created by Bill Forsyth in 1983. It is a quirky and whimsical movie in which a big Houston oil company intends to buy an entire village called Ferness in order to build a huge oil refinery on the Scottish coast. They send a young ambitious deal-maker called “Mac MacIntyre” over to Scotland to sign up the locals. Once he gets to Scotland, he begins to slow down and enjoy the local scenery and the whisky. He becomes entranced by the simple beauty of the place. Eventually his boss, who is an astronomy buff, shows up and decides to build a research institute and observatory there, and the refinery is built somewhere else. Thus the fragile ecosystem is saved from destruction. The appeal of the movie is mainly the beautiful cinematography and the various encounters between MacIntyre and the characters that he meets in Scotland. Neal Checkoway was able to obtain limited theatrical rights from Bill Forsyth, and so we were privileged to see the world premiere of Neal’s stage adaptation of Forsyth’s screenplay. He has not strayed too far from the original, and a quirky and whimsical movie has become a quirky and whimsical play. The staging is brilliant and the sound and light effects are amazing, but on the other hand there is little tension in the story, and as a result the dialogue and the pace of the action seem slow. If you enjoyed the movie, you will certainly have enjoyed the stage version. A huge cast put their heart and soul into the production. Mark Bennett is entirely convincing as “Felix Happer” the eccentric CEO of Knox Oil, while Neal Checkoway is entertainingly wacky as his psychiatrist. Patrick DuMouchel plays Mac with subdued humor and Doug Pinkerton (a genuine Scot) is very

14

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

real as the local innkeeper “Gordon Urquhart.” Collette Clavadetscher is sweet as Gordon’s wife “Stella.” Jennings Bennett – a newcomer to LLT – plays “Danny,” Mac’s UK helper and sidekick, with a certain charm and falls in love with local maiden and marine biologist with webbed feet “Marina” (played by another newcomer Tina Leonard). Roland McKoy (a third newcomer) plays the local vicar. Fred Koesling comes ashore in the second Act as Russian sailor “Victor,” and sings an impressive Basso Profundo at the inn, and Dave McIntosh has a good time as eccentric old man “Ben Knox” who lives in a shack on the beach. Sometimes the accents were hard to follow, but mainly the rest of the cast were convincing as Scottish locals. I should mention Chet Beeswanger, Patricia Guy, Zane Pumiglia, Graham Miller, Don Chaloner, Pierre Blackburn, Jim Ryan, Judy Long, Beryel Dorscht and Catharine Huff. We had the pleasure of real musicians on stage – Chuni Medeles Cordova on accordion and Juanpi Medeles Cordova on violin. Shellie Checkoway was the tireless and ever-present Producer of the show, Leslie DeCarl was Stage Manager and Diane Jones was her Assistant. The next show is the classic period drama “The Heiress” directed by Roseann Wilshere. The screen adaptation of this play won several Academy Awards – it opens on November 8 and runs through November 17. I am helping as Assistant Director, so Harriet Hart will be guest reviewer next month. Michael Warren


UUNCOMMON NCOM MM MON CCOMMON OM MM MON SSENSE ENSE B\ Bill Fra\er billfra\er#gmail.com What’s Wrong with the United States? Bill Fra\er

D

on’t get me wrong. I love my country of birth. I am proud of all the wonderful things the United States has accomplished. I am proud that so many people around the world have traditionally looked at the US as a land of freedom, opportunity, and innovation. I also understand that there are many events in US history of which we should not be proud. The treatment of Native Americans, our legacy of slavery, our annexation of a large portion of Mexico, and our use of the military and the intelligence community to violently preserve our economic interests come to mind. Of course, we are not the only country to have a checkered past. Yet today, it seems increasingly clear to me that the United States is moving in a distinctly different direction from the rest of the so-called “Western Democracies.” Although, for the time being at least, we still have the largest economy and the most powerful military capability, there are some disquieting trends emerging. Perhaps the most obvious is the US Congress’ complete inability to govern.  Because of the separation of powers into three branches, which is often cited as a brilliant design, the President and the two branches of Congress regularly come to a complete partisan stalemate on important issues. This problem regularly affects the financial markets and social policy.  Yes, we have elected the first African-American president, yet the level of hatred among those on the Far Right for him is alarming. One of the great strengths of the United States has always been its cultural diversity.  Yet, as the demographic balance of the country is changing, many feel threatened by this diversity and are becoming more xenophobic. This is reflected in our post-9/11 immigration restrictions which keep many potentially productive immigrants from settling in the US.   The American health care system is in crisis. Although the United States spends twice as much as many

industrialized nations, most notably Canada, it has measurably worse health outcomes in areas such as life expectancy and infant mortality, and leaves 50 million of its citizens to fend for themselves. So much for the erroneous canard that the US has “the best health care in the world!” The virulent opposition, among many, to the Affordable Care Act, a very modest attempt to address these problems does not bode well for reform. And then there’s guns.  Where do I begin?  We seem absolutely incapable of establishing even a moderate policy of gun restrictions which could reduce the easy accessibility of firearms. This relates to the very strong culture of pioneer individualism among US citizens who see their right to firearms as a libertarian ideal.  If we could not pass reasonable restrictions on guns after twenty kindergarteners were massacred in Connecticut a year ago, then I doubt it will ever happen. Of course this also points to the weakness in caring for Americans with severe mental health problems.      These problems are not intractable.  The US has the resources to address them.  The Economist   has pointed out on numerous occasions that many of the problems in the United States are self-inflicted. With so many advantages in terms of resources and sheer brain-power, we ought to be able to do better.  Let’s hope.

Saw you in the Ojo 15


,035,176 B t i R blp p A K Ton\ Passarello B\ A Antonio Ramblps AKA ZZZ.antoniorambles.com antonio.rambles#\ahoo.com

Redeeming Works

Santa Cruz de la Soledad is less than 4 kilometers east of Chapala, but by many measures it’s separated from Chapala by light years. It sits back from the coastline, connected to a string of even more remote villages by a road that seems to shrink as it unravels, seemingly a road to nowhere. The villagers here have fished or farmed Alberto in the carpentr\ shop: for generations, but these days more of Santa Contagious enthusiasm Cruz’s 1,700 souls farm maiz, calabasas, and frijoles than fish the lake. It’s not a lucrative occupation, and it only takes a quick walk through the village streets to confirm that prosperity has largely passed this place over. I’m here with my Cuban-American friend Alberto to see in action a program that teaches carpentry skills to at-risk youth, and which he has helped to jump-start. Upon arrival we pass through a modest house and small courtyard to reach the carpentry shop. Here Joel Morando, carpenter and volunteer instructor, patiently watches and coaches a dozen children doing everything from operating a jigsaw to painting items that they’ve fabricated. Their finished work is sold to the public, both to help make the program self-supporting and to teach the children not only how to make their products, but also to

16

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

market them. These children are 9 or 10 years old, but there are no childish hijinks going on here. All are intently focused on the work at hand, watching earnestly as each takes a turn at working the power tools. About a third of the students are girls.  Alberto tells me that there’s a waiting list of students hoping to enroll in future classes. The children seem at first shy as I begin to snap photos, but then one asks to see the digital image on the camera screen and suddenly I’m surrounded by others asking me to take their photos. After each shot I’m obliged to turn the camera around so that all can see each Carpentr\ instructor -oel Morando image, and there’s lots of laughter and Zith students chatter as each portrait is revealed. As a parting gift Joel is presented with the donation of a first aid kit that’s been on his wish list.   Older kids are just beginning to arrive for their advanced apprenticeship as we depart. Alberto next takes me a few doors down and introduces me to community advocate Antonio Morales, where in short order I come to understand that the children’s carpentry program is only the tip of Santa Cruz’s self-help iceberg. Antonio is quick to laugh and his compassion for his neighbors shines through when he talks about projects – some already launched and others not yet hatched – for their betterment. There’s also a steadfastness about him that leaves no doubt about his willingness and ability to drive hard bargains where the welfare of his neighbors is concerned. On this day it’s less than a week after the Dia de los Reyes Magos – Three King’s Day – and as we pass through the plaza a life-sized nacimiento is still arranged there. These figures were annually borrowed for many years until Antonio talked the owners into donating them to Santa Cruz. The features of these statuary are predictably, if incongruously, European. The village, though, has placed its own subtle stamp on the tableau: At the edge of the scene beneath a Mexican clay pottery basin hangs a hand-woven blanket that Antonio tells me is nearly as old as the village itself. In Antonio’s nearby house it becomes obvious that the nacimiento gift pales in comparison to donated goods of every kind that he’s collected.  Clothing.  Walkers for the disabled.  Books.  Children’s toys. It resembles a flea market except that nothing’s sold here, but rather freely distributed within the community on the basis of need. On a table in the jardin out back sits a bottle of Antonio’s favorite tequila, and as our visit draws to a close we’re obliged to accept his proffered hospitality.  Purists may drink it straight up, but for everyone else he has set out mixers:  There’s the perennial Squirt, which makes a sort of lazy man’s margarita, or (the first time I’ve seen this) Coca Cola! As we sip the elixir, the air is suddenly split by an announcement in blaring over a loudspeaker, and it recalls for a moment the recurring P.A. announcements in countless episodes of M.A.S.H. In a town without its own newspaper, loudspeakers perched on poles strategically situated throughout the village are the way that folks get their local news. It’s a lowtech solution perfectly suited to the need. It’s almost time for us to leave as Antonio begins talking enthusiastically about another unfolding project that will teach local farmers how to raise moringa trees, the leaves of which are so rich in vitamins, minerals, and proteins that they’re often called “the super food”.


The fast-growing crop fetches a healthy price on the world market, and promises to help even more of Antonio’s neighbors pull themselves up by their own bootstraps. A few local farmers have already sprouted the first moringa seedlings, learning how best to cultivate and care for them so that their experience can be shared with others. Hopes are for a first crop before this year’s end, and I’m eager to return and see the result! Afterwards as we head back through Chapala, I reflect on the amazing enterprise demonstrated by people who so ably apply what little Antonio Morales they have to better themselves and their community. There’s little here by way of a social safety net except the support that these villagers readily give to one another… but which is clearly priceless.

Saw you in the Ojo 17


SHADOW LOVE

B\ Rob Mohr RevieZed b\ Herbert W. PieNoZ

S

hadow Love by Lakeside writer Rob Mohr is just as the book cover says, “Poems of Life and Love.” Although this is Mohr´s first book of poetry, these are not his first published poems. Mohr, with a MFA, has had an interesting and full life having lived and taught in many parts of the USA and various other Latin American countries. His poems reveal the tender soul of a wise man who has known love, hurt and hope. Throughout Shadow Love, one sees the ink drawings of the ancient Maya, which reflect Mohr´s lifelong focus of both art and this ancient culture. This slim paperback is divided into six separate, but cohesive subjects with the largest part of the book, it’s theme really being, whispers of love. The different headings reveal Mohr’s reflections through poems about love, being a poet, living south of the border, losing and finding family and reflections about writing. The poems are not about the shadow of love, but as the title says: Shadow Love. With the forward Mohr explains his purpose; “In each case, my aesthetic intent was to transform my own perceptions and experiences into a coherent and compelling whole . . . awaken the reader’s emotions as they reflect on their own experiences with love.” Mohr’s poems do affect the reader with their subtle elegance and ephemeral suggestions, such as these words from, Evening Walk We walked under the rising moon, As the sun set, As our paces matched, As our hearts explored, As we exchanged thoughts . . . In a pearl-like night And another couple of lines from Celestial Dreams We dreamed the same dream last night With Venus in our eyes . . . Shadow Love is filled with lovely phrases, beautiful words and exposed emotions. This volume of poetry is worth reading because it brings the reader closer to understanding themselves and because these simple poems are not as simple as they appear upon the first read. These are poems that, like Whitman´s, beg a second and third

18

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

reading. When a writer, a poet, captures emotions with a few phrases, a few simple words then the reader owes that poet some praise and gratitude for sharing in such a subtle; and yet straightforward way parts of life that many of us are afraid to share with those we love and respect. Every writer shares some of themselves, but Mohr shares something intimate in his poems: I wish for a moment I could be a woman, Interconnected, Cherished, even excluded To feel the pain of childbirth, To be pushed aside by men . . . In his writing Mohr reveals that he understands what it is like to suffer, to be ordinary, to have emotions and to experience Shadow Love. This may be his first volume of poetry, but this is not Mohr´s first experience with love or life. His words may not leave a scar, but they will leave tenderness in the reader´s hearts and an invisible connection with the universe. I recommend this read for those times when we want to delve into our own reasons for existing, a quiet time for reflecting on our past and contemplating, or just for the enjoyment of these elegant words. Rob Mohr will read from Shadow Love and sign copies of his book on Wednesday, November 6 at 11:30 at the Oasis Cloud Café, Calle San Luis#330, Riberas, for reservations phone: 765-3516. Books are for sale at Diane Pearl’s and several other locations. Herbert W. Piekow


Saw you in the Ojo 19


Anyone Can Train Their Dog B\ Art Hess artthedogguy@yahoo.com

Going Training? Check your TARP

O

ne of the more difficult things for trainers to grasp and master is TIMING. When we give a directive the student needs to be told that he has done what we expect. Because the dog doesn’t understand English we can’t explain our approval so we have to use a “marker” word or a clicker. He has to hear these markers/clickers at precisely the time he performed the task or assumed the position so he is able to relate his approval to a specific event or task. If we direct the dog to sit and he does as asked and we then fumble around and get the reward out and mumble some kind of acknowledgement about the time the dog has wandered over and sniffed and marked a tire, he obviously doesn’t relate our approval actions to his performance or at least he doesn’t know which task produced the reward. Similarly with corrections, if we are slow, late to correct the dog at a completely inappropriate time, the dog relates the correction to whatever he was doing immediately preceding the correction. Check your timing and if necessary improve your skills. Proper timing will greatly enhance your success. ATTITUDE is everything. If you can’t visualize your dog performing the task you are teaching it is most unlikely that you will succeed. Imagine setting out to ride a bicycle, having

20

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

never seen nor ridden one and having no concept of what is involved in riding a bike. Your chances of succeeding are right up there with winning the lottery. If you’re not completely confident that your dog can learn, perform, and master the task you are teaching you are facing an uphill battle. Also if you are having a “bad hair day,” put your leash away and go out in the yard and play with your dog. You will both benefit from it. REPETITION is the key to any successful training effort. Anyone can do a better than average job of training if they will just give it enough time and repeat all of the training efforts enough times. There’s no magic formula. Show the student what you want. Set him up to succeed. Make the task easy and practice in an environment with no distractions. When he masters the task and performs correctly 10 out of 10 times, then and only then do you gradually change the environment, slowly introduce distractions, and increase the difficulty level. If he does it correctly 100 times do it 100 more times so the task is etched into his mind and muscle memory so the performance is on cruise control like an Olympic diver or a concert pianist. These results only come with REPETITION. More good dogs have been screwed up by people losing their PATIENCE than any other training error. One short outrage can back your training up by days and your best solution is to hang up your leash and start another day. Your best bet is to go back to where you find a task that you and the dog do well and gradually work forward. Hopefully your dog will progress without carrying too much baggage but it’s not uncommon for the dog to have a memory scar that will take a lot of positive experiences before it goes away. Much easier to control that temper. ...artthedogguy “If You Can Master Your Mind … You Can Do Anything You Want.” Art Hess


Saw you in the Ojo 21


CHILD

of the month

B\ Barb Corol

Tadeo de Jesús B. A.

S

ince it has been almost two years since we introduced you to little Tadeo (“Thaddeus”), you might not recognize him now. He has made amazing progress with his disability and has grown a lot since then. Tadeo is the youngest of three children and lives with his parents in Chapala. His mother, María Liliana, is a housewife and Dad, José Roberto works in construction. He has one sister and one brother, ages 6 and 3. This photo doesn’t show Tadeo’s wrist and ankle joints, all of which are not the usual supple joints of a young child. His fingers and toes also overlap each other as if he were purposefully crossing them. This condition is known as “arthogryposis,” which means “curved joint,” curved and in a fixed position. The condition is caused by anything that prevents those normal “kicks and shoves” of the fetus while in utero, thus also not allowing the joints the opportunity to move with full range of motion. This occurs very early in a child’s development, and the more limitation during pregnancy, the more severe the contractures will be at birth. Other causes involve abnormalities of the muscle structure and abnormalities of the nerves that connect to the muscles. Little Tadeo has already undergone several tests (electromyography) to check the function of his nerves, but so far nothing conclusive has turned up. Unfortunately he also suffered from some hours of lack of sufficient oxygen after being born, and so had to take anti-convulsive medications for several months. Fortunately the medications have done their job and he no longer suffers from convulsions. When Tadeo’s mother brought him to Niños Incapacitados, our medical doctor, Dr. Carla Cueva, a geneticist, thought our little guy could also have what is known as “Edwards’ syndrome, a genetic defect (chromosomal), also known as lack of the Trisomy 18 gene. Fortunately, further testing

22

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

over the past year or so has shown that this is not the case… fortunate because “Edwards’” is a very serious syndrome that would have shortened the boy’s life. Now we have a more definite diagnosis of a certain type of “arthrogryposis,” known as Freeman-Sheldon syndrome, which is easier to treat, and while not curable, is not likely to be fatal. You can see that Tadeo’s mouth is smaller than normal. This is a common symptom characterized by pursed lips (also known as “whistling face”). He also has a prominent forehead and somewhat of a sunken appearance of the middle of his face. Tadeo’s mom has to buy special nipples for his nursing bottles to accommodate the labial anomaly. He is responding well to physical therapy at Teletón, Mexico’s national physical and mental therapy clinic which he attends twice a week. His parents have been diligent in continuing the therapy at home, and at our last meeting it was a joy to see Tadeo walking on his own, coloring in a book, and generally being a shy little two-year-old. Niños Incapacitados has been paying for his therapy, his medications, a recent ultrasound and several X-rays, plus bus fare to and from Guadalajara for his therapy. We are hopeful he will continue improving and thriving. If you would like to learn more about Niños Incapacitados, please join us the second Thursday of each month at 10:00 a.m. in one of the meeting rooms at the Hotel Real de Chapala in La Floresta. We always present one of “our” children prior to the business meeting. Please feel free to bring a friend.


Saw you in the Ojo 23


YOU ARE NOT A TYP PICAL MEXIC CAN! B\ Rosamaria Casas

H

ow many times have I heard this statement since I arrived at Lakeside over three years ago? Dozens! The most amazing fact about it is that most people that emphatically assure me of this, only know perhaps two Mexican women (besides their maids and Aurorita Michel or other ladies at the banks). Typifying or being typified is, to me, a generalization as misleading as saying I hate the Germans, the French, the Brits or the Italians. Nobody could, or should, hate an entire country. There are always compatible people in every corner of the world. And every human being is different. But, what is a typical Mexican? I’ll answer, like a Jesuit, with another question. What is a typical US citizen? Not even the stereotypes of the cowboy films are the same. John Wayne, as an actor or as a human being, had nothing “typically” in common, in the movies or in real life, with Clint Eastwood, another famous cowboy. Writers? Barbara Bickmore, a successful writer, besides writing has nothing “typically” in common with other successful American writers like Alice Walker or Danielle Steele. Every one of them is entirely different from the other. The same goes for the men of Lakeside. Every person is unique. Not all US citizens look alike, not all Mexicans look like “Mexicans,” or like the stereotype in people’s imagination. About women like me “not typical Mexicans”. There is a whole generation of women “like me.” We were all educated in the same school, we all speak at least three languages, most of us have travelled a lot, read voraciously and have had successes and failures in the different walks of life each one fol-

24

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

divorcees, career womllowed: d wives, i di en, widows, with children or without, nuns still in the convent and some out. They are all over the country and you can find them in politics, in hospitals, in shopping centers, in universities in radio, in television. Several of us write, there are two or three successful artists and many mothers of four or five children and scads of grandchildren. Not all of us practice the religion in which we were educated, not all of us have the same political ideas and not all of us live the same way. We have some points in common: our handwriting looks alike, we all need reading glasses and we all have gray hair, tinted or not, wrinkles, with facelifts or not! (Ed. Note: This article was written some years ago, when Rosamaria was the editor of this publication. Prior to relocating at Lakeside, she was with the Mexican Foreign Service, having been posted in Athens, Paris and London. Returning to Mexico, she took up writing, and over the years won two of Mexico’s most prestigious literary awards. She was also, I might happily add, the person most responsible for getting me the Ojo editorship.)


Saw you in the Ojo 25


Wondrous Wildlife B\ Vern and Lori Gieger

O

ur love affair with wildlife began some 20 years ago, and started with an ad on n the radio. Our local humane societyy and Dept. of Natural Resources were looking for people to rehabilitate wildlife. ildlife. Remembering stories my fatherr told me about “Jenny,” one of his childhood dhood companions, I was intrigued. After fter a discussion with my husband, Vern, we decided to give them a call. A few days after finishing our training, three baby raccoons arrived. Looking into those tiny eyes, as they grasped a finger with their paws, we realized how innocent and helpless they were, and how much they needed “human help” for their very survival. We were hooked! This is what we wanted to do. Here’s to you, Jenny! ________________________ Pepe Le Pewww! Ah, what beautiful evening, a great time to sit back and relax, taking the time to smell the — well, it’s not the roses! We have all smelt that unmistakable odor! It reminds us that we are not alone. That a small, black and white critter is lurking nearby. That smell also tells us that some unsuspecting intruder got just a little too close. And will probably be sleeping “outside” tonight.           Skunks live  only  in North America. There are four species of skunks. They occupy a variety of habitats including forests, cultivated farmland, and even suburban neighborhoods. Having adapted well to neighborhoods, it’s not uncommon to find skunks and domestic cats dining peacefully to-

26

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

gether. They tend to be quite tolerant of humans and other animals and can often be approached quite closely. There have been cases of skunks entering homes through pet doors, and finding a quiet closet or empty bed, taking a nap. As long as the skunk does not feel threatened, it won’t spray. Hmmm, wouldn’t recommend waking him up!     Skunks have a bad reputation but are actually very shy and non-aggressive animals, using their “weapon” as a last resort. They rarely attack unless cornered or defending their young. If unable to flee, a skunk will usually fluff its fur, shake its tail, stamp the ground with its front feet, growl, stand on its hind legs, turn its head and spit to scare the potential attacker. If those techniques do not work, it will lift up its tail and spray. The skunk is aware of the respect it enjoys and will rarely run from a threat.      This tidy little animal serves the beneficial purpose of insect and rodent control. Skunks are important to the balance of nature. Skunks are generally nocturnal and begin foraging at sunset. Their diet consists of all types of rodents, black widow spiders, rattlesnakes, scorpions, and garden pests such as snails, crickets, gophers, grubs, cockroaches and all other insects. Also being carrion eaters, they keep roadways and neighborhoods clean. An estimated 70 percent of a skunk’s diet consists of insects considered harmful to humans. With their slow, waddling gait and bushy tail, these gentle mammals are delightful to see from a distance, and play an important role in keeping nature in balance — the natural way. Remember, if you have a problem with a “wild” uninvited guest or encounter a wild animal that needs help and can be caught call: Lakeside Wildlife Rescue & Rehab. 765-4916 (Vern & Lori Geiger)


PROFILING TEPEHUA B\ Moon\een King moonie#\ahoo.com

I

n the Yucatan Times, Aug 2011, Eduardo Cabrera Ruiz wrote an article on Domestic Violence. “A virtual License to Kill.” Quote: “Jalisco-Chihuahua-Morelos-Sonora-the Federal District and Guerrero, are the states with the highest number of reported cases against women, according to the Gender based Violence report of 2010, published by the National Commission for Prevention and Eradication of Violence against Women, a division of Mexico’s Department of Government. The survey taken indicates one in every three women experience some form of Domestic violence. Based on available data, the rate of homicide per 100,000 women grew more than 40% in 2009. A survey in 2010 stated there were 1,728 femicides across 18 Mexican states. Many preexisting statutes at State and City level have been amended to match the new federal law, which was credited to Felipe Calderon in 2007, then President of Mexico. Calderon sanctioned the first official law pertaining to Domestic Violence, called “General Law on Women’s access to a life free of Violence” to equality and nondiscrimination. Little has improved in Mexico dealing with domestic violence, or abuse by known attackers, or strangers. Rarely are women protected by authorities. If protests or restraining orders are filed, they are never acted upon. Feb. 2013, Senator Angelica de la Pena spearheaded a call to action against the ongoing Femicide phenomenon. Within Mexico alone 67% of women have been the target of crime. Most women are encouraged by Church and medical facilities to remain quiet. If families want to report a missing woman or girl, they have to wait 72 hours before reporting it, a time frame that puts women and girls at risk. There are 16 Domestic Violence Centers in the Federal District...all in cities and out of reach for the rural barrios. Femicide is punishable by 20 to 40 years, but very few sentences are passed down or even investigated. Yet, there are many women serving time for killing their abusive husbands. At the Tepehua Centro Comunitario, in the Barrio of Tepehua, 750 women went to counseling through the year of 2012, for sexual and family abuse in general. Police are barely visible in the area, and complaints mainly ignored by

local officials. The Tepehua Center gives the Women the support they need, but support for Mexico’s greatest asset... women, should come from the government itself, as it became law in 2007, that a woman had the right to a life free of violence. A politician once wrote, “If Mexico doesn’t take care of its greatest asset, its women, Mexico will implode.” I think he was right.

Saw you in the Ojo 27


GRINGAS & GUACAMOLE B\ Gail Nott THE BIG “C”

I

have just survived my second bout with cancer. After going through the usual range of emotions—fear, anger, rage and shame—I finally realized there are some positive aspects to these experiences. Thirty is when you finally get your head together and your body starts falling apart. My first surgery insured that I would never have to save money for a kid’s college education or a drug rehab facility, they would never move back home and any dents in the car, I got to make them. I wouldn’t have to worry about a stroke from birth control pills; OK, partying too hard and too many cigarettes might do me in. It moved like a freckle, looked like a freckle but it was a malignant melanoma. I agreed to have lymph nodes removed from my groin to insure the cancer hadn’t spread. Let’s look on the bright side; I can be the entertain-

28

ment at your party. We can play Connect a Scar! Seriously addicted to the female ritual of shaving my legs, now it goes much faster; I have less territory to cover. Ladies, we know how expensive new bathing suits are. If I can find the correct yellow body paint to match the Tweetie Bird band-aids, I can paint on the bottom of my bikini. The new scars make it easy to stay within the lines. My friend, Lee Ann, a Reiki practitioner, kept telling me to get in touch with my body. Mine isn’t all that communicative but I heard from it the other day after I said, “Body, how would you like to go play tennis tomorrow?” Clear as a bell my body said, “Listen bitch...do it and die.” It’s been two months since the surgery and I decided to try tennis again; no, I didn’t ask my body. Another perk, if you drum up enough sympathy, you

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

can play lousy and your partner forgives you. The older you get, the tougher it is to lose weight because by then, your body and your fat are really close friends. Mine weren’t even acquaintances. Massive doses of antibiotics resulted in diverticulitis and then I met the infamous E Coli. Losing 10% of my body weight in seven days; well, it is a lot faster than Weight Watchers. Friends insisted they wanted to bring me healthy foods. Why would I want to eat chicken soup when my restrictive diet kept me on such treats as fruit sorbet, tapioca, and Jello?

You’re right, it’s obvious that I have struggled to find anything positive about the last two months. What I know for a fact is that “stuff just happens.” (Ed. Note: Sadly, the cancer finally killed Gail—but those of us who knew and admired her will always remember that the last thing that went was her marvelous sense of humor. May we all have Gail’s courage when our own ticket is eventually punched.) Gail Nott


Saw you in the Ojo 29


COMPAS SSIO ON FO OR ALL CREATURES B\ Cameron Peters and El\n McEvo\

A

popular statue found in many area gardens is that of St. Francis of Assisi. The patron saint of animals, he is remembered for his compassion toward all creatures. Certainly that kind of tender mercy is a much needed commodity at Lakeside. To the same extent that many people consider this area to be an idyllic retreat, it is often a less hospitable environment for many animals. Overpopulation, human mistreatment, malnutrition and untreated illness and disease often result in short, sad and sometimes savage lives. And yet tender mercy does exist, as is evident in the works of several local animal welfare organizations. Though their individual programs and philosophies may differ, each strives to improve the lives of animals and with the support of the Lakeside community their collective efforts do make a difference. One lesser-known organization is Lakeside Friends of the Animals A.C. Since 2006, LFA has been assisting Mexican nationals of limited financial means by offering free spaying and neutering for their dogs and cats as well as underwriting the cost of emergency veterinary care. Those of us who have pets know well that our animals offer us invaluable emotional gifts, yet responsible pet ownership can often be costly. LFA, through its programs for Mexican nationals of limited means, seeks to support the relationship of pet and owner while alleviating some of the expense. Providing free spaying and neutering, not only addresses overpopulation in general but also encourages pet ownership without the worry of unwanted litters. In cooperation with the Clinica para Animales Dres. Ladron de Guevara in Riberas del Pilar, 40 pets belonging to Mexicans of limited means are sterilized each month. In addition, on a monthly basis,

30

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

an average of five pets receive emergency care. Treatment can include surgery, medication and, if necessary, humane euthanasia for untreatable conditions. Owners are asked to pay only what they can and LFA contributes to the balance. LFA also supports the Humane Education Alliance which was formed in 2011 by four non-profit organizations whose common interest is to foster respect and responsibility in children towards all living creatures and the environment. This is achieved through ethical education which promotes and builds a culture of non-violence. The HEA is currently launching a program in elementary schools using a DVD as a textbook for trainers and instructors. LFA is also developing a post-life planning program in which individuals can enter into an agreement with LFA in which the organization would assume responsibility for a pet upon the owner’s death. Bequests would be accepted as part of the plan. Lakeside Friends of the Animals A.C. has formal recognition as a charitable organization under Mexican law. LFA asks for the support of the community in order to continue all of its programs. To help, or for more information, visit our website at www.lakesideanimalfriends.org, email us at info@lakesideanimalfriends.org or call us at (376) 766-4341.


Saw you in the Ojo 31


A Tale of Two Towns B\ Maggie Van Ostrand

I

’m the type who thinks the great outdoors is the distance between my front door and the car. So what am I doing in Taos, New Mexico, where it’s still sometimes snowing at the beginning of May? Simple. I came because my dogs like to run in the snow and there isn’t any in Ajijic. Not that I spoil them, as you know, but I do consider it my responsibility to insure their happiness. (After reading Shirley Maclaine’s books, one never knows who the dogs used to be, do one?) And probably the annual appeal of snow is that I can come to it, rather than the other way around. Kind of a poor man’s weather control. Then there are the appealing similarities between Taos and Ajijic. Taos has Indians, Mexicans, and Anglos, while Ajijic has Mexicans, Canadians and Texans. The men here look like either Jesus in Bermuda shorts, or the guy who posed for the buffalo nickel, and the women look either like an old Cher, or Roseanne. The people of Taos decided to stop time a couple of decades ago. For example, the biggest news is not the balanced budget; rather it’s the death of Allen Ginsberg and the fact that Marshal Herf Applewhite once made Kosher sandwiches at Taos’ “Sunshine Eating Establishment,” a now-defunct eatery popular in, you guessed it, the early 70’s. The new tail on Comet Hale-Bopp has enormous significance here, as you can well imagine. I’ll bet you one of those Indian Head nickels that Cult leader Applewhite will soon channel his recipe for great pastrami sandwiches through

32

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

Shirley MacLaine. On the local radio station, Artist of the Week is Bob Dylan, while the winning group is The Mamas and the Papas for the second week running. Taos is a mecca for artists and writers, which brings me to D.H. Lawrence. No matter where I go, he lived there and he wrote something there. For instance, he, too, lived in New York, and Los Angeles. I moved to Ajijic, only to find that he once lived in Chapala at Calle Zaragoza #4 where he began writing The Plumed Serpent (completed in Oaxaca). Now, wonder of wonders, he also lived here in Taos in, not one, but two places: The Laughing Horse Inn (where he “plotted the next issue of the maverick “Laughing Horse” magazine, with Spud Johnson), as well as The D.H. Lawrence Ranch between Taos and Red River, where he wrote, among other things, A Cow Named Susan. He sought primitive communities still relatively unspoiled by industrialism. His nomadic feet could probably tell even better stories than those told by his educated other parts. I should travel to all of his homes world-wide, maybe I’ll run into Mr.Chatterly. Or should I hold out for Maggie Van that gardener? Ostrand


7+()/$6+(5)/236

He looks At her standing at the deli, eyeing The salamis, the bolognas, sighing At the prices. He thinks she’s crying over lost lovers and decides to make her day. He edges closer as people move away Opens up his slicker and softly calls out “Hey!” He proudly parts the zipper’s teeth, opening the trap And freeing his tumescence, it tumbles out the flap Standing at attention – well almost. In a snap She says, “Put that puny putz back in your pants and give it time to grow and keep it there till you have something worthy of a show.” He slinks away as she calls out, “That made my day, you know.” By Margie Keane

Transformation

Shhh --- don’t tell the secret here revealed, of a place remote and hidden deep, where spirits pull and hold one firm, within dimensions gods deemed to craft, realms entered through starlight’s force, mysteries held fast in human hearts, and dreams that restore one’s shattered life. The mind encounters by mirror’s lens ancient parador’s resplendent gleam from treasures denied in woken states. Once inside strange worlds emerge, where blue waves bathe a crystal beach, while we who endeavor to forget, dance a long and tortured dance, as oceans rush in to cover, and mountains move to there reform shadows cast in former days. Poem By Rob Mohr

Saw you in the Ojo 33


SWEET MOTHER OF MEXICO

— Leona Vicario

B\ Herbert W. PieNoZ

I

n the small Pueblo of Santa Cruz de la Soledad, where I live, the local grade school is named Leona Vicario. At least a dozen times per week I walk by the school with its opened windows and playground where I often hear the teachers or students at work or play. Sometimes I wonder if they might have their lives influenced by the heroic acts of their school´s namesake. Her full name was Maria de la Soledad Leona Vicario Camila Fernandez de San Salvador and this does not include her married name, but with such an impressive name I think she would most likely treasure the honorary name the Mexican Congress bestowed on her when they awarded her they named her Meritorious and Most Sweet Mother of the Nation. Her full name is inscribed on the Wall of Honor at the San Lazaro Legislative Palace, headquarters of the Chamber of Deputies in Mexico City. In 1982 there was a Mexican TV series based on her heroic and interesting life; billed as full of drama and romance, some called it period soap opera. In the State of Quintana Roo, close to Cancun, there is a town called Leona Vicario. Leona Vicario was born April 10,

34

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

1789 in Mexico City to well-to-do parents. Her father was a merchant from Spain and her mother was from an equally wealthy family from San Salvador; actually one source said both her parents were Spanish. She was pampered by her parents until she was 18, when both died and left her in the care of her lawyer uncle, Agustin Fernandez de San Salvador Pompous. By that time she had acquired a good education and learned science, art, painting, singing and literature. It made me wonder if she had read any of the works by the Mexican scientist, musician and writer, Sor Juana Inez. Of course, since Leona was attractive, well-to-do, educated and available, she had no lack of men to court her. Her Uncle Pompous promised his niece in marriage to another lawyer named Octavian Obregon; however, Leona was in love with Andrés Leone Quintana Roo, a law student from the Yucatan, whom she had met in her uncle’s offices. Andrés asked her uncle for permission to marry the beautiful Leona. Her uncle refused and forced the two to separate. Also, Uncle Pompous did not approve of the radical political idealism of the young Quintana Roo. Leona was saved from marrying Obregon when he was called to Spain before the wedding could take place. Leona was an early conspirator in Mexico´s fight for Independence, probably influenced by her friend, Andrés Quintana Roo. Even before the Revolution had a name she was a member of the super-secret group that called themselves the Guadalupes, whose members formed a network of cells in preparation for what they knew would be an arduous struggle for independence from Spain. Before there was Mata Hari or the White Mouse, there was Leona Vicario, who passed along information she gathered at the vice royal court to Padre Miguel Hidalgo and José Maria Morelos. Vicario was known to give shelter to fugitives of colonial justice and later, as the War


for Independence grew in numbers, strength and casualties Vicario used her personal funds to supply medicines and to pay for much needed supplies. In 1812, Vicario sold her inherited jewels and some personal properties to pay for the manufacture of cannon and a supply of munitions from a Tlaquepaque arms dealer. Someone estimated that she probably spent about $85,000.00 in 1812 US dollars of her own money to aid the insurgent movement. In March of 1813, one of her secret letters was intercepted and Leona Vicario fled Mexico City for her life. Leona was interrogated and faced with substantial incriminating evidence; I can only imagine the methods the Court of Inquisition used to try and extract information from this heroine. Despite all their methods Leona Vicario never revealed the names of her contact, associates, their plans or their locations. The Board of Inquisition confiscated all her personal properties and sentenced her to imprisonment. Vicario was sent to the convent prison of Belén de las Mochas. In May 1813, after she had spent several months in prison, she was visited by three colonial officers. The men led the stoic Leona Vicario to a private room, supposedly for further interrogation. Once inside the room the men revealed that they were actually dressed in stolen uniforms and were there to help her escape. Her clandestine departure from Mexico City was the stuff of high drama and intrigue. She disguised herself as a black woman, (remember she was from a class that looked down on black people) and in disguise travelled on a donkey loaded with pulque leather. Once in Tlapujaha, Michoacán she was taken to the safe house of a friend. When she rounded the corner to the main room she was confronted with the man of her dreams, Andrés Quintana Roo. Later the two married and continued to fight for Mexico´s inde-

pendence. Although she no longer had her fortune to use for the cause, Leona Vicario had her education, skills and personal beliefs, along with a large reserve of personal energy. Like the American Revolutionary Thomas Paine, Leona Vicario wrote political pamphlets and articles, some for the American Illustrator and Patriotic American Weekly. She also helped nurse the wounded, prepare munitions and do whatever was possible to further the cause she and her husband so fervently believed in. After the Revolution’s leaders José Maria Morelos and Padre Hidalgo were captured and executed, Leona and her husband were offered pardons, which both rejected. As hunted and wanted revolutionary criminals, they were forced to live in hiding and in very precarious circumstances. In 1817, Leona and Andrés had their first child, a daughter, who was born in a damp cave in the Tierra Caliente. A few months later, on March 14, 1818, the couple along with their infant daughter were captured by the Royalists troops. Realizing the possible consequences for her child, Leona accepted the pardon she had earlier rejected. In 1823, after independence from Spain, the newly formed Mexican Congress rewarded Leona Vicario for her many personal sacrifices by granting her a cash settlement, an estate called Ocotepec and three houses in Mexico City. Later she and Andrés Quintana Roo had a second daughter whom they named Dolores after the town where Father Miguel Hidalgo first raised the cry for rebellion in 1810. Since her death in 1842 at the age of 53, her remains have been re-interred several times. Originally both her husband and she were buried together in the Independence Column in Mexico City. In 2010 Leona Vicario´s remains were temporarily displayed at Chapultepec Castle and later taken to the National Palace and placed in the National Gallery. She is the only woman who has received a Mexican State Funeral.

Saw you in the Ojo 35


LA MALINCHE—Harlot or Heroine B\ Shep LencheN

L

a Malinche, Slave, Interpreter, secretary, mistress, mother of the first Mexican, her very name still stirs up controversy. Many Mexicans continue to revile the woman called Doña Marloa by the Spaniards and La Malinche by the Aztecs, labeling her a traitor a harlot for her role as the alter-ego of Cortes as he conquered Mexico. They ignore that she saved thousands of Indian lives by enabling Cortes to negotiate rather than slaughter. Her ability to communicate also enabled the Spaniards to introduce Christianity and attempt to human sacrifice and cannibalism. Herself a convert, baptized Marina, she was an eloquent advocate for her new faith. As for the charges against her, they are in my opinion baseless. So let us reexamine this remarkable woman and examine the laws. All historians agree that she was the daughter of a noble Aztec family. Upon the death of her father, a chief, her mother remarried and gave birth to a son. Deciding that he rather than Marina, should rule, she turned her young daughter over to some passing traders and thereafter proclaimed her dead. Eventually, the girl wound up as a slave of the Cacique (the military chief ) of Tabasco. By the time Cortes Arrived, she had learned the Mayan dialects used in the Yucatan while still understanding Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs and most Non-Mayan Indians. La Malinche did not choose to join Cortes. She was offered to him as a slave by the Cacique of Tabasco, along with 19 other young woman. She had no voice in the matter. Up till then, Cortes had relied on a Spanish priest. Jeronimo de Aguilar, as his interpreter. Shipwrecked off Cozumel, Aguilar spoke the Mayan language as well as Spanish. But when the expedition left the Mayan-speaking area, Cortes discovered that he could not communicate with the Indians. That night he was advised that

36

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

one of the women given to him in Tabasco spoke Mexican. Doña Marina now enters Mexican history. It was she who served as the interpreter for all the first meetings between Cortes and the representatives of Moctezuma. At that time Marina spoke no Spanish. She translated what the Aztecs said into the Mayan and Aguilar translates to Spanish. The process was then reversed, Spanish to Mayan and Mayan to Nahuatl. Bernal Díaz author of The Conquest of the New Spain authenticated her pedigree. An eyewitness to the events, he did not describe her physically, but related that after the Conquest he attended a reunion of Doña Marina, her mother and the half-brother who had usurped her rightful place. Diaz marveled at her kindness in forgiving them for the injustice she had suffered. The author referred to her only as Marina or Doña Marina. So where came the name La Malinche? Diaz said that because Marina was always with Cortes, he was called Malinche which the author translated to mean Marina’s Captain. Prescott in The Conquest of Mexico, (perhaps the best known book on the subject) confirms that Cortes was always addressed as Malinche which he translated as captain and defined La Malinche as “the captain’s women.” Both definitions confirm that the Indians saw Cortes and his spokesperson as a single unit. They recognized that what they heard were the words of Malinche, not La Malinche. So much for the charge that she was a traitor, instigating the destruction of the Aztec Empire. As for the charge of harlotry, it is equally flawed. She was totally loyal to Cortes, a one-man woman, who loved her master. Cortes reciprocated her feelings. Time after time he was offered other woman but always refused them. Bernal Diaz frequently commented on the nobility of her character and her concern for her fellow Mexicans. It is very possible


that without her Cortes would have failed. He himself, in a letter preserved in the Spanish archives, said that after God we owe this conquest of New Spain to Doña Marina. Doña Marina’s progress from interpreter to secretary to mistress, as well as her quick mastery of Spanish, are remarkable--and all this amidst the turmoil of constant warfare, times when a woman less courageous and committed might well have fled. As Cortes moved toward the Aztec capital, a pattern evolved. First conflict, then meetings in which Doña Marina played a key role in

avoiding more bloodshed. Hence the picture of Marina that emerges is that of an intelligent, religious, loyal woman. In more recent times the term Malinchista has been used by some to describe those who dislike Mexicans. But Doña Marina deserves better. A fearless, loyal and determined woman, she was a heroine who helped save Mexico from its brutal bloodthirsty rulers -- and in doing so she played a major role in fashioning what is today one of the most dynamic societies in all of Latin America.

Saw you in the Ojo 37


Sandy Olson

Phone: 331-283-8529 376-766-3035 Email: sandyzihua@hotmail.com

COMING EVENTS ART SHOW AND RECEPTION On Friday, November 8, from 3:00 p.m., Sol Mexicano will host a reception and showing of the works of artists Robert Burns Wilson and Isabel DeBlanc. Lakeshore: Oil on Board by Isabel Refreshments will be DeBlanc served. Sol Mexicano is located at Colon 13 in Centro Ajijic. Opening times are 10:30- 4:30 Monday through Saturday (closed Wednesdays) and Sundays 12-5. Tel. (376) 766-0734. END POLIO NOW! The Rotary Club of Ajijic, A.C., will hold an End Polio Now! Dinner Fundraiser on Friday, November 8, from 5 pm to 8 pm at Roberto’s Restaurant on the carretera in West Ajijic. For $300 per ticket guests will enjoy live musical entertainment and a four-course gourmet dinWork by ner. Roberto’s cash bar will be available for those wishing an alcoholic beverage. Artist RobTickets are on sale at Roberto’s Restaurant, Diane Pearl’s Colert Burns lections, or from any Rotary club member. Ticket requests can be sent to Anita Hocker, event chairman, at ganitahocker@gmail.com. Wilson OPERA IN GUADALA-ARA Viva Musica is sponsoring bus trips to Guadalajara and Live from the Met Simulcasts for the ¿nal operas of the season. There are some tickets still available for the following bus trips: Saturday November 9 at noon Puccini, Tosca. Bus leaves at 10.30 a.m. Saturday December 14 at noon Verdi, Falstaff. Bus leaves at 10.30 a.m. Tickets are available at the Lake Chapala Society, Thursdays and Fridays 10-12, or contact M. Krantz mak1939@gmail.com. The cost is 300 pesos for Viva members, and 400 pesos for non-members. ANA-NU VEATEM DANCE GROUP The LaNe Chapala Shrine Club is bringing the dance group Anajnu Veatem from Mexico City to Ajijic. Anajnu Veatem is a Mexican, interdisciplinary, traditional Jewish dance group. The group will present two performances, one on Saturday, November 9 at 7:00 p.m. and a matinee at 1:00 pm on Sunday, November 10. There is open seating for both performances. A no-host bar will be available one hour prior to each performance, and at intermission. Tickets are 200 pesos. The funds generated from this event will bene¿t the Lake Chapala Shrine Club to support its activities, especially helping Lakeside children in need of medical care. To purchase tickets, contact Noble Denny Strole at 766-0485, Noble Perry King at 763-5126, or from any Shriner. Tickets will also be on sale at the Lake Chapala Society from September 23 and O&A Investments (at the corner of the libramiento and the highway), starting September 18. NIÑOS INCAPACITADOS KERMÉS The families of the children helped by Niños Incapacitados will say “thank you” with a kermés (similar to a fete) on Sunday, November 10, at Christiana Park in Chapala, starting at 10 a.m. The mothers will be cooking up a variety of delicious tacos, and will serve pozole, ceviche and other dishes, costing between ¿ve and twenty pesos. There will also be a bazaar with clothes, books and music. Call Bev Kephart at 7663940 or email her at bevkephartinmex@gmail.com if you would like to donate. Entrance to the park is ¿ve pesos for adults and two pesos for children. Chapala City Hall is donating the park, bathroom and swimming pool entrance fees to the ker-

38

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

més. This is a fun and heartwarming event and everyone is welcome. LAKESIDE LITTLE THEATRE The next LaNeside Little Theatre production is The Heiress, November 8-17. It’s been a while since the Lakeside Little Theatre has performed an authentic period drama. The Heiress is directed by Roseann Wilshere. It runs from November 8 thru 17 The play is set in 1850 and is a timeless New York story of society, status and the true cost of love. It’s been said that the play “has it all”.....romance, money, lies, and manipulation. Tickets are 200 pesos and can be obtained at the LLT Box Of¿ce from 10 am to 12 noon on the Wednesday and Thursday before opening and every day during the run of the show, or one hour before curtain time for each performance.

The cast in rehearsal: standing, left to right, Ken Yakiwchuk, Tony Wilshere, Geoff Long, Diana Rowland, and Judy Long. Seated: Caroline McCormack, Jayme Littlejohn, Arleen Pace Not pictured: Kathleen Morris The box of¿ce opens the Wednesday before opening night (Friday) and from 10-12 every day except Sunday until the show is sold out. It is also open an hour before each performance. Shows are 200 pesos. Season tickets are still available. Email Paula, the box of¿ce manager, at mctavish@prodigy.net.mx or phone 766-0954. Future Pla\s December 6-15 Over the River and Through the Woods January 17-26 Blood Relations February 21-March 4 Hooray for Hollywood! March 28-April 6 Social Security FERIA MAESTROS DEL ARTE Lakeside’s annual fair for Mexican art, The Feria Maestros del Arte, will be held at the Chapala Yacht Club (Club de Yates de Chapala), Paseo Ramón Corona on November 15-17. The times: Frida\ Saturda\ 1 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunda\ 1 a.m. to  p.m. There is a ¿fty pesos admission. Credit cards for purchases will be accepted. CONCERT IN ATEQUIZA A concert featuring music of “La Bella Epoca” Mexican romantic music of 1880-1920 will be presented on Saturday, November 16, at 7 p.m.. If people are willing to drive to this magni¿cently remodeled theatre only a few miles from Ajijic, contact Rosemar\ Keeling at vivamusica3@yahoo.com. MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR ROBERTO MOULUN Roberto Moulun, M.D., award-winning author and longtime resident of Lake Chapala, died Monday, September 30, 2013, in Ajijic at the age of 89. His most recent book is The Iguana Speaks My Name, mainly set in Guatemala during the 1960-1996 civil war. A memorial service for Roberto is set for Saturday, November 16, at 2:30 p.m. in the back garden of the Lake Chapala Society. BEHIND THE WALLS HOME TOURS The annual ¿ve Ajijic Behind the Walls Home Tours for 2013-2014, sponsored by LaNeside School for Children Zith Special Needs (formerly School for the Deaf) begin on November 21. The other tour dates are January 23, February 27, and March 27. The Christmas Tour and Party is on December 12. Tickets are available at Diane Pearl’s and Charter Club Tours at Plaza Montana.


Saw you in the Ojo 39


40

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013


Saw you in the Ojo 41


For further information, contact: Cece Girling, 376-766-3964, or Leslie Martin, 376-7662274, or Shirley West, 376-766-4997. THE NAKED STAGE The next production of The NaNed Stage is a reading of No Exit, by Jean-Paul Sartre, and will be presented November 22, 23 and 24. It is directed by Shirley Appelbaum. No Exit introduces us to three ¿nished, fully formed souls in the process of facing whom they ended up being. Save these dates for upcoming Naked Stage productions: December 27, 28 and 29 Voice of the Turtle January 31, February 1 and 2 And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little February 1, 2 and 3 Comic Potential March 21, 22 and 23 Breaking the Code April 25, 26 and 27 Taking Leave

Cast: Fred Koesling, Florette Schnelle,Elliott Gould, Sandy Applebaum, Shirley Applebaum (director), and Kat Terrault The e-mail address for future reservations: nakedstagereservations@gmail.com or phone Michelle at 765-6408. The Naked Stage is located at #10A Rio Bravo. Directions: west on the carretera from Ajijic, south on Rio Bravo, about two blocks down behind Daniel’s Restaurant on the east side. Daniel’s is open for lunch and dinner with a no host bar available at 3:00. The box opens at 3:15 and the show starts at 4:00. OASIS CLOUD CAFE Meet the Writers Luncheons are held at the Oasis Cloud Cafe in Riberas del Pilar. Social time is 11:30 and the readings begin at noon. Rob Mohr, art editor of Ojo del Lago, is scheduled to present on November 6. Local book authors Patricia HemingZa\ and Zo¿a Barisas are scheduled for a reading together on November 20. Advance reservations for Meet the Writers Luncheons are necessary. Email Duane at info@oasiscloud.mx or call (376) 765-3516. OasisCloud Cafp is at Calle San Luis #330, Riberas del Pilar. “LET’S DO IT…AGAIN!” “Let’s Do it…Again!” is Mac Morisson’s new show that will kick off the holiday season and bring you another evening of classic romantic songs, and this time,....a few laughs! Opening for Mac will be special guest comic, -eff Capri. Also, turning up the romance vibe, will be featured guest vocalist -ud\ HendricN. The price of the ticket includes complimentary hors d’oeuvres. There will also be a no host bar. The event will bene¿t the Ajijic Fire Department to assist them with equipment purchases. The show is at Club Exotica on the Ajijic plaza, on December 4 at 5:30 pm. The tickets are 300 pesos. Tickets are on sale at Diane Pearl, Mia’s boutique, and Lois Cugini’s. VIVA MUSICA HOLIDAY CONCERT IN THE AUDITORIUM On Friday, December 6, at 6:00 p.m. Viva Musica presents Opera and Christmas Music Between Friends. Featured players are The Hermosillo Family Singers: Gaby Zepeda, piano and soprano, Antonio Hermosillo, baritone, Patricia Hernandez, mezzo soprano, and Hector Lopez, baritone. Children Mariana, Lucia and Jorge Hermosillo will sing and play the violin. Note: there is a special offer of “Buy one, get one free” if tickets are purchased before November 15. Tickets will be on sale the LCS Thursday and Friday, 10-12; the auditorium and at Diane Pearl Colecciones. MASTER CHEF “HANDS ON” COOKING WORKSHOP -altepec Centro Educativo presents guest chef Gerard Militello, owner of La Vita

42

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

Bella Restaurant in San Juan Cosala. On Thursday, November 21, from 10 to 2 he will prepare and present a three course festive menu. After the ¿rst two dishes are demonstrated, the guests will go to the Centro’s eight mini kitchen laboratories and duplicate what they learned in the morning session. The menu: queso de cabra (goat cheese, pan fried) with chutney de tomatillo, a great starter course or hors d’eouvre; sefood pasta with pomodoro. Dessert: apple and pear tarts. Guests are welcome to bring their own wine. Wine will also be available for sale by the glass or bottle. The price is $800 pesos per person. For further information please contact Stacey Hewitt at cruisedirectormex@

gmail.com LOS CANTATES HOLIDAY CONCERT TRADITIONS - Christmas & Hanukkah is the theme of this year’s holiday concert, featuring the talented voices of Los Cantantes del Lago, Lakeside’s well-known community choir. Led by Timothy G. Ruff Welch, Music Director, the concert will combine Christmas and Hanukkah traditions in song and promises to make the season warm and full of memories for all. A clarinetist who performs in the Klezmer style will accompany some of the Hebrew pieces and, as always, the fabulous Eleanor Stromberg will accompany on piano. Concerts are Tuesday, December 10, at 7:00pm and Wednesday, December 11, at 4:00 pm. A cash bar will open one hour before performances. Seating is general admission. Tickets are 250 pesos, available at Diane Pearl Colecciones, Mia’s Boutique, by contacting any Los Cantantes member, or by emailing Kathleen Carlson at cantantesdellago@gmail.com. ROCKIN’ FOR THE NIÑOS On December 7, from 4 to 10, Los Niños de Chapala y Ajijic (NCA) will present Rockin’ for the Niños at Danza del Sol. The party will feature two popular rock styles. NCA’s party last December at LCS was generally acknowledged as “the party of the year.” For only $300 pesos per ticket, you will have a full dinner of chicken and ribs, dancing until 10, auction and rafÀe, and a no-host bar. Tickets are available from Diane Pearl, the Niños Bazar in Riberas, the Niños project of¿ce in Chapala, or from Amy at 765-5454. Come enjoy a great party, and do your part to help keep NCA’s kids in school! LA NUEVA RE-EVOLUCION On Friday, November 22, the Centro Cultural -ocotepec will present La Nueva Re-Evolucion, an eclectic exhibition of art, poetry and music. The opening reception will take place from 5-8 pm. Botanas and a welcome cocktail will be provided and entrance is free. Well-known participating local artists are -esus Lope] Vega, Antonio Lope] Vega, Isidro ;ilon]ochitl ;ilotl), Francisco Gon]ale], Manuel Santillan, DePaul Durham and David Mendo]a. Poetry readings in English and Spanish will be given by -ud\ D\Nstra-BroZn, -ames Tipton, Mario Puglisi, Miguel Oro]co and Adrian Habano. Guitar music will be provided by Mo\ Ramire] and Alfonso “Poncho” Nava. ONGOING EVENTS AMiMic Societ\ of the Arts Members of ASA will show their art works on the third Sunday of the month through April, on the Ajijic plaza. The next event will be on November 17, from 10-2. Viva Musica There will be two more bus trips this year to the symphony in the Degollado Theatre in Guadalajara, and sponsored by Viva Musica: La Traviata Sunday November 10 with the Jalisco State Chorus, Vladimir Gomez conducting. Wagner Gala Sunday December 1 includes Bruckner Symphony No. 3, Guido Maria Guida conducting. Contact Marshall at mak1939@gmail.com to reserve. Tickets can be purchased at LCS Thursday and Friday 10-12 $250 members, $350 non-members. American Legion in Chapala Saturdays: 3:30 - 6:30 Fish Fry Sundays: Burgers & Hot Dogs 12 - 3


Saw you in the Ojo 43


B\ Elsa R Wasserman

H

e shouted out to me from across the grassy lawn at the LCS, while I was trying to walk, yanking and pulling my first ever dog. “That’s the best thing you have ever done, getting that dog!” I looked over in the direction of the shout, and there was Alejandro Grattan, smiling at me. Little did he know my true thoughts about this little three month-old dog that came to me by chance. Even though I had raised three children and assisted with six grandchildren, I had no idea how to house train a puppy. I named her Esta Bien because when I first arrived in Ajijic, my housekeeper would say, “Esta Bien, Esta Bien” whenever I looked worried or upset. My little house was filled with pee and poop everywhere. I put in a special “doggie door” and Esta Bien refused to use it. The only way she would use that door was when I left it propped open with two cans of tomato soup. When the winter cold started to invade the house through that open door, many kinds of wild life found their way into the warmth of my stove. The black rat family loved to nest near the heat of the gas pilot. Never mind the huge opossum that found a hiding place in my cupboard underneath my printer. It took two big, strong guys to get that animal out.

44

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

We went to Art Hess, the dog guy’s classes, which were really about training dog owners to train their dogs. Esta and I seemed to be performing at a very low level of obedience. Some classmates suggested that she might be too young. Maybe she needed more time to grow up. I could live with that. Esta Bien was a pretty little puppy, a pure bred Mexican Street Dog. Many people asked me about her breed. Others told me that Esta Bien was not a dog’s name. “Of course it is,” I would reply. “You are looking at Esta Bien right now.” Through a mutual friend, I was told that a newly single woman was looking for a small dog. I immediately offered Esta Bien as a great companion, not mentioning the hundreds of dollars I had to spend replacing two nearly new prescription glasses. We agreed to meet. The new potential owner took Esta Bien for a walk with our mutual friend. She was smitten. Evidently Esta Bien had remembered some of the obedience training. There was one more step to complete the deal. The potential owner wanted to see Esta in her own home and then pick up her bed, toys, and food. I was delighted. I was already imagining my house the next winter without that open dog door. The day before the final visit, the potential new owner called and said, “I have to ask you one more question. Does Esta Bien chew on furniture? I just rented a casita and the rentor said I could have a small pet if it didn’t scratch up the furniture.” I thought for a moment, and before I could stop myself, I blurted out, “Esta Bien chews on the furniture all the time.” That was the deal breaker. What followed will always be a miracle to me. Suddenly Esta Bien did whatever she could to please me, except for pushing open the doggie door. Now it is about six years later and I can’t imagine my life without Esta Bien. So, Alex, you were right. She is the best dog/companion ever.


Saw you in the Ojo 45


  —In Memoriam—

Roberto Moulun, M.D., awardwinning author and longtime resident of Lake Chapala, died Monday, September 30, 2013, in Ajijic at the age of 89. He was a native of Guatemala and a retired psychiatrist from Hawaii. Moulun’s book The Iguana Speaks My Name is set in Guatemala during the 1960-1996 civil war, which resulted in 200,000 indigenous people killed or missing. The title novella and ten separate short stories use fictional village characters to examine the epic topics of war and peace, love and loss. Published in 2012, the book received accolades in the USA and in Mexico. It won the prestigious 2013 Benjamin Franklin Silver Award for Best First Book of Fiction, awarded by the Independent Book Publishers Association in the USA. Highly-respected Kirkus Reviews in New York City named it one of the top 25 independent books of 2012. In addition to his book Moulun wrote many short stories published by El Ojo del Lago, winning three annual awards for best fiction. He was working on publishing a new collection of stories before being diagnosed with inoperable cancer this summer. Survivors are his daughter Renee and her husband Bart, of Portland, Oregon, and his granddaughter Maria Hanna, also of Portland; his third wife Monica, of Ajijic, and his two stepchildren, Marta and Ivan, also of Ajijic. Born to a Spanish mother and French father in Guatemala, Moulun grew up on the family coffee plantation, imbued with a love of music and literature. He was a child prodigy on the violin and performed solo concertos in Guatemala City when he was only five. At age eight, he read The Story of San Michele by Axel Munthe, M.D., which set the course for his life in many ways. He received his college degree at age fifteen—the youngest graduate at that time in the history of Instituto Modelo, Guatemala City. Three years later he earned his medical degree from the National University of Mexico, Mexico City, becoming one of the youngest

46

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

medical doctors ever from the respected university. His USA post-doctoral studies and medical residency included several years at the prestigious Menninger Foundation, School of Psychiatry, Topeka, Kansas. In 1962 he moved to Hawaii and became Chief of Services and Psychiatric Supervisor at Hawaii State Hospital in Honolulu, where he maintained a private practice. He was a volunteer member of International Red Cross disaster teams, and also an honorary member of the Guatemalan diplomatic corps. During his years in Hawaii, Moulun became an avid ocean sailor, and he and the crew of his Cal 40 Seafire won the Hawaii Yacht Club championship one year. After retiring from medical practice, Moulun traveled to Guatemala and lived among villagers before the civil war forced him to leave his homeland forever. He returned to Hawaii and wrote the stories for the book from 19931996, then moved to Ajijic in 1999. A lengthy video interview with Moulun is available on the Internet at http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=M19OrrTv00Q, with more information at http://www. egretbooks.com/moulun. Obituary written by Mikel Miller (Ed. Note: With the passing of Roberto, an entire epoch in the creative life of our community has ended. An event celebrating his extraordinary life will be held on Nov. 16 at 2:30 on the back patio of the LCS. This magazine has lost one of its most talented writers, and I have lost an irreplaceable friend.)


Saw you in the Ojo 47


The Gift B\ Margaret Ann Porter

T

o suffer writer’s block is to drink a double-shot of dread and chase it with i ith self-loathing. The empty page mocks c cks you but there is no clever retort, no kinship that might be restored beb be tween dexterous thought and sharpened pencil. As the concrete begins to set around the feet of your intentions, you are silenced by the deep dislike for writing that dwells in the loneliest corner of your mind, ever threatening to expose your failure. To ever. Produce. Anything. Worth. Reading. Again. Still, you get up the next day and go at it one more time. Or you carry your overwrought similes, metaphors and analogies, along with your fat and gassy adjectives, down to the water where they are sure to be cleansed by a baptism in nature. There we were out west in August, the dogs and me, down at the 10-yearago waterline, where we discovered the remains of erstwhile hopeful bushes that had established themselves in the dry lake bed. Over the 3,000 someodd days from then until now, heavy rains and dam politics had drowned them, then the waves and sand whittled their thick stems into sturdy elk antlers that were rising up through the muck. While tip-toeing through them, I spied a set of keys among the hardening points and so I picked them up. A tiny barnacle had begun its life on the bow of the most interesting one – an automobile key with a four-flanged blade. Probably European; the Japa-

48

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

nese aesthetic wouldn’t allow such complication. The keys have since sat here on my desk for these three long months, the powdery rust and calcification fighting to tell me a story: How did these keys get down there? There are five connected rings with 14 keys strung on three of them. All the brand names have rusted off, but on the larger, foreign-car ring are also found two General Motors-shaped keys, which I recognize because my ex-husband owned a pickup with keys exactly like these. Ah, yes. The pickup, 1985. Purchased when we were supposed to be choosing new carpeting for our house. Purchased with the money that we’d saved up together. This was after he’d spent the previous year’s carpeting money, but that time on a Harley Davidson. And the year before that, a Rolex watch and 9mm Glock handgun. And probably, her. My husband seriously needed a swift kick in the ass from my imaginary best friend Big Rufus. What he got instead was a divorce decree, which I didn’t really want because of the boys, but it’s damned hard to have a marriage when you’re the only one who wants to do things for the family. But I digress. There’s a ring with eight keys that


are typical for door locks, each one with different teeth. The next ring has a duplicate set of the General Motors keys, along with a little gas-cap key. This ring is the quick-release type, indicating that the owner wanted to easily remove this set and snap it back on – to be able to lock the truck while the original set of keys kept the vehicle running, and warm. So the keys probably belonged to someone from coldweather country. A Canadian. Jogging along the shore amid the shrubs 10 years ago, trying to lose the results of all that poutine. Plop! There went the keys and he had no idea until he got home. But would such exertions bring him this far west on the lake, where gringos don’t usually tread? Aha! But the same scenario is possible for someone who wanted to keep the vehicle cool. Air conditioning. The month of May in Guadalajara. Keep the truck running. Lock it up. Into the Oxxo. Grab a twelve pack and a bag of ice. Snap the keys back on. Head for the lake. Amigos are out west. In the bushes. Turn up the radio. No one will complain down here. But now, chingale! Where are the keys?! How am I going to explain to Papa that I borrowed his truck but I didn’t go to work. I came to the lake instead, hoping that Martina would wander by and ask for

a swim. Pinche cabron! When she said come here, I grabbed the keys from the ignition, hit the lock, rushed them into my pocket, slammed the door and dove toward the glory that is Martina, who, like a miracle, lights up the dark night. I tell you, Papa, I have seen it … Ah, relief. The doors are unlocking, the dread escaping, and the blessings descend like butterflies. Thank you, Lake Chapala, for Margaret Ann the gift. Porter

Saw you in the Ojo 49


BRIDGE BY THE LAKE B\ Ken Masson

This hand caused headaches for at least one pair when played at the Lake Chapala Duplicate Bridge Club in Riberas. South, holding a powerful 2 suiter, started the bidding with his six-card diamond suit. North replied with 1 heart and South now bid 2 spades. Most players consider a jump shift of this nature to be 100% forcing to game but North wasn’t on the same wavelength and passed. As a result, the partnership played in a part-score while cold for slam, not an outcome you would want to repeat too often! How did this disaster happen? It all goes back to some misguided information the partners received in their early days of learning bridge. Most bridge teachers correctly stress the importance of finding major suit fits but some, in my view, neglect to stress the need for common sense in describing one’s hand. North was of the impression that since her partner didn’t open 1 spade he must have fewer than 5 cards in the suit so she couldn’t understand his introducing the suit at the 2 level The South hand is so strong that there should be a play for some game if North can manage to scrape up a response. To my mind the auction should have gone as in the diagram above.

Some players may feel that the South hand is so powerful that it should be opened 2 clubs but I disagree – big 6/5 hands are notoriously difficult to describe after this opening. When North responds 1 heart, 2 spades by South says that the partnership must play at least in game somewhere (unless they double the opponents for penalties). North can now temporize with 2 no trump (or 2 hearts if a bit squeamish about not having a full club stopper!) When South next bids 3 spades, his distribution becomes much clearer: a 5 card spade suit with longer diamonds and at least game-going values. North now has a simple raise to 4 spades. But South is not finished yet - he has loftier aspirations in mind. His 5 club bid shows first round control in the club suit and says, in effect: partner, my hand is really terrific, take another look at yours and see if you feel slam may be on. Holding the heart ace, spade king and diamond queen, North should have no hesitation in jumping to the small slam in spades. The play in six spades is easy: win whatever is led, draw two rounds of trumps and watch that each opponent follows both times. When they do, just keeping cashing winners and let East take his good trump at any time. Admittedly, hands of this nature do not show up all that often but when they do it is a good idea for both partners to bid in harmony so I suggest you discuss this deal with your partners. If the South hand in question had small cards instead of the diamond ace and the club king, then I would have opened 1 spade and continued as though my distribution was 5 spades and 5 diamonds. Questions or comments: email: masson. ken@gmail.com Ken Masson

50

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013


Saw you in the Ojo 51


THE THIRD DEATH B\ Carol L. BoZman

T

he creaky, wooden kitchen chairs arranged around the Franklin stove, awaited the ‘reading of the will.’ My insides harbored sparks of secret excitement mixed with twitches of disappointment. The December snowfall worsened the foreboding gloom, bringing the miserable dreariness inside the room. I hated snow. Every Pennsylvania winter while growing up on the farm, it meant trudging through drifts, no electricity for days and huddling around the fire for warmth. It meant my father struggling to plow the mile-long lane in the cold, blowing wind. Mother had summoned my three sisters and me to the house on this mournful Sunday. It was the first time we all gathered together since my father’s funeral, taken at age 60, ravaged by a cancerous brain tumor. He never had a chance. I stared at mom as she paced back and forth, tapping the sealed envelope in her hand, looking like a lost teenager, wishing someone would sign her dance card. In contrast, her sunken eyes and turned down mouth, her hair now grey with routine coloring forgotten and her sluggish movements had turned my 58-year-old mother into a scared, elderly woman. Always dependent on my father, she was afraid of being alone, afraid that no one would plow the lane, afraid of showing relief that the stink of illness had left her house. Seeing my mother, a frightened child and a sad, aged widow wrapped into one, made me squirm. I drifted from this unbearable scene back to the agonizing environment of Massachusetts General Hospital a month earlier. I visited my father there prior to his brain surgery. Months of life-depleting chemotherapy and fruitless, cruel radiation left surgical removal of the tumor as the last, slimmest hope. Days before the operation, I asked him, “Daddy, what would be the greatest gift I could give you right now?” ‘A cigarette,’ this life-long smoker begged through tearful eyes. My husband retrieved an ashtray from our room at the Sheraton Hotel; I bought a pack of Lucky Strikes, ordered my sisters and mother to the hospital snack bar, cleared the room of the oxygen tank and closed the door. My father and I had our last laugh together, as he

52

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

coughed and choked on his old friend. I smiled at this memory as we took seats around the stove. Reflections of sitting in the hospital corridor after the surgery and hearing the ‘code blue’ over the intercom flashed through my mind. Nurses careened down the hall, pushing the crash cart, running, running. This scene, which I witnessed often at the hospital where I worked, resonated in my soul. The doctor had neglected to order the DNR- Do Not Resuscitate- which my family had requested. They brought him back to life- for what. He died once, was revived, then after the order was written, he died again. He never had a chance. My mother’s tremulous voice brought me back to the present. “Your father wrote his will in long-hand the day before his surgery. Two nurses witnessed it and gave it to me after he died. It’s the only copy and I haven’t opened it yet. I thought we should all hear it together,” she said, anxiety flowing from her eyes as she glared at the envelope. My dad knew every penny they had. He knew where it was, how much was there, the value of the house, the car, the truck and the farm equipment, everything. By design, my mother knew nothing. The yellow-lined legal size papers fell from the wrapping. The words looked squiggled with jittery edges as the tumor had robbed my father of his familiar pen strokes. The struggle he must have had to write pages and pages in long-hand pained me. As she read aloud the contents, my mom’s voice faltered and fear spilled from her entire being as his wishes unfolded. He outlined how much money each daughter was to receive and with great care, reassured her that the remainder would keep her comfortable and not wanting. She stared into space.


The papers rustled as his instructions shook in her hands. Without a word and with a striking swiftness in her step, my mother bolted from her chair, clutched the handle of the Franklin stove and threw my father’s last will and testament into the roaring fire. My sisters and I gasped, competing with the sound of crackling wood igniting a promise. Mom staggered back and in a nervous rant, shouted, “Your Daddy was not thinking straight. I can’t possibly live on the money he left me. I can’t give you a cent. You girls must understand.” She fell into her chair, reduced to an impulsive, terrified child,

afraid of life, afraid of her future. The hot coals seized the pages, a flare of light exploded as the entire packet became engulfed in flames. My father’s final words, his last conscious thoughts and effort turned to ashes as the fire sprinted through every line, erasing his desires forever. For me, it was as if he were dying again, dying a third death. She never recanted. He never had a chance. Carol L. Bowman

Saw you in the Ojo 53


T

he Union Ajijic soccer school was started in January 2013 with the mission of providing a way to channel youthful energy in a positive direction. It was founded by the Patronato de Futbol, Ajijic, an elected group of five people who are responsible for the soccer resources (fields, equipment, etc.) in Ajijic. Since the inception of the program they have recruited coaches into the program and enrolled more than 80 kids. The school is free and available to all. The kids show up to the intense practices five days a week. They never complain and are never late. In exchange for playing time, they have to bring their grades up. But while they bring plenty of dedication, they need financial help. Up until recently they were playing without uniforms, the soccer balls were splitting at the seams, and the training equipment had seen better days. Over the last few months, with the help of the ex-pat community, they have gained additional financial and moral support. A Bringa-Ball program yielded not only a dozen new soccer balls in its first week but also an eager new audience to cheer at the games. A group of people who were members of the

54

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

Inside Lakeside online forum provided the funds to get uniforms for the kids. One of the members, Ivan Woodburne, started to organize ongoing financial support from the expats. A very generous donation by Jim and Deb Wilson has allowed the school to buy training equipment. But of course there are on-going expenses, travel to other teams, referees and league fees, etc. which the school hopes to cover on an ongoing basis by adding some stability to the financial support. They also want to enroll more kids, and help them all achieve a positive identity and attitude. If you would like to be a part of this amazing program, come to the games and donate a little if you can. Soccer is a Mexican passion tightly woven into their culture and this type of program is repeated in villages along lakeside. Support your local team. It’s a great opportunity for the ex-pat community to support the village kids and make a real connection with them at the same time. Check-out UnionAjijic.com for more details about the school, the kids and upcoming games. You can contact webmaster and fundraiser Phil Rylett via the website too. Or join our Facebook group, Union Ajijic.


Saw you in the Ojo 55


on B\ Neil McKinnon

A

recent newspaper pap per er carcararried an article ab about a b out a gentleman who keeps ho o ke k epss ep a piece of paper pinned ab above abov ove e his his desk. The paper is a school hool progprog ress report written when n the man was 15 years-old. It states, es, “I believe he has ideas about becoming ming a scientist. On his present showing owing this is quite ridiculous ... it would be a sheer waste of time both on his part and of those who have to teach him.” The schoolmaster who wrote the report also told the boy that he was “too stupid” for science. The man is John Gurdon, co-recipient of last year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine. He did the pioneering work that allowed a Japanese researcher to show that mature specialized cells of the body can be reprogrammed into stem cells. Gurdon joins a long list of individuals who have had obstacles thrown in their way, either by teachers or others in senior positions, and the shorter list of individuals who have triumphed in spite of obstacles. We all know examples. They range from Marie Curie, two-time Nobel winner, who overcame extreme gender bias, ethnic discrimination and religious persecution (she was an atheist), to Douglas Cardinal, one of the world’s premier architects who was told at university, that because he was an aboriginal, he should take up teaching or welfare work. The same newspaper that announced John Gurdon’s Nobel Prize also carried an article about another winner. That article was titled, Edward Archbold Dies after Winning Live Cockroach Eating Contest. The competition took place in Deerfield Beach, Florida and first prize was a live python which will now go to Archbold’s estate. Edward’s story got me thinking. Perhaps there are individuals in this world who should have obstacles placed in the path of their ambitions. For example, Archbold might still be alive today if his kindergarten teacher had said, “Edward, stop eating bugs. Entomology is not for you. You’ll have

56

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

go easier ... to og o into into ssomething om m llilike lik ike ke dentistry.” den ntist tist ti s ry ry”.” decided find out if there I de d cided to fi other where were o we ther th er iinstances n criticism or a brutal assesstalent might have ment of talen proved beneficial to a particular individual. partic I soon found one. A 28-year-old California woman died after participating in a radio station contest called, “Hold your wee for a wii.” She had tried to drink large quantities of water without urinating in order to win a gaming console. It’s possible that this tragedy might have been averted had some kindly teacher, years before, taken her aside and told her that only people with very large bladders should engage in anti-pissing competitions. I found other examples where setting up barriers might have been beneficial: In 1993 Canadian lawyer, Garry Hoy ran into a tempered glass window in the TD Tower in downtown Toronto to prove that it was unbreakable. Unfortunately, he crashed through and fell 24 floors to the street below. On the 11th floor balcony of his apartment, Ottawa engineering student, Ameer Jinah calculated he would need a running start to win a spitting contest. Sadly, his momentum carried him over the rail. In 1923, Homer Morehouse participated in a dance marathon. After 87 hours on his feet, Morehouse collapsed and died. He came in fifth. In 1920, 58-year-old Charles Stevens constructed a fool-proof indestructible barrel to go over Niagara Falls. He took height, buoyancy, oxygen and impact into account and made it safely over the falls. However he had neglected to devise an exit strategy and drowned inside the barrel. In 1912, Franz Reichelt invented a combination overcoat/parachute and tested it by jumping from the top of the Eiffel Tower. It didn’t work. Sergei Tugama, a 28-year-old Rus-


sian, bet two women that he could have continuous sex with them both for 12 hours straight. A few minutes after he won the $4300 bet he suffered a fatal heart attack caused, not by the sex, but by the complete bottle of liquid Viagra he had ingested shortly after making the bet. All of these individuals could have benefited from some caring adult taking each aside at the appropriate stage of his or her development and informing each that he or she did not have what it takes. I myself could have profited from such advice. Imagine how much higher the quality of

written exposition would be if some compassionate older individual had whispered years ago, “McKinnon, you really should take up skydiving.” (Ed. Note: Neil is the author of Tuckahoe Slidebottle (Thistledown Press) which was a finalist for the Stephen Leacock Humor Award and the Howard O’Hagen Short Fiction Award.) Neil McKinnon

Saw you in the Ojo 57


Respect is the Key Word B\ Kate Karns

M

exico has a great tolerance for oddballs. In Ajijic there are a few retarded native boys, young men really. They are neither institutionalized nor hidden behind walls. They are given the same respect and gentle acceptance that the Mexican people give all of us. One lad is an extroverted, hard working bricklayer. Another does a lot of walking. In one day I’ve seen him in both Chapala and Ajijic, about five miles apart. He wears a favorite clothes pin, usually clipped to his ear and an unlighted cigarette hangs from his lips. He is very self-absorbed, but he is accepted. Another sings with savant accuracy, wandering from one performing band to the other. “Pechi” deems it his duty to empty the public waste baskets. “Buenos dias, Pechi,” the local merchants will say and he replies in a very business like voice as he makes his rounds from hotels to the post office, the weaving shops and boutiques. A serious offense would be to make a defamatory remark. In Mexico, if you have nothing else, you have your honor and that is defended, sometimes, to death. And the old are revered. Thank God! One old Gringa was recently hospitalized in one of the best hospitals of Guadalajara. She cussed the bumps on the new highway which the ambulance was trying to avoid, she cussed the ambulance, the new Cat Scan machine, so proudly in use as a new purchase by the hospital. She rang bells from her bed like the Swiss Family Robinson. She kicked over bed rails and actually hauled herself upright and saluted shouting, “God Bless America” as the nurse stroked her head and held her (other) hand, all the while soothing her with benevolent “Ya, reinita, ya. Está bien.” Translated, loosely, as “Now, little queen, it’s all right.” Maybe US nurses would duplicate this behavior, but I doubt it. Most everyone knows about the fifteenth birthday or quince años party a young girl has in Mexico upon reaching that important year in her life, that marks the end of childhood and

58

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

the beginning of young adulthood. It involves a preliminary thanksgiving mass with the priest asking for special blessing and guidance for the young lady, and is followed by a reception for family and friends. We recently lent our house and garden for the party that follows the church ceremony. It was to the family of a young friend of my granddaughter who is fourteen. We could then see how it is done in preparation for her own rite-of-passage. Huge cazuelas of chicken mole were made. Grand bowls of fruit salad. Mounds of different kinds of breads and tortillas were on each table and a large specially decorated cake was brought in with pomp. The singing and music carried down the street and it attracted two North American men into the festivities. They were dressed in shorts, perfectly okay for resort wear, but not respectful of the occasion. In true Mexican hospitality, they were welcomed into the throngs of family and friends even though they weren’t invited -weren’t even known. One of the prettily dressed girls offered one of the men a plate of food. When he took it in his hands this is what he said: “I have a condom in my pocket. Wanna get laid?” The girl didn’t understand English and smiled, assuming he was thanking her. I reached over and took the plate from his paws and dumped it over his lap, burning his “offering.” “If you want to live,” I seethed, “get up quietly and walk out of here and don’t stop until you reach the border.” If the man had been heard and then shot, the incensed protector of the girl’s honor would have been pardoned. Mi casa es su casa, indeed! I wish my fellow countrymen would learn how to respect our hosts. If Mexicans respect even the mentally ill, why cannot we learn to respect everything about them?


FUN MEM MORIE ES OF MOM AND DAD D B\ Bob Tennison

I

t was in my early teens that I realized how much fun my parents were, what a great sense of humor they had and how much enjoyment they received from playing tricks on each other, and especially on people lacking a sense of humor. One of the real winners was the time my father was going on a fishing trip with some of his buddies, leaving at four o’ clock in the morning. He retired very early, and my mother decided how much fun it would be to sew up the cuffs of his trousers. When his alarm went off she heard him stumbling around in the bathroom trying to put on his trousers and wondering what in the world was going on. She finally heard him leave the bathroom for the machine drawer and a pair of scissors. As he finally leaned over to kiss her goodbye between her gales of laughter, he said, “I’ll get even.” He lived up to his word the day she went shopping with a friend, to be followed by a box lunch party at another friend’s house. While she was away he short-sheeted her bed as he knew she would be tired and ready to get to sleep for an early Sunday morning. It was his turn to laugh when he heard her having to remake her bed after finally figuring out what had happened. Each and every Sunday morning for four weeks, around seven or a little earlier, we got a phone call from a woman asking for Sister Thompson. On the fifth Sunday I heard my mother say, “Sister Thompson didn’t come home until four this morning, and she’s still too drunk to come to the phone.” Needless to say, no more Sunday calls for Sister Thompson. My father was a Dallas policeman, and he was still in uniform when he picked me up downtown one afternoon on the way home. We were stopped at a red light and the very moment the yellow light came on, the car behind us honked, not a smart move on the part of that driver. My father got out of the car, walked back to the “honker” and, since this was before air conditioning in cars, reached through the open window, turned off the man’s ignition, threw the keys across the street and onto the raised sidewalk. Heaven alone knows how long it took the “honker” to find his keys. Something tells me he never honked his horn at all after that episode.

Shopping with my mother one day for a gift for the new baby of a friend turned out to be a real hoot. Mother wanted something unique and different. The saleslady behind the counter showed her a pair of blue booties. My mother didn’t think they were unusual enough and somebody else was sure to take them to the party, so we continued looking. The saleslady followed us around with suggestions, bringing along the booties she was determined to sell my mother. Mother found a beautiful blanket and matching pillow, so we took them to the counter to be gift wrapped. As we were ready to leave, the saleslady again asked my mother if she wouldn’t like the blue booties as well. My mother told her again that, even though they were beautiful they just wouldn’t do. The saleslady then asked if my mother would tell her why they wouldn’t do and, to my surprise, she said to the saleslady, “Well, there are only two booties here. And I would need three.” The look on the saleslady’s face as we turned to leave was something I will never forget. She may even be still trying to figure that one out. (Ed. Note: There will be more of these stories as, in Bob’s words “they come to mind when the mind is really working.”)

Saw you in the Ojo 59


-R\IXO0XVLQJV B\ -o\ Birnbach Dunstan, MA, LPC, MAC New Adventures Ahead

L

ife certainly brings some unexpected surprises. A truly serendipitous convergence of events brought about the sudden and unexpected sale of our home here at Lakeside. After much thought, my husband and I have decided to return to the U.S. We will be moving back to Portland, Oregon, where my greatest pleasure in returning will be again to live near to my son who I have missed very much while living so far away. Lakeside has been my home for more than twelve years now. It is the first place that truly feels like “home” to me as opposed to merely the place I live. After years of not quite fitting into round holes, there are lots of square holes down here for a square peg like me. And lots of other square pegs. I love this place. Yet despite all that, there comes a time to return to my other home and family. I’m surprisingly eager to make the move. I hope that feeling lasts when I’m in the midst of a Portland winter! I don’t know just what the future has in store for me or whether my departure from Lakeside will be temporary or permanent. All that remains to be seen.   Meantime, there is another exciting adventure on the horizon that will help get me though that first long winter. Next May I will be going to Bhutan, a tiny kingdom between India and Tibet.  I’ll be working there for several months in their national hospital seeing patients and trying

60

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

to help achieve their goal of “Gross National Happiness.” (Yes, that’s how they measure their country’s wealth!) And so, I begin the process of sorting and packing, figuring out what to keep and what to leave behind. I don’t need a packing box for those things that are most important to me. What I value most from my time here at Lakeside is my own growth and the friends who’ve been part of my life. After twelve-and-a-half years, I’ll be leaving here confident in my ability to make my own way in a foreign culture (a skill that will certainly serve me well in Bhutan!). I came to Mexico with only English and a smattering of French, and now I can hold my own in a basic conversation in Spanish. I can navigate intricate dealings with Telmex and the electric company. I not only know what are mamey, pitaya, nopal, and verdolaga, I know how to use them to create something delicious to eat. I suspect that returning to the United States will be far more of a culture shock than my coming to Mexico. Acculturation to life southof-the-border was easy for me. The bonuses and benefits far outweighed the adjustments and headaches. Sure, I look forward to living a short hop away from Powell’s Books and Trader Joe. Uninterrupted electricity and phone service and drinking clean water from the tap won’t be hard to adjust to either. But I will deeply miss the many friends I have made here, those I know personally and those I have shared deep connections with as clients. It saddens me that I cannot say a personal goodbye to each of you. I am heartened by the words of Richard Bach who wrote, “Don’t be dismayed at goodbyes. A farewell is necessary before you can meet again. And meeting again, after moments or lifetimes, is certain for those who are friends.” Goodbye, dear friends. You’ll be missed. Wherever I am, my email remains the same (joy@dunstan.org), and I invite all of you who wish to please stay in touch. I’ll miss you lots.


Saw you in the Ojo 61


SPAIN N’S S FIF FTY MAGIC CAL YEA ARS B\ Morgan Bedford

F

rom 1492 until 1542, a dozen men under the flag of Spain created by the right of discovery and conquest one of the great Empires of all time. We are literally talking of a handful of men, not the armies of Alexander the Great, Napoleon, Caesar or Genghis Khan. We are talking of armies of 19 to 250 men and a short but magical 50 years. Columbus gets credit for discovering “New Spain” in 1492, but after four voyages, he hadn’t scratched the surface of this Empire. The boundaries of New Spain at one time extended north from Panama to Canada, east to Charleston, South Carolina and Florida and the Spanish Caribbean, west to the Philippine Islands and north up the Mississippi above St. Louis. The Empire also included what is today the eleven western states of the United States; were the prime jewels of Mexico. The capitals of the four judicial units that controlled this Empire were in Mexico City, Guadalajara, Guatemala, and Santo Domingo, whose government moved to Cuba. All of the explorers used Santo Domingo as a base, as had Columbus. Capitals are only geographical names. It is the man that counts. It was only 27 years after Columbus landed on San Salvador Island (Watling Island) that Hernan Cortez took Mexico some 480 years ago. Who were the incredible explorers who defying all odds created an empire in fifty years out of millions of square miles of jungle and ocean? Ca-

62

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

beza de Vaca from 1528 on explored Florida through Texas to the Gulf of California. Francisco Coronado in 1540, acting on the fabulous report of Fray Marcos de Niza, left Compostela at the head of a 250-man army in search of the “Seven Golden Cities of Cibola” (now identified with the Zuni Pueblos of New Mexico). Coronado searched as far as Kansas and the Grand Canyon. But the fame and fortune that might have been his for colonizing this vast area was not to be his. Coronado returned with less than 30 men. Hernando De Soto explored all of the Southern U.S., as well as Peru. He took home a fortune. Unfortunately, he came back for more and died while still searching. Hernan Cortez took Mexico in 1519, and also developed Honduras and Lower California. Little more be said here about this intrepid genius. Francisco Pizzaro captured Peru in 1531. The rumor remains that the Incas killed him by pouring molten gold down his throat, apparently in the hope this would satiate his greed. Yet, amazingly, he had begun his conquest with only 30 men. Antonio de Mendoza was the first and greatest Viceroy of New Spain. In 1540, he inspired the conquests of New Mexico, California and again, the Philippines. Vasco Nuñez discovered the Pacific Ocean in 1513, and his commander, Vasco Balboa, took possession in the name of New Spain later in that same year. Portillo discovered Monterey, California in the mid-1700s. The Franciscan monk, Junipero Serra, founded 21 missions from San Diego northward until he died in 1784. But these discoveries were mere icing on the cake. When Mexico gained her independence from Spain in 1821, it had a population of six million, of which only some 30,000 were literate. Mexico now has a population approaching 116 million, larger than any European nation—and all because of the early efforts of a handful of lionhearted men who, in an incredibly brief period, would change the course of history and redefine the boundaries of much of the world. It was indeed a magical fifty years.


Saw you in the Ojo 63


CALIFORNIA

—Once Again the Golden State! B\ Fred Mittag

E

conomists know how to manage the economy; the problem is always political”—My economics professor, 55 years ago. But Charles Darwin explained biological evolution 154 years ago and they’re still arguing about biblical creation vs. evolution at the Texas State Board of Education. It’s embarrassing to our race that a percentage of humans are slow learners. They tend to be Republicans, who put ideology ahead of science, and thus retard their intellectual development. A valid criticism of journalism today is that it strives for “false equivalency,” an attempt to be “fair.” It’s dishonest to pretend that a skunk is no more offensive than Mimi, my little dog – and it’s unfair to Mimi. What then, pray tell, is Chuck Todd’s job, if not to identify skunks? He recently said it’s President Obama’s job to identify Republican lies. What a dereliction of journalistic ethics! John Maynard Keynes was a giant of economics. He advised President Franklin Roosevelt on the Great Depression of the 30’s. Keynes was openly gay. Conservatives have tried to use that to discredit his economic theories, for lack of any intellectual foundation of their own. A major contribution of Keynes was the principle that when the economy is sluggish, government should increase spending, and when it’s overheated, government should reduce spending. Years later, President Nixon said, “We are all Keynesians now.” We must remember, however, that in today’s Republican world, Nixon would be a flaming liberal. John Kenneth Galbraith was F.D.R.’s man to make sure that the demands of war production didn’t cause runaway inflation. He also served as an economic advisor to Harry Truman, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon Johnson. Galbraith showed that individual economic decisions are not necessarily rational. Like Keynes, Galbraith was counter-intuitive to long established economic thought. The 2008 financial meltdown was the result of irrational

64

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

decisions on Wall Street, something Galbraith predicted and only government regulation can prevent. There is ample empirical evidence for Republicans, if only they possessed critical thinking skills to set themselves free. California is the latest laboratory example. Under Republican Governor Schwarzenegger, things didn’t go well. He promised to reduce the state’s debt, but it tripled during his time in office. Following George Bush’s example, he financed the government on a credit card, even as he recklessly reduced taxes. He fired thousands of state workers, adding to unemployment, and cut funding for education, the single best economic investment possible. Today California has a Democratic governor and a solidly Democratic legislature. They raised taxes and now produce a budget surplus that they are using to pay down the Republican debt. The conservative predictions were all wrong. Businesses and employers did not flee California for Texas, where taxes are low and regulation almost non-extant.  When California was beset by blackouts and electric bills that soared to eight times, the conservative Wall Street Journal wrote that California “has come to look like a hapless banana republic.” It turned out the reason was Republican deregulation that opened an opportunity for Enron to manipulate the market. Enron cut pipeline supplies of fuel and used other schemes to drive up energy prices. Before their financial implosion, Enron was able to engineer a recall election in which Democratic governor Gray Davis was defeated – because of voter anger at energy costs, which Enron had manipulated—unfettered Republican-style capitalism, in other words.  Proposition 13 was a California disaster. It requires a legislative supermajority to make tax and budget policy. It made California ungovernable. But now, the Republicans have lost many seats, allowing Governor Brown and the Democrats to pursue tax increases


and infrastructure spending that is helpful to the economy. The result is that California is now the world’s eighth biggest economy! Unemployment is down and housing prices are going up, an indication of increased demand. California accounted for a quarter of the nation’s job growth last month. California increased income taxes on its wealthiest citizens to the highest rate in the nation. Could they still add jobs? Economists said yes, that the taxes wouldn’t matter much. Conservatives said increased taxes would be doomsday for California (yawn).

Bill Maher said it best: “And everything conservatives claim will unravel the fabric of our society . . . has only made California stronger. Without a Republican governor and without a legislature being blocked by Republicans, a $27 billion deficit was turned into a surplus, continuing the proud American tradition of Republicans blowing a huge hole in the budget and then Democrats coming in and cleaning it up.” Amen! Fred Mittag

Saw you in the Ojo 65


The Ojo Crossword

ACROSS 1 Whinny 6 Skidded 10 Beers 14 Treed (2 wds.) 15 Bankrupt 16 Invalidated 17 Make 18 Ancien German character 19 American Civil Liberties Union (abbr.) 20 Sister for short 21 Foray 23 Mr. Doodle 25 Ding´s partner 26 Environmental protection agency (abbr) 27 Paean 30 Bow 34 Use 35 Throw in the air 36 Medical practitioner 38 Hot sandwich 39 Bull¿ght cheer 40 Doctrine 42 Lode yield 43 Famous cookies 44 _ in (focused) 45 Pipe repairman 48 W. Cameroon seaport 49 Ocean 50 Absorbed 51 Cast away

66

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

54 Thump 55 To be 58 Basket 59 Café 61 Suffuse with color 63 Competent 64 Kiln 65 Type of peace prize 66 Midday 67 Information 68 Urges DOWN 1 Takes 2 Decorative needle case 3 Wading bird 4 Miss 5 Simplest element 6 Small bunch of Àowers 7 Brazen 8 Cation 9 Ice cream brand 10 Pineapple (German) 11 Fortune 12 Women´s magazine 13 Veer 22 One of these 24 Able 25 Former magistrate of Venice 27 European monetary unit 28 Arrogate 29 Mark 30 Gray 31 Avails 32 Swelling 33 Warble 35 Volume 37 Musical repeat 40 Dicing 41 Root 43 Quit 46 Sports match 47 Kitten´s cry 48 Dkm 50 Leftovers of civilizations 51 Other _ 52 Homeless person 53 Rolled chocolate candy brand 54 Fanned 55 Syrian bishop 56 Feared 57 Snaky ¿sh 60 Evening 62 Cow speak


Saw you in the Ojo 67


THE OJO INTERNET MAILBOX (Wherein we publish some comments about our previous issues.)

THE GHOSTS AMONG US - OCTOBER 2013 Linda Steele That was very informative! It was well-written and I enjoyed the article very much. HUCKLEBERRY FINN: A MISUNDERSTOOD CLASSIC Linda Steele What a great article! I loved it! BLUE SHUTTERS Juliana Well done Kathy! THE DISTRIBUTION OF WEALTH IN MEXICO Jenny Pruim Beautiful, historic, mystical Coyoacan, stunning, complicated, and intriguing Frida, talented and complex Diego R, Trotsky, and their story-book/horrorstory lives.....reality is truly stranger than fiction. CARLOTA—MEXICO´S LOST EMPRESS

68

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

Herbert W. Piekow Your article was both well written and well researched about a favorite historical personage. I enjoyed how you let the reader decide if Carlota was a prisoner or had dementia. Currently at the La Casa ITESO Clavigero museum located at José Guadalupe Zuno 2083, a block south of Chapultepec, there is an exposition of early Mexican talking movies of the 1920´s and 1930´s. Two of the features are Maximiliano y Juarez, the other is La Paloma . . . do go if you can and keep writing. LAKE CHAPALA WRITERS CONFERENCE eBook DesignWorks Love the story about the eulogy. :-) Renee, eBook DesignWorks THE MAESTROS ARE COMING, THE MAESTROS ARE COMING! NJ Wilson How much & details for trip to Artesian Fair/maestros


The

Lൺ඄ൾ Cඁൺඉൺඅൺ Sඈർංൾඍඒ

News

www.lakechapalasociety.com

LCS Annual Arts and Crafts ShoZ LCS works with local artists each November celebrating our own Maestros del Lago! This year the event has been expanded to two days, November 23 and 24. The exhibition begins on Saturday morning at 10 AM. The Children’s Art Program will be conducting the Annual LCS Children’s Art Contest that morning, come and celebrate with the winners. Remember the winner is featured on the cover of our annual membership directory. A community cultural committee of local artists will be speaking at Open Circle Sunday morning prior to opening the exhibition at noon. The exhibition runs until 4 PM both Saturday and Sunday. All local artists are welcome to sign up for space. The Cost is only $100 pesos. Sign-up with Maria at the Wilkes Education Center at Galeana #18. Help us celebrate the talent found and grown right here at Lakeside. This is a unique opportunity to support our local community of talented artists all gathered in the same place! See you there!!!!

Children from the LCS Children’s Art Program painted muñecas (dolls) to decorate the entrance of the Annual Feria del Maestros Del Arte, scheduled for November 15-17 in Chapala. Important Note: Once again representatives of the United States Consulate will return to LCS every second Wednesday from 10-12:30 pm. You must sign up on the Verandah the morning the visit. Sign-up begins at 10 am and ends at 11:30 am.

November 2013 -ust Do It! It’s Time to -oin or ReneZ It’s that time again. S’wonderful being a member of the Lake Chapala Society! It’s your opportunity to take advantage of some of the terri¿c bene¿ts of value to all Lakeside residents. Your membership may be full, or monthly for those of you who are short-term visitors to Lakeside. You may join at any time, but you need to be a full member by December 15 to be included in the annual Member Directory. Stop by the service of¿ce; our volunteers will make the process simple and easy. And this year, you can make it easy on yourself by renewing online at www.lakechapalasociety.com Among the many bene¿ts LCS members enjoy are services like free WiFi, our worldwide mail service via the U.S., and our three-times weekly exercise classes. Members enjoy our 24,000+ volume library--Latin America’s largest Englishlanguage lending library, and our Talking Books library which houses hundreds of recorded books on nearly every subject and literary genre. Our Video Library has 6,000+ ¿lms and television series for rent, and many DVDs and VHS titles for sale. We can even duplicate your crumbling old VHS tapes onto compact discs. Cheap. Always of interest, member favorite Film A¿cionados, a weekly event, shows little-known, unusual, and sometimes rarelyseen, international and domestic feature ¿lms and documentaries. Representatives of the United States Consulate are here at LCS each month on every second Wednesday from 10-12:30 pm. LCS members enjoy dining discounts at La Hacienda de Don Pedro Steakhouse. Regular presentations are offered on subjects from crime prevention, customs rules, immigration rules and other timely subjects. Information about our many activities is listed in this monthly newsletter, on-line, and posted on the wall opposite the of¿ce. Our bi-lingual operations manager and the volunteers at the front desk are on duty daily to assist you. Please remember the December 15 deadline! Join now-you’ll be glad you did! Mexico’s Justice System Did you ever wonder how justice is served in Mexico? It is a system unto itself, and expats should understand it. In a ¿rst of its kind presentation - Ministerio Publica has accepted our invitation to give an informative presentation to our members. We expect the presentation to outline the justice system and the steps required to ¿le a complaint when you have been the victim of a crime. Seating is limited, sign up in the LCS Services Of¿ce. Date and time TBA.

Saw you in the Ojo 69


LCS TED TALKS Learning Seminars Return The popular TED Talks podcasts return for the 2013-2014 season with more presentations on subjects of interest to anyone intrigued by cutting edge ideas.

November 1 Nov 5 Jamie Oliver “Teach Every Child About Food” Facilitator: Fred Harland Nov 12 Dan Pallotta “The Way We Think About Charity is Dead Wrong” Facilitator: Ron Mullenaux Nov 19: Neil Pasricha “The 3 A’s of Awesome” Facilitator: Reba Mayo Nov 26 no seminar December 1 Dec 3: Paddy Ashdown: “The Global Power Shift” Facilitator: Ron Mullenaux Dec 10: Russell Foster “Why Do We Sleep?” Facilitator: Ron Mullenaux Dec 17: Amy Cuddy "Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are" Facilitator: Rick Rhoda Dec 24: Holiday Dec 31: Holiday -anuar\ 1 Jan 7: Lesley Hazleton "The Doubt Essential to Faith” Facilitator: Bill Frayer Jan 14: J.J. Abrams “The Mystery Box: All About Movies/ Mystery” Facilitator: Ron Mullenaux Jan 21: Sheena Iyengar's "The Art of Choosing" Facilitator: Bill Frayer Jan 28: Atul Gawande “How Do We Heal Medicine?” Facilitator: Fred Harland Februar\ 1 Feb 4: Pico Iyer “Where is Home?” Facilitator: Ron Mullenaux Feb 11: Dan Dennett “The Illusion of Consciousness” Facilitator: Bill Frayer Feb 18: Janine Shepherd “A Broken Body Isn’t a Broken Person” Facilitator: Fred Harland Feb 25: Sam Harris “Science Can Answer Moral Questions” Facilitator: Ron Mullenaux March 1 Mar 4: Holiday Mar 11: "The Power of Introversion" Facilitated by Bill Frayer Mar 18: Susan Lim “Transplant Cells, Not Organs” Facilitator: Fred Harland Mar 25: Richard Wilkinson “How Economic Inequality Harms Societies” Facilitator: Ron Mullenaux April 1 Apr 1: Jessica Jackley “Poverty, Money—and Love” Facilitator: Fred Harland Apr 8: Brian Goldman “Doctors Make Mistakes. Can We Talk About That?” Facilitator: Ron Mullenaux Apr 15: Allan Savory ³+RZWR)LJKW'HVHUWL¿FDWLRQDQG5Hverse Climate Change” Facilitator: Fred Harland

70

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

Exciting NeZ Activities American Histor\ Lectures A new series will take place in the Sala from 2 to 4 pm starting Tuesday, November 12th. The ¿rst lecture includes an introduction to the series and focuses on Truman, Oppenheimer and the bomb. Open to the public. ToZn Topics The ¿rst presentation, “The Icons of Mexico”, presented by Judy King, editor of the Lake Chapala Review, will take place on Friday, November 22 in the Sala from12:15-2 pm. Judy King will share what she has learned about Mexican history, traditions and holidays. LCS members only. PathZa\s to Inner Peace Explore the philosophy and metaphysics of The Course in Miracles and related texts on Saturdays from 2-3:30 pm in the Ken Gosh Pavilion. Immigration Education A do-it-yourself course presented by INM of¿cials from Guadalajara will teach you how to go online to renew your visa. Attendance is limited to 50 people; sign up in the of¿ce. Tuesday, November 26 from 12-2:45 pm in the Sala. The Philosoph\ Group Discuss issues and articles Wednesdays 10:45-11:45 am at the LCS Gazebo. Investment Management and Financial Planning for American Expats Meet Thursday, November 7, from10-11 am in the Sala. Presented by Marion Wellman.

Life-long Learning

The ¿rst of the Life-long Learning series Neill James Lectures will start Tuesday, December 3 in the Sala at 2 pm. The initial presentation, hosted by Fred Harland, is entitled “The Anti-Aging Debate”. Ten lectures are currently scheduled, but we need presenters for three open dates: February 11, March 11, and March 18. If you are interested in participating contact Richard Rhoda at rhodarick@yahoo.com with a brief description of your topic and a brief bio.

iPad Class NeZs

Need more information about iPad classes? Please contact lcsipadclasses@gmail.com

Important Post life Update

The new telephone number for the San Miguel Funeral Home is 01 33 13 88 56 27 You may use this number in addition to the main number 01 33 38 2515 56.

FareZell Message of Appreciation From an LCS Friend I have been in Ajijic for almost 15 years. My husband, Morris Reichley, died December 2011. I miss him. I am going to California and will be with my daughter, Jane. Thank each and every one of you for being you and providing all of us with the LCS. --- Ida Lou Quinn


VIDEO LIBRARY NEW ADDITIONS

NOVEMBER ACTIVITIES

New Additions for November See the Video Library bulletin board and the binders on the FRXQWHUWR¿QG¿OPVRILQWHUHVW

*Open to the Public ** US Citizens (S) Sign in required (C) Membership card required

CRUZ RO-A Cruz Roja Sales Table M-F 11-1 Cruz Roja Monthly Meeting 2nd W 2-4 HEALTH INSURANCE Blue Angel Insurance F 10:30-1 IMSS & Immigration Services M+T 10-1 Met Life Insurance T+TH 11-2 ReHealth Therapies 1st+3rd TH 10-12 HEALTH LEGAL SERVICES Becerra Immigration F 10:30-12:30 Blood Pressure F 10-12 Diabetes Screenings 2nd+3rd F 10-12 Hearing Services (S) M and 2nd+4th SAT 11-3 Hypnotherapy W 2-5 Information Desk M-SAT 10-2 Loridans, Marquez & Assoc T 10-12 Optometrist (S) TH 9-2 Pharmaceutical Consultations 4th M 10-12 Skin Cancer Screening (S) 2nd +4th W 10-12 US Consulate 2nd W 10-12:30 Sign Up begins10; and ends 11:30 ** LCS PATIO LCS Patio, Bus Trips & Sales Table M-F 10-1 LESSONS Children’s Art SAT 10-12* Chidren’s Reading Program SAT 9-10* Exercise M+W+F 9-10 Have Hammer Workshop Demo W 10-12* Intermediate Hatha Yoga T+ TH 2-3:30, SAT 1-2:30 Line Dancing T+TH 10-11:10 LIBRARIES Audio TH 10-12 Book & Video M-SAT 10-2 Library of Congress Books**/ Talking Books TH 10-12 Wilkes M-F 9:30-7, SAT 9:30-1 SOCIAL ACTIVITIES American History Lecture T Nov 12 2-4* Beginners Digital Camera W 12-1 Beginners iPadClass F 2:30-4:30 Begins 1-22 Nov Bridge 4 Fun M+W 1-4:30 Conversaciones in Espanol. M 10-12 Digital Camera Club M+W 10:30-11:50 Discussion Group W 12-1:30 Film A¿cionados 1st+3rd TH 12-2:15 Film A¿cionados 2nd+4th +Last TH 2-4:30 Genealogy Last M 2-4 iStuff Discussion Group F 9:30-10:30 Learning Seminars T 12-1:30 Mac OS Class 1st M 12-1:30 Mac User Group 3rd W 3-4:30 Mahjong F 10-2:30 Needle Pushers T 10-12 Pathways to Inner Peace SAT 2-3:30* Philosophy Group W 10:45-11:45 Scrabble M+F 12-2 Storytellers T 3:30-6, 12 Nov* Tournament Scrabble T 12-2 Town Topics “The Icons of Mexico” F 12:15, 22 Nov Windows Computer Group F 10:30-11:45 SERVICE SUPPORT GROUPS Gamblers Anonymous W 11-1 Green Group 1st T 3-4:30 Lakeside AA M +TH 4-5:45 MS Support Group 3rd W 3-4 Niños de Chapala y Ajijic F 10-12 Open Circle SUN 10-12:15 SMART Recovery W 2:30-4 TICKET SALES M-F 1-1

The Great Gatsb\ #6338 (2013) An adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's Long Island-set novel, where Midwesterner Nick Carraway is lured into the lavish world of his neighbor, Jay Gatsby. Soon enough, however, Carraway will see through the cracks of Gatsby's nouveau riche existence, where obsession, madness, and tragedy await. Leonardo DiCaprio Carrey Mulligan Mud #6331 (2012) Two young boys encounter a fugitive and form a pact to help him evade the bounty hunters on his trail and to reunite him with his true love. Matthew McConaughhey Tye Sheridan Amour #6333 (2012) George and Anne, an octogenarian couple. are cultivated, retired music teachers. One day, Anne has a stroke, and the couple's bond of love is severely tested. Drama English sub-titles Jean-Louis Trinsignant Emmanuella Riiva Bobb\ #6336 (2006) The story of the assassination of U.S. Senator Robert F. Kennedy in the early morning hours of June 5, 1968 in the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, and 22 people in the hotel whose lives were never the same. Anthony Hopkins Demi Moore The Sum of Us #6342 (1994) Set in Sydney, Australia. A father and his gay son are trying to ¿nd Ms/Mr Right respectively. The ¿lm shows their relationships with one another and the objects of their affection as tragedy strikes. There is no overt 'message' in the ¿lm, just very natural, entertaining story-telling. Russell Crowe Jack Thompson The President’s Last Bang #6340 (2005) On October 26, 1979, President Park Chung Hee, who had ruled South Korea since a 1961 coup, was assassinated by Kim Jae Kyu, his director of intelligence. The ¿lm depicts the events of that night, with a coda about the fate of each conspirator. Comedy/drama Japanese/Korean English subtitles Jae-Ho Song Suk Han Disconnect #6339 (2012) A hard-working lawyer, attached to his cell phone, can't ¿nd the time to communicate with his family. A couple is drawn into a dangerous situation when their secrets are exposed online. A widowed ex-cop struggles to raise a mischievous son who cyber-bullies a classmate. An ambitious journalist sees a career-making story involving a teen who performs on an adult-only site. Jason Bateman Jonah Bobo Additions to our series inventory: The Good Wife (4th year); Scandal, (2nd year); Homeland (2nd year); Big Love (4th year); Boardwalk Empire (3rd year); and -XVWL¿HG (1st year). Please be advised that there is a possibility that these items will not be available until November 4th. Our courier had some family health problems in Nogales and had to return home before entering Mexico. The LCS Video Library is dependent upon the availability of couriers. If you are traveling north and returning in a timely manner or if you are having someone coming to visit, we could use your help. Please contact Tom at keanhombre@prodigy.net.mx for details. Thank you.

MeoZ! A kitty thank you to all of our past supporters! Funds are getting low again and we need donations to spay, neuter, feed and care for our furry amigos. Make a much-needed and much appreciated contribution at the of¿ce. Muchas gracias! A new batch of kittens arrived :-( please take one :-)

Saw you in the Ojo 71


Casi Nuevo NeZs: We’re Here to Help

Casi Nuevo Consignment & Thrift Shop can quickly sell your unwanted household items on consignment. We can handle everything from the smallest item to a full household of furniture. You need help with transporting the items to our store in Riberas Del Pilar? No problema! We can arrange transport for you. You don’t want to wait until the items are sold to collect the money? We’ve got you covered! We are now buying items for cash. Please contact Jacqueline Smith at smithjacqueline55@gmail. com or 766-1303. We can arrange a visit to your house to appraise your items, pay you cash, and remove the items from your home. All pro¿ts go to supporting Casi Nuevo’s three children’s charities: The School for Special Needs Children (formerly School for the Deaf), LCS Educational Program, and Have Hammer‌Will Travel . We need volunteers!!!!! Stop in and sign-up: fun work atmoVSKHUHVLPSOHWUDLQLQJSURJUDPDQGEHQH¿WV

Gotcha!

Check out the Lost and Found in the service of¿ce for those items that you suspect may have been lost or strayed. Chances are we’ve got those keys, that jacket, sweater or book you may have misplaced. Many items belonging to members and visitors have found a temporary home with us and we’d like to return them to you. We even have keys found by strangers on the street.

COURIERS STILL NEEDED! Members onl\)

Please keep us in mind when you’re expecting visitors from north of the border or when you’re going north and returning in a timely manner. Mail - Stop by the of¿ce to pick up mail for fellow members and ask if we need stamps. Video -Ten DVDs don’t take up much space in your luggage. Contact keanhombre@prodigy.net.mx BooNs - You can also bring books if you’re driving.

THURSDAY FILM AFICIONADOS

LCS Members Onl\ Bring Your Card All Âżlms shown in the Sala No food No pets

November 7 12:00 Shun Li and the Poet Italy 2012 Single mother Shun Li has come to Italy from China seeking a better life for her son. However, she has partnered with an unscrupulous employment agency. She meets Beppi, a ¿sherman-poet exile from Yugoslavia and they become friends. November 14 2:00 pm M\ Grandfather’s People Turkey 2011 This drama about people forced into exile between Turkey and Greece between the wars was rescheduled from the October 12 cancelled showing. November 21 12:00 QZert\ USA 2012 A heartwarming tale of romance and Scrabble. Word-nerd Zoe meets Marty and thus begins an improbable relationship that will have you laughing, cheering, and crying at the same time! 1RYHPEHU1R¿OP/&6LVFORVHG

Blood Pressure Group Needs Volunteers The Lake Chapala Society “Blood Pressure Groupâ€? is looking for volunteers with medical/nursing training and experience. If you have had training and practice taking blood pressure, please consider joining us and sharing your expertise. Our schedule is Ă€exible Âą you can sign up to work on a regular basis or volunteer just once a month. Currently, we work Fridays from 10 am to 12 noom, but will add Mondays, if there are enough volunteers. Contact Lindy White: lindywhite246@ hotmail.com or Mary Anne Molinari: mycasa17@gmail.com

Order Your Holida\ Cards NoZ Starting on November 1, you'll be able to order your Holiday Cards from the catalog at the LCS Patio. View the catalog online at lakechapalasociety.com and download order forms to drop off at the Patio. Last year over 700 cards were sold. These colorful and endearing cards sell for $20 pesos each with our young artists receiving half; the remainder is used to purchase materials for the Saturday classes and to pay for production.

THE LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY, A.C. 16 de Septiembre #16-A, Ajijic, Jalisco LCS Main OfÂżce: (376) 766-1140

OfÂżce, information and other services - Monday Âą Saturday, 10:00 am to 2:00 pm. Grounds open until 5:00 pm

LCS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

President - Howard Feldstein (2014); Vice-President - Ben White (2015); Treasurer - Michael Searles (2015); Secretary - John Rider (2014); Directors: Karen Blue (2014); Lois Cugini (2015); Ernest Gabbard (2015); Aurora Michel Galindo (2015); Fred Harland (2015); Cate Howell (2015); Ann D. Houck (2014); Wallace Mills (2015).

Executive Director - Terry Vidal The LCS Newsletter is published monthly. Deadline for submissions is the 17th of the month preceding publication. News items may be e-mailed to Reba Mayo rebaelizabethhill@yahoo.com; cc to Terry Vidal tqv56431@yahoo.com Note: The editorial staff reserves the right to edit all submissions according to time, space availability and editorial decision.

72

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013


Saw you in the Ojo 73


EMERGENCY NUMBERS

Service

ZZZ.tel.chapala.com

DIRECTORY ADVERTISING  DIRECTORY

- CASA DEL SOL Tel: 766-0050 - CASA TRES LEONES Cell: (045) 331-350-6764

- EL O-O DEL LAGO Tel. 765-3676

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS - ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Tel: 766-5961

Pag: 

ANIMAL CLINICSPET SHOP - ANIMAL SHELTER, A.C. Tel: 765-5514 - CLINICA VETERINARIA SAN ANTONIO Tel: 766-0808 - DEE’S PET HOTEL Tel: 762-1646 - MASKOTA’S LAKE Tel: 766-0287 - PET FOOD AND GROOMING Tel: 766-3062

Pag: 39 Pag: 1 Pag: 7 Pag: 72 Pag: 71

APPLIANCES Pag: 21

ART GALLERIESHANDCRAFTS Pag: 79 Pag: 33, 5 Pag: 7

BEER LIQUOR STORES - BETO’S WINE LIQUOR Cell (045) 333-507-3024 - LICORES PAZ - SOLOVINO

- CANADA EURO US Cell. 333-815-7436 - LINEA PROFESIONAL Tel. 766-2555, Fax. 766-0066

Pag: 3 Pag: 2 Pag: 13 Pag: 7

BLINDS AND CURTAINS - HUNTER DOUGLAS Tel: 766-0026 - QUICK BLINDS Tel: 765-5067

Pag:  Pag: 3

BOOKSTORE  BOOKS - SANDI - BooNstore Tel: 01 (33) 3121-0863

Pag: 55

- BANCO MONEX Tel: 765-8100 01 800 0036 663 - INTERCAM Tel: 766-5978 - INVESTMENTS SAN-FEL Cell: 333-966-5908 - MULTIVA Tel: 766-2499

Pag: 72 Pag: 11

Pag: 5 Pag: 79 Pag: 51 Pag: 1

BEAUTY - ANGEL ESTRADA Cell: 331-230-9994 - AFRODITA Tel: 766-6187 - BLUE MOON Tel: 766-0937 - FRESH BEAUTY SALON Tel: 766-4596 - GLORIOSA Tel: 766-3372 - GRECO SALON Cell: 331-113-2772 - -AMES DON SALON Tel: 766-4073 - NEW LOOK STUDIO Tel: 766-6000

- CUGINIS OPUS BOUTIQUE Tel/Fax: 766-1790 - FIAGA BOUTIQUE Tel: 766-1816 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - MI MEXICO Tel: 766-0133 - OLGA’S - Custom SeZing Tel: 766-1699

Pag: 11 Pag: 

- FITWELL Tel: 33-1149-7271 - SKY FITNESS Tel: 766-1379

Pag: 7

Pag: 2

Pag: 

- MOBILE PROFESSIONAL CLEANING SERVICES Tel: 766-5360 - ORIENTAL RUGS CLEANING Tel: 3625-8456 - PROFESSIONAL WINDOW WASHING Tel: 765-4507 - SPRING CLEAN Tel: 765-2953

Pag: 7 Pag: 52 Pag: 3

CONSIGNMENT STORE Pag: 2 Pag: 

Pag: 57

CONSTRUCTION

Pag: 1

- ARQ. GUSTAVO RIVERA MENDOZA Tel: (044) 333 952 6475 Pag: 3 - CABO DO MUNDO- INTERIOR DESIGN Tel: 766-0026 Pag:  - CONSTRUCTION REMODELING Cell: 33 3954 5444, Home: (33) 2410-8401 Pag: 2 - EL MARIACHI - Artistic Iron WorNs Cell. 33-1138-8927 / 33-1768-1063 Pag: 7 - MARBLE GRANITE Tel: 766-1306 Pag: 9 - SPECIALIZED WATERPROOFING SOLUTIONS Of¿ce: (376) 766 5360, Cell: 045 331 282 5020 Pag: 7

Pag:  Pag: 55 Pag: 32 Pag: 7 Pag: 15 Pag: 23

BED BREAKFAST

DENTISTS Pag: 39

- A-I-IC DENTAL

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

7-17 75- 7-5555

HEALTH - LAKE CHAPALA CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING Tel: 766-0920 Pag:  - MIA PRATT - The Center for Creative Being Tel: 766-6003, 33-1004-3013 Pag: 51 - WELLNESS CENTER RESPIRO Tel: (045) 33-3157-7790 Pag: 1 - YOGA Tel: 766-0523 Pag: 51

HEARING AIDS - LAKESIDE HEARING SERVICES Cell. (045) 33-1511-4088

Pag: 71

HOTELS  SUITES - ADOBE WALLS INN Tel: 766-1296 - LA NUEVA POSADA Tel: 766-1444, Fax: 766-2049 - QUINTA DON -OSE Tel: 01-800-700-2223 - VILLAS DEL SOL Tel: 766-1152

Pag: 7 Pag: 3 Pag: 37 Pag: 9

- BETH CATHCART DESIGN DIRECTIONS Tel: 766-1842 Pag: 3

INSURANCE Pag: 5 Pag: 5

Pag:  Pag: 7 Pag: 57

- KR FURNITURE Tel: 766-4666 Pag: 1 - TEMPUR, MATTRESS AND PILLOWS Tel: (52) 333-629-5919, (52) 33 3611-3049 Pag: 37

- BLUE ANGEL Tel: 766-0547 - EDGAR CEDEÑO - MEXICO PROTECT Cell: (045) 33-3106-6982 - HOMEOWNER’S INSURANCE AXA Cell: (045) 331-074-3311 - PARKER INSURANCE SERVICES Cell: (33) 3809-7116 - PROTEXPLAN U.S. Toll Free 1-800-608-5743 Mexico Toll Free 01-800-681-6730 - RACHEL’S INSURANCE Tel/Fax: 765-4316 - TIOCORP Tel: 766-3978 - WEST COAST MEXICO INSURANCE Tel: (818) 788-5353

GARAGE DOORS OPENERS - AUTOMATIC GARAGE DOOR OPENERS Tel: 766-4973 Pag: 5

- GARDEN CENTER Tel: 765-59-73 - VIDA VERDE Tel: 106-0884 - L R WATER GARDENS Tel: 766-4386

Pag: 

Pag: 57 Pag: 7

Pag: 9

GRILLS - NAPOLEON Tel: 766-6153

Pag: 55 Pag: 3 Pag: 9 Pag: 23 Pag: 25 Pag: 32

- QUICK BLINDS Tel: 765-5067

Pag: 3

- CENTRO LAGUNA Tel: (376) 766-5514 - FRIDAY ARTISANS MARKET - LAKE CHAPALA FARMER’S MARKET - MONDAY MARKET

Pag: 2 Pag: 52 Pag:  Pag: 2

MEATPOULTRYCHEESE - PURITAN POULTRY Tel: 765-4399 - TONY’S Tel: 766-1614, 766-4069

Pag: 2 Pag: 17

MEDICAL SERVICES Pag: 17

HAND LOOMS - TELARES LOS REYES Tel: 766-5640

Pag: 2

MALL  MARKET

GRANITE MARBLE - MARBLE GRANITE Tel: 766-1306

Pag: 2

LIGHTING

GARDENING Pag: 7

- TEPEHUA TREASURES Tel: 763-5126, 763-5147 - NEW CONSIGMENT STORE Tel: 331-410-1707

Pag: 3

- BUGS OR US Tel: 762-1516 - FUMIGA Tel: 766-6057, Cell: (045) 33-1464-6705 - FUMI-TECH Tel: 766-1946 - TOTAL MOSQUITO CONTROL Cell. 333 459 8103 - VIDA VERDE Tel: 106-0884

COMMUNICATIONS - ISHOPNMAIL

Pag: 2, 59

FURNITURE

Pag: 5

 75-, 75-55 7-15

INTERIOR DESIGN

FUMIGATION

Pag: 1

CHIROPRACTIC - DR. VICTOR -. YOUCHA Tel: 766-1973

FITNESS

Pag: 3

CASINO - FOLIATTI CASINO

Tel: 766-3682 Pag: 13 - C.D. MARÍA LUISA LUIS VILLA Tel/Fax: 766-2428 Pag: 7 - C.D. SANDRA ANAYA MORA Tel: 765-3502, Cell: 331-218-6241 Pag: 11 - CENTRO DENTAL Tel: 766-2911 Pag: 1 - DENTAL EXPRESS Cell: (045) 331-121-6518 Pag: 1, 55 - DENTAL HEALTH ONE Tel: 1060-826 Pag: 1 - DENTAL PLASTICA LIFT Tel: 108-0595 Pag: 3 - DR. ALBERTO DON OLIVERA Tels: 765-4838, 765-4805 Pag: 12 - DR. ANGEL MEDELES Tel: 766-5050 Pag: 1 - DR. CARLOS CERDA VALDÉZ Tel: 766-0336 Pag: 71 - DR. FRANCISCO CONTRERAS Tel: 765-5757 Pag: 32 - DRA. ANGELICA ALDANA LEMA DDS Tel: 765-5364 Pag: 3 - HÉCTOR HARO DDS Tel: 765-3193 Pag: 29

CLEANING SERVICE

BANK INVESTMENT

74

Pag: 72 Pag: 52 Pag: 

Pag: 7

AUTOMOTIVE

- CASA DE LAS FLORES Tel: 766-5493

Pag: 5

BOUTIQUE  CUSTOM SEWING

- EL TIO SAM Tel: 766-5664, (33) 3811-0364

- ART HOUSE Tel: 765-5097 - DIANE PEARL COLECCIONES Tel: 766-5683 - EL MARIACHI Cell. 33-1138-8927 / 33-1768-1063 - EL PALOMAR Tel: 01 (33) 3635-5247 - FERIA MAESTROS DEL ARTE Tel: 765-7485 - MR BLUE PIG Tel: 766-3437 - SOL MEXICANO Tel: 766-0734 - ZARAGOZA Tel: 766-0573

Pag: 11

EMERGENCY HOTLINE AMBULANCE - CRUZ RO-A FIRE DEPARTMENT POLICE AMiMic Chapala La Floresta

Pag: 3

HARDWARE STORES - FERRETERIA Y TLAPALERIA GALVEZ Tel: 766-0880, Fax: 766-2440 Pag:  - REAL ORTEGA SONS-HardZare for Carpenters Tel: 765-7556, 765-2404 Pag: 5

- BRAIN BODY BASICS BOOTCAMP Pag: 1 - CHAPALA MED Tel: 765-7777 Pag: 27 - CLINICA Y FARMACIA MASKARAS Tel: 765-4805 Pag: 3 - DERMATOLOGIST Tel: 766-1198, 765-2400 Pag:  - DERMIKA-Dermatologic Center Tel: 766-2500 Pag: 12 - DRA. MARTHA R. BALLESTEROS FRANCO Cell: (045) 333-408-0951 Pag: 19 - DR. GABRIEL DE -. VARELA RIZO Tel: 765-6666 Pag:  - GO-LAB LaNe Chapala


Tel: 106-0881 Pag: 2 - HOSPITAL ANGELES DEL CARMEN Tel: (01) 3813-0042 Pag:  - ISILAB Tel: 766-1164 Pag: 1 - LAKESIDE MEDICAL GROUP Tel: 766-0395 Pag: 39 - PLASTIC SURGEON-Sergio Aguila Bimbela M.D. Tel: 108-0595 Pag: 3 - PLASTIC SURGERY-Dr. BenMamin Villaran Tel: 766-5513, Cell 044-333-105-0402 Pag: 31 - PLASTIC SURGERY RECONSTRUCTIVE Dr. Manuel -impne] del Toro Tel: 765-4805 Pag: 9 - PLAZA MONTAÑA HEALTH BEAUTY Tel: 766-5513 Pag: 31 - RICARDO HEREDIA M.D Tel: 765-2233 Pag: 52 - VARICOSE VEINS TREATMENT Tel: 765-4805 Pag: 2

MOVERS - LAKE CHAPALA MOVING Tel: 766-5008 - STROM-WHITE MOVERS Tel: 766-4049

Pag:  Pag: 17

Tel: 766-4197 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: (387) 761-0903 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Cell. 331-384-2821 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: (387) 761-0829 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: (374) 748-1658 - GEORGETTE RICHMOND Tel: 766-2077 - -UAN -OSE GONZÈLEZ Cell. 33-1113-0690 - LORI F-ELSTED Cell: (045) 331-365-0558 - MPR REAL ESTATE Tel: (315) 351-5167 - NOÉ LOPEZ Cell: (045) 331-047-9607 - PETER ST. -OHN Tel: 765-3676 - RAUL GONZALEZ Cell: 33-1437-0925 - SANDI ALLIN BRISCOE Tel: 765-2484 - SARA ARREOLA Cell: 331-438-8489

Pag: 53 Pag: 5 Pag:  Pag: 5 Pag:  Pag: 11 Pag: 5 Pag: 51 Pag: 9 Pag: 19 Pag: 3, 5 Pag: 3 Pag: 29 Pag: 37

MUSICTHEATRE

RENTALSPROPERTY MANAGEMENT

- D.-. HOWARD Tel: 766-3044 Pag: 1 - LOS CANTANTES DEL LAGO Pag: 5 - THE NAKED STAGE READER’S THEATRE Tel: 765-3262 Pag: 

- COLDWELLBANKER CHAPALA REALTY Tel: 766-1152, movile: (045) 33-1175-9632 Pag:  - FOR RENT Tel: 765-2671 Pag: 71 - GETAWAY TO PUERTO VALLARTA Pag:  Tel: (52) (322) 223-1340 - HACIENDA PMR Pag: 59 Tel: 766-3320 - -ORGE TORRES Tel: 766-3737 Pag: 25 - MANZANILLO VACATION RENTALS Tel: (314) 100-6773 or (314) 125-2817 Pag: 5 - RENTAL CENTER Pag: 5 Tel: 765-3838 - RENTAL LOCATERS Pag: 57 Tel: 766-5202 - SANTANA RENTALS Cell: 315-104-3283, Pag: 9 - VILLAS DEL SOL Tel: 766-1152 Pag: 9

NURSERY - LAS PALMAS Cell: 33-3170-1776/33-1195-7112 - SAN ANTONIO VIVERO Tel: 766-2191 - VIVERO AZUCENA Tel: 766-4289

Pag: 37 Pag: 13 Pag: 35

PERSONAL ASSISTANCE - -USTUS HAUSER Tel: 763-5333, Fax: 763-5335 Emergencies: 01 (33) 3441-8223 - NEWCOMERS ILSE HOFFMANN ilsecarlota40@gmail.com www.guadalajarachapalatravelguide.com Tel 01(33)3647-3912 Cell 33-3157-2541

Pag: 15

- SERVICIO OSTOS Tel: 01-800-504-7132 - TV REPAIR SERVICIO BELTRÈN Tel: 765-3949 - WATCH CLOCKS Tel: 765 5190, Cell: (045) 33-1331-9226

PAINT - QUIROZ-Impermeabili]antes Tel: 766-2311 - QUIROZ-Pinturas Tel: 766-5959 - SHERWIN WILLIAMS Tel: 766-1855

Pag: 27 Pag: 5 Pag: 

PHARMACIES - FARMACIA CRISTINA Tel: 766-1501 - FARMACIA EXPRESS II Tel: 766-0656 - FARMACIA MASKARAS Tel/Fax: 765-5827 - FARMACIA MORELOS Tel: 765-4002 - FARMACIA UNICA Tel: 766-0523

Pag: 1 Pag: 9 Pag: 53 Pag: 72 Pag: 51

POOL MAINTENANCE - EQUIPMENT AND POOL MAINTENANCE Tel: 766-1617 Pag: 2

OFFICE SUPPLIES - OFFICELAND Tel: 766-2543

REPAIRS

Pag: 5

REAL ESTATE - A-I-IC HOME INSPECTIONS Tel: 766-2836 Pag: 9 - ALL IN ONE REAL ESTATE SERVICE Tel: 766-1161 Pag: 15 - BUTCH HARBIN Cell: 33-3107-8748 Pag: 5 - CHAPALA-ARA Of¿ce: 106-1206, Cell: 333 953 8620 Pag: 7 - CHULA VISTA NORTE Tel: 766-2177 Cell: (045) 33-3841-8867 Pag: 22 - COLDWELL BANKER CHAPALA REALTY Tel: 766-1152, 766-3369 Fax: 766-2124, Tels: 765-2877 Fax: 765-3528 Pag:  - COLLINS REAL ESTATE

Tel: 766-1360 - PANINO Tel: 766-3822 - PERRY’S - PIZZERIA TOSCANA Tel: 765-6996 - SIMPLY THAI Tel: 766-5665 - SPANISH PAELLA Tel: 766-2225 - THE COFFEE KINGDOM Cell: 33-1115-6584 - THE PEACOCK GARDEN Tel: 766-1381 - TONY’S Tel: 766-1614, 766-4069 - YVES Tel: 766-3565

Pag: 17, 33, 3, 53

- LA CASA NOSTRA Tel: 765-3824 - LA VALENTINA Tel: 766-5179 - LAKE CHAPALA NURSING HOME Tel: 766-0404 - MI CASITA - Nursing Home Tel: 106-2081 - THE BLUE HOUSE Tel: 766-1695

- A-I-IC ELECTRONICS S.A. DE C.V. Tel/Fax: 766-1117, 766-3371 - SERVICIO BELTRÈN Tel: 765-3949, 766-4586

Pag: 71 Pag: 13 Pag: 7

SPA  MASSAGE - BALNERIO SAN -UAN COSALA Tel: (387) 761-0302 - CASA DE MARINA - Dra. -acNie Tel: ((387) 763 0973 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - MARIELE Tel: 766-4229 - TOTAL BODY CARE Tel: 766-3379 - WELLNESS CENTER RESPIRO Tel: (045) 33-3157-7790

Pag:  Pag:  Pag:  Pag: 7 Pag: 13 Pag: 1

Pag: 17

THERAPISTS

Pag: 5

- LESLIE D. STRONG Ph.D. -Marital Famil\ Therapist Tel: 766-5374 Pag: 59 - PROFESSIONAL REHABILITATION Tel: 766-5563 Pag: 19

Pag: 3 Pag: 23 Pag:  Pag: 57 Pag: 53

TOURS - CARLOS ANDRADE L. - Tour Guide Tel: 333-4000-838 Pag: 72 - CHARTER CLUB TOURS Tel: 766-1777 Pag: 9, 35 - MEX-ECO TOURS Pag: 

TREE SERVICE Pag: 17

- CHAPALA TREE SERVICE Tel: 762-0602

Pag: 9

Pag: 72

SCHOOL - INSTITUTO TERRANOVA Tel: 766 2401, 766 3999

Pag: 27

SELF STORAGE - SELF STORAGE-BODEGAS CHAPALA Tel: 766-0661, Tel/Fax: 766-1045 Pag: 3

SOCIAL ORGANIZATIONS

Pag: 72

SOLAR ENERGY

- A-I-IC TANGO Tel: 766-2458 Pag:  - BAYA BISTRO Tel: 766-2845 Pag: 59 - BRUNO’S Tel: 766-1674 Pag: 9 - CAFÉ ADELITA Tel: 766-0097 Pag: 5 - CASA FUERTE Tels: 3939-6474 / 81 Pag: 23 - CHOPSTICKS Tel: 766-1375 Pag: 2 - EL AZUL DE FRIDA Tel: 766-3437 Pag: 57 - EL -ARDIN DE NINETTE Tel: 766-4905 Pag: 2 - GO LE CLUB Cell: (045) 33-3502-6555 Pag: 25 - HACIENDA DE DON PEDRO Tel: 766-4906 Pag: 22 - HACIENDA DEL LAGO Tel: 766-0685 Pag: 51, 3 - HOSTERIA DEL ARTE Tel: 331-410-1707 Pag: 5 - -ASMINE’S Tel: 766-2636 Pag:  - LA CASA DEL WAFFLE Tel: 766-1946 Pag: 19 - LA NUEVA POSADA Tel: 766-1444, 766-2049 Pag: 3 - “ LA TAVERNA”DEI QUATTRO MORI Tel: 766-2848 Pag: 2 - LAURI’S MARKET CAFE Cell. 33-1466-4553 Pag: 53 - LOS MOLLETES Tel: 766-4296 Pag: 2 - LOS TELARES Tel: 766-0428 Pag: 3 - MANIX Tel: 766-0061 Pag: 3 - MOMS DELI RESTAURANT Tel: 765-5719 Pag: 13 - NUMBER FOUR

Pag: 5

SATELLITES T.V.

Pag: 7

RESTAURANTSCAFES

Pag: 15

RETIREMENTRESTNURSING HOMES

- LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY Tel: 766-1140 - LOS NIÑOS DE CHAPALA Y A-I-IC Tel: 765-7032

Pag: 

Pag: 2 Pag: 71

- DESMEX SOLAR CHAPALA Tel: 766-2889 - ESUN Tel: 766-2319

Pag: 9-72 Pag: 7

Pag: 55 Pag: 25

The Ojo Crossword

Saw you in the Ojo 75


CARS FOR SALE: Dodge Stratus 2003. R/T Turbo Ϯ͘ϰƵƚŽŵĂƟĐϰĚŽŽƌ͕ϭϮϭ͕ϬϬϬŬŵƐ͘WŽǁĞƌǁŝŶĚŽǁƐĂŶĚĚŽŽƌƐͬ͘ĐĂƐƐĞƩĞͬDͲ&D͘^ƵŶƌŽŽĨ͘ :ĂůŝƐĐŽƉůĂƚĞƐ͘'ƌĞĂƚƐŚĂƉĞĂŶĚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϲϴ͕ϬϬϬ͘ FOR SALE: ϮϬϬϱ &ŽƌĚ džƉůŽƌĞƌ ĚĚŝĞ ĂƵĞƌ͘ :ĂůŝƐĐŽ ƉůĂƚĞƐ͘ džĐĞůůĞŶƚ ŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ ƌƵŶƐ ŐƌĞĂƚ͘ 'ĂƌĂŐĞĚ ƐŝŶĐĞ ŶĞǁ͘ ŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ŵĂŝŶƚĞŶĂŶĐĞ ƌĞĐŽƌĚƐ͘ ϲϴ͕ϱϬϬ ŵŝůĞƐ͘ ϰ͘ϲ >ŝƚĞƌ sϴ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϭϯϬ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: DĞƌĐĞĚĞƐĞŶnj͘sĞƌLJŶŝĐĞǀĞŚŝĐůĞ͘ ŶĞǁ DŝĐŚĞůŝŶ ƟƌĞƐ͕ ĐůĞĂŶ͕ DĞdžŝĐĂŶ ƉůĂƚĞĚ ĂŶĚ ŝŶŐƌĞĂƚƐŚĂƉĞ͘ŽƐĞƌĂĚŝŽĂŶĚĐĚƉůĂLJĞƌ͘ŶĞĞĚĂ ƐŵĂůůĞƌĐĂƌ͘ǁŝůůƚƌĂĚĞĨŽƌĂϮϬϬϳŽƌŶĞǁĞƌ:ĂƉĂŶĞƐĞŵŽĚĞůĞdžĂŵƉůĞͬĂŵƌLJǁŝƚŚĂŝƌ͕,LJƵŶĚĂŝ ŽƌEŝƐƐĂŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϯϬ͕ϬϬϬ͘ϬϬŵdžŶ͘ FOR SALE:ϮϬϭϬstĞĞƚůĞ͘DŝŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ ůĂĐŬůĞĂƚŚĞƌŝŶƚĞƌŝŽƌ͘:ĂůŝƐĐŽƉůĂƚĞĚ͘ FOR SALE: dƌĂŝůĞƌͲZĞŵŽůƋƵĞ͘dŚŝƐƚƌĂŝůĞƌŝƐŝŶ ŐƌĞĂƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͕ŽŶůLJƵƐĞĚŽŶĐĞ͘/ƚŚĂƐŵĞƌŝĐĂŶ ĂŶĚDĞdžŝĐĂŶƉĂƉĞƌƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϮ͕ϬϬϬŵdžƉͲϭ͕ϬϬϬ ƵƐĚ͘WůĞĂƐĞĐŽŶƚĂĐƚŵĞĂƚϯϯϯͲϭϵϭͲϰϲϲϴ͘ FOR SALE: ,ŝƚĐŚ ĨŽƌ Ă h ,ĂƵů ƚƌĂŝůĞƌ͕ ƵƐĞĚ Ă ĨĞǁLJĞĂƌƐĂŐŽŽŶůLJŽŶĐĞƚŽŚĂƵůĂƚƌĂŝůĞƌĐŽŵŝŶŐ ĨƌŽŵƚŚĞh͘^͘ĚŽǁŶŚĞƌĞ͘ĂŶŚĂƵůƵƉƚŽϮϬϬϬ ůďƐ͘ƵƌƌĞŶƚǁĞďƐŝƚĞƐŚŽǁƐƚŚĞƉƌŝĐĞĨŽƌĂŶĞǁ ŚŝƚĐŚ Ăƚ ΨϭϳϬ h͘^͘ / ǁŽƵůĚ ƐĞůů ŝƚ ĨŽƌ ΨϭϬϬ h͘^͘ Ăůů ŵĞ Ăƚ ϳϲϲͲϯϬϮϱ Žƌ ǁƌŝƚĞ ĨŽƚŽŇLJĞƌϮϬϬϯΛ LJĂŚŽŽ͘ĐŽŵ.

COMPUTERS FREE: WƌŝŶƚĞƌĂƌƚƌŝĚŐĞƐ͘ϭϰŶĞǁƵŶŽƉĞŶĞĚ ŝŶŬĐĂƌƚƌŝĚŐĞƐƚŚĂƚĮƚƐĞǀĞƌĂůŵŽĚĞůƐŽĨĂŶŽŶ WŝdžŵĂƉƌŝŶƚĞƌƐ͘^ŽŵĞĐŽůŽƌƐĂŶĚďůĂĐŬ͘&ƌĞĞ͘Ăůů ƵĚϳϲϲͲϭϭϮϳ͘ FOR SALE: >ĞŶŽǀŽ /ĚĞĂ ƉĂĚ ϭ ϮϮϮϴϮh ϳͲ/Ŷ͘^ůŝŐŚƚůLJƵƐĞĚĞǀĞƌLJƚŚŝŶŐǁŽƌŬƐĮŶĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭϳϱ͘ϬϬ͘ FOR SALE: >'ϭϴŝŶĐŚŵŽŶŝƚŽƌ͕'ƌĞĂƚĨŽƌƵƐŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚƐŵĂůůůĂƉƚŽƉƐĐƌĞĞŶƐ͘WƌŝĐĞΨϭ͕ϭϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ FOR SALE: ůĂĐŬ /ŶŬ ĐĂƌƚƌŝĚŐĞƐ ĨŽƌ ĂďŽǀĞ ŵŽĚĞů>ĞdžŵĂƌŬƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͘/ǁŝůůďƌŝŶŐǁŝƚŚŵĞĨƌŽŵ ĂŶĂĚĂ KĐƚ͘ ϮϮ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮϱ h^ Žƌ ΨϯϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϯϯϬϭ͘ FOR SALE: hŶƵƐĞĚ ƚŚĞƌŶĞƚ ďƌŽĂĚďĂŶĚ ƌŽƵƚĞƌ ĨŽƌ ƵƐĞ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ǁŝƌĞĚ ŶĞƚǁŽƌŬ͘ &ĂƐƚ ^> ĐŽŶŶĞĐƟŽŶ͘'ŽƚŽĚůŝŶŬ͘ĐŽŵƚŽƐĞĞƐƉĞĐƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘dĞů͗ϳϲϱϱϬϴϱ͘ FOR SALE: DĂũŝĐ ũĂĐŬ ƉůƵƐ͕ ΨϴϬ ĚŽůůĂƌƐ ŝŶ ƐƚĂƚĞƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬ͘ FOR SALE: ,W>ĂƉƚŽƉ͕dǁŽͲLJĞĂƌŽůĚ,WWĂǀŝůŝŽŶĚǀϲ͘DsŝƐŝŽŶ͕YƵĂĚŽƌĞ͕ϳϬϬ',ĂƌĚ ƌŝǀĞ͕tŝŶĚŽǁƐϳ͘WŝĐƚƵƌĞŽŶƌĞƋƵĞƐƚ͘/ŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϳ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϬϰϱͲϯϯϭͲϯϴϮͲϰϳϳϭ͘ WANTED:^dŝŶƚĞƌŶĂůŚĂƌĚĚƌŝǀĞ͘^ŚŽƵůĚďĞ ŝŶŐŽŽĚǁŽƌŬŝŶŐŽƌĚĞƌ͘ FOR SALE:ĂŶŽŶŵƵůƟͲĨƵŶĐƟŽŶƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͘ŽůŽƌ͕Θt͕^ĐĂŶŶĞƌ͕ĐŽƉŝĞƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:Ğůů^ƚƵĚŝŽyW^ϳϭϬϬнϮϰ͟^ĐƌĞĞŶ͘ tŝŶĚŽǁƐ ϳ WƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂů͘ ŽƉLJƌŝŐŚƚ ϮϬϬϵ DŝĐƌŽƐŽŌ͘ ^LJƐƚĞŵ dLJƉĞ ϲϰͲďŝƚ KƉĞƌĂƟŶŐ ^LJƐƚĞŵ͘ WƌŽĐĞƐƐŽƌDWŚĞŶŽŶ;dDͿ//yϲϭϬϵϬdWƌŽĐĞƐƐŽƌ͘EŝĐĞĞƐŬƚŽƉ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬ͕ϬϬϬ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲ ϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: WůƵŐ ŝŶƚŽ Ă ĐĂƌ Žƌ ĂŝƌƉůĂŶĞ ϭϮǀ ƐŽĐŬĞƚĂŶĚŚĂǀĞϭϱϬǁĂƩƐŽĨƉŽǁĞƌ͘ĂŶĂĐĐŽŵŵŽĚĂƚĞ ƚǁŽ ƉŝĞĐĞƐ ŽĨ ĞůĞĐƚƌŽŶŝĐ ĞƋƵŝƉŵĞŶƚ͘ KǀĞƌůŽĂĚƉƌŽƚĞĐƟŽŶ͘ĂůůŵĞ͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE: WƌŝŶƚĞƌ͕ŚƉϳϵϲϬƉŚŽƚŽƐŵĂƌƚ͕ĨŽƵƌ ĐŽůŽƌŝŶŬũĞƚ͕ůŝŬĞŶĞǁ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϱϬŵdžƉ͘ĂůůϯϳϲͲ ϳϲϲͲϱϰϱϮ͘ FOR SALE: dǁŽĨŽƌƉƌŝĐĞŽĨŽŶĞ͘ĂďůĞƌŽƵƚĞƌ ĂŶĚ ^> ŵŽĚĞŵ͘ ŽƚŚ ǁŽƌŬ ĮŶĞ ĂŶĚ ĐĂŶ ďĞ ďĂĐŬƵƉƐĨŽƌǁŚĂƚLJŽƵŚĂǀĞŶŽǁ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϮϱĨŽƌ ďŽƚŚ͕ΨϳϱĞĂĐŚ͘ĂůůŵĞ͘ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE: W͘dƌĂŶƐĨĞƌs,^Žƌs͘ĂƉƚƵƌĞ ĂŶĚ ĞĚŝƚ ŚŝŐŚͲƋƵĂůŝƚLJ ǀŝĚĞŽ ĂŶĚ ĂƵĚŝŽ ƚŽ LJŽƵƌĐŽŵƉƵƚĞƌ͘ŽŵƉůĞƚĞǁŝƚŚĂŶĚƌĞĂĚLJƚŽ ƌŽůů͘zŽƵĐĂŶďƵƌŶĐĂƉƚƵƌĞĚƉƌŽĚƵĐƚƚŽĂsŽƌ

76

 Žƌ ƉƵƚ ŝƚ ŽŶ Ă ŇĂƐŚ ĚƌŝǀĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭϳϱ͘ Ăůů ŵĞ͘ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘

PETS & SUPPLIES FOR SALE: ϰĚŽŐŬĞŶŶĞůƐ͘ϮŵĞĚŝƵŵĐŽůůĂƉƐŝďůĞ ǁŝƌĞ ŬĞŶŶĞůƐ ϮϱŝŶ ůŽŶŐ y ϭϴ ŝŶ ǁŝĚĞ y Ϯϭ ŝŶ ,ŝŐŚ͘ ϭ ŵĞĚŝƵŵ ƐŽŌ ƐŝĚĞ ĐŽůůĂƉƐŝďůĞ ŬĞŶŶĞů ΨϯϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ϭƐŵĂůůƉůĂƐƟĐŬĞŶŶĞůΨϭϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬ͘ϬϬ͘ FOR SALE: >ĂƌŐĞΘyͲ>ĂƌŐĞŽŐ<ĞŶŶĞůƐ͘ŝƌůŝŶĞĂƉƉƌŽǀĞĚŽŐ<ĞŶŶĞůƐ>ĂƌŐĞŝƐϮϬ͟džϯϮ͟dž Ϯϰ͟ΨϱϬϬƉ͘yͲ>ĂƌŐĞϮϰ͟džϯϲ͟džϯϬ͟ΨϳϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: 'ĞŶƵŝŶĞ ^ƵďĂƌƵ ŵĞƚĂů ďĂƌƌŝĞƌ ƚŽ ŬĞĞƉ&ŝĚŽďĞŚŝŶĚƚŚĞƌĞĂƌƐĞĂƚŽĨLJŽƵƌǁĂŐŽŶ͘,ĂƐ ƐŽŵĞĂĚũƵƐƚĂďŝůŝƚLJ͕ƐŽŶŽƚƐƵƌĞŝĨŝƚǁŽƵůĚĮƚŽƚŚĞƌĐĂƌŵĂŬĞƌƐ͘ƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJƐĞůůŝŶŐŽŶĞĂLJĨŽƌΨϮϵϵ h^͘ƉƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϴϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϰϵϴϴ͘ FOR SALE: ŽŐ ĐŽƐƚƵŵĞƐ͕ ůŽďƐƚĞƌ͕ ũĞĂŶ ũĂĐŬĞƚƐ͕ ĚƌĞƐƐĞƐ͕ ŚĂƚƐ Ăůů ŬŝŶĚƐ͕ ƉƌŝĐĞĚ ΨϮϬƉ͕ ΨϱϬƉ ĂŶĚΨϭϬϬƉĞĂĐŚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FREE:ĚŽƉƚƐďĞĂƵƟĨƵůĚŽŐŐLJ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲ ϯϴϭϯ

GENERAL MERCHANDISE FOR SALE:,ŽŶĚĂĞƌĞŽϳϱϬĐĐ͕ϮϬϬϱ͕Ϯϯ͕ϬϬϬ ŵŝůĞƐ͕WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲϱ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘dĞů͗ϯϯϯͲϵϱϮͲϴϱϯϭ FOR SALE: DŽĚƵůĂƌůŝǀŝŶŐƌŽŽŵĨƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞƐĞƚ͘ >ŽǀĞƐĞĂƚƚƵƌŶƐŝŶƚŽĂĚŽƵďůĞďĞĚĂŶĚƐůŝĚĞƐŝŶ ƌĞƉŽƐĞƚ͕ ŝŶ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭϱ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϴϳͲϳϲͲϯϬϰͲϯϮ FOR SALE: <ŝŶŐ ƐŝnjĞ ǁŽŽĚĞŶ ďĞĚ ǁŝƚŚŽƵƚ ŵĂƩƌĞƐƐ ŝŵƉŽƌƚĞĚ ĨƌŽŵ hƐĂ ǁŝƚŚ ďŽdž ƐƉƌŝŶŐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϯϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϴϳͲϳϲͲϯϬϰͲϯϮ FOR SALE:ĂƌĐĂƌƌŝĞƌĞŶĐůŽƐĞĚůƵŐŐĂŐĞƌĂĐŬ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϴϳͲϳϲͲϯϬϰͲϯϮ FOR SALE: ϭϮǁŝĚĞŵŽƵƚŚƉŝŶƚĐĂŶŶŝŶŐũĂƌƐ͕ ǁŝƚŚƌŝŶŐƐ͘ΨϮϰϬƉĞƐŽƐĨŽƌĂůů͕ΨϮϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘ ĂůůϳϲϱͲϰϯϬϯ͘ FOR SALE: >ĂƌŐĞ ^ƵƉĞƌ ^ŝnjĞ ĐŽƌŶĞƌ ĚĞƐŬ ĨŽƌ ƐĂůĞΨϰ͕ϬϬϬƉdŚŝƐŝƐĂƌĞĂůůLJŶŝĐĞƵŶŝƚ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲ ϰϱϵϬƚŽǀŝĞǁ͘ŽŵĞƐĂƉĂƌƚŝŶϯƉŝĞĐĞƐ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŚĂǁ ŚŽŝĐĞ ZĞĐĞŝǀĞƌ ^Z ϯϭϳ ĨƌĞĞ ĂŶĚ ĐůĞĂƌ ΨϱϬϬƉ ǁŝƚŚ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲ ϰϱϵϬ FOR SALE: &KZ ^>͗ ^ƉĂŶŝƐŚ ŬƐ͘ DĂŐƌŝŐĂů͛Ɛ DĂŐŝĐ <ĞLJ ƚŽ ^ƉĂŶŝƐŚ ĂŶĚ hůƟŵĂƚĞ ^ƉĂŶŝƐŚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘ FOR SALE: tŝƌĞůĞƐƐ DŝĐƌŽƉŚŽŶĞ ^ĞƚƐ͘ tŝƌĞůĞƐƐŵŝĐƌŽƉŚŽŶĞƐĞƚƐĨŽƌƐĂůĞ͘ĞƐƚŵĞĚŝĂDͲ ϰϴϮhǁŝƚŚϰŵŝĐƐ͕ƉƌĂĐƟĐĂůůLJďƌĂŶĚŶĞǁ͘Ψϭ͕ϮϱϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ ƵĚŝŽ ϮϬϬϬƐ tDϲϭϭϮ ǁŝƚŚ Ϯ ŵŝĐƐ͘ ΨϯϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ ^ƚĞƌĞŶ tZͲϭϬϬ ǁŝƚŚ Ϯ ŵŝĐƐ͘ ΨϮϱϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘^ƚĞƌĞŶtZͲϭϬϮDǁŝƌĞůĞƐƐŚĞĂĚƐĞƚ͘ΨϱϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: WƌŝŶĐĞƐƐ ŝĂŶĂ ϭϵϵϳ ƐƚĂŵƉƐ͘ &ƌĂŵĞĚ ĞŶǀĞůŽƉĞ ǁŝƚŚ ĮǀĞ ƉŽƐƚĂŐĞ ƐƚĂŵƉƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: WŽƌƚŵĞŝƌŝŽŶ ĚŝƐŚǁĂƌĞ͘ >ĂƐĂŐŶĂ ƌĞĐƚĂŶŐƵůĂƌƚƌĂLJŝƐ^ǁĞĞƚtŝůůŝĂŵƉĂƩĞƌŶ͘^ĞǀĞŶ ŝŶĐŚ ďŽǁů ŝƐ ŽŶǀŽůǀƵůƵƐ ƉĂƩĞƌŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϮͲϭϲϵϱ͘ FOR SALE:^ƚĂŝŶůĞƐƐƐƚĞĞůŽĚƵŵĐŽīĞĞŵƵŐ͕ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͕ ƐĞůůƐ ŶĞǁ ĨŽƌ ΨϮϵ͕ϬϬ h^͘ ƉƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϮͲϭϲϵϱ͘ FOR SALE: WƌĞƐƚŽ ϲ ƋƵĂƌƚ ƉƌĞƐƐƵƌĞ ĐŽŽŬĞƌ͘ /ŶƐƚƌƵĐƟŽŶŬůĞƚŝŶĐůƵĚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϰϱϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϮͲϭϲϵϱ͘ FOR SALE:/ŚĂǀĞĂĐŽůůĞĐƟŽŶŽĨĂƐƐŽƌƚĞĚĨƌĂƐĞƌΘ>ŝůůŝƉƵƚůĂŶĞĐŽƩĂŐĞƐ͕ĚŽŶ͛ƚǁĂŶƚƚŽƚĂŬĞ ƚŚĞŵďĂĐŬƚŽƌŝƚĂŝŶƐŽŵĞŶŝĐĞƉŝĞĐĞƐ͕ĐŽŵĞΘ ŚĂǀĞĂůŽŽŬĂŶĚŵĂŬĞĂĚĞĂů͘ FOR SALE: ĂĐŬ Ϯ ůŝĨĞ ŵĂĐŚŝŶĞ ǁŝƚŚ ƵƐĞƌ ŐƵŝĚĞĚǀĚĨŽƌĂůůďĂĐŬƉƌŽďůĞŵƐŝƚĚŽĞƐƚŚĞĞdžĞƌĐŝƐĞĨŽƌLJŽƵŚĞůƉĞĚŵĞǁŝƚŚƐƉŝŶĂůĨƵƐŝŽŶĂŌĞƌ ƐƵƌŐĞƌLJ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϬϬh^͘ FOR SALE: Ϯ ĐĂŵĞƌĂ ƐĞĐƵƌŝƚLJ ƐLJƐƚĞŵ ǁŝƚŚ ϰ ĐĂŵĞƌĂƐĐƌĞĞŶďŽƵŐŚƚŝŶh^͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϬϬh^͘ FOR SALE:ǁĞůůͲŵĂĚĞƉŝŶĞĞŶĚƚĂďůĞ͘ůĞĂŶ͕ ƐŝŵƉůĞ ůŝŶĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĞůĞŐĂŶƚ ĐƵƌǀĞĚ ůĞŐƐ͘ WĞƌĨĞĐƚ ĨŽƌ ŶŝŐŚƚƐƚĂŶĚ͕ ƉůĂŶƚ ƐƚĂŶĚ ͕ ƐŝĚĞ ƚĂďůĞ͘͘͘͘ Ϯ Ō

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013

ŚŝŐŚ͕ϭϴŝŶĐŚĞƐǁŝĚĞ͕ϭϮŝŶĐŚĞƐĚĞĞƉ͘ĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞ Ăƚ^/EhsKĐŚĂƌŝƚLJƚŚƌŝŌƐƚŽƌĞ͘;/ŶZŝďĞƌĂƐ ĂĐƌŽƐƐĨƌŽŵϳͲϭϭͿWƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϬϬƉ͘ WANTED:tĂŶƚĞĚƚŽďŽƌƌŽǁŽƌďƵLJƚǁŽƉůĂLJƉĞŶƐĨŽƌŽƵƌǀŝƐŝƟŶŐƚǁŝŶϭϰŵŽŶƚŚŽůĚŐƌĂŶĚĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶƚŽƵƐĞĨŽƌƐůĞĞƉŝŶŐ͘ FOR SALE:^ŚĂǁ^ZϲϯϬ,WsZǁŝƚŚƌĞŵŽƚĞ ĂŶĚ,D/ĐĂďůĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϰ͕ϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WANTED:tŽƵůĚůŝŬĞƚŽƌĞŶƚĂƌƵŐƐŚĂŵƉŽŽŝŶŐ ŵĂĐŚŝŶĞ ƚŽ ĐůĞĂŶ ƐĞǀĞƌĂů ĂƌĞĂ ƌƵŐƐ ŝŶ ŵLJ ŚŽŵĞ͘ŽĞƐĂŶLJŽŶĞŬŶŽǁǁŚĞƌĞ/ĐĂŶƌĞŶƚŽŶĞ͍ Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϯͲϱϬϯϴ͘ FOR SALE: YƵĞĞŶ ƐŝnjĞ ĐŽƉƉĞƌ ĐŽůŽƌĞĚ ƐŝůŬ ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĞƌǁŝƚŚŵĂƚĐŚŝŶŐƉŝůůŽǁƐŚĂŵƐ͘͘dŚĞƐŝůŬ ĨĂďƌŝĐŚĂƐĂƐŵĂůůĚĞƐŝŐŶŝŶŝƚŽĨƚŚĞƐĂŵĞĐŽůŽƌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: <ŝŶŐ ƐŝnjĞ ƌĞǀĞƌƐŝďůĞ ďĞĚ ƐƉƌĞĂĚͬ ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĞƌ ǁŝƚŚ ŵĂƚĐŚŝŶŐ ƉŝůůŽǁ ĐŽǀĞƌƐ͘ KŶĞ ƐŝĚĞ ŝƐ ĐŚŽĐŽůĂƚĞ ďƌŽǁŶ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ŽƚŚĞƌ ŝƐ Ă ƚĂƵƉĞͬďĞŝŐĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WANTED:ƌŽƉůĞĂĨƚĂďůĞ͘ WANTED:/ŚĂǀĞƚŚĞƚĂŶŬďƵƚǁĂŶƚƚŚĞY͘ dĂďůĞƚŽƉŝƐĮŶĞĂŶďŝŐĞŶŽƵŐŚĨŽƌϮƐƚĞĂŬƐŽƌ ŚĂŵďƵƌŐĞƌƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯͲϰϴ͘ FOR SALE:ůŽƚŽĨƐƚƵī͘ƋƵŝƉŵĞŶƚƚŽƚƌĂŶƐĨĞƌ Ăůůs,^ƚŽs͘dĂƐĞƌͬ^ƚƵŶŐƵŶ͘ΨϱϬϬ͘KŶůLJŚĂǀĞ Ϯ ůĞŌ͘ /ŶǀĞƌƚĞƌ ;ϭϮs ĐĂƌ ďĂƩĞƌLJ ƚŽ ϭϱϬt ͘͘Ϳ tŝƌĞůĞƐƐĐĂŵĞƌĂ;ƚŽĂdsͿ͘dĞůŵĞdžƐƚLJůĞŵŽĚĞŵ͘ ^ĞŶĚ ŵĞ ĞŵĂŝů ĂŶĚ /͛ůů ƐĞŶĚ ƉƌŝĐĞƐ ĂŶĚ ŵŽƌĞ ŝŶĨŽ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE: <ĞLJďŽĂƌĚ͘ hƉƐĐĂůĞ ZĞƐĂůĞ͘ ZĂĚŝŽ ^ŚĂĐŬ <ĞLJďŽĂƌĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϳϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲ ϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: ,ŝĚƌŽŶĞƵŵĂƟĐŽ ƉƵŵƉ͘ ^ŝĞŵĞŶƐ͕ ϭͬϰŚŽƌƐĞƉŽǁĞƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϴϱϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲ 0882. FOR SALE:&ŝŶĞŽŽŬǁĂƌĞ͘ŚĂŶƚĂůĐĂƐƐĞƌŽůĞ ĂŶĚ ƋƵŝĐŚĞ ĚŝƐŚĞƐ͘ KƚŚĞƌ ƵƌŽƉĞĂŶ ŵĂĚĞ ĐĞƌĂŵŝĐ ĐŽŽŬǁĂƌĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞƐ ƌĂŶŐĞ ĨƌŽŵ ΨϭϮϬƉĞƐŽƐ ĂŶĚƵƉ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϮϬʹϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲ 0882. FOR SALE: >Ğ ƌĞƵĐĞƚ WĂŶƐ͘ ĞĂƵƟĨƵů ƌĞĚ͕ ŝƌŽŶƐŬŝůůĞƚƐďLJ>ĞƌĞƵĐĞƚ͘^ƚĂƌƟŶŐĂƚΨϲϬϬƉĞƐŽƐĨŽƌŵĞĚƐŝnjĞĂŶĚΨϳϬϬƉĨŽƌůĂƌŐĞƐŝnjĞ͘Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ WANTED:>ŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌƵƐĞĚĚĂLJďĞĚŝŶŐŽŽĚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ FOR SALE: ,ĞŝŶƚnjŵĂŶ ĂƉƚ͘ ŐƌĂŶĚ ƉŝĂŶŽ͕ ĂƉƉƌŽdž ϱϬ LJĞĂƌƐ ŽůĚ͕ ŐŽŽĚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͕ ŝŶĐůƵĚĞƐ stool. FOR SALE: dŽŽůƐ͘ DŝůǁĂƵŬĞĞ ƌŽƚĂƌLJ ŚĂŵŵĞƌ Ěƌŝůů͕ ΨϰϯϵƉ͕ ^Ŭŝůů ƐĂǁ͕ ǁŽƌŵ ĚƌŝǀĞ͕ ΨϭϭϵϵƉ͘ ůƵŵŝŶƵŵǀĞŶƚĞĚƐŬLJůŝŐŚƚ͕ŶĞǁ͕ϰϰĐŵyϰϰĐŵ͕ ΨϮϵϵƉ͘ ĂƩĞƌLJ ĐŚĂƌŐĞƌ͕ ΨϮϱϵƉ͘ :ƵŵƉĞƌ ĐĂďůĞƐ͕ ΨϳϵƉ͘ ĂŶŽŶ : ƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͕ ΨϭϱϵƉ͘ /ŐůŽŽ ϰϴ Ƌƚ ŝĐĞ ĐŚĞƐƚ͕ ΨϮϯϵƉ͘ ŽůůĂƉƐŝďůĞ ƚĂďůĞ͕ ƉĂĚĚĞĚ ƚŽƉ͕ Ϯϰ͟yϰϴ͕͟ ΨϮϵϵƉ͘ sdĞĐŚ ĐŽƌĚůĞƐƐ ƉŚŽŶĞ ;ϮͿ ΨϮϯϵƉ͘DŽďŝůĞKŶĞŵŽƚŽƌŽŝů͕ϱtͲϯϬ͕ΨϲϬƉΛŽƌ ΨϮϵϱƉĨŽƌϱ͘ůĂĐŬΘĞĐŬĞƌƚŽĂƐƚĞƌΨϭϯϵƉ͘Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϱϬϱ͘ FOR SALE: ŵĞĚŝƵŵ ŽĂŬ ϰ ƐŚĞůĨ ŬĐĂƐĞ ϯϭŝŶĐŚǁŝĚĞϭϮĚĞĞƉϰϴŚŝŐŚΨϱϬƵƐĂůƐŽŽůĚĂŶĂĚŝĂŶĐĞĚĂƌĐŚĞƐƚƌĞĮŶŝƐŚĞĚΨϱϬƵƐĂůƐŽĐŚĞƐƚ ŽĨ ϱ ĚƌĂǁĞƌƐ ΨϱϬƵƐ ϭϴ ďLJ ϯϮ ďLJ ϱϮ ŵĂŚŽŐĂŶLJ ƌŽƵŶĚ / ƐŚĞůĨ ĞŶĚ ƚĂďůĞ ΨϮϱƵƐ ƐŵĂůů DĞdžŝĐĂŶ ƉŚŽŶĞƚĂďůĞΨϭϬƵƐ͘ FOR SALE: sĞƌLJ ŶŝĐĞ ĚĂƌŬ ďƌŽǁŶ ůĞĂƚŚĞƌ ƌĞĐůŝŶĞƌ͘ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͘ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ^KEz ůƵͲƌĂLJ ŝƐĐͬs WůĂLJĞƌ WͲyϱϴ͘ /ƚ ŚĂƐ tŝͲ&ŝ ĂŶĚ ϯ ǀŝĞǁŝŶŐ ĐĂƉĂďŝůŝƟĞƐ͘ /ƚ ƉůĂLJƐ ďŽƚŚ ƌĞŐƵůĂƌ sƐ ĂŶĚ ůƵͲƌĂLJ ŝƐĐƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: 'ŽůĨ 'ĞĂƌ͘ &Ƶůů ƐĞƚ ŽĨ ĂůůĂǁĂLJ tŽŽĚƐ;ϭ͕ϯ͕ϱ͕ϳͿŽďƌĂ/ƌŽŶƐ;WtͲϯͿ͕ůĞǀĞůĂŶĚ ǁĞĚŐĞƐ ; >t͕ ^t Ϳ͕ WŝŶŐ WƵƩĞƌ͕ Z,D ŝŶĐůƵĚŝŶŐ ďĂŐ ĂŶĚ Ϯ ƉĂŝƌƐ ŽĨ ŐĞŶƚůLJ ƵƐĞĚ ϭϬ ϭͬϮ ƐŚŽĞƐ͘ůƵďƐĂƌĞƌĞŐƵůĂƌŇĞdž͕WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬh^͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϯϭϱ͘ FOR SALE: ϯ ƉŝĞĐĞ sŝĐƚŽƌŝĂŶ ƐƚLJůĞ ƐĞƚ ŽĨ ůŝǀŝŶŐƌŽŽŵƐŽĨĂƐ͘tĞůůĐŽŶƐƚƌƵĐƚĞĚ͕ĐŽǀĞƌĞĚǁŝƚŚ ĂďƵƌŐƵŶĚLJĐŽůŽƌĞĚĨĂďƌŝĐĂŶĚǁŽŽĚƚƌŝŵ͘/ĨŝŶ-

ƚĞƌĞƐƚĞĚ/ĐĂŶƐĞŶĚƉŝĐƚƵƌĞƐ͘ΨϭϬ͕ϬϬϬ͘ϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ĨƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞ ŚŽƚ ĨŽŽĚ ďĂƌ͕ ĂŶĚ Ă ϯͲĚŽŽƌĐĂďŝŶĞƚǁŝƚŚŶĞǁĂŶĚĨƵůůĞŶŐŝŶĞŽĨŐĂƐ ƚŽĐŽŽůĨŽŽĚ͕ĂůůŝŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞƐdž ƐĞƉĂƌĂƚĞŽƌƐƉĞĐŝĂůƉƌŝĐĞĨŽƌĂůů͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϱ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐĨŽƌĂůů͘ FOR SALE:ĞĂƵƟĨƵůƐĞƌǀŝĐĞĨŽƌϴ͘ůĂĐŬĂŶĚ ǁŚŝƚĞ ĚŝƐŚĞƐ͘ KŶůLJ ϳ ƐĂůĂĚ ƉůĂƚĞƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϳϱϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ FOR SALE:sĞƌLJĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞƋƵĂůŝƚLJϴŌůŽŶŐ ƐŽĨĂŝŶŐŽŽĚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ĂŶďĞƵƐĞĚĂƐĂŶĞdžƚƌĂ ďĞĚ͘KīͲǁŚŝƚĞǁŝƚŚϴůĂƌŐĞĮƩĞĚƐĞƉĂƌĂƚĞĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ϰϮϬϬƉǁŝůůĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌϯϵϬϬƉ͘ FOR SALE:>ĂƌŐĞƌĞĐƚĂŶŐƵůĂƌƚĂďůĞǁŝƚŚƚŚƌĞĞ ĞƚĐŚĞĚ ŐůĂƐƐ ŝŶƐĞƌƚ ;ŇŽƌĂůͿ͘ ŶŽ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ͕ ŽŶůLJ ƚŚĞ ƚĂďůĞ͘ĞĂƐŝůLJƐĞĂƚƐϲ͕ŝĨŶŽƚĞŝŐŚƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϭϴϰϬ͘ FOR SALE: ,ŽƐƉŝƚĂů ďĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ ĂŶƟƐŽƌĞŵĂƩ͘ dŚĞŚŽƐƉŝƚĂůďĞĚŝŶƚŚĞƉŝĐƚƵƌĞŝƐĂƐƚŽĐŬƉŚŽƚŽ͕ ƐŽŶŽƚƚŚĞĂĐƚƵĂůďĞĚ͘dŚĞŚŽƐƉŝƚĂůďĞĚǁĞŚĂǀĞ ĨŽƌƐĂůĞŝƐŝĚĞŶƟĐĂů͘/ƚŝƐĂďŽƵƚϮLJƌƐŽůĚ͘ůůĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐĂů ŽƉĞƌĂƚĞĚ͘ /ƚ ĂůƐŽ ĐŽŵĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ĂŶƟƐŽƌĞ ŵĂƩƌĞƐƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϵ͕ϱϬϬ͘ &Žƌ ŵŽƌĞ ŝŶĨŽ ĐĂůů ŵĞ ĂƚϳϲϲͲϰϭϱϰ FOR SALE: ĞĂƵƟĨƵů ůĂƌŐĞ ƌŽƵŶĚ ďĞǀĞůĞĚ ŐůĂƐƐƚĂďůĞĂŶĚĨŽƵƌĐŚĂŝƌƐĞƚ͘'ůĂƐƐƚŽƉŝĨǀĞƌLJ ƚŚŝĐŬĂŶĚŚĂƐŇŽƌĂůĞƚĐŚŝŶŐŝŶƚŚĞĐĞŶƚĞƌ͘ŽŵĞ ĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ĐŚĂŝƌ ĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ ĂŶĚ ƚĂďůĞ ĐůŽƚŚ͘ WZ/͗Ψϰ͕ϱϬϬ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϭϴϰϬ͘ FOR SALE: KďůŽŶŐ ϲϬ͟džϯϴ͟ ŐůĂƐƐ ƚŽƉ ƌƵƐƚƉƌŽŽĨĂůƵŵŝŶƵŵƚĂďůĞǁŝƚŚĐŽǀĞƌǁŝƚŚŵĂƚĐŚŝŶŐ ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĐŽǀĞƌ ǁŚĞŶ ƐƚĂĐŬĞĚ͕ ƵƐĞĚ ŽŶůLJ ƚǁŽ ƟŵĞƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮϱϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϳϮϲϵ͘ FOR SALE:'ŽǀŝĚĞŽĚǀϮϭϱϬĚǀĚƉůĂLJĞƌΘŚŝͲĮ ǀŚƐǀĐƌƌĞĐŽƌĚĞƌͬƉůĂLJĞƌǁͬƌĞŵŽƚĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϰϬϬƉ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: EŝĐĞ ůŝŐŚƚ ĐŽůŽƌĞĚ >ŽǀĞ ^ĞĂƚ ĂŶĚ Ϯ KǀĞƌ ^ƚƵīĞĚ ƉĂƩĞƌŶ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϭϮ͕ϬϬϬƉ͘ ͲŵĂŝůĨŽƌƉŝĐƚƵƌĞƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ^ĂŵƐƵŶŐ >> /E KE ,ŽŵĞ dŚĞĂƚĞƌ ^LJƐƚĞŵ ,dͲyϰϬ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϴϬϬƉ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲ ϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:ϮĞĂƵƟĨƵůWƵƌƉůĞ<ĂƚƌŝŶĂ͛ƐϭͲϭϱ͟ ƚĂůůĂŶĚϭͲϭϳ͟ƚĂůů͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϱϬƉĞĂĐŚ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲ ϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:EŝĐĞϯƌĂǁĞƐŬŵĂĚĞŽĨZƵƐƟĐŽ tŽŽĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϴϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:hŶŝǀĞƌƐĂůƌƟĐƵůĂƟŶŐtĂůůŵŽƵŶƚ ĨŽƌ WůĂƐŵĂ Θ > ^ĐƌĞĞŶƐ͕ ĨŽƌ ŇĂƚ ƉĂŶĞůƐ ϯϮ͟ Ͳ ϰϴ͟ t/ƚŚ ƐĞĐƵƌĞ ůŽĐŬ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞŌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϳϬϬƉ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ^ůŝŐŚƚůLJ ƵƐĞĚ DĞŵŽƌLJ &ŽĂŵ WĂŶ <ŝŶŐ^ŝnjĞǁŝƚŚŽƵƚƐŝĚĞĐŽǀĞƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:,ŽŽǀĞƌ&ŽůĚǁĂLJĂŐůĞƐƐ>ŝŐŚƚǁĞŝŐŚƚhƉƌŝŐŚƚsĂĐƵƵŵůĞĂŶĞƌůůĞƌŐĞŶ&ŝůƚĞƌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ŶĞƌŐŝnjĞƌ yWϰϬϬϭ hŶŝǀĞƌƐĂů ZĞĐŚĂƌŐĞĂďůĞ WŽǁĞƌ WĂĐŬ WĂĐŬĂŐĞ ŽŶƚĞŶƚƐ Ͳ ;ϭͿ hƐĞƌ͛Ɛ DĂŶƵĂů͕ ;ϭͿ  ĚĂƉƚĞƌ ;ϱsͿ͕ ;ϮͿ h^ ŚĂƌŐŝŶŐĂďůĞƐ͕;ϲͿĞůůWŚŽŶĞƐdŝƉƐ͕;ϭͿdƌĂǀĞů ĂŐ &ĞĂƚƵƌĞƐ WŽǁĞƌĨƵů ŚĂƌŐĞƐ ƚǁŽ ĚĞǀŝĐĞƐ Ăƚ ŽŶĐĞ͕^ƚĂLJŚĂƌŐĞĚDĂŝŶƚĂŝŶƐĐŚĂƌŐĞĨŽƌƵƉƚŽϭ LJĞĂƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϰϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:ϮƌĂǁĞƌDĞƚĂů&ŝůĞĂďŝŶĞƚ>ĞƩĞƌ ƐŝnjĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϱϬƉ͕ϰƌĂǁĞƌDĞƚĂů&ŝůĞĂďŝŶĞƚ ΨϱϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:EĂƌƌŽǁ,ĂůůǁĂLJdĂďůĞǁŝƚŚϮĚƌĂǁĞƌƐŶŝĐĞZƵƐƟĐŽǁŽŽĚ͘ϭϴ͟džϰϳ͘͟WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬƉ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ZƵƐƟĐŽ tŽŽĚĞŶ ds ^ƚĂŶĚ ǁŝƚŚ Ϯ ĚŽŽƌƐ ĂŶĚ Ϯ ĚƌĂǁĞƌƐ ŶŝĐĞ ĚĂƌŬ ǁŽŽĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϳϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:ϮƌĞĂZƵŐƐ>ŝŐŚƚůƵĞǁŝƚŚŇŽƌĂů ƉĂƩĞƌŶϲ͛džϵϴ͟Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉ͕DƵůƟƉĂƩĞƌŶƚƌŝĂŶŐůĞƐ ϰϲ͟džϲϰ͟ΨϲϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ,ĞĂǀLJ ƵƚLJ ŽŽŬ ^ŚĞůĨ ǁŝƚŚ ϰ ƐŚĞůǀĞƐĂŶĚϮĚƌĂǁƐ͘ϱϲ͟džϳϲ͟WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϴϬϬƉ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ŽŽŬ ĂƐĞ ϱ ^ŚĞůĨ ϰϴ͟ dž ϳϱ͟


Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ŽŽŬĂƐĞϱ^ŚĞůĨϯϱ͟džϳϱ͟WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϴϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: KŶůLJ ƵƐĞĚ Ă ĐŽƵƉůĞ ŽĨ ŵŽŶƚŚƐ EŝĐĞYƵĞĞŶŵĂƩƌĞƐƐǁŝƚŚŚĞĂǀLJĚƵƚLJǁŽŽĚĞŶ ĨƌĂŵĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϰ͕ϬϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϱϭϲ͘ FOR SALE: Ğ>ŽŶŐŚŝ ϭϰϱϮϮ ƵĂů ŽŶĞ ϰͲ>ŝƚĞƌ ĞĞƉ &ƌLJĞƌ ĂƐLJ ƌĂŝŶ &ƌLJĞƌ ĂƐŬĞƚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: WŚŝůŝƉƐ DyϯϲϬϬ s ,ŽŵĞ dŚĞĂƚĞƌ^LJƐƚĞŵ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: >ĂƌŐĞ ĚŝŶŝŶŐ ƌŽŽŵ ƚĂďůĞ ǁŝƚŚ ϲ ĐŚĂŝƌƐͲŚĂƐƌĞŵŽǀĂďůĞůĞĂǀĞƐ͘ƌŽƵŐŚƚŚĞƌĞĨƌŽŵ EŽƌƚŚĂƌŽůŝŶĂ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ĞĂƵƟĨƵůŽǀĞƌƐƚƵīĞĚĐŚĂŝƌďƌŽƵŐŚƚ ŚĞƌĞĨƌŽŵEŽƌƚŚĂƌŽůŝŶĂ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: sĞƌLJŶŝĐĞƐŽĨĂͲďƌŽƵŐŚƚĨƌŽŵƚŚĞ h^͘Ψϰ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ůŽǀĞůLJ ϯ ƉŝĞĐĞ ďĞĚ ĐŚĞƐƚĞƌĮĞůĚ ƐƵŝƚĞŝŶŶŝĐĞĐůĞĂŶĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶŶĂǀLJďůƵĞƉĂůĞďůƵĞ Θ ŐŽůĚ ĂůƐŽ ůŽǀĞƐĞĂƚ ďĞĚ ĐŚĞƐƚĞƌĮĞůĚ ŝŶ ďĞŝŐĞ ŇŽƌĂů ǀĞƌLJ ƐƚƵƌĚLJ ŐŽŽĚ ĂŶĂĚŝĂŶ ďƌĂŶĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϯϬϬƵƐ͘ΘΨϱϬƵƐ͘ WANTED:/ĂŵŝŶŶĞĞĚŽĨĂǁŚĞĞůďĂƌƌŽǁ͘Ž LJŽƵŚĂǀĞŽŶĞLJŽƵĚŽŶ͛ƚŶĞĞĚ͍WůĞĂƐĞƌĞƉůLJ͘ WANTED: dŚĞ ƐŽĐĐĞƌ ĮĞůĚ ŶĞĂƌ ϲ ŽƌŶĞƌƐ ŶĞĞĚƐ Ă ůĂǁŶ ŵŽǁĞƌ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ĐĂƌĞƚĂŬĞƌ ŚĂƐ ĂƐŬĞĚ ŵĞ ƚŽ ůŽŽŬ ĨŽƌ ŽŶĞ͘ tĞ ŚĂǀĞ ƌĂŝƐĞĚ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐƐŽĨĂƌĂŶĚǁŽƵůĚůŝŬĞĂĚŽŶĂƟŽŶ ŽƌĂŶŝŶĞdžƉĞŶƐŝǀĞůĂǁŶŵŽǁĞƌ͘ FOR SALE: sŝƚĂ ŵŝdž ůĞŶĚĞƌͲhƉƐĐĂůĞ ZĞƐĂůĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϳϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ŚŝŶĂ ,ƵƚĐŚ Ͳ hƉƐĐĂůĞ ZĞƐĂůĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϱ͕ϮϬϬ͘ FOR SALE:ĞĂƵƟĨƵůůLJĞdžĞĐƵƚĞĚǁŽŽĚĐĂƌǀŝŶŐ ŽĨ ^ƚ͘ DŝĐŚĂĞů͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮ͕ϯϲϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲ ϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE:ŽŽůƚĂďůĞĂŶĚĐŚĂŝƌƐ͕ƌĞƚƌŽƐƚLJůĞ͘ ZĞĚŽŶĞŝŶ&ƌĞŶĐŚďůƵĞĂŶĚLJĞůůŽǁ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϱ͕ϵϬϬ ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: ƌƵŵ WĞĚĂů͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϭϰϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ FOR SALE:^ĞǀĞƌĂůƐĞƚƐŽĨŐŽůĨĐůƵďƐ͕ƐƚĂƌƟŶŐ ĂƚΨϵϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: dǁŽ͕ ůĂƌŐĞ͕ ĂƌŵŽŝƌĞƐ͘ dŚƌĞĞ ĚŽŽƌ ĂƌŵŽŝƌĞΨϯ͕ϳϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͕dǁŽĚŽŽƌĂƌŵŽŝƌĞΨϮ͕ϵϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: dǁŽ ůůŝƉƟĐĂů ƚƌĂŝŶĞƌƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲ ϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: ĞĂƵƟĨƵů ďƌŽŶnjĞ ĨŽƵŶƚĂŝŶ ƐĐƵůƉƚƵƌĞ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE:,ƵŐĞƌŽŶnjĞůĞƉŚĂŶƚ,ĞĂĚ͘ŽƵůĚ ŐŽŽǀĞƌĂĚŽŽƌŽĨĂůĂƌŐĞŚŽƵƐĞ͘dŚĞƌĞĂƌĞƚǁŽŽĨ ƚŚĞŵĂƚΨϭϭ͕ϱϬϬĞĂĐŚ͘͘͘Žƌ͕ŵĂŬĞĂŶŽīĞƌ͘Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŽĨĂ Θ dǁŽ ŚĂŝƌƐ͘ ƌĞĂů ůŽŽŬŝŶŐ ŝŵŝƚĂƟŽŶůĞĂƚŚĞƌ͘sĞƌLJĚƵƌĂďůĞĨĂďƌŝĐŝŶƉĞƌĨĞĐƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϴϬϬ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: sŝŶƚĂŐĞ &ƌŝĚŐĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϵ͕ϴϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE:^ƚƵƌĚLJŽƌĂŶŐĞƐƚĂĐŬĂďůĞϭϳĐŚĂŝƌƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ϲϵϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘WƌŝĐĞŵĂLJďĞŶĞŐŽƟĂďůĞ ĚĞƉĞŶĚŝŶŐŽŶƋƵĂŶƟƚLJ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: dŚĞƌĞ ĂƌĞ ϭϳ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĂƌŵƐ ĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞĂƐǁĞůůĂƐƚŚĞϯϰƐƚĂŶĚĂƌĚ;ϲϵϬƉĞĂͿ͘ EĞŐŽƟĂƚĞĂĚĞĂůŝĨďƵLJŝŶŐŝŶǀŽůƵŵĞŶ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲ ϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE:ŽŵĨLJĐŚĂŝƐĞŝƐďƌŽǁŶƚŽŶĞƐǁŝƚŚ ƵŶĚĞƌƐƚĂƚĞĚ ƉŽƉƐ ŽĨ ďůƵĞͬƚƵƌƋƵŽŝƐĞ ĂŶĚ ƉƵƌƉůĞ͘/ƚŝƐ͗>Ͳϱϰͬ͟ĐŵϭϯϲytͲϯϯͬ͟Đŵϴϲ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϯ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů<ƌŝƐnjͲϳϲϱͲϳϬϯϰ FOR SALE: zĂŵĂŚĂDŽƚŽƌĐLJĐůĞ͘DŽĚĞůϮϬϭϮ͕ ZĞĚĐŽůŽƌ͕&ϭϲϭϱϯĐĐ͘ůŵŽƐƚŶĞǁ͕ŚĂƌĚůLJƵƐĞĚ͘ DĞdžŝĐĂŶƉůĂƚĞĚ^ƚĂƚĞŽĨDŝĐŚŽĂĐĄŶ͘ůůƉĂŝĚ͘ WANTED: WĂƌƚŶĞƌ ƚŽ ƐŚĂƌĞ ůĂƌŐĞ D ďŽdž͘ tŚĞŶ ƉĂLJŝŶŐ ϭϯ ŵŽŶƚŚƐ ŝŶ ĂĚǀĂŶĐĞ ƚŚŝƐ ůĂƌŐĞ ŵĂŝů ďŽdž ĐŽƐƚ ůĞƐƐ ƚŚĂŶ Ψϭϰ͘ϬϬ h^ ƉĞƌ ŵŽŶƚŚ͘ tĞŶĞĞĚŽŶĞŶĞǁƉĂƌƚŶĞƌĂŶĚƚŚĂƚĐĂŶďĞLJŽƵ͊ FOR SALE:^ŚĂǁ^ZͲϲϬϬ,ŝƐŚΘZĞĐĞŝǀĞƌ͗ ŽƵŐŚƚŶĞǁ^ĞƉƚϮϬϭϮ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϱϬ FOR SALE:ĞĂƵƟĨƵůĂŶĚĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞĐƵƐƚŽŵ ŵĂĚĞĐŚĂŝƐĞϭLJĞĂƌŽůĚ͕ůŽŽŬƐůŝŬĞŶĞǁ͘ŚĂŶŐŝŶŐ ŵLJĚĞĐŽƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϯ͕ϱϬϬƉĮƌŵ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϬϯϰ͘ FOR SALE: EŝĐĞ ĐŽůůĞĐƟŽŶ ŽĨ ϭϳϱ s,^ ŵŽǀŝĞƐ͘͘͘ŵĂŶLJƉůĂLJĞĚŽŶĐĞ͘͘͘ůŽƚƐŽĨĐůĂƐƐŝĐƐ͘͘͘ƐŽůĚĂƐ ĂĐŽůůĞĐƟŽŶŽŶůLJ͘͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϴϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:ZƵƐƟĐŽŶĚdĂďůĞƐ;ϮͿ͘ϭϳ͟ǁŝĚĞdž ϭϱ͘ϱ͟ĚĞĞƉdžϮϯ͘ϱ͟ŚŝŐŚ͘dŚƌĞĞƉƵůůͲŽƵƚĚƌĂǁĞƌƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϱϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϮͲϭϱϮϰ͘ FOR SALE: 'ƌĞĂƚ ĐĂďŝŶĞƚƐ ĨŽƌ ƐƚŽƌĂŐĞ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ŐĂƌĂŐĞ͕ ůĂƵŶĚƌLJ ƌŽŽŵ Žƌ ƉĂŶƚƌLJ͘ ^ŝnjĞ ŝƐ tŝĚƚŚ ϰϴ͕͟ĞƉƚŚϮϰ͕͟ĂŶĚ,ĞŝŐŚƚϲ͛Ͳϲ͘͟ϯŽƉĞŶƐŚĞůǀĞƐ ǁŝƚŚůŽǁĞƌƉŽƌƟŽŶǁŝƚŚĚŽŽƌƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚͬƚǁŽĨŽƌΨϮ͕ϯϬϬ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϱϲϬϳ͘

FOR SALE: 'ƌĞĂƚ ƐŽůŝĚ ŽĂŬ ĚĞƐŬ ǁŝƚŚ ƚŚƌĞĞ ĚƌĂǁĞƌƐ͕ůŽǁĞƌĚƌĂǁĞƌŚĂƐŬĞLJĂŶĚŚŽůĚƐĮůĞƐ͘ ĞƐŬŝƐŽŶǁŚĞĞůƐ͘^ŽůŝĚKĂŬŽŶƚŽƉ͕ƐŝĚĞƐĂŶĚ ĨƌŽŶƚ ŽĨ ĚĞƐŬ͕ tŝĚƚŚ ϰϴ͕͟ ĞƉƚŚ ŝƐ Ϯϴ͕͟ ,ĞŝŐŚƚ ϯϭ͘͟WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϲϬϬƉĞƐŽƐŽƌΨϭϮϬh^͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲ ϱϲϬϳ͘ FOR SALE:ĐŽŶƐŽůĞƉŝĂŶŽͲĞĂƌůLJϲϬͲƐ^ƚŽƌLJΘ ůĂƌŬ͕ƌĞĐĞŶƚůLJƚƵŶĞĚ͕ǁŝƚŚďĞŶĐŚ͘ĂƐĞŝŶŐŽŽĚ ƐŚĂƉĞǁŝƚŚƐŽŵĞƐĐƌĂƚĐŚĞƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ϯ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:tĂƌĚƌŽďĞͲƐŽůŝĚǁŽŽĚ͘ůĞĂŶ͕ŚŝŐŚ ƋƵĂůŝƚLJ͕ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘^ŝŶŐůĞƵŶŝƚ͕ϴŌďLJ ϴ Ō ǁŝƚŚ Ϯ ƐŝĚĞ ďLJ ƐŝĚĞ ĐůŽƚŚĞƐ ĐůŽƐĞƚƐ ǁŝƚŚ Ϯ ƐŚĞůǀĞƐĂďŽǀĞĞĂĐŚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬϬϬʹŶĞŐŽƟĂďůĞ͘ FOR SALE:ůĞĐƚƌŽŶŝĐĐĂƌƉĞƚĐůĞĂŶĞƌĨŽƌůĞĐƚƌŽůƵdž ǀĂĐƵƵŵ ĐůĞĂŶĞƌ͘ EŽ ŵŽƌĞ ĐĂƌƉĞƚ ŝŶ ŵLJ ŚŽƵƐĞ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŵĂůů ĮƌĞƉƌŽŽĨ ƐĂĨĞ ǁŝƚŚ ŬĞLJƐ͕ϭϰyϲyϭϭ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϮϴϭϭ͘ FOR SALE:DĞŶƐƌĞƐƐWĂŶƚƐͲEĂŵĞďƌĂŶĚƐͲ WĞƌƌLJ ůůŝƐ͕ ŽĐŬĞƌƐ ͕ <ĞŶŶĞƚŚ ŽůĞ͕ >ŽƵŝƐ ZĂƉŚĂĞů͕ŶĚƌĞǁ&ĞnjnjĂĂŶĚdžKĸĐŝŽ͘ůůŝŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘^ŝnjĞƐϯϮƚŽϰϬ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϬϬWĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘:ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐĂůů:ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲ ŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: DĞŶƐ ƌĞƐƐ ůŽŶŐ ƐůĞĞǀĞ ƐŚŝƌƚƐ͕ ĐĂƐƵĂů ůŽŶŐ ƐůĞĞǀĞ ƐŚŝƌƚƐ͕ ĐĂƐƵĂů ƐŚŽƌƚ ƐůĞĞǀĞ ƐŚŝƌƚƐĂŶĚŐŽůĨƐŚŝƌƚƐ͘^ŝnjĞƐůĂƌŐĞĂŶĚĞdžƚƌĂůĂƌŐĞ͘ ĨƌŽŵ Ψϯϱ͘ϬϬ ƚŽ ΨϱϬ͘ϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘ :ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐ͘ Ăůů:ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭϰϯϰͲ ϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: DĞŶƐ tĞĂƚŚĞƌƉƌŽŽĨ 'ĂƌŵĞŶƚ ŽŵƉĂŶLJ :ĂĐŬĞƚ Ͳ dĂŶ͕ džƚƌĂ >ĂƌŐĞ͕ >ŝŶĞĚ͘ ΨϰϬϬ͘ϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘:ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐ͘Ăůů:ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳ ϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: DĞŶƐ ͞ŽƵƚƵƌĞ͟ ƌĂŶĚ y> >ĂŵďƐ ^ŬŝŶ>ĞĂƚŚĞƌŽŵďĞƌ:ĂĐŬĞƚƌŽǁŶǁŝƚŚnjŝƉŽƵƚ ůŝŶĞƌ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ Ψϭ͕ϱϬϬ͘ϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ͘ :ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐĂůů:ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůů ϯϯϭϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE:dŚƵůĞϲϲϴ^&ƌŽŶƟĞƌ^ZŽŽĨdŽƉ ĂƌŐŽ Ždž͘ ZĞƚĂŝůƐ ĨŽƌ ΨϯϯϮ h^ ĨŽƌ ƐĂůĞ ƵƐĞĚ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉ͘ĂůůϳϲϲͲϱϴϲϯ͘ FOR SALE:ϲƉĐďĂŵĨƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞǁŝƚŚĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ ůŽǀĞƐĞĂƚ Ϯ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ Ϯ ƐƚŽŽůƐ ŐůĂƐƐ ƚŽƉ ĐŽīĞĞ ƚĂďůĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͘ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ĂůůϳϲϲͲϯϭϵϭ͘ FOR SALE: /ŶĚŽŶĞƐŝĂŶ ƌĂƩĂŶ ƐĞƚ ǁŝƚŚ ƚǁŽ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ ĂŶĚ ŽŶĞ ƐŵĂůů ŐůĂƐƐ ƚŽƉ ƚĂďůĞ͘ ŶĞǁ ƐĞĂƚ ĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϬϬϬ͘ϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘:ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐĂůů :ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŵĂůů ƵƉŚŽůƐƚĞƌĞĚ ƌŽĐŬĞƌ ƚĂŶ ŝŶ ĐŽůŽƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬ͘ϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ:ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐ͘Ăůů:ŽŚŶ ŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭͲϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE:^ŽůŝĚtŽŽĚͬ'ůĂƐƐĚŽƵďůĞƐŝĚĞĚŽŶ ǁŚĞĞůƐĂƌϲϯŝŶďLJϮϳŝŶďLJϰϳŝŶƚĂůů͘'ůĂƐƐƐŚĞůĨ ŝŶƚŚĞŵŝĚĚůĞ͘'ůĂƐƐĚŽŽƌƐŽŶďŽƚŚƐŝĚĞƐ͘'ůĂƐƐ ŽŶƚŽƉ͘KŶĞĚƌĂǁĞƌŽŶĞĂĐŚƐŝĚĞ͘tŝŶĞƌĂĐŬĂŶĚ ƐƚĞŵǁĂƌĞ ŚŽůĚĞƌƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϰ͕ϬϬϬ͘ϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ :ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐĂůů:ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůů ϯϯϭϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: >ĂƌŐĞ ŽůůĞĐƟŽŶ ŽĨ Ɛ Θ sƐ͘ ,ƵŶĚƌĞĚƐ ŽĨ ŵƵƐŝĐ Ɛ ŝŶĐůƵĚŝŶŐ :Ănjnj͕ ZŽĐŬ ĂŶĚZŽůů͕ůĂƐƐŝĐĂů͕ůƵĞƐ͕ŚƌŝƐƚŵĂƐ͕ŽƵŶƚƌLJΘ tĞƐƚĞƌŶ͕ĂƐLJ>ŝƐƚĞŶŝŶŐ͕&ŽůŬͬ&ŽůŬZŽĐŬ͕DĞĚŝƚĂƟŽŶĂŶĚŵŽƌĞ͘ĂůůĨŽƌŝŶǀĞŶƚŽƌLJ͘ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϭϮϯϮ͘ FOR SALE: ϭͬϮ,WŝƌŽŵƉƌĞƐƐŽƌǁŝƚŚŵĂŶLJ ĂĐĐĞƐƐŽƌŝĞƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϴϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ FOR SALE: ϭͬϮ ,W 'ŽƵůĚ ^ƵďŵĞƌƐŝďůĞ ƉƵŵƉ ϭϬ'^Ϭϱ ǁŝƚŚ ŵŽƚŽƌ ƐƚĂƌƚĞƌ ĨŽƌ ǁĞůů͕ ĂůũŝďĞƌ Žƌ ƟŶĂĐŽ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: hƐĞĚ ŽŶĐĞ͘ ϮϬϭϯ ŵŽĚĞů zĂŬŝŵĂ ^ŬLJďŽdžϭϲ^;ϭϲĐĨͿĮƚƐĂůůĨĂĐƚŽƌLJƌŽŽĨƌĂĐŬƐ͘KƵƌƐ ǁĂƐ ŽŶ Ă ϮϬϬϱ ZĂǀϰ͘ KƉĞŶƐ ĨƌŽŵ ĞŝƚŚĞƌ ƐŝĚĞ͘ >ŽĐŬƐ ƐĞĐƵƌĞůLJ͘ EŽ ŶŽŝƐĞ Žƌ ĚƌĂŐ͘ DŝůĞĂŐĞ ŽŶůLJ ƐůŝŐŚƚůLJĚŝŵŝŶŝƐŚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬŽƌWĞƐŽĞƋƵŝǀŝůĞŶƚ͘ FOR SALE:&ƵůůƐĞƚŽĨŽďƌĂ'ŽůĨĐůƵďƐŝŶĐůƵĚŝŶŐďĂŐĂŶĚϮƉĂŝƌƐŽĨŐĞŶƚůLJƵƐĞĚϴϭͬϮƐŚŽĞƐ͘ ^ŚŽĞƐ ŝŶĐůƵĚĞ ϯ ŶĞǁ ƐĞƚƐ ŽĨ ĐůĞĂƚƐ ĂŶĚ ĐůĞĂƚ ƚŽŽů͘ĂĐŬƐƵƌŐĞƌLJĨŽƌĐĞƐƐĂůĞ͘ůƵďƐĂƌĞŶĞǁůLJ ŐƌŝƉƉĞĚ;ƌLJͲdĂĐͿĂƌĞƌĞŐƵůĂƌŇĞdž͕ŐƌĂƉŚŝƚĞǁŝƚŚĂ ϭϬ͘ϱĚĞŐƌĞĞĚƌŝǀĞƌ͘ŽŵĞƐǁŝƚŚŵĂŶLJďĂůůƐĂŶĚ d͛Ɛ͘ƌƐĂLJƐ/ĐĂŶ͛ƚƉůĂLJĂŶLJŵŽƌĞ͘DLJůŽƐƐLJŽƵƌ ŐĂŝŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϭϬϬ͘ϬϬ ;h^Ϳ ƉƌŽďĂďůLJ ŶĞŐŽƟĂďůĞ͘ĂůůϳϲϱͲϮϯϱϳ FOR SALE::ĂĐŬ>ĂůĂŶĞƐ͛ƐWŽǁĞƌ:ƵŝĐĞƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϲϵϱ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE:>ĂƌŐĞŚĂŝƌ͘>ĂƌŐĞĞŶŽƵŐŚĨŽƌƚĂůůͬ ďŝŐƉĞƌƐŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϵϬϬ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: ůŝƉƟů dƌĂŝŶĞƌ hƉƐĐĂůĞ ZĞƐĂůĞ͕ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϰ͕ϵϱϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE:<ĂLJĂŬͲhƉƐĐĂůĞZĞƐĂůĞ͕ƚǁŽŚŽƵƌ ƐĞƐƐŝŽŶƐ ŽĨ ŬĂLJĂŬ ůĞƐƐŽŶƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϱ͕ϬϳϬ͘ Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϴϴϮ͘ FOR SALE: 'ĂƌƌĞƩ 'd/ϮϱϬϬ DĞƚĂů ĞƚĞĐƚŽƌ

ŬŝƚǁŝƚŚϮƐĞĂƌĐŚĐŽŝůƐĂŶĚĚĞĞƉƉƌŽďĞ͘dŚŝƐŬŝƚ ĐŽŶƚĂŝŶƐ ǀĂƌŝŽƵƐ ŝƚĞŵƐ ƵƐĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞ ĚĞƚĞĐƚŽƌ͘ sĞƌLJ ůŝƩůĞ ƵƐĞ ĂŶĚ ŝŶ ƉĞƌĨĞĐƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϱϱ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘WŚŽŶĞ͗ϳϲϲͲϰϲϵϰ͘ For sale: ŽŶƚĞŵƉŽƌĂƌLJ ƐƚLJůĞ ĚŝŶŝŶŐ ƚĂďůĞ ǁŝƚŚ ϲ ĂƌŵůĞƐƐ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ͘ WƵƌĐŚĂƐĞĚ ĨƌŽŵ WůĂĐĞŶĐŝĂ͘dĂďůĞŚĂƐŐůĂƐƐƚŽƉ͕ϱĨĞĞƚdžϯĨĞĞƚĂŶĚϯϬ ŝŶĐŚĞƐ ŚŝŐŚ͘ ,ĂƐ ƐƋƵĂƌĞ ƐƚLJůĞ ůĞŐƐ ǁƌĂƉƉĞĚ ŝŶ ĐŚŽĐŽůĂƚĞ ďƌŽǁŶ ůĞĂƚŚĞƌ͘ ŚĂŝƌƐ ĂƌĞ ŵĂƚĐŚŝŶŐ ĐŽůŽƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϰϮϭ͘ FOR SALE: Ăƌ ƐƚLJůĞ ƚĂďůĞ Θ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ͘ ƵƚŚĞŶƟĐ DĞdžŝĐĂŶ ƋƵŝƉĂůĞ ƌŽƵŶĚ ďĂƌ ƐƚLJůĞ ƚĂďůĞ͕ϯϳ͟ ŚŝŐŚ͕ϮĨĞĞƚŝŶĚŝĂŵĞƚĞƌ͕ǁŝƚŚĨŽƵƌĐŚĂŝƌƐ͕ŐŽůĚĞŶ ƚĂŶĂŶĚĚĂƌŬďƌŽǁŶůĞĂƚŚĞƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϰϮϭ͘ FOR SALE: sĂĐƵƵŵ ĮůƚĞƌƐ͘ ůĂĐŬ Θ ĞĐŬĞƌ ZĞƉůĂĐĞŵĞŶƚĮůƚĞƌƐĞƚĨŽƌϰ͘ϴǀŽůƚĂŶĚŚŝŐŚĞƌs ƐĞƌŝĞƐƵƐƚďƵƐƚĞƌƐŵŽĚĞůs&ϮϬŝƌƚĞǀŝůŵŽĚĞů η&ϭϵϮĮůƚĞƌƐŝŶĞĂĐŚďŽdž͕ŚĂǀĞϮ FOR SALE: ^ĂŵƐƵŶŐ'ĂůĂdžLJ///;ZĞĚͿ͕WƌŽĐĞƐƐŽƌYƵĂĚŽƌĞϭ͘ϰ',nj͕ĂŵĞƌĂϴŵƉdž͕ŶĚƌŽŝĚ ϰ͘Ϭ/ĐĞƌĞĂŵ^ĂŶĚǁŝĐŚ͕^ĐƌĞĞŶ,^ƵƉĞƌŵŽůĞĚ ϰ͘ϴ͕ƌĞĐŽƌĚ ĂŶĚ ƉƌŽĚƵĐĞ ǀŝĚĞŽ ŝŶ &Ƶůů ,͕ ĞdžƚĞƌŶĂůŵĞŵŽƌLJƵƉƚŽϯϮ'͕ŵŽďŝůĞďĂŶŬŝŶŐ͕ ĂďůĞƚŽƚƌĂŶƐĨĞƌĮůĞƐ͕ŝŶƚĞƌŶĂůŵĞŵŽƌLJϭϲ'͘/ŶĐůƵĚĞƐ ĐŚĂƌŐĞƌ͕ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ^ĂŵƐƵŶŐ ŚĞĂĚƉŚŽŶĞƐ͘ ,ĂǀĞ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ďŽdž ĂŶĚ ƌĞĐĞŝƉƚ ĨƌŽŵ dĞůĐĞů͘ WŝĐƚƵƌĞƐŽŶƌĞƋƵĞƐƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϳ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϬϰϱͲ ϯϯϭͲϯϴϮͲϰϳϳϭ͘ FOR SALE: >ĂƌŐĞ ^ĐƌĂďďůĞ ŝĐƟŽŶĂƌLJ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϱϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ŽƵŶƚĞƌƚŽƉ tĂƚĞƌ WƵƌŝĮĞƌ ǁŝƚŚ džƚƌĂĮůƚĞƌEĞǁ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϱϬϬƉн&ŝůƚĞƌΨϰϴϬƉ hƐĞĚƉƌŝĐĞΨϭ͕ϮϬϬĨŽƌďŽƚŚ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:ŽǁŇĞdždƌĞĂĚŵŝůů͘KƌŝŐŝŶĂůůLJĐŽƐƚ ΨϭϮϬϬ͘ϬϬ͘,ĂƐƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŵĞĚǁŽƌŬŽƵƚƐͲƐŝŵƵůĂƚĞĚůĞǀĞůǁĂůŬŝŶŐĂŶĚƵƉŚŝůůĐůŝŵďƐ͘^ĞůĚŽŵƵƐĞĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬ͘ϬϬ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŚĂǁ ^Z ϯϭϱ ZĞĐĞŝǀĞƌ ǁŝƚŚ ƌĞŵŽƚĞĨŽƌƐĂůĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: džĞƌĐŝƐĞďĂůůǁŝƚŚƉƵŵƉĂŶĚďƌŽĐŚƵƌĞ ŽĨ ƐƵŐŐĞƐƚĞĚ ĞdžĞƌĐŝƐĞƐ͘ / ďŽƵŐŚƚ ƚŚŝƐ Ăƚ ŽƵƌůŽĐĂůtĂůͲDĂƌƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: dǁŝŶ DĂƌƚŚĂ ^ƚĞǁĂƌƚ ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĞƌ͕ ƚǁŽ ƐŚĂŵƐ͕ ďĞĚ ƐŬŝƌƚͲ ǁĂƐ ŝŶ Ă ŐƵĞƐƚ ƌŽŽŵͲ ďĂƌĞůLJƵƐĞĚWƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϱϬƉ͘dǁŝŶƐŚĞĞƚƐĞƚ;ďůƵĞ ΘǁŚŝƚĞƐƚƌŝƉĞͿ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬϬƉ͘ FOR SALE: >ŽƚƐ ŽĨ ĐƌŽĐŚĞƚ ĐŽƩŽŶ Ăůů ĐŽůŽƌƐ ŵŽƐƚůLJǁŚŝƚĞĂŶĚĐƌĞĂŵ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱƉĂŶĚƵƉ͘ůů ƉƌŽĐĞĞĚƐ ǁŝůů ďĞ ĚŽŶĂƚĞĚ ƚŽ EĞĞĚůĞ WƵƐŚĞƌƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ŝŐ DĞŶ͛Ɛ WĂŶƚƐ͘ :ĞĂŶƐ͕ ĚƌĞƐƐ ƐůĂĐŬƐĂŶĚĚŽĐŬĞƌƐ͕ϱƉĂŝƌƐŝŶĂůů͘^ŝnjĞƐϭͲϰϲ͕ϮͲ ϱϴĂŶĚϮͲϲϬ͘/ƉĂŝƌĚƌĞƐƐƐůĂĐŬƐŚĂƐƚŚĞƚĂŐƐŽŶ ƚŚĞŵ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϬϬƉĞĂĐŚ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:zĂŵĂŚĂWŽƌƚĂďůĞ'ƌĂŶĚƚŽƉŽĨƚŚĞ ůŝŶĞ ŬĞLJďŽĂƌĚ Ͳ 'yͲϱϬϱ͘ ϴϴ ƉŝĂŶŽ ƐƚLJůĞ ŬĞLJƐ͕ ŚŝŐŚƌĞƐŽůƵƟŽŶƐƚĞƌĞŽƉŝĂŶŽƐĂŵƉůĞ^ŵĂƌƚDĞĚŝĂ ƐƚŽƌĂŐĞ͕ h^ ĐŽŵƉƵƚĞƌ ĐŽŶŶĞĐƟǀŝƚLJ͕ ůĂƌŐĞ ďŝƚŵĂƉƉĞĚ>ƐĐƌĞĞŶ͕ĐĂŶďĞƵƐĞĚĨŽƌŬĂƌĂŽŬĞ͕ ƚǁŽďƵƩŽŶƉƵƐŚĞƐĂŶĚLJŽƵ͛ƌĞƌĞĐŽƌĚŝŶŐĂŶĚƐŽ ŵƵĐŚŵŽƌĞ͊>ŝŐŚƚǁŽŽĚƐƚĂŶĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϱϭŽƌƌĂũŚĂƚŚLJΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ͘ FOR SALE: ŽůŵĂŶ ƐƚLJůĞ ůĂŶƚĞƌŶ Θ ƚĂŶŬ͕ &Žƌ ǁŚĞŶ LJŽƵƌ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐ ŐŽĞƐ ŽƵƚ ;ĂŶĚ LJŽƵ ŬŶŽǁ ŝƚ ǁŝůůͿ͘dǁŽŶĞǁŵĂŶƚůĞƐĂŶĚƚĂŶŬŝƐĂůŵŽƐƚϭϬϬй ĨƵůů͘tŝůůůŝŐŚƚĂĨƵůůƌŽŽŵĞĂƐŝůLJ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ĂůůŽƌĞŵĂŝů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE: DĞdžŝĐĂŶ ƐĂĚĚůĞ ŝŶ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϱϳϬ͘ FOR SALE: / ŚĂǀĞ ƚǁŽ ;ϮͿ ĨƌĞƐŚͲŽƵƚͲŽĨͲƚŚĞͲ ďŽdž yϯϮϬϬ ϯ ƐĞƌŝĞƐ ^ŚĂǁ ĐĂďůĞ ƐLJƐƚĞŵ ŽŶůLJ ƌĞĐĞŝǀĞƌƐ͘ / ƉƵƌĐŚĂƐĞĚ ƚŚĞŵ ŝŶ ĞƌƌŽƌ ĂŶĚ ĐĂŶ͛ƚ ĐŽŶŶĞĐƚƚŚĞŵƚŽƚŚĞƐĂƚĞůůŝƚĞƐLJƐƚĞŵ͘dŚĞLJĐŽƐƚ ŵĞ ΨϭϰϬ͘ϬϬ E ďƵƚ LJŽƵ ĐĂŶ ŚĂǀĞ ƚŚĞŵ ĨŽƌ ΨϭϬϬ͘ϬϬĞĂĐŚĂŶĚƚĂŬĞƚŚĞŵďĂĐŬǁŝƚŚLJŽƵĂŶĚ ŵĂŬĞΨϴϬ͘ϬϬ͘ FOR SALE: tŝƌĞůĞƐƐŚĞĂĚƉŚŽŶĞƐ͘tŽƌŬƐĮŶĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϱϬĂůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE: DŽƚŽƌĐLJĐůĞ ŚĞůŵĞƚ͘ 'ŽŽĚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶǁŝƚŚďůĂĐŬďĂŐͬĐŽǀĞƌŝŶŐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϬϬKK͘ Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŽůŝĚ ďƌĂƐƐ ŬŝƚĐŚĞŶ ĨĂƵĐĞƚ͘ dŚŝƐ ĐŽƐƚ ŽǀĞƌ ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬ Ăƚ ƚŚĞ ůĂƌŐĞ ƉůƵŵďŝŶŐͬƚŽŽů ƐƚŽƌĞŝŶũŝũŝĐ͕ďƵƚŝƚĞŶĚĞĚƵƉďĞŝŶŐƚŽŽŚĞĂǀLJ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ĐŚĞĂƉ ƐŝŶŬ ǁĞ ŚĂǀĞ͘ dŚĞ ƐƉƌĂLJĞƌ ƉƵůůƐ ŽƵƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬ͘ĂůůŽĨĞŵĂŝů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE:ϭϲĨŽŽƚůƵŵĐƌĂŌǁŝƚŚϰϴŚƉǀĞŶ ƌƵĚĞ͘ ϱ ƐĞĂƚƐ ĂŶĚ ƚƌŽůůŝŶŐ ŵŽƚŽƌ͘ EĞǁ ƟƌĞƐ ŽŶ ƚƌĂŝůĞƌ͘^ĞĂƚƐĞŵŝͲŶĞǁŵĂƚĞƌŝĂů͘ϮĞdžƚƌĂƌŝŵƐĂŶĚ ŽŶĞ ĞdžƚƌĂ ƟƌĞ ĨŽƌ ƚƌĂŝůĞƌ͘ ZĞͲĚĞĐŬĞĚ ĂŶĚ ĐĂƌƉĞƚĞĚƌĞĐĞŶƚůLJ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϵϵϱ͘ϬϬh͘^͘Ž͘ď͘Ž͘Ăůů ϳϲϮͲϭϲϮϴ Žƌ ĞŵĂŝů ďĂƌƌŝƐƌŽŽŵΛĂŽů͘ĐŽŵ ǁŝůů ƐĞŶĚƉŚŽƚŽ͘

FOR SALE͗ WůĂǀŝdž ϳϱŵŐ͕ ĨƌĞƐŚ ĂŶĚ ĂĐƚƵĂůůLJ ŵŽƌĞ ƚŚĂŶ ΨϯϱϬ͘ Ăůů Žƌ ĞŵĂŝů ŵĞ͗ ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲ 6348. FOR SALE: ŝŬĞ ĐĂƌƌŝĞƌ ƌĂĐŬ ĚĞƐŝŐŶĞĚ ƚŽ Įƚ ŽǀĞƌƌĞĂƌŵŽƵŶƚĞĚƐƉĂƌĞƟƌĞ͘,ŽůĚƐƚǁŽďŝŬĞƐ͘ &ŝƚƐŽƵƌϮϬϬϲZsŽƌƐŝŵŝůĂƌƐƉĂƌĞƟƌĞ͘sĞƌLJƐĞĐƵƌĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬ͘ϬϬ͘ FOR SALE:ůŽƚŽĨƉŚŽƚŽƉĂƉĞƌĨŽƌƐĂůĞ͕ŵĂŶLJ ŬŝŶĚƐ͕&Ƶũŝ͕^ƚĂƉůĞƐ͕ŵŽƐƚůLJϴ͘ϱyϭϭ͕ĂůƐŽϰyϲĂŶĚ ϱyϳ͘DŽƌĞƚŚĂŶϭϬϬůĂƌŐĞΘϭϬϬнƐŵĂůů͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϯϱϬĨŽƌƚŚĞůŽƚ͘Ăůů͗ϯϴϳͲϳϲϭͲϬϮϱϵ͘ FOR SALE: dĂƐĞƌͬ^ƚƵŶ 'ƵŶ͘ ϭϬϬй ůĞŐĂů ŝŶ DĞdžŝĐŽ͘ ϴ͘ϵ ŵŝůůŝŽŶ ǀŽůƚƐ͘ tŝƚŚ ĐĂƌƌLJŝŶŐ ĐĂƐĞ ;ĮƚƐ ŽŶ ďĞůƚͿ EŽŶͲůĞƚŚĂů͘ WůƵŐ ŝŶ ƚŽ ƌĞĐŚĂƌŐĞ͘ džĐĞůůĞŶƚĨŽƌĚĞĨĞŶƐĞĂŐĂŝŶƐƚƉĞŽƉůĞŽƌĂŶŝŵĂůƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬ͘ĂůůŽƌĞŵĂŝů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE: ^d/,> ŐĂƌĚĞŶ ƚƌŝŵŵĞƌͬĞĚŐĞƌͬ ǁŚŝƉƉĞƌ͘ /Ŷ ǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͖ ũƵƐƚ ƌĞƉůĂĐĞĚ ƚŚĞǁŚŝƉƉĞƌƉĂƌƚ͘dŚŝƐŝƐĂŐĂƐŽůŝŶĞŵŽĚĞů͕ŶŽƚ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϴϬϬƉĞƐŽƐKK͘YƵĞƐƟŽŶƐ͗ϬϰϱͲ ϯϯϭͲϯϴϮͲϰϳϳϭ͘ĞŵĂŝůďƌƵŶŽLJŝƚŽΛŚŽƚŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ. FOR SALE: ,ĞĂǀLJ ƵƚLJ Y ŽǀĞƌƐ ŶŝĐĞ ŐƌĞĞŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϱϬƉĞĂĐŚ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: >ŝŵŽŐĞƐ WŽƌĐĞůĂŝŶ ^Ğƚ͘ ϭϮͲƉůĂĐĞ ƐĞƫŶŐ͕ ƐĞƌǀŝŶŐ ƉůĂƩĞƌƐ͕ ďŽǁůƐ͕ ŽīĞĞ ƐĞƚ͖ tŚŝƚĞ ǁͬƌĞĚ Θ ŐŽůĚ ďŽƌĚĞƌ͖ ůŝŬĞ ŶĞǁ ;ŽǀĞƌ h^ΨϭϮ͕ϬϬϬ ŶĞǁͿ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬ h^ ͬ ΨϯϬ͕ϬϬϬ DdžƉ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϮϵϵ͘ FOR SALE: yD ZĂĚŝŽ DŽĚĞů ϭϯϲͲϰϯϰϱ ŝŶĐůƵĚĞƐƚŚĞƌĂĚŝŽ͕ĚŽĐŬŝŶŐƐƚĂƟŽŶ͕ĐĂƌƉůƵŐŝŶĂŶĚ ĂŶƚĞŶŶĂĨŽƌLJŽƵƌĐĂƌΨϮϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: Dƌ͘ ,ĞĂƚĞƌͲŽŶǀĞĐƟŽŶ ,ĞĂƚĞƌ EĞǁǁĂƐΨϭϯϱh^ƐĂůĞΨϰϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ŝƐŚǁĂƐŚĞƌͶŝŶĚƵƐƚƌŝĂů͕ ,ŽďĂƌƚ ͞ƵŶĚĞƌ ƚŚĞ ĐŽƵŶƚĞƌ͟ >yϯϬ ŽŵŵĞƌĐŝĂů ŝƐŚǁĂƐŚĞƌ͘tĂƐŚĐLJĐůĞ͗ϴϱƐĞĐŽŶĚƐͬϭϱϬΣ&;ϲϲΣͿ͕ ƌŝŶƐĞĐLJĐůĞ͗ϭϬƐĞĐŽŶĚƐ͕ϭϴϬΣ&;ϴϮΣͿ͘/ŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬh^͕ŽƌďĞƐƚŽīĞƌ͘ĂůůĂƚ͗ ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϰϱϮϭ Žƌ ĞͲŵĂŝů Ăƚ͗ ůŝǀŝŶŐŝŶĐŽŵŵƵŶŝƚLJŵdžΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ. FOR SALE: tĂLJ ĮŶĚĞƌ sϮϬϬϬ ŝŐŝƚĂů sĞŚŝĐůĞ ŽŵƉĂƐƐdŚĞƌŵŽŵĞƚĞƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϬϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲ ϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:hƐĞĚĨŽƌƚǁŽLJĞĂƌƐ͘ůĞĐƚƌŝĐǁŚĞĞůĐŚĂŝƌ͕ /ŶǀĂĐĂƌĞ WƌŽŶƚŽ Dϵϰ ĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ŵĂŶƵĂů͕ĞdžƚƌĂďƌĂĐĞƐĨŽƌůĞŐƐ͕ĐŚĂƌŐŝŶŐƐLJƐƚĞŵ͘ ϮϱŵŝůĞƐƚŽĞĂĐŚĐŚĂƌŐĞ͘EĞǁůŝƐƚƐΨϲ͕ϵϬϬh^͘ 'ŽŽĚŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬh^͕ŶĞŐŽƟĂďůĞ ǁŝƚŚŝŶůŝŵŝƚƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϬϲϭ͘ FOR SALE:WƌŝŶĚůĞϭϲǁƚƌĂŝůĞƌ͘DĂŝŶƐĂŝůĂŶĚ ƚƌĂŵƉŽůŝŶĞ ĂƌĞ ĂůŵŽƐƚ ŶĞǁ͘ WŽŶƚŽŽŶƐ ĂŶĚ Ăůů ƌŝŐŐŝŶŐ ŝŶ ŶĞǁ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ϭϳ͕ϬϬϬW͘ Ăůů͗ ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϭͲϬϭϮϱ͘ FOR SALE: sĂƌŝŽƵƐ /ƚĞŵƐ͘ ^ŚĂǁ ƐLJƐƚĞŵ ^ZϰϬϭDE Ͳ 'E /E^d Ͳ /^, E ZĞŵŽƚĞ͘ ZĞƉůŝĐĂŽĨDĞdžŝĐĂŶƐŚŽǁ͕ĚĂŶĐŝŶŐŚŽƌƐĞ͕ĂƉƉƌŽdž ϯĨĞĞƚƚĂůůͲϯĨĞĞƚůŽŶŐͲƵŶŝƋƵĞŚĂŶĚĐĂƌǀĞĚƐĂĚĚůĞ ƐŝƫŶŐƵƉŽŶďůĂĐŬůĞĂƚŚĞƌďůĂŶŬĞƚ͕ĞŵďƌŽŝĚĞƌĞĚ ŝŶŐŽůĚĂůůĂƌŽƵŶĚ͕ŐĞŶƵŝŶĞůĞĂƚŚĞƌĐŝŶĐŚĞƐ͕ƐƟƌƌƵƉƐ͕ ůĞĂƚŚĞƌ ŚĞĂĚŐĞĂƌ ĂŶĚ ƌĞŝŶƐ͕ ƌĞĂů ŚŽƌƐĞƐ ŚĂŝƌ ƚĂůĞͲŵŽƵŶƚĞĚ ŽŶ ƉĞĚĞƐƚĂů͕ ƌĞƉůŝĐĂ ŽĨ ďƌŝůůŝĂŶƚĮŐŚƟŶŐƌŽŽƐƚĞƌͲŵĂĚĞĨƌŽŵŵĞƚĂů͕ƐƚĂŶĚƐϯ ĨĞĞƚŚŝŐŚ͕ŐƌĞĂƚĨŽƌŚŽŵĞŽƌŐĂƌĚĞŶ͘Ăůů͗:ŽŚŶŶLJ ϳϲϲͲϮϮϭϬ͘ FOR SALE:KƵƚĚŽŽƌ>ŽƵŶŐĞŚĂŝƌƐ͘,ĂŵƉƚŽŶ ĂLJ;,ŽŵĞĞƉŽƚŶĂŵĞďƌĂŶĚͿŽƵƚĚŽŽƌůŽƵŶŐĞ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ͕ƌƵƐƚƉƌŽŽĨĂůƵŵŝŶƵŵĨƌĂŵĞ͕ĨƵůůLJǁĞůĚĞĚ ĐŽŶƐƚƌƵĐƟŽŶ͕ Ăůů ǁĞĂƚŚĞƌ ĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ͘ ,ĂǀĞ Ϯ ĨŽƌ ƐĂůĞ Ăƚ Ψϭ͕ϴϬϬ͘ϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘ tŝůů ĞŵĂŝů ƉŝĐƚƵƌĞƐŽŶƌĞƋƵĞƐƚ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϱϲϴϲ FOR SALE: ^D^hE' Ϯϳ͟ ds͘ ^ŝůǀĞƌ tŝƚŚ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ ĂŶĚ ŵĂŶƵĂů͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘ FOR SALE:tŚĞĞůĞĚĐůŽƚŚĞƐƌĂĐŬƐ͘dǁŽůĂĐŬ ŝƌŽŶ ϳϱ͟,ŝŐŚ dž ϳϮ͟ ůŽŶŐ ǀĞƌLJ ŵĂŶĞƵǀĞƌĂďůĞ ĐůŽƚŚĞƐ ƌĂĐŬƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘ FOR SALE:/ŶǀĞƌƐŝŽŶdĂďůĞ͘WƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂůĂŶƟͲ ŐƌĂǀŝƚLJŝŶǀĞƌƐŝŽŶƚĂďůĞĨŽƌĂƚŚůĞƚĞƐĂŶĚƌĞŚĂďŝůŝƚĂƟŽŶŽĨƚŚĞƐƉŝŶĞĂŶĚďƌĂŝŶďůŽŽĚĐŝƌĐƵůĂƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϯ͕ϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘ FOR SALE: ŽǀĞƌĞĚ ǁĂƌĚƌŽďĞ ƌĂĐŬ͘ ŚƌŽŵĞ ƐŚĞůǀŝŶŐ ŽŶ ǁŚĞĞůƐ ǁŝƚŚ ƚǁŽ njŝƉƉĞƌ ĐŽǀĞƌ͘ ΨϮ͕ϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘ FOR SALE: ϯ WŝĞĐĞƐ ŝƌŽŶ ƉĂƟŽ ƐĞƚ͘ Ϯ Ō ϲ ŝŶĐŚ ĚŝĂŵ ŐůĂƐƐ ƚĂďůĞ ƚŽƉ ϯ ƐĞĂƚĞƌ ĐŽƵĐŚ ǁŝƚŚ ĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ Ϯ ƐĞĂƚĞƌ ĐŽƵĐŚ ǁŝƚŚ ĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϯ͕ϬϬϬDyE͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘

Saw you in the Ojo 77


78

El Ojo del Lago / November 2013


El Ojo del Lago - November2013  

Ajijic and Chapala newspaper devoted to news, interviews, history, culture and art.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you