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Saw you in the Ojo

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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014


Saw you in the Ojo

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PUBLISHER Richard Tingen

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alejandro Grattan-DomĂ­nguez Tel: (01376) 765 3676, 765 2877 Fax: (01376) 765 3528 Associate Publisher David Tingen Graphic Design Roberto C. Rojas Sandra Hernandez Special Events Editor Sandy Olson Associate Editor Jim Tipton Contributing Editor Mark Sconce Drama Critic Michael Warren Art Critic Rob Mohr Roving Correspondent Dr. Lorin Swinehart Sales Managers Omar Medina Bruce Fraser 2IÂżFH6HFUHWDU\ Rocio Madrigal ADVERTISING OFFICE Av. Hidalgo # 223, Chapala Mon. thru Fri. 9am - 5pm Sat. 9am - 1pm Tel. 01 (376) 765 2877, 765 3676 Fax 01 (376) 765 3528 Send all correspondence, subscriptions or advertising to: El Ojo del Lago http://www.chapala.com ojodellago@prodigy.net.mx Ave. Hidalgo 223 (or Apartado 279), 45900 Chapala, Jalisco Tels.: (376) 765 3676, Fax 765 3528 PRINTING: El Debate

Index...

FEATURE ARTICLES

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Dr. Lorin Swinehart’s Easter Story is unique in that he writes not only about the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ—but also about the history of the savage method that was used to kill him.

8 &RYHUE\Dani Newcomb

11 LOCAL COLOR Teri Saya writes about some of Mexico’s most energetic pint-sized entrepreneurs—the children who clean car windshields.

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Editor’s Page

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Anita’s Animals

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Imprints

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Uncommon Sense

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Welcome to Mexico

Wherein we re-publish an article written in 1946 by the legendary Neill James.

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Profiling Tepehua

32 MORE HUMOR

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Heart at Work

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Lakeside Living

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Child of Month

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Bridge by Lake

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Front Row Center

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Dear Portia

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LCS Newsletter

16 HUMOR Neil McKinnon sets his piece in a funny-bone of a country that somewhat resembles Ireland. Ah, if only it was as wonderfully looney as he thinks it could be.

24 LAKESIDE HISTORY

Tom Eck checks out online dating serYLFHV DQG ÂżQGV WKDW WKH DQQRXQFHments they carry are unintentionally funny enough to win the prestigious Robert Benchley Humor Award.

42 LAKESIDE PROFILE Tod Jonson shines a klieg light on Lakeside celebrity Barbara Clippinger, and relates that her career in dancing started because as a child, her ankles were so weak, she kept falling down. A doctor recommended that she take ballet lessons to strengthen them—and as they say, the rest is history.

El Ojo del Lago aparece los primeros cinco dĂ­as de cada mes. (Distributed over WKHÂżUVWÂżYHGD\VRIHDFKPRQWK) &HUWLÂżFDGRGH/LFLWXGGH7tWXOR &HUWLÂżFDGRGH/LFLWXGGH&RQWHQLGR Reserva al TĂ­tulo de Derechos de Autor 04-2011-103110024300-102 Control 14301. Permisos otorgados por la SecretarĂ­a de GobernaciĂłn (EXP. 1/432 “88â€?/5651 de 2 de junio de 1993) y SEP (Reserva 171.94 control 14301) del 15 de enero de 1994. DistribuciĂłn: Hidalgo 223 Chapala, Jalisco, MĂŠxico. All contents are fully protected by copyright and may not be reproduced without the written consent of El Ojo del Lago. Opinions expressed E\ WKH DXWKRUV GR QRW QHFHVVDULO\ UHĂ€HFW WKH views of the Publisher or the Editor, nor are we responsible for the claims made by our advertisers. We welcome letters, which should include name, address and telephone number.

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COVER STORY

COVER STORY

z DIRECTORY z

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

LAKESIDE LIVING

VOLUME 30 NUMBER 8

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Editor’s Page %\$OHMDQGUR*UDWWDQ'RPLQJXH] For more editorials, visit: http://thedarksideofthedream.com (This article is republished by way of a tribute to the recent sensational LLT show, Hooray for Hollywood, and its knock-out musical presentation of the song Yankee Doodle Dandy.)

The Screen’s Greatest Performance

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t’s been said that hundreds of millions of people have two businesses: their own and show business, this most demonstrable during the movie/ TV awards season, when the ultimate prize is the Oscar. The yearly TV presentation is watched by people in virtually every corner of the world—from the fjords of Norway to the savannahs of South Africa to castles along the Rhine—and implicit in this interest is the viewer’s faith in the  fairness  of the judging.         In a way, however, this huge audience is watching a rigged competition, though not in the normal sense of that pejorative word. Scandals involving ballot-box tampering have never once darkened Oscar’s  doorstep. The fix materializes in a more sophisticated manner; e.g., the expensive studio films with unlimited advertising budgets usually do better than their country cousins; the more popular veteran actors consistently fare better than newly-acclaimed upstarts, and players in the more sympathetic roles are more often given the nod.         Humphrey Bogart, who loved to bite the hand that fed him, once

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said that the acting awards were hogwash—that the only true test would be if all the actors played the  same role, be they male or female; a logical notion, but highly impractical—though to Bogart’s credit, he maintained this sarcastic opinion even after he had won the Oscar himself for The African Queen.     Another element which often taints the awards can be the mediocre quality of the competition in any given year. So just for fun, let’s imagine a mythical contest which includes every  Oscar-nominated performance, but all done in the same year—and declare a winner in this Best of the Best competition. My choice would be... and the envelope, please.         Jimmy Cagney in  Yankee Doodle Dandy—an early 1940’s Warner Bros. film in which he played the composer and performer George M. Cohan. The role won Cagney the Best Actor Oscar in 1942. In a performance in which his singing and dancing were compared to that of Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire’s, his acting was also second to none. Whether impersonating a much older man, a hopelessly smitten young vaudevillian, a world-famous sophisticate wearing his patriotism on his sleeve, or a brash, yet deeply devoted son, Cagney achieved the ultimate accolade: today, it is impossible to imagine anyone else in the role.         In a marvelous scenario filled with dozens of world-class scenes, one sequence nevertheless stands out, perhaps because it is so unexpected in a movie which could have been just another louder-than-usual showbiz biography: the scene in which Cohan says goodbye to his


dying father who had first trained him for the stage. It is, I think, the most touching scene of its type ever filmed, and greatly aided by the masterful performance of the always wonderful Walter Huston as the elder Cohan. The director, the humorless, often cruel Michael Curtiz, reportedly had giggled all the way through the filming of the last scene at the airport in  Casablanca, a scene which he considered utterly laughable—and he did so, causing the scene to have to be shot again and again. By contrast, Curtiz ru-

ined take after take of the shooting of the death sequence in  Yankee Doodle Dandy  because he was loudly weeping behind the camera.          It’s an actor’s dream to (in one way or another) dissolve his or her director to tears, but few if any other Oscarwinning actors have ever done it in quite the same way as the i n c o m p a r a b l e Alejandro GrattanJimmy Cagney. Dominguez

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THE CRUCIFIXION OF JESUS

—Resonates yet in the world’s torture chambers %\'U/RULQ6ZLQHKDUW

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rucifixion is among the most barbaric and agonizing methods of capital punishment devised by the mind of man. The most widely recognized crucifixion is that of Jesus of Nazareth. Each year at this time, many of us remember his sacrifice and honor his name. According to the Roman historian Tacitus and the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus, Jesus was executed by order of Pontius Pilate, Prefect of the province of Judea. Many Biblical scholars suggest that the incident occurred in the spring of 33 CE, during the reign of the Emperor Tiberius. Sadly, Jesus was not the world’s first crucifixion victim, and he was far from the last. The definition of crucifixion is to torture and torment. The word “excruciating” is derived from it. By some accounts, the practice was first used by Lucius Traquinius Priscus, an early Roman monarch. Other sources attribute it to the Phoenicians, from whom the Romans may have adopted it. It became standard practice in the Mediterranean region by 260-160 BCE, although there is some evidence that it was used as early as the Sixth Century BCE. The Roman leadership, never known for sensitivity when dealing with offenders or dissidents, desired a slow, painful method of execution that would serve to discourage onlookers from criminal or anti-government activity. Crucifixion was generally reserved for the most despised of offenders, in accordance with the mores of the time, rebels, murderers, political and religious dissidents, pirates. Herodotus reports that the Persian king Darius I had 3000 political rivals crucified in 519 B.C. Flavius Josephus reports that the Roman Emperor Titus had 500 Jews per day crucified during the siege of Jerusalem between 66 and 70 CE Earlier, Alexander the Great is said to have crucified 2000 of the enemy during the siege of Tyre. Perhaps the most infamous mass crucifixion involved 6000 followers of the slave general Spartacus, who were suspended from crosses along the road from Rome

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to Capua in 71 BCE, an incident vividly described in Howard Fast’s historical novel, later adapted by Dalton Trumbo to a film (Spartacus) starring Kirk Douglas. The psychopathic Emperor Nero had his living crucifixion victims drenched with oil and set ablaze to light his nocturnal orgies and garden parties. Death came slowly to most victims, whose ordeals could last up to three days. Five to seven inch iron spikes were, driven through the median nerves in the wrists and through the plantar nerves in the feet, causing some of the worst agony imaginable, the equivalent of having non-stop bolts of lightning shooting up the arms and legs. With the pectoral muscles paralyzed, the victim was forced to heave himself up onto his feet in order to breathe. The feet were either nailed flat against the cross or crossed over one another and impaled on a single spike. Loss of blood caused extreme dehydration and thirst. Carbon dioxide built up in the system, causing severe muscle cramps. Afterward, the bodies were frequently left to decay on the cross before being thrown into a heap to be fed upon by dogs and vultures. Unlike most victims, Jesus did not survive beyond the very day of his crucifixion, not surprising when one considers the brutal treatment he received at the hands of his tormentors before he even began the slow, agonizing trek to Calvary. According to the writings of St. Luke, a physician, Jesus literally sweat blood in anticipation of his coming ordeal, while he prayed in the Garden of Gesthemane on the night of his arrest. This rare condition, known as hematidrosis, occurs when a person is under such incredible emotional stress that blood vessels hemorrhage inside the sweat glands. The loss of blood would have weakened Jesus’ system prior to his arrest. Wishing to pacify the mob demanding his execution, Pilate, who could find no fault in Jesus, ordered him scourged. Scourging involved multiple lashes with the Roman flagrum, a whip con-


sisting of three or more leather thongs with lead balls, like buckshot, or pieces of sheep bones at the ends. This form of torture sometimes fractured ribs, as the flagrum bit down through skin and muscle to the bone, causing extreme hemorrhaging. Jewish law limited such punishment to forty lashes, but the actual number depended more upon the caprice of the Roman soldiers. Many victims died of pain, shock, dehydration and loss of blood, requiring no further punishment or execution. Most depictions of crucifixion, including that portrayed in the movie produced by Mel Gibson, are in error on a number of important points. The Romans utilized three or more types of cross. Most came in two parts, the upright post, called the stipis crucis, and the crosspiece, called the patibulum. It would be highly unlikely that a victim would carry both pieces of the cross, as so often appears in illustrations and movies. Typically, the prisoner would carry the patibulum, weighing 50-60 pounds across his shoulders. The entire cross could weigh up to 200 pounds, too heavy for a prisoner who had already been tortured to a condition of near death. The stipis crucis would remain permanently anchored in the ground at the place of execution. Once nailed to the patibulum, the prisoner was then hauled atop the stipis Crucis. Jesus most likely succumbed to traumatic and hypovolemic shock, causing cardiac and respiratory arrest. If a victim endured too long on the cross, a soldier would break his legs, to prevent any further attempts to breathe. In Jesus’ case, the soldiers arrived to find that he was already dead but pierced his side with a lance in order to be certain. There are eleven hypotheses regarding the blood and water that flowed from Jesus’ side when the lance was driven between his ribs. Probably the most accurate explanation is that the right atrium of the heart was penetrated causing the blood flow and that the water was a result of pleural effusion from his earlier scourging.

Christians as well as most non-believers are familiar with the rest of the story of Jesus. Constantine I banned crucifixion throughout the empire in 341 CE, but it has resurfaced many times since. Twenty-five Jesuit and Franciscan priests were crucified by Japanese authorities in Nagasaki in 1597. The Mexican revolutionary Emilio Zapata was accused of crucifying landowners on telegraph poles. The Nazis were reported to have crucified prisoners at the infamous death camp of Dachau during World War II. As recently as the 1990’s, there have been reports of crucifixions in the Sudan. On May 25, 2013, three men in Darfur were sentenced to hanging and crucifixion. Each year at Easter time, Christians and many others remember the torture and execution of Jesus and honor his memory. Crucifixion is no longer in vogue as it once was. Other forms of torture, however, are still prevalent. Masters of the old Soviet Gulag, third world generalissimos and even apologists for democratic societies that have abandoned their principles bury the realities of torture beneath a blanket of evasions, euphemisms and Newspeak. It would require extreme moral and ethical gymnastics to pretend that the process known as waterboarding does not constitute torture. And yet, a recent US vice president assured the world that it was merely an “enhanced interrogation technique.” Even as the frenzied obscene consumerism that has debauched Christmas infects the Easter season, those who profess to follow the teachings of Jesus bear a heavy obligation to oppose cruelty in all its manifestations. Remaining ignorant or acquiescent is not an option. As Jesus says, “As you have done unto the least of these, you have done unto me.” Lorin Swinehart

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any people use the term “street dog” and apply it generously to all dogs they see on the street. There is a sort of degree or level of capability of living on the street [a good portion of the day/night], versus those dogs that are not equipped or due to unique circumstances unable to survive on the street and are in a kind of ‘crisis’ mode. Most street dogs have owners or people who look out for them, but the dog does not live inside their house. Too frequently ‘street dogs’ have been removed from the street and brought to a shelter by persons with good intentions. The good feeling of having ‘rescued’ a dog off the street has an impact on shelter populations. So much so in fact, that representatives of the three local shelters, Anita’s Animals, The Ranch and Lucky Dog, have identified this phenomenon.

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These shelter volunteers are working as a team, because they share the concern for the welfare of dogs. They are working on a project to help offer guidelines to the community to help identify those dogs that can use assistance for their life on the street versus those dogs that truly need to be “rescued.” Many dogs just need a bit of regular aid such as being offered food and water and do not need to be ‘rescued.’ Possibly a dog with its hair so matted it has difficulty walking has an owner who cannot afford a groomer, and the offer of a haircut is all that is needed. A dog that appears to have been injured could benefit from a vet assessment to determine if it is an

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

old or new injury, with appropriate follow-up actions. When the guidelines have been solidified they will be posted on the three shelters websites and other dog friendly media sites. A reminder as we are getting close to warm weather, do not leave your pet in a car, even parked in the shade with the windows down. The car can become an ‘oven’ very quickly. If you walk your dog, try to avoid the hottest part of the day and have water available for your pet. As I write this column I wonder how much of an influx of abandoned / tossed away dogs there will be in our community with the exit of some of our part-time visitors as has occurred in previous years. Previous columns have addressed the value of pets in our lives and the commitment a person needs to make when a pet is taken into a household family. But many people in our community unfortunately have seen firsthand or heard of a story about a ‘disposable’ dog taken for a period of time and then ‘returned’ or left to fend for itself. Shelters do try their best to weed-out these possibilities, but if a person would toss away an animal, they will also not tell the truth about their commitment to treasure and protect a defenseless cat or dog. My

only hope is that Karma comes back swiftly to this heartless person. On a more positive note, there are countless individuals who help animals in need. Many assist in a variety of ways including feeding street dogs and cat colonies, spending time with the animals at shelters, work at the local spay-neuter clinics, foster young or injured animals, adopt off the street, donate food or provide financial support to their favorite shelter. For this, we as a community are very grateful and appreciative. Anita and her volunteers Thank You!


THE WIN NDSHIELD WASHERS %\7HUL6D\D

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e were moving to Mexico from California. We packed and drove our little Toyota RAV across the border at Otay, just east of Tijuana. In a tiny town, we stopped to get some water at a mini-mart.  As we pulled in, two young guys jumped at the car to wash our windshield. They started arguing, and then started beating each other with their fists!  My husband said, “Let’s get the hell outta here!” and as I was trying to get it into reverse, the two guys, who were bloody by now, started beating each other over the hood of the car.  I finally backed out, and they fell to the ground with fists still flying.  We peeled out of there with spray bottles and rags flying off in all directions.  In the larger towns and cities, the Windshield Washers worked in teams… and with squeegees.  Their timing was impeccable!  The light would turn red, and they would have two to three cars complete and paid for by the time the light turned green.  Not only were they quick, they did a great job!  But the most impressive entrepreneur we met was the one who did nothing at all to clean the windshield. We were sitting in a long line of cars waiting for the light to change.  We could see the Windshield Washers doing their job several cars ahead of us.  The spray floating on and above the cars, a quick swipe of the squeegee, and rags moving in fast circular motions.  Then I noticed a boy of about eight or nine years of age.  He had a bottle in his hand, and it looked like he was washing windows too as he came down the line of cars.  However, as he got closer, I saw that he had no rags, but seemed to be using big white gloves to wipe the windshields. As he approached our car, I noticed he was wearing white makeup and was dressed in typical mime fashion, a striped shirt, suspenders, and large pants with deep pockets.  Some of the makeup had worn off as the boy was sweating in the mid-day heat. To my surprise it was not water that he squirted over our windshield, but a

small amount of tiny Styrofoam balls, the kind you would find inside a stuffed doll that was won at the carnival.  They floated delicately down our windshield and then the boy, wearing his oversized gloves, pretended to wash our windshield without touching it.  The little balls blew away with his movements. I was very impressed with this innovative twist on a theme.  When the boy came to my window, I handed him a large tip and said, “Muchas Gracias!”  Staying in character, he said nothing, but looked at me with large, brown eyes, smiled and nodded, then headed for the car behind us. As we drove away, I looked in the rear view mirror.  I saw several young men with rags, spray bottles, and squeegees, moving out of the way of traffic, and one small mime following behind them. We never again saw a mime windshield washer on that long road trip, and I often wonder about that boy…. does he go to school?  Is he an orphan?  Does he have a family? Is he an extremely smart street kid?  Where does he go after a long day of miming? I can only speculate.  I wish that intelligent little mime all the luck in the world. Teri Saya

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The Riviera Rediscovered

An overnight sail after a day spent in Montpelier and Sète, France the ship anchors at Monte Carlo, Monaco. The harbor sits like the stage of an amphitheater upon which the rest of Monaco looks down from the surrounding heights. Riding at anchor here are dozens of luxury yachts so large as to almost defy belief that so many private citizens can afford them.  Most of the hotels, condos, restaurants, and shops are of modern design. Fortunately, a few surviving structures like L’Hermitage, a hotel dating from the Belle Époque, evoke the feel of this place when rail service first connected it to Paris 6W1LFKRODV&DWKHGUDO0RQWH and the casino at Monte Carlo was brand new. Carlo, Monaco The St. Nicholas Cathedral is only 150 years old, but sits on the site of the original cathedral of the same name built in 1252.  It’s the home of the well-known Cathedral Choir School, and its Little Singers of Monaco perform at its masses during the school year. Other historical architecture worth seeing is the Grimaldi Palace. It’s been the home of Monaco’s ruling family for more than 800 years and is the one time home of Princess Grace Kelly. Because Monaco’s land area is too limited to afford its royalty the luxury of multiple residences, this palace has been remodeled and expanded throughout its 700-year history and so it’s a slice through the layer cake of history. Terrain and language aside, Monte Carlo has very much the feel of Palm Beach.  Immense wealth is now sheltered in – and managed from – Monaco, and many of its owners have at least a pied-à-terre in the Principality.  Chic shops and restaurants prosper here in abundance. Duty-free shopping for designer goods holds little appeal for me, and I instead take a 5 mile drive into France where the historic village of Eze overlooks the Mediterranean Sea from a 1,500 foot promontory, accessible by roads so narrow that motor vehicles Grimaldi palace, Monte Carlo, Mocannot pass into the old town. naco The terrain here seems better suited to mountain goats than to people, and the modest uphill climb from the parking spot is the first of several. Here goods are trundled through narrow cobblestone streets on hand-trucks and wrestled around switchbacks and up endless stairwells.

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An easily defended coastal lookout, this site has been highly prized for nearly 4,000 years and has been occupied by the Phoenicians, Romans, Italians, and Moors. There are several high-end hotels in the area, but the most interesting hotel was one cobbled together from adjoining homes on a pedestrian-only lane which left every doorknob on the lane sporting either a “MAID SERVICE REQUESTED� or “DO NOT DISTURB� sign!  Eze is also the site of a botanical garden created after World War II and known worldwide for an impressive collection of cactus and other succulents from around the Mediterranean and the Americas. The cruise ship is scheduled to hoist anchor late in the evening. Passengers (]H)UDQFH straggle aboard laden with bags of purchases from the shops of Monte Carlo.  As the boat leaves the harbor the lights and sounds of parties in progress on the big yachts at anchor carries across the water. My takeaway is instead the memory of looking down at Monte Carlo from the vantage point of the Corniche, and out over the Mediterranean through the charming picture frame of medieval Eze. Tomorrow we’re scheduled to drop anchor in Portofino, Italy.

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ON O N IIN N CACT CACT ACTUS A BALLOON CACTUS %\0DJJLH9DQ2VWUDQG 2VWUDQG

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exicans are the best packagewrappers I’ve ever seen (except for my mother). They use homemade handles made out of hairy cord for easy carrying and they work great, no messing with fancy stuff. These folks could make big bucks at the Home Shopping Network. My mother used so much Scotch tape when she wrapped a package for mailing (“You can’t be too careful”), that, when you got it, you practically had to use a flamethrower to open it up. Actually, I would’ve been better off going to a Mexican package wrapper for my annual physical last November, than to the doctor I ended up with. That way, if I’d been given the same diagnosis, I wouldn’t have been upset because a package-wrapper isn’t supposed to know about the human body, right? Well, here’s what happened. I informed my children, who arranged for flights from California to be here for the impending surgery, despite their own feelings about it. (In fact, I could say that they had reservations in more ways than one.) I decorated the Christmas tree (my last, I thought), wondering who would be there to take it down after the holidays, since the survival rate for this surgical procedure is practically nil -- like 2% live for 5 years after surgery, in a condition I’d hardly call living. One of the last things I did, while setting my affairs in order, was to phone a good friend, an oncologist at the National Institute of Health at Bethesda, Washington, D.C. She seriously questioned the diagnosis, con-

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sidering there were no symptoms other than a raised enzyme level ( w h i c h could’ve been caused by what I had eaten the day before the physical), and strongly advised against having immediate surgery. She suggested instead that I FedEx all data to her for the head of oncology at NIH to look over. Optimistically (hope blooms eternal, doesn’t it), I cancelled the surgery, told my kids not to come, and arranged for the recommended new tests. And it was not easy to find the specific equipment necessary to do those tests. The results from both Washington and Guadalajara were that I am in excellent physical condition. There is nothing wrong at all, never was. I am suggesting that you be very careful whom you choose. It’s taken me, a professional comedy writer, four months to be able to find anything humorous in this incident. I finally said to myself, “To lighten up does not necessarily mean to become a blonde.” I’m on my way back to the Mexican package guy to see if he can help me because, after this experience, I ain’t wrapped too tight, anymore. Maggie Van Ostrand


UUNCOMMON NCOM MM MON CCOMMON OM MM MON SSENSE ENSE %\%LOO)UD\HU ELOOIUD\HU#JPDLOFRP Empowering Your Inner Introvert

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was surprised when in graduate school I took the MeyersBriggs assessment and discovered, among other things, that I was an introvert.  In addition to being surprised, I think I was also a bit embarrassed.  I was a teacher and had expected that good teachers would naturally be extroverts.  It was confusing to me to be labeled an introvert.  The more I thought about it, the more obvious it was, however.  Being an introvert is not the same as being shy.  A shy person is afraid of being judged in social situations.  Introverts simply do not feel as stimulated by social interaction. They prefer solitude or the company of a small group of friends to a large party of people they do not know well.  As a teacher, much of my work was done alone in preparing for my classes.  As a writer, all of my work is done alone.  I like being with people, but I also value my contemplative time.     Susan Cain, who was recently featured in a TED presentation at LCS, wrote the best-selling book, Quiet: The Power of Introverts.  She claims that our society, especially since the 20th century, has been biased in favor of extroverts. In our classrooms, we insist students arrange themselves in circles for group discussions and group projects.  In the workplace, considerably more emphasis is placed on collaboration and group problem-solving.  Cain claims that, although there is nothing wrong with collaborating, we have undervalued those who prefer working alone.  If one third to one half of people are introverts, as she claims, then we need to respect the fact that many don’t work as well in environments that insist on extroversion.  The research demonstrates that often the best ideas are generated by those who have time to think and process their thoughts alone.  Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein are good examples of introverts whose quiet thinking time led to revolutionary ideas.  As a society, we have come to favor extroverts because we value action over contemplation.  Maybe it is our distrust of intellectuals.  Maybe it’s our irrational fascination of celebrities with outsized personalities.  Whatever the

%LOO)UD\HU reason, we have created a world where we value extroverts, even if they have little to contribute other than their appealing, extroverted personalities.   Some research suggests that introverted supervisors produce better results and more innovation. They tend to allow people to work with more freedom than extroverts who have a tendency to impose their ideas and values on the group. Many of the best ideas are, indeed, produced by introverts who, working alone, can backup their ideas with clear thinking.  When I think back to my teaching days, I can see how I favored extroverts.  When I asked a question in class, the extroverts would raise their hands even if they only had a preliminary answer.  The introverts would still be processing the question while the extroverts were speaking.  When I read over the work the students did at home, on their own, it was often the quiet introverts in class who had the most thorough, well-reasoned answers.  Of course, as Jung pointed out, we are all on an introvert-extrovert continuum.  No one is entirely extroverted or introverted.  But we probably do need to appreciate introversion more.  And those of us who are introverts don’t need to feel less than adequate.  Abraham Lincoln was another famous introvert, and we’ve all heard his famous quote: “Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt!”

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DRIVING DRUNK IN IRELAND %\1HLO0F.LQQRQ

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any farmers in Kerry County, Ireland live in areas where there is no public transport and few local pubs. They have a long way to travel for liquid socialization. Most don’t mind the distance because an evening in the pub is a sure-fire way to combat the boredom and loneliness caused by their isolation. However, there is a problem—the police have been lying in wait for these rural folk as they wend their bleary way home after an evening of battling melancholy and depression at their favorite watering hole. Recognizing the problem as serious, the Kerry County Council recently passed a motion to create special permits that would allow these poor sots

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to have a few pints and then drive home while under the influence without getting busted. They say the permits are needed to fight an epidemic of despair and misery. The national government wasted no time in overruling the local council. On reflection, I feel that the national government is short-sighted. They and governments everywhere should recognize this trend setting move as a novel way to generate revenue, reduce spiraling debt and cut out-of-control deficits. Consider the following: Instead of an annual license to drive drunk, they could sell one-time permits and make them available right in the pub. There would be no increase in government administrative costs. Pubs

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would be happy to make permits available as a service to clients because of the increase they could expect in sales. To alleviate the possibility that farmers would only buy permits when they over-indulge, the authorities could begin using random legal limits that vary daily. This simple act would encourage every prudent farmer to purchase a permit along with his first pint. This is such a good idea that it could be adopted in other areas of criminality with equally lucrative results. A few examples will suffice: ARSON – If one is afflicted with a desire to watch a building being reduced to a pile of smoldering ash it should be legally possible to engage in the obsession. Any house can be chosen by the firebug as the price of a permit can be set high enough so that the government can reimburse the homeowner for his insurance and still come out ahead. The arsonist will be happy to pay as he or she nullifies all risk of going to jail. FLASHING – An individual with this particular form of deviancy should be able to acquire a permit that allows him to practice his calling in pre-designated areas—areas where people have been warned to expect a man to leap from a conveniently planted bush while yelling and ripping open

his raincoat. Deviancy rarely dissolves on its own, so permit sales will be a permanent source of government revenue. The authorities might, for example, sell a standard one-time flashing license for $50 and then offer a $100 special that would be good for three subsequent streaking performances at sporting events. SPEEDING – The cost of a driver’s license that makes it okay for one to commit this particular misdemeanor should be proportional to the speed one wishes to drive. For example, the price for someone who wants to drive at 90 miles per hour may be set at $90 whereas another individual who only wants to travel at 80 would be charged $80. The price could be doubled or even tripled if the speeding is to be done in a downtown area. ROBBERY – A high percentage of crooks are caught, so purchasing a permit before holding up a bank makes perfect sense. It should be easy to calculate the price of the permit so that the government makes money and so that it is advantageous for the robber to buy the license. Perhaps different types of robberies should carry different fees. For example, a license to perform a bank job should carry an added premium if the heist is to be an armed robbery. HOMICIDE – Say Adele M. wants to do in her husband, Geoffrey, so that she can run off with Lancelot, the man who came to fix the leak in the dishwasher. She knows there is a risk of getting caught and spending the rest of her life incarcerated instead of wallowing in erotic bliss on a Caribbean Island. The cost to the state to catch, prosecute, convict, and incarcerate or execute is very high. All that money is saved and the government gains substantial revenue if they simply issue Adele M. a homicide permit—so much revenue in fact that the state can afford to pay for a nice funeral for Geoffrey. These are just a few examples. There are infinite possibilities for adding new laws or resurrecting old ones. Think of the potential in areas such as bigamy, blasphemy, polygamy, adultery, self-abuse, suicide and tax evasion. Just as the Catholic Church did years ago with indulgences, the council in Kerry has hit on something and if our government is smart, it will indeed take heed. (Ed. Note: Neil is the author of Tuckahoe Slidebottle (Thistledown Press) which was a finalist for the Stephen Leacock Humor Award and the Howard O’Hagen Short Fiction Award.) Neil McKinnon


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%\9LFWRULD6FKPLGW

Do you have the time?

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n ime has been an illusive conceptt for me. When I lived and worked in the USA, I had a large day planner where my day was scheduled in 15 minute intervals. When I first came to o Mexico, I took off my watch. h. It was a short-lived act of rebellion. Some habits aree hard to break. One day I was standing di iin line at the bank and I looked at their big red clock and mentioned it was off by an hour. Others customers smiled and corrected my error telling me that Mexico had changed to daylight savings time the week before. Recently the USA and Canada “jumped ahead” one hour. And Mexico will do so on April 6. So for the next month, our satellite clocks will tell us the time in Canada, and household clocks will tell us the time in Mexico, and I will be confused for a month. I’m even more confused when calling my friend who is on Pacific Time. So there’s a two-hour difference, except now, when there’s a one-hour difference—oh forget it! When I came to Mexico I didn’t want to be tied down by time. I wanted to live as I assumed the Mexicans lived. Sure, we live in the Land of Mañana. But I see many are up before the sun, rush to get their kids to school and hurry to get to their jobs on time. But they always seem to go about it in a manner that is less—well, rude, than Americans seem to get. Mexicans still allow for the

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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

common courtesies of ccom om respect in their culre tture. They greet one another, exchange a few pleasantries, and when they are very rushed they say “Adios.” Meaning both “goodbye” and b “go with God because “g I don’t do have time to chat.” At my usual breakfast hang out, “Does anybody h know what day it is?” is a common question asked. Even while doing volunteer work, I had a hard time answering that question. I worked to reconcile yesterday’s work, do today’s work, and prepare the register banks for tomorrow, yet the work all had to be properly dated to appease the accounting gods. What day it was, was determined by what I was doing at the moment. But after so many years of retirement, I’m back to carrying a date book again. Oh, I don’t fill every 15 minutes as I did when I was working. In fact, there are days I forget to look at it to my own detriment. Last week I didn’t look and we nearly missed our Saturday doctor appointments. That’s imbedded timing. Doctors in the USA don’t take appointments on Saturdays! I spend a lot of time trying to find time. Who knew that retirement was going to be so complex? Friends have begged me to slow down, and my doctors have ordered it. I just have this imbedded time schedule in me that keeps up a constant push-me-pull-you existence for me. In rare moments I find myself alone in the house thinking, what do I do now? I feel sort of lost for a few moments, and then I remember there are some chapters waiting for me to review, an article I have to finish, and then there is that book I’ve been writing. Time, my friends, is a precious commodity. Someone once said “Life is what happens when you are busy doing other things.” When someone discovers the secret to slowing down and pacing themselves, discovers the way to defeat the imbedded internal clock, would you share it with me? Victoria Schmidt


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620() )$0286: :5,7 7(56 —Their Day Jobs!

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harles Bukowski worked for the Post Office in Los Angeles. Henry David Thoreau worked as a land surveyor, teacher, and tutor. Franz Kafka was the Chief Legal Secretary for the Workman’s Accident Insurance Institute. Anthony Trollope also worked at the Post Office. Joseph Heller wrote Catch-22 while working full time in magazine advertising. Salinger wrote part of Catcher in the Rye while on active duty in the military. Toni Morrison worked as an editor. T S Eliot worked at Lloyd’s Bank on the Colonial and Foreign Accounts desk for eight years. Robert Frost changed light bulbs filaments in a factory. John Steinbeck worked in a fish hatchery. Langston Hughes was an academic assistant. Anne Rice was an insurance claims examiner. William S Burroughs worked as an

exterminator. Vladimir Nabokov was an entomologist. Zane Gray was a dentist. George Orwell was an officer of the Indian Imperial Police. Jack London worked various jobs, including in a cannery. Kurt Vonnegut managed a Saab dealership. Jack Kerouac did various jobs, including picking cotton and working as a gas station attendant. Harper Lee was an airline reservation clerk. Ralph Waldo Emerson was a minister, teacher, and lecturer. t /BUIBOJFM )BXUIPSOF XPSLFE GPS the Boston Customs Office.

In the wind and the rain I think of you And in the sunlight, smiling. By the sea with her joyous whispers, On the plain with her swells of gold, With never a touch of sorrow But a trace of saddened joy. When the grapes grow round in the summer And fall in the languorous heat, When the leaves are gold and fragile When the wind is brushing the wheat. And in the hour of dawning You rise in me with the sun And fill me with your presence Till, when each day is done You slip away in shadows To join the glowing night, And leave me in quiet darkness With the memory of your light. By Rachel McMillen

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PROFILING TEPEHUA %\0RRQ\HHQ.LQJ PRRQLH#\DKRRFRP

P

ublic Health care is provided to all Mexican Citizens as guaranteed by the Constitution. Care is either fully or partially subsidized by the Federal Government, depending on the person’s employment status. The IMSS (Institute Mexicano del Seguro Social) health care program is a tripartite system funded by the employee, private employer and the federal Government. Anyone can apply for IMSS status.  The health inequality amongst the population is influenced by the socioeconomic factor. Mexico has witnessed great progress in its health care system, and Americans receiving care here declare it is as good as anywhere. This care does not reach the poor, for whom the bus fare to the facilities is beyond their reach. Bus fare to and from Guadalajara from Chapala is just under 100 pesos. Workers earning forty pesos an hour cannot afford the luxury of good health. Most of the free facilities are understaffed and overworked, and the waiting for service can be hours. The smaller free facilities outside the cities are not equipped for laboratories, radiography equipment etc, so people are forced to take that bus into the city. Or pay for the equipped clinics. The need for health Insurance in Mexico is a comparatively new concept, brought about by the influx of foreigners, but certainly prohibitive for the masses. The free Clinic of the

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Tephua Centro Comunitario is open to the poor, those masses under the poverty line, which is hard to define. The writer would like to draw attention to the very fine professionals who donate their valuable time, and would like to echo the feelings of the people. t Dr. Carlos Rodriguez, who helped license the clinic and serves the people every Friday. t Dr. Joe de Leon who is our Consultant and Dr. Santiago, M.Ds who give one day a week. t Dr. Geo. Ruwwe, who also deals with pain management and pulls teeth in a floppy flowered hat to make it less frightening for the children. t Dr. Manuel Garcia Baron. Dr. Marlen.C.Perez Cerda, Wanda Cowlishaw Dental Hygienist and her assistant Lindy White, t Dr. Tony Pinto, who will see the people of Tepehua free at his eye clinic near Maskaras Clinic, and Lulu Garcia’s new Laboratories in the Plaza Maskaras, who does the lab tests for the Tepehua Clinic...a huge round of applause to all of them for the selfless use of their valuable time. Thank you is not big enough for the relief they bring to the people. We need more dental assistance at the center, and extra doctors, because the people overwhelm the doctors on hand. If you are retired and would like to help as consultants, please contact Moonie.


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I LIVE IN AJIJIC %\1HLOO-DPHV

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d. Note: This article (in a much lengthier version) was first published in 1946 in the magazine Modern Mexico. Ms. James, known as the “Godmother of Ajijic,” set many of her charming stories and celebrated books here at Lakeside. Her legacy did not end there, for the magnificent area that today is the site of the Lake Chapala Society once belonged to Ms. James, who willed it to the LCS long before her death at nearly 100 years of age. Hence, all of us are the beneficiaries of her generosity.) Ajijic is an old, old village. Our solidly built Franciscan Church bears the date when it was finished: November 27, 1749. But it is not the original. The first was destroyed by a hurricane. Even before that, before the Conquistadores set foot on the shores of the New World, Ajijic was an Indian settlement. Ancestors of my neighbors gained a comfortable livelihood fishing in the lake and cultivating their milpas. Long after the Spaniards had planted a new religion, Indians continued to make their little clay figurines, bake them, and toss them into the lake to appease Tlaloc, their Rain God. Often we foreigners amuse ourselves diving for these exotic little figurines which we use to decorate our homes. Foreigners of many nationalities come to Ajijic by design. Otherwise they’d never find the village hidden among tall green-black mango trees, squeezed in between the green mountains and the lake. Only two new houses, one built by a Mexican Colonel and the other by an English refugee couple, break the natural mild contour of the grassy shore. These estates and the tall stark white unfinished alfeñique tower of the church jutting above the tree tops sharply silhouetted against the hills serve as landmarks for the settlement when approached by boat. Compared with places outside Mexico, Ajijic with its peaceful inhabitants and climate of perpetual Indian Summer, is a little bit of heaven. The Lake’s natural shore line with droopy willows standing ankle deep

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in water, and gray-green eucalyptus alive with bees, nets drying in the sun, fishermen leisurely drawing in a graceful loop of floaters and women using the 75 kilometer by 25 kilometer lake as a washtub have caught the fancy of more than one visiting artist. Villagers lead modest dignified lives governed to a degree by the spirit of mañana. We have hospices where a stranger may find lodging; we have a posada, a casa de asistencia, and even a hotel, but none of the inn keepers trouble themselves to display a sign indicating the nature of their establishment. No need for grocery stores to display names either. Everybody knows where they are. And the Post Office, too. Only the foreigners come daily for their mail. Sometimes when the courier forgets and permits the Ajijic mail pouch to remain on the bus and continue on to Jocotepec, foreigners howl as if the oversight were a personal affront. Our streets have names but no one knows what they are. Our letters arrive marked simply “The House is known.” Village children are plump and well-nourished, and we have only an occasional beggar, usually a man from elsewhere. Jalisco is one of the Republic’s richest agriculturist states, and the Lake Chapala region is especially favored. Mango, papaya, bananas, maiz, frijoles, chile, and jitomates form the main crops, but vegetables and fruits of almost every climate will grow in the local gardens. We have plums, peaches, lemons, oranges, grapefruit, apples, pomegranates, zapotes and many others. And at certain harvest seasons section of the village sidewalks are completely spread with drying peanuts, bean pods or ripe maiz, usually guarded by a girl nursing a baby or a woman engaged in needlework, against depredations of pigs, burros or cattle. Our animals lead a free life and when venturing abroad on a dark night there is always the danger of stumbling headlong over a black cow or pig sleeping in the street, or crashing into the rear of a burro. Foreigners


carry flashlights, Mexicans look where they’re going. Our Dry Season is really dry and the Rainy Season very wet. However, Tlaloc, our Rain God, is considerate and the tropical downpours which usually blow in with sudden strong gusts of wind come at night when everyone is asleep. I prefer the rainy days when tender young mushrooms spring up like giant snowdrops in the corrals, and the orchids clinging to boles of leafy trees in the valleys swell to flower. Then the atmosphere is crystal clear and the sunsets of the lake a marvel to behold. An occasional urchin clad in blue denim overalls and a wide brimmed sombrero can often be seen ambling along the street swinging a stem of the luxury flowers worth $25.00 in another locale. Many families have a few orchids growing on orange trees in patio or garden. Our trees shaded central plaza is the scene of many fiestas complete with fireworks, music and serenatas. The latter is a happy occasion when the boys and girls stroll about the plaza in opposite directions and flirt with flowers, with a musical background, frequently in the moonlight. Artists, writers and foreign vacationers arrive by launch, struggle ashore to spend the day for a brief

glimpse of Ajijic. Many return to paint or write. Lack of a dock has been a serious handicap to lake-borne traffic, and a poor road has hampered land travelers, and happily contributed to our isolation. All this will end soon. Already an engineer is in our midst rushing work to completion on a new 30,000 pesos dock. Launches formerly unable to dock now will kill their engines, pole cautiously, rest the gang plank on the half-finished rock and concrete pier; and passengers walk ashore with dry feet. Thus Art and Isolation must bow to Progress and Transportation.

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Hearts at Work $&ROXPQE\-DPHV7LSWRQ

“To Become a Fool”

I

ssac Bashevis Singer, winner of the 1978 Nobel Prize in Literature, includes in The Collected Stories the charming tale, “The Spinoza of Market Street”. Dr. Nahum Fischelson, a scholar and son of the late Rabbi of Tishjevitz,” lives alone in a garret in Warsaw, and, for the past thirty years, he has been studying Spinoza’s Ethics: “He knew every proposition, every proof, every corollary, every note by heart. When he wanted to find a particular passage, he generally opened to the place immediately without having to search for it. But nevertheless, he continued to study the Ethics for hours every day with a magnifying glass in his bony hand, murmuring and nodding his head in agreement. The truth was that the more Dr. Fischelson studied, the more puzzling sentences, unclear passages, and cryptic remarks he found.” Dr. Fischelson, a bachelor, often stood at the single window in his room and looked up at the heavens, “thickly strewn with stars.” He rarely looked down toward Market Street below, a “half-lit bedlam,” filled with thieves, prostitutes, gamblers, rabble whose behavior was “the very antithesis of reason.” He knew that “these people were immersed in the vainest of passions, were drunk with emotions, and according to Spinoza, emotion was never good.” Existing on a tiny pension, Dr. Fischelson “had isolated himself completely and had become a forgotten man,” and furthermore he was weakened by a mysterious illness, “his intestines seemed about to turn themselves inside out.” But, in the dark corridor leading to his room, there was another door, “cluttered with boxes and baskets, in which the odor of fried onions and laundry soap was always present. Behind this door lived a spinster whom the neighbors called Black Dobbe. Dobbe was tall and lean, and as black as a baker’s shovel. She spoke with the hoarse voice of a man and she wore men’s shoes. For years Black Dobbe had sold breads, rolls, and bagels which she had bought from the baker at the gate of the house.” One afternoon Dobbe received a letter, and needing someone to read it to her, she knocked on the door of Dr. Fischelson’s room. Receiving no answer she pushed it open to discover Dr. Fisch-

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%DUXFK6SLQR]D elson “fully clothed on his bed; his face was as yellow as wax….” She screamed, certain that he was dead, but when she threw water in his face he opened his eyes. The “street” had entered his life. Several times a day Dobbie prepared soup for him. Dr. Fischelson continued to study the Ethics, but now “he could make no sense of the theorems and proofs with their many references to axioms and definitions and other theorems.” Dr. Fischelson and Dobbie, both misfits, fell in love, and, to the astonishment of the locals, they married. On the wedding night Dobbie appeared in his room “wearing a silk nightgown, slippers with pompoms, and with her hair hanging down over her shoulders. There was a smile on her face.” Powers long dormant awaked in him. Although he had had only a sip of the benediction wine, he was as if intoxicated. He kissed Dobbe and spoke to her of love. Long-forgotten quotations from Klopstock, Lessing, Goethe, rose to his lips. The pressures and aches stopped. He embraced Dobbe, pressed her to himself, was again a man as in his youth. Dobbe was faint with delight; crying, she murmured things to him in a Warsaw slang which he did not understand. Later, Dr. Fischelson slipped off into the deep sleep young men know.” Waking early, Dr. Fischelson got out of bed and quietly walked up the steps to his single window and looked up at the sky. “In the higher sphere, apparently, little notice was taken of the fact that a certain Dr. Fischelson had in his declining days married someone called Black Dobbe.” Filled with joy, he “breathed deeply of the midnight air, supported his shaky hands on the windowsill and murmured, ‘Divine Spinoza, forgive me. I have become a Jim Tipton fool.’”


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WHO ARE THE BABY BOOMERS? %\%OXH PH[LFREOXH#SURGLJ\QHWP[ 766-5023

R

emember that civil war song, “When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again—Hurrah! Hurrah!”? Well, those World War II Johnnies and the ladies who “all turned out” made a whole lot of babies when that war ended. Born between 1946 and 1964, there are nearly 80 million of those post-war babies in the United States. The 8.5 million Canadian boomers are generally defined as those born between 1947 and 1966, because Canadian soldiers were repatriated later than Ameri-

28

can servicemen. As a group, boomers head the world’s most powerful companies, have tremendous purchasing power, a strong work ethic (live to work rather than work to live), thrive on action and causes, push hard on economic, political, and social reform, and are, generally, fierce competitors. Boomers born between 1946 and 1955 have different outlooks on life from those born between 1956 and 1964. The older boomers were influenced by events such as the assassinations of Martin Luther

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

King and John and Robert Kennedy, the moonwalk, the Vietnam War, social experimentation, civil rights, the women’s movement, sexual freedom, and drugs. They appear to be more experimental, individualistic, free-spirited, and oriented toward social causes. The younger boomers, on the other hand, were influenced by the cold war, raging inflation, gasoline shortages, AIDS, Watergate, and Nixon’s resignation. Therefore, they are a bit more cynical, less optimistic, and more distrustful. Baby boomers will live longer, stay healthier, and be more active than any prior generation; however, because of economic crises resulting in financial setbacks, they will probably have to work longer than their parents’ generation. Even if they don’t have to work, many will choose to do so because they enjoy the social opportunities and mental stimulation a job or volunteer work can provide. Unfortunately, most boomers have not saved sufficient funds for a comfortable retirement, and many in the United States who thought they had saved appropriately, lost much of their home equity in the 2008 financial meltdown.

Many senior Canadians do not want to retire and/or simply cannot afford to do so, and employers need them to remain in the workforce. They do not view age 65 as a magic number that should force them out of the labor pool. Following are a few excerpts from an article by Mark Miller titled “Seven Ways Boomer Retirees Are Different,” published in Reuters on February 5, 2013: “The baby boomer generation has broken the mold at every stage of life, and it looks like old age won’t be any different. Boomers aren’t heading quietly into retirement. They’re launching businesses, embracing digital technology and living abroad in greater numbers than ever before. “Twenty-one percent of baby boomers say they are “interested” or “very interested” in retiring abroad, according to a survey by the Center for Medical Tourism Research at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas.” That 21% equates to more than 16 million boomers from the States alone. As the boomers begin to understand what these trends mean to them personally, some of them will be looking toward Mexico as a place to reinvent themselves. For many others, the very idea of moving to a foreign country at this stage of their lives is incomprehensible. “This is a generation,” says Ken Dychtwald, president of the consulting firm Age Wave, “which is far more comfortable, and even addicted in some ways, to change and newness and adventure. They are going to pioneer a lifestyle where people reinvent themselves again and again and again.” (Ed. Note: Blue is the author of Baby Boomers: Reinvent Your Retirement in Mexico.)


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On Aging %\0DUJLH.HDQH

Tears irrigate wrinkles In Mama’s face, trickling Down, splopping off her chin. “I’m old,” She says, “I looked in the mirror And it shows an old crone, but I feel so young. Where has my life gone? How can I be loved? With my grandchildren I feel loved. They make me forget my wrinkles Because they treat me like I’m young their vitality trickles through my vein but that rotten mirror! Why does it show me so old? How can anyone love this old Wrinkled face? I can’t even love It. When I look in the mirror I see crepe-like skin, moles, wrinkles. Outside my youth seems to have trickled Away yet inside I still feel young. I look at her and tell her to me she is still young, That to me, she’ll never seem old. She talks of my father whose life trickled away in cancer cells. “At seventy he still wanted to make love But by the time he shook out the wrinkles He forgot what he wanted.” She says I’m a mirror of him. I tell her life itself is a mirror, and her eyes reflect the young person lurking behind her wrinkles, they are the chronicles of her life, not of old age, I see creases from laughter, marks of love I leave her then. I feel a dampness trickling into ditches beginning in my face, trickles trapped in tiny creases. I look in my mirror. My husband stands behind me, looking at me with love, and I cry. Not for my mother, no longer young but for the two of us. We’re growing old. Laugh lines? Worry lines? They’re wrinkles! I say “Let’s not let our lives trickle away. We’ll be young always. We’ll shroud the mirrors showing us old and make love among the wrinkles.

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THE DATING GAME—Revisited %\7RP(FN

O

nline dating has become quite a social phenomenon. I know several people who have found their “soul mates” through such dating services as Match. com, eHarmony.com, and POF (Plenty of Fish). I know many more who have been woefully disappointed. I must admit that my curiosity more than once has prompted me to read such syrupy lines as “love long walks on the beach.” That was from a lady who lived in Iowa. “Looking for a man with a good heart” always piqued my interest. Does she want someone to respond with his latest CAT scan and stress test? I could understand if she did. Who wants a guy with a ticker that’s about to give out, especially if you’re not yet the beneficiary of his life insurance policy? Years ago, the precursor to online dating was the ”personals” column in the newspaper. I found those ads back then were definitely more honest and more amusing. These are from the London Review of Books which began publishing personal ads in October of 1998: —I’ve divorced men better than you. And worn more expensive shoes than these. So don’t think placing this ad is the biggest comedown I’ve ever had to make. Signed, Sensitive —Or this from an obvious insomniac: “ Tired of partners who talk in their sleep? Meet insomniac woman (31) who’s heard it all before. If you sleep like a dog, or currently take lots of medication after

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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

10 p.m., write me and we can both get some rest. —Here’s the affection all men are looking for: Blah, blah, blah. Indifferent woman. Go ahead and write. Like I care. —Or perhaps this one could have been placed by a Lakeside resident: So many men to choose from. So few vitamin supplements. Arthritic f., 73 —I’m not sure where this lady was coming from: To male readers. Drawing little faces on your thumbs, getting them to order meals, and then shouting at them for not being able to pay is no way to win a woman. You know who you are. Men to 40 with working credit cards, reply to once-bitten, twice bitten, three-strikesand-you’re-all-out. —Men, also, are not without their foibles and shortcoming in emblazoned bold print. This is a real “babe magnet”: Grave disappointment all around would like to meet serious mistake in a nightie. —And the honesty: Mid-fifties man. Recently discovered guilt. Can’t wait to try it out. —Or perhaps this model of sensitivity: Unashamed triumphalist male for the past 46 years. Will I bore you? Probably. Do I care? Probably not. —This is a sure fire winner: Not everyone appearing in this column is a deranged, cross-dressing sociopath. Let me know if you find one and I’ll strangle him with my bra. Man, 47. —Here is a rare combination of honesty, pragmatism and realism: Practical, forward-thinking man. 35. List your ten favorite albums. I don’t want to compare notes. I just want to know if there’s anything worth keeping when we finally break up. —And of course, the obvious wannabe writer: Don’t reply to this ad. It’s a fake. Just like the man who placed it. Deny nothing, regret all, but live to fight another day with phenomenologically ashamed, melanindeprived, testosterone-poisoned scion of the patriarchal ruling class system. And they say women are hard to understand… --Tom Eck Tom Eck


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DEJA VU – All Over Again! %\-LP0XLU

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irst they came for . . .” is the opening of a famous statement and provocative poem attributed to Pastor Martin Niemoller (1892 – 1984) about the sloth of German intellectuals following the Nazis’ rise to power and the subsequent purging of their chosen targets, group after group. The content of the groups was allegedly presented differently by him on different occasions – as his awareness of events or changing times dictated. The fact that the group content changed as the occasion dictated is perfectly normal and acceptable given the fact that the essential message of the poem was to demonstrate how permitting a slow but steady disenfranchisement of one

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discrete group after another would lead ultimately to the loss of personal liberty for all. In its most widely known version, the poem reads as follows: First they came for the Jews, And I didn’t speak out because I was not a Jew. Then they came for the communists, And I didn’t speak out because I was not a communist. Then they came for the trade unionists, And I didn’t speak out because I was not a trade unionist. Then they came for me, And there was no one left to speak out for me. Given the current obsessive preoccupation of the quintessential National Security State (aka the United States of America) to hide from public view its many and varied crimes against humanity, against foreign nations and against its own populace, one should be rightly concerned about one’s own potential risk of being ultimately a victim of the ongoing assault against personal freedoms formerly protected by the Bill of Rights, which freedoms have already been seriously abrogated by the trump card known as “National Security.” Thus we have the recent prosecution of Bradley (now Chelsea) Manning and the attempts to cause the extradition and prosecution of Edward Snowden and Julian Assange for publication of classified or secret informa-

tion that discloses the extent of criminal activity by the U.S. Government. These efforts by the U.S. Government are officially and primarily based, inter alia, on alleged violation of provisions of the Espionage Act which prohibit aiding and abetting the enemy. In reality, however, since the Government has been unable to demonstrate any specific instance of any enemy being aided or abetted, we can only conclude that these efforts are based on the need of the military/industrial/government complex to prevent knowledge of its illegal activities from being known to the public. Beyond the above considerations, we should remember that the actions for which Manning has been convicted and sentenced and for which the Government wishes to prosecute Snowden and Assange are actions for which they would have been prosecuted for not, repeat not, performing under the provisions of the Nuremburg Charter. In the hope of generating a little more concern on the part of the U.S. population, we should perhaps rewrite Niemoller’s poem as follows: First they came for the whistle blowers, And I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a whistle blower. Then they came for the journalists, And I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a journalist. Then they came for the publishers, And I didn’t speak out because I wasn’t a publisher. Then they came for me, And there was no one left to speak out for me. Finally, while contemplating the looming loss of all personal liberties in a national security state, it might be wise to remember and ponder the statement by Thomas Jefferson who was a zealous defender of individual liberties versus a tyrannical government: “I would rather have newspapers with no government than a government with no newspapers.”


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0<7:2/29(6 %\-LP5DPER

M

y parents, Sam and Helen, were married at the ages of 18 and 17. They both embraced music, living and often singing, in harmony. Mom sang a great version of Deep Purple and Dad, known as “rubber legs” for his jitterbug moves, loved music. When he returned from World War II, he seemed bent on collecting more records than anyone within range of his booming speakers. About every three weeks, Mom and Dad magically escaped our cramped walk-up for an evening that would have made Houdini proud. On these party nights my sister Pat and I were pointed off to bunk beds where, wide awake, I would lie on my pillow and memorize the lyrics from the records Dad played in our living room till midnight. I knew them all. I began trumpet lessons at the age of 12 and eventually my bleeps and blurps turned into quarter, half, and semi-melodic whole notes. I was soon able to play the songs on my parents’ records “and even more,” as they say in the commercials. A memorable aberration in my positive music experience in school was our orchestra leader, Mrs. Cann, pointing her baton at us defiantly and declaring that all real education, music and otherwise, was coming to an end. Why? Because the Supreme Court had just passed Brown vs. The Board, integrating the public schools. That was not music to our ears. We inner city kids were depending on public education to help us find our future niche. You politically correct types will forgive that we were the Conrad Redskins. I played first trumpet and, if you count prizes, we had the “most bestest band in that land.” Years after high school, in 1985, our alumni band was invited to Dublin, Ireland to play in the St. Patrick’s Day parade. We captured first prize, playing a toe tapping rendition of “The St. Louis Blues” march.

36

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

Afterward, we visited the local pubs where the preferred music was not Irish but Dixieland jazz. We played “When the Saints Come Marchin’ In” for them and led marches of drunken Irishmen around the bar rooms. They loved it! Music: the universal language. My Dad, who had been a drummer in a pick-up band in the Army, formed his own band in the early 1960’s and began taking gigs at parties and clubs around town. Getting paid to party was my idea of the good life and I was soon playing trumpet with the five-piece group. Our sax man smoked pot under a large sheet when he practiced at home. Our bass player hung a rubber chicken from the top of his upright bass, and our piano player was seen one Thanksgiving eve running from the officers’ club kitchen with a fresh cooked turkey. Luckily, seen only by me. I took Dad to New Orleans for his 70th birthday in 1992 and Bourbon Street turned out to be the finest gift I ever gave him. After feasting on Pete Fountain’s clarinet, Al Hirt’s horn and late night meandering through dark alleys, listening to haunting strains of a street clarinetist, we both fell into bed every night near 3 A.M. When Dad died in 2001, we played Dixieland at his funeral and crisp musical notes were engraved on his tombstone. Mom was lowered next to him ten years later, in case they might choose to harmonize again. My wife Linda and I traveled to San Miguel recently with good friends to hear the trumpet of Doc Severinsen, the band leader from the old Johnny Carson Show. At 86 years of age, he was sensational. That performance compelled me today to revisit my lifelong love affair with good music. Jim Rambo


Saw you in the Ojo 37


Sandy Olson

Phone: 331-283-8529 Email: sandyzihua@hotmail.com

PAST EVENTS

:5,7(56$7:25. The tenth annual /DNHVLGH:ULWHUVÂś&RQIHUHQFH, held on February 26-28, was a huge success. Over seventy people attended and heard writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; words of wisdom from the following authors:

the following events: April 4 at 7 pm Orquesta de Camara Cedart Clemente Orozco April 8 at 7 pm Orquesta Tipica de Chapala April 10 at 5 pm Encuentro de Alumnos del Centro Cultural Gonzalez Gallo, con alumnos de La Casa de Cultura de Ixtlahuacan. April 11 at 7 pm Group to be announced. The events are free and everyone is welcome. Please attend to help celebrate this 94th anniversary of the arrival of the train to Chapala. /(7Âś67+,1.$%28762&,$/6(&85,7< /DNHVLGH /LWWOH 7KHDWHUÂśV ÂżQDO SOD\ RI WKH VHDVRQ 6RFLDO 6HFXULW\ will have its ÂżQDOSHUIRUPDQFHRQ)ULGD\$SULO)RUODVWPLQXWHWLFNHWVDUULYHDQKRXUEHIRUHWKH performance. Tickets are 200 pesos.

Cast members left to right are Phyllis Silverman, Pierre Blackburn, Georgette Richmond, Zane Pumiglia, Candace Luciano, and Roger Larson. The director is Phil Shepherd.

The panelists, left to right: John Scherber, Claudia Long, Miranda Hill, and Lawrence Hill Claudia Long, author of the popular novel -RVHÂżQDÂśV6LQ, set in 17th century Mexico (yes, it is a bodice ripper). One of the main characters is Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, who is nowadays depicted on the 200 pesos note. Miranda Hill has created a collection of short stories titled 6OHHSLQJ)XQQ\. -RKQ6FKHUEHU, of San Miguel de Allende, has authored nineteen books. The most recent is ,QWRWKH+HDUWRI0H[LFR([SDWULDWHV)LQG7KHPVHOYHV2IIWKH%HDWHQ3DWK Lawrence Hill held the luncheon group spellbound with the story about his inspiration for 7KH%RRNRI1HJURHV (published as 6RPHERG\.QRZV0\1DPHin the United States). His most recent book is %ORRG The Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Conference Committee members are Harriet Hart, Victoria Schmidt, &DURO %RZPDQ +HUEHUW 3LHNRZ and 6DQG\ Olson. They are still congratulating each other on the success of the event, and are already looking forward to next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conference, which promises to be even more successful. Danza del Sol was the venue for this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conference and was a happy choice for attendees. LIFELINES: AN AMERICAN DREAM Writer Antonio Rambles spoke to an interested group recently at Oasis Cloudâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet the Writers Luncheon.â&#x20AC;? Rambles read from his new book, titled /LIHOLQHV$Q$PHULFDQ'UHDP The generational story is of two families, set against the backdrop of US emergence as a world power, and the rise and fall of industrial America and the labor movement. The Roaring Twenties are still ahead when West Virginia newlyweds and a young farmer from Italy uproot themselves to pursue the American dream. /LIHOLQHV is available digitally on Amazon. FRP+LVÂżUVWERRN/DJXQD7DOHV, is a collection of short stories. It is available on Amazon. Antonio Rambles com as well.

COMING EVENTS NINETY-FOUR YEARS AGO 7KHÂżUVWWUDLQRIÂżFLDOO\DUULYHGDWWKH2OG7UDLQ6WDWLRQLQ&KDSDOD²DQGLWZDVQÂśWROG thenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;ninety-four years ago, on April 8. To celebrate this anniversary the city will host

38

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

Social Security is a play by Andrew Bergman. The play focuses on trendy Manhattan art gallery owners Barbara and David Kahn, whose life is upended when her Mineola housewife sister Trudy deposits their eccentric mother Sophie on the coupleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doorstep while she and her husband Martin head to Buffalo. They intend to rescue their sexually precocious college student daughter from a mĂŠnage a trios with two men. Barbara and David introduce Sophie to suave aging artist Maurice Koenig, who offers to paint her portrait and soon begins to brighten her life in ways she never expected in her twilight years. HOW DOES YOUR GARDEN GROW? Popular local watercolorist -RKQ 0F:LOOLDPV has started a successful veggie gardening class. The next meeting is Wednesday, April 9 at 10 am. The topic will be planting seeds and growing them into strong starter plants. John reports an excellent response and enthusiasm from the gardening group. Contact him at mcwilliamsmx@ gmail.com or by phone at 376-7660620. YOUNG MEXICAN PAINTERS Support a group of independent young Mexican painters by attending a show and reception at Sol Mexicano on April 11 from 4 to 7. Thee artists are from Guadalajara. They are Enrique Avila Gordiano, Miguel &DVWHOODQRV 0DULWD 7HULTXH] and $ORQVR&UX] Alonso Cruz has previously had some excellent examples of beautiIXOO\ FRORUIXO WUHHV Ă&#x20AC;RZHUV DQG ZLOGlife. Miguel Castellanos has sold pieces here at Lakeside. Each El Burro Blanco by Enrique Avila many are unique and individual. Pieces vary in subjects of nature, wildlife, renditions of children in colorful indigenous clothing and fabulously muscular horses. This year he is producing a new series of meditative mandalas. Marita Terriquezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work is a unique realism. Previously she created a series based on the derelict grand houses of Guadalajara. Enrique Gordiano Avila has proven popular with art lovers. He uses oil paint lightly, to delicately capture the Mexican countryside or street scenes. He manages to freeze-frame a slice of life in his paintings. Since the opening reception is on March 11, the same day as the next CaminARTE de Axixic event, the gallery will be open from 10:30 am through 7 pm for extended viewing. Sol Mexicano is located at Colon 13 in Centro Ajijic. Opening times are 10:30- 4:30 Monday through Saturday and Sundays 12-5. Tel. (376) 766-0734. Email: GaleriaSolMexicano@gmail.com.


Saw you in the Ojo 39


Our own Ojo del Lago Editor $OHMDQGUR *UDWWDQ will be the featured speaker at the April Democrats Abroad meeting. He will speak about immigration, his years with the 2MR, his recently republished historical novel, 7KH'DUN6LGHRIWKH'UHDP, and his experiences working as a writer and director in Hollywood. He will also reminisce about a few of the unforgettable charDFWHUV KH NQHZ ZKHQ KH ÂżUVW came to Lakeside many years ago. The event is April 14 at 4 pm at La Bodega Restaurant in Ajijic. 7KHSXEOLFLVLQYLWHG THE PASSION OF CHRIST La PasĂ­on de Cristo, the Passion Play, will be on Good Friday at the Cathedral in Ajijic. The date this year is April 18. The depiction of Jesusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; trail DQG FUXFLÂż[LRQ LV D GUDPDWLF and memorable event. Be sure to arrive prepared to be in the heat and sun for the length of the performance. Seats are at a premium. Bring a folding chair if you have GLIÂżFXOW\VWDQGLQJIRUDORQJSHULRGRIWLPHDQGSHUKDSVDQXPEUHOOD 7$1.$/22.$77+,6ÂŤ Margaret Van Every will read from her new book of poetry +ROGLQJ+DQGVZLWKD 6WUDQJHU on Wednesday, April 23, at the OasisCloud CafĂŠ in Riberas del Pilar. +ROGLQJ+DQGV is a collection of 100 wry tanka* on life and wisdom gleaned from her experience and observation. Âł(YHU\ZRPDQVRPHWLPHKDVVOXQJDOHJ XSLQWRWKHEDVLQDSSOLHGDUD]RUWRWKHVLONHQ KDLUV  DVNHG KHUVHOI ZK\´   Margaret Van Everyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tanka have muscle, are almost always summation, distilled meaning, tightly rendered. 7DQNDD-DSDQHVHSRHPFRQVLVWLQJRI V\OODEOHV LQ  OLQHV ZLWK  V\OODEOHV LQ WKH ÂżUVW DQGWKLUGOLQHVDQGLQWKHRWKHUV 2DVLV &ORXG &DIp hosts â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet the Writers Luncheons.â&#x20AC;? The social hour starts at 11:30, the readings at 12. Lunch follows. For reservations call 765-765-3516 or email: info@oasiscloud. mx /,9,1*'<,1*²'2(6,70$.(6(16(" 7DNLQJ/HDYH, by Nagle Jackson, is a comPhoto by KenĂŠe Campo. edy about life. And living. And dying. And trying to make sense of it all. It runs April 25, 26 and 27. The play is directed by *HRUJHWWH5LFKPRQG A retired English professor in the early stages of Alzhiemersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; disease prepares to take leave from the real world as his three very different daughters argue the pros and FRQVRISODFLQJKLPLQDKRPH7KHFRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWOHDGVWRDQRGGO\FRPLF\HWV\PSDWKHWLF play. In the middle of the night, Eliot Pryne, professor of English Literatureâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;specialty Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;is packing what he thinks is a suitcase and leaving what he thinks is a hotel. In the early stages of Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease, he is â&#x20AC;&#x153;taking leaveâ&#x20AC;? of the real world and imagining a new one, but the transition is painful. His alter-ego, seen RQO\ E\ WKH DXGLHQFH FKDUWV WKLV ÂżQDO voyage speaking as Eliot once did when he was the leading authority on Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s King Lear The visitation of Eliotâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three daughters, Alma, Liz and Cordelia, forms the central event of this oddly comic, yet fully sympathetic play. The decisionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;whether or not to have Father put in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;homeâ&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SURYLGHV WKH FHQWUDO FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFW DPRQJ WKH three very different sisters: the public school counselor, Alma; the TV actress, Liz; and the neâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;er-do-well vagabond, Director Georgette Richmond

40

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

&RUGHOLDZKRDUULYHVLQKHUEODFNOHDWKHUPRWRUF\FOHRXWÂżWIUHVKIURPD\HDULQ3DULV and a history of drug abuse. The e-mail address for future reservations: nakedstagereservations@gmail.com or phone Michelle at 765-6408. Reservations guarantee a seat until 3:50, after which seats will be sold to those waiting without reservations. The Naked Stage is located at #10A Rio Bravo. Directions: west on the carretera from Ajijic, south on Rio Bravo, about two blocks down behind Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Restaurant on the east side. Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is open for lunch and dinner with a no host bar available at SP7KHER[RIÂżFHRSHQVDWDQGWKHVKRZ starts at 4:00 p.m. BRUSH UP ON YOUR SPANISH The Centro Cultural Gonzalez Gallo is presenting ÂżOPVGHGLFDWHGWRWKRXJKWIXOFRQVLGHUDWLRQÂł:KDWLV Mexico?â&#x20AC;?and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who are Mexicans?â&#x20AC;? The movies will be shown at the Old Train Station in Chapala. The DGPLVVLRQLVWZHQW\SHVRV$OOÂżOPVDUHVKRZQDW pm. The last one in the series is on May 2. &RPR $JXD3DUD&KRFRODWH with Alfonso Arau, 1992. It runs 123 minutes $728&+,1*0(02,5$1',7Âś6)5(( %REE\ -RKQV, long-time favorite with the Ajijic Writerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Group, has written a deeply touching memoir called 7KH$GYHQWXUHVRID<RXQJ&RUQLVKPDQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;For years,â&#x20AC;? our Ojo editor says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bobby has been wowing audiences with his stories, and now they are in a marvelous book in stores all over Lakeside--and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s IUHH!â&#x20AC;?

ONGOING EVENTS LIVE (ALMOST) AT THE METROPOLITAN OPERA Viva Musica sponsors bus trips to televised operas in Guadalajara. The coming operas are: Saturday, April 5 Pucciniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s /D%RKHPH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bus leaves at 9.30 a.m. Saturday, May 3 at noon, Mozart, &RVL)DQ7XWWL. Bus leaves 10.30 a,m, Saturday, May 10 at noon, Rossini, /D&HQLFLHQWD. Bus leaves 10.30 a.m. The following webpage gives the starting times and duration of the Metropolitan Operas being shown at the Teatro Diana: http://www.teatrodiana.com/met2013_14/ Contact Marshall at mak1939@gmail.com to reserve. Tickets can be purchased at LCS Thursday and Friday 10-12 250 pesos for members, 350 pesos non-members. Seats are reserved only when tickets are purchased. Buses leave from a point just east of Farmacia Guadalajara on the carretera. 648($.<:+((/5($',1*6 /D 5XHGD WKH ZKHHO  D QHZ FRIIHHJDOOHU\ LQ 6DQ -XDQ &RVDOD VWDJHG WKH ÂżUVW RIDPRQWKO\UHDGLQJVHULHVLQ(QJOLVKZKLFKDUHKHOGRQWKHÂżUVW:HGQHVGD\RIHDFK month.The next event is May 7. Some of the featured readers so far were 3DWULFLD +HPLQJZD\ 0LFKDHO :DUUHQ$JXVWLQ9DVTXH]-XG\'\NVWUD%URZQ0HO*ROGEHUJ5RQ.QLJKWand Doug /DQJOH\ Directions to La Rueda: at the only stop light in San Juan Cosala, turn towards the lake. Go RQHEORFNDQGWXUQULJKWDWWKHSOD]D RQ3RUÂżULR Diaz.) Drive two blocks or so, past Viva Mexico restaurant on your right. Please arrive at 3 pm to order refreshments. The readings begin at 3:30. Writers who want to read, or those needing further information, can contact Judy DykstraBrown at 387 761 0281 or email her at jubob2@ hotmail.com. CAMINARTE DE AXIXIC An DUW ZDON organized by ten galleries in Ajijic started in January. The events will be held every second Friday. All the galleries involved will be open for visitors. Refreshments will be served at each gallery. Pick up a map in your nearest gallery. The next walk will be April 11. Check www.ajijicnews.com for the times. $-,-,&62&,(7<2)7+($576 Members of ASA will show their art works on the third Sunday of the month through April, on the Ajijic Plaza. The next event will be on April 20. AMERICAN LEGION IN CHAPALA Saturdays: 3:30 - 6:30 p.m. Fish Fry Sundays: Burgers & Dogs 12 - 3 p.m.


Saw you in the Ojo 41


+225$<)25%$5%$5$&/,33,1*(5 %\7RG-RQVRQ

H

aving a “star-quality” is not new to Barbara Clippinger-Morison, creator of  LLT’s overwhelmingly popular and brilliantly executed musical, Hooray for Hollywood. In the show, those auditioning learn to sing, dance and sparkle, performing the wonderful music from the Golden Age of Hollywood, and specifically the fabulous songs that never won an award or were even nominated, a clever premise that Barbara developed for the show, based on a specialty song written for Sammy Davis Jr. and Steve Lawrence, Barbara began her dancing career at the age of four when a doctor recommended ballet classes because her ankles were so weak she kept falling down and had difficulty walking.     At age 13 she landed her first professional job dancing in grandstand shows at State Fairs throughout the United States and Canada. A few years later after a summer of dancing at Kansas City’s Starlight Theatre, the choreographer took her aside and said “Honey, you should go to NY…..you could be a working dancer.” Her first audition in NY resulted in her joining the Valerie Camille Dancers, a group of six dancers that performed in clubs, auditoriums, and stadiums all over Europe and South America.   Returning to the Big Apple, she was hired to perform in Golden Boy on Broadway for two years with Sammy Davis Jr.  When the show was about to close, she became a dancing member of the great June Taylor Dancers on “The Jackie Gleason Show.”   NYC was the center of big stuff at that time pumping out weekly the ”Colgate Comedy Hour” and “The Ed Sullivan Show,” TV shows that were fun dance jobs for Barbara. The famous Latin Quarter in NYC nabbed her as the assistant choreographer to Ron Lewis. They also did the choreography for the Dunes and Riviera Hotels in Las Vegas and nightclub acts for Debbie Reynolds and Lisa Minnelli. As a single parent of two wonderful boys, it wasn’t long before she learned

that show business h b i iis nott a very stable t bl career, so Barb earned a Master’s Degree in Psychology and with the growing awareness of domestic violence, spoke to the public, educating lawyers, law enforcement officials, doctors and teachers about  spousal abuse. She developed programs for battered women, runaway kids, and homeless men and women that were used in shelters throughout the United States. Barbara moved to Ajijic, Mexico in 1996 and fell in love with this “wonderful little fishing village.”   She has been the President of LLT and a Board member for seven years. Barbara was also President of CASA (Culinary Art Society of Ajijic) for three years, and was co-writer of the Lakeside Living column for the Ojo del Lago for several months. For a couple of years, she MC’d the Red Cross Fashion Shows as well as sitting on several committees for  Ninos Incapacitados “Dinner/ Auction Fund Raisers.”   Last year, Barbara wrote, produced, and directed A Taste of Tin Pan Alley plus two shows starring her husband Mac Morison, Come Fly with Me and Let’s Do it Again, which donated a total of $100,000 pesos to the Tepehua Community Center and the Ajijic Fire Department. To date she has directed and/or choreographed 19 shows for LLT, beginning with the first big musical ever done at Lakeside The Unsinkable Molly Brown. Starting out as a little girl with weak ankles, she has done remarkably well in overcoming her handicap. So stand up on those “weak” ankles and take a bow, Barbara Clippinger-Morison!  You done good, girl! Tod Jonson

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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014


Saw you in the Ojo 43


CHILD

of the month

%\5LFK3HWHUVHQ

Gerardo M. E.

P

lease meet Gerardo, who lives in Chapala with his parents and a younger brother. Gerardo is 13 years old and a typically active teenager—who also happens to be an excellent student. About 10 years ago Gerardo developed what is called odontogenic myxoma of the maxilla---in other words, a non-invasive tumor in his left upper jaw. These are usually benign tumors and quite rare in people under 20 years of age, but Gerardo’s tumor developed at age 3 and began to cause distortion and distension of his left upper jaw. Perhaps you can tell in the photo that the left side of his face looks “higher” or more swollen that the right. This was due to the invasive nature of a neoplasm (typical in cases of maxillary myxoma) which did, unfortunately, became cancerous. Gerardo’s mother has been diligent in the care of her son, and both she and Gerardo understand very well the nature of his illness. When Gerardo was enrolled with Niños Incapacitados, his mother had a job through which she was eligible for IMSS (Mexico’s National Health Service), but she was responsible for the payment of the yearly premium since she needed to add Gerardo to her policy. Thus, Niños Incapacitados has paid the insurance premium for the family because not paying it would have

44

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

cost us much more every year in payments for Gerardo’s chemotherapy treatments, as well as an operation just this past year to reconstruct the gum. He will have to undergo a couple of other surgeries in the next year or two in order to help align both sides of his mouth. Hopefully these surgeries, too, will be successful and Gerardo can work on improving what is already a beautiful smile. If you would like to meet other children being helped by Niños Incapacitados, please attend our regular monthly meetings on the second Thursday of each month in one of the meeting rooms at the Hotel Real de Chapala in La Floresta. Coffee and cookies at 10:00, meeting at 10:30. Bring a friend. You will learn how you can volunteer in many different ways and how your monetary support helps so much to assist needy families whose children suffer from a chronic and/or debilitating illness or condition.


Saw you in the Ojo 45


Jesus And The Jews %\6KHS/HQFKHN

A

lthough I am not a Christian, I regard my fellow Jew, Jesus Christ, with respect and good will. It was his teachings that were responsible for the spread of the Jewish concept of one God, the code of the Ten Commandments and many other uniquely Jewish ideas throughout a world that worshiped multiple Gods or idols, engaged in human sacrifice and was subject to the tyranny of rulers who were regarded as living gods, answerable to no higher authority. What is most remarkable about this is that Jesus himself sought only to reform Judaism. His words, as reported in the first three Gospels—though written long after his death—reflect a total

46

commitment to Jewish law and philosophy. Basically, Jesus aimed his messages at the Jews of his time. The first chapter of the Gospel by St. Matthew traces his ancestry back to David and Abraham, Old Testament figures. Clearly, this was an effort to seek validation with his co-religionist Jews. The same Gospel quotes the Sermon on the Mount. Now Jesus says “Think not that I am come to destroy the law of the prophets: I am not come to destroy but to fulfill.” Again quoting St. Matthew, we hear Jesus instructing his disciples, saying, “Go not into the way of the Gentiles and into any city of the Samaritans enter ye not. But go rather to the lost sheep of

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

the House of Israel.” He too was bound by the Jewish belief that they were a chosen people, whose God was theirs alone, not to be shared with those not born into the religion—a concept fatally flawed. Had the ancient Hebrews been willing to share their one God, their Code of Ethics, Judaism might well have become the universal religion. Instead, when in about 300 A.D. Christianity offered the non-Jewish world the same relationship of man to God, once claimed exclusively by the Jews, it gained wide acceptance and by 600 A.D. most of the known world had converted to the new religion. It is almost impossible to discover why the Jews of his day rejected Christ’s teachings. None really threatened the basic principles of their religion. There is little record of his existence in either Jewish or Roman secular writings. The Jewish historian, Flavius Josephus, in his “Antiquities of the Jews,” written between 93 and 94 A.D., mentions him only in one short paragraph. He describes Jesus as a wise man, a teacher, a worker of miracles, founder of Christianity and confirms that he was crucified, but offers no explanation as to why, safe to say in previous paragraphs that the Jews of the day were troubled that the Roman Governor, Pontius Pilate, had brought images of Caesar into Jerusalem. This was a violation of Jewish law against setting up idols and as a result of the unrest, many whom he describes as Galilean Jews were crucified for leading the disturbances. Tacitus, a contemporary Roman historian, simply notes Jesus’ name and that he was put to death on the cross. It seems obvious that Jesus had little impact on the Judaism of his day. The explanation offered by modern Jewish scholars is that the Old Testament predicted the coming of a Messiah who would re-establish the Kingdom of David, re-build the Temple and resurrect the dead. What Jesus promised did not fulfill Jewish expectations. A threat to the establishments, both Jewish and Roman, his New Covenant

appealed only to a limited number of a population already engaged in conflict with their Roman rulers. Also, he spoke in parables, at times clear, other times obscure. The first split between the Old and New Religion came in 45 A.D. when Paul, born Saul, challenged the method the Church itself had set up for pagan conversion, i.e., embrace Judaism, then become a Christian; 300 years later it became expedient for Christianity to shift the blame for the Crucifixion from the Romans who they were seeking to convert, to the Jews who had rejected the new religion. This caused the final Jewish-Christian break that Jesus had never visualized and that cannot be blamed on him. It is a mistake to view early Judaism or Christianity as monolithic. There were constant internal battles regarding doctrine and dogma. But in the end the concepts of one God, written Codes of ethics, and the sanctity of life, prevailed. First promulgated in the Old Testament, somewhat modified by Jesus and then transplanted into the New Testament, they have served mankind well. Christians should recognize that their code of ethics originated in Judaism. They have but to read the Gospel by St. Matthew to note that when Jesus was asked, “Which is the great commandment of the Law?” he replied, “Thou shall love the Lord, thy God with all thy heart and with all thy soul and with all thy mind.” Part of a quotation from Deuteronomy, these words are the very essence of Judaism. They are encased in the Mezuzahs that adorn doorways in homes of devout Jews. According to St. Matthew, Christ then said, “The second most important is: thou shall love thy neighbor as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law.” With these two quotations, Jesus handed his followers a blue-print for living. If all other religious tracts and dogma were discarded by both Jew and Gentile, these few words would guide us to a better world. Unfortunately, as Christianity grew by converting a largely illiterate population, the words of Christ himself receded further and further into history. It was impossible for the average man to read either the Old or New Testament. The Christ that emerges to those who do read the New Testament is of a Teacher, born a Jew, living as a Jew, and dying as a Jew. Christians who revile Judaism ignore his message. He preached Brotherly Love, they preach hate. This Easter, let us all take a second look at Jesus. Christians should obey him, Jews should respect him. Shep Lenchek


Saw you in the Ojo 47


BRIDGE BY THE LAKE %\.HQ0DVVRQ

Duplicate bridge players know that garnering 60% of the available match points is usually a very good score and will often win. 65% –70% scores happen with much less frequency and almost guarantee a win. Once in a blue moon a pair will attain slightly higher percentages but in 40 years of playing this game I have never come across a score as high as Alex Chartier and Nick Horbatch achieved at the Lake Chapala Duplicate Bridge Club in Riberas this March. To say they could do no wrong that day would only be a small exaggeration as contract after contract of theirs succeeded while their opponents consistently failed in their efforts. Of the 27 hands they played that day, Alex and Nick had 9 solo tops and 6 ties for tops. Most of their other scores were better than average and helped them to the unbelievable final tally of 81.22%! When I spoke to Alex about this game the next day he maintained that they just played steadily and took advantage of any slips by the opposition. Alex gave me the diagrammed deal where a combination of aggressive bidding and less than stellar defence gave them one of their many tops on the day. North dealt and passed and East, with 12 high card points, also chose to pass. Alex opened the bidding 1 heart, a call that was light even by today’s reduced requirements for third-seat openings but he sensed that the Great Shuffler was smiling benevolently on him, so why not? Even though West held 14 high card points, he felt that his hand was too flat to make a take-out double so he passed and Nick responded 1

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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

spade. East passed and Alex made his second ultra-aggressive call on the hand by rebidding 1 no trump, a call that usually shows a full opening bid! This was quickly followed by three passes and Alex found himself in the precarious position of having to play 1 no trump with a grand total of 14 high card points between his hand and dummy’s. West made the passive lead of the spade 7 which was allowed to run to declarer’s jack. South now played a heart to dummy’s 10 and returned the 9 which was taken by West’s ace. West now switched to the diamond ace on which East played an encouraging 2 (upside down attitude) but when West continued with a low diamond East, unsure as to the location of the king, played the 9 allowing Alex to win in hand with the jack! Alex now ran the four remaining hearts before playing a club to dummy’s club ace. He had actually made an overtrick for a score of 120 on a hand where East-West could have made game! It’s easy to be critical of the defenders at Alex’s and Nick’s table but we have all been in similar situations at one time or another. When both East and West decided to pass throughout they were going to find it very difficult to estimate how many points each other held when defending. But kudos to Alex and Nick for finding the right time and place to take a risk and then coolly reaping the rewards. Questions or comments: email: masson.ken@gmail. com Ken Masson


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FRONT ROW CENTER %\0LFKDHO:DUUHQ Hooray for Hollywood! :ULWWHQDQG'LUHFWHGE\%DUbara Clippinger 0XVLF'LUHFWLRQE\-XG\ +HQGULFN&KRUHRJUDSK\E\ Alexis Hoff

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his is a fun entertainment, based around that there are so many well-known and wonderful songs that never won an Oscar; in fact they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even nominated. Barbara Clippinger has woven a little story around this fact, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Billie Baxterâ&#x20AC;? a young screenwriter trying to make her name in the bright lights of Hollywood. Finally she gets the attention of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mr. Goldmanâ&#x20AC;? who gives her the go-ahead to run auditions and produce a show. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it so far as the story goes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Act 1 is the auditions, and Act 2 is the show which is very entertaining. We get to hear all those popular songs, plus we also see some fascinating old screen clips from the archives of Hollywood. Kat Tetrault gives an accomplished performance as Billie, and Peter Luciano is convincing as Mr. Goldman. Chet Beeswanger plays Mr Goldmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bodyguard â&#x20AC;&#x201C; of course with dark glasses. I enjoyed Graham Miller in a cameo performance as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dannyâ&#x20AC;? who manages the audition, while Judy Hendrick is accomplished on the piano and also demonstrates her beautiful voice. Highlights of this scene were the smooth baritone solo of Mac Morison singing All of Me, and the comic timing of Catherine Huff who makes us laugh as she fails her audition. The second Act is a nostalgia trip through thirty years of Hollywood songs

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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

and dances. The pace and the staging are just great, and the set design and dĂŠcor is very glamorous â&#x20AC;&#x201C; credit to Barbara Clippinger and Beth Cathcart. Space does not permit me to mention all the songs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; here is a brief selection. Patrick DuMouchel performs several song and dance numbers with great energy, notably Singing in the Rain and I Wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Dance (with Alexis Hoff). Wendy Petersen gives us some magic with A Dream is a Wish, followed by Judy Hendrick with Some Day My Prince Will Come. Helena Feldstein sings and dances several romantic golden oldies, and Alexis Hoff demonstrates her skills with Put the Blame on Mame. And I should mention the stage presence of Peggy Lord Chilton, playing an aging screen star who loves to sing and dance. The dance team is terrific, with Alexis Hoff, Heather Hunter and Val Jones performing with infectious energy, in particular during a wonderful Benny Goodman rerun of Sing Sing Sing. Other performers in the ensemble were Don DeCarl, Bob Hendrick, Irma Henson and Norm Whelpdale. The Sound and Film (special credit for the old movie clips) were handled by Karen Lee and Jim Jack. The beautiful costumes were designed by Paulette Coburn, and Sherolyn Gregory and her team of dressers did a great job with all the rapid changes backstage. Altogether it was quite a show, and the audience, most of whom really remember those old movies, left humming and happy. Congratulations to Barbara Clippinger who put the whole thing together, and to Stage Manager Leslie DeCarl and Assistant Stage Manager & Production Assistant Ginger Thacker. Next up is Social Security, a sophisticated comedy by Andrew Bergman, directed by Phil Shepherd. Opening on March 28, this will be the final show of what has been a memorable season. Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hope Season 50 will be as good or even Michael Warren better!


Saw you in the Ojo 51


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ne of my favorite sayings is “A friend will come and bail you out of jail, but a good friend will be sitting there next to you saying “Damn, that was fun!” Cicero says, “Friendship improves happiness, and abates misery, by doubling our joys, and dividing our grief”  There are lots of clichés about friendship, such as “A friend in need is a friend indeed.” Oh, there are many of those. But let’s look beneath the surface and see what it really means to be a friend. A friend is someone who knows all about you and still loves you. When I moved to Mexico one of my friends gave me a little pillow that said “We have to be friends forever; you know too much!” I have always been a “rescue ranger” for my family and my friends. I want to “fix” things, help in any way I can, make things better. And yes, a friend does this, with no thought to repayment or return favors. I have a dear friend who is very, very ill, and has been for some time. She and I met as co-workers when we were in our early 30’s, and I have been there to care for her through several life-threatening surgeries and illnesses. Yet it is she that cheers me up, not vice versa, with her indomitable spirit. I have another dear friend who signs her e-mails with the following quote: “Friends are like the stars; you don’t always see them, but you always know

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they are there.” This is a simple but profound statement. I have many friends that I have known for 30, 40 or even 50 years. In fact I have known my best friend almost 60 years. And yet when I see her or talk to her, it is as though the years melt away and we take up where we left off, be it weeks, months or even years since we were last together. A true friend reaches for your hand, but touches your heart. But it is harder to be a friend when your task is to do nothing – to let your friend make her own decisions and follow whatever path she chooses, even when you think it might be the wrong choice. It is hard to just listen, truly listen, to what another is saying or feeling, rather than assume you understand or that you can “fix” the problem. Sometimes you need to be the friend who is there when someone falls, pick up the pieces and never says “I told you so.” Sometimes we need to be the friend who can share the pain, who can be silent in a moment of despair or confusion, can stay with someone in an hour of bereavement, who can tolerate not knowing, not curing, not healing and face the reality of our powerlessness. That is a friend who cares. Friendship means understanding, not agreement. It means forgiveness, not forgetting. It means the memories last, even if the contact is lost. I have been fortunate to have many people I consider true friends in my life. I have had childhood friends, school friends, co-workers, UU friends, and, of course, my soul mate, who is also my best friend. Each one is different. Each one is unique. And I treasure each and every one of those friendships. Since I was a child, I have loved this line from Winnie the Pooh: “If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day so I never have to live without you.”  My favorite definition of a friend is this one: “A friend is someone who knows your heart’s song, and will sing it back to you when you forget the words.” I am truly blessed to have such friends.


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bout every other week, there’s some kind of excitement around here. Couple of months ago, it was the cowboy’s Christmas celebration. They do it in mid-January so as not to compete with the more conventional, religious Christmas activities. They and all their families get together along the tree-lined bridle path in lower La Floresta. The village priest says mass under the trees, serves communion to a handful of elderly ladies, finishes off his sacramental wine, and goes home. With the religious aspects of the posada completed, the cowboys break open the sacramental tequila. The ladies cook up some traditional holiday fare -- pork skins, kidneys and livers -- all deep fried in a big wash tub full of bubbling lard. I guess you can eat just about anything if it has enough hot sauce slathered on it. While the crowd feasts on this heart smart diet, the kids proceed to break a few piñatas. Not to be outdone, the cowboys proceed to break a few laws. Cockfighting and horse racing are the activities of choice. That’s probably why, at the original Christmas, the angels didn’t bother harking the herald to any cowboys. It’s a little easier to keep the lid on

track is crowded with people having a good time – men drinking, bookies scribbling in notebooks, food vendors peddling mystery treats, charros twirling their lariats, dogs and children chasing each other back and forth across the race track. Dozens of people are standing, not just at the finish line, but on it — literally. It is just a piece of rope lying on the ground. The horses are then trotted down to the far end of the path, where a cowboy has scraped a line in the dirt. There is no starting bell or flag. The jockeys just maneuver

their jittery steeds up to the line as evenly as they can. If they are both satisfied, they nod to each other, whack their horses, and thunder down the track, yelling as loud as they can. Down at the finish line, somebody hears them coming, yells “Look out!” and the Red Sea of spectators parts just in time for the horses to come barreling through, showering everyone with dirt. A winner is declared, bets are settled, and the whole process starts again. Not quite Dodge City, I suppose. But close enough.

shepherds and wise men. If you’ve never seen a cockfight, don’t bother. It is everything you’ve imagined. The horse racing, however, is a hoot. Like so much else in Mexico, these races are unencumbered by formality or safety regulations. This is not Santa Anita. This is Dodge City on a Saturday night. There is no starting gate, no guard rail, no actual race track – just a block-long stretch of dirt path that leads right into the area in which the crowd is partying. There is nothing separating the crowd from the thundering hooves and eternity. Mexicans like their horse racing up-close and personal. The jockeys wear no colorful silks, no jodhpurs, no helmets, no riding boots. In fact, most don’t even wear shoes. The horses aren’t overdressed either. There are no saddles, no stirrups -- just the bridle and reins. This is hell-bentfor-leather racing, but without the leather. Once two owners agree to race their horses, each jockey hops aboard his bareback mount. A friend then straps him to the horse with an ordinary cargo strap cinched over the jockey’s thighs, calves and ankles. Like I said — up close and personal. The end of the block-long race

Saw you in the Ojo 53


MIGUEL MORA—A Muralist for thhe Ages %\5RE0RKU

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n 2013, during a national event in Guanajuato, Miguel Mora was named one of the 10 top muralists in Mexico. Recently, Mora’s new Mural, commissioned by the Instituto Technilogico Superior Chapala, was dedicated, and honored by dignitaries from State and Local governments. Focused on the great achievements of humankind, the mural blends pivotal moments in human history with a powerful statement about how our diverse human origins come together to form a strong and vibrant educational community. A lifelong student of the fine arts, as well as an astute student of the history of Mexico, Mora is considered by the arts community a master Mexican painter and restorer of sacred objects. His stunning painting of La Llorona, (the crying goddess) --- who sheds her tears on the fledgling Inca town, today’s Mexico City, built on a rattlesnake infested island in the middle of Lake Texoco --- is typical of Mora’s daring renditions of Mexican history. His paintings of history recreate specific events. His series, Estampas de la Conquista, takes the viewer through time into a mysterious, idealized, and romanticized world,

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where segments of Mexican history have been recreated. Mora, nationally acclaimed for these works, uses his mature vision, the symbolic nature of events in history events, and his well developed understanding of human history to create fascinating dramas that allow a viewer to enter and dwell in a long-lost world for an hour or two. (see 18 Mora paintings here) https://plus.google.com/photos/111258927866130698336/albums/5988735063705545745 Consistent with the best of the early American painters, many of Mora’s paintings of pre-Columbian history have the stark feel and power of Watson and the Shark, and other works by John Singleton Copley (1738 -1815). Mora’s stoic painting of the Inca founding their independent state on the shores Lake Texoco, which presents the founders as noble and courageous people grasping a future not yet realized, is equal to Edward Percy Morgan’s (1862-1935,) Pilgrims Landing, and The Purchase of Manhattan. Mora’s long career as an artist began with sudden recognition of his unusual talent for bringing history to life. After finishing his arts education, Miguel’s first arts position was as an assistant mural painter for the


National Anthropology Museum in Mexico City. Soon after he began, his boss left on a trip and forgot to leave Mora with a specific task to complete. Mora, for the next 26 hours, without a break, worked on a large original work designed to illustrate a pre-Columbian scene. As he was finishing the work he felt the presence of someone behind him. It was his boss, who was delighted with the quality of Moraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mural. That same day, Mora was appointed as an official mural painter. Miguel Mora over the next ten years painted numerous murals for the highly acclaimed displays of pre-Columbian art that grace the Anthropology Museum. Here at Lakeside, Mora is best known for a series of paintings of the historical events in the development of Chapala, which adorn the El Faro (small round lighthouse) at the end of the pier in Chapala. In Jalisco, he has also been commissioned for major works at the Club de la Uni-

versidad, and the Club de Golf in Guadalajara, restoration planning for the Academia de Artes Plasticas de la Universidad de Guadalajara, and by the city of Chapala for a series of low relief sculptures of the life of Rivera located across from the Cathedral. Commissioned by the national government as a restorer of religious art, Mora has restored artifacts throughout Mexico. On occasion, these precious objects are shipped to Mora and restored in his studio. Mora has made a significant commitment to the restoration and preservation of religious art in national religious shrines, while locally, he has restored works in Santa Elena de la Cruz in Guadalajara, in Templo Senor de la Ascencion in Teuchitlan, the Monumento al Maestro, in Villacorona, and major restorations within the Temple in Chapala. Miguel Mora is a gentle, unassuming man of great talent, who wants to spend the remainder of his life painting murals of historical events and working to restore damaged painting and sculptures from churches throughout Mexico. His dream its to paint a great religious mural in a church of national significance. I suspect that dream will soon be realized. Rob Mohr

Saw you in the Ojo 55


LINDA BUCKTHORP—“A Woman of Valor”* %\(OVD:DVVHUPDQ

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oday Linda lives in the “house of her dreams” overlooking Ajijic Village, her gardens (mostly desert plants to save water), Lake Chapala and the encircling Sierra Madre Mountains. She journeyed, however, over much difficult terrain to finally reach this place. Seeing Linda for the first time at a fund- raising dinner for her beloved school, Jaltepec Centro Educativo, she was mediating between many groups to ensure the success of the dinner. Everything was going well with the students in crisp uniforms serving hors d’oeuvres, volunteers helping at the bar, mu-

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sic from Tim Ruff Welch and a few of his Cantantes. Some diners were being taken on tours of the school while others wandered the grounds way above the carreterra, looking down to Lake Chapala. The students prepared all the food for the dinner as part of their studies. After the dinner, Linda spoke about the success of the fund raising efforts to date. She introduced members of the school administration, the students, and special guests. The respect and admiration from everyone there was palpable. Through Linda’s efforts as both Community Facilitator and President of the Scholarship Foun-

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

dation, more than half of the fifty young women there are able to attend. (See Jaltepec Centro de Educativo-Google Search.) I wondered, “Who is this impressive woman?” So I invited her for an interview, hoping that she would find the time in her schedule since Jaltepec is not her only love. Linda is also a patron of the arts, inviting friends to dramatic performances and concerts of all kinds in Ajijic. She is on the board of directors for Los Cantares del Lago. Linda is the oldest of three daughters from a third generation Chinese-Canadian Family. Linda excelled in school, even joining the Precision Drill Team at her high school. She became famous for her two sword dances. When the time came to think about going to college, her father shrugged her off. He thought that a girl didn’t need college to find a husband and raise a successful family. College was for the sons. So Linda married young and gave birth to two children, a boy and a girl. Here the seeds were planted for her enduring belief that women benefit from having an education. Five years later the marriage was over. Linda had a two and a four year old to care for. At one point she supported her family by becoming an haute couture fashion model. Later Linda became an insurance underwriter and succeeded to the highest level in her field, the Million Dollar Table. She worked in the insurance field for eleven years. Marriage beckoned again. Linda had proven to herself that she could accomplish any goal she chose, so she chose marriage. Her new husband took her to Australia for a two-year management job for him. It lasted sixteen years. These were the golden years of traveling around the world, staying in the finest hotels, and playing the “cor-

porate wife.” Even then Linda had to contend with the “all white” Australian policy in effect until 1977. When the time came to consider retirement, Linda and her husband weighed many possibilities. Ajijic won. Here, they met a couple, Norris and Nancy Price, who introduced them to Jaltepec which was not yet an accredited university. Linda and her husband sponsored two students and she was hooked. Linda is the perfect role model for her students. She fought for and got herself an education the hard way. The Price’s didn’t get to see their dreams for Jaltepec come to fruition. They died a sudden, brutal death. Linda had been such a close friend and collaborator, her grief seemed insurmountable. Then Linda heard Nancy’s voice tell her to carry on the work at Jaltepec. “The girls need your help.” In 2007 Linda met Tim Welch and they became mutual supports while they helped each other with their loves, Jaltepec and Los Cantantes del Lago. Linda’s greatest joy and satisfaction is the progress of Jaltepec. While still a work in progress, so much has been accomplished. She told me, “Education is so important to me. Mexican boys have better opportunities than the girls. But Jaltepec girls know they have resources. Education makes difficult mountains to climb. Meeting each challenge adds to confidence.” Now Linda is still looking ahead. She knows her work is not done. Whatever the challenge, I know that her boundless energy and enthusiasm will rise to meet it. (* A Woman of Valor is the title of a poem with which King Solomon concludes the Book of Proverbs (Proverbs 31). The poem describes the woman of valor as one who is “energetic, righteous, and capable.”) *About.com JUDAISM


Time Is Like A River %\$Q$QRQ\PRXV&RQWULEXWRU

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ime is like a river. You cannot touch the water twice, because the flow that has passed will never pass again. Enjoy every moment of life. As a bagpiper, I play many gigs. Recently I was asked by a funeral director to play at a grave side service for a homeless man. He had no family or friends, so the service was to be at a pauper’s cemetery in the Nova Scotia back country. As I was not familiar with the backwoods, I got lost and, being a typical man, I didn’t stop to ask for directions. I finally arrived an hour late and saw the funeral guy had evidently gone and the hearse was nowhere in sight. There were only the diggers and crew left and they were eating lunch. I felt badly and apologized to the men for being late.

I went to the side of the grave. The vault lid was already in place. I didn’t know what else to do, so I started to play. The workers put down their lunches and began to gather around. I played out my heart and soul for this man with no family and friends. I played like I’ve never played before for this homeless man. And as I played “Amazing Grace,” the workers began to weep. They wept, I wept, we all wept together. When I finished, I packed up my bagpipes and started for my car. Though my head was hung low, my heart was full. As I opened the door to my car, I heard one of the workers say, “I never seen nothing like that before and I’ve been putting in septic tanks for twenty years.” Apparently I’m still lost. I guess it’s a man thing.

Bones betray your perfect skin your grey-green eyes, your secret smile – always beneath the smile behind the eyes always I see the bones. Moments of tenderness moments of hope somehow entangle me, though I know this universe must end, and these soft arms hide only bones. I throw these words down to be consumed – no sonnet will speak my love, only my sweet desire remains while it lives in your eyes and in your bones.

Michael Warren Saw you in the Ojo 57


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ive volcanoes often have craters where rain collects in scalding lakes. When underground heat rises through the water, steam bursts into the sky. As the pressure of gas and hot ejecta builds in the tube, the clouds rise higher. Scientists can guess that an eruption may be imminent by testing the amount of sulfur dioxide in the cloud. Another clue is a foci of earthquakes that close in on the summit. Sometimes a bulge forms near the summit, indicating extreme pressure. There is no sure way of predicting eruptions, but when several signs point to trouble, people are advised to evacuate until the danger passes. Twenty years ago, my husband, John, and I joined a group of tourists on a trail ride halfway up Colima Volcano. Though dormant, morning mist rolled from its summit. The trail was steep and rocky. Our horses were ready to turn back before we were. I would not venture that close today, but more daring climbers will go to the top. When the late Neill James joined a Mexican Explorers’ Club climb into Popocatepetl seventy years ago, that volcano was active, but not quite as dangerously close to eruption as it is today. The party spent two bitterly cold nights and a day within the rim. One by one they climbed down a 225-

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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

foot rope ladder over rotten ice walls into the lower crater. She describes the experience in Dust On My Heart, a book she wrote in Ajijic during the 1940s. “It was like walking about in the throat of a giant. Sulfur fumes and steam hissed from cracks in the lava all about us, and rose from the bottomless lake. It was like a preview of Christianity’s much-publicized Hell. Sulfur fumes smelled like rotten eggs. We fashioned gas masks from bandannas. Many men suffered violent headaches. We made a circuit of the walls of the crater, and then climbed gingerly down to the shore of the lake. Large boulders, weighing tons, tossed up by an eruption, were precariously balanced upon the steep slopes. There was always danger of setting one in motion and liquidating members of the party on a lower level. The bluegreen, bubbling lake surrounded by large, smooth volcanic boulders lacked only palm trees to form a bit of Paradise in Hell. But it was far too hot for swimming. I thought to bathe my feet, which had been encased in heavy boots for thirty-six hours, but could not sustain even a toe in the hot water. We circled the lake, and walked about the bottom of the crater peering into sulfur vents, breathing-holes for the immense power trembling beneath our feet.” From the terrace of our home in Ajijic, I look south across Lake Chapala at cone-shaped Mount Garcia. It’s one of many extinct volcanoes that rose eons ago. The dome on top may be a hardened lava stopper that sealed the tube and ended an eruption. Lower down the slope is another cone, perhaps a later eruption that broke through rubble under the cork. Beyond Garcia, mountain ridges line the horizon. Popocatepetl, Colima and Garcia are part of a chain of mountains, rivers and lakes across the width of Mexico. Oceanic crust, more dense than continental crust, “subducts” beneath the latter, causing earthquakes and volcanoes where the land is thrust up by the tremendous force of moving


plates. Geologists have identified the relatively minor Cocos plate moving north under Mexico, causing a jagged rift. As described in Many Mexicos, by Lesley Byrd Simpson, “That rift, or tectonic seam, extends from Cape Corrientes on the Pacific coast, eastward to Tuxtla San Andres in Vera Cruz, on the Gulf of Mexico. North and south of the seam, huge blocks were up-tilted into what we call the Central Plateau which covers about two thirds of the total area of the country. The seam itself is a chaotic belt of broken land 100 miles wide and 800 miles long. Through -it a magnificent procession of volcanoes

pushed up: Colima, Sanganguey, and Ceboruco, at the Pacific end; the Nevado de Toluca, Ajusco, Popocatepetl, Ixtaccihuati, and Malinche, on the Plateau; and the incomparably beautiful Pico de Orizaba, whose dazzling snowcapped cone rises more than 18,000 feet and may be seen from a hundred miles out in the Gulf of Mexico.” The upheaval did not happen all at once; indeed it is still going on today. Occasional earthquakes and volcanic activity remind us of the restlessness of Mother Earth. We who live with her and love her must learn to understand and respect the pressures she bears.

DEAR PORTIA Advice to the Lovelorn the Overfed and the Deeply Disgruntled

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ortia, Portia! Just hazarding a guess here, but I think you may be the twit who lacks a life! You remember Lucretia?  She’s been the pigment of your infatuation for some time now, and, well, the sad truth is she also was mine.  My name is Louis (Lou) Creesha, a recent arrival here at Lakeside.  In search of a new life, I dared to impersonate your soul sister, only to find you reacting to her with the intensity of a pissed-off pit viper. I had no intention of creating a firestorm! I did review your earlier writing, and now surmise that your response to me (her) was not personal, but rather the fulminations of your everyday angst. What I’m wondering, Portia, is how you managed to become your authentic, acerbic self after your move to this fair Paradise.  I’m just guessing that you had a “real life” elsewhere, and were forced to conform to societal expectations.  You seem to have created a successful niche here, a place to be your fullest, most obnoxious self.   You do it with such style and grace. I’m sure you have many clues for the neubies like me who seek not so much to fit in as to finally make the world fit us.  Before my re-

tirement I spent years in organized crime, working for various government agencies.  I am not lacking in skills and resources; still, I find myself adrift.  I am puzzled as to how you have parlayed your liabilities into assets, and become the go-to-person for all of the community’s deeply troubled expats. Best Regards, Lou Creesha Dear “Lou,” OMG, now there’s two of you— you and who you pretended to be?! I know that Mexico is a friendly and tolerant country but how the hell did they let you across the border?! Aren’t there criminal background checks, not to speak of ascertaining how much time an applicant for admission has spent in various funny farms? As for your claim to have worked in “organized crime working for various government federal agencies,” I can fully understand how half-wits can work in Congress) but I would think that the Mafia have much loftier intellectual criteria. But you’re here, and as I pride myself that I can help even the most terminally helpless of expats, I suppose I’ll have to keep trying until you’re sane enough to be deported.

Saw you in the Ojo 59


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aja, California -Mexico, one of the world’s great travel destinations, is often singled out for violent crime without telling the whole story. While there is sporadic violence along parts of the U.S. border, the majority of Mexico’s key tourism areas are not only safe, but safer than many other popular tourism areas. While the media often portrays Mexico as the most dangerous place on earth, it is statistically quite safe. According to NationMaster.com which uses U.N.-based data, Mexico doesn’t even make the list of the 36 nations with the highest murder rates. Mild-mannered nations like Sweden and Switzerland top Mexico for murders on NationMaster.com. The assault rate in the U.S. is nearly 5 times greater than that of Mexico in the independent Prominix Report adjusted for under-reported crime. Even when we add on independent estimates for unreported homicides, Mexico ranks 21st behind many popular vacation destinations. Places we think of as idyllic Caribbean retreats have double, triple, even quadruple the murder rates of Mexico. Mexico’s famous vacation areas are even safer than the averaged statistics, and even safer still for tourists. Mexico is safer than many cities in the U.S. More than 150,000 Americans safe-

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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

ly visit Mexico every day. And while the media sensationalizes stories of violence In Mexico, Mexico is safer than many major U.S. cities. Travelers feel relatively safe visiting popular U.S. cities like Miami, Philadelphia, Chicago, New Orleans, Washington D.C, or Atlanta. Visitors from around the world enjoy these vibrant cities in relative, reasonable safety. Yet each of these cities is statistically less safe than Mexico. Mexico and politically charged Media Bias In the debate on Immigration reform in the US, the facts on safety in Mexico have become a casualty of politics. To change public opinion and policy, politicians sometimes throw fuel on the fire. If you make up an exciting story about “severed heads in the desert,” it gets a lot of attention and people believe it. The governor of Arizona admitted this story was baseless, but only after months of damage was successfully inflicted to the image of Mexico. Understanding the size and scope of Mexico Mexico is huge, ranking 14th in the world, and spanning over 2,000 miles from end to end. Mexico is a nation of 31 states as diverse as those in the U.S. and is larger than the states from Texas to Maine. Canceling a vacation to Mexico because of isolated border violence would be like canceling a vacation to Orlando because of the Boston Bombings. People didn’t cancel trips to Dallas or New Orleans in the aftermath of mass shootings in Arizona, Colorado or Connecticut, because they simply aren’t related. Yet Dallas and New Orleans are closer to border violence than many of Mexico’s peaceful tourist areas. Mexico City is 4 times safer than Washington D.C. The U.S. State Department in Washington issues warnings about Mexico, yet Washington D.C. is four times more deadly than Mexico City. Washington’s murder rate has been cut almost in half in the last 10 years, but it still averages 24 per 100,000 vs. only 8-9 per 100,000


in Mexico City. How do you suppose the U.S. State department would feel if the Mexican government posted travel warnings for the U.S. capital? Mexico City is a cultural treasure that is larger than New York, London or Paris. In fact, it is about the same size as London and Paris combined. Mexico’s violence not as widespread as it seems After months of sensationalized stories about Mexico’s border violence, USA Today published a story about the media hype. While the story itself became an opportunity to re-tell some sensational tales, it did set the record straight by finally comparing U.S. and Mexican homicide figures, Mexico has very low violent crime rates The U.S. Assault rate is 5 times higher than Mexico’s. Mexico’s violent crime rates for Assault, Kidnapping and Rape are substantially lower than Canada’s and yet the U.S. State Department issues no such warnings for Canada. The rate for Rape in the U.S. is more than double the rate in Mexico. The numbers have been adjusted for unreported crime from the respected 2012 Prominix report and are most accurate statistics available on this subject. Unless you are involved in the drug trade, you are statistically safer in Mexico

than anywhere else in North America. Even though the U.S. murder rate of 4 per 100,000 is lower than Mexico’s, tourists and visitors are statistically safer in Mexico and much less likely to be a victim of violent crime than in the U.S., Canada and many other countries regarded as safe. *Asociacion Mexicana de Asistencia en el Retiro (AMAR) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to encouraging and helping people from outside Mexico to retire in this country. Its mission is based on freedom, trust, well-being, and security for retirees making their future home in Mexico.

Silentium Withdraw, be silent and conceal The dreams you hold and what you feel. Within your soul in stillness let Your inner visions rise and set Like stars at night in their commute: Pay homage to them—and be mute. How can the soul its truth impart? How can another know your heart Or comprehend the path you ply? A thought once uttered is a lie; Disturb the wells and you pollute: Drink deeply of them—and be mute. To live within yourself aspire; Your soul contains a world entire, Where hidden mystic thoughts abound; In noise abroad such thoughts are drowned, And daylight will their force dilute: Attend their singing—and be mute! —Author Unknown—

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The Ojo Crossword

Across 1 Listens 6 Brim 10 Killed 14 Unfasten the pins of 15 Legal claim to property 16 Goddess 17 Water retention 18 Ran away 19 Shower 20 South southeast 21 Mr. Donahue 23 Show 25 Onto 26 Point 27 Brand of pain reliever 30 Sayings by Christ not found in the Gospels 34 Chills 35 Brews 36 Queasy 38 Jewish scripture 39 Long time 40 Spanish-American dance 42 Supersonic transport 43 Terminated 44 __ days(long ago) 45 Jewelry type 48 Contaminated 49 Goddess 50 Parent teacher groups 51 Artful 54 Big party 55 Compass point

62

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

58 Dregs 59 Cain´s brother 6SULQJÀRZHU 63 Canal 64 Object 65 Purr 66 Lairs 67 Seeds 68 Soft drink brand DOWN 1 Colors 2 Tails 3 Fencing sword 4 Gloomy 5 Ornery 6 Mischievous 7 Herb 8 “To the right!” 9 Delights 10 Prawn 11 Slope 12 Little Mermaid´s love 13 Become smaller 22 Term of affection 24 By way of 25 California University 27 Doings 28 Hanging knot 29 Artery 30 With 31 Heredity component 32 Large eastern religion 33 Young boys Rags-toriches author 35 Long time 37 Single 40 FSU chop 41 Swiss mountains 43 Spurn 46 Peanut butter candy maker 47 Propel with oars 48 That (possessive) 50 Hand heels 51 Sliding toy 52 Not there 53 Stable gear 54 Vegetable 55 Uproar 56 Capital of Switzerland 57 Goofs 60 Energy unit 62 Her


THE STORY OF THE THREE EGRETS %\7RQ\%XUWRQ

T

hree related but different species of white herons can often be seen somewhere near water almost anywhere in Western Mexico, including Lake Chapala and other nearby ponds and drainage ditches. They are the great egret, the cattle egret and snowy egret. If all three species are seen side by side, they are very easy to tell apart: the small ones, about 50 centimeters (20”) tall with yellow or orange beaks (red when breeding) and dark feet are cattle egrets. The middle sized ones, of a different shade of white, with dark bills and yellow feet, are snowier. And the largest ones, one metre (40”) tall, yellow-billed with black legs, are great egrets. Cattle egrets nest in colonies, usually near water, with other herons, ibises, cormorants and anhingas. After the male attracts a female, both egrets build the nest from twigs or reeds, depending on the available vegetation. Nests from previous years are sometimes reused. Since other birds may steal their nesting materials, it is common for one bird (usually the male) to gather the nest material while the other acts as builder and security guard. The female lays from two to six eggs, at intervals of two or three days, thus ensuring that there is always a variety of sizes of young in the nest. The youngest chicks are the most likely to be preyed upon by grackles, purple gallinuies, gulls and snakes, or to starve if food is scarce. Both parents share fairly equally in incubation and in bringing food to the young, who begin to fly when about 40-50 days old. Unlike its two cousins, the cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis) is often seen feeding alongside cattle as they graze. Indeed, the “Bubulcus” of its Latin name means “concerning cattle”. While they also eat “solo”, as do most herons, it is their use of cattle as insect beaters that makes them special. Studies of the feeding success of egrets foraging alone, compared with others looking for a meal next to grazing cattle, have shown that those near cattle captured significantly more insects, with far less expenditure of effort (using the number of steps taken as the measure). Analyses of their stom-

ach contents have shown grasshoppers to be their preferred diet. While some authors have suggested that the egrets serve the cattle by deticking them, this has never been proven by the contents of their stomachs! The great egret (Casmerodius albus) and snowy egret (Egretta thula) both prefer an aquatic diet. Great egrets have been reported to eat fishes, frogs, salamanders, snakes, and even tasty crayfish in addition to grasshoppers and mice. Snowy egrets also like shrimp and crab meat. Many snowy egrets feed by using one foot to stir up the mud in the shallow water on the edge of a pool, frightening prospective prey into view, then stabbing them repeatedly with ever- ready beaks. They will also “eat on the run”, dashing through shallow water, wings outstretched, after the next item on their menu. These three close relatives, often seen in large flocks, add a dash of sparkling white to the Mexican landscape. The cattle egret, perhaps more than the other two, has claim to fame as being the earliest “snowbird” in the Chapala area to fall in love with the area’s climate, beauty and people sufficiently to settle here permanently! (Ed. Note: Tony Burton is a naturalist, eco-tourism guide and freelance writer. His book, Western Mexico -A Travelers Treasury, includes details of many of the natural and historical wonders of Western Mexico.)

Saw you in the Ojo 63


The

Lŕľşŕś&#x201E;ŕľž Cŕś ŕľşŕś&#x2030;ŕľşŕś&#x2026;ŕľş Sŕś&#x2C6;ŕľźŕś&#x201A;ŕľžŕś?ŕś&#x2019;

News

www.lakechapalasociety.com

/&6%RDVWV1HZ7LHVZLWK-DOLVFR Governor Jorge Aristoteles Sandoval Diaz and State Attorney General Luis Carlos Najera attended a private luncheon at the Lake Chapala Society accompanied by Chapala Mayor Joaquin Huerta Barrios, Jocotepec Mayor Juan Francisco Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Shea Cuevas, Canadian Consul Francis Uy, and U.S. Consul General Susan Abeyta, Jalisco, along with several other dignitaries. LCS Executive Director Terry Vidal and community liaison Sandra Loridan represented Lakesideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expatriate community. Attorney General Najera presented four new pick-up trucks to the municipalities of Jocotepec and Chapala demonstrating his commitment to turn the tide of crime Lakeside. /&6LVZRUNLQJFORVHO\ZLWKKLVRIÂżFHRQWZRLQLWLDWLYHV 1) The )LVFDOLD*HQHUDOGHO(VWDGR (FGE) the comprehensive criminal justice and public security agency, will collaborate with the Lake Chapala Society to set up weekly sessions with a bilingual lawyer from 0LQLVWHULR3XEOLFR to accept GHQXQFLDV from the foreign community on the LCS grounds. 2) Assist LCS in becoming the clearinghouse for information, coordination and training for the new Lakeside neighborhood watch program. Currently, data received from victims by 0LQLVWHULR3XEOLFR is woefully sparse. In an effort to obtain accurate information, LCS is providing victims a safe place with bi-lingual VXSSRUW %\ UHSRUWLQJ WKH GDWD 6U 1DMDUD FDQ OLJKW D ÂżUH under the local 0LQLVWHULR3XEOLFRRIÂżFHV /&6 ZLOO EHJLQ ZLWK D SURJUDP DLPHG DW ÂżOLQJ UHSRUWV against burglaries, the single most under-reported crime in Lakeside. We look forward to new federal laws that take effect in 2016, which should greatly simplify criminal procedures erasing the old system so troubling to victims of crime.

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/&6&KLOGUHQÂśV$UW3URJUDP Many of our volunteers bring special projects for the children. Recently, our volunteers taught the kids how to make little â&#x20AC;&#x153;froggyâ&#x20AC;? hand puppets out of paper, and to how illustrate their own hand fans. Artist Dan Williams teaches watercolor and maestro Javier Zaragoza teaches oil painting to a small group of students. We are always looking for volunteers for this free program for local kids. Classes are Saturdays from 10 am to noon on the back patio.

64

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

April 2014 Report from the Annual General Meeting (AGM) Outgoing President Howard Feldstien gave his report ending with this inspiring statement: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Architects cannot renovate the magic. Businesses cannot incorporate the magic. Developers cannot innovate the magic. Engineers cannot calculate the magic. Governments cannot legislate the magic. Judges cannot adjudicate the magic. Lawyers cannot litigate the magic. Politicians cannot appropriate the magic. Technicians cannot generate the magic. Only you can make the magic happen. 7KDQN\RXDOOIRUPDNLQJWKHPDJLFKDSSHQDW/&6´ He, of course, was referring to the board and all of LCSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 250+ volunteers. 6HYHUDOLPSRUWDQWLWHPVZHUHUDWLÂżHGDWWKH$QQXDO*HQHUDO Meeting. The Audit and Advisory Committee delivered an opinion letter JLYLQJ/&6DFOHDQÂżQDQFLDOVODWHIRU 7KHERDUGÂśVVHOHFWLRQRIWKHRXWVLGHDXGLWLQJÂżUP6DOOHV6DLQ] *UDQW 7KRUWRQ ZDV UDWLÂżHG WR FRQGXFW RXU  DXGLW 7KLV LV DQ KLVWRULF RFFDVLRQ )RU WKH ÂżUVW WLPH LQ /&6 KLVWRU\ D ZRUOG UHFRJQL]HGDFFRXQWLQJÂżUPZLOOUHYLHZRXUSURFHVVHVDQGSURFHGXUHVDQGJXLGHXVDVZHFRQWLQXHRQWKHSDWKRIÂżUPÂżQDQFLDO responsibility. A membership dues increase was approved that brings single membership dues costs closer to those paid by other categories: 2014 Single membership - $550; double - $950; triple - $1350; quad - $1700. As an incentive to members, the board is offering the purchase of future membership years at the 2013 rate through June 30, 2014. Please consider taking advantage of this opportunity. The LCS reserve fund will receive an addition $50,000 pesos, bringing it to $500,000. The goal is to have one yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operational costs in a reserve fund. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re about 40% there. The adoption of our three-year strategic goals: Â&#x2021; Improve community and member perception of LCS Â&#x2021; Optimize programs to assure continued relevance to LCS members and the Lakeside community Â&#x2021; Re-engineer campus infrastructure to meet current and future needs The following new board members were elected: Ben White, President; Carole Wolff, Secretary; Keith Martin, Director at /DUJH 3HWH 6RGHUPDQ 'LUHFWRU DW /DUJH 7KH 2IÂżFH RI 9LFH President is now vacant, and per the LCS constitution, a vice president will be appointed by the board from one of the current LCS board members. The item petitioned by the members and added to the agenda asking that the AAC be maintained as an independent committee responsible solely to the membership, it was declared out-oforder, and its appeal was rejected by almost everyone present, an overwhelming majority.


7('7DONV/HDUQLQJ6HPLQDUVIRU$SULO

April Activities

TED internet podcast seminars available to LCS members only, take place weekly in the Sala from 12 to 1:15 pm. April 1 Chaired by Fred Harland features Jessica Jackley: â&#x20AC;&#x153; Poverty, Moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and Love.â&#x20AC;? What do you think of people in poverty? -- maybe what Jessica Jackley once did: â&#x20AC;&#x153;theyâ&#x20AC;? need â&#x20AC;&#x153;ourâ&#x20AC;? help, in the form of a few coins in a jar. The cofounder of Kiva.org talks about how her attitude changed â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and how her work with micro loans has brought new power to people who live on a few dollars a day. April 8 Chaired by Ron Mullenaux. Featuring Brian Goldman: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doctors make mistakes. Can we talk about that?â&#x20AC;? Every doctor makes mistakes. But, says physician Brian Goldman, medicineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culture of denial (and shame) keeps doctors from ever talking about those mistakes, or using them to learn and improve. Telling stories from his own long practice, he calls on doctors to start talking about being wrong. April 15 Chaired by Fred Harland features wildlife and land management specialist Allan Savoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quietly powerIXOWDONHQWLWOHGÂł'HFHUWLÂżFDWLRQ,V$)DQF\:RUGIRU/DQG That Is Turning to Desert,â&#x20AC;? Savory claims that about twothirds of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grasslands are turning into desert, accelerating climate change and causing traditional grazing societies to descend into social chaos. He demonstrates how our assumptions about dealing with this have all been wrong, and that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a surprising factor can protect grasslands and even reclaim degraded land that was once desert.

Acupuncture Comes to LCS twice a month beginning April 25 from 9 am to 2 pm. Sign up for a free diagnostic outside the Eye Clinic. Film and Discussion hosted by Arnold Smith in the Sala from 2-4 pm on April 21. Two divergent topics will be presented- â&#x20AC;&#x153;Language Immersion and Chinese Historyâ&#x20AC;?. 0XVLF-DPThursdays from 2-4 pm at the Library Pad outside the Video Library. Anyone with an acoustic instrument is welcome to come and make music. Open Gaming Want to learn new card/table/board games? Want to share favorite games with new players? Join us Mondays at the Gazebo from 1-3:45 pm. 1R JDPHV DUH SURYLGHG Players without games are welcome or you can bring their own: Fluxx, Uno, Monopoly, Mah Jongg, Dominoes, Scrabble, Cribbage, Clue, Pandemic, etc. Open to members only from 1-2 pm. 3OHDVHQRWHRSHQWRWKHSXEOLFIURPSP Please, no â&#x20AC;&#x153;loudâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;partyâ&#x20AC;? games that are likely to distract or disrupt nearby games & gamers. 3DWKZD\V WR ,QQHU 3HDFH Explore the philosophy and metaphysics of the Course in Miracles and related texts on Saturdays from 2 -3:30 pm in the Ken Gosh Pavilion. 3KLORVRSK\ *URXS Discuss issues and articles Wednesdays from 10:45 - 11:45 am at the Gazebo. Members only.

/LIHORQJ/HDUQLQJ1HLOO-DPHV/HFWXUH6HULHV 2QO\RQHOHFWXUHIRU$SULO April 1 2 pm Bob Miller addresses: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Historical Fakes, Frauds, Forgeries and Phonies.â&#x20AC;? How we are bamboozled by fraudulent, faked & forged so-called historical objects and archaeological discoveries later proven to be phony. Some examples are the Donation of Constantine; the Shroud of Turin; the â&#x20AC;&#x153;remainsâ&#x20AC;? of Noah´s ark on Mt. Ararat; the ossuary of James, brother of Jesus, and anything from Eric Von Daniken and his ilk.

Android for Beginners Android for Beginners classes for both tablets and phones will continue for the next three Tuesdays between 9:30 and 11:30 am. You must pre-register to attend. You will also need to obtain the password for the LCS Wi-Fi from WKHRIÂżFH7KHVHUYLFHGHVNFDQQRWUHJLVWHU\RXQRUFDQ you register by phone. To register or obtain more details, send an e-mail with your name and LCS membership number to lcsandroidclasses@gmail.com. Space is limLWHG WR WKH ÂżUVW  PHPEHUV DQG DVVRFLDWHV /DWH UHJLVtrants will be scheduled for the next class. Topics will include connecting to the internet, sending and receiving e-mail, connecting to the Google store and downloading apps, taking and e-mailing photos, setting up folders, basic word processing functions, traveling with your Android device and downloading and reading e-books, music and other media. Participants may also suggest topics theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to cover. Contact lcsandroidclasses@gmail.com for more information.

3UHVLGHQWÂśV/LVW Many people have heard of it but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what it is or how to ÂżQGLW7KH3UHVLGHQWVÂśV/LVWZDVRUJDQL]HGZHOORYHUDGHFDGH ago and maintained by Betty Prentki the entire time. What is it? It is an attempt to list of all of the organizations and clubs at Lakeside including their primary contacts, and mission statements. Betty has graciously turned over responsibility for maintaining and posting the list to LCS. We will be working diligently to keep it updated and posted on our website.

Gardeners Wanted

,I \RX KDYH D IHHO IRU Ă&#x20AC;RZHU SRZHU DQG love gardens, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to have your assistance. We need volunteers to help in our gardens. If you are interested in helping us maintain and improve our gardens, please ÂżOORXWDYROXQWHHUDSSOLFDWLRQRUFRQWDFW 7HUU\9LGDORU$GHOD$OFDUD]LQWKHRIÂżFH for a description of our needs and opportunities. Together we will be able to VKRZRIIWKHÂżQHVWPRVWEHDXWLIXOSXEOLF space in Lakeside.

LCS Spanish Classes The third 2014 term of Warren Hardy Spanish classes at Wilkes Education Center starts in late April. The cost is $650 pesos for eight students or more; prices will increase if fewer students enroll. 7KHUHTXLUHGWH[WLVSHVRVRSWLRQDOĂ&#x20AC;DVKFDUGV SHsos) and DVDs ($430) are also available. Monthly Introduction WR6SDQLVKFODVVHVDUHKHOGLQWKH*D]HERWKHÂżUVW7XHVGD\RI every month and run for three weeks. The cost is $150 pesos, and no materials are required. Check the website for more information.

Saw you in the Ojo 65


APRIL ACTIVITIES

*Open to the Public ** US Citizens (S) Sign in required (C) Membership card required &58=52-$ Cruz Roja Sales Table M-F 10-1 CRIV Monthly Meeting 2nd W 2-5 +($/7+,1685$1&( Blue Angel Insurance F 10:30-1 IMSS & Immigration Services M+T 10-1 Met Life Health Insurance T+TH 11-2 San Javier/ReHealth 1st+3rd TH 10-12 +($/7+ /(*$/6(59,&(6 Acupuncture beginning April 18 F 9-2 Becerra Immigration F 10:30-1 Blood Pressure M+F 10-12 Diabetes Screening (no sign up) 2nd+3rd F 10-12 Hearing Aid Services (S) M+2nd+4th SAT 11-4 Hypnotherapy W 2-5 Information Desk M-SAT 10-2 Loridans Legal T 10-12 Optometrist (S) TH 9-5 Pharmaceutical Consultations 4th M 10-12 Skin Cancer Screening (S) 2nd +4th W 10-12 US Consulate 2nd W 10-12 /&63$7,2 LCS Patio, Bus Trips & Sales Table M-F 10-1 LESSONS Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Art SAT 10-12* Chidrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Reading Program SAT 9-10* Exercise M+W+F 9-10 HH Workshop Demo W 10-12* Intermediate Hatha Yoga T+ TH 2-3:30, SAT 1-2:30 Line Dancing T+TH 10-11:15 LIBRARIES Audio TH 10-12 Book & Video M-SAT 10-2 Library of Congress Books**/ Talking Books TH 10-12 Wilkes M-F 9:30-7, SAT 9:30-1 SOCIAL ACTIVITIES All Things Android M 10-11:30 American History Lectures 3rd M 2-4* Beginners Android Classes T 9:30-11:30 Beginners Digital Camera W 12-1 Beginners iPad Class (S) TH 10-12 Bridge 4 Fun M+W 1-5 &RQYHUVDFLRQHVHQ(VSDxRO M 10-12 Digital Camera Club 2nd & 4th W 10:30-11:50 Discussion Group W 12-1:30 Everyday Mindfulness M 10:30-11:30 )LOP$ÂżFLRQDGRV VWUG7+ )LOP$ÂżFLRQDGRV QGWK/DVW7+ Genealogy Forum Last M 2-4 iStuff Discussion Group F 9:30-10:30 Learning Seminars T 12-1:30 Mac OS 1st Mon 12-1 Mac User Group 3rd W 1-2 Mahjong F 10-1 Needle Pushers T 10-12 Open Gaming (open to the public from 2) M 1-3:45* Pathways to Inner Peace SAT 2-3:30* Philosophy Group W 10:45-11:45 Scrabble M+F 12-2 Tournament Scrabble T 12-2 Windows Discussion Group F 10:30-11:45 6(59,&( 6833257*52836 Gamblers Anonymous W 11-1 Green Group 1st T 3:30-4:30 Lakeside AA M +TH 4-6 Open Circle SUN 10-12:30 SMART Recovery W 2:30-4:30 7,&.(76$/(60)

VIDEO LIBRARY NEW ADDITIONS

1HZIRU$SULO 6HHWKH9LGHR/LEUDU\EXOOHWLQERDUGDQGWKHELQGHUVRQWKHFRXQWHUWRÂżQGÂżOPVRILQWHUHVW The Video Library is going to miss Greg Vogel and Russ and Fran Aldcroft who are headed north at the end of March. Volunteers are needed to take their place. All that we can guarantee is that the chair behind the counter spins, if you want it to, and you can lean back comfortably when time permits. Drop in; ask the volunteer on duty if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a fun place to work, and when WKH\VD\Âł<HVLWLV´ÂżOORXWDYROXQWHHUDSSOLFDWLRQDQGZHÂśOOJHWEDFNWR\RX %OXH-DVPLQH#6484; The Butler #6481; Captain Phillips #6485; Enough Said (check it out) #6470; Cloudburst #6482. Those are the ones youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve have heard of. Here are some that you might not have. Goal, The Dream Begins #6477 Whether you like futbol, or not, this is a good one. Santiagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father, Hernan Munez, smuggled his penniless Mexican family over the US border to seek a better future in L.A. Eldest son 6DQWLDJRMRLQV+HUQDQÂśVJDUGHQLQJÂżUPEXWGUHDPVRIPRUH+LVRSSRUWXQLty arrives when a British ex-pro spots him as an exceptional soccer natural and promises he can arrange a real British talent scout to check him out. The Four Seasons #6473 No car crashes, no foul language, no embarrassing scenes, just a fun movie that, in one way or another, you can identify with. (Oops, a preposition to end a sentence with...oh, well) Three wealthy middle-aged couples take vacations together in spring, summer, autumn and winter. Along the way, we are treated to mid-life, marital, parental and other crises. Carol Burnett Alan Alda Rita Moreno Jack Weston Sandy Dennis Tender Mercies #6487 Robert Duvall at his best. A broken-down, middleaged country singer gets a new wife, reaches out to his long-lost daughter, and tries to put his troubled life back together. The Lost Battalion #6486 Rick Schroeder, looking like a young Henry Fonda, shines as a young man in trouble. In 1918 during World War I, in the Meuse-Argonne sector in France, Major Charles White Whittlesey, a former New York lawyer, is assigned by Gen. Robert Alexander to lead massive suicidal attack against German forces in the Argonne Forest with KLVÂżYHKXQGUHGPDQEDWWDOLRQ All of the new additions for April are reviewed in the green catalogs at the LCS Video Library and on the LCS web page. Oh yeah, and in the Ojo Del Lago, WDPELHQ.

/&63RZHUHGE\H681 Just a reminder, for those of you with photo voltaic solar panels - keep them clean. In a little as three months our solar panels collected enough dirt and dust to diPLQLVKWKHLUHIÂżFLHQF\E\URXJKO\SHUPRQWK Wash them in the early morning or late afternoon because the panels could crack if applying cold water when their collecting power is at its peak!

IT Position Open :H QHHG DQ ,QIRUPDWLRQ WHFKQRORJ\ SHUVRQ WR ÂżOO D YROXQWHHU VWDII SRVLWLRQ7KH TXDOLÂżHG FDQGLGDWH PXVW EH DQ /&6 PHPEHU KDYH H[SHULHQFH in building computers, installing software, trouble-shooting computer and network problems, and building and managing networks. Position requires climbing stairs several times a day. If you are interested, please contact Robert Katz at bobkat1226@gmail.com

Convert Your Tapes to DVD Only $50 pesos each tape. Drop them off in the Video Library.

66

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014


Casi Nuevo News

THURSDAY FILM AFICIONADOS

Our personalized estate sale services are available to people who are changing homes. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to take it with you? Too PDQ\LWHPVWRÂżWDIWHUGRZQVL]LQJ"/HWRXUWHDPRIH[SHUWVVHOO your excess household items quickly and make your moving job easier. We also buy selected items for cash. Our experienced team will price your items and showcase them for quick sales. No item is too small or too expensive. Large consignment items? No problem. We can recommend DORZFRVWTXDOLÂżHGPRYHUWRSLFNXSDQGGHOLYHUFRQVLJQPHQW items to our store. Please contact Jacqueline at 766-1303 or email jacquelinesmith230@gmail.com for further information. :HDUHDQDOOYROXQWHHURUJDQL]DWLRQ3URÂżWVVXSSRUWWKH children in our three charities: LCS Community Education Program, School for Children with Special Needs, and Have Hammer...Will Travel. We are the red store with the corner door across from 7-Eleven in Riberas de la Pilar. Our hours are from 10 am to 3 pm Monday through Saturday. Call 376 106-2121for more information.

/&60HPEHUV2QO\%ULQJ<RXU&DUG $OOÂżOPVVKRZQLQWKH6DOD No food No pets

iPad/iPod/iPhone Classes The next four-class session for LCS members only will start in late March from 10 to 11:45 am in the Sala. To enroll, or for further information, please e-mail Keith Martin at lcsipadclasses@gmail.com. Indicate in the subject line â&#x20AC;&#x153;LCS iPad Classesâ&#x20AC;? to avoid having your message wind up in the spam folder. Please provide your LCS membership number when registering.

6SHQG6XQGD\LQWKH*DUGHQ  Sip wine and sample tequila in the cool, lush gardens of the Lake Chapala Society on Sunday, April 27, 2 - 5 pm. Merchants will have several varieties of wine and tequila for sampling, including some outstanding Mexican wines, along with cheeses and other delicious nibbles all for $75 pesos admission. The wine and tequila vendors will offer discount coupons on bottles and cases. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry about carrying those heavy cases home after the event. Coupons may be redeemed later at La Paz Liquor store, next to Super Lake. Tickets will be available at LCS from April 1st and at the door on the day of the event. Gather your friends, family and neighbors, and spend Sunday afternoon with us in the garden. For more information contact Karen Cage at kcage2@aol.com766-5047.

7KHÂżUVWWKUHHÂżOPVDUHDWULORJ\E\&]HFKGLUHFWRU-DQ6YHUDN 7KHWKHPHLVDJLQJ(DFKÂżOPVWDQGVDORQHVRPLVVLQJRQHPDWters not. The second one won the Academy Award in 1996. April 3 12:30 pm 7KH(OHPHQWDU\6FKRRO 1991 Czechoslovakia Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1945. Some elementary school boys are so mischievous the teacher has to resign. She is replaced by a tough disciplinarian who boasts that he had a major role in the Nazi resistance. April 10 2:00 pm .RO\D 1996 Kolya loses his job as a cellist in the Czech National Orchestra for criticizing the government. He is forced to eke out a living by painting tombstones and performing at funerals. April 17 12:30 pm Empties Prague 2007 A comic love story about a man who refuses to accept that old age is empty of love, meaning, and value to society. April 24 2:00 pm It Should Happen to You 1954 USA Unsuccessful model Gladys Glover believes a jolt of publicity would boost her career. She rents a billboard in mid-town Manhattan. 6WDUV-XG\+ROOLGD\DQGIHDWXUHV-DFN/HPPRQLQKLVÂżOPGHEXW

:HÂśUH$OO,Q7KH6DPH%RDW" Join professional facilitators Karyn Packard and Sybilla Mannsfeldt Friday, April 4, at 12 to 3:30 pm in the Sala for a special seminar to discover (or rediscover) how â&#x20AC;&#x153;temperamentâ&#x20AC;? affects who you are and what you do. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Temperament Indicatorsâ&#x20AC;? will be available at the beginning of the session and is available as a hyperlink on the LCS website if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to take it in advance. Bring your answer sheets with you. Contact: 335-035-7645 or email karyn@seagoer.net. See you there.

Super Shopping in McAllen Again Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re planning another trip to McAllen, TX., May 4 - 8. We need a minimum number of passengers to make the trip a go. Cost will be $7000 pesos for a double room or $8700 pesos for a private room. Included are three days of shopping and three nightsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; accommodations. If you are interested, make a non-refundable deposit of $1000 pesos to reserve your seat. See June on the Cafe Patio.

Bus Trips for April April 9 GaleriasMall $250 pesos. Leaving from the sculpture on the carreterra in La Floresta at 9:30 am.

THE LAKE CHAPALA SOCIETY, A.C. 16 de Septiembre #16-A, Ajijic, Jalisco /&60DLQ2IÂżFH   2IÂżFHLQIRUPDWLRQDQGRWKHUVHUYLFHV0RQGD\Âą6DWXUGD\DPWRSP*URXQGVRSHQXQWLOSP LCS BOARD OF DIRECTORS President - Howard Feldstein (2014); Vice-President - Ben White (2015); Treasurer - Michael Searles (2015); Secretary - John Rider (2014); Directors: Karen Blue (2014); Lois Cugini (2015); Ernest Gabbard (2015); Aurora Michel Galindo (2015); Fred Harland (2015); Cate Howell (2015); Ann D. Houck (2014); Keith Martin (2014); Wallace Mills (2015). Executive Director - Terry Vidal

The LCS Newsletter is published monthly. Deadline for submissions is the 17th of the month preceding publication. News items may be e-mailed to Reba Mayo rebaelizabethhill@yahoo.com; cc to Terry Vidal tqv56431@yahoo.com Note: The editorial staff reserves the right to edit all submissions according to time, space availability and editorial decision.

Saw you in the Ojo 67


68

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014


Saw you in the Ojo 69


EMERGENCY NUMBERS

Service

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DIRECTORY $'9(57,6,1*',5(&725<

Cell: (045) 331-350-6764

(/2-2'(//$*2 Tel. 765-3676 %(672)/$.(&+$3$/$ Cell: 331-296-7566 Pag: 42 /$.(&+$3$/$&/$66,),('6 3DJ

$/&2+2/,&6$121<0286 - ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Tel: 766-5961

Pag: 62

$1,0$/&/,1,&63(76+23 $1,0$/6+(/7(5$& Tel: 765-5544 - CLINICA VETERINARIA SAN ANTONIO Tel: 766-0808 '((¶63(7+27(/ Tel: 762-1646 0$6.27$¶6/$.( Tel: 766-0287 - PET PLACE Cell: 333-1964-150 - PET FOOD AND GROOMING Tel: 766-3062

Pag: 37 Pag: 14 Pag: 65 Pag: 67 Pag: 48 Pag: 67

$57*$//(5,(6+$1'&5$)76 - ANA LUCIA PEWTER Tel: (33) 36 83 27 94 - ART HOUSE Tel: 765-5097 - DIANE PEARL COLECCIONES Tel: 766-5683 - EL PALOMAR Tel: 01 (33) 3635-8089 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - SOL MEXICANO Tel: 766-0734 - ZARAGOZA Tel: 766-0573

Pag: 45 Pag: 75 Pag: 31

Pag: 52

- LINEA PROFESIONAL Tel. 766-2555, Fax. 766-0066 Pag: 60 - MULTISERVICIOS Y LLANTAS DE CHAPALA Cell: 331-457-2204 Pag: 44

%$.(5< Pag: 51

Pag: 67 Pag: 53 Pag: 43

%/,1'6$1'&857$,16 - HUNTER DOUGLAS Tel: 766-0026 48,&.%/,1'6 Tel: 766-3091

Pag: 09 Pag: 53

%22.6725(%22.6 029,1*720(;,&2¶6/$.(&+$3$/$ /LVD/-RUJHQVHQ  3DJ 6$1',%RRNVWRUH Tel: 01 (33) 3121-0863 Pag: 61

%287,48( / CUSTOM SEWING - ARATI Tel: 766-0130 %287,48($-,-,& Cell: 331-773-1000 - CUGINIS OPUS BOUTIQUE Tel/Fax: 766-1790 - FIAGA Tel: 766-1816 - MI MEXICO Tel: 766-0133 2/*$¶6&XVWRP6HZLQJ Tel: 766-1699

- FOLIATTI

Pag: 49 Pag: 03

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%($87< - AFRODITA Tel: 766-6187 - FRESH BEAUTY SALON Tel: 766-4596 - GLORIOSA Tel: 766-3372 - GRECO SALON Cell: 331-113-2772 1(:/22.678',2 Tel: 766-6000 - PANACHE Tel: 766-2228

Pag: 21 Pag: 22 Pag: 24 Pag: 15 Pag: 23 Pag: 46

%(' %5($.)$67 - CASA DE LAS FLORES Tel: 766-5493 - CASA DEL SOL Tel: 766-0050 - CASA TRES LEONES

Pag: 13

- SUPER SENIOR FITNESS Cell: 045 333 458 1980 6.<),71(66 Tel: 766-1379

Pag: 56

- FUMIGA Tel: 766-6057, Cell: (045) 33-1464-6705 - FUMI-TECH Tel: 766-1946

Pag: 45

Pag: 07

Pag: 65

- AUTOMATIC GARAGE DOOR OPENERS Tel: 766-4973 Pag: 32

- CABO DO MUNDO- INTERIOR DESIGN Tel: 766-0026 Pag: 09 - DAMP PROOFING & TREATMENT SPECIALISTS Tel: 766-5360 Pag: 39 - DITO HUBER Cell: (045) 331-519-3094 Pag: 34 - EME ARQUITECTOS Tel: 765-4324 Pag: 10 - EAGLE CO Cell: 333-955-1699 Pag: 30 - MARBLE & GRANITE Tel: 766-1306 Pag: 47 3$-80$ Tel: (33) 1617-7990 Pag: 49 - SPECIALIZED WATERPROOFING SOLUTIONS 2I¿FH   Cell: 045 331 282 5020 Pag: 39 :$5:,&.&216758&7,21 Tel: 765-2224 Pag: 66

- GARDEN CENTER Tel: 765-5973 - L & R WATER GARDENS Tel: 766-4386

Pag: 65

+27(/668,7(6 - ADOBE WALLS INN Tel: 766-1296 - HOTEL DEL PESCADOR Tel: 106-1247 - LA NUEVA POSADA Tel: 766-1444, Fax: 766-2049 48,17$'21-26( Tel: 01-800-700-2223 - VILLAS DEL SOL Tel: 766-1152

Pag: 07 Pag: 23

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,1685$1&( - BLUE ANGEL Tel: 766-0547 - EDGAR CEDEÃ&#x2018;O - MEXICO PROTECT Cell: (045) 33-3106-6982 3$5.(5,1685$1&(6(59,&(6 Cell: (33) 3809-7116 - PROTEXPLAN U.S. Toll Free 1-800-608-5743 Mexico Toll Free 01-800-681-6730 5$&+(/¶6,1685$1&( Tel/Fax: 765-4316 - TIOCORP Tel: 766-3978

Pag: 36 Pag: 20 Pag: 22

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/,*+7,1* 48,&.%/,1'6 Tel: 766-3091

Pag: 53

- REAL ORTEGA & SONS-Hardware for Carpenters Tel: 765-2404, 33-1261-0053 Pag: 60

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- SONORA´S FINE MEAT Tel: 766-5288 721<¶6 Tel: 766-1614

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+$5':$5(6725(6 - FERRETERIA Y TLAPALERIA GALVEZ Tel: 766-0880, Fax: 766-2440 Pag: 74

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- TELARES LOS REYES Tel: 766-5640

/$.(6,'(+($5,1*6(59,&(6 Cell. (045) 33-1511-4088

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*5,//6 - NAPOLEON Tel: 766-6153

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*5$1,7( 0$5%/( - MARBLE & GRANITE Tel: 766-1306

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 765-4444 766-5555

Tel: 766-0920

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- TEMPUR, MATTRESS AND PILLOWS Tel: (52) 333-629-5919, (52) 33 3611-3049 Pag: 31

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- EFFICIENT WEALTH MANAGEMENT Tel: 766-2230

Pag: 16

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- TEPEHUA TREASURES

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- INTERCAM Tel: 766-5978 - MULTIVA Tel: 766-2499

Tel/Fax: 766-2428 Pag: 07 &'6$1'5$$1$<$025$ Tel: 765-3502, Cell: 331-218-6241 Pag: 11 - DENTAL EXPRESS Tel: 106-2080 Pag: 20, 61 - DENTAL HEALTH ONE Tel: 1060-826 Pag: 16 - DENTAL PLASTICA LIFT Tel: 108-0595 Pag: 41 '5$/%(572'212/,9(5$ Tels: 765-4838, 765-4805 Pag: 12 '5$1*(/0('(/(6 Tel: 766-5050 Pag: 22 '5&$5/26&(5'$9$/'e= Tel: 766-0336 Pag: 66 '5)5$1&,6&2&2175(5$6 Tel: 765-5757 Pag: 14 '5$$1*(/,&$$/'$1$/(0$''6 Tel: 765-5364 Pag: 32 +e&725+$52''6 Tel: 765-3193 Pag: 27

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- ROCHATAS Tel: 765-3150

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EMERGENCY HOTLINE $0%8/$1&(&58=52-$ FIRE DEPARTMENT POLICE $MLMLF   Chapala La Floresta

/$.(&+$3$/$&(17(5)2563,5,78$/ LIVING

- CHAPALA MED Tel: 765-7777 Pag: 25, 37 - DERMATOLOGIST Tel: 766-1198, 765-2400 Pag: 44 '(50,.$'HUPDWRORJLF&HQWHU Tel: 766-2500 Pag: 12 - DOCTOR PINTO OPTICAS Tel: 765-7793 Pag: 26 '5$0$57+$5%$//(67(526)5$1&2 Cell: (045) 333-408-0951 Pag: 17 '5)(/,3(0(1'2=$ Tel: 331-109-7737 Pag: 67 '5*$%5,(/'(-9$5(/$5,=2 Tel: 765-6666 Pag: 50 '5-26(+$52)(51$1'(=*HQHUDO 6XUJHU\*DVWURHQWHURORJ\ Tel: 766-5154 Pag: 51 *2/$%/DNH&KDSDOD Tel: 106-0881 Pag: 47 - HOSPITAL ANGELES DEL CARMEN


Tel: (01) 3813-0042 Pag: 06 - ISILAB Tel: 766-1164 Pag: 08 /$.(6,'(0(',&$/*5283 Tel: 766-0395 Pag: 45 - MED INTEGRITY Tel: 766-5154 Pag: 26 - PLASTIC SURGEON-6HUJLR$JXLOD%LPEHOD0' Tel: 108-0595 Pag: 41 3/$67,&685*(5<'U%HQMDPLQ9LOODUDQ Tel: 766-5513, Cell 044-333-105-0402 Pag: 29 - PLASTIC SURGERY & RECONSTRUCTIVE 'U0DQXHO-LPpQH]GHO7RUR Tel: 765-4805 Pag: 31 - PLAZA MONTAÃ&#x2018;A HEALTH & BEAUTY Tel: 766-5513 Pag: 29 5,&$5'2+(5(',$0' Tel: 765-2233 Pag: 52 - VARICOSE VEINS TREATMENT Tel: 765-4805 Pag: 48

029(56 /$.(&+$3$/$029,1* Tel: 766-5008 - STROM-WHITE MOVERS Tel: 766-4049

Pag: 06 Pag: 17

086,&7+($75( '-+2:$5' Tel: 766-3044 Pag: 11 7+(1$.('67$*(5($'(5¶67+($75( Tel: 765-3262 Pag: 08

1856(5< - LAS PALMAS Cell: 33-3170-1776/33-1195-7112 - SAN ANTONIO VIVERO Tel: 766-2191

Pag: 35 Pag: 11

2)),&(6833/,(6 - OFFICELAND Tel: 766-2543

 3(5621$/$66,67$1&( - NEWCOMERS ILSE HOFFMANN ilsecarlota40@gmail.com www.guadalajarachapalatravelguide.com Tel 01(33)3647-3912 Cell 33-3157-2541

3$,17 Pag: 42

3+$50$&,(6 - FARMACIA CRISTINA Tel: 766-1501 - FARMACIA EXPRESS II Tel: 766-0656 )$50$&,$0$6.$5$6 Tel/Fax: 765-5827

5(3$,56 Pag: 73 Pag: 11 Pag: 31 Pag: 64 Pag: 19 Pag: 34, 54 Pag: 03, 21 Pag: 43 Pag: 05

5(17$/63523(57<0$1$*(0(17 &2/':(//%$1.(5&+$3$/$5($/7< Tel: 766-1152, movile: (045) 33-1175-9632 Pag: 60 - FOR RENT Tel: 765-2671 Pag: 62 - FOR RENT Pag: 63 Tel: 3615-9356 - GETAWAY TO PUERTO VALLARTA Tel: (322) 223-1340 Pag: 52 -25*(7255(6 Tel: 766-3737 Pag: 36 - MANZANILLO VACATION RENTALS Tel: (314) 100-6773 or (314) 109-0657 Pag: 30 - RENTAL LOCATERS Tel: 766-5202 Pag: 57 - ROMA Tel: 766-3163 Pag: 51 - SANTANA RENTALS Cell: 315-104-3283, Pag: 64 - VILLAS DEL SOL Tel: 766-1152 Pag: 64

5(67$85$176&$)(6 Pag: 30

- SHERWIN WILLIAMS Tel: 766-1855

- FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 766-2891 - GEORGETTE RICHMOND Tel: 766-2077 /25(1$&%$55$*$1 Cell: (045) 331-014-5683 - MPR REAL ESTATE Tel: (315) 351-5167 12e/23(= Cell: 331-047-9607 3(7(567-2+1 Tel: 765-3676 - RAUL GONZALEZ Cell: 33-1437-0925 - SANDI ALLIN BRISCOE Tel: 331-451-6431 - VISTA ALEGRE Tel: 766-4867

Pag: 67 Pag: 64 Pag: 58

322/0$,17(1$1&( - EQUIPMENT AND POOL MAINTENANCE Tel: 766-1617 Pag: 56

5($/(67$7( $-,-,&+20(,163(&7,216 Tel: 766-2836 Pag: 25 - ALL IN ONE REAL ESTATE SERVICE Tel: 766-1161 Pag: 15 - ALMA NIEMBRO Cell: 331-212-9553 Pag: 25 - ARGOS RENDON Cell: 331-228-8795 Pag: 56 %(9 -($1&2)(// +RPH2I¿FH Pag: 48 - BUTCH HARBIN Cell: 33-3107-8748 Pag: 54 - CIELOVISTA Tel: 766-4867 Pag: 05 - CHULA VISTA NORTE Tel: 766-2177 Cell: (045) 33-3841-8867 Pag: 17 &2/':(//%$1.(5&+$3$/$5($/7< Tel: 766-1152, 766-3369 Fax: 766-2124, Tels: 765-2877 Fax: 765-3528 Pag: 76 - COLLINS REAL ESTATE Tel: 766-4197 Pag: 43 - CONTINENTAL REALTY Tel: 766-1994 Pag: 53 - CUMBRES Tel: 766-4867 Pag: 05 '(5(.75(9(7+$1 Cell: 333-100-2660 Pag: 25 - FOR SALE BY OWNER Tel: 766-3201 Pag: 52

$-,-,&7$1*2 Tel: 766-2458 - AZUL FRIDA Tel: 766-3437 %5812¶6 Tel: 766-1674 &$)e$'(/,7$ Tel: 766-0097 - CASA FUERTE Tels: 3639-6474 / 81 - GO LE CLUB Cell: (045) 33-3502-6555 - HACIENDA DE DON PEDRO Tel: 766-4906 - HOSTERIA DEL ARTE Tel: 331-410-1707 -$60,1(¶6&ODVVLF,QGLD Tel: 766-2636 -$5',1'(1,1(77( Tel: 766-4905 - LA CASA DEL WAFFLE Tel: 766-1946 - LA GOURMANDISE Cell: 331-518-9082 - LA NUEVA POSADA Tel: 766-1444, 766-2049 ³/$7$9(51$´'(,48$7752025, Tel: 766-2848 - LOS MOLLETES Tel: 766-4296 - LOS TELARES Tel: 766-0428 - MANIX Tel: 766-0061 - MAQUINA 245 0(/¶6 Cell. 331-402-4223 020¶6'(/, 5(67$85$17 Tel: 765-5719 - NUMBER FOUR Tel: 766-1360 3(55<¶6),6+ &+,36 Tel: 766-2841 - PIZZERIA TOSCANA Tel: 765-6996 - SIMPLY THAI Tel: 766-5665 - SPANISH PAELLA Tel: 766-2225 7$%$5.$ Tel: 766-1588 7+(3($&2&.*$5'(1 Tel: 766-1381 721<¶6 Tel: 766-1614, 766-4069 7523,&$/-8,&(6 Tel: 106-2182 - YVES Tel: 766-3565

7(0386:DWFK&ORFNV Tel: 765-5190

Pag: 28

5(7,5(0(175(671856,1*+20(6 - EL PARAISO Tel: 766-2365 - LA CASA NOSTRA Tel: 765-3824 - LA VALENTINA Tel: 766-5179 - MI CASITA - Nursing Home Tel: 106-2081 - THE BLUE HOUSE Tel: 766-1695

Pag: 41 Pag: 13

67$,1('*/$66 Pag: 03 Pag: 21 Pag: 51 Pag: 52

- AIMAR - Stained Glass Cell: 331-741-3515

Pag: 55

7$;, - ARTURO FERNANDEZ - Taxi Cell: (045) 333-954-3813

Pag: 65

7+(5$3,676

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/(6/,('67521*3K',QGLYLGXD0DULWDO  )DPLO\7KHUDSLVW Tel: 766-5374 Pag: 35

Pag: 11

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6&+22/ - INSTITUTO INTERNACIONAL Tel: 688-0004 - INSTITUTO TERRANOVA Tel: 766 2401, 766 3999

Pag: 44

Pag: 65

6$7(//,7(679 - SHAW SATELLITE SERVICES Tel: 33-1402-4223 $-,-,&(/(&7521,&66$'(&9 Tel/Fax: 766-1117, 766-3371

- RESPIRO SPA Tel: (045) 33 3157 7790 - TAHAWI Tel: 106-2182 - TOTAL BODY CARE Tel: 766-3379

Pag: 39 Pag: 35

6(/)6725$*( - SELF STORAGE-BODEGAS CHAPALA Tel: 766-0661, Tel/Fax: 766-1045 Pag: 28

62&,$/25*$1,=$7,216 /$.(&+$3$/$62&,(7< Tel: 766-1140 Pag: 64-67 /261,f26'(&+$3$/$<$-,-,& Tel: 765-7032 Pag: 68

- CHARTER CLUB TOURS Tel: 766-1777 &+$3$/$/$.($'9(1785( Tel: 01-800-410-3234 - LYDIAS TOUR Tel: 33-1026-4877 7285*8,'(&DUORV$QGUDGH/ Cell. 333-4000-838

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75((6(59,&( - CHAPALA TREE SERVICE Tel: 762-0602 Pag: 64 /$.(6,'(75((6(59,&(6 /$1'6&$,1* Tel: 766-5360 Pag: 39

62/$5(1(5*< Pag: 62 Pag: 46 Pag: 49 Pag: 22 Pag: 17 Pag: 23 Pag: 14 Pag: 45

- ESUN Tel: 766-2319 - ERA Tel: 01-800-841-0139

Pag: 19 Pag: 27

63$0$66$*( - HYDROPOOL Tel: 766-4030 - LA BELLA VIDA Tel: 766-5131 - MARIALE Tel: 766-4229

Pag: 55 Pag: 51 Pag: 61

Saw you in the Ojo

Pag: 18 Pag: 13 Pag: 19 Pag: 57 Pag: 03

The Ojo Crossword

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Saw you in the Ojo 71


CARS FOR SALE: 2013 Honda Fit Mexican Plates, ŝƌ ŽŶĚŝƟŽŶĞƌ͘ Dͬ&D ^ƚĞƌĞŽ͘ ƵƚŽŵĂƟĐ dƌĂŶƐŵŝƐƐŝŽŶ͘  WůĂLJĞƌ͘ WŽǁĞƌ tŝŶĚŽǁƐ͘ WŽǁĞƌ^ƚĞĞƌŝŶŐ͘WŽǁĞƌ>ŽĐŬƐ͘^ĞĐƵƌŝƚLJ^LJƐƚĞŵ͘ WůĞĂƐĞĞŵĂŝůĨŽƌƉŚŽƚŽƐĂŶĚƉƌŝĐĞŝĨŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚĞĚ͘ FOR SALE:džĐĞůůĞŶƚ,ŽŶĚĂĂƌ͘KŶĞŽǁŶĞƌ͕ ŶĞǀĞƌ ŝŶ ĂĐĐŝĚĞŶƚ͕ Ăŝƌ ďĂŐƐ͕ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ ĨƵĞů ĚŽŽƌ͕ Ɵůƚ ƐƚĞĞƌŝŶŐ͕ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ ƚƌƵŶŬ ůŝĚ͕ ǀĂŶŝƚLJ ŵŝƌƌŽƌƐ͕ ƚƌŝƉ ŽĚŽŵĞƚĞƌ͕ ŝŶƚĞƌǀĂů ǁŝƉĞƌƐ͘ sĂůŝĚ h^ ƉůĂƚĞƐ ĂŶĚ ƉĞƌĨĞĐƚ ĨŽƌ ĂŶLJŽŶĞ ƌĞƚƵƌŶŝŶŐ ŶŽƌƚŚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϰϵϱϬh^͘ FOR SALE: DŽƚŽ/ƚĂůŝŬĂdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ ϯ͕ϬϬϬŵŝůĞƐ͕ĐŽůŽƌďůƵĞ͕ĂƵƚŽƚƌĂŶƐŵŝƐƐŝŽŶ͕ϮϬϭϭ ŵŽĚĞů͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϮ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϲϵϰ͘ FOR SALE: &ŽƌĚdžƉůŽƌĞƌ>ŝŵŝƚĞĚŵŽĚĞůLJĞĂƌ ϮϬϬϬ ZƵŶƐ ůŝŬĞ ŶĞǁ ĂŶĚ ůŽƐĞƐ ŶŽ Žŝů͘ ϭϰϴ͕ϬϬϬ ŵŝůĞƐ͘ϰǁŚĞĞůĚƌŝǀĞ͘&ĂĐƚŽƌLJŵĂŶƵĂů͘DĞdžŝĐĂŶ ƉůĂƚĞƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϰϴ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϲϵϰ͘ FOR SALE: DĂnjĚĂ WŝĐŬƵƉ͘ EŝĐĞ ůŝƩůĞ ƚƌƵĐŬ͕ 'ĂƐ ^ĂǀĞƌ͕ 'ŽŽĚ ďŽĚLJ Θ ƉĂŝŶƚ͕ EĞǁ ďƌĂŬĞƐ͕ ŶĞǁďĂƩĞƌLJ͕ĐĞŶƚĞƌůŝŶĞǁŚĞĞůƐ͕ƟŶƚĞĚǁŝŶĚŽǁƐ Dͬ&D͘ĞĚůŝŶĞƌΘƚŽŽůďŽdž͕ďĂůůŚŝƚĐŚ͕ŚĂƐ ƐŵĂůůƐĞĂƟŶŐďĞŚŝŶĚŵĂŝŶƐĞĂƚƐŽƌĨŽƌƐƚŽƌĂŐĞ͘ DĞdžŝĐĂŶWůĂƚĞĚϮϬϭϰ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϯϵ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů >ĞŽĂƚϯϯϭͲϴϬϮͲϳϮϳϮ͘ SELL OR TRADE:'K'ŽůĨĂƌƚΘĐŚĂƌŐĞƌ͕ ŐŽŽĚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘&ŽƌstďƵŐŽƌǀĂŶ͕ƐŵĂůůƉŝĐŬ ƵƉ Žƌ dƌĂĐŬĞƌ Žƌ ũĞĞƉ͘ ^ĂůĞ ƉƌŝĐĞ ΨϭϳϬϬ͘ϬϬh^͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϳϭϴϮĂŌĞƌϲWD͘ FOR SALE: ϮϬϬϭ ŽĚŐĞ ƵƌĂŶŐŽ ϰdžϰ ^>d͘ &ƵůůLJ >ŽĂĚĞĚ͕ ǁŚŝƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ƚĂŶ ůĞĂƚŚĞƌ ŝŶƚĞƌŝŽƌ͘ ϳϯ͕ϬϬϬ ŵŝůĞƐ͘ DĞdžŝĐĂŶ WůĂƚĞĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϲϱ͕ϬϬϬƉ &ŝƌŵ͘ FOR SALE: dƌĂŝůĞƌͲZĞŵŽůƋƵĞ͘ sĞƌLJ ŐŽŽĚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ ĞŶĐůŽƐĞĚ ϱdžϴ ĂƌŐŽ <ŝŶŐ ƚƌĂŝůĞƌ͕ ƚĂŝů ĂŶĚ ƐŝŐŶĂů ůŝŐŚƚƐ ǁŽƌŬ͕ ĐůĞĂŶ ŝŶƚĞƌŝŽƌ ǁŝƚŚ ůŝͲ ŶŽůĞƵŵŽŶŇŽŽƌ͕ƟƌĞƐŚĂǀĞŽŶůLJϲϬϬϬŵŝůĞƐŽŶ ƚŚĞŵ͘WĂƉĞƌƐŝŶŽƌĚĞƌ͘,ŝƚĐŚůŽĐŬϱϬϬƉĂŶĚƌĞĂƌ ĚŽŽƌůŽĐŬϯϬϬƉĂůƐŽĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞ͘^ĞĞŶĞdžƚƚŽĂĨĠ DĂŐĂŶĂ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ϭϵ͕ϬϬϬŵdžƉ͘Ăůů͗ϯϯϭͲϯϴϴͲϴϵϮϬ͘ WANTED: Have Honda Civic 2002 to trade, tĂŶƚƚŽƵƉŐƌĂĚĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϲϬ͕ϬϬϬ FOR SALE͗tŚŝƚĞsĂŶ͘ Jalisco Plated, 2004, ϭƚŽŶ͘Ăůů͗ϯϯϯͲϭϴϱͲϴϬϮϲ FOR SALE:DĞƌĐƵƌLJsŝůůĂŐĞƌ'^͘KŶĞŽǁŶĞƌ ϳƉĂƐƐĞŶŐĞƌǀĂŶ͕ĐůĞĂŶŶŽŶƐŵŽŬĞƌ͘sĞƌLJŐŽŽĚ ƌƵŶŶŝŶŐĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶͬ͘͘h͘^͘ƉůĂƚĞĚĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĨŽƌ ƐŽŵĞŽŶĞƌĞƚƵƌŶŝŶŐƚŽƚŚĞh͘^͘ŽƌĂŶĂĚĂ͘dŚŝƐ ǀĞŚŝĐůĞ ŝƐ ƚŚĞ ƐĂŵĞ ĂƐ Ă EŝƐƐĂŶ YƵĞƐƚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϯ͕ϵϳϱ͘ϬϬŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϲϵϭ͘ FOR SALE: WŝŵƉ LJŽƵƌ ƌŝĚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ƚŚĞƐĞ ǁĂLJ ĐŽŽůƐŝůǀĞƌƌƵŶŶŝŶŐďŽĂƌĚƐĨŽƌϮϬϭϮ,ŽŶĚĂZs͘ ΨϭϱϬ h^ Žƌ ďĞƐƚ ŽīĞƌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϭϱϬh^ ŽďŽ͘ WŚŽŶĞϳϲϲͲϯϱϴϳ͘ FOR SALE: DĞdžŝĐŽ н ĂŶĂĚĂ ƉůĂƚĞĚ dŽƉͲ ŽĨͲƚŚĞͲůŝŶĞ ĐůŽƐĞĚ ĐĂƌŐŽ ƚƌĂŝůĞƌͬƌĞŵŽůƋƵĞ͘ >ŝŬĞ ŶĞǁ͕ ƵƐĞĚ ŽŶĐĞ ŝŶ ĞĐĞŵďĞƌ ƚŽ ĐŽŵĞ ĨƌŽŵ ĂŶĂĚĂ͘ ƵƐƚŽŵ ϳ Ō͘ ;ϴϬ ŝŶĐŚ ŝŶƚĞƌŝŽƌͿ ŚĞŝŐŚƚ͕ ƐůĂŶƚͬǁĞĚŐĞĨƌŽŶƚ͕ŚĞĂǀLJĚƵƚLJƌĂŵƉƌĞĂƌĚŽŽƌн ƐŝĚĞĚŽŽƌ͕ƚŽƉͲŽĨƚŚĞůŝŶĞǀĞŶƟŶŐ͕ϭϮǀƐǁŝƚĐŚĞĚ ŝŶƚĞƌŝŽƌ ůŝŐŚƚ ĂŶĚ ƐŬLJůŝŐŚƚͬǀĞŶƚ͘ ŚĞĂǀLJ ĚƵƚLJ Ͳ ƚƌĂĐŬ ĨŽƌ ƐĞĐƵƌŝŶŐ ůŽĂĚƐ͕ ƌĂƚĐŚĞƟŶŐ ĐĂƌŐŽ ďĂƌ͕ ƐƉĂƌĞ ǁŚĞĞů ĂŶĚ ƟƌĞ͕ ĨƵůů ϭϱ ŝŶĐŚ ƚƌĂŝůĞƌ ƟƌĞƐ͕ ϮϬϬϬůď ůŽĂĚ ĐĂƉĂĐŝƚLJ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϯ͕ϬϬϬ h^͘ Ăůů͗ ũŝũŝĐϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϭϭϳϱŽƌĨƌĂŶnjŬϯϵΛLJĂŚŽŽ͘ĐŽŵ͘ FOR SALE: DĞƚĂůůŝĐ ŐƌĞĞŶ ϲ͛ϲ͟ ƐƚĂŶĚĂƌĚ ƚƌƵĐŬ ĐĂƉ ĨŽƌ 'D ƚƌƵĐŬ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚ ϮϬϬϳ͘ džĐĞůͲ ůĞŶƚ ƐŚĂƉĞ͕ ůŽĐŬĂďůĞ ǁŝƚŚ ĐůĂŵƉƐ͘ ƌĞĂĚLJ ƚŽ ŝŶͲ ƐƚĂůůĂŶĚƵƐĞ͘ͲŵĂŝůŽƌƉŚŽŶĞϳϲϲͲϯϴϴϱ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϳ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ϮϬϬϱ ĨŽƌĚ ĨƵůůLJ ůŽĂĚĞĚ͘ ŵƵƐƚ ƐĞůůďĞĐĂƵƐĞ/ĂŵŐŽŝŶŐWĞƌŵĂŶĞŶƚĞ͘sĞƌLJŐŽŽĚ

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ŵĞĐŚŝĐĂŶŝĐĂů ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ EĞĞĚƐ ďŽĚLJ ǁŽƌŬ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϯϬ͕ϬϬϬ Ɖ͘ ŐƌĞĂƚ ƚŽǁŶ ĐĂƌ ĐĂůů ũŽŚŶ Ăƚ ϳϲϱͲϮϳϮϲ Žƌ ĞŵĂŝů ũƉŵϯϲĐŚĂƉĂůĂΛŚŽƚŵĂŝů͘ ĐŽŵdĞdžĂƐƉůĂƚĞĚ͘

COMPUTERS FOR SALE: ĐĞƌ ƐƉŝƌĞ KŶĞ t/EKt^ ϳ͘ ŽŶƚĂĐƚ ŵĞ ĨŽƌ ŵŽƌĞ ŝŶĨŽ͘ Ϯϴϰ ' , ůƵĞ ĐŽǀĞƌ͘͘͘ůŝŐŚƚůLJ ƵƐĞĚ͘͘͘ D&' ŝŶ ϮϬϭϮ͘ ŵĂŝů ŵĞ ĨŽƌ ƉŝĐƚƵƌĞ͘ ,ƵƌƌLJ / ůĞĂǀĞ ƐŽŽŶ͘ ŽĞƐ ĐŽŶǀĞƌƚ ƚŽ ^ƉĂŶŝƐŚ ůĂŶŐƵĂŐĞ͘ ΨϭϱϬ ŝŶ ĚŽůůĂƌƐ Žƌ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Trade? FOR SALE: dǁŝĐĞͲƵƐĞĚĂŶŽŶƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͘ŽĞƐ ĞǀĞƌLJƚŚŝŶŐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲ Ϯϳϯϰ͘ FOR SALE: h^DĞŵŽƌLJ^ƟĐŬ&ůĂƐŚƌŝǀĞƐ͗ ϭ';ϭϬϬWĞƐŽƐͿ͖ϰ';ϭϱϬWĞƐŽƐͿ͖ϯϮ';ϯϮϬWĞͲ ƐŽƐͿ͘ ŽŶƚĂĐƚ ŵĞ Ăƚ ĞƌŶƐƚͺŐƌĂĨΛLJĂŚŽŽ͘ĐŽŵ Žƌ ĐĂůůŵĞĂƚϳϲϲͲϯϮϭϬ͘ FOR SALE: ,W ϯϬϱϬ ůůͲŝŶͲKŶĞ WƌŝŶƚĞƌ͘ tŝƌĞůĞƐƐůLJ WƌŝŶƚ͕ ƐĐĂŶ͕ ĂŶĚ ĐŽƉLJ ĚŽĐƵŵĞŶƚƐ͕ tĞď ƉĂŐĞƐ ĂŶĚ ŚŽŵĞǁŽƌŬ͘ &ĂƐƚ ĂŶĚ ĚĞƉĞŶĚͲ ĂďůĞ ƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞ͘ ůĂĐŬ ĂŶĚ ĐŽůŽƌ ĐĂƌƚƌŝĚŐĞƐ ĂƌĞŝŶĐůƵĚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϳϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘ŽŶƚĂĐƚŵĞĂƚ ĞƌŶƐƚͺŐƌĂĨΛLJĂŚŽŽ͘ĐŽŵŽƌĐĂůůŵĞĂƚϳϲϲͲϯϮϭϬ͘ FOR SALE: ŝWĂĚ ŝƌ͕ ŶĞǁĞƐƚ ŵŽĚĞů͘ tŝͲ&ŝ ŽŶůLJ;ŝ͘Ğ͘ŶŽϯ'Ϳ͕ƚŚĞƉƌŝĐĞŝŶĐůƵĚĞƐďůƵĞƉƉůĞ ^ŵĂƌƚ ŽǀĞƌ ĂŶĚ ƉƉůĞ ĂƌĞ ĞdžƚĞŶĚĞĚ ǁĂƌͲ ƌĂŶƚLJ͘ WƌŝĐĞ ŝƐ ΨϳϬϬ h͘^͘ Žƌ ƉĞƐŽ ĞƋƵŝǀĂůĞŶƚ͕ Įƌŵ͘ &Žƌ ĐŽŵƉĂƌŝƐŽŶ͛Ɛ ƐĂŬĞ͕ ƚŚĞ ƐĂŵĞ ŵŽĚĞů͕ ŶĞǁ͕Ăƚ>ŝǀĞƌƉŽŽů͕ŝƐϭϬ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐŽƌΨϴϬϬh͘^͘ ǁŝƚŚŽƵƚ ƚŚĞ ĐŽǀĞƌ ĂŶĚ ƉƉůĞ ĂƌĞ͕ ǁŚŝĐŚ ĐŽƐƚ ΨϭϰϬ͘WůĞĂƐĞĞŵĂŝůŵĞĂƚĞŬŬŶŽdž;ĂƚͿŐŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ ŝĨLJŽƵ͛ƌĞŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚĞĚ͘ FOR SALE: ŽŵƉƵƚĞƌ ,ĞĂĚƐĞƚ͘ hƐĞƐ h^ ƉŽƌƚ͘DŝĐƌŽƉŚŽŶĞ͕ǀŽůƵŵĞĐŽŶƚƌŽů͕ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞ ĞĂƌƉŝĞĐĞƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: tŝƌĞůĞƐƐĂĚĂƉƚŽƌ͘>ŝŶŬƐLJƐƵĂůͲ ĂŶĚ tŝƌĞůĞƐƐͲE h^ ĚĂƉƚĞƌ ;ϯϬϬϬ ^ĞůĞĐƚͲ ĂďůĞƵĂůͲĂŶĚǁŝƚŚϯyϯĨŽƌϰϱϬDďƉƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ^ĂŵƐƵŶŐ sͬZt džƚĞƌŶĂů ƌŝǀĞ͘ ϴy s tƌŝƚĞ͕ Ϯϰy  tƌŝƚĞ͘ h^ ƉŽǁͲ ĞƌĞĚ͕ŶŽƉŽǁĞƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϬ͘ϬϬ͘ FOR SALE: ϯŐͬϰ'͕ tŝͲ&ŝ͕ ƚŚĞƌŶĞƚ ƌŽƵƚĞƌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲϱ͘ϬϬ͘ FOR SALE:EĞƚŐĞĂƌWƌŽͲ^ĂĨĞϱͲƉŽƌƚϭϬͬϭϬϬ ĚĞƐŬƚŽƉ ƐǁŝƚĐŚ͘ ŽŶŶĞĐƚ ƵƉ ƚŽ ϱ ƚŚĞƌŶĞƚ ĚĞͲ ǀŝĐĞƐ Ăƚ ƐƉĞĞĚ ƵƉ ƚŽ ϭϬϬ DďƉƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ϰϳϱ͘ϬϬ WĞƐŽƐŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲϬϲϵϭ͘ FOR SALE: WƌŝŶƚĞƌ͕ ŚƉϳϵϲϬ ƉŚŽƚŽ ƐŵĂƌƚ͕ ĨŽƵƌĐŽůŽƌŝŶŬũĞƚ͘ůŝŬĞŶĞǁ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϱϬDyWĐĂůů ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϰϱϮ͘

PETS & SUPPLIES FOR SALE: Free delivery Chapala area. >ŝƚͲ ƚůĞ ^,/,Ͳdh ƉƵƉƉŝĞƐ͕ ǁͬW/'Z͕ Ϯ ŵŽŶƚŚƐ ĂŐĞ͘ ǁŝƚŚŽƵƚ W/'Z͕ ƚŚĞLJ ĐŽƐƚ h^ΨϭϬϬ ůĞƐƐ ;ŽŶůLJĨĞǁŵŽƌĞĚĂLJƐ͕ďĞĨŽƌĞƌĞŐŝƐƚĞƌŝŶŐƚŚĞŵͿ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϰϴϬ͘ϬϬh^͘ FOR SALE: ĂLJ 'ĞůĚŝŶŐ͘ 'ƌĞĂƚ ĐŽŵͲ ĨŽƌƚĂďůĞ ŐĂŝƚƐ͕ ĞĂƐLJ ŬĞĞƉĞƌ͕ ^ŽƵŶĚ͘ &Žƌ ůŽŶŐƌŝĚĞƐ͕ŵŽƵŶƚĂŝŶŽƌŇĂƚ͕ĂĚĞůŝŐŚƚ͘Ăůů͗ϯϯϭͲ ϯϯϭͲϱϵϭϯ͘ POSITION DESIRED: sĞƌLJ &ƌŝĞŶĚůLJ Θ ǁĞůů ďĞŚĂǀĞĚ ^ŚŝŚ dƐƵ ŝƐ ůŽŽŬŝŶŐ ĨŽƌ Ă ƐǁĞĞƚ ŚŽŵĞ ĨƌŽŵƉƌŝůϮϴƟůůDĂLJϮϵƚŚǁŚŝůĞŽǁŶĞƌƐĂƌĞŝŶ ƵƌŽƉĞ͘DĂůĞďƵƚĐƵƚ͘EŽƉƌŽďůĞŵƐĞůůƉŚŽŶĞ ϯϯϯͲϭϵϳͲϵϵϴϬŽƌϯϯϭͲϯϰϰͲϯϯϰϭ

GENERAL MERCHANDISE FOR SALE: >ĂƌŐĞ ǁĂůů ĚĞĐŽƌĂƟŽŶ ŽĨ ƐƵŶͬ ŵŽŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϯϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ŽďŽ͘ Ăůů͗ ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲ

El Ojo del Lago / April 2014

ϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: hŶŝƋƵĞ ŐůĂƐƐ ƚŽƉ ƚĂďůĞ͘ ,ĂŶĚ ĐĂƌǀĞĚǁŽŽĚĞŶŚŽƌƐĞŚĞĂĚƐĂƌĞƚŚĞďĂƐĞ͘WĞƌͲ ĨĞĐƚ ĨŽƌ ŚĂůůǁĂLJ ĞŶƚƌĂŶĐĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϯϱϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE:ϮƌƵƐƟĐƚLJƉĞĐŚĞƐƚƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϳϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: WĞĐĂŶ ĐŽīĞĞ ƚĂďůĞ ĂŶĚ Ϯ ĞŶĚ ƚĂďůĞƐ͘ džĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ ǀĞƌLJ ĐůĂƐƐLJ͘ ^ŽůŝĚ ǁŽŽĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϴ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲ ϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE:ϮǁŽŽĚĞŶďĂƌƐƚŽŽůƐŐŽŽĚĐŽŶĚŝͲ ƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲ ϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ZƵƐƟĐ ŬŝŶŐ ƐŝnjĞ ďĞĚƌŽŽŵ ƐĞƚ͘ ,ĂŶĚ ƉĂŝŶƚĞĚ ŚĞĂĚďŽĂƌĚ ĂŶĚ ĚƌĞƐƐĞƌ͘ Ϯ ŶŝŐŚƚ ƐƚĂŶĚƐ͘ ƌĞƐƐĞƌ ŚĂƐ ϲ ĚƌĂǁĞƌƐ͘ DĂƩƌĞƐƐ ĂŶĚ ĨƌĂŵĞŝŶĐůƵĚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ZƵƐƟĐƚLJƉĞĚĞƐŬǁŝƚŚĨŽůĚĚŽǁŶ ǁƌŝƟŶŐƚĂďůĞŚĂƐϯĚƌĂǁĞƌƐ͘Ăůů͗ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ ŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ϮƌƵƐƟĐƚĂůůŬĐĂƐĞƐϮƐŚĞůǀĞƐ ĂŶĚ ĚŽƵďůĞ ĚŽŽƌƐ ŽŶ ďŽƩŽŵ͘ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ĞĂƵƟĨƵů DĂŚŽŐĂŶLJ ŬĐĂƐĞ ƚĂůůǁŝƚŚϯƐŚĞůǀĞƐĂŶĚĚŽƵďůĞĚŽŽƌƐŽŶďŽƩŽŵ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϱ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ĞĂƵƟĨƵů ƵŶŝƋƵĞ ĞŶƚƌĂŶĐĞ ŚĂůů ƚĂďůĞĂŶĚŵŝƌƌŽƌ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϰ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE:^ŽĨĂ^ĞƩĞĞŐŽůĚĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚĐŽŶĚŝͲ ƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϱϬϬWĞƐŽƐŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲ ϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ĞĂƵƟĨƵů ƐŽĨĂ ƚĂďůĞ͕ ĐŚĞƌƌLJ ǁŽŽĚ ůŽŽŬƐ ŐƌĞĂƚ͘ ΨϮ͕ϱϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲ ϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ĞĂƵƟĨƵů Ăƌ ǁŝƚŚ ůĂƌŐĞ ŵŝƌƌŽƌ͘ 'ůĂƐƐ ƐŚĞůǀĞƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϭϮ͕ϬϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ ŽďŽ͘ Ăůů͗ ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŽůŝĚ KĂŬ &ƌĞŶĐŚ WƌŽǀŝŶĐŝĂů ƋƵĞĞŶƐŝnjĞďĞĚƌŽŽŵƐĞƚϵĚƌĂǁĞƌĚƌĞƐƐĞƌǁŝƚŚ ŵŝƌƌŽƌĂŶĚϮŶŝŐŚƚƐƚĂŶĚƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭϳ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ ŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ^ĂŵƐƵŶŐ tŝŶĚŽǁ Ăŝƌ ĐŽŶĚŝͲ ƟŽŶĞƌ Ͳ ĞĂƐLJ ŵŽƵŶƚ ϭϮ͕ϬϬϬ dhƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮϳϱ͘ ŵĂŝů͗ũŝũŝĐϲϮΛLJĂŚŽŽ͘ĐŽŵ͘ FOR SALE: &EZ ^ZD ϴϯϬϮ ϴ ĐŚĂŶŶĞů DŝdžĞƌ ŵƉ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϯ͕ϬϬϬ͘ϬϬ WĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲ Ϯϵϲϰ͘ WANTED: ŽŵƉƵƚĞƌ &ůĂƚ ^ĐƌĞĞŶ DŽŶŝƚŽƌ͘ WůĞĂƐĞƐĞŶĚĞŵĂŝůǁŝƚŚƉƌŝĐĞ͘ FOR SALE: ϭϴWZϮϱϬƉƌŽĨĞƐƐŝŽŶĂůƌĞĐŽƌĚŝŶŐ ƚĂƉĞƐ͕ŽƵďůĞWůĂLJƌĞĞůƚŽƌĞĞůƚĂƉĞƐ͗ZƵďLJƌĂī͕ ƌƟĞ^ŚĂǁ͕ŽƵŶƚĂƐŝĞ;ϮͿ͕,ĂƌƌLJ:ĂŵĞƐ͕ƵŬĞ ůůŝŶŐƚŽŶ͕ ƵŬĞ ůůŝŶŐƚŽŶ /ŶƚĞƌǀŝĞǁ͕ ůŝīŽƌĚ ƌŽǁŶ͕͘:ĂĐŬdĞĂŐĂƌĚĞŶ͘Ăůů͗ϳϰϰͲϰϬϵϯ͘ FOR SALE: Ϯ ďůĂĐŬ ŵĞƚĂů ĐŚĂŝƌƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĐŽǀͲ ĞƌĞĚƐĞĂƚƐĂŶĚƐŵĂůůďůĂĐŬŵĞƚĂůƚĂďůĞͲϭϲŝŶĐŚ ĚŝĂŵĞƚĞƌ͕ϮϭŝŶĐŚĞƐŚŝŐŚƐƵŝƚĂďůĞĨŽƌƉĂƟŽ͕ƐƵŶͲ ƌŽŽŵ͕ĞƚĐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϴϬϬƉĞƐŽƐϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ͘ WANTED:>ŽŽŬŝŶŐƚŽďƵLJŽƌƌĞŶƚĂƉŽǁĞƌͲ ĨƵů ŚŝŐŚͲƉƌĞƐƐƵƌĞ ǁĂƚĞƌ ǁĂƐŚĞƌ͕ ŐĂƐ Žƌ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐ Ͳ^ƚĞǀĞ͘DŽďŝůĞWŚŽŶĞ͗ϯϯϯϭϳϲͲϰϴϰϰŽƌZŝďĞƌĂƐ ŚŽŵĞƉŚŽŶĞ͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϰϭϬ͘ WANTED:/ĂŵůŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌŐŽŽĚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͕ ƵƐĞĚ ŵĞŶƐ͕ ƌƚ͘ ŚĂŶĚĞĚ͕ ŐŽůĨ ĐůƵďƐ͕ ĐĂƌƌLJ ďĂŐ͕ ĞƚĐ͘͘͘ WƌŝĐĞ ŝƐ Ă ŵĂũŽƌ ĨĂĐƚŽƌ ƐŽ ŶŽƚŚŝŶŐ ƌĞĂůůLJ ĞdžƉĞŶƐŝǀĞ͘ FOR SALE: ŚŝĐĂŐŽ ůĞĐƚƌŝĐ tĞůĚŝŶŐ ^LJƐͲ ƚĞŵƐ /ŶĚƵƐƚƌŝĂů D/'ͲϭϬϬ tĞůĚĞƌ ǁŝƚŚ dŚĞƌŵĂů ŽǀĞƌůŽĂĚ DŽĚĞů ϰϰϱϲϳ ǁŝƚŚ ŵĂŶƵĂů ĂŶĚ ŝŶͲ ĐůƵĚĞƐ ƵƚŽͲĂƌŬĞŶŝŶŐ ǁĞůĚŝŶŐ ŚĞůŵĞƚ DŽĚĞů

ϵϭϮϭϮ͘ůůĨŽƌΨϮ͕ϬϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ϱϬϬϬ ƚƵ ^ĂŵƐƵŶŐ tŝŶĚŽǁ ŝƌ ŽŶĚŝƟŽŶĞƌ͘/ƚ͛ƐŝĚĞĂůĨŽƌĂďĞĚƌŽŽŵŽƌĚĞŶ͘,ĂƐ ƌĞůŝĂďůĞ ŵĞĐŚĂŶŝĐĂů ĐŽŶƚƌŽůƐ͕ ƌĂƚŚĞƌ ƚŚĂŶ ĞůĞĐͲ ƚƌŽŶŝĐŽŶĞƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϵϵh^͘ FOR SALE: >ĂnjĞƌ >ĞǀĞů ůĂĐŬ Θ ĞĐŬĞƌ ƌŽƐƐĮƌĞ ĂƵƚŽŵĂƟĐ ŚŽƌŝnjŽŶƚĂů ĂŶĚ ǀĞƌƟĐĂů ƌĞĚ ůĂnjĞƌůŝŶĞƐ͘sĂƌŝŽƵƐĂƩĂĐŚŵĞŶƚƐĨŽƌĂĚũƵƐƚŵĞŶƚ ĂŶĚŚĂŶŐŝŶŐ͘ϵϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϲϵϰ͘ FOR SALE: dŝůĞ ƵƩĞƌ ϯϬŝŶĐŚ ǁŝƚŚ ǀĂƌŝŽƵƐ ĂƩĂĐŚŵĞŶƚƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϱϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϲϵϰ FOR SALE: >>EǀŝŶLJůƌŽŽĨƚŽƉĐĂƌƌŝĞƌ͘ƉͲ ƉƌŽdžŝŵĂƚĞůLJ ϰϬ ŝŶĐŚĞƐ ƐƋƵĂƌĞ ǁŝƚŚ njŝƉƉĞƌ ĂŶĚ sĞůĐƌŽ͘ ůů ƐƚƌĂƉƐ ƚŽ ƐĞĐƵƌĞ ƚŽ ƌŽŽĨ ŽĨ ǀĞŚŝĐůĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ͘ WANTED: tĞ ŚĂǀĞ Ă ďĞĂƵƟĨƵů ŚŽŵĞ ŝŶ ǀŝƐƚĂĚĞůůĂŐŽ;ĐŚĂƉĂůĂĐŽƵŶƚƌLJĐůƵďͿĂŶĚǁĞǁŝůů ďĞŐŽŶĞĨƌŽŵƉƌŝůƚŚƌƵĞĐĞŵďĞƌ͘ůŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌ ƐŽŵĞŽŶĞƚŽůŝǀĞŝŶŽƵƌŚŽŵĞǁŚŝůĞǁĞĂƌĞŐŽŶĞ͘ ĂŶŵĂŬĞĂƌƌĂŶŐĞŵĞŶƚƐĨŽƌƌĞŶƚĂůĂŌĞƌƚŚĂƚŝĨ LJŽƵǁŝƐŚ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϯͲϱϭϯϯ͘ WANTED: >ŽŽŬŝŶŐ ƚŽ ďƵLJ Ă ŐĂƐ ƐƚŽǀĞ ǁŝƚŚ ǁŽƌŬŝŶŐŽǀĞŶ͘ůĂĚLJŝŶ:ŽĐŽŶĞĞĚƐŽŶĞƚŽĐŽŽŬ ĂŶĚƐĞůůĐŽŽŬŝĞƐ͘ĂŶƉŝĐŬƵƉ͘dŚĂŶŬƐ͘ FOR SALE: >ĂƌŐĞ ƚůĂŶƟĐ ƐŽŌ ƐŝĚĞĚ ƚĂƵƉĞ ĐŽůŽƌ Ϯ ǁŚĞĞůĞĚ ƐƵŝƚĐĂƐĞ͘ ϯϬ /Ŷ͘ dž ϭϮ ŝŶ͘ dž Ϯϭ ŝŶĐŚĞƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ FOR SALE: ŝƌĐƵůĂƌ ĂŶĚ ƐƚƌĂŝŐŚƚ <ŶŝƫŶŐ ŶĞĞĚůĞƐ͕ŵĂŶLJůĞŶŐƚŚƐĂŶĚƐŝnjĞƐ͘ΨϭϬƉĞĂĐŚƐĞƚ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ,WƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͕ƚŚƌĞĞŝŶŽŶĞ͕ƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͕ ƐĐĂŶŶĞƌ͕ ĐŽƉŝĞƌ͘ EĞĞĚƐ ĐĂƌƚƌŝĚŐĞƐ͕ ďůĂĐŬ ĂŶĚ ĐŽůŽƌ͘ŚĂŶŐĞĚƚŽĂƐŵĂůůĞƌǀĞƌƐŝŽŶ͘^ƟůůĂŐŽŽĚ ƉƌŝŶƚĞƌ͕ŽůĚĞƌďƵƚǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ͘ĂůůϳϲϲͲϱϱϵϮ'ƌĞĂƚ ǀĂůƵĞ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ƉƌŝĐĞ ŽĨ ΨϱϬ ĚŽůůĂƌƐ Žƌ ΨϲϱϬ ƉĞͲ sos. FOR SALE: sĞƌLJ ĐŽŵĨŽƌƚĂďůĞ ůĂƌŐĞ ǁŚŝƚĞ ƐŽĨĂ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϯ͕ϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ůĞĐƚƌŝĐ ĞǁĂůƚ ^ĂǁnjĂůů ǁŝƚŚ ϭ ďůĂĚĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR LEASE: ^ŚĂǁĐĐŽƵŶƚƚŽ^ŚĂƌĞ. DŽŶƚŚͲ ůLJƐĞƌǀŝĐĞŝƐƚŚĞ^ŝůǀĞƌŚŽŝĐĞ;ĂƐƚŽĂƐƚͿƉĂĐŬͲ ĂŐĞ͕ďƵŶĚůĞƐŝŶĐůƵĚĞ͗>ŝĨĞƐƚLJůĞ͕^ŵĂƌƚ^ƚƵīĂŶĚ ZĞĂů >ŝĨĞ͘ /Ĩ LJŽƵ ǁĂŶƚ ĂŶLJ ĂĚĚŝƟŽŶĂů ƉƌŽŐƌĂŵͲ ŵŝŶŐ͕ ŝƚ ŝƐ ĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞ Ăƚ ĂŶ ĂĚĚŝƟŽŶĂů ĐŚĂƌŐĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϯϬh^͘ WANTED: >ŽǁĞƌ >Ă &ůŽƌĞƐƚĂ ŚŽŵĞ͘ ^ŝƩĞƌ ƌĞƐƉŽŶƐŝďůĞ ĨŽƌ ŐĂƌĚĞŶĞƌ͕ ŚŽƵƐĞ ŬĞĞƉĞƌ͕ ĂŶĚ ƵƟůŝƟĞƐ͘ƉƌŝůƚŽEŽǀĞŵďĞƌ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϯϮϱϰ͘ FOR SALE:ĂďŝŶĞƚĨŽƌƐŚŽĞƐŽƌƋƵŝůƟŶŐĨĂďͲ ƌŝĐƐŽƌǁŚĂƚĞǀĞƌLJŽƵǁĂŶƚ͘DĞĂƐƵƌĞƐϴϴ͟ŚŝŐŚ ďLJϮϵϭͬϮ͟ǁŝĚĞĂŶĚϭϴ͟ĚĞĞƉŝƚŚĂƐϭϬƐŚĞůǀĞƐ͘ ƌĞĂŵ ĐŽůŽƌĞĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϴϬϬƉ ͲŵĂŝů ĨŽƌ ƉŝĐͲ ƚƵƌĞƐ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϬϮϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: <ŝŶĚůĞ dŽƵĐŚ DŽĚĞů ϬϭϮϬϬ ƉƌĞͲůŽĂĚĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ ĂƉƉƌŽdž ϭϬϬϬ Ŭ ƟƚůĞƐ͘ EŝĐĞ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͕ ĐŽŵĞƐ ŝŶ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ďŽdž ǁŝƚŚ ĐŚĂƌŐĞƌ ĞƚĐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ϲϱh^͘ŽŶƚĂĐƚŵĞǀŝĂĞŵĂŝů͕/ǁŝůů ƌĞƐƉŽŶĚĂƐĂƉ͘ FOUND: EĂŵĞ ďƌĂŶĚ ƐƵŶŐůĂƐƐĞƐ ǁĞƌĞ ĨŽƵŶĚ Ăƚ ĂƐŝ EƵĞǀŽ dŚƌŝŌ ^ŚŽƉ ŝŶ ZŝďĞƌĂƐ ŽŶ dŚƵƌƐĚĂLJ͕ &Ğď͘ Ϯϳ͘ WůĞĂƐĞ ĐĂůů ;ϯϳϲͿϭϬϲͲϮϭϮϭ͘ DƵƐƚŐŝǀĞďƌĂŶĚŶĂŵĞ͘ FOR SALE: &ƌĂŵĞĚĂĐŬWĂĐŬƐ͘ ϯďĂĐŬƉĂĐŬƐ ϭͲ^ĞƌǀĂůŶŽĨƌĂŵĞ͘ϭͲ:ĂŶƐƉŽƌƚĨƌĂŵĞĚϭͲŶŽ ŶĂŵĞ ĨƌĂŵĞĚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮϱϬƉ ĞĂĐŚ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲ ϰϱϵϬ͘ WANTED: >ŽŽŬŝŶŐ ĨŽƌ ƉĂƟŽ ƵŵďƌĞůůĂ ǁŝƚŚ ƐƚĂŶĚƚŚĂƚĚŽĞƐŶŽƚĐŽƐƚϮϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͊hƐĞĚĐŽŶͲ ĚŝƟŽŶŝƐĮŶĞ͘Ğůů͗;ϯϯϯͿϴϰϭͲϳϮϮϴ͘ FOR SALE:dŚŝƐŝƐĂŶŽůĚĞƌŵŽĚĞůWƌŽ&Žƌŵ ϯϴϱϳϬ͕ĂŐŽŽĚƐƚĂƌƚĞƌƚƌĞĂĚŵŝůůĂƚĂŐŽŽĚƉƌŝĐĞ͘ /ƚŝƐĂďŝƚŶŽŝƐLJďƵƚƌƵŶƐǁĞůů͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ


ĐĂƐŚ Θ ĐĂƌƌLJ͘ Ăůů DĂƌƟŶ Ăƚ ϳϲϱͲϯϰϱϵ Žƌ ǁƌŝƚĞ ŵŐǁΛŵĂƐŵŐƚ͘ĐŽŵ͘ BEST OFFER FOR: &Ƶůů &ĂŵŝůLJ 'ŽůĨ DĞŵͲ ďĞƌƐŚŝƉ ƚůĂƐ ŽƵŶƚƌLJ ůƵď ĞĞĚĞĚ ĂŶĚ WĂŝĚ Ψϭϯ͕ϬϬϬƉŝŶϮϬϬϳŵĂŝůŽŶůLJ͗ƚŚĞƐŚĞŝŬŽĨĂũŝũŝĐΛ ŚŽƚŵĂŝů͘ĐŽŵ FOR SALE: 'ŽůĨŐƌŝƉƟŐĞƌƐŚĂƌŬƉƵƩĞƌ͘:ƵŵͲ ďŽƉŝƐƚŽůŐƌŝƉ͘ϭƉŝĞĐĞϭϭͬϴ͟ĚŝĂŵĞƚĞƌ͕ƌĞĚĂŶĚ ďůĂĐŬ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϬ͘h^&͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϰϱϮ͘ FOR SALE: 'ĞŶĞƌŝĐ D WƌŽ ŚĞĂƌŝŶŐ ĂŝĚƐ Ͳ ƐŵĂůůĮƚƐďĞŚŝŶĚƚŚĞĞĂƌ͘sĂƌŝŽƵƐƐĞƫŶŐƐǁŝƚŚ ĞdžƚĞƌŶĂů ǀŽůƵŵĞ ĐŽŶƚƌŽů͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů ;ϯϳϲͿ ϳϲϲͲϭϳϭϴ ĞǀĞŶŝŶŐƐ͕ Žƌ ϭ ;ϯϬϲͿ ϱϰϲ ϴϯϱϳĂŶĚůĞĂǀĞŵĞƐƐĂŐĞ͘ FOR SALE: 'ŽůĨŐƌŝƉƐ͘t/EED^dZtZW tϳĨŽƌǁŽŽĚƐĂŶĚŝƌŽŶƐ͘ůĂĐŬ͕ƐŽŌ͕ϭϮƉŝĞĐĞƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬ͘h^&>Kd͘ĂůůϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϰϱϮ͘ FOR SALE: 'ƌĞĂƚĐĂďŝŶĞƚƐĨŽƌƐƚŽƌĂŐĞŝŶƚŚĞ ŐĂƌĂŐĞ͕ůĂƵŶĚƌLJƌŽŽŵŽƌƉĂŶƚƌLJ͘ϯŽƉĞŶƐŚĞůǀĞƐ ĂďŽǀĞ ůŽǁĞƌ ƉŽƌƟŽŶ ǁŝƚŚ ĚŽŽƌƐ͘ ,ĞŝŐŚƚ ŝƐ ϲ͛Ͳ ϲ͕͟tŝĚƚŚŝƐϰ͕͛ĞƉƚŚŝƐϮ͛͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ ĞĂĐŚͬƚǁŽĨŽƌΨϮ͕ϯϬϬ͘ĂůůϳϲϱͲϱϲϬϳ͘ FOR SALE: sEdhZ͛Ɛ ZyͲϱ dĞůĞƐĐŽƉĞ͘ dŚŝƐ ĂĚǀĂŶĐĞ ŵŽƵŶƟŶŐ ĚĞƐŝŐŶ ĂůůŽǁƐ LJŽƵ ƚŽ ĞĂƐŝůLJ ŬĞĞƉ ƚƌĂĐŬ ǁŝƚŚ ŵŽǀĞŵĞŶƚ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ĞĂƌƚŚ ;ĨŽƌ ĞĂƐLJ ŽďƐĞƌǀĂƟŽŶ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ĐĞůĞƐƟĂů ŽďũĞĐƚ͘Ϳ dŚĞ ϭ͘Ϯϱ͟ ĞLJĞƉŝĞĐĞ ĨŽƌŵĂƚ ŬĞĞƉƐ LJŽƵ ƵƉĚĂƚĞĚ ĨŽƌ ĞĂƐLJͲƵƉŐƌĂĚŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ ǁŝĚĞůLJ ĂǀĂŝůĂďůĞ ŽƚŚĞƌ ŽƉĞŶͲƐŽƵƌĐĞĚ ĞLJĞƉŝĞĐĞƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬƉ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ,ds^ƚĂƌŚŽŝĐĞZĞĐĞŝǀĞƌ͘ /ǁĂƐ ĂƐŬŝŶŐĨŽƌΨϭ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐŝĨŝƚ͛ƐƚŽŽŵƵĐŚŽīĞƌ/ ŶĞĞĚƚŽƐĂůĞŝƚ͘ĂůůŵĞĂƚĐĞůůŶƵŵďĞƌ͗ϯϯϭͲϳϵϯͲ ϳϯϮϴ͘ FOR SALE: 'ŽůĨĐůƵďƐƵƐĞĚZ,WŝŶŐ'ϭϬ͘ϭϮ ĐůƵďƐ ǁͬĐĂƌƚ ďĂŐ 'ƌĞĞŶ Žƚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϰϱϬ h^&͘ ĂůůϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϱϰϱϮ WANTED: / ǁŝƐŚ ƚŽ ƉƵƌĐŚĂƐĞ Ă ŐŽŽĚ ƵƐĞĚ ƵƉƌŝŐŚƚǁĂƐŚĞƌͬĚƌLJĞƌ;ŐĂƐͿĐŽŵďŽƵŶŝƚ͘DƵƐƚďĞ ŝŶƌĞĂƐŽŶĂďůĞĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶĂŶĚǁŽƌŬŝŶŐƉƌŽƉĞƌůLJ͘ FOR SALE: EŝĐĞ͕ ǀĞƌLJ ƐƚƵƌĚLJ͕ ƵƉŚŽůƐƚĞƌĞĚ ďĂŵƉĂƟŽĨƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞ͗ϯĐƵƐŚŝŽŶƐŽĨĂ͕ϮĐƵƐŚͲ ŝŽŶůŽǀĞƐĞĂƚ͕ǁŝƚŚƚŚƌŽǁƉŝůůŽǁƐ͕ĂŶĚŐůĂƐƐͲƚŽƉ ĐŽīĞĞƚĂďůĞ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐŽďŽ͘ WANTED: >ŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌĂůĂƚĞƌŵŽĚĞů,ŽŶĚĂ ͲϵϬƉƌĞĨĞƌĂďůLJǁŝƚŚůŽǁŬŵƐďƵƚǁŝůůĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌ ŽƚŚĞƌƐŝĨƌĞŇĞĐƚĞĚŝŶƉƌŝĐĞ͘EKd/EdZ^dŝŶ ĂŶLJŽƚŚĞƌŵĂŬĞƐͬŵŽĚĞůƐ͘,ŽŶĚĂͲϵϬ͛ƐŽŶůLJ͘ WANTED: tŽƵůĚ ůŝŬĞ Ă ƌĞĂƐŽŶĂďůLJ ƉƌŝĐĞĚ ƐƚĂƟŽŶĂƌLJďŝŬĞŝŶŐŽŽĚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ FOR SALE: ŚĞĂǀLJŐůĂƐƐĨŽƌƚĂďůĞϲŌdžϰŌdžϮŝŶ ƚŚŝĐŬ͕ ƌŽƵŶĚĞĚ ĞĚŐĞƐ͘ ĐƵƐŵĂƌƚ ƐƚĂŝƌ ƐƚĞƉƉĞƌ͕ ĚƌĂŌŝŶŐ ƚĂďůĞ ǁŝƚŚ ůĂŵƉ͕ ϱ͕ϬϬϬ ǁĂƩ ŽůĞŵĂŶ ŐĞŶĞƌĂƚŽƌ͘ FOR SALE: s Ždž ^Ğƚ DŝĚŶŝƚĞ ^ƉĞĐŝĂů͘ ^ĞĞ ůĞŐĞŶĚĂƌLJ ƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞƐ ŽŶ ŵŝĚŶŝŐŚƚ ƐƉĞͲ ĐŝĂůďLJƚŚĞƌŽĐŬĂŶĚƐŽƵůŵƵƐŝĐƐƚĂƌƐŽĨƚŚĞϳϬƐ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭϯϵh^͘Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬDyW͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϲ͘ WANTED:/͛ŵŝŶƐĞĂƌĐŚŽĨŝŶĞdžƉĞŶƐŝǀĞŐůĂƐƐ ƉůĂƚĞƐ͕ ďŽǁůƐ͕ ĐƵƉƐ͕ ƉůĂƩĞƌƐ͕ ĞƚĐ͘ ŽŶĂƟŽŶƐ ǁŽƵůĚ ĂůƐŽ ďĞ ǁĞůĐŽŵĞĚ͘ / ŚĂŶĚͲƉĂŝŶƚ ƚŚĞƐĞ ŐůĂƐƐŝƚĞŵƐĨŽƌƐĂůĞĂŶĚĂƉŽƌƟŽŶǁŝůůŐŽƚŽǀĂƌŝͲ ŽƵƐůŽĐĂůĂŶŝŵĂůĐŚĂƌŝƟĞƐ͘

FOR SALE: ^ůŝŬ hŶŝǀĞƌƐĂů hͲϭϬϮ dƌŝƉŽĚ͕ ďůĂĐŬĂŶĚĞdžƚĞŶĚƐŵĂŶLJĚŝīĞƌĞŶƚŚĞŝŐŚƚƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϮϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:YƵĞĞŶ^ŝnjĞĞĚ^Ğƚ͘ĞĐĞŶƚĐŽŶͲ ĚŝƟŽŶ͕ YƵĞĞŶ ďŽdž ƐƉƌŝŶŐ͕ ŵĂƩƌĞƐƐ ĂŶĚ ǁŽŽĚ ƐƚĂŶĚͬĨƌĂŵĞ͘ / Ăŵ ŝŶ ŚĂƉĂůĂ ,ĂĐŝĞŶĚĂƐ͘ ^ĞŶĚ ŵĞ ĂŶĚ ĞDĂŝů Žƌ WŚŽŶĞ ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϯϰϴ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϳϱϬKK͘/ŚĂǀĞĂĨƌŝĞŶĚǁŚŽǁŝůůĚĞůŝǀĞƌůŽͲ ĐĂůůLJďƵƚŝƚ͛ƐΨϮϱϬ͖ďĞƩĞƌƚŽĚŽŝƚLJŽƵƌƐĞůĨ͘ FOR SALE: >ĂĚŝĞƐ ZĂŵ 'ŽůĚĞŶ 'ŝƌů >ŝƚĞ ůĞŌ ŚĂŶĚĞĚ ĐůƵďƐ͘ /ŶĐůƵĚĞƐ ϭ͕ϯ Θ ϱ ǁŽŽĚƐ͕ ϰ͕ϱ͕ϲ͕ϳ͕ϴ͕ϵ ŝƌŽŶƐ͕ ƐĂŶĚ ǁĞĚŐĞ͕ ƉŝƚĐŚŝŶŐ ǁĞĚŐĞ͕ ƉƵƩĞƌ͕ďĂŐΘĐĂƌƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:ϮŶĚ'ĞŶĞƌĂƟŽŶ<ŝŶĚůĞĞͲƌĞĂĚĞƌ͘ ŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ůĞĂƚŚĞƌ ĐŽǀĞƌ͕ ĐŚĂƌŐĞƌ͕ h^ ĐĂͲ ďůĞ͕ĂŶĚĂůŝďƌĂƌLJŽĨϲϬϬϬĞŽŽŬƐ͘ϳϲϱͲϯϰϱϵĨŽƌ ŵŽƌĞŝŶĨŽ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: ^ƚĂŝŶůĞƐƐ ^ƚĞĞů &ŝƐŚ WŽĂĐŚĞƌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉ͘ FOR SALE: ƵŝƐŝŶĂƌƚ /ĐĞ ƌĞĂŵ DĂŬͲ Ğƌ͘ ŽůŽƌ ŝƐ ƌĞĚ ĂŶĚ ŽŶůLJ ƵƐĞĚ ƚǁŝĐĞ͘ tŽƌŬƐŐƌĞĂƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϲϬϬƉ͘ FOR SALE:ZĞƐƚĂƵƌĂŶƚĨƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞĂŶĚĞƋƵŝƉͲ ŵĞŶƚ ĨŽƌ ƐĂůĞ͘ ƋƵŝƉĂůĞ ƚĂďůĞ ĂŶĚ ĐŚĂŝƌ͕ ǁŽŽĚ ŚŝŐŚĐŚĂŝƌƐ͕sĞƌLJ>ĂƌŐĞtŽŽĚĂƌƵƐĞĚŝŶĂďĂƌ͕ ďĂƌ ƐƚŽŽůƐ͕ ĐŽŽůĞƌƐ͕ ǀĞƌLJ ůĂƌŐĞ ƐƚĂŝŶůĞƐƐ ƐƚĞĞů ƐŝŶŬ͕ ŐĂƐ Őƌŝůů ĂŶĚ ĨƌLJ ƐƚĂŶĚ͘ EĞŐŽƟĂďůĞ͘ Ăůů͗ ϯϯϯͲϭϴϱͲϴϬϮϲ͘ FOR SALE:sŝŶƚĂŐĞ^ŝŶŐĞƌdƌĞĂĚůĞDĂĐŚŝŶĞ͕ WƌĞϭϵϲϬ͛Ɛ͘/ƚǁŽƌŬƐďƵƚǁŝůůŶĞĞĚĂŶĞǁďĞůƚŝŶ ƚŚĞ ĨƵƚƵƌĞ͘ dŚĞ ĨŽŽƚ ƚŚĂƚ ǁĂƐ ŽŶ ŝƚ ŝƐ ŶŽƚ ƚŚĞ ĐŽƌƌĞĐƚ ŽŶĞ͘ dŚĞLJ ŚĂǀĞ Ăůů ƚŚĞƐĞ ŵĂĐŚŝŶĞƐ ŝŶ 'ƵĂĚĂůĂũĂƌĂĂŶĚƚŚĞLJĂƌĞǀĞƌLJŬŶŽǁŶƚŚĞƌĞĨŽƌ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞĂŶĚƉĂƌƚƐ͘dŚĞĐĂďŝŶĞƚŝƐŝŶŐŽŽĚƐŚĂƉĞ ũƵƐƚŶĞĞĚƐƌĞĮŶŝƐŚĞĚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϵϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲ ϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: dĞůĞƐĐŽƉĞ DĞĂĚĞ dyͲϭϮϱ͘ ϱϬϬdžŵĂdžŝŵƵŵŵĂŐŶŝĮĐĂƟŽŶ&ŽƌŬŵŽƵŶƚƐǁŝƚŚ ƐƚĂŶĚĂƌĚͲĞƋƵŝƉŵĞŶƚĚƵĂůͲĂdžŝƐĚƌŝǀĞƐLJƐƚĞŵĂŶĚ ĞůĞĐƚƌŽŶŝĐ ĐŽŶƚƌŽůůĞƌ ůƚĂnjŝŵƵƚŚ Žƌ ĞƋƵĂƚŽƌŝĂů ŽƉĞƌĂƟŽŶ ŽƌĚůĞƐƐ ĮĞůĚ ŽƉĞƌĂƟŽŶ &ůŝƉͲŵŝƌƌŽƌ ƐLJƐƚĞŵ /ŶĐůƵĚĞƐ dƌŝƉŽĚ͕ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ ĐŽŶƚƌŽů͕ ĞdžƚƌĂ ůĞŶƐĞƐ͕ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ďŽdž͕ ŵĂŶƵĂůƐ ĂŶĚ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ƌĞͲ ĐĞŝƉƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϲ͕ϱϬϬƉ͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϯϰ͘ FOR SALE: ŽŵƉŽƐƚĞĚ ,ŽƌƐĞ DĂŶƵƌĞ͘ 'ĞŶƵŝŶĞ ŚŽƚ ĐŽŵƉŽƐƚĞĚ WĂƐŽ WŽŽƉ ŚŽƌƐĞ ŵĂͲ ŶƵƌĞĨŽƌƐĂůĞ͘EŽǁĞĞĚƐ͕ŶŽƐĞĞĚƐ͕ĂŶĚŐƌŽƵŶĚ ĨŽƌĞĂƐLJĂƉƉůŝĐĂƟŽŶ͘'ƌĞĂƚŵƵůĐŚ͕ĨĞƌƟůŝnjĞƌĂŶĚ ƐŽŝůĂŵĞŶĚŵĞŶƚ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϳϱƉĞƐŽƐĨŽƌϮϬůďďĂŐ͘ Ăůů͗ϯϯϯͲϭϱϬͲϲϭϴϱ͘ FOR SALE: ŝĐŝŵŽƚŽͬ^ĐŽŽƚĞƌ͘ŚĂǀĞƵƐĞĚƚŚŝƐ ďŝĐŝŵŽƚŽ ƚǁŝĐĞ ƐŝŶĐĞ / ďŽƵŐŚƚ ŝƚ Ă ǁĞĞŬ ĂŐŽ͘ / ŶŽǁŶĞĞĚƚŽƚƌĂǀĞůƚŽ'ƵĂĚĂůĂũĂƌĂƚǁŝĐĞĂǁĞĞŬ ƐŽ / ŵƵƐƚ ďƵLJ Ă ĐĂƌ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϱ͕ϮϬϬ͘ KīĞƌƐ ĂĐͲ ĐĞƉƚĞĚ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŽůŽ ŇĞdž ŵĂĐŚŝŶĞ ǁŝƚŚ Ăůů ĂƚͲ ƚĂĐŚŵĞŶƚƐĂŶĚďĂŶĚƐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮ͕ϬϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ ϬϭϯͲϴϳϳͲϲϯϬͲϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE:ďĞĂƵƟĨƵůďƌĂŶĚŶĞǁƐŝůŬƌĞĚĂŶĚ ǁŚŝƚĞĂƌĞĂƌƵŐϲyϰ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϯϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: tƌŽƵŐŚƚ ŝƌŽŶ ŐůĂƐƐ ƚŽƉ ƚĂďůĞ ϯϮyϭϴǀĞƌLJŐŽŽĚĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϵϱϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘

FOR SALE: sŝŶƚĂŐĞ DĂŚ :ŽŶŐŐ ;ϭϵϱϲͬϱϳͿ ƐĞƚƐ ǁŝƚŚ ϭϱϮ ƟůĞƐ ǁŝƚŚ ĐĂƐĞƐ͕ ŽŶĞ ŝŶ ůĞĂƚŚĞƌ͘ ŶŐůŝƐŚ ŵĂŶƵĂů ǁͬ^ƉĂŶŝƐŚ ƚƌĂŶƐůĂƟŽŶ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψϭ͕ϬϬϬDyΘΨϰϬϬDydĞů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϮϮϮϱ͘ FOR SALE: ^ĞĂƌƐ Ăƌ dŽƉ ĂƌƌŝĞƌ͘ DŽĚĞů ͞^ƉŽƌƚϮϬ^s͟hƐĞĚŽŶĐĞ͘ϮϬĐƵ͘Ō͘ĐĂƉĂĐŝƚLJ͘ƉͲ ƉƌŽdž͘ϭ͘ϳϱŵdžϭ͘ϬϬŵdžϬ͘ϱϬŵ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϮϬϬDy͘ dĞů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲϮϮϮϱ͘ FOR SALE: ůĞĐƚƌŝĐ ^ŬŝůůĞƚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ Ψ ϲϱϬ͘ϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϬϭͲϯϴϳͲϳϲϯͲϬϵϬϴ͘ FOR SALE: ůƵĞ ĂƌĞĂ ƌƵŐ ĂƉƉƌŽdž͘ ϴ ďLJ ϱ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϭ͕ϴϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:hŶŝĚĞŶĞĐƚϲ͘ϬŝŐŝƚĂůĂŶƐǁĞƌͲ ŝŶŐƐLJƐƚĞŵͲƐĞƚŽĨϯĐŽƌĚůĞƐƐƚĞůĞƉŚŽŶĞŚĂŶĚͲ ƐĞƚƐ Ͳ ϲ ŵŽŶƚŚƐ ŽůĚ͘ ŽƵŐŚƚ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ h͘^͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϵϵϬƉĞƐŽƐŽďŽ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϭϬϲͲϬϲϵϭ͘ FOR SALE: ^ŚĂǁͬ^ƚĂƌ ŚŽŝĐĞ ^ZϮϬϳ ƌĞͲ ĐĞŝǀĞƌ EKd , ĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ƌĞŵŽƚĞ ƉŽǁĞƌ ƐŽƵƌĐĞ ĂŶĚ s ĐĂďůĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϲϱϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ Ăůů͗ ϳϲϲͲϰϭϬϱ͘ FOR SALE: 'ŽůĨ Ăƌƚ ůĞĐƚƌŝĐ tĂůŬͲĞŚŝŶĚ͘ sĞƌLJ 'ŽŽĚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ :ƵƐƚ ƌĞĚƵĐĞĚ ĨƌŽŵ ΨϯϬϬ ŵƵƐƚ ƐĞůů͕ ůĞĂǀŝŶŐ DĞdžŝĐŽ͘ dŚŝƐ ŝƐ Ă ƵƐĞĚ ĐĂƌƚ͘ ^ŝŵŝůĂƌ ƵƐĞĚ ŽŶĞƐ ŽŶ ĞĂLJ ƐĞůů ĨŽƌ ΨϲϬϬ h^ ƉůƵƐƐŚŝƉƉŝŶŐ͘dŚŝƐĚŽĞƐŶŽƚŚĂǀĞƌĞŵŽƚĞĐŽŶͲ ƚƌŽů ƐŽ LJŽƵ ƐŝŵƉůLJ ǁĂůŬ ďĞŚŝŶĚ ŝƚ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ŚĂŶĚ ƐƉĞĞĚĐŽŶƚƌŽů͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϱϬh^͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϯͲϱϬϴϲ͘ FOR SALE: Ϯ ϮϬ ƉŽƵŶĚ ŐĂƐ ĐLJůŝŶĚĞƌƐ ǁŝƚŚ DĞdžŝĐĂŶĐŽŶŶĞĐƟŽŶ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϬϬƉĞƐŽƐĞĂĐŚ͘ WANTED: ůŽŽŬŝŶŐ ĨŽƌ Ă ƐƚƵƌĚLJ ŽƵƚĚŽŽƌ ůĂŵƉƉŽƐƚ͘ĞƐŝŐŶŶŽƚŝŵƉŽƌƚĂŶƚ͘ FOR SALE: ^<zW&ƌĞĞdĂůŬŽŶŶĞĐƚDĞŽdž͘ ŽŶŶĞĐƚ ĂŶĚ ƵƐĞ ŽŶ LJŽƵƌ ůĂŶĚůŝŶĞ ƚĞůĞƉŚŽŶĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϭϱϬ͘ϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE:WŽƌƚĂďůĞŽŵŵŽĚĞ͘ĚũƵƐƚĂďůĞ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϱϬϬƉĞƐŽƐ͘ FOR SALE: >ĞĂƚŚĞƌ ^ŽĨĂ͘ ;ϯ ƐĞĂƚĞƌ Ͳ ϵϮ͟ ůŽŶŐͿ͘ ĂƌŬ ďƌŽǁŶͬďůĂĐŬ͘ ,ŝŐŚ ƋƵĂůŝƚLJ ůĞĂƚŚĞƌ ĂŶĚ ŝŶ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ ƉƉƌŽdžŝŵĂƚĞůLJ ϱ LJĞĂƌƐ ŽůĚ ;ŽǁŶĞĚ ďLJ ƉĂƌƚ ƟŵĞ ƐŶŽǁďŝƌĚƐͿ͘ KƌŝŐŝŶĂů ƉƵƌĐŚĂƐĞ ƉƌŝĐĞ ΨϮϲ͕ϬϬϬн ƉĞƐŽƐ͘ EŽǁ

ƉƌŝĐĞĚ ƚŽ ƐĞůů Ăƚ Ψϳ͕ϱϬϬ Žƌ ďĞƐƚ ƌĞĂƐŽŶĂďůĞ ŽĨͲ ĨĞƌ͘tĞǁŽƵůĚůŝŬĞƚŽƐĞůůƚŚŝƐĐŽƵĐŚĂƐĂƉ͘Ăůů͗ ϳϲϲͲϬϯϳϬ͘ WANTED:EĞĞĚůŽĐŬĂďůĞƌŽŽĨƌĂĐŬƐĨŽƌŵLJ ϮϬϬϴEŝƐƐĂŶydƌĂŝů͘/ĂŵĂůƐŽůŽŽŬŝŶŐĨŽƌĂůŽĐŬͲ ĂďůĞ ĂƌŐŽ ĂƌƌŝĞƌ͘ WůĞĂƐĞ ĐĂůů :ŽŚŶ ϯϳϲͲϳϲϲͲ ϭϬϴϳ͘ FOR SALE:WƵƌŝĮĐĂĚŽƌĚĞĂŐƵĂhŶŝůĞǀĞƌWƵͲ ƌĞŝƚ ůĂƐƐŝĐ ϵ ůŝƚƌŽƐ njƵů DŽĚ͘ ϮϭϵϯϯϬ͕ ďŽƵŐŚƚ ŶĞǁ Ăƚ tĂůŵĂƌƚ Ψϭ͕ϰϵϵ &ŝůƚĞƌ Ψϰϵϵ ďŽƚŚ ĨŽƌ ΨϲϬϬƉ&ŝůƚĞƌŝƐďƌĂŶĚŶĞǁĂŶĚŝƚŝƐĂůůŝŶŝƚƐŽƌŝŐŝͲ ŶĂůďŽdž͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE:EŽƌĚŝĐdƌĂĐŬĐŽŵ͘ůůŝƉƟĐĂů͘ŽŵͲ ƉĂĐƚƐƚƌƵĐƚƵƌĞĂŶĚĂŶŝŵƉƌĞƐƐŝǀĞǀĂƌŝĞƚLJŽĨůŽǁͲ ŝŵƉĂĐƚǁŽƌŬŽƵƚŽƉƟŽŶƐ͕ǁŚŝůĞŽǀĞƌƐŝnjĞĚƉĞĚĂůƐ ĐƵƐŚŝŽŶ ĞĂĐŚ ƐƚĞƉ ƚŽ ĂǀŽŝĚ ĨĂƟŐƵĞ ĂŶĚ ŶƵŵďͲ ŶĞƐƐ ŝŶ LJŽƵƌ ĨĞĞƚ͘ &ŝŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƉĞƌĨĞĐƚ Įƚ ǁŝƚŚ ĂŶ ĂĚũƵƐƚĂďůĞƐƚƌŝĚĞůĞŶŐƚŚ͘ǁŝĚĞǀŝĞǁŝŶŐĂŶŐůĞ ŵĂŬĞƐ ŝƚ ĞĂƐLJ ƚŽ ƌĞĂĚ LJŽƵƌ ƐƉĞĞĚ͕ ƟŵĞ͕ ĚŝƐͲ ƚĂŶĐĞ͕ƉƵůƐĞĂŶĚĐĂůŽƌŝĞƐďƵƌŶĞĚ͘ŶŝŵƉƌĞƐƐŝǀĞ ƐŽƵŶĚƐLJƐƚĞŵŬĞĞƉƐLJŽƵŵŽǀŝŶŐ͘WƌŝĐĞ͗Ψϳ͕ϴϬϬ ƉĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͗ϯϳϲͲϳϲϱͲϲϱϬϱ͘ WANTED: WƌĞƉĂƌŝŶŐƚŽŵŽǀĞĂŶĚŶĞĞĚůŽƚƐ ŽĨďŽdžĞƐĂŶĚƉĂĐŬŝŶŐŵĂƚĞƌŝĂů͘Ăůů͗ϳϲϯͲϱϬϴϲ͘ FOR SALE: ϭϴ ďŽƩůĞ ǁŝŶĞ ĐŽŽůĞƌ ĂůŵŽƐƚ ŶĞǁ ĐŽŶĚŝƟŽŶ͘ ϰϭ͟;,Ϳ dž ϭϭ͟;tͿ dž Ϯϭ͟;ĚͿ͘ tŝůů ĚĞůŝǀĞƌ ŝŶ ǀŝĐŝŶŝƚLJ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ ΨϭϱϬ͘ϬϬ h^͘ ͲŵĂŝů Žƌ ƉŚŽŶĞϳϲϲͲϯϴϴϱ͘ FOR SALE:ͲŝŐĂƌĞƩĞŐŽͲŝŐĂƐĞ,ŽůĚͲ Ğƌ WŽƵĐŚ >ĂŶLJĂƌĚ EĞĐŬůĂĐĞ ůĂĐŬ ΨϭϬϬƉ ĞĂĐŚ͘ Ăůů͗ϳϲϱͲϰϱϵϬ͘ FOR SALE: ϭͬϯ ƐŚĂƌĞ ŽĨ tŝŶĚ ZŝĚĞƌ ϭϳDz ƚƌŝŵĂƌĂŶƐĂŝůďŽĂƚ͕ǁŝƚŚƚƌĂŝůĞƌĂŶĚĞůĞĐƚƌŝĐŽƵƚͲ ďŽĂƌĚ ŵŽƚŽƌ͘ &ŽŽƚ ƉĞĚĂů ƐƚĞĞƌŝŶŐ͕ ďĞůŽǁͲƚŚĞͲ ŵ ƐĞĂƟŶŐ͕ ĂŶĚ Ă ĨŽƌǁĂƌĚ ĨĂĐŝŶŐ ĐŽĐŬƉŝƚ͘ WƌŝĐĞ͗ΨϮϯ͕ϬϬϬDyE͘ FOR SALE: dƌĂŝůĞƌ ,ŝƚĐŚ͕ ĂƌƌŝĞƌ͕ ĨŽƌ ďĂĐŬ ŽĨ ĐĂƌ͕ ĨŽůĚƐ ƵƉ ǁŚĞŶ ŶŽƚ ŝŶ ƵƐĞ͕ ŚĞĂǀLJ ĚƵƚLJ ϱϬϬůďƐ͘WƌŝĐĞΨϭ͕ϬϬϬWĞƐŽƐ͘Ăůů͖ϳϲϱͲϰϯϳϵ͘

Saw you in the Ojo 73


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El Ojo del Lago / April 2014



El Ojo del Lago - April 2014