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Saw you in the Ojo

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013


Saw you in the Ojo

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z DIRECTORY z PUBLISHER Richard Tingen

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alejandro Grattan-Domínguez Tel: (01376) 765 3676, 765 2877 Fax: (01376) 765 3528 Associate Publisher David Tingen

Index...

FEATURE ARTICLES

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COVER STORY

Idella Purnell spins a story that while not set during the Christmas season nevertheless contains a heartwarming message.

COVER STORY

VOLUME 30 NUMBER 4

Graphic Design Roberto C. Rojas Sandra Hernandez

Associate Editor Jim Tipton Contributing Editor Mark Sconce Drama Critic Michael Warren Art Critic Rob Mohr Roving Correspondent Dr. Lorin Swinehart Sales Managers Omar Medina Bruce Fraser 2I¿FH6HFUHWDU\ Rocio Madrigal ADVERTISING OFFICE Av. Hidalgo # 223, Chapala Mon. thru Fri. 9am - 5pm Sat. 9am - 1pm Tel. 01 (376) 765 2877, 765 3676 Fax 01 (376) 765 3528 Send all correspondence, subscriptions or advertising to: El Ojo del Lago http://www.chapala.com ojodellago@prodigy.net.mx Ave. Hidalgo 223 (or Apartado 279), 45900 Chapala, Jalisco Tels.: (376) 765 3676, Fax 765 3528 PRINTING: El Debate El Ojo del Lago aparece los primeros cinco días de cada mes. (Distributed over WKH¿UVW¿YHGD\VRIHDFKPRQWK) &HUWL¿FDGRGH/LFLWXGGH7tWXOR &HUWL¿FDGRGH/LFLWXGGH&RQWHQLGR

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12 PSYCHOLOGY Dr. M.I. Ehrlich believes that those who adapt well to Mexico are healthier from a psychological standpoint. The others—? Well, not so much.

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Editor’s Page

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Dear Portia

Marilyn Davis knows Mexico better than most ex-pats, and here relates a true story that demonstrates that what is courteous behavior to North Americans might not seem so to a Mexican.

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Wondrous Wildlife

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Uncommon Sense

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Imprints

32 PROFILE

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Welcome to Mexico

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Anita’s Animals

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Child of Month

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Profiling Tepehua

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Lakeside Living

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Focus on Art

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Front Row Center

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Bridge by the Lake

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The Poets’ Niche

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Hearts at Work

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Ghosts Among Us

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LCS Newsletter

26 BEHAVIORAL GLITCHES

Kay Davis looks at the life and times of Art Hess—a man known here at Lakeside as “The Dog Whisperer,” a gentle PDQ ZKR ¿UPO\ EHOLHYHV WKDW ZKHQ LW comes to “problem” dogs, the problem is usually at the other end of the leash.

34 FICTION Tom Eck mixes peppermint ice cream, the Christmas season and mysticism in a story that proves irresistible.

36 NOSTAGLIA Dr. Lorin Swinehart remembers the old movie cowboy heroes, and thinks that they truly embodied both the Boy Scout Law and the Medieval Code of Chivalry.

54 HOLIDAY TRAVEL Ed Tasca believes that airplane travel has become little more than a macrovariation of the common sausage. We believe that his article is nothing short of a Christmas gift to our readers.

Reserva al Título de Derechos de Autor 04-2011-103110024300-102 Control 14301. Permisos otorgados por la Secretaría de Gobernación (EXP. 1/432 “88”/5651 de 2 de junio de 1993) y SEP (Reserva 171.94 control 14301) del 15 de enero de 1994. Distribución: Hidalgo 223 Chapala, Jalisco, México. All contents are fully protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without the written consent of El Ojo del Lago. Opinions expressed E\ WKH DXWKRUV GR QRW QHFHVVDULO\ UHÀHFW WKH views of the Publisher or the Editor, nor are we responsible for the claims made by our advertisers. We welcome letters, which should include name, address and telephone number.

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

LAKESIDE LIVING

Special Events Editor Sandy Olson

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Editor’s Page RPLQJXH] %\$OHMDQGUR*UDWWDQ'RPLQJXH]

The Bottom Line

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ur readers might have noticed that the Ojo recently celebrated its 30th birthday. Over these past years, we have developed many popular features, established a highly professional sales and office staff and published the work of many hundreds of talented writers—all of which has done much to establish us as the premier magazine here at Lakeside. But as in any enterprise, the financial bottom-line is not the only criterion. We are equally proud that we have tried to give something back to our community by way of free publicity/ space every month (in most cases) to the following groups for the following reasons. t Ninos Incapacitados—does a marvelous job aiding Mexican children with serious disabilities. t The Tepehua Project—whose members work valiantly to improve the living condition of people who inhabit one of our most povertystricken areas. t Front Row Center—carries reviews of many theatrical events, thus demonstrating appreciation for our many talented theater people. t Ojo Annual Literary Awards Luncheon—does much to honor the wonderful writers at Lakeside whose contributions make life here more culturally diverse. t The Lake Chapala Society Newsletter—we carry the news

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

rom tthe he LCS, LCS C , LakeL ke La efrom ide de’s ’ss major major ajjor organiorg rgan gani an niside’s zation, to many thousands of our residents, as well as countless others we reach through our website of Chapala.com. (Currently receiving more than 11 million hits per month.) t Jaltepec Centro Educativo — is a Technical University for young women from poor families, teaching them Hotel and Hospitality Management, skills that will not only improve their lives, but those of their families and communities, as well. t The Ojo Classified Section— carries a large number of ads to our readers at no cost to either the sellers or buyers. tThe Ojo Web-Board—serves as a huge conduit for issues that are important to our local community. t Obituaries—honoring those who have passed on, giving our readers some appreciation for the many people who have contributed so much over the years to enrich our beloved little corner of Mexico. t Focus on Art—wherein we promote and publicize the work of visual artists whose work deserves special recognition. t Los Ninos de Chapala (NCA)/ Educating Lakeside Ninos—has been “nurturing the minds, bodies and spirits of children since 1977.” t Local Orphanages—During the Christmas season, we allocate two entire pages or inserts (without ads of any kind) in our December issue to publicize and promote the many orphanages around the Lakeside area All by way of saying that at El Ojo del Lago, we have long been aware that the bottom-line is not the only line. Alejandro Grattan


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A Christmas Story

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nce upon a time, and not so long ago, lived a boy and his grandmother in a village called Ajijic along the lake. His name was JosĂŠ. They had a grocery store so small and with so few groceries that we would wonder why they called it a store. A dozen paraffin candles, a few pounds of coffee, beans, corn, sugar, ropes, green peppers, soap, onions, ten bottles of soda pop, half a dozen cans of sardines and of hot green peppers, perhaps one egg or two, were for sale. His grandmother could no longer read the numbers on money or on the weights, and JosĂŠ would show her: “These two weights you put on this side of the scales when anyone wants to buy ten centavos of coffee.â€? He kept store for her most of the time, and always while she went to the mill to have the corn ground for their corn cakes, or while she washed their clothes up at the spring. One Sunday JosĂŠ and his friend Paco decided to go up in the mountains. Paco’s father lent Paco his burro. Climbing out of the town they soon left behind them cobblestone streets and small mud-brick houses with fences of cobblestones piled on each other, and gardens of fruit and flowers. In the mountains they climbed until they reached the rich black fields where wild flowers grow. Here the two boys picked St. John’s roses to take home. Paco wanted his flowers for rice pudding but JosĂŠ thought maybe his grandmother could use his for her eyes. The boys tied their big bouquets to the high-peaked crowns of their hats, climbed on the burro again and started home. On their way they met CholĂŠ driving home her father’s big black ox, which had been grazing in the upland pastures all day. CholĂŠ was a ragged-looking girl of fourteen, much poorer even than JosĂŠ. She had two dresses and one pair of shoes and a pair of stockings worn out at the feet. Mostly she went barefoot to save her shoes and stockings for church.

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CholĂŠ told them that more than anything in the world she wanted to earn some money to go in the bus to Guadalajara to find work, so that she could wear nice clothes and help her family. Her father and mother were willing, but she didn’t have even two pennies. When JosĂŠ told her what his flowers were for, she shook her head. “It will take more than St. John’s roses to cure your grandmother’s eyes. It is not sickness, but old age that makes her sight dim, and for old age, there is no cure. What she needs is a good pair of glasses. In Guadalajara, they say there are all kinds of spectacles for two and three pesos.â€? That night as JosĂŠ lay on the straw mat that was his bed, he wondered how he could earn two or three pesos. He had not told his grandmother the real reason he had brought her St. John’s roses, and she had cooked rice pudding with them. While JosĂŠ ate it, he nearly choked with his secret disappointment. The next day someone told him how he might earn some money. “Why don’t you go to San Juan on San Juan’s Day? They say that on that day, the idols come out of the lake, and if you can find a few and sell them, you can earn money!â€? The village of San Juan was only five miles away so that in a few hours JosĂŠ could walk there. He decided that if he found any idols he would sell them in his grandmother’s store. That would make the foreigners come to buy and maybe they would purchase some soap, or candles, or an egg, after they once came in for an idol. He remembered what their school teacher had told them about the history of the lake. “Once upon a time,â€? The school teacher had said, “A long time ago, San Juan was the capital of the Indian Kingdom of Cutzalan. There were a great many people there. The people worshipped many gods. One of them, called the unknown God, had no name. The Indians used to make idols and images of stone and throw


them into the lake for the Unknown God. They also made tiny jars with three handles. They pierced their ears or noses and let drops of blood fall into these tiny jars, and when after a few weeks or months, when the jars were full, they threw them into the lake as sacrifices to him.” José decided that he must tell Cholé about this, too. Perhaps she could find enough idols and carved jars to earn money to go to Guadalajara! On San Juan’s Day, José and Cholé set out for the lake. They got up earlier than the earliest fisherman and walked and walked in the dark, on their way to San Juan. About daylight they arrived. They went at once to the beach and sat down, to wait for the idols to come out of the lake. A boat from Chapala came in, with its big square sail, bringing a load of cow peas and rope to trade for papayas. The bus to Jocotepec went by. Fisherman put out with empty nets and came back with full baskets. The men were up in the mountains working in the corn. And the idols had not come out of the lake! Cholé began to cry and José wanted too, but he was nearly a man, so he whistled instead, a thin, unsteady tune. Suddenly José gave Cholé a great clap on the back that nearly upset her.    “Cholé!” he cried. “I bet that story about the idols coming out of the lake on San Juan’s Day is what our teacher would call a myth! I bet it isn’t even so. It is the end of the dry season, though, so the lake waters are at their lowest and that’s why they say the idols come out. I’m going in!” “But you’ll get your clothes all wet!” “Who cares?” cried José. He took off his hat and his blanket, and his overalls, and red waist sash. He rolled his white cotton trousers up as high as they would go, and waded in. Then he stubbed his toe on something hard, felt for it, and pulled it up out of the water. Only a stone. This happened three times. But the fourth time the

object was carved. An idol! Cholé was so exited and happy that her tears dried up. Slipping off her dress and wearing the white cotton slip that all the women of Ajijic use as a bathing suit, she waded in, too. In an hour or so they had all that they could carry: idols, little jars for blood sacrifices, and stands for the jars, ugly small objects called naguales—witches who change themselves into animals whenever they will it. José and Cholé sat in the hot sun until they dried off, and then put on the rest of their clothes and started home. On their way the bus picked them up and gave them a ride to Ajijic. The driver knew José because his bus always brought coffee out from Guadalajara to the grandmother’s store. Nearly a month later, Cholé climbed onto the same bus on her way to Guadalajara. She was wearing her best dress and her shoes and stockings. Folded in her handkerchief she had ten pesos to buy new clothes and pay her expenses until she found work. José and his grandmother came out to wave good-bye to her. Jose’s grandmother looked proud and happy in her new spectacles which, as Cholé rode away, sparkled and flashed in the bright sunshine.

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DEAR PORTIA Advice to the Lovelorn the Overfed and the Deeply Disgruntled

Dear (Be still, my heart!) Portia, Though usually reticent, I feel led, perhaps even compelled, to express the feelings that burgeoned within me upon reading your interview with the Editor in the September Ojo. Your pithy and trenchant comments ignited an instant bond. Finally I had found a soul mate, a mind and spirit fully in sync with my own mordant and malevolent self! Your willingness to speak your twisted truth out loud ignited in me a fire which I had thought was long since extinguished. While the Editor sought to reveal your “compassionate” side, it was exquisitely thrilling to discover in its place a pure and pristine void. Your sassy attitude is free and unfettered by maudlin, mainstream, mealy-mouthed values. What started for me as shock and awe at your outspoken wisdom has evolved

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into feelings of adoration of you, tinged with a soupcon of lust. Despite your photo, and despite my six plus decades of fealty to traditional sexual mores, I beg you to meet with me just once. Pick one of the sleazy strip malls south of Zapopan where we can revel in anonymity while we explore mutual commonalities. Your penchant for stinky cigars entitles you to assume the more butch aspects of our relationship, should you so choose. Expectantly yours, Lucretia from Guadalajara Dear Lucretia, Well, as the old country western song says, “If you got the money, honey, I got the time.” But here’s a Weather Advisory: Could get stormy because I am no fonder of the female gender than I am of the male. Indeed, my role model has always been Franz Kafka, who once

so accurately wrote that the world would be a wonderful place to live in, if it just weren’t for all the human beings. So I’ll agree to meet with you once, but you better bring along your best game because if it gets tedious, I’ll head out to one of the super malls, where I’ll drown my frustration by buying things I either can’t afford or am much too old to wear. Like a bikini. Now for Full Disclosure: I have agreed to meet with you only because I am hoping that with your unusual name, you are related to the Borgia Family, that old Italian clan that, while murderous, really knew how to party.


Wondrous Wildlife %\9HUQDQG/RUL*LHJHU

Polly Wants a . . .Tortilla!?

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arrots are among mo mong ong g eaut ea utiithe most beautitell te lliiful and intellid d. gent birds in the world. This explains why theyy are such a popular pet. Unfortunately, people who are attracted to o them are often disapapp pointed, when they get to know the other aspectss of what makes a parrot a parrot! t! They Th are charming, social, loving, intelligent, and comical; they are also emotional, noisy, easily bored, destructive and messy. Whoever coined the phrase “bird brain” was not referring to parrots. They are known for being extremely intelligent, with smarts that surpass dogs and cats and sometimes even their owners. A parrot’s intelligence can rival that of a four-year-old child. And have the emotions of a two or three-year-old. They are boisterous, playful, loving and also prone to fits and tantrums. Parrots are brainy. This means they need interaction, attention and toys they can destroy. It also means that a parrot can absolutely  not  be locked in a cage all day. They need stimulation. It is important to add new toys, change the cage setup every week or two to keep them on their mental toes. (This can be a costly endeavor.) Yes, parrots can talk. However, human language and cute tunes are not the only things to escape that hooked beak. They love to hear themselves make noise; any noise they scream, at any opportunity. (Especially when you’re on the phone.) Some of the noise can be curbed, but it is part of this bird’s social structure. They love to chew, shred and they otherwise destroy whatever they can get their beaks around; not only that $20 toy you just got them, but also the couch, the TV remote and other items in your house! While we expect this of the toys we give them, it can be a dangerous behavior when your bird finds other things around the house. The possibility of electrocution or poisoning exists. They cannot be left unsupervised.

In the wild, the forest floor is their litter box. The remains of their meals (parrot poop) help to move seeds around their habitat. This is an important link in the delicate “web of life” in the rainforest. However, just because a bird moves indoors, does not mean their manners improve. Food scraps and bird-doo are still going to be left in a parrot’s wake. Locally it is not uncommon to see these beautiful birds for sale, but remember, without proper legal documentation, it is illegal for you to have them. Before you buy, be sure the “vendor” can give you the correct legal documents. Any bird /wild animal without proper legal documentation is “illegal.” Only buy from a reputable pet store. Not off the street. Most of the birds for sale on the street are not legal, are usually sick, and will most likely die. You may think that by buying the poor little parrot, you are saving it, but in reality, you are supporting an illegal trade, and helping to create a market, encouraging people to catch and sell wildlife. Think of it this way: for every one bird that makes it to the market three have died. Parrots have become one of the most threatened groups of birds in the world, primarily because of international trade and habitat destruction. An estimated 50,000 wild parrots are caught or plucked from their nests in Mexico each year. Approximately half of these parrots will die while being transported. Trafficking in exotic birds has been a problem for decades along the border between Mexico and the United States. Trafficking parrots is the second-largest illegal border business next to drug smuggling.

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     —Linked to Personality? %\'U0,(KUOLFK

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belief that their here are peosense of psychople who are logical wellbeing able to addepends on such just to life in Mexico routines, habits, and those who find values, and ways living here a personof relating. al nightmare. While This sense of there are no clear-cut deprivation (that rules, there is a suggesis, being deprived tion that those who are of one’s normal conformable with their way of being extroversion, intuition, and acting), often feelings and ability to “Siggie� Freud leads people to “go with the flow� will camouflage their anxiety and the feelgenerally fare better in Mexico. There ing of being disconnected with anger are however, individuals with these perand impatience towards external events sonalities who cannot deal well with such as traffic, pollution, informality Mexico. Given this, one must assume of Mexicans, distrust of the household that there are other, more basic personhelp or the inability to get things done ally traits which can help explain the adon time. This is not to say that such justment differences. events are not as troublesome or as inAlthough unrelated to personality, furiating to the well-adjusted. The wellthe amount of accurate information the adjusted, however, take such things in family received prior coming to Mexico stride. It rarely provokes the emotional is essential for a successful adaptation. crisis typical in the poorly-adapted. There are basic personality traits which The more rigid we are in our dehave a more direct relationship with the mands for being someone of impornature of one’s ability to thrive in Mexitance, being someone whose value and co. These traits include: the ability to be skills be instantly recognized, and for flexible, both in the sense of schedules being someone who “deserves� to be and routines and in relation to one’s treated with respect and deference, the own identity, being tolerant and patient more we are going to resist adapting to with people who have different habits, Mexico. The more we believe that our ideas, and ways of viewing life and relaneeds must be attended to regardless tionships, a strong sense of adventure of the way things are down here, the and a desire to learn, as well as having more we will perceive Mexico as a hosthe good fortune of not being overly tile place to live. judgmental in terms of what is “right� Those who come to Mexico with a and “wrong� or “good� and “bad�. strong sense of Self, based upon a humIn trying to understand what leads bling awareness of both the favorable a person to be flexible, tolerant, open and less-than-favorable aspects of their to others, adventuresome, and willing personality, will usually be more acceptto learn from and about others, I have ing of other life styles. They will be more come to the conclusion that humility is tolerant of other’s customs and habits, the primary ingredient. Humility in the and feel less obligated to either accept sense that one has a deep-rooted belief or criticize them. They can maintain certhat he/she is truly equal to everyone tain of their values without having to be else and that no one culture, society, recritically defensive about why they are ligion, social group, or nationality has a the way they are. The adage, “live and let monopoly on truth. live� is a natural part of their life as they Such humility is often based on an know that no one is closer to God or open and flexible self concept or self blessed with “Universal Truth.� image. Those who judge Mexicans to be The people who can adapt successinferior in one way or another, do so as fully to another country may even dea result of exalting their own way of becide that they do not like living there. ing or their manner of doing things. This Their decision, however, is based upon “holier than thou� attitude is a defensive having really given it a try and realizing reaction to a basic and often unconthat it is just “not for me.� No criticisms. scious feeling of insecurity in a sense, No exaggerations. No implied inferiorone holds on to his/her life because ity. Just not for me. there is an underlying and erroneous

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Count Me In The heart and soul of a couple are not immune to despair, for the wear and tear of the ego will always be there. The mind is ever capable of wandering down dark alleys and wallowing in the wasteland of what’s it all about. So, if one day, doubt enters on a word trailing with it sleepless nights all too surreal, nothing as always is ever the same and you need a friend to say I love you count me in If codependency means someone to lean on in times of anxiety and pain, if it’s pickup when you’re down, a smile upon a frown, or simply someone to be there just to know you are around count me in If you need someone to talk to, someone to listen and hear you cry it out, SHOUT IT OUT, or just to be there which is really what it’s all about count me in It goes without saying that it works both ways. If you wake in the morning wanting to be there, thankful for being alive, in stride with the love of your life, that’s not dependency, it’s just I’m your husband and you’re my wife. There’s nothing wrong with sharing both the highs and the lows of every day’s caring, believing that you can, without a doubt, depend on one another to say count me in By John Thomas Dodds

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The Essential Nature of Doubt %LOO)UD\HU

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esley Hazleton who spent several years researching the life of Muhammad and writing his biography recently spoke at the TED Conference and suggested something quite counterintuitive. When, in 610 AD, Muhammad experienced his first revelation of the Koran, he did not celebrate and proclaim that he had received the Truth. He was unconvinced that his vision was real; indeed he thought he had had a hallucination. He was afraid that he had received a curse from the devil. He was filled with doubt. Hazleton goes on, in her talk, to make the point that doubt is essential to faith. To have faith in anything, we must have doubt. Certainty is clearly not the same as faith. Absolute, blind belief, in her words, “is an antidote to thought.” To have faith, we have to also harbor doubt; otherwise, it’s not faith. Those of us who believe in the primacy of science and empirical evidence must also harbor some degree of doubt. If we believe in the scientific method, we must be ready to accept that what we think we know might not actually be true after all. Scientists have been proving one another wrong for centuries. It goes with the territory of seeking the truth. Rene Descartes was one of the first formal doubters when he declared, “Never to accept anything as true that I do not know to be evidently so.” He ultimately doubted everything but his own awareness of himself as a thinking being with his famous proclamation: Cogito, ergo sum. I think, therefore I am. Many of us have long experience with the concept of doubt. I remember, upon hearing about Santa Claus and his method of delivering gifts, even at that young age, I had doubts about how he could accomplish such a feat in one evening. I had doubt when I asked my Episcopalian minister whether people who lived in China

or India were going to hell, even if they were unfamiliar with Jesus and could not be “saved.” I have doubt every day when I consider if I am doing the right thing. Of course, with doubt, we can have faith. We can have faith that if we live a healthy life we will live a long time. We can have faith that we will get democracy right eventually (a stretch?). We can have faith that the world can become more peaceful and prosperous for everyone. We can have faith even while consumed with doubt. Colin Blakemore, a neuroscientist at Oxford, put it well when he stated, “Doubt is the engine of intelligence. We suffer from a surfeit of certainty. The most powerful philosophy is to ask whether there is a possibility that you are wrong.” Too many people today are suffering from insufficient doubt. Many politicians have no doubt about the correctness of their views. Fundamentalist religions proclaim to have all the answers; no thinking is required. It is simpler not to doubt at all, but believe what others proclaim to be true. Here’s a question for each of us. How often do we doubt those things we believe? How certain are we of our core beliefs? How seriously do we consider the possibility that we might just be wrong?

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Gone full circle

The Jalisco villages of Cajititlan and San Juan Evangelista face each other across a couple of kilometers of lake, but on the day of my visit they’re also separated by 300 years of Mexican history. I can’t take credit for planning this trip to Cajititlan on the Día de la Candelaria (Candlemas) but – as these photos show – the timing couldn’t have been more fortuitous. Candlemas observes the Biblical presentation of the infant Jesus at the temple in Jerusalem 40 days after his birth, but here it’s also the last observance of the Christmas holiday season. Figures of the baby Jesus first displayed in Nativity scenes on Christmas Eve are given presents from the Magi on el Día de los Reyes (King’s Day, January 6), and on the Día de la

Candelaria (February 2) are dressed in fine clothes and presented at the church for blessing. Family and friends also traditionally gather on this day to eat tamales. In Mexico, this holiday is a follow-on to Kings’ Day, when children receive gifts and families and friends break share generous loaves of Rosca de Reyes, a special sweet bread with a figurine hidden inside. Whoever finds the figurines in their portion must host a party on the Día de la Candelaria. We arrive in Cajititlan to find streets jammed with cars that surround blocks of the city center cordoned off for a great street festival. On the approach to the central plaza and the local parish church, the sound of drumbeats grows ever louder. The narrow street opens suddenly onto the plaza, where at least 40 dancers in full Aztec ceremonial garb move about in intricately choreographed lines. The costumes are elaborate and the pageantry is stunning. The dancers are men and women of all ages, and even a few children participate. As I draw closer I can hear faint strains of a violin, and in a moment see a fiddler walking among the dancers, an impresario guiding the procession toward the church. The church is packed as the procession makes its way up the central aisle toward the altar, the drums continuing their steady beat. It’s startling to see this spectacle of pagan-rooted pageantry occupy a place of Christian worship. As the ceremony ends and the procession backs slowly down the aisle and back into the sun-washed plaza, though, its leader makes the sign of the cross and kisses his fingers.

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As I study the dancers more closely I can see crosses hanging around the necks of many. Nearly 500 years after the Conquest, and 400 years after native artisans surreptitiously integrated icons of their native religion into the design of the church in nearby San Juan Evangelista, native tradition has re-emerged as such an integral part of mainstream Catholic ceremony in Mexico that it’s no longer possible to imagine one without the other. Things have, indeed come full circle.

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Christmas in Mexico

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exicans love to celebrate. Their fiestas start early, run late, are filled with lots of food, fun and music and usually fireworks! Like every other Holiday in Mexico, I have found that Mexicans make the most of Christmas. Here in Mexico, Christmas isn’t about marathon shopping, Black Friday, standing in long lines, and trying to out-decorate your neighbors’ house. My Christmas’ in Minnesota were set in white blankets of snow, and decorative lights and people running around in a frenzy of Holiday parties and shopping sprees. There was constant activity. But somehow the spirit and meaning of the Holidays seemed to get mixed up with the hype. The US economic bottom line depends heavily on Christmas. The sales between Black Friday and Christmas make or break retailers. I once told you of our last Christmas in the USA. My husband ran out to pick up a last minute stocking stuffer for our son. It was snowing, and on his way out of the store, he slipped, fell on his back and got the wind knocked out of him. He lay in the drive trying to catch his breath. No one came to his aid. Instead, cars were honking at him for blocking the driveway. Yep, that is Christmas spirit for you. He’s experienced falls here in Mexico, and people

come running to help. It may seem like a small difference, but to me it speaks volumes. The people here care about the well being of others. Even complete strangers. There is no snow here, that made it difficult for me to get into the “Christmas mood.” The decorations seem simple and meaningful not commercial. The posadas remind of us the story of Christmas. My favorite posada was put on by the children of The Little Blue School. This is a school in Chapala for children who have disabilities. There was a variation of the Christmas story not in my Methodist upbringing, something about an angel and a devil doing battle. This still requires translation. But the children had such a great time, and I watched the children with tears in my eyes. The children welcomed us with hugs, and escorted us to our seats and waited on us hand and foot. I was a foreigner, yet they treated me as family. In Mexico businesses don’t take Christmas day and the next day off, or make it a four-day weekend. Here, many businesses close for two weeks so their workers can spend time with their families and extended families. The season goes beyond Christmas and includes Three Kings Day. Still unsure of what Three Kings Day is? Look it up!! But it involves a bread-like cake, and for six years, I’ve managed to avoid getting the piece of the cake that has a baby Jesus. They don’t even allow me to use my gluten problem to avoid the cake… I still have to take a piece and sort through it. OK, some day, I’ll have to provide the tamales for the party in early February that signals the end of the Holiday Season. I do see the retailers selling Christmas bling here, but I hope that Mexico hangs tight to its culture and traditions and does not “buy” into the Christmas hype that passes for the Christmas holiday in the USA. Victoria Schmidt

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hen this column is published, unless some kind of miracle occurs, the new 16% IVA tax on all pet food is in effect in January. This will affect the majority of people who have family pets, but it will have the hardest impact on Mexican families who have a very restricted income and budget. Those who have a cat / dog, or more, take pride in their pet and consider it an integral part of the family unit. Research has shown that adults who have a pet gain a positive effect, both physically and mentally. Families that have both children and a family pet usually gain a positive learning experience for their child as pet ‘ownership’ usually promotes self-worth, a sense of pride, compassion and responsibility which leads to good citizenship. If you have staff who takes care of your house, garden, etc., ask if they have a family pet. If they do, consider a holiday gift of some pet food for that pet family member – I know they will be touched by your thoughtfulness. We are upon a normally happy time of year, with celebration of many holidays, feelings of joy and gathering of friends and family. At this time too, there are many cats and dogs that are living in a variety of ‘shelters’ at Lakeside, waiting for their chance for a forever home and happiness. Might I suggest that in lieu of giving a holiday gift to a person who really does not need another scarf, knick-knack or . . . that you consider a donation to your favorite rescue group in that person’s name. Maybe even create a holiday party and ask those attending bring some pet food as a “hostess gift” which then

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

can be donated to a rescue group. If you do not support a particular rescue group, please then consider one of the groups that help with spay-neutering of pets belonging to Mexican Nationals of limited economic means. At present time, there are three groups with this specific goal of trying to reduce pet over-population. These groups are: Lakeside Friends of the Animals - www. lakesideanimalfriends.org For the Chapala Municipality, is Operacion Amour - Cameron Peters - zo-onna@hotmail. com., which holds regular three-day spay-neutering events in communities at the east end of the lake. A newly formed sister organization in the Jocotepec Municipality is called Operacion Compacion - Operacioncompacion@gmail.com. It will be starting with a spay-neutering event in San Juan Cosala on February 7, 8 and 9th.. They will have other spay-neutering events in SJC and other towns at the west end of the lake. When spay and neutering is supported, it might hopefully reduce the need to have so many unwanted, abused, starving and neglected cats/dogs waiting in shelters. Your support of adopting from a shelter and not buying a pet will also help stop perpetuating the ugly business of puppy mills. This enslaved breeding is solely for profit at the expense of perpetual breeding of a dog, unknown health conditions, and the creation of cruel inhumane living conditions. Certainly there are enough available pets at our shelters to pick from for adoption, rather than buying a puppy. Anita and her volunteers would like to express a special Thank You! to those un-sung individuals, heroes/ heroines actually, who go out of their way in their busy lives to provide assistance to animals in need. It is easy to walk by a problem and figure someone else will take care of it. Happily there are many un-named individuals who do take the time and effort to make a difference in a needy animal’s life by providing food and water, rescuing from an abusive/hazardous situation, providing foster care and adopting. Happy Holidays to All!


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CHILD

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his pretty little girl is Ambar Yissel. Ambar, age 10, has been diagnosed with Polyarticular Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (PJRA). The polyarticular type, more common in girls than in boys, affects five or more smaller joints (such as hands and feet) and usually both sides of the body. It can also affect large joints. Juvenile Arthritis is a long-lasting chronic disease. Children with a certain antibody in their blood often have a more severe form of the disease. Antibodies are proteins in the blood usually used by the body to fight off infection through an immune response. In this form of arthritis, the antibody attacks the body’s own tissues. The result is inflammation, heat, pain and swelling. Researchers still don’t know why the immune system goes awry in children who develop JRA although they suspect a two-step process. First, something in a child’s genetic makeup gives them a tendency to develop JRA. Then an environmental factor, such as a virus, triggers the development of JRA. Ambar is a new client for Niños Incapacitados, having joined us this past July. The family just moved to the area. Thanks to Mom’s tenacity, they have been relocated to a brand new housing development subsidized by the government. Through tears, Mom said they are very happy as they now have a proper home with tiled flooring and she turns on a tap for water! She said they feel very blessed. Dad who can only work part time is hoping he will find work on some of the local farms. For many years it was believed that most children eventually outgrow juvenile arthritis. Now it is known that half of the children diagnosed will continue to have active arthritis ten years after a diagnosis unless they receive aggressive treatment. Exercise helps maintain muscle tone and helps preserve and

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

recover joint range of motion and function. Ambar has been enrolled in Fundacion Teleton, which is a government funded therapy program in Guadalajara. Since her evaluations by numerous specialists, Ambar has been assigned a rigorous therapy program which she will attend three days per week. Although this means travelling to Guadalajara, both mom and Ambar are hopeful of positive results. Ambar has had to be fitted with special arm and leg splints and now has the use of a motorized wheelchair thanks to Fundacion Teleton. At present, a nonsteroidal antiinfammatory drug seems to be working fairly well. Since joining Niños Incapacitados, we have reimbursed the family 4500 pesos for medicines and transportation. As Director of the Jocotopec Clinic, thank you again for the opportunity of presenting some of our children to you. Just a reminder that the monthly meetings for Niños Incapacitados have resumed. Our next meeting will take place on December 12th, 2013 at the Real de Chapala Hotel in La Floresta, starting with coffee at 10:00 a.m. We invite you to come and meet another one of the children we are helping. If you would like to learn more about Niños Incapacitados, please visit our website at www.programaniños.org or call Rich Petersen (376-765-5511) or Barb Corol (376-766-5452).


10th Annual Lake Chapala Writers’ Conference —Bigger & Better Than Ever %\+DUULHW+DUW

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he Tenth Annual Lake Chapala Writer’s Conference will be bigger and better than ever. We’re trying out a new venue, the Hotel Danza del Sol, with its spacious meeting rooms, generous parking lot and excellent dining room. There will be four presenters, instead of our usual two, and the agenda will include two panel discussions featuring all four, plus six additional 90 minute presentations. During the opening panel discussion, the presenters will describe their personal journeys as authors. Miranda Hill’s presentation on The Basics of Clear Writing and John Scherber’s on The Reader/Writer Relationship will be helpful to the newer writers, as will the closing panel discussion on Creativity and Where Ideas Come From. Seasoned writers can benefit from these presentations as well. Other topics include: Writing the Short Story; Turning Fact into Riveting Fiction, The Real World of Self-Publishing and Seven Ingredients to Make a Scene Sizzle (the first time a presenter has spoken about writing sexy scenes). The four authors who will be presenting this year are highly qualified. Lawrence Hill is the author of nine books. His 2007 novel The Book of Negroes (published in the USA as Someone Knows My Name) won the Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize, the Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best Book and CBC’s Canada Reads. A television mini series based on the novel is currently in production. This past fall Hill gave the CBC Massey Lectures. His new book Blood: the Stuff of Life will air on CBC Radio and is published by House of Anansi Press. Non-registrants who are fans of Lawrence Hill’s will be able to attend the Thursday luncheon (for a $150 pesos ticket) and hear his keynote address. Miranda Hill is a writer of fiction and poetry. In 2011, she won The Writers’ Trust / McClelland & Stewart Journey Prize for her story, “Petitions to Saint Chronic.” Her collection of short fiction, Sleeping Funny, is published by Doubleday Canada. She is currently at work on a novel (Conduct, also for Doubleday Canada), a multi-generational story that weaves between Pittsburgh’s fine houses and steel mills and Muskoka’s cottage country. Miranda received a degree in Drama

Lawrence Hill from Queen’s University and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Today, she writes and reads in Hamilton, Ontario where she lives with her husband Lawrence, and their children. Claudia Long grew up in Mexico City and moved to the United States when she was eleven. She wrote her senior thesis at Harvard on the feminism of Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, and revived her passion for her when she wrote Josephina’s Sin, published in 2011. The sequel, The Duel for Consuelo will be available in the spring of 2014. Claudia lives in northern California where she practices law with her husband. John Scherber, a Minnesotan, settled in Mexico in 2007. He is the author of ten Paul Zacher mysteries, all set in San Miguel de Allende. In addition, two volumes of the Townshend Vampire Trilogy have appeared, as well as his award-winning nonfiction account of the expatriate experience titled San Miguel de Allende: A Place in the Heart. I hope that lakeside’s writing community comes out in full force to learn from these gifted professionals, meet other writers, and help celebrate the literary accomplishments of both presenters and registrants. Conference dates are February 26 – 28th, 2014. The early bird fee is only $1300 pesos for those who register by January 31st. It’s time to sign up. Conference registrations (and luncheon tickets for non-registrants) will be sold at Diane Pearl’s or you can email registrar Victoria Schmidt at victoriaaschmidt@ gmail.com Harriet Hart

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:+(5( (: :(5 5(<2 28,1" (You should have been in Ajijic!) &RXUWHV\RI.D\%RUNRZVNL

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EXICO CITY (AP)-Feb. 2, 1958â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Worried about retiring on that pittance of a pension? Well, perk up! You can live in Mexico for as little as $50 a month! On $90 a month, you can even have a servant. On $150, you can have a three-bedroom home, two servants, entertain and travel around a bit. With $200 and up, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the luxury bracket. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do this in Mexico City or any of the other large cities or in resorts like Acapulco. In the capital, living is high even compared with US cities. Rents have doubled in three years. But there are scores of little paradises scattered all over Mexico, some near cities, where the living is cheap. Take for example the village of Ajijic on the shores of colorful Lake Chapala. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drive northeast of the capital and just 30 minutes from Guadalajara, Mexicoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second-largest city. Montana-born Bob Thayer moved there seven years ago to escape high taxes and the pressure of living in the States. He opened a posada (or inn). He gives these figures and will give you more if you write him care of Ajijic, Jalisco, Mexico. For $50-65 a month, you can rent a room in an ordinary inn, pay $24 a month which includes meals and laundry and have enough left

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

over for clothing, entertainment, drinks, and cigarettes. For this same $24, you could also room and eat with a family that takes in boarders. For $90-100, (which includes most pensioners), you may take a long lease on a home, paying as little as $8 a month rent, then spend a few hundred to modernize it. You may employ a maid, live well and pursue hobbies. For $150, you can rent a two or three-bedroom home, with patio, cooks, maid, lots of entertainment and travelâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and still have a good chunk left over for fun. For $200 and up, you can live high on the hog. Thayer said that he has a four-bedroom home with four baths, servantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; quarters, a cook and two maids. You can buy Mexican-made Bacardi rum for 88 cents a fifth, brandy for $1, tequila for 60 cents a quart, 25 bottles of beer for $1.80. Mexican cigarettes are as cheap as three cents a package, cigars one cent. Regular gasoline is 17 cents a gallon, a car wash 16 cents. Labor is cheap. Bricklayers work for $1.20 a dayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not an hour! Is there much red tape for those who want to live here? No. Most merely use a tourist card, and renew it every six months by returning to the border. You may obtain resident immigration papers if you have a proven steady income (such as a pension) of $160 a month. (Ed. Note: Before we all go get drunk, remember that 50 years from now, people will be saying â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dammit, if only I had been in Ajijic in 2013!)


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“THANKS, BUT NO THANKS” %\0DULO\Q3'DYLV

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he was usually the first one to greet my arrival and always with a big smile. But this morning I was sitting by the fire, drinking my first cup of coffee, before I saw my goddaughter. Immediately I knew something was wrong. Her face was sad. For a few minutes she didn’t say anything, and then as large tears came to her eyes she asked if she had offended me in some way. “Anita, of course not.” I put a consoling hand on her shoulder. “Why would you think that?’ “But, madrina, why would you send me a letter?’ A letter? I had recently sent her a thank-you note. On my visit the week before she surprised me with a set of lovely napkins for my tortillas. She had colorfully embroidered each one with different fruits and flowers and crocheted the edges in a variety of patterns. Of course, I was moved and thanked her profusely. Then, as is our custom, of wanting the thanks to measure up to the thoughtfulness and appreciation of the gift, I also sent a note. I explained that I loved the napkins and wanted her to know, and so sent her a note of thanks. “But why would I be angry?” ‘Well I don’t know. I knew you would like the servilletas but, no one ever sent me a letter. I didn’t know what it meant.” When you’re learning a new language, one of the joys is finding the word that is familiar, a word you already know, can pronounce, and there is a direct translation. Seemingly the Spanish word “gracias’ is one of those joys. We use it numerous times a day; and when someone says, “gracias,” we know they’re saying thank-you. But in Mexican Spanish, the word “gracias” is not a direct translation of “thank-you.” It holds

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

worlds of meaning. Underlying all forms of thanks is a system of interchanges that are meant to define, continue, or terminate the relationship. In casual encounters people will say ‘gracias’ when you do a small favor, buy something from them, or let them pass in front of you. If you give your housekeeper a gift of clothing or food, she may respond “gracias.” This “gracias” is a casual form of courtesy and indicates a distance in the relationship with no further obligation. You may notice that when you give someone a few coins, in lieu of “gracias,” they most often respond with, “Que Dios se lo pague.” Then there are times when you give a friend what you would consider to be nice gift, and her reaction might be to utter an almost inaudible, “gracias” or nothing at all. You may overlook your friend’s lack of enthusiasm, but there is an underlying feeling that she didn’t like the gift, or perhaps you have done something inappropriate. You’ll wonder, why the thoughtlessness in this normally very courteous, formal culture? Make no mistake, this is not ungracious or a lack of interest. Your friend is thrilled to receive your gift. Be patient. Eventually she will respond with a gift or favor that is (in her mind) of the same value or higher than what you gave. This is not one-upmanship or an issue of thanks. Rather your friend is telling you that she holds your friendship in high regard and is doing her part to maintain the bond. If this is an on-going relationship, as evidence and reaffirmation, you must eventually reciprocate with another gift. This is a case in which you can say gracias, but isn’t nearly enough, and won’t be interpreted as thank-you. It’s a fascinating culture, isn’t it?!


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espite a concentrated effort to crack down on pedophiles in both Mexico and the US, child prostitution continues unabated, especially in Mexican tourist towns like Acapulco, Cancun, Puerto Villarta, and most major cities. Most of the tourists who pay for sex with children in Mexico are, Americans, Canadians and European, at a price of 10 to 50 dollars a hit. India, China, Indonesia and Thailand are also notorious for supplying tourists with the same service. Let us keep in mind that it is poverty that puts and keeps our children on the streets in most cases...some of their pimps are their parents or family members. Another twist: in 2009, a Saudi, living in Saudi Arabia, kidnapped and raped 5 children between the ages of 7 and 3 years. The youngest was left to die in the desert. The perpetrators punishment was to be beheaded by sword, his body tied to a cross and his head on a pole as a deterrent to other sex offenders...but, in 2013, a Muslim cleric in Saudi Arabia, raped his 5-yearold daughter with a cane to inflict sexual injuries on her, which killed her. His punishment was a short prison sentence and a fine. Why? Under Islamic Law a man cannot be executed for the murder of his own girl, child or wife. Lydia Cacho Ribeiro, Mexican Journalist, Feminist and Civil Rights activist, published her book Demons of Eden, which dealt with child prostitution rings and the government involvement. Her book was selling badly and it wasn’t until they arrested her in 2005 for speaking out against government corruption that her book and she, skyrocketed to fame. She was released on bail. The word pedophilia originated from the Greek word ‘paidos,’ meaning child, and ‘philia’ meaning love. Sources indicate that sexual relations with children have always existed.  In Classical Greece, sex with a child was to further the child’s education, until the rise of Christianity prohibited incest and homosexuality. In the course of history these attitudes have changed also.  Many people assume pedophiles have to be gay. This was never the

love whom we want, that same sex love is also a natural thing and has been since the beginning of time as we know it, the right to dignity, the right to justice. But why are the rights of children ignored—the silent majority in our midst, the most vulnerable? Our children are our greatest asset and our future. Why have we forsaken them? Poverty in barrios such as Tepehua, the barrio just outside of the bustling tourist town of Chapala, encourages intimacy within the family group. Families of seven to twelve, men, women and children live and sleep in one room. There is no privacy in sexu-

ality, no shame in sex and no way to be discreet about our most primal of instincts...to love.   The counseling in the Community Center of Tepehua, deals with the tip of an iceberg. Educating the next generation, and educating women on Maternal Health and the wisdom of family planning is just a start. The Center is also helping the men to build homes that include hygiene, and a more dignified way of living. Dignity is the right of everyone, and safety and education is the right of every child. The aim of the Tepehua Community Center is to help people help themselves.

case. A pedophile is any man/woman who preys on children. Although most pedophiles are heterosexual men, women are becoming more exposed as capable of the same evil. The growing disclosures of pedophilia is characteristic of the cultural changes of the 20th century, as we become aware of the darker side of societies through advanced communications. We are accepting change in many things, especially the right to

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ublished as something ometh th hin i g of a seasonal gift to Lakeside’s many talented and hardworking writers, to keep them from getting discouraged at this reflective time of year.) 1. Stephen King Mr. King received dozens of rejections for his first novel, Carrie; he kept them tidily nailed to a spike under a timber in his bedroom. One of the publishers sent Mr. King’s rejection with these words: We are not interested in science fiction which deals with negative utopias. They do not sell. 2. William Golding Mr. Golding’s Lord of the Flies was

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rejected by 20 publishers.    One denounced the future classic with these words (which should be inscribed on  the hapless publisher’s  tomb): an absurd and uninteresting fantasy which was rubbish and dull. 3. John le Carré     After Mr. le Carré submitted his first novel, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, one of the publishers sent it along to a colleague, with this message: You’re welcome to le Carré – he hasn’t got any future.  4. Anne Frank

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

  According to one publisher, The Diary of Anne Frank was scarcely worth reading: The girl doesn’t, it seems to me, have a special perception or feeling which would lift that book above the ‘curiosity’ level. Fifteen publishers (other than this dope) also rejected The Diary of Anne Frank.  5. Joseph Heller In an act of almost undiluted stupidity, one publisher wrote of Mr. Heller’s Catch-22: I haven’t the foggiest idea about what the man is trying to say…Apparently the author intends it to be funny – possibly even satire – but it is really not funny on any intellectual level. 6. J.K. Rowling Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s (later Sorceror’s) Stone was rejected by a dozen publishers, including biggies like Penguin and HarperCollins. Bloomsbury, a small London publisher, only took it on at the behest of the CEO’s eight-year old daughter, who begged her father to print the book. God bless you, sweetheart.       7. Ursula K. Le Guin One publisher sent this helpful little missive to Ms. Le Guin regarding her novel, The Left Hand of Darkness: The book is so endlessly complicated by details of reference and informa-

tion, the interim legends become so much of a nuisance despite their relevance, that the very action of the story seems to be to become hopelessly bogged down and the book, eventually, unreadable. The whole is so dry and airless, so lacking in pace, that whatever drama and excitement the novel might have had is entirely dissipated by what does seem, a great deal of the time, to be extraneous material. My thanks nonetheless for having thought of us. The manuscript of  The Left Hand of Darkness  is returned herewith.  The Left Hand of Darkness went on to win both the Hugo and the Nebula awards.  8. George Orwell   One publisher rejected Mr. Orwell’s submission, Animal Farm, with these words: It is impossible to sell animal stories in the USA.  9. Tony Hillerman  Mr. Hillerman, now famous for his Navajo Tribal Police mystery novels, was initially told by publishers to: Get rid of all that Indian stuff.  10. William Faulkner   One publisher exclaimed in the rejection letter for Mr. Faulkner’s book, Sanctuary: “Good God, I can’t publish this!” Moral of all this?—What each writer chooses to make of it.


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y wife has established a home regimen which includes an abominable evening diet which she programs to be ready to serve one hour after my evening toddy; not enough time for even a mild buzz. The supper will be mostly fresh vegetables (the pricey organic kind), and a tidbit of fish or lean meat the size of a deck of cards. I haven’t had a Chicken Fried Steak in six months. I don’t know what happens to the Cokes I bring home because she serves juices and Chinese teas. I realized the seriousness of the problem when the kids started telling me they did not want to stop by for Big Macs and fries; they would spoil their appetites for supper. All this is un-American and cost prohibitive. We need to eat like real folks. What’s wrong with hamburger steak with lots of gravy, white bread and butter? Even more despotic, she limits the children’s’ TV to one hour a day. They are at a loss to discuss with their friends such topics as what’s happening with Justin Bieber and Hanna Banana. When I brought the subject up with their mother, they didn’t even put their books down and help me out. The poor tykes are being brainwashed with constant propaganda. Even though I was out voted four to one in the family conference, I had a plan to save us from total ruin. If things did not change and we start living like real Americans, I was not going to make the payments

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

that due on th the credit th t were d dit cards. d Because of the family’s refusal to negotiate, I did in fact not pay, and the credit card folks began calling and threatening to cancel. Even facing such dire consequences, the wife and the kids offered only insignificant compromises. After the cards were cancelled, we finally agreed that we would leave things as they were for three months and try and work things out in that time. I paid the amounts due on the credit cards, along with late fees. When the credit cards were reestablished, there was a notice that because of the late payments, the interest rates were increased from 12% to 35%. That was tough, but I will fight against all odds to protect the kids from abusive rules and regulations. They deserve the right to choose and learn the truth. I want my children to experience the freedoms to which all patriots are entitled. Let’s just see what they have to say when I tell them that I am not going to make the payment on the home mortgage next month.


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ART HESS—the Dog Guy $3URÀOHE\.D\'DYLV

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o you want a dog that jumps up on people? Do you want your hand bitten if you reach for the food dish? Some dog owners bear bruises or scars on their arms from well-intentioned animals. Other owners may have been pulled down the street with the dog clearly in control, or worse, down onto the sidewalk. Not fun. We want our dogs to be loving companions with good manners. And at Lakeside there is one professional who has worked with both horses and dogs all his life. He can help. In training the basics, there are five primary areas of concern: 1) pulling on the leash, 2) digging, 3) chewing, 4) barking, and 5) nipping and biting. The answer is discipline – for the owner and the dog. How do we get there? It takes time and commitment. The dog is willing and is happier once it understands what we want. So how do we communicate? Step by step to keep it simple for the dog. For us, too. We don’t need language at all, it seems. Remember whales and dolphins at Sea World? Trainers use whistles and clickers with fish for reward. That positive approach is what Art has perfected. He says the old methods for dog training were too rigid and more people-oriented than dogs comprehend easily. All we need is a positive attitude

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

and attention to the dog. Dogs know when we are tense. But when we are happy, it becomes fun. We communicate by motivating and teaching one step at a time, then rewarding the dog, including praise like “good dog.” Art uses hand signals instead of words, a “clicker” to indicate the dog has executed a behavior right and treats as motivation for success. The most immediate thing to learn is that the dog doesn’t understand human language. They will, over time, learn some key words, however. Where did Art come from and what makes him qualified to train dogs? High River, Alberta, is about an hour’s drive south of Calgary. It’s a small town situated in farm country and one of the key people in his life was a grandfather who trained dogs. He said, “Art, watch your dog…she’s telling you stuff. Pay attention.” Art did. For many years he worked with dogs and horses, his two passions. But he also had to make a living. At one point he was a Canadian Horse Show judge. He was also an American Quarter Horse Society judge, director of a race track, and vice president of a very large real estate company in Calgary, Alberta. Along the way he developed business sense while continuing to work with the animals he enjoyed. Meanwhile his wife Barbara was online with a lady who had lived in Ajijic,


Mexico. When they were ready, they headed south. At Lakeside, Art trained horses, including those at an organization located in Ajijic where horses are now rented out to the public. He worked with both handicapped children and the animals they learned to ride to improve their sense of balance. That was before Pasos Milagrosos. He also worked with dogs at the shelter. Art has a column that runs in this magazine. In each, he addresses a problem and tells how to resolve it. For more information, he also has his own website at http://anyonecantraintheirdogbyartthedogguy.blogspot.mx/. You might find it easier to work with one idea at a time, bookmarking the website, and once that idea works for you, move to the next. “I’m a full time trainer who handles

over 100 dogs a year including dogs in my classes and individuals in oneon-one training. I don’t believe a dog is trained until he will perform all the basics off leash in public places. My training days are filled with young dogs (my favorites) and problem dogs (whose main problem is usually at the other end of the leash).” So says Art Hess, whose column in the Ojo del Lago is very popular with its readers. Art is a gentle soul which is why he can walk up to a strange dog and gain that dog’s respect as he leads the animal through a lesson he is teaching, and the dog has fun the whole time. Art Hess, a real modern day Dog Whisperer. PS: My thanks to Jim Tipton, whose on-line article about Art provided me with some background material. Also thanks to Jim for the new photo of Art.

SWINDLERS %\0DUJDUHW9DQ(YHU\

You want to think you nailed a bargain— swindled the Incan or Mayan, the ignoramus by the side of the road who haggled away his country’s patrimony for a pittance and never knew it. You pride yourself in thinking you’re the master swindler, prizing your purchase more for its being ancient, illicit. You know pre-Columbian when you spot it. No mistaking antiquity in the pot’s charred surface or the stained, ragged doll of mummy cloth and corn husk. You could not be wrong. In a market near Cuzco I hit upon my pre-Columbian find—a small Andean flute crafted of human bone, he said. There was some kind of comfort in this relic from a lost kingdom, comfort in complicity, his and mine.

Saw you in the Ojo 33


PEPPERMIN NT REVERIE %\7RP(FN

I

t had been a horrendous shopping day, not to be unexpected just two o days before Christmas. s. I don’t usually don’t delay ay my Christmas shopping, but this year was different. Jenny, my wife of 35 years, my confidant and my love was no longer with me. In March, she had died in a car accident. Until now, I couldn’t bring myself to shop. Six hours of competing with all of the other last minute shoppers, only added to my pain. Peace on earth and goodwill toward men? Not today! “The mall will be closing in 20 minutes,” blared throughout the mall. As I dragged myself toward the exit, one little shop caught my eye—an ice cream parlor. I hadn’t noticed it before, but I suddenly had a hankering for peppermint ice cream making its Christmas season appearance. Inside, was a young girl behind the counter- no more than fifteen. “Young lady, do you have any peppermint ice cream?” “I do have some …and you will be my last customer.” She looked at me as if she knew me. I thought she,too, seemed familiar. Maybe one of the neighborhood kids who grow up so fast that they’re hardly recognizable a few years later. “A single or a double?’ “A single, please.” As she reached over to scoop the ice cream, I noticed something vaguely familiar about the shape of her face and neck. I started to say something, but de-

34

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

cided not to. “ Wow! I’m glad I didn’t order a double. It would have been a frozen w heart attack.” hea She smiled. “ How much do I owe you?” “ Nothing. It’s on the house.” “Let me at least give you a tip.” “No thanks, I don’t need the money”. “Thank you so much. This cone is special to me”. “And me, too. Enjoy” I wasn’t sure what she meant. I smiled and left. Outside the parlor, I found a park bench with varnished oak slats and a shiny black cast iron frame, just like those I often shared ice cream with Jenny. I would devour the soft ice cream in just a few bites, ignoring the oncoming brain freeze. I loved to devour ice cream. I’m not sure why, but it did keep the ice cream from dripping on my clothes. And, I would always finish before Jenny, imploring her with my eyes to share what remained of her cone. It usually worked—but not with peppermint ice cream—her favorite. I stared at the cone. Little bits of white and red peppermint candy perfused the soft creamy body, painting pink swirls of dissolving peppermint, like wisps of a miniature sunset. But this time I savored it, taking slow licks, furrowing the yielding silky sides with the bits of candy dragged by my tongue. Every so often, I nibbled a small bite to capture the little pieces trying to flee from their inevitable destiny, crunching them with my front teeth to release the intense peppermint flavor onto my tongue. Distant memories of times past loomed before me, morphing the mall into a poignant dreamscape of dancing images of Jenny and me. I felt her touch, her fragrance, her essence. We were together again. Suddenly, my surrealistic journey ended and I refocused attention on my icy delight, now gone except for what remained inside the cone. With my tongue, I forced the remaining cool, creamy softness into the deep recesses of the pointed tip. My last bite would be perfect. I popped the crunchy cone into my mouth. The ice cream fused with the cone’s brown sugary taste— a fitting finale to the gastronomical delight that


had rekindled some intense memories and had a made them almost real. I had to have another cone. I started towards to the parlor. But there was nothing inside. Not a counter. No chairs. No signs. Only a gray concrete floor and the metal wall studs. I looked around. I took a few more steps down the hallway—no ice cream parlor anywhere in sight. Once home, I microwaved some leftover spaghetti from the night before. It always tasted better the next day. Jenny said that’s because it had time to marry. Interesting term. But, I guess she was right. After my snack and some late night

TV news, I called it a day--a trying and perplexing one I wrote it off to holiday fatigue and previously unacknowledged loneliness. As I kicked off my shoes, I noticed a small spot, about the size and color of a pencil eraser, on my right shoe. Not sure what it was…almost too exhausted to care. But I picked up the scuffed black loafer to examine it more closely. As I brought it toward my face, I noticed the faint fragrance of peppermint.

Dear Mr. Grattan-Domínguez, I am a retired Mexican ambassador, now residing in Guadalajara (Zapopan, to be exact).  Today, I read the latest edition of that wonderful publication, “Ojo del Lago” I was thrilled to read an article by Rosamaría Casas, a wonderful lady whom I met back in the early seventies, when we both served at the Mexican Embassy in Washington, D.C. I would love to get in touch with Rosamaría.  Would you be kind enough to forward this message to her? Thanking you in advance, I am Sincerely  yours Carlos Gonzalez Magallón

e-mail. Regarding our mutual friend, Rosamaria, we have heard little from her for the past several years. She had left the Lakeside area to relocate in San Luis Potosi, where she still had many friends, some going back all the way to her university days. The last I heard anything about her was some ten years ago, when a colleague  of mine was in San Luis and while visiting a convent saw Rosamaria in one of the apartments. They had known each other at the Ojo, and Rosamaria was quick to say that she had not become a nun, but rather was living there because the rent was very cheap. Late Update: The address/ phone number is Residencia Hogar, Paz y Alegría, A.C., Mariano Otero #481, San Luis Potosí, phone 444) 413-0953 and (444) 811-6466. Buena Suerte!

Our Editor Replies: Dear Mr. Ambassador GonzalezMagallon, Thanks very much for your kind

Tom Eck

Saw you in the Ojo 35


&2:%2< <6+ +(52 2(62) )<(67(5<($5 %\'U/RULQ6ZLQHKDUW

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was heartened recently to learn that Disney has released a new Lone Ranger movie. Back in the forties and fifties, every boy knew that a cowboy’s best friend was his horse. We knew the names of all the cowboys and all their horses. There was Red Ryder, Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Straight Arrow, the Cisco Kid, Lash Larue, Monte Hale, Hopalong Cassidy, Tom Mix, the Lone Ranger and Tonto and, far to the north, Sergeant Preston of the RCMP with his great dog Yukon King. The horses were legendary: Champion, Trigger, Fury, Topper, Tony, Diablo, Silver, Scout, and all the others. The good guys were easily distinguished from the bad guys because they were clean-shaven, wore white hats and rode beautiful white horses or palominos. The good guys drank sarsaparilla, while the bad guys choked down whiskey. Good guys didn’t smoke or cuss, and they toted ivoryhandled six shooters. Bad guys were scruffy and scratchy-looking, wore black hats and rode dirty horses. They were usually hired hands of a smirking villain who rode around in his Sunday best. We grew up against a background of thundering hooves, blaring bugles of the U.S. Cavalry, “six shooters” remarkably capable of firing hundreds of rounds without being reloaded, and thrilling background music, like the William Tell Overture. When we saw a preview for an upcoming Roy Rogers flick, we positively levitated from our seats at the old Downtown Theater in Ashland, Ohio. Walking home from school, we would hold lengthy, learned discussions over who was the greatest cowboy, Gene Autry or the King of the Cowboys himself. To our young minds, these were serious matters. We thrilled equally to the adventures of the great Comanche warrior Straight Arrow, with his great palomino stallion Fury and his gold tipped arrowheads, as he galloped out of his secret cave to do battle with the bad guys. We acquired wonderful treasures by mailing in box tops from tortured breakfast cereals. I still have my Hopalong Cassidy pocket knife, and I have collected those Straight Arrow “Injun-uity” cards from Nabisco Shredded Wheat, with instructions on how to construct a lean-to, build a campfire,

36

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

ride a horse, send smoke signals and identify poisonous reptiles. I wonder whatever became of my Tom Mix U.S. Marshal’s badge with its whistle, signal mirror and compartment for holding secret messages or my Rin-Tin-Tin Fighting Blue Devils U.S. Cavalry flag. We vowed to live by the tenets of the Lone Ranger’s Creed, Gene Autry’s Cowboy Code, Roy Rogers’ Rider’s Rules, the Texas Rangers Deputy Ranger Oath, or Hopalong Cassidy’s Creed for American Boys and Girls. The rule about helping those weaker than oneself could well be resurrected in today’s climate of school bullying. The emphasis upon clean, healthful living would preclude the use of narcotics. We all promised to tell the truth, keep our word, work and study hard, obey our parents, reject racism and bigotry, and be kind to animals. One hears echoes of the Boy Scout Law and the Medieval Code of Chivalry. The violence was well choreographed and totally improbable. There was never any blood spatter or mangled corpses. Roy Rogers never shot anyone in all his movies and TV shows. Rather, he managed to shoot the guns out of the hands of malefactors, a feat I have yet to see repeated in real life. In an interview a few years before his passing, he said movies had become so risqué that he refused to allow Trigger to watch them. The cowboy adventures took place in an Old West that existed only in the imagination. Many today wax nostalgic over the forties and fifties, a time of simplicity and innocence that also exists only in the imagination. And yet, I find myself electrified anew by the promise that the Lone Ranger is about to ride again! Lorin Swinehart


Saw you in the Ojo 37


CELEBRATING DEATH —Mexican Style %\6DPDQWKD5D\

O

ne of the popular songs of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 -1921 is “Valentina.” This woman is visited by her lover, who comes in great danger to see her. His last words upon leaving her are: “If I must be killed tomorrow, let them kill me once and for all today.” This shows how Mexicans, fatalists that they are, accept death uncomplainingly, but also bravely. They fraternize, play and joke with death even while they weep. In their blood is the spirit of adventure, first of their preColombian ancestors, later of their Spanish conquerors. The Day of the Dead, November 2nd, is a national holiday. For days before and after, death is everywhere present, leering invitingly from bakery windows, tianguis stalls, candy shops. Children are given miniature dangling skeletons, little coffins from which a skeleton jumps when a string is pulled, people offer friends a sugar skull with their names on it written with tinsel paper, usually the same color of the person’s eyes. The most spectacular and very artistic manifestation of this celebration is the anahuacalis, or altars to the dead. In those altars, offerings are attractively arranged. Sometimes they are placed on the floor on a new petate (straw mat). More often they are placed on the table with the household favorite saint, covered with an especially nice cloth or one of those china paper rectangles perforated with lovely designs. Pictures of the dead are also on this table, the frames with garlands and wreaths around them. The arrangements are done with all flowers in season, but mainly zempasuchitl (a kind of orange marigold) which is the traditional flower of the dead. The offering includes dishes with maize, rice, beans and peas. Fruits and vegetables are intertwined forming designs. The last artistic touch is the spe-

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

cial candle for each dead soul. The artisans that make them, with beeswax, decorate the stick with lace and flowers, made of the same material. Some are so beautiful that it pains to light them. The celebrations really start the day before, All Saints Day November first, when the angelitos, dead children, are remembered. They do not have special offerings, only candles, some special dish of food or a toy, and are included in the offerings of the adults. Every region of Mexico has its own way of celebrating, although there are more similarities than differences. One of the common practices is for those who are away from home to try and return before the first of November, to avoid the risk of meeting any of the souls on the lonely roads. In general the people comport themselves seriously and keep their children from being too boisterous, admonishing them not to take food from the offerings in order not to incur the displeasure of the souls. Many make an effort to stay awake the nights the souls are in the town, and thus not fall prey to those who carry away the sleepy heads. Others, this is more frequent, go to the bars to enjoy themselves, drinking and gambling at the tables set up for the occasion. Many people spend hours at the town’s cemetery. In cities and villages, anybody who goes to a cemetery, will see people covering the tombs of their beloved with flowers, food and drinks. After the dear departed have been remembered, prayers have been recited for the eternal repose of their souls, the living eat the food and drink the wine. Not infrequently the festivities end with everyone leaving the cemetery in complete state of intoxication, laughing and crying at the same time. Healthy and a good way to drown your sorrow, many say! Nothing like suffering aloud with your relatives and friends!


Saw you in the Ojo 39


The Old Mexican Man %\0DU\0RUJDQ

I

approached Real de Catorce from the north, through a tunnel dug over 9000 feet above sea level, its silver mines now silent. Young boys waited eagerly at the other end, competing to lead me through the maze of ancient ribbon-wide streets to “El Centro,” what remained of a Mexican colonial village ghost town. A small inn, Meson de la Abundancia, was my destination. I parked and turned to press pesos in the chosen child’s palm, then caught a glimpse of the square, its splendor marked for continuing decay. Miguel held the January afternoon sun in his hands as he anchored a corner facing the plaza. Deserted mines, deserted buildings and streets. Deserted minds also? I was keen to discover this remnant of San Luis Potosi’s past. Descending in time, I climbed stairs to an icy corner room whose stone structure had saved it for the ages. Luggage deposited, I hurried back to the great hall heated by frenzied flames flashing. Warmed and wrapped, I waddled toward the plaza, my duck’s neck extended for a closer glimpse of Miguel. One of three vendors along the main village street, the only Mexican, his magnetism drew me with a strength conjured from true believers. Catorce is the spiritual center of the earth. Miguel was perched on a plateau above the Huichol’s sacred valley of peyote. His metal and stone wares lay upon faded fabric. Our introduction and continued awkward signals focused entirely on his work. Semi-

crude semi-pure metals d bracelets, b l i l surrounding semi-precious stones. Multi-faceted, finely carved faces eyed me from different directions. A worn navy pack with webbed trim was crammed with used sacks to pack sales and store his stock each evening. His hands were gentle, long fingers streaked dark and nails ringed black. Perhaps from carving stone or polishing silver to get the glint of the sunlight they reflected still. (Tiffany’s, I remember, is in New York City.) Broken bits of language and laughter transacted a sale, prices crudely printed and hardly a word exchanged. Spanish, English, French? The numbers merged. A carved jade face, flat black and slender, encircling its own depth and dangling two inches below my breasts. I understood little except that time taken to craft this piece was the mark that measured a man. No macho milieu for Miguel. As my retreat to Catorce flew by, I merely caressed Miguel’s work, but he described it infinitely: how long, how much time, how many nights by firelight. I had hardly a clue as to

CORRECTION, PLEASE! Regarding the cover of our November issue, we failed to mention that the painter was Jose Manuel Robles, and Paul Hart the photographer. There was also some confusion in that the cover was directly cononnected with the Feria, though the cover story oryy was about a jazz band. We should have done a much better job on all this, and extend our heartfelt apologies to Paul Hart, Jose Manuel Robles and the Feria. The Staff of El Ojo del Lago

40

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013


the geo-graphics of where each bit of stone or metal originated. But I breathed the freshness of the yielding soil. And I coveted the particular priceless spreads of time spent crafting each piece. In short, I was saturated with Miguel”s satisfaction in his work. I visited and returned to Miguel’s corner. On the second day, I gave him my watch to replace its worn leather with a sturdy silver band. Confidently and casually he left me with all his wares, returning later with tools and silver wire to complete the task. I watched his fingers work the wire,

his head bent low revealing one white wedge in the baseball cap worn backwards to warm the wind. His long dark hair hung in a ponytail, a nicked jacket covering a more tattered sweater beneath. He squatted on the wide stone sidewalk, one sandaled foot before the other, raw laced beige leather protection on which he balanced perfectly. On my third and final night in Catorce, Miguel slipped easily into the inn’s restaurant where I sat by the fire. I sensed that his matted hair, body odor and old, layered clothes might be unwelcome at some ta-

bles. I motioned him to mine. While I ordered another coffee and dessert he continuously fingered something inside a left jacket pocket where he also warmed a gloved hand. Finally he withdrew an eagle taking form on an oval black stone. I looked into dark liquid eyes set under bushy brows. His eyes struck my soul as I struggled to piece words together, words which would not come. I confronted desire and guilt. I was determined to possess this most precious of pieces, though I was short of cash. I signaled Miguel

with “manana,” one of the only Spanish words I knew, while pointing to the plaza. I desperately wanted to be in his presence one more time. Finality sunk in unbidden. Speaking of “manana” had veiled his pockmarked face. His eyes froze with disappointment in me which I could not ignore. “Manana,” he motioned repeatedly for my edification, might never come. All that is given is today. On Sunday morning, I packed my car and turned tentatively to the plaza. Miguel was there, and I walked in his direction.

Saw you in the Ojo 41


2%$0$&$5(,6$%$'/$: %\.HQQHWK*&URVE\

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bamacare is, as conservatives claim, a bad law-but not for the reason they give: government takeover of health care. It is a bad law for precisely the opposite reason: it relies on freemarket capitalism to provide access to health care for everyone, which freemarket capitalism cannot do. Health care insurers in free-market capitalism have only one objective: to make money. Such access to health care as they provide is merely their means of making money. (Providing health care for profit is why such care in the U.S. costs so much more than care in other countries, without producing better results: unnecessary but profitable diagnostic and treatment procedures are used just to make money.) The niece of a friend has been condemned to death by her health insurance company. The company was interested only in collecting as much as

42

possible in premiums and paying out as little as possible for care. Having reached the point at which her care is costing too much, it refuses to provide the care that she needs to stay alive. Former U.S. vice president Richard Cheney recently told a TV interviewer that there was nothing unique about the health care, including a heart transplant, that he had received, at an unusually advanced age and at public

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

expense: “anyone can receive it.” That was a lie. News media briefly reported last year the deaths of much younger Medicaid patients in Arizona because the state claimed that it didn’t have the funds to pay for the transplants they needed. The Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives recently declared yet again that “the U.S. has the best health care system in the world.” Another lie. Millions of Americans lack the access to health care that insurance provides. The politically conservative American Medical Association estimates that 45,000 Americans die annually because they cannot afford to buy the care that they need. No country has been able to provide health care to all its citizens under free-market capitalism. Most patients cannot be the informed consumers making rational purchase decisions that free market theory assumes. Advertisements of drugs, doctors, hospitals, and insurers are, like all advertisements, intended not to inform consumers, but to persuade them to buy. Young, healthy, upper- and middle-class people who can afford to buy health insurance refuse to do so, knowing that the premiums others pay will also pay for their care when they need it. That increases the premiums paid by

those who do buy insurance. Obamacare tries to use free-market capitalism by forcing everyone to buy insurance, telling insurance companies the minimum coverage that their policies must provide, and limiting what they can keep for overhead and profit to twenty cents of every dollar of premiums received. The health care insurers went along with that with the promise that there would be no competing non-profit government run-insurance, the so-called “public option,” though some insurers are now claiming that 20% of premiums is insufficient for overhead and profit. (In stark contrast, non-profit, government-run Medicare’s administrative expense is about 2% of benefits paid out,) Health insurance companies now see a way to overturn Obamacare by informing policy holders that their inadequate policies cannot be renewed, because they do not provide the minimum coverage required, and that continuing their coverage will require significantly increased premiums. Access to health care for all Americans can be provided only if the U.S. adopts a single-payer, publicly-run system like Canada’s or some other country’s in which all citizens are required to pay for health care in the taxes that they pay.


Saw you in the Ojo 43


Sandy Olson

Phone: 331-283-8529 Email: sandyzihua@hotmail.com

PAST EVENTS -DOWHSHF7HFKQLFDO6FKRRORI+RWHO DQG +RVSLWDOLW\ presented a dinner for supporters on October 21. Linda Buckmiller coordinated the event. Her assistant is 6WDFH\+HZLWW. The evening started with hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres created and served by students.

Pictured above, left to right, are students Tere Juarez, Lupe CaĂąada, MĂłnica RĂŹos, and Caty AragĂłn A bonus was the cake presented to Ojo del Lago Editor-in-Chief $OHMDQGUR*UDWWDQ, who does not enjoy getting attention on any of his birthdays, nor does he like having his picture taken. But this cake was in celebration of the Ojoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 30th Anniversary! For further information about Jaltepec Technical School and the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; achievements, contact Linda Buckthorp at buckthorplm@gmail. com. GOLF TOURNAMENT The &UX]5RMD&ODVVLF held at the Country Club de Chapala on November 7 was a huge success. Ninety-six enthusiastic golfers hit the fairways and although no one drove away in a new car or golf cart this year, there were plenty of smiling winners at dinner. Cruz 5RMD0H[LFDQD&KDSDOD'HOHJDWLRQWKDQNVWKH&RXQWU\&OXEGH&KDSDODWKHLUWHUULÂżFVWDII

nationally. She describes herself a self-taught painter whose style is derived from the roots of Mexican culture and primitive universal symbolism. The show continues throughout December. Galeria Sol Mexicano is at Colon 13, Ajijic Centro. Tel: 376 766 0734. Opening times are 10:30- 4:30 Monday through Saturday (closed Wednesdays) and Sundays 12-5. VIVA MUSICA HOLIDAY CONCERT On Friday, December 6, at 6:00 p.m., Viva Musica presents Opera and Christmas Music Between Friends. Featured are the Hermosillo Family Singers: Gaby Zepeda, piano and soprano, Antonio Hermosillo, baritone, Patricia Hernandez, mezzo soprano, and Hector Lopez, baritone. Children Mariana, Lucia and Jorge Hermosillo Hector Lopez, Patricia Hernandez, will sing and play the Baritone Mezzo Soprano violin. Enjoy this wonderful holiday concert in the Auditorium at 6.00 p.m. on Friday, December 6. Tickets available at LCS Thursday and Friday, 10-12, at the auditorium and at Diane Pearl Colecciones. OVER THE RIVER AND THROUGH THE WOODS The upcoming production at the Lakeside Little Theatre is a comedy about an ItalianAmerican family. Now in rehearsal, Over The River and Through the Woods runs from December 6 to 15. Ann Swiston is the director.

Left to Right: Georgette Richmond, Ed Tasca, Heather Hunter, Kevin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Byrne, Kenneth Bridges, Peggy Lord Chilton 2013 winners. From the left, Bruce Barman, Dalton Senorita, Mike Daniels, Janis Phair and Charles Temple. the generous sponsors, tireless volunteers and all participants for a wonderful day. COMING EVENTS ART SHOW AND RECEPTION The Lake Chapala Painting Guild is presenting New Works at the Ajijic Cultural Center. The opening reception is January 4 from 4 to 6. The show continues until January 16. Featured artists are %HWW\ 3HWHUVHQ &DURO $QQ 2ZHUV *HUDOGLQH &ODVVHQ -RDQ /RZQGHV/RLV6FKURII6WHYH$FKV9DUQ:LQQLH+XQW&\QWKLD'X%RLV,QD*LH\V]WRU+HOHQ0DULH.UXVWHY1DQF\*UD\and0DU\$QQ/LQKDUW CENTRO CULTURAL GONZALEZ GALLO The Music Department of the University of Guadalajara and the Centro Cultural Gonzalez Gallo presents recitals at the old train station in Chapala. The following piano recitals are offered in December: Thursday, December 5 Jorge SĂĄnchez Wednesday, December 11 Azael Medeles These events are free and open to the public. They begin at 6:30. ART SHOW AND RECEPTION The works of &ODXGLD1HU\ will be featured at Galeria Sol Mexicano on Friday, December 6, from 3 to 6:30 pm. The gallery will offer opening night discounts. The artist has lived at Lakeside for many years, and has a great following here as well as

44

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

The play, by American playwright Joe DiPietro, is set in Hoboken, New Jersey, where all four of Nick Cristanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grandparents live. Although Nick works in the city, and his parents have retired and moved away, he still takes the bus to see his grandparents for dinner every Sunday. 7LFNHWV DUH  SHVRV DQG FDQ EH REWDLQHG DW WKH //7 %R[ 2IÂżFH IURP  DP WR  noon on the Wednesday and Thursday before opening and every day during the run of the show â&#x20AC;&#x201C; or one hour before curtain time for each performance. 7KH ER[ RIÂżFH RSHQV WKH :HGQHVGD\ EHfore opening night (Friday) and from 10-12 every day except Sunday until the show is sold out. It is also open an hour before each performance. )XWXUH3OD\V January 17-26 Blood Relations February 21-March 4 Hooray for Hollywood! March 28-April 6 Social Security CONCERT AT THE TRAIN STATION Two artists are in concert at the Centro Gonzalez Gallo (old train station) in Chapala on Sunday, December 8 at 4 pm. -RUJH7DGGHR, tenor, will perform songs by Dowland, Campi-


Saw you in the Ojo 45


on, Caccini, Handel, Mozart, Schubert, Sor, Diabelli and others. -LP%\HUV is the accompanist on the classical guitar. Jorge Taddeo is well known in Mexico and beyond. He is a specialist in German Lieder and French Chanson. He performed a solo concert to a packed Teatro Degollado on the November 12, to a standing ovation. Jim Byers, classical guitarist, has performed internationally. He has studied with Mexican teachers David Mozqueda and Philip Rosheger, and in master classes with Oscar Ghiglia, Alfred Deller, Paul Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;dette and Philip Rosheger. LOS CANTANTES HOLIDAY CONCERT Traditions - Christmas & Hanukkah - is the theme of this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s holiday concert, featuring the talented voices of Los Cantantes del Lago, Lakesideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s well-known community choir. Led by 7LPRWK\*5XII:HOFK, Music Director, the concert will combine Christmas and Hanukkah traditions in song and promises to make the season warm and full of memories for all. Welch has found very rich and satisfying musical selections that will please all our friends at Lakeside, including songs in Hebrew, Latino, English and other languages. A clarinetist who performs in the Klezmer style will accompany some of the Hebrew pieces and, as always, the fabulous Eleanor Stromberg will accompany on piano. Concerts are Tuesday, December 10, at 7:00 and Wednesday, December 11, at 4:00. A cash bar will open one hour before performances. Seating is general admission. Tickets are 250 pesos, available at Diane Pearl Colecciones, Miaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boutique, by contacting any Los Cantantes member, or by emailing Kathleen Carlson at cantantesdellago@gmail.com. CELEBRATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS The &KDSDOD &XOWXUDO &LWL]HQV &RXQFLO is organizing a December 10 event for the Celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights 65th Anniversary. The purpose is to disseminate and educate all individuals about their human rights in order to stand up for them against abuse, crime and violence. Artists of all disciplines--artists, performers, dancers, poets, and writers--will participate. The celebrations will be December 9 and 10 in the Ajijic Plaza. Closing will be at the Jocotepec Cultural Center on December 11. For more information call 356-766-0948 or email celebracionderechoshumanos@gmail. com BEHIND THE WALLS HOME TOURS Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that time of year again when the kind people of Ajijic let us look behind the walls of their beautiful homes to help a worthy causeâ&#x20AC;ŚThe Lakeside School for Special Needs Children,IRUPHUO\WKH6FKRROIRUWKH'HDI7KHÂżUVWRIWKHVHKRXVHWRXUVWRRNSODFHRQ November 21 and it was a great success. The next event, the Christmas tour, will take place on December 12. Four beautiful homes will be decorated for Christmas and the Christmas party will be held at the fourth house. The ticket will include a glass of wine and appetizers as well as entrance to the party. Those taking the Christmas tour will meet at the Ajijic Pier at 5:15 p.m. Tickets for this run out quickly so pick them up as soon as possible. Three more dates have been set: January 23, February 27, and March 27. The meeting time/place for these is 10:15 at the Ajijic pier. This is one of the most successful series of events of the season. Tickets for all these tours are available at Diane Pearlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s or Charter Club Tours at Plaza Montana. For further information, contact: Cece Girling, 376-766-3964, or Leslie Martin, 376-766-2274, or Shirley West, 376-766-4997. 23(5$,1*8$'$/$-$5$ Viva Musica is sponsoring a bus trip to Guadalajara and Live from the Met Simulcasts IRUWKHÂżQDORSHUDRIWKHVHDVRQ)DOVWDIIE\9HUGL7KHSHUIRUPDQFHLVRQ6DWXUGD\'HFHPber 14 at noon. The bus leaves Ajijic at 10.30 a.m. Tickets are available at the Lake Chapala Society, Thursdays and Fridays 10-12, or contact M. Krantz at mak1939@gmail.com. The cost is 300 pesos for Viva members, and 400 pesos for non-members. Viva Musica OperaTrips in 2014 Saturday, February 8 at noon Dvorak, Rusalka. Bus leaves 10.30 a.m. Saturday, March 1 at 11.00 a.m. Borodin, Prince Igor. Bus leaves 9.30 a.m. Saturday, March 11 at 11.00 a.m. Massenet, Werther. Bus leaves 9.30 a.m. Saturday, April 5 at 11.00 a.m. Puccini, La Boheme. Bus leaves 9.30 a.m. Saturday, May 3 at noon, Mozart, Cosi Fan Tutti. Bus leaves 10.30 a,m, Saturday, May 10 at noon, Rossini, La Cenicienta. Bus leaves 10.30 a.m. THE VOICE OF THE TURTLE The Naked Stage production of The Voice of the Turtle, by John van Druten, deals with the challenges of the single life in New York City during World War II. Controversial in its time, the play explores the sexual struggles of Sally Middleton, a young woman attempting to reconcile her childhood teachings on the importance of chastity with her newfound affection for Bill Page.

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

Because this show is in the Christmas season, the Naked Stage will be offering a free glass of wine after each performance. The show is performed December 27, 28, and 29 at 4 pm. Save these dates for upcoming Naked Stage productions: January 31, February 1 and 2 And Miss Reardon Drinks a Little February 1, 2 and 3 Comic Potential March 21, 22 and 23 Breaking the Code Left to right: Robin Lawrason, ColApril 25, 26 and 27 lette Clavadetscher, Damyn Young, Liz Taking Leave The e-mail address White and the director, Jim Lloyd. for future reservations: nakedstagereservations@gmail.com or phone Michelle at 765-6408. The Naked Stage is located at #10A Rio Bravo. Directions: west on the carretera from Ajijic, south on Rio Bravo, about two blocks down behind Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant on the east side. Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is open for lunch and dinner with a no host bar available at 3:00 p.m. The box opens at 3:15 and the show starts at 4:00 p.m. ),6+)$50,1*,1/$.(&+$3$/$ /X]GH0DOOD$&LVDORFDO0H[LFDQQRQSURÂżWDVVRFLDWLRQDLPHGDWEDODQFLQJWKHHQvironmental protection of Lake Chapala, while at the same time guaranteeing the stream of sustenance for rural Lakesiders. The main interest is education among Lakeside rural ÂżVKLQJFRPPXQLWLHV /X] GH 0DOOD 3URMHFW JRDOV DUH WR FKDQJH WKH PRGHO RI WUDGLWLRQDO ZLOGFDXJKW ÂżVKLQJ WRÂżVKIDUPLQJLQĂ&#x20AC;RDWLQJFDJHVLQVLGH/DNH&KDSDODDQGWRSURJUDPKDUYHVWLQJRIÂżVKWR assure continued supply all year long, v. a FORVHGÂżVKLQJVHDVRQ To learn more about how to contribute to the project, contact Karuna Gomez Mont, luzdemalla@gmail.com. Tel (376) 766-2610, cell 333-101-8092. -$==*5($763/$<$-,-,& Ninos Incapacitados presents the internationally acclaimed Guido Basso Quartet, with smoky-voiced guest singer Molly JohnVRQZKRZLOOSHUIRUPWZREHQHÂżWFRQFHUWVDW the Auditorio in Ajijic on Saturday, January 11 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, January 12 at 2:30. Guido Basso on Trumpet The other members of the Guido Basso Quartet are Mike Murley on saxophone, Reg Schwager on guitar and Steve Wallace on bass. Please email Ninos Incapacitados at jazz.ppni@gmail.com to add your name to our V.I.P (Very Interested People) list, for ticket availability and other information. All proceeds from WKHFRQFHUWVZLOOJRWREHQHÂżWWKHFKLOGUHQLQWKHSURJUDP7LFNHWVDUHSHVRV -$/,6&267$7(&+2,5 Viva la MusicaSUHVHQWVWKH-DOLVFR6WDWH&KRLUIHDWXULQJIRUW\ÂżYHSURIHVVLRQDOVLQJers, directed by Sergio, in a program of classical music, operatic choruses, and Mexican music, on January 23 at 6 pm. Admission is 200 pesos for Viva members, and 300 pesos general admission. Students are free. Contact Rosemary Keeling at rosemarykeeling @hotmail.com for information. /$.(6,'(:5,7(56Âś&21)(5(1&( Hold the weekend of February 26-28 for the tenth anniversary of the Lakeside Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Conference. This yearly event starts with a no-host cocktail party on Friday, February 26. The venue will be Danza del Sol in West Ajijic. Lawrence Hill, prominent Canadian author of The Book of Negroes and other works, will be one of the featured speakers. This book is available in the USA and on Amazon.com under the title Somebody Knows My Name. Registration for the weekend conference will be 1500 pesos, with an early bird discount to 1300 pesos. Registration forms are available at Diane Pearl Colecciones. For further information, contact Victoria Schmidt at victoriaaschmidt@gmail.com. ONGOING EVENTS American Legion in Chapala Saturdays: 3:30 - 6:30 p.m. Fish Fry Sundays: Burgers & Dogs 12 - 3 p.m. $MLMLF6RFLHW\RIWKH$UWV Members of ASA will show their art works on the third Sunday of the month through April, on the Ajijic plaza. The next event will be on December 15, from 10:00 to 2:00.


Saw you in the Ojo 47


TIMOTHY RUFF—The Man Behind the Smile %\+HUEHUW:3LHNRZ

R

ecently a Guadalajara friend went to a concert at Teatro Degollado where his friend gave a voice recital sponsored by the Secretary of Culture of Jalisco. My friend, Juan Carlos, asked me if I knew the American accompanist with a big smile because the soprano told him that Timothy was the best accompanist she had ever sang with. Tim does have a large and earnest smile; I think of it as a stage smile, only his is not just for an audience; it is because he is genuinely happy accompanying talented people in public. Most of us here at Lakeside already know about Timothy G. Ruff Welch, or Tim, as he is most commonly called; although there is nothing common about this talented musician and excellent choral director. But since he is such a busy man it can be difficult to know him personally so I invited Tim to coffee. He gave me three time slots for the month of October. Tim grew up on a Wisconsin dairy farm, the eldest of three children. Besides the milk cows, his family commercially grew peas, corn and cabbages. Like all farm boys he competed state wide in 4H projects, where he won numerous Blue Ribbons. “Almost everyone in my family played a musical instrument,” said Tim. Mostly they played popular and ethnic music. His parents let him begin piano lessons at the age of four; his first teacher was an aunt. His parents recognized his passion for music and made a bargain; if he practiced his music, he would be excused from farm chores. He shared that as he grew up, his family never listened to classical music, and that his first exposure was when he was twelve and his grandmother took him to visit the Northern European countries, his ancestral roots. While in Helsinki, they went to the Temppeliaukio Church to hear an organ concert. “Never before had I heard such glorious music. It changed my life,” Tim said. Eventually he earned a Masters in Coaching and Accompanying in Cincinnati, at only one of three schools to offer such a degree at that time. His degree allowed him to accompany choirs and singers/instrumentalists and to go on world tours with his groups. “I got to live my two passions, music and travel,” he said. For twenty years he worked hard in

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

Chicago but like so many he reached a point where he needed to relax and do something for himself. Tim took out his map and blindly selected Guadalajara, a place he had never visited. Over coffee we talked about his hectic schedule. During the year he will conduct or accompany fifteen to twenty concerts, which means hours of rehearsals, both for the individual soloist and for the entire ensemble or choir. He is the musician for Saint Andrews Anglican Church in Riberas, as well; he gives about twenty private voice and piano lessons per week. Whenever one of his students or talented friends needs an accompanist, he spends hours rehearsing with them, so that they are both perfect. It takes hours of working together to be synchronized, even when the music gives the tempo and the scale gives the pitch, there is so much more involved. He feels so fortunate to be able to live his passion. I think his schedule would wear anyone else down, or drive them to drink. We talked about what he dreams of, and Tim divulged that he would love to have a quality boys’ choir. “There is talent here, but it takes time, commitment and funds to successfully put this together.” Tim lived in Guadalajara for two years before coming to Lakeside; he now owns two homes, one here and one in the city because those commutes can be grueling. His wonderful Holiday Concerts are on almost everyone´s schedule and this year Los Cantantes del Lago will present a concert called Traditions — Christmas and Hanukkah, at the newly remodeled Auditorio de la Ribera on December 10 and 11. Tickets are available at Diane Pearl Colecciones, Mia’s Boutique or by writing Herbert W. cantantesdellago@ Piekow gmail.com.


Saw you in the Ojo 49


PARACHO—The Guitar Capital of Mexico %\5DOSK)*UDYHV

F

ew will argue that Mexico would be quite the same without its guitars: Mariachis with their lively ranchero renderings, strolling folk singers ready to burst into song at the drop of a few pesos, even local Romeos serenading their favorite senoritas-all rely on the guitar to enhance their performances. And, very likely, the guitar they rely upon was made in the Michoacan village of Paracho. Surrounded by pine-clad mountains, Paracho lies in the heart of Tarascan Indian country. Long before the Spanish Conquest, the Tarascans were noted for their skills in crafting wood, copper and pottery; and even then

50

Paracho was an important center for the manufacturing of drums, flutes, whistles and other instruments they traded to the Aztecs. The very name Paracho means, in the Tarascan language, “home of the instrument makers.” The modern craft of guitar making here had its origins in the vocational schools founded by the 16th century bishop, Vasco de Quiroga, who had designated different crafts for the various Tarascan villages. Paracho was assigned guitars, with the classic Spanish-type guitar serving as a model. For generations the training and skills acquired in the colonial schools were handed down from father to son,

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

along with the rudimentary tools used in the manufacturing process. Today, Paracho produces not only the familiar 6 and 7-string guitars, but violins, cellos, bass guitars, and the small, highpitched guitars called requintos. Well over three-quarters of all the guitars produced in Mexico are made here, with something like 60% of the population engaged in some aspect of their manufacture and sale. Paracho’s main street demonstrates the predominance of this industry. Varied displays of guitars and other stringed instruments of all sizes beckon from the windows of retail stores, while numerous small workshops lining both sides of the street proudly display samples of their wares. One such place is the shop of Luis Silva, the Aguila Real (the Royal Eagle). Luis, now in semi-retirement, leaves the day- to-day operations to his sons, Juan and Francisco. As one enters the shop, finished guitars hang from the ceiling. Wood shavings carpet the floor. Shells of future instruments are fined up, bound in heavy twine to hold them together while the glue sets. Others, in various stages of production, are carefully hung against the walls. At the workbench, the Silva brothers are busily shaping, sanding and gluing the wood that will become the famed Paracho guitars. The Silvas proudly specialize in the finer instruments—those used by professional and concert guitarists. “Fine guitars take as long as a month to complete, as opposed to just a few days for a guitarra corriente,” explains Francisco. “But of course that does not include the aging and treating of the woods, which by itself can take as long as five months. Different types of wood are used for various parts of the guitar, and each type has an effect on the quailty.” Although the forests surrounding Paracho yield an ample supply of oak, cedar, magnolia and rosewood—all of which are used in various parts of

the finished instruments—the Silvas import some of their wood from as far away as Brazil and Australia. Francisco Silva explains that other factors, as well, are responsible for the overall quality and tone of the finished product. For instance, the thickness of the wood used in the body will affect the vibration and depth of tone. The methods used in gluing, even the number of coats of varnish, determine the instrument’s ability to retain its tone, regardless of changes in weather and humidity. Yet with the growing popularity in Mexico of rock groups and their electronic instruments, one would imagine that the acoustical guitar business might be on the wane. “Not so,” says Juan Silva. “The acoustic guitar is still the single most popular instrument in all Mexico. Almost anyone can learn to play it, and you can take it anywhere. You don’t have to worry about finding an electrical outlet, or carrying along a lot of speakers, or learning how to adjust the electronic equipment. Besides, I do not know of anyone who doesn’t love to hear a well-played acoustic guitar.” The state government has invested many millions of pesos in the local industry; yet guitar-making in Paracho remains essentially a family affair. For those interested in seeing work in progress, a polite inquiry at any of the small shops should elicit a friendly welcome. An ideal time to visit Paracho is during the Annual Guitar Fair in August, when the village is filled with musicians, tourists, dealers and retailers— all shopping for the treasured Paracho guitars. The village is easily accessible from Uruapan, lying 35 kilometers north of the city, via Highway 37. It can also be reached from Morelia or Guadalajara by taking Highway 15 to the town of Carapan, and turning south on Highway 37 for about forty kilometers. The nearest overnight accommodations are in the city of Uruapan.


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Focus on Art %\5RE0RKU UREPRKU#JPDLOFRP

Women Artists on the Edge

J

ulie Elizabeth Mignard, http://julie-mignard. fineartamerica.com/ In contrast to paintings that are “composed” based on what was seen, Julie Mignard’s painting Divine Reflection (photo), with its spiritual and emotional power, enriches a viewer’s appreciation of abstract art, an art which exist independent from visual references. Julie uses paint as the primary ‘objective subject’ of her art, while juxtaposing the qualities of form, color, and line to create paintings that both emit and elicit emotion. “I can’t stand it if I don’t paint every day. Painting was the way I broke free of an earlier restrictive relationship with a man. I paint to let my emotions out, and to share my innermost feelings and spiritual yearnings.” Julie studied art as a child, and took advanced art classes at the Springfield Missouri College, where she learned to “let her hair down” and be responsive to the artist inside of her. Later, an experience with a juried show, where the judge rejected her painting, had significant impact on her growth as an artist. “I went home and threw my painting into a corner and stared at it realizing that it was not a work I was proud of. Emotionally distraught I threw all of my paint at the rejected painting. It took a month to dry. This rejection, coupled with the positive qualities created by the thrown paint, had a powerful effect on my future works.” Julie’s paintings combine, oil paint, acrylic, with dry pigment and glitter rubbed in to create a textured surface that exists in a nuanced relationship with the spiritual drama created by broad areas of color that push and pull against one another to create a sense of infinite space. On a different tack, Monica Petrowitsch’s iconographic works Frank Lloyd Wright and Girl’s Best Friend (photo) have strong symbolic and iconographic presence. She combines layers of mirrors, glass and

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

paint (impossible to photograph) to create spatial illusions with shifting planes of light and color that pull viewers into the work’s depths. She scrapes away part of the silvered back of the mirrors and pours liquid colors to fill the void. Working blind, she senses how the colors will add dimension to the finished artworks. “At the age of five, sunlight chose me. I saw a beautiful design in a museum where the interior colors of the frame reflected by the sunlight captured me spiritually. Since then, I have loved to bounce light and color

around. I collect scrap glass and mirrors and assemble them to create worlds dominated by the refraction of light.” The ambience of Ajijic has become Monica’s inspiration. “The clear light at Lakeside enables me to experience the beauty of sunlight and to capture it in the layers of mirrors and glass—to reflect the light over and over before releasing it.”   Monica’s works, initially influenced by her career as an Interior Designer, have become the works of a creative artist. Her more symbolic works function as icons that express our cultural preoccupation with technology. Icons touch things the mind already knows. They are hybrid objects,


cultural statements that reflect desires and feelings, and encapsulate ideas and beliefs. They are reference points—like Rita Hayworth as a Hollywood pinup, Gloria Steinem’s Wonder Woman fixation, Jasper John’s neo-Dada American flag as a cold war symbol, and Andy Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe as a cultural object. www.articons.co.uk/warhol. htm The art works of both Julie and Monica may be enjoyed at Sol Mexicana, #13 Colon in Ajijic. Rob Mohr

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PLANE TRAVEL AT CHRISTMAS %\(G7DVFD D

M

any off you are ae about to send yourself lff off again into a e torment like none n ever noted in n Dante. You’ll soon n-be getting on anh other plane, which ng g is currently nothing crroo-more than a macroo omvariation of the common sausage. As I recall reca re c lll from past trips, I could ould have havve been stuffed into a h hockey k bag b g and a d an gotten dumped into cargo and had a pleasanter journey. And according to those who measure these things, passenger seat space allotment has never been so stingy. I can put up with just about any insanity related to flying in a commercial airliner, including security checks and interminable customs and immigration fuss. The one thing I consider to be the ultimate sacrifice in order to catch up with family and friends thousands of miles away is flying around for several hours in 1 and 1/3 feet of space, ergonomically designed for the spatial needs of a capuchin monkey (a creature needing little personal space because he can do things like wash his face with his tongue). Humans aren’t monkeys, at least not until we land. According to CNN: CNN (November, 2013): You’re not imagining it: Airline seats are generally getting smaller. But while many airlines have been slimming down their seats over the past few decades, we’ve been bulking up. According to the World Health Organization, the global prevalence of obesity has doubled since 1980. Your 1 and 1/3 feet of space reduces further by overlapping from the two BIG co-passengers who almost always squeeze in on either side of you (and aren’t really big at all, but get bigger the moment they sit down). There is usually convivial acceptance all around, and an immediate forgiveness when your row mate gropes your buttock on his way to finding his seatbelt buckle, and then assumes immediate possession of the arm rest, squeezing you into even tighter quarters. Your carry-on bag then goes under the seat in front of you, leaving limbs mortified and

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

unmoving and unmovi unm unmo un movi ving ing n either dumped inside your carryon, crushing your bag of pretzels or pinched beneath your own seat with the potential for a deep-vein thrombosis and possible death. So inside and over the bag they go, given that your dying in mid-flight would make it impossible for co-passengers to enjoy the in-flight movie, It’s a Wonderful Life. As a quick distraction from the discomfort, you snare Sky Mall Magazine. It’s unfailingly right there in front of you, as ubiquitous as the Gideon bible. It also fits into the last remaining space in front of you. But you never get to read much of it, because very shortly the guy in front of you decides to lower his seatback into your lap, giving you the eerie feeling the guy is looking for a shave. At this point, it becomes luminously clear without the need of scientific explanations why animals in zoo cages refuse to mate. And… often eat their keepers. This situation continues to exist after almost fifty years of modern airline development and advancement, because cutting internal spatial capacity to human sausaging is an airline’s key to profitability, despite the Geneva Conventions prohibiting human sausaging. According to airline experts, here’s how the capacity/profitability math works: You take the basic measure of airline revenue production, something called the Revenue Passenger Mile (RPM). An RPM is one passenger seat flying one mile, and, of course, if that seat is travelling on its own without the rest of the plane, it’s in violation of FAA regulations—and a sure lawsuit. Now, to calculate the value of a single customer to the airline, you divide your ticket price by Revenue Passenger Miles travelled, say 500


miles. This gives you something to do during flight delays while you sit eating airport food and wishing you had taken the bus or even a forced military march. If a customer pays $250.00 for the 500-mile trip mentioned above, the revenue yield would be 50 cents per mile per person, including gratuities, which airlines claim is cheaper than calling a cab and avoids all traffic lights. The obvious problem with this argument is that nobody takes a cab from New York to Los Angeles—at least not sober. This is the rationale used to squeeze into their sausage skin as many passengers as possible, so they can say it’s cheaper to fly than to take a cab. Anyway, while all this is spinning through your thoughts, it’s always nice to hear the snack trolley coming, right? Except that now, down comes the place-mat sized tray in front of you. This tray just fits under the sleeping head of the imbecile in front of you. But it further compresses your only moveable body part, your diaphragm, into a tortilla. All space around your body has now left you more or less with the freedom of a shrink-wrapped fish fillet. Not surprisingly, the overweight man next to you interrupts your in-flight repast just as

you are savoring your fourth peanut. He has to go to the washroom. This requires everyone in your row to get up, jostle through body contact reminiscent of a Sumo-wrestler attack. Unable to shrink physically any further for the rest of the trip, you take the equivalent of a spy’s arsenic pill, your sedative of choice. After a few minutes, you shrink to total disembodiment and disappear from the plane entirely. Ed Tasca

Saw you in the Ojo 55


FRONT ROW CENTER THE HEIRESS By Ruth Goetz & Augustus Goetz Directed by Roseann Wilshere 5HYLHZE\+DUULHW+DUW

A

udiences are calling The Heiress the best production Lakeside Little Theatre has done in years. Does it deserve such high praise and if so, why? I attended the play closing night and was fortunate to hear first hand from cast and crew. Director Roseann Wilshere said: “A play is like making a stew – you never know how it will turn out in the end. There was magic to this production from the outset.” All the ingredients that went into Roseann’s stew pot worked. Although The Heiress is a period drama set in the 1800’s, it’s relevant today. We can still relate to conflict between parent and adult child. Is the stern father trying to protect his plain daughter from the handsome devil who is wooing her out of paternal love or is he more concerned about his fortune getting into the wrong hands? Should the timid young heiress marry the fortune hunter knowing full well he’s just after her money? Is her self respect more important than being part of a couple in a society where spinsters are pitied? The members of the audience I spoke to after the final curtain were all discussing these issues as if the play were real life. To my mind, a period piece requires a beautiful set and fabulous costumes to seduce the audience. When the curtains opened on The Heiress there was a communal gasp followed by hearty applause. Beth Cathcart, a retired interior designer, had never designed a theatre set before, but told me she threw herself into the challenge, watched the film version, studied domestic furnishings of the period and sketched the rooms she wanted. Working with Alex Pinkerton and a skilled construction crew, Beth put together a magnificent Victorian drawing room worthy of a Washington Square home of the period. The costumes were mouth dropping. The men wore morning suits and top hats, the ladies divine dresses, hats and capes. Wardrobe designer Karin Eichler and seamstress Johanna Clark created perfect outfits and nine dressers got the actors in and out of over

56

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

30 costume changes without a hitch! The Heiress was a visual treat thanks to the talented crew guided by a beloved director who according to stage manager Margo Eberly “cares about every single thing she puts on the stage.” The stage manager “kept everyone in line” and assistant director Michael Warren supported them both as he modestly put it, “by showing up regularly.” None of this would matter without a superb group of actors. As Dr. Austin Sloper, Tony Wilshere was the most natural actor on stage. His autocratic father figure was chilling yet sympathetic. Diana Rowland played flighty chaperone Aunt Lavinia with wide-eyed enthusiasm. Her vicarious pleasure at Morris Townsend’s wooing made me wonder if she was actually going to run off with him herself. Ken Yakiwchuk as Morris charmed and repelled me by turns. I wanted to believe he was a sincere suitor even when his body language told me otherwise. At the beginning Jayme Littlejohn as Catherine Sloper was so self-effacing, so pitiful that there were times when it was hard to watch her. By the final scene, Jayme had transformed her character into a strong woman unwilling to spend her adult life with a husband who didn’t love her, after spending her childhood with an uncaring father. The leading actors were backed by a strong supporting cast: Judy Long as the maid Maria, Arlene Pace as the realistic Aunt Elizabeth Almond, Caroline McCormack as popular cousin Marian, Kathleen Morris as Morris’s loyal sister, and Geoff Long, on stage for the first time, as Marian’s husband. Director Roseann Wilshere says she was privileged to direct such a play. “Only at Lakeside would I get the opportunity.” I think Lakeside audiences are equally privileged and predict the rest of the season will be first rate. The Heiress has raised the bar.


1?<E.FLI@E>(L;@JKFCFE@<J %\0 0DUJLH. .HDQH %\0DUJLH.HDQH The tour guide says …and please don’t stare from neck to knees Don’t be rude, don’t look askance When touring nudist colonies. To make this easier for you, please Pretend they’re wearing skirts, pants, And please don’t stare from neck to knees Never let your vision freeze On anybody’s elegance When touring nudist colonies And be sure it’s just the hand you squeeze If they invite you to a dance, And please don’t stare from neck to knees. You won’t see any fripperies, No lifts, no girdles, no implants When touring nudist colonies, But feel the natural harmonies, Notice their insouciance And please don’t stare from neck to knees When touring nudist colonies.

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BRIDGE BY THE LAKE %\.HQ0DVVRQ

In order to become a consistently good bridge player it is very useful if one is a pragmatist. By this I mean the game cannot be learned and played by rote, one must constantly be prepared to alter strategies as conditions change at the table. The diagrammed hand occurred in a matchpoint duplicate game where overtricks are invaluable and where declarer was forced to find an alternative line of play when the opening lead was not to his liking. With East and West silent throughout, South dealt and opened 1 spade and North responded 2 diamonds which in their “2 over 1” system was forcing to game. South’s rebid of 2 hearts brought a 2 no trump bid from North which showed a balanced hand with clubs (the unbid suit) guarded. South felt his distributional holding favored a suit contract so he jumped to 4 spades to close the auction. West led a low trump and South paused to consider his options. The first thing he noticed was that, without a spade lead he could have played three rounds of hearts in an attempt to ruff a loser in the dummy. The opponents’ hearts were statistically more likely to be divided 4-2 rather than 3-3 so he could well have 2 losers in that suit if he

couldn’t ruff at least one. The opening lead scotched that idea and it was time to change plans. South called for the spade 10 which was covered by the jack and king. He then played his solitary club towards the dummy and called for the queen. This was a relatively risk free move as even if the finesse lost he could later pitch one of his losing hearts on the club ace. However, the queen won the trick and now declarer looked around for more opportunities. He next cashed the ace and king of diamonds and crossed to the spade ace receiving the gratifying news that jack of trumps was falling. Now declarer called for the diamond 10 and got more good news when the queen fell, establishing the jack for another heart pitch from his hand. Now all that remained was for declarer to return safely to his hand with the heart king, draw the opponents’ last trump with his spade 9, return to dummy with the heart ace and discard his losing clubs on the ace of clubs and jack of diamonds. All in all this partnership scored 710 points for taking all the tricks and a near top in duplicate comparisons. You will have noticed that scoring 13 tricks is the equivalent of making a grand slam but of course it was not biddable. In fact, bidding even a small slam would have been extremely risky and quite anti-percentage. North and South only held a total of 28 high card points, well below the recommended 33 usually accepted as the minimum requirement for contracting a 12-trick slam. But the beauty of the duplicate game is that the combination of a skillful declarer and a little luck in the distribution meant that this partnership received almost the same match point score as though they had bid and made the grand slam! Questions or comments: email: masson. ken@gmail.com Ken Masson

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013


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A WEIGHTY ISSUE By Neil McKinnon

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t’s an axiom that, with the passage of time, pets and their owners begin to look alike. The axiom is at least partially true. As the obesity rate soars in North America, many pets are becoming more pot-bellied. Veterinarians classify 60% of their adult dog and cat patients as overweight according to APOP, the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention. There is an epidemic of portly pups, fat cats and blubbery bunnies. Now, the inevitable has happened. There is no trend where an entrepreneur fears to tread, and no product that he or she creates is so silly that some consumer won’t buy it. We now have treadmills designed for Rover, puppy pedometers, fitness classes for canines, obesity clinics for pets, dog yoga, puppy Pilates, diet dog food and canine interval training courses. Hundreds of doggy treadmills have been sold. They come in regular and mini sizes, and they’re priced around $500 which proves that it’s not the dogs that are daft. There is even an activity monitor with a built in GPS device that you can attach to Fido so you will know where he is at all times without actually having to accompany him on his morning wander in the park. So far canine obesity has primarily been tackled by traditional diet and exercise, and to-date few of these efforts are paying off. If anything, the epidemic is getting worse. Therefore, as a favor to pet owners everywhere, I’ve researched a number of non-traditional weight reduction techniques that have actually worked on humans and by inference may be beneficial to an obese pet. I’ve listed some of the pros and cons for each method: 1) Daily Injections: Sheryl Paloni of Boston, daily injected herself with urine derived from pregnant women and lost 43 pounds in 5 months. Irish McCarthy of Success

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

Weight-loss Systems in Albuquerque says, “It’s not the urine, but the hormone in it that takes off the pounds. It tricks the brain into thinking your body is pregnant and your metabolic rate increases.” The hormone is human Chorionic Gonadotrophin or hCG. If daily injections are not your thing, hCG can also be used by spraying a mist under the tongue. HCG is also a fertility drug that is commonly used by pro-athletes to restart testosterone production and restore testicular size after a steroid cycle. In 2009, Manny Ramirez of the Los Angeles Dodgers was suspended 50 games for using it. Other high profile users were Houston Texans linebacker Brian Cushing and Jose Canseco who was arrested for bringing hCG into the U.S. from Mexico.” Because of its multifunctionality, hCG injections may be ideal for knocking pounds off Rover. However, dog owners should be aware of potential drawbacks: It may be difficult to find pregnant women who are willing to sell their urine to dogs, If Rover is female, you may find yourself the proud owner of a new litter of pups, If Rover is male he may soon be begging you to let him attend Dodger Spring Training even though his fielding ability may be impeded by having to tote around an unusually large set of testicles. Worse still, if he makes the team, you may find yourself smack-dab in the middle of a doping scandal. 2) The Jesus Diet: This diet allows you to lose weight and gain divine favour at the same time. Adherents only eat foods that are mentioned in the Bible. Dr. Don Colbert, Director of the Divine Health Wellness Center in Orlando has written a book titled, What Would Jesus Eat? His answer, “Jesus mostly ate fish, vegetables, beans and lentils,” and as Dr. Don says, “What was good


enough for Jesus is good enough for me.” It seems reasonable to assume that pets following this regimen will be rewarded with a trim body and a place in Heaven. The main problem is that not all dogs are Christians and many that are do not own a Bible. I interviewed a few dog owners who have used variations of this diet. Abraham Rothstein of Montreal, Canada says, “I tried to get my dog to eat kosher as prescribed in the Torah. However, she refused. Her name is Mei Li and she’s a Pekingese. She lost weight anyway because rice, ginger and wine were the only foods she could find in the Sayings of Confucius. Another owner who had little success with the diet is Gilbert Romney of Salt Lake City. He says, “My dog Ali is an Afghan hound and only wanted foods that were listed in the Koran. I couldn’t find a copy of the Koran in all of Utah and Ali refused to even look at The Book of Mormon.” It seems that this approach is best employed in areas that are not overly pluralistic and where there is a scarcity of foreign dogs. 3) Having Sex: The world’s heaviest woman is burning 3500 calories a day by having sex. Pauline Potter, 47, became the Guinness World Record holder for heaviest woman last year when she weighed in at 700 pounds. Divorced for four years, Pauline recently met up with her ex-husband Alex. They reunited, rekindled and repeatedly re-consumated. “It’s helped me lose 98 pounds,” Potter says. “I can’t move much in bed, but I burn 500 calories a session by just jiggling around. We have sex up to seven times each day. Alex weighs just 140 pounds so he does most of the work.” This activity may be more useful as a weight reduction method for rabbits than for other pets unless, of course, you happen to keep an overweight mink in the basement. 4) The Tapeworm Diet: This technique is not new. In the 19th century, ladies swallowed tapeworms in order to lose weight. It fell out of favour because the tapeworm sometimes caused diarrhoea, headaches and infections. Today, the diet is making a comeback. It’s thought that tapeworms eat some of the excess calories that humans ingest, and also that they help balance the immune system. The theory is that humans had worms in the past and now the body wants its parasites back.

To find out more, I interviewed Russian weight loss guru, Dr. Dimitri Flaboff. “There’s a problem using this technique on your dog,” Flaboff says. “After the tapeworm becomes accustomed to Rover’s diet, many people find themselves feeding two obese pets.” 5) Cotton Ball Diet: Many people believe that eating cotton balls helps them lose weight? The idea is that cotton balls are low in calories but filling, and hence, you won’t feel the need to eat for a long while after a cotton ball meal. It may be difficult to get Rover to eat cotton and therefore the technique may be more successful with flabby felines than with dogs. They already have experience with hair balls which have a similar consistency to cotton. In either case, be careful to only tempt your pet with fresh cotton balls. Otherwise the results can be disastrous. Warnings have been passed down for generations. Consider the original versions of Cotton Fields and Old Man River: When those cotton balls get rotten, You can’t eat very much cotton. And those that eats it are soon forgotten. Dire warnings indeed! These are just a few of the nontraditional weight-loss methods available to pet owners. I have omitted others such as hypnosis, diet sunglasses, slimming soap, naso-gastric drips, tongue patches, raw food diets and bite-o-meters. However, it won’t be long until Spot has tried them all. Just as he followed his master into the realm of the rotund, it’s only a matter of time until he tries every quick fix Neil McKinnon available.

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SOCCER SCHOOL

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t was 2 PM on a hot afternoon in August, and the Union Ajijic youth soccer team had just played two backto-back games in a soccer tournament in Chapala. They’d had little opportunity to eat and now they had only a 10 minute rest before playing a third consecutive game against Los Charales of Chapala in the final. Los Charales had been resting, watching Union Ajijic play, and they must have felt confident and refreshed as they walked on to the field to face the exhausted Ajijic team. We’d set off from Ajijic at 7:30am: three teams of three age groups from the Union Ajijic soccer school, a free local program for the kids of Ajijic. Earlier, the teams in the younger age groups had played their tournaments. The 6-9 year-olds had come in second and the 10-12 year olds had won the championship in their group. Now all had gathered to watch the 13-15 year olds in their final. These kids practice five days a week at the Cruz Azul soccer field with the help of volunteer coaches. Their workouts are intense, and so is their love of the game. Lately, the school has been getting increasing support from the

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local ex-pat community who have provided new balls, and for the older team, their first uniforms. An increasing number of ex-pats have been coming to the games, impressed with the heart and spirit they’re seeing. The mutual love of soccer breaks down language barriers and creates a real connection between the Mexican and ex-pat communities. The referee blew his whistle to start the game, and our sweatsoaked players started to run. One of our players collapsed under the heat and was carried off by the paramedics, another succumbed to the heat a little later. Cramps were setting in and injuries mounted. They were running until they fell. And they dug deep to win an astonishing game 4-0. At the final whistle, the younger kids came onto the field to celebrate and congratulate their older heroes. It was quite a scene. Despite being exhausted, it didn’t stop them singing and chanting all the way back from Chapala and through the streets of Ajijic. You might have heard them. If not you can catch the spirit at one of our games. Checkout UnionAjijic.com for more details about the school, the kids and upcoming games.


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hristmas has always been my favorite holiday. Since my earliest days, I have loved the music, the smells, the decorations and the excitement in the air. Every .DWK\ KHUVLVWHU6KLUOH\Âą&KULVWPDV year my sister and I would help Daddy take the lights and colored but could not guess what they were. decorations in from the garage, lovingSo one of us, (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure it must have ly unpacking each bulb and garland been my sister) suggested we take a to be placed on the tree. After the tree peek. We thought about it for awhile: was up, we would play â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m thinking of Did we dare do it? Would anyone find an ornamentâ&#x20AC;? and try to guess which out? Could we pull it off? one the other person had chosen. We Finally the temptation was too had candles in the shape of snowmen, much, so we carefully lifted the tape on Santa and reindeer, and we always one end, slid the box out of the wrapset up a â&#x20AC;&#x153;woodland sceneâ&#x20AC;? under the ping, and slowly lifted the lid. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tree with little animals, even placing know what we were expecting, perducks on the small round mirror which haps a huge stuffed animal, or a new served as our â&#x20AC;&#x153;lake.â&#x20AC;? And of course we coat â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but much to our dismay we each had Santa in his sleigh, with his nine got a new Hudsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bay blanket for our reindeer. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget Rudolph, with beds. Now these were very nice, exhis red nose, in the lead. I remember pensive blankets, but somehow they that we took turns setting up all the just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fulfill our expectations of decorations, and most of the time got opening those two huge boxes! And along just fine. of course we were both feeling very But there was one thing on which guilty about opening them in the first my sister and I could never agree. The place! We quickly replaced them in the box of decorations contained two boxes, slid the paper over them, being identical Christmas stockings, one red careful not to wrinkle or tear it, and reand one green. Neither one had a placed the tape. name on it, nor were they different in To this day I do not know if our any way, except color. But every single parents ever knew what we had year Shirley and I would fight over who done, and we both put on a pretty got the red one and who got the green good show of being surprised and one. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember why this was pleased when we opened them on so important, and usually neither of Christmas morning. But we both us could remember what color we had vowed never again to spoil the surthe year before. But somehow, this â&#x20AC;&#x153;arprise or peek at our presents! gumentâ&#x20AC;? became one of our Christmas traditions! We always placed wrapped gifts under the tree, and the closer it got to Christmas, the more presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;magicallyâ&#x20AC;? appeared. We were â&#x20AC;&#x153;on our honorâ&#x20AC;? not to peek, and it was unthinkable that we would. That is until one night, when I was about 10 and Shirley was about 15. Our parents had gone to a Christmas party, and we were left home alone. There, under the tree, were these two enormous packages, one for each of us. There were lots of other presents too, but these two really had us guessing. We could not figure out what they might be! We picked them up, weighed them, shook them,

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THE WONDER RS OF MEXICO %\0DJJLH9DQ2VWUDQG

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h, the wonders of Mexico, they never cease to amaze me. I wonder how the lawn gets watered. The sprinkler is always moved to another area, yet I never see the gardener. Once, I spied a sombrero floating along the top of the wall, but can only assume there was a gardener under it. I wonder whatever happened to the performer who fell into the orchestra pit at the Degollado Theater during a performance of Ballet Folklorico I was attending a few months ago. The horse that lives next door was moved last night. He was my neighbor’s mode of transportation and he ran out of grass. How come I never see a Mexican with zits? Why do they seal stuff in jars so that you can’t open the darned things? By the time you get the aspirin out, your headache is gone. Why do they sell hot dogs eight to a package, but the hot dog buns come in packages of 10? Why don’t Americans maintain their cars the way Mexicans do? Incidentally, a good way to meet men is simply to raise the hood of your car and stand over to the side. Why don’t Lakeside foreigners eat more Mexican food? In my opinion, other foods can equal, but not excel it. My housekeeper, Josefina, could

hold her own with the finest chefs of the world. Nothing is too fancy or demanding that she can’t fix it. The meals replicate perfectly the photographs in the cookbook. I used to think no meal was any good unless you could set fire to it before serving. Josefina can also iron better than anyone I ever saw. I’m considering a face lift because I’m getting tired of my neck hanging in the soup. Wattles and dewlaps. I’d like to get a body lift but, if you pick the wrong plastic surgeon, you could end up with hair over your arms. On Josefina’s birthday, Enrique Grande had the Banda de Caramelo (all 17 of them) play love songs to her. She invited me to join her and a few of her amigas. Exactly as described in Village in the Sun, chairs were drawn up in a horizontal row. The only difference between us ladies was that they sat rather stiffly, while I was guilty of displaying a rhythmic foot. None of the other ladies moved a muscle, including facial. One of the little boys in the band saw my bobbing foot, and it made him smile. This created an interesting problem, since his instrument was the tuba and he couldn’t play it while smiling. Reminded me of the time my mother as a little girl went, with her two sisters, to Central Park in New York City, sat on the brass side of the band shell, and sucked on lemons. Mom said that this made the musicians salivate and they could no longer play. I love that story. My mom and her siblings, at the ages of 8, 9 and 10, were banned from Central Park. Nowadays, you can pillage and plunder and still not be banned from Central Park. The greatest wonder of Mexico is not the weather, nor the mountains, nor the waterfalls nor the interest the banks pay, it’s the people. They personify the meaning of the phrase, “pure Maggie Van and simple.” Ostrand

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Mexico’s Most Surprising Export: SOAPS! %\&DWKHULQH/DQFDVWHU

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exico has been striving to export as much as possible to improve its economy, but what nobody expected is that one success story in the exporting effort would be—soap operas! Although I find soaps (telenovelas)—from any country— excruciatingly boring with their slow pace, eternal close-ups and its unlikely stories, watching them can be helpful. For language practice, for instance. Unfortunately, not everywhere people will learn Spanish with the Mexican soaps, since most of them are dubbed into the language of the country. Exceptions are Spanish-speaking countries and the US, where they are transmitted by Spanish language channels. “Mexicans have a way with soaps, and there are lots of addicts in the US,” said Alan Duncan, a production executive for ABC’s General Hospital. When a Mexican diplomat traveled to Beijing a while back, a band welcomed him not with the Mexican national anthem but with the theme from the soap Rosa Salvaje, or Wild Rose, a very popular telenovela broadcast in Mexico two or three years ago. A high officer from the Brazilian government recently made time to meet a visiting Mexican soap star. In Spain, merchants adjusted store hours to avoid conflict with the broadcast of another Mexican soap. Last year, a Mexican telenovela was number one in South Korea, and struck such a chord there that many viewers thought the program was produced in Seoul. In Istanbul, Turkey, a Mexican friend of mine turned up her telly in her hotel room and gazed upon the opening credits of Los Ricos También Lloran (The Rich Also Cry), which was the top-rated program in Turkey while it was on the air. Mexican soap opera makers say they owe their success to a wealth of offscreen inspiration. One well-known telenovela director says that in Mexico emotions and actions tend toward dramatic extremes, and the soap opera is a reflection of reality, not a distortion of it. Mexicans may in general love telenovelas, but it was Televisa, the company that has produced the most spectacular,

7KH5LFK$OVR&U\ in far away locations that had never been chosen before. Televisa built its own factory to produce makeup so durable that it would hold under the frequent tears of the characters or the extreme heat in tropical locations. The studio’s special effects are wonderful, although their choice of background music can sometimes be irritating. A great deal of the success story of the telenovelas crystallized during the past decade, along with Mexico’s economic depression. Sociologists claim that soaps allowed Mexicans to focus on someone else’s problems and forget their own. Thus, Rosa Salvaje, the story of a street vendor who ascends into high society, reached a record of 80% of Mexican television viewers. Certain conventions of telenovelas differ from those in US soap operas. The daily, hour-long Mexican soaps are transmitted at night, rather than in the day. And unlike American soaps, which can go on for decades, telenovelas usually are wrapped up in five months. Thus, the standard telenovela story-line—the romantic first encounter, followed by the heart-rending breakup and heart-warming reconciliation—is compressed into a veritable dramatic whirlwind. To meet the enormous demand for soaps, Televisa has developed production shortcuts that make it unnecessary for stars to memorize scripts, or even read them. Actors are equipped with electronic receivers that pick up dialogue read by an offstage prompter. This demands extraordinary acting skills from the actors. For instance, if someone is unable to cry on cue, his or her acting credibility diminishes enormously and it is considered a cardinal sin, never-forgiven and never-forgotten by the directors of telenovelas. The cauldron of passions, always on the verge of bubbling over, translates into money (lots of it!) for Mexico in the export world.

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The Poets’ Niche %\0DUN6FRQFH PVFRQFH#JPDLOFRP

Pablo Neruda (1904-1973)

History makes it perfectly clear that totalitarian regimes on the far Left or the far Right abhor intellectuals. And they certainly don’t like poets unless they become apologists for the regime, like fascist Ezra Pound. Russia of course provides many examples of poet persecution. Pushkin, Akhmatova, Brodsky, Pasternak, et al. In China, the so-called Misty Poets were exiled after the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Then, on the Right, well, let’s just dwell on Chile for a moment and leave aside Hitler, Mussolini, and Franco. Chile’s greatest poet was Pablo Neruda who some called the Walt Whitman of Latin America. He was also a fervent communist. Paraphrasing a physics law, excess generally causes an equal and opposite reaction. The excess in this case was the military takeover of the government. Military rule drove many Chileans into the arms of the communists culminating in the first democratically elected socialist, Salvador Allende. Neruda was a close advisor to the new president. But Neruda died 12 days after Allende was overthrown in a military coup, and General Augusto Pinochet took over. The poet’s work was banned under the Pinochet regime. When Chilean soldiers searched Neruda’s house, he reportedly told them: “There is only one thing here that poses a danger to you: poetry.” Indeed. But here’s a Neruda poem that should unite nearly everyone of any political stripe. Dog Lovers of the World, Unite! A Dog Has Died My dog has died. I buried him in the garden next to a rusted old machine. Some day I’ll join him right there, but now he’s gone with his shaggy coat, his bad manners and his cold nose, and I, the materialist, who never believed in any promised heaven in the sky for any human being, I believe in a heaven I’ll never enter. Yes, I believe in a heaven for all dogdom where my dog waits for my arrival waving his fan-like tail in friendship. Ai, I’ll not speak of sadness here on earth, of having lost a companion who was never servile. His friendship for me, like that of a porcupine withholding its authority, was the friendship of a star, aloof, with no more intimacy than was called for, with no exaggerations: he never climbed all over my clothes filling me full of his hair or his mange, he never rubbed up against my knee like other dogs obsessed with sex.

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013


No, my dog used to gaze at me, paying me the attention I need, the attention required to make a vain person like me understand that, being a dog, he was wasting time, but, with those eyes so much purer than mine, he’d keep on gazing at me with a look that reserved for me alone all his sweet and shaggy life, always near me, never troubling me, and asking nothing. Ai, how many times have I envied his tail as we walked together on the shores of the sea in the lonely winter of Isla Negra where the wintering birds filled the sky and my hairy dog was jumping about full of the voltage of the sea’s movement: my wandering dog, sniffing away with his golden tail held high, face to face with the ocean’s spray. Joyful, joyful, joyful, as only dogs know how to be happy with only the autonomy of their shameless spirit. There are no good-byes for my dog who has died, and we don’t now and never did lie to each other. So now he’s gone and I buried him, and that’s all there is to it. Translated by Alfred Yankauer

Mark Sconce

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Hearts at Work $&ROXPQE\-DPHV7LSWRQ

I want you to faint.

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ell, the holidays are upon us, and mistletoe (with all of those easy but reserved kisses) still hangs in the memories of most Americans and Canadians here at Lakeside, not to mention those New Year’s Eve parties that not so long ago provided a once-a-year open license (alas usually for less than a minute) to kiss—with what we then considered abandon—the pert lips of the neighbor lady or the sensuous and slightly parted lips of the lawyer’s wife that one had been surreptitiously studying for the past twelve months. At those New Year’s Eve celebrations, all of the men, at least this one, at the stroke of midnight, wanted to be like Clark Gable, remembering those famous lines he uttered to Scarlett in Gone with the Wind following the most famous kiss in movie history: “I want you to faint. That’s what you were meant for. None of those fools you’ve ever known have kissed you like this, have they?” I used to do a lot of kissing in movie theatres back in the 50’s and early 60’s, sitting in the dark with a reasonably eager date, in the popular last row, practicing the lessons those celluloid lovers so casually offered us. Who doesn’t remember those passionate kisses between Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh in Gone with the Wind (1939)? And who can forget that beach scene in From Here to Eternity (1953) as Burt Lancaster (damn him) kissed (more delicious because illicit) the delectable Deborah Kerr, the woman I, with the hormones of puberty running high, was already in love with. I saw that film for the first time at a drivein about 1960, and I remember later that night trying to convince my date--a short, dark-haired girl with glasses—and myself that she looked just like Deborah Kerr. Or what about A Place in the Sun (1951), where Montgomery Clift, playing a poor boy, kisses Elizabeth Taylor, playing a rich girl…satisfying for the moment the multiple fantasies of many of us. And we got to see those incredibly sensual lips of Elizabeth Taylor really close up. (That’s when I decided there really is a God.) And then there was Grace Kelly

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seducing Cary Grant in To Catch a Thief (1955), encouraging him to enjoy the beauty of her diamonds (imitation) and her breasts (certainly not imitations), as she said, in classic double entendre, “Even in this light I can tell where your eyes are looking.” Cary Grant really got the kisses. Another woman I was in love with was Ingrid Bergman, and as I watched re-runs of Notorious (1946) I had to tolerate Grant enjoying the lips of the lovely (my lovely) Ingrid for more than three minutes, some say the longest kiss in film history at the time of production. (I planned that my first words to Ingrid Bergman--just after she told me she would be mine forever-were going to be, “I forgive you for that kiss you gave Cary Grant in Notorious, and that kiss you gave Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca (1942), and that kiss you gave Gary Cooper in For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943)…and…and…I forgive you for all of those kisses…as long as you assure me you weren’t using your tongue.” (Her response most likely would have been, “But Jim, a kiss is just a kiss.”) When cable became popular, with lots of uncut re-runs of old classics, I was able to see some classics, like Don Juan (1926), in which John Barrymore, playing a roguish Casanova, set the record (which I understand still holds), for the most kisses in a single film: he gave Mary Astor 127 kisses, and other females in the film 191 kisses. The first open-mouth kiss was also that same year, Flesh and the Devil (1926), with screen siren Gretta Garbo (playing the sultry and insatiable Felicitas von Kletzingk) kissing her reallife-love-at-the-time, John Gilbert. That was also the first film with a horizontalposition kiss. And so to all of you wonderful ladies here at Lakeside, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. This column (consider it a kiss) is for you. Jim Tipton


AN ANJANA IN AJIJIC! %\$XURUD7HUUHQXV

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n anjana is a type of witch in Hispanic folklore who takes on the disguise of a horrid old woman to test the charity of human beings. But in her true form, an anjana is a very beautiful young woman who lives underground and has many palaces full of treasures and many precious stones. In her true form an anjana is said to be clothed in flowers and silver stars. She wears green stockings and walks in the air. An anjana carries a golden staff that can turn anything into a treasure. You know if you have been in the presence of an anjana if your dreams come true. This is the story of an anjana in Ajijic as told to me by Jose Luis. “When I was a young boy my father died and my mother left Ajijic to go to the United States to work and send money back to Mexico for me and my old aunt who took care of me. My mother came to Ajijic to visit and while she was here visiting, she got very sick and she died. We buried her next to my father. Then my old aunt died but by now I was 19 years old and I was working and soon I was married. My wife is from Ajijic too. We didn’t have much but we were very happy together in love. Then my wife wanted a baby and she could not get pregnant. The doctors said probably she could not have children. For many years this was making my wife very sad.

It was the Day of the Dead and we went to the cemetery. My wife was preparing a small picnic and I was putting flowers on the graves of my father, my mother and my aunt. I felt someone behind me and I turned thinking it was my wife but it was a poor old woman who was so ugly that she actually frightened me and I jumped. Then I was embarrassed and overcome with a great sympathy for her, I invited her to come and join us in our meal. The three of us, my wife, the old woman and I, spent the day together. Then the old woman got up and said: ‘Thank you for your kindness. Now I want to give something to you. In the language of ancient Mexicans, blood was called chalchiuhll which means water of precious stones. The Aztecs wore precious stones to enrich their blood. The blood is life. This is quetzal chalchihuitl a precious variety of stone of great value. There is a spirit in this stone. May it bring you joy and hope.’ And she placed a greenish white stone something like jasper in my wife’s hand. In the months that followed, my wife became pregnant with the first of our four children. And that is how I know I have been in the presence of an anjana in Ajijic because our dreams came true.” The moral of this is: Be kind in all you say or do if a poor old woman appears to you. She could be an anjana and make your dreams come true.

Saw you in the Ojo 69


THE LADY(?) WHO CAME TO LUNCH %\.DWH.DUQV

I

had lived in in fo Mexico forr rss twenty years n or so and when someone asked,, “Do you like itt d here?” It’s hard err not to answer ou u’re sarcastically. You’re Would I live tempted to say, “Would dn’t?” But utt here this long if I didn’t?” nd dly. that sounds unfriendly. ntt visitor I took my recent elect a place to lunch, trying to select where she could “taste some decent (American) food” and “served at a civilized hour,” (noon). Having found such a place, we slid into our seats and faced a jungle garden of flowers and palms with even a couple of parrots decorating a frond or two. The waiter gave us the menu appropriate in Mexico at this hour. Breakfast. My visitor scanned it and slapped it back on the table, her lips pursed, eyes challenging me. “It’s not in English.” “Oh, see the peacock,” I said pointing out the window with one hand and gesturing with fervor to the waiter with the other. The house cat then slid under the table and rubbed lovingly against our legs. The mating call of the peacock was no match for the yelp from our table. The startled waiter shoved the comida menu into my hands and swept up the big tabby cat from under the table in one masterful gesture, spilling only the hot rolls that were releasing steamy smells of fresh bread from their basket. The big bird disappeared behind the bougainvillea with the tossed out cat and order was restored to our corner of the restaurant. A “Salisbury steak,” (hamburger) was finally ordered. “That’s more like it!” my friend told the waiter when her meal was served. “Why, that meat is good!” she declared as she dug into it. “What do you suppose it is?” I said, “Hamburger, you know ground beef.” I was taught at an early age to be polite to visitors. It’s good that those things stick with you.

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

“This is a b baked potato. W Where do you s suppose they g potatoes. It’s get c cooked, too.” The waiter bro brought some fresh butter. “What’s t is?” th this?” Ass she smacked her li lips, I answered her quest io questions. “This is pig ffat at and the potatoes are flown in from Alaska.” “No wonder!” she said not hearing me. Then the waiter asked me and I asked her if she wanted coffee. “Do they have that here?” “It is grown in the back yard.” I was getting testy. When it was served she asked the waiter if it was American. The waiter had been brought up right and smiled his reply. “Ask him if they have cream.” “Crema, por favor!” “Is it real?” “It’s milked from donkeys.” “I’d like some dessert. What do they have?” I suggested flan. “It’s like custard with a little caramel sauce on top.” I told the waiter to bring that to the lady. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw the cat wander back in the door heading straight for our table, of course. Unfortunately, my fellow diner saw it too and started to scream. “Waiter, waiter! Get that cat out of here!” She did everything but stand on the table, arousing our corner of the room. After much mopping up and changing the tablecloth, the waiter brought her another cup of coffee. “Where is my dessert?” she screamed at him. He went to the kitchen and brought back a dish of custard and set it before her. Then, with a flourish he stepped forward and picked off the fly that was stuck like a cherry in the caramel on top. “Buen provecho, Señorita,” he said and bowed from the waist. The tip I left him was not inconsequential.


1

The roundest knight at King Arthur’s round table was Sir Cumference. He acquired his size from too much pi. 2. I thought I saw an eye doctor on an Alaskan island, but it turned out to be an optical Aleutian . 3. She was only a whiskey maker, but he loved her still. 4. A rubber band pistol was confiscated from algebra class, because it was a weapon of math disruption. 5. The butcher backed into the meat grinder and got a little behind in his work. 6. No matter how much you push the envelope, it’ll still be stationery. 7. A dog gave birth to puppies near the road and was cited for littering. 8. A grenade thrown into a kitchen in France would result in Linoleum Blownapart. 9. Two silk worms had a race. They ended up in a tie. 10. Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana. 11. A hole has been found in the nudist camp wall. The police are looking into it. 12. Atheism is a non-prophet organization. 13. Two hats were hanging on a hat rack in the hallway. One hat said to the other: ‘You stay here; I’ll go on a head.’ 14. I wondered why the baseball

kept getting bigger. Then it hit me. 15. A sign on the lawn at a drug rehab center said: ‘Keep off the Grass.’ 16. A small boy swallowed some coins and was taken to a hospital. When his grandmother telephoned to ask how he was, a nurse said ‘No change yet.’ 17. A chicken crossing the road is poultry in motion. 19. The short fortune-teller who escaped from prison was a small medium at large. 20. The man who survived mustard gas and pepper spray is now a seasoned veteran. 21. A backward poet writes inverse. 22. In a democracy it’s your vote that counts. In feudalism it’s your count that votes. 23. When cannibals ate a missionary, they got a taste of religion. 24. Don’t join dangerous cults: Practice safe sects! 25. A crowded elevator smells different to a midget.

Saw you in the Ojo 71


THE GHOSTS AMONG US %\)UHG0LWWDJ “Karl Marx: Father of Socialism”

K

arl Marx rates as the most influential scholar in all history. But Americans have so demonized him that his name is mostly used as an insult. At least academic economists can appreciate him. I had an economics professor who talked about one of Marx’s many books, Das Kapital, and half-jokingly said it would take about 12 years for anybody to understand it. It’s complex material. America has irrationally suffered two major Red Scares from a fear of Marx. The first began in 1919. U.S. Attorney General Alexander Palmer ordered the “Palmer Raids,” to arrest and deport radical leftists. More than 550 were deported. Of the 10,000 arrested, 3,500 were held in detention. The second Red Scare was under U.S. Senator Joseph “Joe” McCarthy (RWisconsin). He created a scare of subversion in the State Department, the military, and all the way down to the Boy Scouts. Parents were warned that some Scout leaders were Communists who would brainwash their sons. Senator McCarthy was responsible for the smearing of countless innocent people, from the State Department to Hollywood. People had their passports taken away; they were put on “blacklists” so they couldn’t work, and some were arrested. Edward R. Murrow played a major part in stopping McCarthy. Marx left Germany in 1849 for London. This was the perfect laboratory for Marx and his colleague Friedrich Engels to study, because the Industrial Revolution, with all its pain, was transforming England. In our own economic situation today, his analyses are gaining more and more respect, as corporations become more powerful and wealthy, while workers fall behind. Marx pioneered the study of the relationship of labor to capitalism. He was able to integrate philosophy, history, and economics to an extraordinary level. He developed the theory called “economic determinism,” meaning that economics and class struggle determine history. Marx explained this through a process he called “dialectic materialism.” It means

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

aristocracy ((thesis) by h ) was challenged h ll db an emerging merchant and peasant class (antithesis) in a clash that produced the bourgeoisie (synthesis). The bourgeoisie in turn became the investors and capitalists who will then be challenged by the workers (proletariat). The proletariat, in the last phase of dialectic materialism, will take over the means of production. Marx saw the horrible conditions in the evolving English factories, with children chained to their machines, so they could not run away, and he saw the great wealth the capitalists were extracting from the economy. Conservative ideologues are blithely unaware of the misery Marx saw in his day – nor do they care. Marx was interested in what the utilitarian value of a commodity is, and why it is unrelated to market price. He postulated what he called “surplus value.” He believed the true value of a commodity was the labor that went into it. Any price above that was the profit that the capitalists extracted from the workers. If workers could exchange the products of their labor without the extraction of profit by the capitalists, then supply and prices would be better for everybody. That’s why Marxism predicts the elimination of the capitalists through class warfare. Marx’s ideas have had application in many ways, including the evolution of co-ops in the United States. I belong to a co-op for educators, a credit union. It eliminates bank profits so that banking services are cheaper. Marx inspired the communal farms in Israel called Kibbutzim. Most advanced nations of the world have eliminated insurance company profits that make health care more expensive – or even deny it – and instead, provide a socialized system. Love or hate him, Karl Marx remains one of the most important thinkers of all time. Fred Mittag


Saw you in the Ojo 73


The Ojo Crossword

ACROSS 1 Not bottom 5 Acting (abbr.) 9 City 14 Fencing sword 15 Den 16 Circle 17 Bare 18 Thought 19 Manor heads 20 Plug part 22 Science lab burner 24 Cereal 25 Becomes active 27 Box lightly 31 Toss 32 Part of a min. %XOO¿JKWFKHHU &RZER\¿JKW 38 Swindle 40 What Charles is prince of 42 Refastens 44 Stood opposite 46 _ Oyl (Popeye´s girlfriend) 47 Open grassy area 48 Dad´s mate 50 Bard 51 Dickens´Tiny_ 52 Licensed practical nurse 55 Condiment 57 Block 59 First month of Jewish calendar 61 Foreign Agricultural Service 64 Modern female mystery writer

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

Christie 66 Reproduce 68 Organized crime 71 Peel 73 Advise 74 Secret plans 75 Murky 76 Restaurant 77 Unsympathetic 78 Court suit 79 Eve´s garden '2:1 1 Bpm 2 Musical production 3 Ross __, philanthropist 4 Was looked at 5 Boxer Muhammad 6 ____ Eggs(Easter treats) 7 Truss (2 wds.) 8 Gives 9 Weight unit 10 Clothes pressers 11 Reduced (abbr.) 12 Center 13 __ A Small World… 21 Understand 23 Compass point 26 Cheat 28 Crippling disease 29 Pain reliever brand 30 Start over 31 Slipup 33 Cash with order (abr.) 35 Cleans 36 To that time 37 Water retention 39 Highest trump in some loo 41 Dog food brand 43 New Jersey´s neighbor 45 Toy story 2´s Woody (2 wds) 49 Mutilate 53 School group 54 Type of acid 56 Shrill bark 58 Lures 60 Dardic language 61 Laid-off 62 Part of a triangle 63 Beer mug 65 Cut 8QUH¿QHG 68 Miles per hour 69 Wing 70 Pro 72 Change hue


Saw you in the Ojo 75


THE OJO INTERNET MAILBOX :KHUHLQZHSXEOLVKVRPHFRPPHQWV DERXWRXUSUHYLRXVLVVXHV

WINNERS! Fran Brown Hi Neil, Thanks for the chuckles. In retrospect, I’ve decided not to enter neither an anti nor a pro-pissing contest, due to, an aging bladder urgently heading towards malfunction. Bugs are really out to lunch. However; skydiving has always been a fear. I’ve been told one should try to overcome one’s fears. Should that be a an aye or nay??¿¿?? Fran Bill Ross It gave me flashbacks. Someone should have told me I didn’t need to memorize every report card I got in primary & secondary school. I can still recite them all, because they were all the same - “If Bill only applied himself he could do so much better.” Better than a spouse, a house, 3 kids (grown), 2 cars, 1

76

motorcycle & a Judy McKinnon original work of art on the wall? I did OK. SWEET MOTHER OF MEXICO— Leona Vicario Geraldine Ethen Herb, This is a wonderful story, one worth sharing. It’s a part of the story of the Mexican revolution that I have never heard before. You told Leona’s story very well. Cheri

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

Herbie, I really enjoyed reading about this courageous woman, and it had a wonderful ending. She was very lucky to stay alive. UNCOMMON COMMON SENSE - NOVEMBER 2013 Margaret Larson For a long time, I felt that we did not need term limits in Congress because they seemed redundant vote someone out of office if they don’t deserve to be there. But I believe that the US voters have abdicated their responsibility in civic life as it pertains to our democracy, for many reasons (lack of educational focus, laziness, rewarding the miscreant news media with our attention, fear). So I relent: an important step in the right direction would be to now have term limits. This would disable the entrenched power structures that are clearly bought and paid for by big military and finance. It would limit the power of the lobbying firms - the go-to place for retiring Congress persons, where they make millions by further selling us out. We are at each others’ throats out of frustration that our nation’s leaders are no longer serving the American people. Let’s march on D.C. and insist on it! Time for Congressional term

limits, even if the ‘good’ babies are tossed with the dirty water. Bob Brandson I applaud Margaret Larson’s comments. The government of the supposed “leader of the free world” has been chained by special interests to the point where the will of the people is squelched so severely that lunacy runs rampant. Case in point? How could any sane nation not realize that allowing the ongoing murder of its citizens by deeply troubled individuals who still have legal access to weapons designed to kill as many living beings as possible in as little time as possible, is sheer madness? And yet elected officials continue to be petrified of the lucre laden NRA lobbyists and always will be without term limitations..... or some sudden plague of sanity in D.C. Methinks Mr. Smith needs to return to Washington. SPAIN’S FIFTY MAGICAL YEARS Herbert W. Piekow Morgan, this is a well researched and written article. Thank you for breaking these historic facts into a fifty year time frame and containing so much history in so few words. CONGRATULATIONS


The

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News

www.lakechapalasociety.com

/&6'LUHFWRU\'HDGOLQH-XVW$KHDG The membership deadline looms! You may join LCS at any time, but if you want to be included in the LCS Membership Directory you need to be a regular member by December 15. Your membership may be regular (annual), or associate (monthly) for those of you who are short-term visitors to Lakeside. You may join at any time. Stop by the MemberVKLSWDEOHLQWKHVHUYLFHRIÂżFHRXUYROXQWHHUVZLOOPDNHWKH process simple and easy. And this year, you can make it easy by renewing online at www.lakechapalasociety.com Our bilingual operations manager and the volunteers at the front desk are on duty daily to assist you. Please remember the December 15 deadline!

2UGHU&KLOGUHQÂśV$UW+ROLGD\&DUGV1RZ Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s art holiday cards are available from the catalog at the LCS Patio. View the catalog online at lakechapalasoFLHW\FRPDQGGRZQORDGRUGHUIRUPVÂżOOWKHPRXWDQGGURS off the completed forms at the Patio. Last year over 700 cards were sold. These colorful and endearing cards sell for $20 pesos. Each of our young artists receives half of the proceeds; the remainder is used to pay for production and to purchase materials for the Saturday art classes.

7KH/LEUDU\ÂśV7KRXVDQG1HZ7LWOHs $ WKRXVDQG QHZ WLWOHV ERWK ÂżFWLRQ DQG QRQÂżFWLRQ ZHUH added to the libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection this year. Titles include not only books published since 2000,--those reside on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Arrivalsâ&#x20AC;? shelves for three months,--but also older titles that enrich our collection, such as translations of SRSXODU ÂżFWLRQ IURP DEURDG RU SHUKDSV DQ LQWURGXFWLRQ WR an author or subject which hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been in our collection previously. The lists are sorted by genre, then author. We currently have more than 24,000 books on the shelves, so thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bound to be something you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read yet. /&66LQJOHV+ROLGD\ Bash The holiday party will begin at 4 PM Tuesday, December 17 at LCS featuring a full-course turkey or ham dinner, value-priced drinks, and live dance music by Ricardo and Blanca. Starting Monday, December 2 buy the $185 pesos tickets at LCS, Diane Pearl's, or from Sue Hurst 331-405-4911 (suesomething@yahoo.com) or Tinker Reilly 331-531-1464 (TinkerReilly@aol.com) Tickets at door are $220 pesos.

December 2013 3DUW\WLPH Guess who makes the Lake Chapala Society possible with all its many events and programs? Volunteers! Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s right. Without volunteers, the LCS couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t function. As 2013 is drawing to a close, the Board of Directors of the Lake Chapala Society extends an invitation to all of its volunteers to play, have fun, eat, have fun, hit the piĂąata, have fun, pat ourselves on the back for a job well done, and have fun. This year will be our biggest and best volunteer â&#x20AC;&#x153;thank youâ&#x20AC;? holiday Posada ever. So, put on your party duds and get down to the Main Campus on December 21, for a rollicking good time with your fellow volunteers and share your success stories. It takes 2500 volunteer hours a year just to keep our basic services in operation. Add that to the thousands of hours committed by the ESL volunteers, all of the activity leaders hopurs and the events team and we have close to 10,000 volunteer hours provided to LCS annually! It takes a lot to keep an organization as complex as LCS running. But due to the generosity of our volunteers and the richness of their giving, we are alive and well and this years Holiday Posada is our way to say thanks! Meet your Board of Directors up close and personal, tell them your ideas, share thoughts and concerns, and get a quick sneak preview of what the board is planning for the coming months. It is sure to be a party that we will talk about for some time to come. Whew, you are all awesome and the board hopes to see all of you on the 21st. Regards, The LCS Board of Directors

Blood Pressure Group Needs Volunteers The Lake Chapala Society â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blood Pressure Groupâ&#x20AC;? is looking for volunteers with medical/nursing training and experience. If you have training and practice taking blood pressure, please consider joining us. 2XUVFKHGXOHLVĂ&#x20AC;H[LEOH²\RXFDQVLJQXSWRZRUNRQDUHJXODUEDVLV or volunteer just once a month. We work Fridays from 10 am to 12 noon and we will be adding Mondays if we have enough volunteers. Contact Lindy White: lindywhite246@hotmail.com or Mary Anne Molinari: mycasa17@gmail.com if you are interested in participating.

Saw you in the Ojo 77


Learning Seminars for December

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TED seminars are available for LCS members and take place weekly in the Sala from 12 to 1:15 PM. The December 3 session chaired by Ron Mullenaux, features a presentation by Paddy Ashdown, diplomat and former member of the British Parliament, discussing â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Global Power Shiftâ&#x20AC;?. Ashdown claims that we are living in a moment in history where power is changing in ways it never has before. In a spellbinding talk he outlines the three major global shifts that he sees coming. The December 10 seminar will be chaired by Ron Mullenaux. Circadian neuroscientist Russell Foster addresses the question: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why Do We Sleep?â&#x20AC;?. Foster shares three popular theories about why we sleep, busts some myths about how much sleep we need at different ages, and hints at some bold new uses of sleep as a predictor of mental health. The December 17 Social psychologist Dr. Amy Cuddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presentation "Body Language Shapes Who You Are" provides some surprising answers to questions such as: How should you prepare for a very important job interview? How much attention should you give to body ODQJXDJH"  'RHV RQH V DWWLWXGH DQG FRQÂżGHQFH VKDSH their body language or vice versa? This seminar will be chaired by Dr. Rick Rhoda.

A new LCS lifelong learning lecture series will feature experienced Lakeside lecturers speaking on a variety of intriguing topics. All lectures will be on 7XHVGD\VDW30in the LCS Sala. We have reserved a few dates for new lecturers, so if you are interested participating contact Rick Rhoda at rhodarick@yahoo.com. December 3: "The Anti-Aging Debate" by Fred Harland The last century has seen enormous increases in life expectancy and lifespan. Should we try to increase them even further? This lecture explores WKHFRQWURYHUV\FRQFHUQLQJVLJQLÂżFDQWOLIHH[WHQVLRQ²KRZIHDVLEOH is it? If it is indeed feasible, would we enjoy it? Could society handle WKHPHGLFDODQGÂżQDQFLDOLPSOLFDWLRQVRIKDYLQJSHRSOHOLYHDVORQJ as 120 or 150 years? December 10: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evolution of Human Views of the Cosmosâ&#x20AC;? by Rick 5KRGD/RQJDJRZHYLHZHGWKHFRVPRVIURPĂ&#x20AC;DWHDUWKJHRFHQWULF and heliocentric perspectives. How accurate is the current Big Bang, the accelerating expansion model of the universe? What about possible parallel and multiple universes? December 17: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Behind the World-wide Economic Stalemate?â&#x20AC;? by Roger Heath. How did we get into this economic mess? How can we get out of it?

There will be no LCS Learning Seminar on December 24 or on December 31.

L3DGL3RGL3KRQH&ODVVHV The day and time for the iPad classes will change in 2014. The January session will start on Thursday the WKEHJLQQLQJDW$0DQGÂżQLVKLQJDW$0$OO four classes are held in the Sala. You must have an iPad, iPod or iPhone to attend. Registration for the January session will close shortly and class size is limited. After reviewing the basics, the topics will include setting up e-mail accounts, connecting to WiFi, and downloading and reading e-books from various sources, including Kindle and other formats. Various applications will be demonstrated including word processing, Skype, FaceTime and Magic Jack, as well as installing and using different language keyboards. We also show you how to use the cameras, and how to sort and edit your photos. There will also be a discussion of the latest features in iOS 7.03, the various options available under Settings, and instructions on troubleshooting your device. Classes are restricted to LCS members. For further information, or to register, please e-mail Keith Martin at lcsipadclasses@gmail.com. Please indicate in the Subject Line â&#x20AC;&#x153;LCS iPad Classesâ&#x20AC;? to avoid your message winding up in the Spam folder. When registering, please provide your LCS membership number. You will also need to obtain the password for the LCS :L)LIURPWKH/&6RIÂżFHPlease note: the LCS service desk cannot register you, nor can you register by phone. Need more information about iPad classes? Contact lcsipadclasses@gmail.com.

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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

No lecture on Christmas and New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eves

+ROLGD\6KRSSLQJ%XV7ULSV Galerias Mall â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tuesday, December 3 (9:30 departure) Tonala/Tlaq â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Wednesday, December 11 (9:00 departure) Galerias Mall â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday, December 19 (9:30 departure)

More New Activities Open Gaming Want to learn new card/table/board games? Want to share favorite games with new players? Join us at the Gazebo Sunday, December 1, after Open Circle from 12:30 - 4:30 PM. Enter through the â&#x20AC;&#x153;backâ&#x20AC;? gate near the patio where Open Circle is held. No games are provided. Players without games are welcome or you can bring your own: Fluxx, Uno, Monopoly, Mah Jongg, Dominoes, Scrabble, Cribbage, Clue, Pandemic, etc. Please, no â&#x20AC;&#x153;loudâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;partyâ&#x20AC;? games that are likely to distract or disrupt nearby games & gamers. Please note: The LCS grounds will not be open after Open Circle for anything except Open Gaming.. Public welcome. 0XVLF -DP Thursdays from 2-4 pm, beginning December 12th at the Library Pad outside Video Library. Anyone with an acoustic instrument is welcome to come and make music. $PHULFDQ+LVWRU\/HFWXUH hosted by Arnold Smith will take place the 3rd Monday of each month in the Sala from 2 - 4 PM. DecemEHUÂśVOHFWXUHZLOOIHDWXUHDÂżOPRJUDSK\RQ3UHVLGHQW+DUU\7UXPDQ 3DWKZD\VWR,QQHU3HDFH Explore the philosophy and metaphysics of the Course in Miracles and related texts on Saturdays from 2 -3 :30 PM in the Ken Gosh Pavilion. 3KLORVRSK\*URXSDiscuss issues Wednesdays from 10:45 - 11:45 AM at the Gazebo. Open to members only.


DECEMBER ACTIVITIES

*Open to the Public ** US Citizens (S) Sign in required (C) Membership card required &58=52-$ Cruz Roja Sales Table M-F 11-1 Cruz Roja Monthly Meeting 2nd W 2-4 +($/7+,1685$1&( IMSS & Immigration Services M+T 10-1 Met Life Insurance T+TH 11-2 ReHealth Therapies 1st+3rd TH 10-12 +($/7+ /(*$/6(59,&(6 Becerra Immigration F 10:30-12:30 Blood Pressure F 10-12 Diabetes Screenings 2nd+3rd F 10-12 Hearing Services (S) M and 2nd+4th SAT 11-3 Hypnotherapy W 2-5 Information Desk M-SAT 10-2 Loridans, Marquez & Assoc T 10-12 Moreh Funeral Planning M-TH 10-1 Optometrist (S) TH 9-2 Pharmaceutical Consultations 4th M 10-12 Skin Cancer Screening (S) 2nd +4th W 10-12 US Consulate 2nd W 10-12:30 /&63$7,2 LCS Patio, Bus Trips & Sales Table M-F 10-1 LESSONS Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Art SAT 10-12* Chidrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reading Program SAT 9-10* Exercise M+W+F 9-10 Have Hammer Workshop Demo W 10-12* Intermediate Hatha Yoga T+ TH 2-3:30, SAT 1-2:30 Line Dancing T+TH 10-11:10 LIBRARIES Audio TH 10-12 Book & Video M-SAT 10-2 Library of Congress Books**/ Talking Books TH 10-12 Wilkes M-F 9:30-7, SAT 9:30-1 SOCIAL ACTIVITIES American History Lectures 3rd M 2-4* Beginners Digital Camera W 12-1 Beginners iPadClass 1st four F 2:30-4:30 Bridge 4 Fun M+W 1-4:30 Conversaciones in Espanol. M 10-12 Digital Camera Club M+W 10:30-11:50 Discussion Group W 12-1:30 Everyday Mindfulness M 10:30-11:30 )LOP$ÂżFLRQDGRV VWUG7+ )LOP$ÂżFLRQDGRV QGWK/DVW7+ Genealogy Last M 2-4 iStuff Discussion Group F 9:30-10:30 Learning Seminars T 12-1:30 Mac OS Class 1st M 12-1:30 Mac User Group 3rd W 3-4:30 Mahjong F 10-2:30 Music Jam TH 2-4 begins Dec 12* Needle Pushers T 10-12 Neill James Lectures T 2-3:30* Open Gaming 1st-3rd SUN 12:30-4:30* Pathways to Inner Peace SAT 2-3:30* Philosophy Group W 10:45-11:45 Scrabble M+F 12-2 Tournament Scrabble T 12-2 Windows Computer Group F 10:30-11:45 6(59,&( 6833257*52836 Gamblers Anonymous W 11-1 Green Group 1st T 3-4:30 Lakeside AA M +TH 4-5:45 MS Support Group 3rd W 3-4 NiĂąos de Chapala y Ajijic F 10-12 Open Circle SUN 10-12:15 SMART Recovery W 2:30-4 7,&.(76$/(60)

VIDEO LIBRARY NEW ADDITIONS New Additions for December See the Video Library bulletin board and the binders on the FRXQWHUWRÂżQGÂżOPVRILQWHUHVW -LUR 'UHDPV RI 6XVKL      ,Q WKH EDVHPHQW RI D7RN\R RIÂżFH building, 85 year old sushi master Jiro Ono works tirelessly in his renowned restaurant, His son, Yoshikazu faces the pressures of stepping into his father's shoes and taking over the legendary restaurant. Jiro relentlessly pursues his lifelong quest to create the perfect piece of sushi. Documentary %HKLQGWKH&DQGHODEUD  Based on the autobiographical novHOWKLVÂżOPUHFRXQWVWKHWHPSHVWXRXV\HDUUHODWLRQVKLSEHWZHHQ/LEHUDFH and his much younger lover, Scott Thorson. Matt Damon Michael Douglas (QURQ7KH6PDUWHVW*X\VLQWKH5RRP  7KLVLVDÂżOPDERXW the Enron corporation, its faulty and corrupt business practices and how they led to its downfall. Documentary The Wedding Banquet #6391 (1993) To satisfy his nagging parents, a gay landlord and a female tenant agree to a marriage of convenience, but when his parents visit, things go awry. Winston Chao May Chin Comedy (QGHDYRUÂą New series from the Masterpiece Mystery Theater follows the young Endeavour Morse in his early day as an Oxford constable working with CID and developing his notable personality traits. Shaun Evans Roger Allam Drama/Mystery Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re featuring three old â&#x20AC;&#x153;shoot â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em upsâ&#x20AC;?:7KH*XQÂżJKWHU(#6376) with Gregory Peck, Garden of Good and Evil (#6375) with Gary Cooper, and Rawhide (#6374) with Tyrone Power. More â&#x20AC;&#x153;oldiesâ&#x20AC;?: My Man Godfrey (#6386) with William Powell and Carol Lombard, and Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re No Angels with Humphrey Bogart and Peter Ustinov. All of the new additions for December are reviewed in the red catalogs at the Video Library and on the web page. If you have any VHS tapes that you would like to have transferred to DVD discs, the Video Library can do that for you at the very reasonable cost of 50 pesos per tape. The Video Library depends on volunteer couriers. If you are traveling north and returning in a timely manner or if someone is coming to visit you, you or your guests can act as couriers. We order the DVDs, pay for them, and ship them to the address you designate. Contact Tom at keanhombre@prodigy. net.mx.

A Message From the Book Mavens Those of you who donate your books to and/or purchase used ones are the backbone of the LCS Library. Your generosity allows us to purchase newer titles or replace lost/damaged books not available locally. We are also able WRHQULFKRXUÂżFWLRQDQGQRQÂżFWLRQFROOHFWLRQV There are no book vendors near us that carry titles in English, and new bestsellers may not be available for months unless weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky enough to have a member able bring books back from North America. Each donated book is evaluated: we check each one against our database and if we already own it, we check to see if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in better condition than ours. If so, we switch them. We put unneeded ones for sale in the Reading Room or held in storage for our upcoming book sales. Many periodicals unsuitable for our use are donated to local schools. Others worn/damaged beyond repair are donated and distributed to Mexican artists to be made into a papiermache product used in sculpture. Anything leftover goes to poor families for fuel. Every book you donate has value. Thanks for all you do. &RXULHUV6WLOO1HHGHG0HPEHUV2QO\ Mail6WRSE\WKHRIÂżFHWRSLFNXSPDLOIRUIHOORZPHPEHUVDQGDVNLIZH need stamps. Video -Ten DVDs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take up much space in your luggage. Contact keanhombre@prodigy.net.mx Books - You can also bring books if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re driving. Contact brendadawson81@yahoo.com

Saw you in the Ojo 79


Casi Nuevo News This past month, we had our third successful estate sale since we started managing estate sales in May. In less than two weeks, our volunteer sales team priced, advertised, promoted, staged--and then sold, all the contents of a large two-story house in one day! Casi Nuevo has proven that it can sell everything from a complete estate down to a single150 peso consignment item. Need a single source to sell your larger goods? Our store is capable of displaying many large furniture items. We carry and sell an assortment of decorator items, clothing and books; most of our merchandise is sold within 30 days. :HDUHDQDOOYROXQWHHURUJDQL]DWLRQ3URÂżWVVXSSRUW children in our three charities: School for Children with Special Needs, (formerly the School for the Deaf), LCS Community Education Program, and Have Hammer...Will Travel. Casi Nuevo is the store with the red door on the carretera in Riberas del Pilar on the corner across from 7-Eleven. We are open 10 am to 3 PM, Monday to Saturday. Stop by frequently, whether you want to sell that under-loved item or you want to furnish your new home. For further information on our estate sale services, please contact Jacqueline Smith at smithjacqueline55@gmail.com, 766-1303.

THURSDAY FILM AFICIONADOS /&60HPEHUV2QO\%ULQJ<RXU&DUG

$OOÂżOPVVKRZQLQWKH6DOD No food No pets December 5 - 12 PM Wild Bill 8.2QSDUROHDIWHU\HDUV%LOOUHWXUQVKRPHWRÂżQGKLVDQG 15-year old sons abandoned by their mother. December 12 - 2 PM Broken Circle Breakdown %HOJLXP$PD]LQJÂżOPKDSS\VDGDQGH[KLODUDWLQJ3RLJQDQWO\ URPDQWLFZLWKDWHUULÂżFVRXQGWUDFN $FDGHP\$ZDUG1RPLQHH

December 19 - 12 PM :DGMDGD 6DXGL$UDELD$PRYLHRIÂżUVWVWKHÂżUVWIHDWXUHÂżOPHYHUVKRWHQWLUHO\LQ6DXGL$UDELDDQGWKHÂżUVWIHDWXUHÂżOPHYHUPDGHE\DIHPDOH Saudi director. A new voice in a country where cinema has been all but silenced. (Academy Award Nominee) December 26 - 2 PM Populaire France 2013 Set in 1958, this is the story of Rose, a terrible secretary who lives at home while engaged to the son of a local mechanic. She VHHPVGHVWLQHGWRDTXLHWGUXGJHU\ÂżOOHGOLIHEXWWKDW VQRWZKDWVKH ORQJVIRU7KHPRVWSRSXODU)UHQFKÂżOPRIWKH\HDU

Thank You To Our Electronics Donors

&DW)DQF\ We have three orphaned little cat angels romping around the grounds who really need homes. Their mother was found dead a few weeks ago. Their sibling has found a home, and the three leftâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a black and white bandit, a caramel tiger and a smoky black one with yellow-grey eyes, need permanent families. We also need more dinero to care for our resident felines. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end, and our kitty, so to speak, has gotten very low. We need funds for food and medical care for our furry amigos. Please be generous. Make donations or ask about adopting one of our little buddies at the Patio table near the coffee shop. Muchas gracias!

A heartfelt thank you to all of the generous donors who contributed electronic equipment to LCS in the past. The equipment you donate is used by LCS for its operations and programs and is essential to our continued success. If you wish to make a donation of computers, audio equipment, and monitors in working order and accessories like keyboards and mice, contact the service desk at 766 1140 and tell them what you wish to donate and when you can deliver it. Muchas gracias!

Post life Update The new telephone number for the San Miguel Funeral Home is 01 33 13 88 56 27 You may use this number in addition to the main number 01 33 38 2515 56.

,PSRUWDQW$3DUNLQJ5HPLQGHU When you park your vehicles on Ajijicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s narrow streets, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to park as close to the curb as you can, and be sure your wheels are not turned out at an angle. Angled wheels and careless parking make it nearly impossible for other vehicles and large delivery and trash trucks to pass by or to avoid damaging your exterior mirrors.

LCS Closed

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THE LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY, A.C.

16 de Septiembre #16-A, Ajijic, Jalisco /&60DLQ2IÂżFH   2IÂżFHLQIRUPDWLRQDQGRWKHUVHUYLFHV0RQGD\Âą6DWXUGD\DPWRSP*URXQGVRSHQXQWLOSP LCS BOARD OF DIRECTORS President - Howard Feldstein (2014); Vice-President - Ben White (2015); Treasurer - Michael Searles (2015); Secretary - John Rider (2014); Directors: Karen Blue (2014); Lois Cugini (2015); Ernest Gabbard (2015); Aurora Michel Galindo (2015); Fred Harland (2015); Cate Howell (2015); Ann D. Houck (2014); Wallace Mills (2015). Executive Director - Terry Vidal

The LCS Newsletter is published monthly. Deadline for submissions is the 17th of the month preceding publication. News items may be e-mailed to Reba Mayo rebaelizabethhill@yahoo.com; cc to Terry Vidal tqv56431@yahoo.com Note: The editorial staff reserves the right to edit all submissions according to time, space availability and editorial decision.

80

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013


Saw you in the Ojo 81


EMERGENCY NUMBERS

Service

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$33/,$1&(6 - EL TIO SAM Tel: 766-5664, (33) 3811-0364

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- ARATI Tel: 766-0130 - ART HOUSE Tel: 765-5097 - DIANE PEARL COLECCIONES Tel: 766-5683 - EL MARIACHI Cell. 33-1138-8927 / 33-1768-1063 - EL PALOMAR Tel: 01 (33) 3635-5247 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - ZARAGOZA Tel: 766-0573

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Pag: 53 Pag: 56 3DJ 3DJ 3DJ 3DJ Pag: 50

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+($/7+ $63(&76 Cell: (045) 331-691-7567 Pag: 57 /$.(&+$3$/$&(17(5)2563,5,78$//,9,1* Tel: 766-0920 Pag: 06 - WELLNESS CENTER RESPIRO Tel: (045) 33-3157-7790 Pag: 69 - YOGA Tel: 766-0523 Pag: 58

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- BLUE ANGEL Tel: 766-0547 3DJ - EDGAR CEDEÃ&#x2018;O - MEXICO PROTECT Cell: (045) 33-3106-6982 3DJ 3$5.(5,1685$1&(6(59,&(6 Cell: (33) 3809-7116  3DJ - PROTEXPLAN U.S. Toll Free 1-800-608-5743 Mexico Toll Free 01-800-681-6730 Pag: 38 5$&+(/¶6,1685$1&( Tel/Fax: 765-4316 Pag: 35 - TIOCORP Tel: 766-3978 3DJ - WEST COAST MEXICO INSURANCE Tel: (818) 788-5353 3DJ

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Tel: 765-6666 3DJ '5/8&$6&255$/ Tel: 01 (33) 3641-1958 3DJ - GO-LAB Lake Chapala Tel: 106-0881 3DJ - HOSPITAL ANGELES DEL CARMEN Tel: (01) 3813-0042 Pag: 06 - ISILAB Tel: 766-1164 Pag: 08 /$.(6,'(0(',&$/*5283 Tel: 766-0395 3DJ - PLASTIC SURGEON-6HUJLR$JXLOD%LPEHOD0' Tel: 108-0595 3DJ 3/$67,&685*(5<'U%HQMDPLQ9LOODUDQ Tel: 766-5513, Cell 044-333-105-0402 Pag: 31 3/$67,&685*(5< 5(&216758&7,9( 'U0DQXHO-LPpQH]GHO7RUR Tel: 765-4805 Pag: 39 3/$=$0217$f$+($/7+ %($87< Tel: 766-5513 Pag: 31 5,&$5'2+(5(',$0' Tel: 765-2233 Pag: 60 - VARICOSE VEINS TREATMENT Tel: 765-4805 Pag: 75

- CIELOVISTA Tel: 766-4867 Pag: 51 - CHULA VISTA NORTE Tel: 766-2177 Cell: (045) 33-3841-8867 Pag: 07 &2/':(//%$1.(5&+$3$/$5($/7< Tel: 766-1152, 766-3369 Fax: 766-2124, Tels: 765-2877 Fax: 765-3528 Pag: 88 - COLLINS REAL ESTATE Tel: 766-4197 Pag: 61 - CONTINENTAL REALTY Tel: 766-1994 3DJ - FOR SALE BY OWNER Cell. 331-384-2821 3DJ - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: (387) 761-0903 Pag: 75 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: (374) 748-1658 Pag: 75 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Cell: 333-201-5102 3DJ - FOR SALE BY OWNER Cell. 331-093-6042 Pag: 56 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Pag: 80 - GEORGETTE RICHMOND Tel: 766-2077 Pag: 11 -8$1-26(*21=Ă&#x2C6;/(= Cell. 33-1113-0690 Pag: 53 /25(1$&%$55$*$1 Cell: (045) 331-014-5683 3DJ /25,)-(/67(' Cell: (045) 331-365-0558 Pag: 63 - MPR REAL ESTATE Tel: (315) 351-5167 Pag: 77 12e/23(= Cell: (045) 331-047-9607 Pag: 19 3(7(567-2+1 Tel: 765-3676 Pag: 36, 66 - RAUL GONZALEZ Cell: 33-1437-0925 Pag: 03 - SANDI ALLIN BRISCOE Tel: 765-2484 3DJ - SARA ARREOLA Cell: 331-438-8489 3DJ

Tel: 766-1444, 766-2049 Pag: 03 - â&#x20AC;&#x153; LA TAVERNAâ&#x20AC;?DEI QUATTRO MORI Tel: 766-2848 Pag: 16 /$85,Âś60$5.(7&$)( Cell. 33-1466-4553 Pag: 63 - LOS MOLLETES Tel: 766-4296 3DJ - LOS TELARES Tel: 766-0428 Pag: 30 - MANIX Tel: 766-0061 Pag: 36 0(/Âś6 Cell. 331-402-4223 Pag: 57 020Â?6'(/, 5(67$85$17 Tel: 765-5719 Pag: 13 - NUMBER FOUR Tel: 766-1360 Pag: 17, 33, 35 - PANINO Tel: 766-3822 3DJ 3(55<Âś6  3DJ - PIZZERIA TOSCANA Tel: 765-6996 Pag: 15 - SPANISH PAELLA Tel: 766-2225 Pag: 79 7+(&2))((.,1*'20 Cell: 33-1115-6584 Pag: 15 7+(3($&2&.*$5'(1 Tel: 766-1381 Pag: 38 721<Âś6 Tel: 766-1614, 766-4069 Pag: 19 - YVES Tel: 766-3565 Pag: 39

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&2/':(//%$1.(5&+$3$/$5($/7< Tel: 766-1152, movile: (045) 33-1175-9632 3DJ - FOR RENT Tel: 765-2671 Pag: 79 - HACIENDA PMR Pag: 67 Tel: 766-3320 -25*(7255(6 Tel: 766-3737 3DJ - MANZANILLO VACATION RENTALS Tel: (314) 100-6773 or (314) 125-28173DJ - RENTAL CENTER Tel: 765-3838 Pag: 58 - RENTAL LOCATERS Pag: 63 Tel: 766-5202 - SANTANA RENTALS Cell: 315-104-3283, Pag: 77 - THE PENTHOUSE Tel: 765-4521 Pag: 58 - VILLAS DEL SOL Tel: 766-1152 Pag: 77

029(56 /$.(&+$3$/$029,1* Tel: 766-5008 - STROM-WHITE MOVERS Tel: 766-4049

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1856(5< - LAS PALMAS Cell: 33-3170-1776/33-1195-7112 - SAN ANTONIO VIVERO Tel: 766-2191 - VIVERO AZUCENA Tel: 766-4289

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3(5621$/$66,67$1&( - NEWCOMERS ILSE HOFFMANN ilsecarlota40@gmail.com www.guadalajarachapalatravelguide.com Tel 01(33)3647-3912 Cell 33-3157-2541 - RIGHT HAND SERVICES Cell: 331-147-9319

Pag: 56

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63$0$66$*( %$/1(5,26$1-8$1&26$/$ Tel: (387) 761-0302 - HYDROPOOL Tel: 766-4030 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - MARIELE Tel: 766-4229 - TOTAL BODY CARE Tel: 766-3379 - WELLNESS CENTER RESPIRO Tel: (045) 33-3157-7790

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COMPUTERS FOR SALE: ,ĞǁůĞƩ WĂĐŬĂƌĚ >ĂƐĞƌ:Ğƚ WϭϬϬϲ͘ ůŵŽƐƚ ŶĞǁ͕ ŶĞǁ ĐĂƌƚƌŝĚŐĞ ĐĂŶŶŽƚ ƵƐĞ ŝƚ ĂŶLJŵŽƌĞďĞĐĂƵƐĞ/ŝŶƐƚĂůůĞĚtŝŶĚŽǁƐϴ͘/ĨLJŽƵĂƌĞ ƵƐŝŶŐtŝŶϳŽƌůŽǁĞƌƚŚŝƐŝƐĂŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚŽƉƉŽƌƚƵŶŝƚLJƚŽŚĂǀĞĂŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͘EĞǁWƌŝĐĞŝƐ Ψϭϲϴ͘ϬϬh^ƚŽΨϭϳϴ͘ϬϬh^͘ FOR SALE: >ĞŶŽǀŽ /ĚĞĂ ƉĂĚ ϭ ϮϮϮϴϮh ϳͲ/Ŷ͘^ůŝŐŚƚůLJƵƐĞĚĞǀĞƌLJƚŚŝŶŐǁŽƌŬƐĮŶĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭϳϱ͘ϬϬ͘ FOR SALE: >'ϭϴŝŶĐŚŵŽŶŝƚŽƌ͕'ƌĞĂƚĨŽƌƵƐŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ ƐŵĂůů ůĂƉƚŽƉ ƐĐƌĞĞŶƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ Ψϭ͕ϭϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬ͘ϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: DĂŐŝĐ ũĂĐŬ ƉůƵƐ͕ ΨϴϬ ĚŽůůĂƌƐ ŝŶ ƐƚĂƚĞƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬ͘ FOR SALE: KŶĞͲLJĞĂƌ ŽůĚ /ƉĂĚ ϯ͕ ǁŝƚŚ ĚĞƚĂĐŚĂďůĞ ŬĞLJďŽĂƌĚ͘ /Ŷ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ ZĞĚ ĐŽǀĞƌĂŶĚĐŚĂƌŐĞƌŝŶĐůƵĚĞĚ͘WŝĐƚƵƌĞƐŽŶƌĞƋƵĞƐƚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϴ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϬϰϱͲϯϯϭͲϯϴϮͲϰϳϳϭ͘ FOR SALE: ,W>ĂƉƚŽƉ͕dǁŽͲLJĞĂƌŽůĚ,WWĂǀŝůŝŽŶĚǀϲ͘DsŝƐŝŽŶ͕YƵĂĚŽƌĞ͕ϳϬϬ',ĂƌĚ ƌŝǀĞ͕tŝŶĚŽǁƐϳ͘WŝĐƚƵƌĞŽŶƌĞƋƵĞƐƚ͘/ŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϳ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϬϰϱͲϯϯϭͲϯϴϮͲϰϳϳϭ͘ FOR SALE:Ğůů^ƚƵĚŝŽyW^ϳϭϬϬнϮϰ͟^ĐƌĞĞŶ͘ tŝŶĚŽǁƐϳWƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂů͘ŽƉLJƌŝŐŚƚϮϬϬϵDŝĐƌŽƐŽŌ͘^LJƐƚĞŵdLJƉĞϲϰͲďŝƚKƉĞƌĂƟŶŐ^LJƐƚĞŵ͘WƌŽĐĞƐƐŽƌDWŚĞŶŽŶ;dDͿ//yϲϭϬϵϬdWƌŽĐĞƐƐŽƌ͘ EŝĐĞĞƐŬƚŽƉ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϴ͕ϬϬϬ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: WƌŝŶƚĞƌ͕ŚƉϳϵϲϬƉŚŽƚŽƐŵĂƌƚ͕ĨŽƵƌ ĐŽůŽƌŝŶŬũĞƚ͕ůŝŬĞŶĞǁ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϱϬŵdžƉ͘ĂůůϯϳϲͲ ϳϲϲͲϱϰϱϮ͘

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ŚĂƉĂůĂ͘tĞĂƌĞůŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌĞŝƚŚĞƌĂĚŽŶĂƟŽŶŽƌ ƐŽŵĞƚŚŝŶŐĐŚĞĂƉ͘ FOR SALE: dǁŽ ƚĞŶŶ͘ ǁĂůŬĞƌƐ͕ ƉĂůŽŵŝŶŽ ŵĂƌĞϭϭLJƌƐŽůĚĂŶĚŽŶĞƐƚƵĚƚĞŶŶ͘tĂůŬĞƌ͕ďŽƚŚ ĂƌĞ ǀĞƌLJ ŐŽŽĚ ŚŽƌƐĞƐ ĂŶĚ ĞĂƐLJ ƚŽ ƌŝĚĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬƵƐĞĂĐŚ͘ FOR SALE: ϰĚŽŐŬĞŶŶĞůƐ͘ϮŵĞĚŝƵŵĐŽůůĂƉƐŝďůĞ ǁŝƌĞ ŬĞŶŶĞůƐ ϮϱŝŶ ůŽŶŐ yϭϴ ŝŶ ǁŝĚĞ y Ϯϭ ŝŶ ,ŝŐŚ͘ ϭ ŵĞĚŝƵŵ ƐŽŌ ƐŝĚĞ ĐŽůůĂƉƐŝďůĞ ŬĞŶŶĞů ΨϯϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ϭƐŵĂůůƉůĂƐƟĐŬĞŶŶĞůΨϭϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬ͘ϬϬ͘

GENERAL MERCHANDISE FOR SALE: &ƌĞŶĐŚͲŵĂĚĞ ŽƉƉĞƌ ƉĂŶƐ ZŽŶĚĞĂƵ ĂƐƐĞƌŽůĞ ǁŝƚŚ ůŝĚ ϭϬ͟ ʹ ϱϬϬƉ͘ ZŽƵŶĚ ĂƵ 'ƌĂƟŶ ƉĂŶ ϭϬ Ъ ͟ ʹ ϯϬϬƉ͘ KǀĂů ĂƵ 'ƌĂƟŶ ƉĂŶ ϭϮ͟džϴ͟ʹϯϬϬƉ͘ƌĞƉĞƉĂŶϴ͟ʹϯϬϬƉ͘DŽƵůĚϳ͟Ͳ ϮϬϬƉ͘DŽƵůĚϱЪ͞ʹϭϱϬƉ͘ƉůƵƐDĞƌŝŶŐƵĞŵŝdžŝŶŐ ďŽǁůϴ͟ʹϮϬϬƉ͘ FOR SALE: ƌĂƉƉĞůůŝŶŐ ƌŽƉĞ ϭϳϱ ĨĞĞƚ͘ ƉƵƌĐŚĂƐĞĚEKĨŽƌŽƵƌĐůŝŵďŝŶŐĐůƵďŚĞƌĞĂƚ>ĂŬĞƐŝĚĞͲ^tdͬZĂŶŐĞƌŚĞĂǀLJĚƵƚLJƌĂƉƉĞůůŝŶŐƌŽƉĞ͕ ĐůŝŵďŝŶŐ ƐƚĂƟĐ ƌŽƉĞ͘ ,ŝŐŚ ƚĞŶƐŝůĞ ƐƚƌĞŶŐƚŚ ŶLJůŽŶĐŽƌĞ͘dŽƉƋƵĂůŝƚLJƐƚĂƟĐƌŽƉĞĨŽƌƌĂƉƉĞůůŝŶŐ͕ ĐůŝŵďŝŶŐ͕ĐĂǀŝŶŐΘƌĞƐĐƵĞ͘ϳ͕ϮϬϬƉŽƵŶĚƚĞƐƚ͘hs ƌĞƐŝƐƚĂŶĐĞĂŶĚĚƵƌĂďŝůŝƚLJ͘WƌĞͲƐŚƌƵŶŬƚŽƌĞĚƵĐĞ ƐŚƌŝŶŬĂŐĞ͘ /ĚĞĂů ĨŽƌ ǁĞƚ ƵƐĞƐ͘ ŝĂŵĞƚĞƌ͗ ϳͬϭϲ͟ ;ŝŶĐŚͿ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϲϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ;ĞĂĐŚͿ͘ FOR SALE: ^ĐƌĂďďůĞͲĞůƵdžĞͲtŝƚŚͲdƵƌŶƚĂďůĞ͘ džĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ ǁŝƚŚ Ăůů ƚŚĞ ƉŝĞĐĞƐ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ďŽdžŝƐĂůƐŽŝŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ΨϮϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:ŽƐƚĐŽ<ŝƌŬůĂŶĚ^ŝŐŶĂƚƵƌĞ^ƚĂŝŶůĞƐƐ ^ƚĞĞů WƌŽƉĂŶĞ 'ƌŝůů ŵŽĚĞů WϮϲϬϬ>͘ dǁŽ ĐĂƐƚ ŝƌŽŶďƵƌŶĞƌƐ;ϰϬ͕ϬϬϬdhͿĂŶĚŝŶĨƌĂƌĞĚƌŽƟƐƐĞƌŝĞ;ϭϰ͕ϬϬϬdhͿ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϱ͕ϱϬϬ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϱϲϴϲ͘ FOR SALE:^ŚĂǁͬ^ƚĂƌŚŽŝĐĞ^ZϱϬϱ,ƌĞĐĞŝǀĞƌĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞǁŝƚŚƌĞŵŽƚĞĂŶĚĐĂďůĞƐƚŽĐŽŶŶĞĐƚ ƚŽ ds ;s/ ƚŽ ,D/ Žƌ ĐŽŵƉŽŶĞŶƚͿ͘&ƌĞĞ ĂŶĚ ĐůĞĂƌ ƚŽ ďĞ ĂĐƟǀĂƚĞĚ͘ Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ͘ FOR SALE:ƵƚŽŐƌĂƉŚĞĚ&ŝƌƐƚĚŝƟŽŶƐ͘ŽŽŬƐ͘ 'ƌĞĂƚ ŚƌŝƐƚŵĂƐ ŐŝŌƐ Ăƚ ƌŽĐŬͲďŽƩŽŵ ƉƌŝĐĞƐ͘ ƚŚĞƐĞĂƵƚŽŐƌĂƉŚĞĚĮƌƐƚĞĚŝƟŽŶƐ͗d,'͕ďLJ ŝĐŬ&ƌĂŶĐŝƐ͕ΨϮϱϬWĞƐŽƐ͖>//KZE͕ďLJƌŶŽůĚZ͘ƌŽǁŶ͕ΨϮϬϬW^K^͖Dz^>^dKDDE͕ ďLJ &ƌĂŶŬ >ĂƵŵĞƌ͕ ΨϮϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ͖ E /E K^dKE͕ DhZZ d  &/EE KEsEd/KE͕ ďLJ 'Ăŝů ͘ &ĂƌƌĞůůLJ͕ ΨϱϬ WĞƐŽ͘ / ĂůƐŽ ŚĂǀĞ ƚŚĞ ĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐ ŚĂƌĚĐŽǀĞƌ &ŝƌƐƚ ĚŝƟŽŶƐ͕ ŶŽƚ ƐŝŐŶĞĚ͕ ĞĂĐŚ Ăƚ ΨϭϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ͗ WĂƚƌŝĐŝĂ ŽƌŶǁĞůů͕ WKZd DKZdhZz͖ WĂƚƌŝĐŝĂ ŽƌŶǁĞůů͕ ^ZWdd͖ ZŽďŝŶ ŽŽŬ͕ ^,K<͖ :ŽŶĞůůĞŶ ,ĞĐŬůĞƌ͕ t,/d >/^͖ ĂŶĚ :ĂŵĞƐ WĂƩĞƌƐŽŶ͕ ϰƚŚ ŽĨ :ƵůLJ͘ Ăůů:ŝŵdŝƉƚŽŶĂƚ;ϯϳϲͿϳϲϱϳϲϴϵ͘ FOR SALE:ŽnjĞŶƐŽĨƉůĂƐƟĐƐƚŽƌĂŐĞďŽdžĞƐŽĨ ĂůůƐŝnjĞƐ͘ FOR SALE:DĂƚƌŝŵŽŶŝĂůďĞĚĞŶƐĞŵďůĞ͘EĞĂƌůLJŶĞǁ͘'ŽŽĚƋƵĂůŝƚLJ͕ŵĞĚŝƵŵĮƌŵ͕ĚŽƵďůĞƐŝnjĞ ;ŵĂƚƌŝŵŽŶŝĂůͿ ŵĂƩƌĞƐƐ ůĞƐƐ ƚŚĂƚ ϭ LJƌ ŽůĚ ǁŝƚŚ ǀŝŶLJů ƉƌŽƚĞĐƚŽƌ͕ ĮƩĞĚ ŵĂƩƌĞƐƐ ƉĂĚ͕ Ϯ ƐĞƚƐ ŽĨ ƐŚĞĞƚƐ͕ĞLJĞůĞƚůĂĐĞďĞĚƐŬŝƌƚ͕ůŝŐŚƚůLJƋƵŝůƚĞĚĐŽǀĞƌůĞƚ ĂŶĚ ƐŽůŝĚ ǁŽŽĚ ĚŽƵďůĞ ƐŝnjĞ ďĞĚ ƉůĂƞŽƌŵ ǁŝƚŚ ϭϮ͟ ĐůĞĂƌĂŶĐĞ ĨŽƌ ƐƚŽƌĂŐĞ ĂĐĐĞƐƐ ƵŶĚĞƌŶĞĂƚŚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϳϱϬƉĞƐŽƐKK͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲ ϰϲϭϵ͘ FOR SALE:ŚƌŝƐƚŵĂƐdĂďůĞƚŽƉƌƌĂŶŐĞŵĞŶƚ͘ ĞĂƵƟĨƵů ŚƌŝƐƚŵĂƐ dĂďůĞƚŽƉ ƌƌĂŶŐĞŵĞŶƚ͘ tĞ ďŽƵŐŚƚ ŝƚ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ h^ ĂŶĚ ƵƐĞĚ ŝƚ ŽŶůLJ ŽŶĞ ƐĞĂƐŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϭϳϬ͘ϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ͘ ŽŶƚĂĐƚ ŵĞ Ăƚ ĞƌŶƐƚͺŐƌĂĨΛLJĂŚŽŽ͘ĐŽŵŽƌĐĂůůŵĞĂƚϳϲϲͲϯϮϭϬ͘ FOR SALE:ϮůŝǀŝŶŐƌŽŽŵĨĂďƌŝĐĐŚĂŝƌƐ͘^ůŝŐŚƚůLJ ƵƐĞĚ ŝŶ ǀĞƌLJ ŐŽŽĚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ KŶĞ ŽƌĂŶŐĞ ĂŶĚ ŽŶĞ ƌƵƐƚ ĂŶĚ ĐƌĞĂŵ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϵϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ͘ FOR SALE:YƵĞĞŶ^ŝnjĞŵƵůƟĐŽůŽƌĞĚĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĞƌ͘ΨϮϱϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ůƐŽƋƵĞĞŶƐŝnjĞŽīǁŚŝƚĞĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĞƌΨϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ͘ FOR SALE: YƵĞĞŶ ƐŝnjĞ ^ƵŶďĞĂŵ ŚĞĂƚĞĚ ďůĂŶŬĞƚ͘ϮϬǁĂƌŵŝŶŐƐĞƫŶŐƐ͕ϭϬŚŽƵƌĂƵƚŽŽī͕ ŵĂĐŚŝŶĞǁĂƐŚĂďůĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲ

El Ojo del Lago / December 2013

ϰϭϬϱ͘ FOR SALE:<ŝŶŐƐŝnjĞĚƵǀĞƚ͘ΨϳϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘tŚŝƚĞ ŬŝŶŐƐŝnjĞĚƵǀĞƚĐŽǀĞƌΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ůƐŽŬŝŶŐƐŝnjĞ ĚƵǀĞƚ ĐŽǀĞƌ ĂŶĚ ƐŚĂŵƐ Ͳ ĐƌĞĂŵ ǁŝƚŚ ďƌŽǁŶ ƐƟƚĐŚŝŶŐΨϰϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ͘ FOR SALE: <ŝŶŐ ƐŝnjĞ ƵǀĞƚ ^Ğƚ͘ ϯϬϬ ƚŚƌĞĂĚ ĐŽƵŶƚ ϭϬϬй ĐŽƩŽŶ ďůĂĐŬ ĂŶĚ ǁŚŝƚĞ ĞďƌĂ ƉƌŝŶƚ </E' hsd KD&KZdZ KsZ н </E' ^,D^ ^d ĨƌŽŵ ZĞŐĂů ŽůůĞĐƟŽŶ ŽĨ >hyhZz >/EE^ ŝƐ ďƌĂŶĚ ŶĞǁ ĂŶĚ ĐŽŵĞƐ ŝŶ ŝƚƐ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ƉĂĐŬĂŐĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϱϱϬ͘ ŽŶƚĂĐƚ ŵĞ Ăƚ ĞƌŶƐƚͺŐƌĂĨΛLJĂŚŽŽ͘ĐŽŵ Žƌ ĐĂůůŵĞĂƚϳϲϲͲϯϮϭϬ͘ FOR SALE: DŽǀŝĞƐ Ăůů ƉůĂLJ ǁĞůů ĂŶĚ ĂƌĞ ŝŶ ŶŐůŝƐŚ͘DŽƐƚůLJĂĐƟŽŶĚƌĂŵĂ͕ƐŽŵĞĐŚŝĐŬŇŝĐŬƐ͕ ĐŚŽƐĞŶ ďLJ ǁĞůů ŬŶŽǁŶ ĂĐƚŽƌƐ͘ WůĞĂƐĞ ĐŽŶƚĂĐƚ ĨŽƌƉƌŝǀĂƚĞƐŚŽǁŝŶŐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘Ăůů͗ ϯϯϭͲϯϭϵͲϭϬϭϮ͘ WANTED: dƌĂŝůĞƌ͘ WůĞĂƐĞ ĐĂůů ϳϲϯͲϱϬϴϲ Žƌ ĞŵĂŝů͘ FOR SALE:>ĂĚŝĞƐ'ƌĂƉŚŝƚĞ'ŽůĨůƵďƐ͘^t͘Wt͕ ϵƚŽϯ/ƌŽŶĂŶĚWƵƩĞƌϱǁŽŽĚ͕ϯǁŽŽĚĂŶĚĚƌŝǀĞƌ͘ ŽǀĞƌƐ ĨŽƌ Ăůů ĐůƵďƐ ƵƐƚŽŵ ďƵŝůƚ ĐůƵďƐͲůŝŬĞ ŶĞǁ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϯϭͲϯϮϰͲϬϰϮϵ͘ WANTED:>ŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌĂƉŽƌƚĂďůĞƵƉƚŽϭϬŬ dh͘dŚĞƚLJƉĞLJŽƵǀĞŶƚǁŝƚŚŚŽƐĞ͘ĂůůŽďϯϯϭͲ ϳϳϰͲϳϵϲϯ͘ FOR SALE: Ϯ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐ ŚĞĂƚĞƌƐ͕ ϭϱϬϬ ǁĂƩƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘džĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϰϬϬƉĞĂĐŚ͘ FOR SALE:ϰƉĂŝƌƐŽĨĚƵŵďďĞůůƐϯϱηϰϬηϰϱη ϱϬηƉůƵƐĂƌĂĐŬĨŽƌƐƚŽƌĂŐĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬƉ͘ FOR SALE:>'dZKDD͕ůĂƌŐĞĚƌƵŵĨƌŽŶƚůŽĂĚ ǁĂƐŚŝŶŐ ŵĂĐŚŝŶĞ͘ džĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐůĞĂŶ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϬϬƵƐĚ͘ FOR SALE:>ĂƌŐĞWŝnjnjĂKǀĞŶ͕ƌĞĨƌĂĐƚŽƌLJƐƚŽŶĞ͕ ĨŽƌ ϰ ůĂƌŐĞ ƉŝnjnjĂƐ͘ ŽƵŐŚƚ ĨŽƌ Ψϵ͕ϬϬϬ͘ ƐŬŝŶŐ Ψϲ͕ϬϬϬ͘ WƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂů ĞĞƉ ĨƌLJĞƌ͕ Ăůů ƐƚĂŝŶůĞƐƐ ƐƚĞĞů͕ dǁŽ ďĂƐŬĞƚƐ ďŽƵŐŚƚ ĨŽƌ Ψϲ͕ϳϬϬ͘ ƐŬŝŶŐ Ψϱ͕ϬϬϬ͘^ƚĂƟŽŶĂƌLJWƌŽƉĂŶĞdĂŶŬ͕ϯϬϬůƚ͘ǁŝƚŚĂůů ĮdžƚƵƌĞƐ͕;ǀĂůǀĞƐ͕ƌĞŐƵůĂƚŽƌ͘͘͘ͿŽƵŐŚƚĨŽƌΨϰ͕ϳϬϬ͘ ƐŬŝŶŐ Ψϯ͕ϱϬϬ͘ǀĞƌLJƚŚŝŶŐ ďŽƵŐŚƚ ďƌĂŶĚ ŶĞǁ͘ KŶůLJϰŵŽŶƚŚƐŽĨƵƐĞ͘Ăůů͗ϯϯϭͲϯϮϰͲϵϳϭϮ FOR SALE: 'Wy ,ŽŵĞ DƵƐŝĐ ^LJƐƚĞŵ͘ ƌĂŶĚ ŶĞǁ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ďŽdž͘ ,ŽŵĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ƐLJƐƚĞŵ ǁŝƚŚ Ϯ ĐŚĂŶŶĞů ƐƚĞƌĞŽ ƐŽƵŶĚ &ĞĂƚƵƌĞƐ͗ dŽƉͲůŽĂĚ  ƉůĂLJĞƌ Dͬ&D ƌĂĚŝŽ ƵŝůƚͲŝŶ &D ǁŝƌĞ ĂŶƚĞŶŶĂ ͬďƵŝůƚͲŝŶDĂŶƚĞŶŶĂLJŶĂŵŝĐĂƐƐŽŽƐƚ^LJƐƚĞŵ ĞƚĂĐŚĂďůĞ ƐƚĞƌĞŽ ƐƉĞĂŬĞƌƐ ZĞŵŽƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ĐŽŶƚƌŽůƐϬ͘ϳ͟ŶĞŐĂƟǀĞ>ĚŝƐƉůĂLJǁŝƚŚďůƵĞ ďĂĐŬůŝŐŚƚ ŝŵŵĞƌ ĐŽŶƚƌŽů ŝŐŝƚĂů ĐůŽĐŬ ǁŝƚŚ ŝWŽĚ͕ ͕ ƌĂĚŝŽ ĂůĂƌŵ ĂƩĞƌLJ ďĂĐŬƵƉ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϲϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:ͲŝŐĂƌĞƩĞŐŽͲŝŐĂƐĞ,ŽůĚĞƌ WŽƵĐŚ>ĂŶLJĂƌĚEĞĐŬůĂĐĞůĂĐŬΨϭϬϬƉĞĂĐŚ͘Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ĂƌŬ ďůƵĞ ůĞĂƚŚĞƌ͕ ϯ ƉŽƐŝƟŽŶ ƌĞĐůŝŶĞƌ͘sĞƌLJĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϱϬϬ͘ϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WANTED:/ŶĞĞĚĂƉƌŽƉĂŶĞŝŶĚŽŽƌŚĞĂƚĞƌĨŽƌ Ă ǁĂƌŵĞƌ ďĞĚƌŽŽŵ͘ ŵĂŝů ŵĞ Ăƚ ũŝŵǁϮϬϯϬΛ ŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵǁŝƚŚLJŽƵƌĂƐŬŝŶŐƉƌŝĐĞŽƌƉŚŽŶĞ'> ŵŽƐƚ ŵŽƌŶŝŶŐƐ ďĞĨŽƌĞ ϭϭ͗ϬϬĂŵ Ăƚ ;ϬϭϯϯͿϯϭϮϭ ϮϯϵϱΘĂƐŬĨŽƌ:ŝŵt͘ WANTED: >ŽŽŬŝŶŐ ĨŽƌ ŶĞǁ Žƌ ƵƐĞĚ ŚĂƌĚďŽŝůĞĚĞŐŐĐŽŽŬĞƌ͘ĂůůϭͲϱWDϳϲϱͲϳϲϮϵ͘ FOR SALE:EĞǁŬĞƩůĞďĞůů͕ϭϬůďƐ͘ΨϭϵϵƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WĂŝƌϱůďĨƌĞĞǁĞŝŐŚƚƐΨϭϴϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘WĂŝƌϯůďĨƌĞĞ ǁĞŝŐŚƚƐΨϭϱϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ĂůůϭͲϱWDϳϲϱͲϳϲϮϵ͘ FOR SALE:/ŚĂǀĞϮŽĨƚŚĞƐĞ͗ŚƩƉ͗ͬͬǁǁǁ͘ĂŵĂnjŽŶ͘ĐŽŵͬ^ŚĂƌƉͲy>Ͳ^ϱϬͲϱͲŝƐĐ DŝĐƌŽƐLJƐƚĞŵͬ ĚƉͬϬϬϬϭtsϲϭKͬƌĞĨсĐŵͺĐƌͺƉƌͺƉƌŽĚƵĐƚͺƚŽƉ͘ EŽƐƉĞĂŬĞƌƐŽƌƌĞŵŽƚĞĐŽŶƚƌŽůŝŶĐůƵĚĞƐƉŽǁĞƌ ĐĂďůĞ͘ /Ĩ LJŽƵ ĂůƌĞĂĚLJ ŚĂǀĞ ƐƉĞĂŬĞƌƐ ǁŝƌĞĚ ŝŶƚŽ LJŽƵƌŚŽƵƐĞƚŚĞƐĞǁŝůůĚƌŝǀĞƚŚĞŵ͘ΨϮϱĞĂĐŚ͘ FOR SALE:,ĞƌĞŝƐĂĚĞƐĐƌŝƉƟŽŶ͗ŚƩƉ͗ͬͬǁǁǁ͘ ĂŵĂnjŽŶ͘ĐĂͬtŚŽůĞͲ,ŽƵƐĞͲdƌĂŶƐŵŝƚƚĞƌͲ'ŽůĚͲ ĚŝƟŽŶͬĚƉͬϬϬϴϴzy<ϰ/͘ 'ƌĞĂƚ ĨŽƌ ƚƌĂŶƐŵŝƫŶŐ ƐĂƚĞůůŝƚĞƌĂĚŝŽŽƌŝWŽĚͬŝWŚŽŶĞŵƵƐŝĐƚŽĂůůLJŽƵƌ ŚŽŵĞƌĂĚŝŽƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬ͘ FOR SALE: 'ƌĞĂƚ ĨŽƌ ĐŽŶƚƌŽůůŝŶŐ /Z ĚĞǀŝĐĞƐ ŝŶ ĂŶŽƚŚĞƌ ƌŽŽŵ Žƌ ďĞŚŝŶĚ ĐůŽƐĞĚ ĚŽŽƌƐ ŝŶ Ă ĐĂďŝŶĞƚ͘ ,ĞƌĞ ŝƐ ƉƌŽĚƵĐƚ ĚĞƐĐƌŝƉƟŽŶ͗

ŚƚƚƉ͗ͬͬǁǁǁ͘ƌĂĚŝŽƐŚĂĐŬ͘ĐŽŵͬƉƌŽĚƵĐƚͬŝŶĚĞdž͘ ũƐƉ͍ƉƌŽĚƵĐƚ/ĚсϮϬϰϵϲϰϮ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϯϱ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŚĂǁ ϲϬ ůůŝƉƟĐĂů ŝƐŚ͘ YƵĂĚ ĚŝƐŚ͕ǁŽƌŬƐǁŝƚŚŽůĚĞƌƌĞĐĞŝǀĞƌƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ϱϬ͘ FOR SALE: ^ZϮϬϳ ^ŚĂǁͬ^ƚĂƌ ŚŽŝĐĞ ƐƚĂŶĚĂƌĚĚĞĮŶŝƟŽŶƌĞĐĞŝǀĞƌ;ŶŽƚ,ͿĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞǁŝƚŚ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ͕ƉŽǁĞƌĐŽƌĚ͕ĂŶĚĐĂďůĞƚŽĐŽŶŶĞĐƚƚŽds͘ &ƌĞĞĂŶĚĐůĞĂƌƚŽďĞĂĐƟǀĂƚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϳϱϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ FOR SALE: DŽƚŽƌŽůĂ ^ZϲϯϬ , WsZ ǁŝƚŚ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ ĂŶĚ ,D/͘ ZĞĐŽƌĚ ŽŶĞ ĐŚĂŶŶĞů ǁŚŝůĞ ǁĂƚĐŚŝŶŐĂŶŽƚŚĞƌ͘&ƌĞĞĂŶĚĐůĞĂƌƚŽďĞĂĐƟǀĂƚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϰ͕ϰϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ͘ FOR SALE:EĞĂƌůLJŶĞǁŚĞĂƚĞƌƉĞƌĨĞĐƚĨŽƌƚŚĞ ƵƉĐŽŵŝŶŐ ǁŝŶƚĞƌ͘ ĂŶ ĂĐƚƵĂůůLJ ŚĞĂƚ ĂŶ ĞŶƟƌĞ ŚŽƵƐĞ͘dŚŝƐŝƐĂŶŝŶĨƌĂƌĞĚƵŶŝƚǁŝƚŚϮĨĂŶŵŽƚŽƌƐ ƉůƵƐ ŐĂƐ ŇĂŵĞ ǁŝƚŚ ĐĞƌĂŵŝĐ ƌĞƚĞŶƟŽŶ ĚĞǀŝĐĞƐ͘ sĞƌLJ ŚŝŐŚ ĞŶĚ͘ / ƉĂŝĚ Ψϭϴϵ ĨŽƌ ŝƚ ďƵƚ ǁŝůů ƚĂŬĞ ΨϭϬϬ ĂƐ / ŶĞĞĚ ƚŽ ƐĞůů ĂƐ ǁĞ ĂƌĞ ŵŽǀŝŶŐ ďĂĐŬ EŽƌƚŚ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϯͲϱϬϴϲ͘ FOR SALE: WŽƌƚĂďůĞ 'ĞŶĞƌĂƚŽƌ͘ DŽĚĞů ϯϬϬϬ ;ϯϬϬϬ ǁĂƩͿ ƐĞĞ ŚƩƉ͗ͬͬǁǁǁ͘ĂŵĂnjŽŶ͘ĐŽŵͬ WƌŽ&ŽƌĐĞͲWŽǁĞƌŵĂƚĞͲWŽƌƚĂďůĞͲ'ĞŶĞƌĂƚŽƌͲ WDϬϭϬϯϬϬϭͬĚƉͬϬϬϯϬϱ/ϭY͘ƐLJŽƵĐĂŶƐĞĞŝƚ ƐĞůůƐĨŽƌĂƌŽƵŶĚΨϲϬϬǁŝƚŚƐŚŝƉƉŝŶŐ͘/ƚŝƐĂƐƚĞĂů ĂƚΨϮϱϬďƵƚǁĞŵƵƐƚƐĞůůĂƐǁĞĂƌĞŵŽǀŝŶŐďĂĐŬ EŽƌƚŚ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϯͲϱϬϴϲ͘ FOR SALE: / ƉƵƌĐŚĂƐĞĚ ƚŚŝƐ ůůŝƉƟĐĂů dƌĂŝŶĞƌ ŶĞǁ ŚĞƌĞ ŝŶ 'ƵĂĚĂůĂũĂƌĂ ĨŽƌ ϭϮ͕ϳϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ƐŽ LJŽƵ ŬŶŽǁ ŝƚ ŝƐ ƚŽƉͲŽĨͲƚŚĞͲ>ŝŶĞ͘ tĞ ĂƌĞ ŵŽǀŝŶŐ ďĂĐŬEŽƌƚŚĂŶĚƚŚŝƐŚĞĂǀLJĚƵƚLJŵĂĐŚŝŶĞŝƐƋƵŝƚĞ ĐŽƐƚůLJ ƚŽ ƐŚŝƉ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϯ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲ ϳϲϯͲϱϬϴϲ͘ FOR SALE: ƵƐƚŽŵ ĞƐŝŐŶ ^ĞĐƟŽŶĂů Θ ĐŚĂŝƌ͘ sĞƌLJ ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞ ƐĞĐƟŽŶĂů ĂŶĚ ĐŚĂŝƌ͘ dƵdžĞĚŽ ƐƚLJůĞ͕ǁŝƚŚďůĂĐŬĂŶĚǁŚŝƚĞǁŽǀĞŶĨĂďƌŝĐ͘ƵƐŚŝŽŶƐĂƌĞĚĞƚĂĐŚĞĚ͕ƚǁŽͲƐŝĚĞĚ͕ǁŝƚŚnjŝƉƉĞƌƐ͘^ĞĐƟŽŶĂů ϭϭϬ͟ dž ϵϬ͘͟ ŚĂŝƌ ϯϳ͟ ǁŝĚĞ dž ϯϱ͟ ĚĞĞƉ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭϭ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ŽŵƉƵƚĞƌ ĞƐŬ͘ >ͲƐŚĂƉĞĚ ĐŽƌŶĞƌ ĚĞƐŬŽĨŐůĂƐƐĂŶĚŵĞƚĂů^/D/>ZƚŽƚŚŝƐŽŶĞ͕ϳϵ͟ tdžϮϰ͟džϮϴ͟,͘WŝĐƚƵƌĞƐĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞƵƉŽŶƌĞƋƵĞƐƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬ͘ϬϬ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϱϲϴϲ͘ FOR SALE: dŚĞ ͲWŽǁĞƌ DĂĐŚŝŶĞ ǁĂƐ ĚĞƐŝŐŶĞĚ ƚŽ ƉƌŽǀŝĚĞ EĞŐĂƟǀĞ WŽƚĞŶƟĂů ŶĞƌŐLJ ;ŶŝŽŶīĞĐƚͿŽƌĂƐ/ƐĂLJ͕EĞŐĂƟǀĞ/ŽŶdŚĞƌĂƉLJ ǁŝƚŚ,ŝŐŚ&ƌĞƋƵĞŶĐLJŶĞƌŐLJ;ZĞƐŽŶĂŶĐĞͿ͘zŽƵƌ ďŽĚLJ ŝƐ ƵƐĞĚ ĂƐ ƚŚĞ ĐĂƉĂĐŝƚŽƌ ĂůůŽǁŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ Ͳ WŽǁĞƌ ƚŽ ŐĞŶĞƌĂƚĞ ϳϬ<,nj ŽĨ ŚŝŐŚ ĨƌĞƋƵĞŶĐLJ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐĂů ǁĂǀĞƐ͕ ĐƌĞĂƟŶŐ ĂŶ ŝŶƚĞƌŶĂů ĞŶĞƌŐLJ ƚŚĂƚŵĂLJďĂůĂŶĐĞĂŶĚƌĞǀŝƚĂůŝnjĞ͘WůĞĂƐĞǀŝƐŝƚǁĞď ƐŝƚĞ ĨŽƌ ĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶ͘ ŚƩƉ͗ͬͬǁǁǁ͘ĞŶĞƌŐLJǁĞůůŶĞƐƐƉƌŽĚƵĐƚƐ͘ĐŽŵͬĞƉ ŽǁĞƌ͘Śƚŵ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϳ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲϬϮϭϱ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŽŶLJ /&Ͳ^ϭϱ/W /ͲƉŚŽŶĞͬ /ͲƉĂĚ ƐƉĞĂŬĞƌĚŽĐŬǁŝƚŚĨŵƌĂĚŝŽĂƐŶĞǁ͘'ƌĞĂƚƐŽƵŶĚ ĂƚĂƐƵƉĞƌƉƌŝĐĞ͘ΨϲϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: / ŚĂǀĞ Ă ƉĂŝƌ ŽĨ ĞŚŝŶĚ dŚĞ Ăƌ ZĞƐŽƵŶĚ njƵƌĞ ϳϬ ŚĞĂƌŝŶŐ ĂŝĚƐ͘ dŚĞLJ ĐĂŵĞ ǁŝƚŚĂϯLJĞĂƌǁĂƌƌĂŶƚLJ͕ǁŚŝĐŚŚĂƐũƵƐƚĞdžƉŝƌĞĚ͘ dŚĞLJĂƌĞĚĞƐŝŐŶĞĚĨŽƌƉĞŽƉůĞǁŝƚŚŵŽĚĞƌĂƚĞƚŽ ƉƌŽĨŽƵŶĚŚĞĂƌŝŶŐůŽƐƐ͘dŚĞůŝƐƚƉƌŝĐĞǁĂƐĂďŽƵƚ Ψϯ͕ϬϬϬ ,͘ / ŚŽƉĞ ƐŽŵĞŽŶĞ ĐĂŶ ƵƐĞ ƚŚĞƐĞ ĂŝĚƐ͘dŚŝƐŝƐĂŐƌĞĂƚďĂƌŐĂŝŶĨŽƌƐŽŵĞŽŶĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϱϬϬƵƐĚŽƌΨϲ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘ FOR SALE:ƌĞĐĞŶƚůLJĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞĚƚŚĞƐĞĂůŝŶŐŽĨ ŵLJƌŽŽĨĂŶĚ/ŚĂĚƉƵƌĐŚĂƐĞĚϰϲůŝƚĞƌƐƚŽŽŵƵĐŚ ĨƌŽŵ,ŽŵĞĞƉŽƚ͘/ƚŚĂƐĂϯLJĞĂƌŐƵĂƌĂŶƚĞĞŽŶ ƚŚĞϮͲϭϵ>ŝƚĞƌĐŽŶƚĂŝŶĞƌƐĂŶĚϱLJƌŽŶĞĂĐŚŽĨƚŚĞ ϮͲ ϰ >ŝƚĞƌ ŽŶƚĂŝŶĞƌƐ͘ / ƉĂŝĚ ϯϵ WĞƐŽƐ ƉĞƌ ůŝƚĞƌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϯͲϱϬϴϲ͘ FOR SALE: / ŚĂǀĞ ƐĞǀĞƌĂů ĞdžƉĞŶƐŝǀĞ ĨĞĚŽƌĂƐ ĂŶĚ^ƚĞƚƐŽŶĐŽǁďŽLJŚĂƚƐƐŝnjĞϳͲϳϭͬϮ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲ ϳϲϲͲϯϱϯϲ͘ FOR SALE: ϰϴ͟ ƐƵď njĞƌŽ ƌĞĨƌŝŐĞƌĂƚŽƌ͘ dŚŝƐ ĨƌŝĚŐĞǁŽƌŬƐǁĞůů͘/ƚŚĂƐĂŶĞǁĐŽŵƉƌĞƐƐŽƌĂŶĚ ĐŽŽůŝŶŐĐŽŝůƐ͕ĚĞƐŝŐŶĞĚĨŽƌďƵŝůƚŝŶĂƉƉůŝĐĂƟŽŶƐ͘ tŽŽĚƉĂŶĞůĨƌŽŶƚƚŚĂƚĐĂŶďĞĐŚĂŶŐĞĚƚŽŵĂƚĐŚ LJŽƵƌĐĂďŝŶĞƚƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ϭ͕ϱϬϬh^͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲ ϯϱϯϲ͘ FOR SALE: ϭͬϯƐŚĂƌĞŽĨtŝŶĚZŝĚĞƌϭϳDzƚƌŝŵĂ-


ƌĂŶ ƐĂŝůďŽĂƚ͕ ǁŝƚŚ ƚƌĂŝůĞƌ ĂŶĚ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐ ŽƵƚďŽĂƌĚ ŵŽƚŽƌ͘ &ŽŽƚ ƉĞĚĂů ƐƚĞĞƌŝŶŐ͕ ďĞůŽǁͲƚŚĞͲŵ ƐĞĂƟŶŐ͕ĂŶĚĂĨŽƌǁĂƌĚĨĂĐŝŶŐĐŽĐŬƉŝƚ͘&ĂƐƚ͕ĨƵŶ ĂŶĚĂŐƌĞĂƚƐĂŝů͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϯ͕ϬϬϬ͘ FOR SALE: ďŽƵŐŚƚ ƚŚŝƐ ĂƐƚŵĂŶ ͲϮϬ ǁŝƚŚ ŚĂƌĚ ĐĂƐĞ ĂƐ ŝƚ ĐŽŵƉĂƌĞƐ ĨĂǀŽƌĂďůLJ ǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞ ϭϵϲϭ DĂƌƟŶ ͲϮϴs͘ / Ăŵ ƵŶĂďůĞ ƚŽ ƵƐĞ ŝƚ ĂƐ / ŚĂǀĞĂƌƚŚƌŝƟƐŝŶŵLJŚĂŶĚƐƐŽƐŽŵĞĞůƐĞǁŝůůĞŶũŽLJ ƚŚŝƐ ďĞĂƵƚLJ͘ /ƚ ƌĞƚĂŝůƐ ĨŽƌ Ψϭ͕ϰϬϬ ǁŝƚŚ ĐĂƐĞ ĂŶĚŬƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϵϵϱh^͘ FOR SALE:^ĞŶƚƌLJƐĂĨĞƐĨǁϭϮϯĚƐďϭ͘ϮϯĐƵďŝĐ ĨĞĞƚĐŽŵďŝŶĂƟŽŶΘŬĞLJ͕ĮƌĞͲƐĂĨĞ͕ŵĞĚŝƵŵŐƌĞLJ͕ ƐŚĞůĨŝŶƐŝĚĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐKK͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲ ϳϲϲͲϰϵϭϳ͘ FOR SALE: ' ĐŽŵƉĂĐƚ ƌĞĨƌŝŐĞƌĂƚŽƌ͘ ϯϱ͟ ƚĂůů ĂŶĚϮϬ͟ǁŝĚĞ͘ΨϭϱϬ͘ϬϬh^ŽƌΨϮ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WANTED:EŽƚƵƐŝŶŐ^ŬLJ&hEƉĂĐŬĂŐĞͲůŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌĂŶŽƚŚĞƌŽǁŶĞƌ͘ŽŶƚƌĂĐƚǁŝƚŚ^ŬLJĨŽƌŽŶĞ ŵŽƌĞLJĞĂƌ͘zŽƵĐĂŶƵƉŐƌĂĚĞƚŚĞƉĂĐŬĂŐĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ ϰϮϵŵŽŶƚŚůLJĨŽƌŽŶĞŵŽƌĞLJĞĂƌ͘ϮϮϮŚĂŶŶĞůƐ FOR SALE: ŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ƌĞĂŬŝŶŐ ĂĚ ^ĞƌŝĞƐ͘ dŚĞƐĞs͛ƐĂƌĞEKdƉŝƌĂƚĞĚ͘ΨϱϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:ĂƌĐĂƌƌŝĞƌĞŶĐůŽƐĞĚůƵŐŐĂŐĞƌĂĐŬ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϴϳͲϳϲͲϯϬϰͲϯϮ FOR SALE: <ŝŶŐ ƐŝnjĞ ǁŽŽĚĞŶ ďĞĚ ǁŝƚŚŽƵƚ ŵĂƩƌĞƐƐ ŝŵƉŽƌƚĞĚ ĨƌŽŵ hƐĂ ǁŝƚŚ ďŽdž ƐƉƌŝŶŐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϯϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϴϳͲϳϲͲϯϬϰͲϯϮ FOR SALE: DŽĚƵůĂƌůŝǀŝŶŐƌŽŽŵĨƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞƐĞƚ͘ >ŽǀĞƐĞĂƚƚƵƌŶƐŝŶƚŽĂĚŽƵďůĞďĞĚĂŶĚƐůŝĚĞƐŝŶ ƌĞƉŽƐĞƚ͕ ŝŶ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭϱ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϴϳͲϳϲͲϯϬϰͲϯϮ FOR SALE:ŽƐŵĞƟĐƐĂŶĚ^ŬŝŶĂƌĞ͘ŶĂƐƚĂƐŝĂƌŽǁWĞŶƋƚLJ͘ϮĐŽůŽƌ͗hŶŝǀĞƌƐĂůĞĞƉΨϮϳϯ ĞĂ͘ ďůŝŶĐ LJĞďƌŽǁ DŽƵƐƐĞ ƋƚLJ͘ Ϯ ĐŽůŽƌ͗ ĂƌŬ ƌƵŶĞƩĞΨϯϭϮĞĂ͘ƌĚĞůƌŽǁ^ĐƵůƉƟŶŐ'ĞůƋƚLJ͘ ϭĐŽůŽƌ͗ůŵŽƐƚůĂĐŬΨϴϵ͘hƌďĂŶĞĐĂLJĐƌĞĂŵ ŚŝŐŚůŝŐŚƚŝŶ͞^/E͟ƋƚLJ͘ϭΨϯϭϮ͘LJĞƐŚĂĚŽǁƌĂLJŽŶϭĞŶĚŽƉƉĞƌŽƚŚĞƌ'ŽůĚƋƚLJ͘ϭΨϭϵϱ͘ŽŽƚƐ ĞdžƉĞƌƚƐĞŶƐŝƟǀĞŐĞŶƚůĞĞLJĞŵĂŬĞͲƵƉƌĞŵŽǀĞƌůŽƟŽŶϮϬϬŵůƋƚLJ͘ĂůůϭͲϱWDϳϲϱͲϳϲϮϵ͘ FOR SALE: ZĂƩĂŶ >ŽƵŶŐĞ ŚĂŝƌ͘ ĞĂƵƟĨƵů ĐŚĂŝƌŝŶŐƌĞĂƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WŝůůŽǁƐŝŶĐůƵĚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ^ĂƚĞůůŝƚĞ ŝƐŚ͕ ϭ͘Ϯŵ͕ĂŶĚ ϴϬĐŵ͕ >͘E͘Ɛ͕ ZĞĐĞŝǀĞƌ ĂŶĚ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ͕ WƌŝĐĞ ΨϲϬϬ WĞƐŽƐĨŽƌĂůů͕ĚĞƚĂŝůƐĐĂůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϯϳϵ͘ FOR SALE:/ŶǀĞƌƐŝŽŶdĂďůĞ͕&ŽůĚƐƵƉǁŚĞŶŶŽƚ ŝŶƵƐĞ͕WƌŝĐĞΨϯϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϯϳϵ͘ FOR SALE:DĂƐƐĂŐĞdĂďůĞ͕&ĂĐĞ͕ƐƵƉƉŽƌƚ͕ƉŽƌƚĂďůĞ͘WƌŝĐĞΨϮ͕ϱϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϯϳϵ͘ FOR SALE: ϭϮǁŝĚĞŵŽƵƚŚƉŝŶƚĐĂŶŶŝŶŐũĂƌƐ͕ ǁŝƚŚƌŝŶŐƐ͘ΨϮϰϬƉĞƐŽƐĨŽƌĂůů͕ΨϮϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘ ĂůůϳϲϱͲϰϯϬϯ͘ FOR SALE: ^ƉĂŶŝƐŚ ŬƐ͘ DĂŐƌŝŐĂů͛Ɛ DĂŐŝĐ <ĞLJƚŽ^ƉĂŶŝƐŚĂŶĚhůƟŵĂƚĞ^ƉĂŶŝƐŚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬ ƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘ FOR SALE: tŝƌĞůĞƐƐ DŝĐƌŽƉŚŽŶĞ ^ĞƚƐ͘ ĞƐƚ ŵĞĚŝĂ DͲϰϴϮh ǁŝƚŚ ϰ ŵŝĐƐ͕ ƉƌĂĐƟĐĂůůLJ ďƌĂŶĚ ŶĞǁ͘Ψϭ͕ϮϱϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WANTED:tŽƵůĚůŝŬĞƚŽƌĞŶƚĂƌƵŐƐŚĂŵƉŽŽŝŶŐ ŵĂĐŚŝŶĞ ƚŽ ĐůĞĂŶ ƐĞǀĞƌĂů ĂƌĞĂ ƌƵŐƐ ŝŶ ŵLJ ŚŽŵĞ͘ŽĞƐĂŶLJŽŶĞŬŶŽǁǁŚĞƌĞ/ĐĂŶƌĞŶƚŽŶĞ͍ Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϯͲϱϬϯϴ͘ FOR SALE: YƵĞĞŶ ƐŝnjĞ ĐŽƉƉĞƌ ĐŽůŽƌĞĚ ƐŝůŬ ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĞƌǁŝƚŚŵĂƚĐŚŝŶŐƉŝůůŽǁƐŚĂŵƐ͘dŚĞƐŝůŬ ĨĂďƌŝĐŚĂƐĂƐŵĂůůĚĞƐŝŐŶŝŶŝƚŽĨƚŚĞƐĂŵĞĐŽůŽƌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: <ŝŶŐ ƐŝnjĞ ƌĞǀĞƌƐŝďůĞ ďĞĚ ƐƉƌĞĂĚͬ ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĞƌ ǁŝƚŚ ŵĂƚĐŚŝŶŐ ƉŝůůŽǁ ĐŽǀĞƌƐ͘ KŶĞ ƐŝĚĞ ŝƐ ĐŚŽĐŽůĂƚĞ ďƌŽǁŶ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ŽƚŚĞƌ ŝƐ Ă ƚĂƵƉĞͬďĞŝŐĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ WANTED:/ŚĂǀĞƚŚĞƚĂŶŬďƵƚǁĂŶƚƚŚĞY͘ dĂďůĞ ƚŽƉ ŝƐ ĮŶĞ Ă ďŝŐ ĞŶŽƵŐŚ ĨŽƌ Ϯ ƐƚĞĂŬƐ Žƌ ŚĂŵďƵƌŐĞƌƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯͲϰϴ͘ FOR SALE:ůŽƚŽĨƐƚƵī͘ƋƵŝƉŵĞŶƚƚŽƚƌĂŶƐĨĞƌĂůůs,^ƚŽs͘dĂƐĞƌͬ^ƚƵŶŐƵŶ͘ΨϱϬϬ͘KŶůLJ ŚĂǀĞ Ϯ ůĞŌ͘ /ŶǀĞƌƚĞƌ ;ϭϮs ĐĂƌ ďĂƩĞƌLJ ƚŽ ϭϱϬt ͘͘Ϳ tŝƌĞůĞƐƐ ĐĂŵĞƌĂ ;ƚŽ Ă dsͿ͘ dĞůŵĞdž ƐƚLJůĞ ŵŽĚĞŵ͘^ĞŶĚŵĞĞŵĂŝůĂŶĚ/͛ůůƐĞŶĚƉƌŝĐĞƐĂŶĚ ŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ FOR SALE: dŽŽůƐ͘ DŝůǁĂƵŬĞĞ ƌŽƚĂƌLJ ŚĂŵŵĞƌ Ěƌŝůů͕ ΨϰϯϵƉ͕ ^Ŭŝůů ƐĂǁ͕ ǁŽƌŵ ĚƌŝǀĞ͕ ΨϭϭϵϵƉ͘ ůƵŵŝŶƵŵǀĞŶƚĞĚƐŬLJůŝŐŚƚ͕ŶĞǁ͕ϰϰĐŵyϰϰĐŵ͕ ΨϮϵϵƉ͘ ĂƩĞƌLJ ĐŚĂƌŐĞƌ͕ ΨϮϱϵƉ͘ :ƵŵƉĞƌ ĐĂďůĞƐ͕ ΨϳϵƉ͘ ĂŶŽŶ : ƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͕ ΨϭϱϵƉ͘ /ŐůŽŽ ϰϴ Ƌƚ ŝĐĞ ĐŚĞƐƚ͕ ΨϮϯϵƉ͘ ŽůůĂƉƐŝďůĞ ƚĂďůĞ͕ ƉĂĚĚĞĚ ƚŽƉ͕ Ϯϰ͟yϰϴ͕͟ ΨϮϵϵƉ͘ sdĞĐŚ ĐŽƌĚůĞƐƐ ƉŚŽŶĞ ;ϮͿ ΨϮϯϵƉ͘DŽďŝůĞKŶĞŵŽƚŽƌŽŝů͕ϱtͲϯϬ͕ΨϲϬƉΛŽƌ ΨϮϵϱƉĨŽƌϱ͘ůĂĐŬΘĞĐŬĞƌƚŽĂƐƚĞƌΨϭϯϵƉ͘Ăůů͗ ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϱϬϱ͘ FOR SALE: 'ŽůĨ 'ĞĂƌ͘ &Ƶůů ƐĞƚ ŽĨ ĂůůĂǁĂLJ tŽŽĚƐ;ϭ͕ϯ͕ϱ͕ϳͿŽďƌĂ/ƌŽŶƐ;WtͲϯͿ͕ůĞǀĞůĂŶĚǁĞĚŐĞƐ;>t͕^tͿ͕WŝŶŐWƵƩĞƌ͕Z,DŝŶĐůƵĚŝŶŐďĂŐĂŶĚϮƉĂŝƌƐŽĨŐĞŶƚůLJƵƐĞĚϭϬϭͬϮƐŚŽĞƐ͘

ůƵďƐĂƌĞƌĞŐƵůĂƌŇĞdž͕WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϵϬϬh^͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲ ϰϯϭϱ͘ FOR SALE:^ĂůĞŽĨĨƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞŚŽƚĨŽŽĚďĂƌĂŶĚ ĂϯͲĚŽŽƌĐĂďŝŶĞƚǁŝƚŚŶĞǁĂŶĚĨƵůůĞŶŐŝŶĞŽĨŐĂƐ ƚŽĐŽŽůĨŽŽĚ͕ĂůůŝŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ΨϮϱ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐĨŽƌĂůů FOR SALE:ĞĂƵƟĨƵůƐĞƌǀŝĐĞĨŽƌϴ͘ůĂĐŬĂŶĚ ǁŚŝƚĞ ĚŝƐŚĞƐ͘ KŶůLJ ϳ ƐĂůĂĚ ƉůĂƚĞƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϳϱϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ FOR SALE:sĞƌLJĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞƋƵĂůŝƚLJϴŌůŽŶŐ ƐŽĨĂŝŶŐŽŽĚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ĂŶďĞƵƐĞĚĂƐĂŶĞdžƚƌĂ ďĞĚ͘KīͲǁŚŝƚĞǁŝƚŚϴůĂƌŐĞĮƩĞĚƐĞƉĂƌĂƚĞĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϰ͕ϮϬϬƉǁŝůůĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌΨϯ͕ϵϬϬƉ͘ FOR SALE: ,ŽƐƉŝƚĂů ďĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ ĂŶƟƐŽƌĞŵĂƩ͘ dŚĞŚŽƐƉŝƚĂůďĞĚŝŶƚŚĞƉŝĐƚƵƌĞŝƐĂƐƚŽĐŬƉŚŽƚŽ͕ ƐŽŶŽƚƚŚĞĂĐƚƵĂůďĞĚ͘dŚĞŚŽƐƉŝƚĂůďĞĚǁĞŚĂǀĞ ĨŽƌƐĂůĞŝƐŝĚĞŶƟĐĂů͘/ƚŝƐĂďŽƵƚϮLJƌƐŽůĚ͘ůůĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐĂů ŽƉĞƌĂƚĞĚ͘ /ƚ ĂůƐŽ ĐŽŵĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ĂŶƟƐŽƌĞ ŵĂƩƌĞƐƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϵ͕ϱϬϬ͘ &Žƌ ŵŽƌĞ ŝŶĨŽ ĐĂůů ŵĞ ĂƚϳϲϲͲϰϭϱϰ FOR SALE: WŚŝůŝƉƐ DyϯϲϬϬ s ,ŽŵĞ dŚĞĂƚĞƌ^LJƐƚĞŵ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϴϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: >ĂƌŐĞ ĚŝŶŝŶŐ ƌŽŽŵ ƚĂďůĞ ǁŝƚŚ ϲ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ Ͳ ŚĂƐ ƌĞŵŽǀĂďůĞ ůĞĂǀĞƐ͘ ƌŽƵŐŚƚ ŚĞƌĞ ĨƌŽŵEŽƌƚŚĂƌŽůŝŶĂ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ĞĂƵƟĨƵůŽǀĞƌƐƚƵīĞĚĐŚĂŝƌďƌŽƵŐŚƚ ŚĞƌĞĨƌŽŵEŽƌƚŚĂƌŽůŝŶĂ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: sĞƌLJŶŝĐĞƐŽĨĂͲďƌŽƵŐŚƚĨƌŽŵƚŚĞ h^͘Ψϰ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ůŽǀĞůLJ ϯ ƉŝĞĐĞ ďĞĚ ĐŚĞƐƚĞƌĮĞůĚ ƐƵŝƚĞŝŶŶŝĐĞĐůĞĂŶĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶŶĂǀLJďůƵĞƉĂůĞďůƵĞ Θ ŐŽůĚ ĂůƐŽ ůŽǀĞƐĞĂƚ ďĞĚ ĐŚĞƐƚĞƌĮĞůĚ ŝŶ ďĞŝŐĞ ŇŽƌĂů ǀĞƌLJ ƐƚƵƌĚLJ ŐŽŽĚ ĂŶĂĚŝĂŶ ďƌĂŶĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϯϬϬƵƐ͘ΘΨϱϬƵƐĚ͘ WANTED: dŚĞ ƐŽĐĐĞƌ ĮĞůĚ ŶĞĂƌ ϲ ŽƌŶĞƌƐ ŶĞĞĚƐ Ă ůĂǁŶ ŵŽǁĞƌ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ĐĂƌĞƚĂŬĞƌ ŚĂƐ ĂƐŬĞĚ ŵĞ ƚŽ ůŽŽŬ ĨŽƌ ŽŶĞ͘ tĞ ŚĂǀĞ ƌĂŝƐĞĚ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐƐŽĨĂƌĂŶĚǁŽƵůĚůŝŬĞĂĚŽŶĂƟŽŶ ŽƌĂŶŝŶĞdžƉĞŶƐŝǀĞůĂǁŶŵŽǁĞƌ͘ FOR SALE: zĂŵĂŚĂDŽƚŽƌĐLJĐůĞ͘DŽĚĞůϮϬϭϮ͕ ZĞĚĐŽůŽƌ͕&ϭϲϭϱϯĐĐ͘ĂůŵŽƐƚŶĞǁ͕ŚĂƌĚůLJƵƐĞĚ͘ DĞdžŝĐĂŶ ƉůĂƚĞĚ ^ƚĂƚĞ ŽĨ DŝĐŚŽĂĐĄŶ͘ ůů ƉĂŝĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϳ͕ϬϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘ WANTED: WĂƌƚŶĞƌ ƚŽ ƐŚĂƌĞ ůĂƌŐĞ D ďŽdž͘ tŚĞŶ ƉĂLJŝŶŐ ϭϯ ŵŽŶƚŚƐ ŝŶ ĂĚǀĂŶĐĞ ƚŚŝƐ ůĂƌŐĞ ŵĂŝů ďŽdž ĐŽƐƚ ůĞƐƐ ƚŚĂŶ Ψϭϰ͘ϬϬ h^ ƉĞƌ ŵŽŶƚŚ͘ tĞŶĞĞĚŽŶĞŶĞǁƉĂƌƚŶĞƌĂŶĚƚŚĂƚĐĂŶďĞLJŽƵ͊ FOR SALE: EŝĐĞ ĐŽůůĞĐƟŽŶ ŽĨ ϭϳϱ s,^ ŵŽǀŝĞƐ͘͘͘ŵĂŶLJƉůĂLJĞĚŽŶĐĞ͘͘͘ůŽƚƐŽĨĐůĂƐƐŝĐƐ͘͘͘ƐŽůĚĂƐ ĂĐŽůůĞĐƟŽŶŽŶůLJ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϴϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:tĂƌĚƌŽďĞͲƐŽůŝĚǁŽŽĚ͘ůĞĂŶ͕ŚŝŐŚ ƋƵĂůŝƚLJ͕ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘^ŝŶŐůĞƵŶŝƚ͕ϴŌďLJ ϴ Ō ǁŝƚŚ Ϯ ƐŝĚĞ ďLJ ƐŝĚĞ ĐůŽƚŚĞƐ ĐůŽƐĞƚƐ ǁŝƚŚ Ϯ ƐŚĞůǀĞƐĂďŽǀĞĞĂĐŚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬʹŶĞŐŽƟĂďůĞ͘ FOR SALE:DĞŶƐƌĞƐƐWĂŶƚƐͲEĂŵĞďƌĂŶĚƐͲ WĞƌƌLJ ůůŝƐ͕ ŽĐŬĞƌƐ͕ <ĞŶŶĞƚŚ ŽůĞ͕ >ŽƵŝƐ ZĂƉŚĂĞů͕ ŶĚƌĞǁ &ĞnjnjĂ ĂŶĚ dž KĸĐŝŽ͘ ůů ŝŶ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘^ŝnjĞƐϯϮƚŽϰϬ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘ :ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐ Ăůů :ŽŚŶ Žƌ ĞƚŚ ϯϴϳͲ ϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭͲϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: DĞŶƐ ƌĞƐƐ ůŽŶŐ ƐůĞĞǀĞ ƐŚŝƌƚƐ͕ ĐĂƐƵĂů ůŽŶŐ ƐůĞĞǀĞ ƐŚŝƌƚƐ͕ ĐĂƐƵĂů ƐŚŽƌƚ ƐůĞĞǀĞ ƐŚŝƌƚƐĂŶĚŐŽůĨƐŚŝƌƚƐ͘^ŝnjĞƐůĂƌŐĞĂŶĚĞdžƚƌĂůĂƌŐĞ͘ ĨƌŽŵ Ψϯϱ͘ϬϬ ƚŽ ΨϱϬ͘ϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘ :ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐ͘ Ăůů:ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭͲϰϯϰͲ ϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: DĞŶƐ tĞĂƚŚĞƌƉƌŽŽĨ 'ĂƌŵĞŶƚ ŽŵƉĂŶLJ :ĂĐŬĞƚ Ͳ dĂŶ͕ džƚƌĂ >ĂƌŐĞ͕ >ŝŶĞĚ͘ ΨϰϬϬ͘ϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ͘ :ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐ͘ Ăůů :ŽŚŶ Žƌ ĞƚŚ ϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭͲϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: DĞŶƐ ͞ŽƵƚƵƌĞ͟ ƌĂŶĚ y> >ĂŵďƐ ^ŬŝŶ>ĞĂƚŚĞƌŽŵďĞƌ:ĂĐŬĞƚƌŽǁŶǁŝƚŚnjŝƉŽƵƚ ůŝŶĞƌ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ Ψϭ͕ϱϬϬ͘ϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ͘ :ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐĂůů:ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůů ϯϯϭͲϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE:dŚƵůĞϲϲϴ^&ƌŽŶƟĞƌ^ZŽŽĨdŽƉ ĂƌŐŽ Ždž͘ ZĞƚĂŝůƐ ĨŽƌ ΨϯϯϮ h^ ĨŽƌ ƐĂůĞ ƵƐĞĚ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉ͘ĂůůϳϲϲͲϱϴϲϯ͘ FOR SALE: /ŶĚŽŶĞƐŝĂŶ ƌĂƩĂŶ ƐĞƚ ǁŝƚŚ ƚǁŽ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ ĂŶĚ ŽŶĞ ƐŵĂůů ŐůĂƐƐ ƚŽƉ ƚĂďůĞ͘ ŶĞǁ ƐĞĂƚ ĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬ͘ϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘:ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐĂůů :ŽŚŶ Žƌ ĞƚŚ ϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲ Žƌ ĐĞůů ϯϯϭͲ ϰϯϰͲ ϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŵĂůů ƵƉŚŽůƐƚĞƌĞĚ ƌŽĐŬĞƌ ƚĂŶ ŝŶ ĐŽůŽƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬ͘ϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ:ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐ͘Ăůů:ŽŚŶ ŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůůϯϯϭͲϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE:^ŽůŝĚtŽŽĚͬ'ůĂƐƐĚŽƵďůĞƐŝĚĞĚŽŶ ǁŚĞĞůƐĂƌϲϯŝŶďLJϮϳŝŶďLJϰϳŝŶƚĂůů͘'ůĂƐƐƐŚĞůĨ ŝŶƚŚĞŵŝĚĚůĞ͘'ůĂƐƐĚŽŽƌƐŽŶďŽƚŚƐŝĚĞƐ͘'ůĂƐƐ ŽŶƚŽƉ͘KŶĞĚƌĂǁĞƌŽŶĞĂĐŚƐŝĚĞ͘tŝŶĞƌĂĐŬĂŶĚ ƐƚĞŵǁĂƌĞ ŚŽůĚĞƌƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϰ͕ϬϬϬ͘ϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ :ŽĐŽƚĞƉĞĐĂůů:ŽŚŶŽƌĞƚŚϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϭϭϭϲŽƌĐĞůů ϯϯϭͲϰϯϰͲϵϲϯϵ͘ FOR SALE: hƐĞĚ ŽŶĐĞ͘ ϮϬϭϯ ŵŽĚĞů zĂŬŝŵĂ

^ŬLJďŽdžϭϲ^;ϭϲĐĨͿĮƚƐĂůůĨĂĐƚŽƌLJƌŽŽĨƌĂĐŬƐ͘KƵƌƐ ǁĂƐ ŽŶ Ă ϮϬϬϱ ZĂǀϰ͘ KƉĞŶƐ ĨƌŽŵ ĞŝƚŚĞƌ ƐŝĚĞ͘ >ŽĐŬƐ ƐĞĐƵƌĞůLJ͘ EŽ ŶŽŝƐĞ Žƌ ĚƌĂŐ͘ DŝůĞĂŐĞ ŽŶůLJ ƐůŝŐŚƚůLJĚŝŵŝŶŝƐŚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬŽƌWĞƐŽƐĞƋƵŝǀĂůĞŶƚ͘ FOR SALE:&ƵůůƐĞƚŽĨŽďƌĂ'ŽůĨĐůƵďƐŝŶĐůƵĚŝŶŐďĂŐĂŶĚϮƉĂŝƌƐŽĨŐĞŶƚůLJƵƐĞĚϴϭͬϮƐŚŽĞƐ͘ ^ŚŽĞƐ ŝŶĐůƵĚĞ ϯ ŶĞǁ ƐĞƚƐ ŽĨ ĐůĞĂƚƐ ĂŶĚ ĐůĞĂƚ ƚŽŽů͘ĂĐŬƐƵƌŐĞƌLJĨŽƌĐĞƐƐĂůĞ͘ůƵďƐĂƌĞŶĞǁůLJ ŐƌŝƉƉĞĚ;ƌLJͲdĂĐͿĂƌĞƌĞŐƵůĂƌŇĞdž͕ŐƌĂƉŚŝƚĞǁŝƚŚĂ ϭϬ͘ϱĚĞŐƌĞĞĚƌŝǀĞƌ͘ŽŵĞƐǁŝƚŚŵĂŶLJďĂůůƐĂŶĚ d͛Ɛ͘ƌƐĂLJƐ/ĐĂŶ͛ƚƉůĂLJĂŶLJŵŽƌĞ͘DLJůŽƐƐLJŽƵƌ ŐĂŝŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϭϬϬ͘ϬϬ ;h^Ϳ ƉƌŽďĂďůLJ ŶĞŐŽƟĂďůĞ͘ĂůůϳϲϱͲϮϯϱϳ͘ FOR SALE: 'ĂƌƌĞƩ 'd/ϮϱϬϬ DĞƚĂů ĞƚĞĐƚŽƌ ŬŝƚǁŝƚŚϮƐĞĂƌĐŚĐŽŝůƐĂŶĚĚĞĞƉƉƌŽďĞ͘dŚŝƐŬŝƚ ĐŽŶƚĂŝŶƐ ǀĂƌŝŽƵƐ ŝƚĞŵƐ ƵƐĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞ ĚĞƚĞĐƚŽƌ͘ sĞƌLJ ůŝƩůĞ ƵƐĞ ĂŶĚ ŝŶ ƉĞƌĨĞĐƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϱϱ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘WŚŽŶĞ͗ϳϲϲͲϰϲϵϰ͘ FOR SALE: Ăƌ ƐƚLJůĞ ƚĂďůĞ Θ ĐŚĂŝƌƐ͘ ƵƚŚĞŶƟĐDĞdžŝĐĂŶƋƵŝƉĂůĞƌŽƵŶĚďĂƌƐƚLJůĞƚĂďůĞ͕ϯϳ͟ ŚŝŐŚ͕ϮĨĞĞƚŝŶĚŝĂŵĞƚĞƌ͕ǁŝƚŚĨŽƵƌĐŚĂŝƌƐ͕ŐŽůĚĞŶ ƚĂŶĂŶĚĚĂƌŬďƌŽǁŶůĞĂƚŚĞƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϰϮϭ͘ FOR SALE:sĂĐƵƵŵĮůƚĞƌƐ͘ůĂĐŬΘĞĐŬĞƌZĞƉůĂĐĞŵĞŶƚĮůƚĞƌƐĞƚĨŽƌϰ͘ϴǀŽůƚĂŶĚŚŝŐŚĞƌsƐĞƌŝĞƐƵƐƚďƵƐƚĞƌƐŵŽĚĞůs&ϮϬŝƌƚĞǀŝůŵŽĚĞůη &ϭϵϮĮůƚĞƌƐŝŶĞĂĐŚďŽdž͕ŚĂǀĞϮďŽdžĞƐĨŽƌďƌŽŽŵ ǀĂĐ͘ΨϮϬƉƉĞƌďŽdž͘ FOR SALE: ^ĂŵƐƵŶŐ'ĂůĂdžLJ///;ZĞĚͿ͕WƌŽĐĞƐƐŽƌYƵĂĚŽƌĞϭ͘ϰ',nj͕ĂŵĞƌĂϴŵƉdž͕ŶĚƌŽŝĚ ϰ͘Ϭ/ĐĞƌĞĂŵ^ĂŶĚǁŝĐŚ͕^ĐƌĞĞŶ,^ƵƉĞƌŵŽůĞĚ ϰ͘ϴ͕ƌĞĐŽƌĚ ĂŶĚ ƉƌŽĚƵĐĞ ǀŝĚĞŽ ŝŶ &Ƶůů ,͕ ĞdžƚĞƌŶĂůŵĞŵŽƌLJƵƉƚŽϯϮ'͕ŵŽďŝůĞďĂŶŬŝŶŐ͕ ĂďůĞƚŽƚƌĂŶƐĨĞƌĮůĞƐ͕ŝŶƚĞƌŶĂůŵĞŵŽƌLJϭϲ'͘/ŶĐůƵĚĞƐ ĐŚĂƌŐĞƌ͕ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ^ĂŵƐƵŶŐ ŚĞĂĚƉŚŽŶĞƐ͘ ,ĂǀĞ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ďŽdž ĂŶĚ ƌĞĐĞŝƉƚ ĨƌŽŵ dĞůĐĞů͘ WŝĐƚƵƌĞƐŽŶƌĞƋƵĞƐƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϳ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϬϰϱͲ ϯϯϭͲϯϴϮͲϰϳϳϭ͘ FOR SALE: ŽƵŶƚĞƌƚŽƉ tĂƚĞƌ WƵƌŝĮĞƌ ǁŝƚŚ džƚƌĂĮůƚĞƌEĞǁ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϱϬϬƉн&ŝůƚĞƌΨϰϴϬƉ hƐĞĚƉƌŝĐĞΨϭ͕ϮϬϬĨŽƌďŽƚŚ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:ŽǁŇĞdždƌĞĂĚŵŝůů͘KƌŝŐŝŶĂůůLJĐŽƐƚ Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬ͘ϬϬ͘ ,ĂƐ ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵŵĞĚ ǁŽƌŬŽƵƚƐ Ͳ ƐŝŵƵůĂƚĞĚ ůĞǀĞů ǁĂůŬŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ƵƉŚŝůů ĐůŝŵďƐ͘ ^ĞůĚŽŵ ƵƐĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬ͘ϬϬ͘

FOR SALE:zĂŵĂŚĂWŽƌƚĂďůĞ'ƌĂŶĚƚŽƉŽĨƚŚĞ ůŝŶĞ ŬĞLJďŽĂƌĚ Ͳ 'yͲϱϬϱ͘ ϴϴ ƉŝĂŶŽ ƐƚLJůĞ ŬĞLJƐ͕ ŚŝŐŚƌĞƐŽůƵƟŽŶƐƚĞƌĞŽƉŝĂŶŽƐĂŵƉůĞ^ŵĂƌƚDĞĚŝĂ ƐƚŽƌĂŐĞ͕ h^ ĐŽŵƉƵƚĞƌ ĐŽŶŶĞĐƟǀŝƚLJ͕ ůĂƌŐĞ ďŝƚŵĂƉƉĞĚ>ƐĐƌĞĞŶ͕ĐĂŶďĞƵƐĞĚĨŽƌŬĂƌĂŽŬĞ͕ ƚǁŽďƵƩŽŶƉƵƐŚĞƐĂŶĚLJŽƵ͛ƌĞƌĞĐŽƌĚŝŶŐĂŶĚƐŽ ŵƵĐŚŵŽƌĞ͊>ŝŐŚƚǁŽŽĚƐƚĂŶĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϱϭŽƌƌĂũŚĂƚŚLJΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ͘ FOR SALE: Dƌ͘ ,ĞĂƚĞƌͲŽŶǀĞĐƟŽŶ ,ĞĂƚĞƌ EĞǁǁĂƐΨϭϯϱh^ƐĂůĞΨϰϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ŝƐŚǁĂƐŚĞƌͶŝŶĚƵƐƚƌŝĂů͕ ,ŽďĂƌƚ ͞ƵŶĚĞƌ ƚŚĞ ĐŽƵŶƚĞƌ͟ >yϯϬ ŽŵŵĞƌĐŝĂů ŝƐŚǁĂƐŚĞƌ͘tĂƐŚĐLJĐůĞ͗ϴϱƐĞĐŽŶĚƐͬϭϱϬΣ&;ϲϲΣͿ͕ ƌŝŶƐĞĐLJĐůĞ͗ϭϬƐĞĐŽŶĚƐ͕ϭϴϬΣ&;ϴϮΣͿ͘/ŶĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬh^͕ŽƌďĞƐƚŽīĞƌ͘ĂůůĂƚ͗ ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϰϱϮϭ Žƌ ĞͲŵĂŝů Ăƚ͗ livingincommuniƚLJŵdžΛŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ͘ FOR SALE:hƐĞĚĨŽƌƚǁŽLJĞĂƌƐ͘ůĞĐƚƌŝĐǁŚĞĞůĐŚĂŝƌ͕ /ŶǀĂĐĂƌĞ WƌŽŶƚŽ Dϵϰ ĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ŵĂŶƵĂů͕ĞdžƚƌĂďƌĂĐĞƐĨŽƌůĞŐƐ͕ĐŚĂƌŐŝŶŐƐLJƐƚĞŵ͘ ϮϱŵŝůĞƐƚŽĞĂĐŚĐŚĂƌŐĞ͘EĞǁůŝƐƚƐΨϲ͕ϵϬϬh^͘ 'ŽŽĚŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬh^͕ŶĞŐŽƟĂďůĞ ǁŝƚŚŝŶůŝŵŝƚƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϬϲϭ͘ FOR SALE: ^D^hE' Ϯϳ͟ ds͘ ^ŝůǀĞƌ tŝƚŚ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ ĂŶĚ ŵĂŶƵĂů͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘ FOR SALE:tŚĞĞůĞĚĐůŽƚŚĞƐƌĂĐŬƐ͘dǁŽůĂĐŬ ŝƌŽŶ ϳϱ͟,ŝŐŚ dž ϳϮ͟ ůŽŶŐ ǀĞƌLJ ŵĂŶĞƵǀĞƌĂďůĞ ĐůŽƚŚĞƐ ƌĂĐŬƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘ FOR SALE:/ŶǀĞƌƐŝŽŶdĂďůĞ͘WƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂůĂŶƟͲ ŐƌĂǀŝƚLJŝŶǀĞƌƐŝŽŶƚĂďůĞĨŽƌĂƚŚůĞƚĞƐĂŶĚƌĞŚĂďŝůŝƚĂƟŽŶŽĨƚŚĞƐƉŝŶĞĂŶĚďƌĂŝŶďůŽŽĚĐŝƌĐƵůĂƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϯ͕ϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘ FOR SALE: ŽǀĞƌĞĚ ǁĂƌĚƌŽďĞ ƌĂĐŬ͘ ŚƌŽŵĞ ƐŚĞůǀŝŶŐ ŽŶ ǁŚĞĞůƐ ǁŝƚŚ ƚǁŽ njŝƉƉĞƌ ĐŽǀĞƌ͘ ΨϮ͕ϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘ FOR SALE:ϯWŝĞĐĞƐŝƌŽŶƉĂƟŽƐĞƚ͘ϮŌϲŝŶĐŚ ĚŝĂŵŐůĂƐƐƚĂďůĞƚŽƉϯƐĞĂƚĞƌĐŽƵĐŚǁŝƚŚĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐϮƐĞĂƚĞƌĐŽƵĐŚǁŝƚŚĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϯ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϭϮϯ͘

Saw you in the Ojo 85


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El Ojo del Lago / December 2013



El Ojo del Lago - December 2013