Page 1

SPRING 2019

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1

EW

I

BY

N

OJA

YEARS

VA

S

PUBLISHED FOR

LLE Y

Being Barbara BARBARA HANNIGAN DIRECTS THE 2019 OJAI MUSIC FESTIVAL

PLUS PHOTOJOURNALIST ARTHUR GRACE / OUTBACK LEGENDS / THE MUSINGS OF BILLY MACNEIL / KRISHNAMURTI IN HIS OWN WORDS / CLASSIC SPRING HIKES

VENTURA + SANTA BARBARA + LOS ANGELES + SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTIES


Immaculate & highly upgraded beauty located in very popular Mira Monte neighborhood. With a remarkably private almost half acre lot, the 3 large bed, 2 bathhome has been expanded and beautifully updated! $789,000

Haven’t found THE ONE?

Call us at 805.620.2438 to learn more about our upcoming listings.

Cal DRE #01906376

2

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


805.620.2438 ojaihomes4sale.com

With a perfect blend of relaxed refinement, this sophisticated Mediterranean single story enjoys one of Saddle Mountain’s most aesthetic settings. $1,595,000

Quintessential East End 1 Bedroom Cottage plus huge detached studio on private, wooded 3/4 acre lot. First time on market in 48 years! $1,249,000

Prime East End location with all the bells and whistles! Sitting on nearly 1 acre this 5 bed, 3 bath home offers a glistening pool, horse corral, and a variety of fruit trees! $1,495,000

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

3


4

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


FINE JEWELRY 453 East Ojai Avenue • (805) 646-1997 • Hrs: 11am - 6pm Thurs - SatVOLUME • susancummings.com 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019 5


106+ Acre Country Retreat with Mountain and Lake Views, Horse Facilities & Exquisite, Custom, Stone House www.LuckyQRanchOjai.com Price Upon Request

36-Acre Upper Ojai Ranch with Caretaker’s House, Guest Quarters, Saloon, Rec. Building, and Amazing Views www.OjaiParadiseRanch.com $3,299,000

4 BR + 3BA Ranch-Style Home on Five Acres with 2 BR Guest House. www.1175CamilleDrive.com $1,639,000

6

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

CalBRE# 01046067

Remodeled 4 BR + 2.5 BA Farmhouse on 3+ Acres with Guest House, Barn, Solar Panels and Orchard www.990LomaDrive.com $1,587,500


277+ Acre Ranch with 5 Houses, Horse Facilities, Stunning Views & More. www.29443hwy33.com $6,250,000

5 Bedroom Horse Property with Guest House, Pool, Horse Facilities and Views www.1577KenewaStreet.com $2,650,000

3 BR, 3 BA Ventura home with fireplace, formal dining room, Italian tile floors. $779,900

Rare opportunity to buy Gateway Plaza! Oak View shopping center with long-term occupants, large parking lot and great location. $1,679,000

Kellye Lynn 805-798-0322 CalBRE# 01962469

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

7


8

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


portraits on paper

Alberto Giacometti

March 15 – June 16 2019

canvas and paper

311 N. Montgomery Street

Thursday – Sunday noon – 5pm

canvasandpaper.org

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

9


A LIGHT UNTO OURSELVES

PUBLISHED SINCE 1982 BY THE OJAI VALLEY NEWS

S

mall-town living, Ojai living — why do people come here? To breathe, to experience one day at a time, to live presently, to understand and be understood, to respect and listen, to parent, to live with intention. To get the chance to know our neighbors, with the promise of being surrounded by quiet beauty to experience ourselves — you know, the same reasons people live anywhere. One strand of Ojai’s rich DNA is philosopher Jiddu Krishnamurti, who came to Ojai in 1922. His influence continued in the generations that have come after. To understand the spiritual essence of Ojai — what makes this town special — an exploration of Krishnamurti’s ideas is essential. Rather than encourage followers, Krishnamurti taught that we must become “a light unto ourselves.” As the Krishnamurti Foundation of America celebrates 50 years in Ojai, it shares a timely sample of Krishnamurti’s writing. Noted American photojournalist Arthur Grace recently made Ojai his home. Please welcome our new neighbor and get the inside scoop behind the lens of some of his most famous photographs during historic political and social times in America. After winning Olympic silver in 1960, diver Paula Jean Pope and husband Karl moved to Ojai and established the Ojai Valley Athletic Club in 1976. What drove the four-time Olympic medalist and mother of five, Paula Jean, to accomplish so much? Learn from reporter Austin Widger. Ojai’s original mountain men were the forest rangers who rode, rescued, fought grizzlies, settled disputes and put out fires “when this country was a howling wilderness.” Who were these men? Reporter Perry Van Houten digs into Ojai’s backcountry legends, revealing the intertwined tales of three rangers from the days when Ojai was truly wild. Once you are ready for your own trek, Perry’s new spring wildflower and hiking guides will keep you informed on your own wilderness adventure. We welcome the new age of cannabis in California and Ojai is a part of that with three local dispensaries. Perhaps you are CBD curious? Writer Alicia Doyle helps navigate the local offerings for healing with the once-forbidden plant extract. The sounds of passion from worldrenowned soprano and conductor Barbara Hannigan will ring through Libbey Bowl for the 79th Ojai Music Festival in June. Karen Lindell digs into what ignites her brilliant flame in OVG’s cover story.

L AURA REARWIN WARD publisher@ojaivalleynews.com 10

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

While there are as many versions of the “real Ojai” as there are people in it, divisions and unnecessary attachments are sources of conflict. How may we live differently? That question leads to a journey, not a path, we few in Ojai travel in parallel. So, bring your Guide; read and discover what our locals have learned along their way.

EDITOR & PUBLISHER Laura Rearwin Ward

CONTRIBUTORS

Perry Van Houten • Austin Widger Arthur Grace • Karen Lindell • Alicia Doyle Richard Camp • Cynthia Grier Richard LaPlante • Elizabeth Memel Jim Churchill • Randy Graham Drew Mashburn • Fred Drennan

ART DIRECTOR Paul Stanton

ASSISTANT EDITORS

Marianne Ratcliff • Linda Griffin Georgia Schreiner

ADVERTISING

Linda Snider • Katrina MacLachlan

PRODUCTION Billy MacNeil

CIRCULATION Ally Mills

BUSINESS MANAGER Jodie Miller

CONTACT US

team@ojaivalleynews.com Phone: 805.646.1476 Fax: 805.646.4281 101 Vallerio Avenue Ojai, California 93023 © 2019 Downhome Publishing

This Edition: Barbara Hannigan directs the Ojai Music Festival.

OJAIVALLEYNEWS.COM


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

11


PERALTA

R E A L E S TAT E TEAM

Stylish and spacious mid-town Ventura cottage

Arbolada home~2 houses and charm galore!

Gorgeous view lot with privacy and mature trees

Small & sweet 1 bedroom condo with yard

Rachelle Giuliani, Serena Handley & Tonya Peralta ILiveinOjai.com | (805) 794-7458 | Team@PeraltaTeam.com 12

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


...for boutique sty le service

@PeraltaTeamOjai

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019 13 BRE #01862743


OUTDOORS EDUCATION

Krishnamurti, in His Own Words - 34 Becoming a Parent While Growing Yourself - 40

SHOPPING

Stopping Points - 47

ARTS & CULTURE Cover Story: Becoming Barbara -54 The Musings of MacNeil - 62 Artists and Gallery Directory - 72

OUR PEOPLE

Olympic Diver Paula Jean Pope - 68 The Art of Grace: Photojournalist Arthur Grace - 82

FOOD & WINE

Sage Mindful Meals - 74 The Feros Ferio Winery - 92 Dining & Tasting Directory -102

HEALTH & MINDFULNESS

Breathe Ojai - 104 Cannabis Curious - 108 Mindfulness & Healing Directory - 113

ACTIVITIES

Three Classic Ojai Spring Hikes -114 Earth Day in Libbey Park -118 Calendar of Events - 124

LIFESTYLE

Between Megalopolis and Wilderness - 134 The Farmhouse Revealed -144

COLUMNS

Look Back in Ojai - 154 Worried in Ojai -159 Real Estate - 147

REAL ESTATE - 146 ADVERTISER INDEX - 161 14

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

SPRING 2019

Outback Legends - 18 Wildflowers of Spring - 26

68

82 99 54 134 74 34


L ov i n g l y h a n d c ra f te d i n O j a i , C A Jes MaHarry Store ~ 316 East Ojai Avenue, Ojai California 93023

www.jesmaharry.com ~ 877.728.5537 ~ jesmaharryjewelry

Photo by: Rylann Smith VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

15


G R A N D OPENING Saturday, March 30, 5 - 9 pm

OVER 50 ARTISTS LIVE JAZZ 214 E OJAI AVE OJAI CA 93023 OPEN 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM MONDAY - SUNDAY CLOSED ON TUESDAY

714- 369 - 9869 Brittany@BrittanyDavisGallery.com Follow us @brittanydavisgallery

BRITTANY DAVIS GALLERY FALL IN LOVE WITH ART

16

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

www.BrittanyDavisGallery.com


e l y t s e f i L a e t a e Cr OVAC is more than just a gym. Our top-notch trainers & nutritionists provide programs to bring you and your family everything you need to create a fun, healthy lifestyle.

• NEW Upstairs Fitness Area • 10 Tennis Hard Courts and 2 Clay Courts • Aquatics Program for Juniors and Adults • 70+ Weekly Group Fitness Classes • Personal Training and Small Group Training • Cafe with Local Produce and Recovery Shakes Call Ojai Valley Athletic Club Today (805) 646-7213

409 S. FOX ST. (805) 646-7213 OVAC.CACLUBS.COM

OWNED & OPERATED BY CALIFORNIA ATHLETIC CLUBS • CACLUBS.COM

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

17


Jacinto Damien Reyes (1871-1953) was a forest ranger of the highest order. “J.D.,� as he was known throughout the Ojai backcountry, could do it all - ride, put out fires, perform rescues, and settle disputes between homesteaders, ranchers and miners that occasionally turned violent.

Forest rangers Howard Bald (right) and Jacinto Reyes (second from right) on a camping trip in the Ojai backcountry, in 1906 or 1907.

18

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Outback Legends Story by Perry Van Houten

The first Hispanic to be appointed a U.S. Forest Service ranger on a permanent basis, he served for 31 years as one of the first rangers on what became the Los Padres National Forest. “When I came here, this country was a howling wilderness,” Reyes wrote. “It was infested with wolves, coyotes and grizzly bears.” Jacinto’s father, Rafael, was a rancher, and a grizzly running amok on a rancher’s livestock could do considerable damage. The Reyes family originally owned the Triunfo Ranch, a Spanish grant near present-day Calabasas, but in 1854 a lack of feed from a severe drought

Among the ranch’s many distinguished visitors was former President Theodore Roosevelt. The Jacinto Reyes Scenic Byway (Highway 33 north of Ojai), Reyes Peak and Reyes Creek are all named for Jacinto or his father. In those days, homesteaders, cattlemen and miners were recruited to become rangers, who had to provide their own quarters, gear and own at least two horses. Their monthly salary was $60. There was no health plan. Rangers were deputies and game wardens, responsible for trail building and maintenance, investigating homesteads and mines, granting grazing

“He was not afraid of any bear that ever lived...” convinced Rafael and his brothers to drive their 3,000 head of livestock to the Cuyama Valley, 30 miles north of Ojai, where they established a ranch. In 1870, Rafael married Maria Ortega, and the couple settled in Ventura, where they lived for 20 years until Maria’s health failed. Believing the climate of the Cuyama Valley could be the cure, the family relocated to the Reyes Creek Ranch. Jacinto, the eldest of 10 children, became a forest ranger in 1900. He operated out of the ranch as the first ranger on the Cuyama District of the Santa Barbara National Forest, then headquartered in Nordhoff, which became Ojai in 1917.

permits and putting out fires — all while dodging grizzlies. Jacinto’s uncle, Ramon Ortega, was well known for his exploits with the brutes. His favorite sport was tying them up. “He was not afraid of any bear that ever lived,” wrote Reyes. Armed with only a six-shooter and a lariat, Ortega would disappear into a canyon and re-emerge two hours later half-dragging, half-leading one of the biggest grizzlies Reyes had ever seen. When he was 9, Reyes witnessed a fight between a grizzly and a bull, a contest staged by Uncle Ramon at the Reyes Creek Ranch. The bull won. Ortega ran a large ranch on the upper VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

19


Sespe at Potrero Seco. Ortega Hill and the Ortega Trail, an important winter route into the backcountry before Highway 33 was built, are named for him. In 1914, at the age of 82, Ortega died when his horse fell off a steep trail, plunging him into the creek bed below. J.D. Reyes rode all night, 28 miles, to the site of the tragedy. Uncle Ramon had always said that if he died in the backcountry, he did not want to be thrown over the back of a horse

For days, he lay, bloody and bruised, his faithful dogs providing his only solace. like a dead deer, so Reyes packed him into the saddle of the gentlest horse he could find, sitting in an upright position. Pounding rain, thunder and lightning made for a miserable ride home. In 1896, Reyes figured in what may have been the last known battle between man and grizzly. As documented in Charles Outland’s “Mines, Murders & Grizzlies,” one day Reyes came upon a sheepherder who’d been badly mauled and would have been killed had it not been for his dogs, which came to his defense. For days, he lay, bloody and bruised, his faithful dogs providing his only solace. “The very source of this story makes it unimpeachable, Jacinto Reyes later being a forest ranger of the highest integrity,” wrote Outland. Reyes and his brother, Geraldo, also a forest ranger, would go on weeklong camping trips with George Bald (1864-1948), who became a ranger in 1903 and was the chief ranger in the Ojai area for more than 20 years. Bald Street in Ojai is named after him.

Jacinto Damien “J.D.” Reyes.

20

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Bald’s son, Howard, followed in his father’s footsteps and served as Ojai’s chief ranger for many years.


Left: Howard Bald on horseback, circa 1916. Like his father George, Howard was an early Ojai forest ranger. VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

21


As a small boy, Howard listened to fanfantastic stories about the exploits of backcountry men like Jeff Howard, who murdered a Basque sheepherder in a feud near his Rose Valley ranch, then twice escaped from jail.

Howard Bald earned a degree in agriculture from the University of California at Davis. He planted a grove of Coulter pines above The Thacher School that became “The Pines Campground,” taking water to the seedlings on horseback, in saddlebags. Bald led camping trips into the backcountry for visitors staying at the Foothills Hotel, and every so often took famed mystery writer Erle Stanley Gardner on hunting trips into the mountains. In the 1970s, Bald wrote a series of 22

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

articles for the Ojai Valley News titled “Reminiscences of Early Ojai,” in which he wondered how the early rangers were able to fight fires with such limited manpower and equipment. “Of course, there were no telephones at first, no lookout stations, no airplanes or helicopters,

or radios, and but few trails. Sometimes a ranger would ride a day or more to get to a fire,” Bald wrote in the March 28, 1973, edition of the OVN. Usually, a ranger’s tools for fighting a wildfire amounted to only an axe, a shovel and burlap sacks to wet down and slip over the head of the shovel to stamp out the flames. These tough, dedicated men — “real westerners,” as Bald called them — so inspired the locals that in 1909 they

adopted “Nordhoff Rangers” as the mascot for the new high school. “With Nordhoff the National Forest headquarters, and since the only means of getting about was via saddle and pack horses, there was a great deal of forestry activity in the valley, that is, mountain men coming and going. A more rugged, hardy,

self-sufficient, picturesque group of men would be hard to imagine,” Bald wrote. On the headwaters of Sespe Creek, near what is now the Chorro Grande Trailhead, lived a man known as “The Sage of the Sespe.” Frank D. Felt wore many hats in his 77 years of life — poet, actor, Ortega Chile Company salesman, soldier and inn manager. Felt developed a serious stomach


Ortega Chile founder Emilio Charles Ortega mentioned to Felt, his nephew, a forest ranger named J.D. Reyes, so Felt rode horseback to the Reyes adobe and from there the two men rode into the upper Sespe. In 1915, Felt homesteaded 160 acres on both sides of Sespe Creek and built a cabin on the mesa, which he jokingly referred to as “the poorhouse.” Out in “the sticks,” Felt’s health improved and many solitary hours were spent farming, “grubbing” brush and writing poems. He served in the U.S. Army in 1918 and 1919, before returning to the mountains. It was a lonely life, until the day Miss Ella Eggen arrived. Frank and Ella fell in love at the Ramona Pageant in the Hemet area. Felt played Father Salvedierra in the outdoor play, from its inception in 1923 until 1946. “He would travel to Idyllwild in the winter months, where he was manager of the Idyllwild Inn, and Ella saw him performing,” Hicks said. Felt believed no woman would want to leave the city for the wilderness, but he was proved wrong one day

Photos courtesy Ojai Valley Museum

ailment, and in 1914 was told by doctors to flee the stressful world of business. “He was told to go to the mountains to live,” said Pardner Hicks, who bought the former Felt property in 1979.

when a team of four horses arrived, packing a minister, a witness, Ella and all her gear. The couple lived a happy, secluded life, which Felt described in his poetry. “She lived the stories and colored the sunsets,” said Hicks. Felt published his poems in two books, “Songs of the Sespe” and “Sunset in the Sespe.” He mounted the poems in frames he made from native wood and sold them at Wheeler Hot Springs. In 1958, the Felts traded the ranch for property in Oxnard and said farewell to their mountain home. Twenty years later, Hicks bought the old Felt place and established the Chorro Grande Pack Station, leading horseback riders into the forest until 1992. “When I bought the ranch, I lived in the Felt homestead, which was adobe and wood construction, most of it native wood, like manzanita cabinets,” Hicks recalled. “It was quite a thrill to live in a home that somebody wrote poems about, while living in the home.” The cabin was destroyed in the Wolf

Fire in 2002, which started a couple of miles away, on property homesteaded by Warren Felt, Frank’s brother. A fenced-off cabin along Highway 33, just south of the former Felt homestead, is sometimes mistaken for the Felt cabin. Built on Felt’s property, it was the caretaker’s residence, explained Hicks. Hicks, 64, who today resides in Atascadero, says the lives of many who called the Ojai backcountry home, including Frank and Ella Felt, were once documented in a photo album he remembers seeing years ago. Its whereabouts are unknown, he said. “If somebody could find out what happened to that photo album, it is a treasure for the county.”

Now, ‘tis sunset in the Sespe, and the day is nearly done. Sands are sifting through the hourglass, each grain drops one by one. And streams of flaming tinsel and their mystery to the skies, As fantastic colored billions march before my wistful eyes. From “Sunset in the Sespe”

Far Left: A 1914 photo by Ventura mystery writer Erle Stanley Gardner, showing forest rangers Bill Herbert (left) and Howard Bald at Pine Mountain Lodge. Above: George Bald, center. Left: Frank and Ella Felt in the late 1950s, following their move to Oxnard. (Photo courtesy the Ramona Pageant) VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

23


Your chance to own 380 acres of Ojai history

1986 Lockwood Valley Road, Maricopa, CA 93252 CalDRE#01988887

An

Outback Legend

380 acres zoned Ventura County OS (Open Space). Historic Reyes Adobe, multiple wells, seasonal pond and rivers, and access to multiple power poles for electricity.Large flat land areas make the perfect potential for residential development, recreational land, livestock raising, agriculture, and use

for wind or solar energy. Also included is a 3,800 Sq.Ft. home that consists of 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Located next to Camp Scheideck and off of Lockwood Valley Road. Subdivided into multiple parcels for your development. This property has road frontage access, backs the national forest, and allows for privacy. Priced to sell at $3,610,000.

Mary Owens

Cell (661) 645-0473 Fax (661) 245-2055 fphomesforsale.com mary@fphomesforsale.com

MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES

24

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Local, Handcrafted and Fair-Trade Goods

327 E. OJAI AVE.

Shop at figojai.com

Ojai Curated Lifestyle Home • Baby • Gift

109 N. Montgomery St, Ojai Shop online at figojai.com

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

25


Drive any road or hike any trail in and around the Ojai Valley this time of year and you’ll see them: local blooms - wildflowers and native flowering plants - springing up in abundance and exploding in color. 26

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Words and pictures by Perry Van Houten

Flower

Power O

jai Valley Land Conservancy nursery manager Ron Singer says there are plenty of places in the Ojai area to get your flower power. “The Ventura River Preserve is fabulous in terms of different types of wildflowers,” he said.

Among the more common blooms is the California poppy, the official state flower since 1903. “Our local Ojai poppies are more yellow than the traditional orange you would see in a wildflower seed packet,” Singer said. The petals of this showy, drought-tolerant plant close at night and during cloudy, cold or windy weather. If there’s one wildflower you’ll find on every single trail in Ojai, Singer said, it’s brodiaea, more commonly called “blue dicks.” “You’ll find them six months out of the year,” he said. Indian paintbrush, also known as “prairie fire,” is one of the bestrecognized western wildflowers, according to Singer. “It’s a very common flower you’ll find on most trails.” Related to the paintbrush, the gorgeous owl’s clover provides a bright splash of purple and pink and blooms from March to May. Other common blooms include elegant Clarkia, “one I generally find on most trails in Ojai,” Singer said. “We have a lot of different types of lupine. On any given day, you could probably find six different species.” Commonly seen in the valley but often a bit more elusive in the backcountry is the “Queen of the California Wildflowers,” the Matilija poppy. “It’s not something you’d see necessarily on every trail. You need to know where to find them.” North of Ojai, in Lockwood Valley, you may encounter the bristly Matilija poppy, distinguished by its hairy sepals and smaller flowers. With an aroma that means “canyon,” the sages grow in arid habitats and come in white, purple and black. Hummingbird sage comes out VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

27


.

..

... ............. ....

.. ... ..

.

..

E G

. ..

..

... ..........

....

...

..

A

..... ..

..

....

............

.... ..

..

..

.....

.............

.

.. ...

...

..

..

.

..

.

..............

..

. ...

... ..

..

..

..

..............

. . . Y E L LO

....

W

...

M

.

SA

R

.

L I LY . . . . . . . . . . . A .. S

..

....

.

... .

..

.

..

...

..............

.

..

..

.

.

...

A P OPPY

..

O

IJ

..

M

.......

IP

..

.....

...

..

.

.... ..

IL

T

V

.... ..

.......... .

...

..

....

A

. . . O W L’ S C LO

.....

....

.......H .... U

...

M

...

..

...

..............

..

.

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

.

. ...

ER

..

B

It’s hard to say what makes a banner year for blooms, according to Singer. “It’s kind of random, what makes a good year for some things and not for others. I would say, overall, some nicely spaced rain certainly helps,” he said.

..

.

........

...

There’s another plant you’ll want to avoid on your flower tour — poison oak. Its bright-green leaves (in spring) and twigs have an oily surface that can cause itching and a serious rash. Remember: “Leaves of three, let it be.”

T L I LY . . . . . ... LD O

.....

..

California goldfields, baby blue eyes, blue larkspur and red maids are other fairly common wildflowers with names that suggest spectacular color.

On hillsides burned in the Thomas Fire, fire followers such as large-flowered phacelia, Humboldt lily and fire poppy can reappear for a few seasons. Many species that are always present are much more abundant after a fire. These include California poppy, Matilija poppy, white fairy lantern and

. ...

..

.. ... ...

..

.

.......

.

.. E

poodle-dog bush, which can cause severe skin irritation if touched.

28

.......

..

...............

..

.....

... ..

..................

... ..

....

. ....... ........

...

.. ...

...

...

..

in the spring. You’ll find it in shady areas along the trail,” Singer said.

Endemic to the Ojai area and quite uncommon is the unusual-looking Ojai fritillary, “which most people won’t be able to find, but it sure is pretty. That’s one I only find reliably on the Gridley Trail,” Singer said.

..

...

.. PU

L RP

...

..

..

...

..

..

..

E ..... .

...

...

UPIN

L ...

...

...

..

...................

..

..

..

...

... ...


.

. ..

.. ...

... .... .............

Y

. ...

. ..

.

..

..

.. ...

.

..

.

.. ...............

. ...

E

.

C

..

A EG

EL

.

...

............

.

... ..

..

...

......

..

.............

.

......

T NER’S LE

TU

..

.

IL

... ...

MI

..

..

.

.

. ...

. ...

... ..........

.....

.

.

... ..

...

...

..

......

.

..........

........

..

...........

.....

.. ...

...

....

...

.........

... ..

..

.

..

.

..

.....................

... .

.

..

...

...........

...

...

.........

....

..

...

..

....

..

...

.. ..

...

...

..

FA

. . . . . . . . . .P .H.O.T O E . . . LIS . . .A N .

.

IA . . . . . .

..

....

... ...

.. .. ..

........

.... ..

. ..

.....

....

...

...

...

.. ...

.......

... ... .

C

RK LA

..

... ...

.....

...

..

.. N

T

...

...

..

..

..

...............

..

E ..............

...

... .

DRAGON

..

ISTL

..........

............

AP

....... .

TH

......

.

...

N

. C AL IF

IA

... L

..

S

....

RN

...

..

.............

O

..

..............

.

..

..

.. ..

S

..

K .....

..

..

. ...

... ...

. BLU E DIC

...

I F RI TIL LARY

..

R TA

.

J

...

......

..

.

A

..

. ...

S

.... ..

O

..

....

.

........

......... .... ..

.........

..

......

....

.

......

...

...

..

...

..

..

.. ...

.

..

..

IL

.................

...

RY

...

. ..

V

.. ...

..

L

E

..

I

ERN .. ANT

LE

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

29


2 Unique Boutique Inns

Ojai

30

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


• • • • • • • •

Spa Memberships Radiant Facials Therapeutic Massage Body Treatments Foot & Hand Services Pre-wedding Day Escapes Far-infared Sauna Spa Day Packages

“Relaxation At It’s Finest” “I live over an hour away from Ojai, but I’ve heard rave reviews from many people regarding this spa. My experience was nothing short of amazing, blissful, relaxing and peaceful. The prices are competitive and they do offer specials.” Malibu, California

“Amazing-The Best Spa I Have Ever Gone To!” “I have been to many Top End Spas in this country and abroad, this was the best facial and massage I have ever gotten.” Long Beach, California

805.640.1100 • 209 Montgomery Street • thedayspa.com VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

31


32

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


SUNSET SCHOOL K-8 A Ventura Unified School District campus serving Kindergarten through 8th grade

A California Gold Ribbon

Model School

A Title 1 Academic Achievement Award A California Green Ribbon

School

Award School

400 Sunset Ave. Oak View, Ca. 93022 (805)649-6600 www.venturausd.org/sunset 1960 Cate Mesa Road • Carpinteria, CA • 93014

Schedule a Tour Today!

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

33


Krishnamurti

34

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


T

he Krishnamurti Foundation of America (KFA) is celebrating its 50th Anniversary. Founded by J. Krishnamurti and a small group of trustees in 1969, the KFA continues to preserve, protect and disseminate Krishnamurti’s teachings. The KFA oversees an adult education center, including an archive; historic Pine Cottage library and Peppertree Retreat; and founded Oak Grove School in 1975. The KFA joins three other foundations around the world—in the UK, Asia, and Spain—to support education, maintain archives, and ensure Krishnamurti’s teachings are still available and more widely read than ever. Jiddu Krishnamurti and his brother, Nityananda, came to the Ojai Valley in 1922 as guests of Theosophist Mary Gray who owned several cottages off McAndrew Road. Krishnamurti fell in love with the valley, and “Pine Cottage” became his home for the next 64 years. Over the years, Krishnamurti gave hundreds of talks at “the Oak Grove” in Meiners Oaks, which drew thousands of listeners to Ojai each year. He established two schools in the valley and a learning center in the East End. Many of those who came to Krishnamurti’s Ojai talks stayed on, either as residents of the valley or as frequent visitors. These included Annie Besant, Beatrice

“Each time you come to this quiet, peaceful valley there is a feeling of strange aloofness, of deep silence and the vast spreading of slow time.” Wood, Monica Ros, Alan and Helen Hooker, Aldous Huxley, Jackson Pollack, David Bohm, and many others. The entire Krotona Colony followed him to Ojai from Hollywood in 1924. Though Krishnamurti seldom participated in local affairs or attended community events, he was often seen walking in the East End, hiking in the mountains, and playing golf or tennis. Occasionally, he would attend a movie at the Ojai Theater or eat dinner at the Ranch House restaurant. Today, 33 years after his death, articles written about the Ojai Valley still mention Krishnamurti’s importance in establishing the intellectual, cultural, and spiritual climate of the community. Most Ojai residents and visitors are aware that an important philosopher named Krishnamurti once lived here; fewer, however, have read his books or studied his teachings. Those who have taken the time to read his teachings find they are

as relevant today as when Krishnamurti was alive. Krishnamurti on the Ojai Valley In a book entitled Krishnamurti To Himself, he describes the experience of arriving back in the Ojai Valley after a long absence. The passages below give the reader a spectacular view of the Ojai Valley—and of human life as seen through the eyes of Krishnamurti. “You have been there for the last sixty years, and each time you are astonished to enter into this valley. It is quiet, almost untouched by man. You enter into this valley which is almost like a vast cup, a nest. Then you leave the little village and climb to about 1,400 feet, passing rows and rows of orange orchards and groves. The air is perfumed with orange blossom. The whole valley is filled with that scent. And the smell of it is in your mind, in your heart, in your whole body. It is the most extraordinary feeling of living in a perfume that will last for about three weeks or more.

in h is ow n wo rd s

“And there is a quietness in the mountains, a dignity. And each time you look at those hills and the high mountain, which is over 6,000 feet, you are really surprised that such a country exists. Each time you come to this quiet, peaceful valley there is a feeling of strange aloofness, of deep silence and the vast spreading of slow time. “Man is trying to spoil the valley but it has been preserved. And the mountains that morning were extraordinarily beautiful. You could almost touch them. The majesty, the vast sense of permanency is there in them. And you enter quietly into the house where you have lived for over sixty years and the atmosphere, the air, is, if one can use that word, holy; you can feel it. You can almost touch it. As it has rained considerably, for it is the rainy season, all the hills and the little folds of the mountain are green, flourishing, full - the earth is smiling with such delight, with some deep quiet understanding of its own existence.” Later in the book, Krishnamurti describes a morning at his home. “It was really a most lovely clear beautiful morning. There was dew on every leaf. And as the sun rose slowly, quietly spreading over the beautiful land, there was great peace in this valley. The trees were full of oranges, small ones but

by The Krishnamurti Foundation of America 50th Anniversary Committee VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

35


many. Gradually the sun lit every tree and every orange. When you sat on that veranda overlooking the valley, there were the long shadows of the morning. The shadow is as beautiful as the tree. We wanted to go out, not in a car, but out among the trees, smell the fresh air and the scent of many oranges and the flowers, and hear the sound of the earth.” After a hike up the mountain behind Pine Cottage, probably following Horn Canyon Trail, Krishnamurti describes the spectacular view and an observation about humanity’s relationship with the earth: “Over the hills in the far distance was the wide, shining, sparkling sea. We have broken up the earth as yours and mine - your nation, my nation, your flag and his flag, this particular religion and the religion of the distant man. The world, the earth, is divided, broken up. And for it we fight and wrangle, and the politicians exult in their power to maintain this division, never looking at the world as a whole. They haven’t got the global mind. They never feel nor ever perceive the immense possibility of having no nationality, no division, they can never perceive the ugliness of their power, their position and their sense of importance. They are like you or another, only they occupy the seat of power with their petty little desires and ambitions, and so maintain apparently, as long as man has been on this earth, the tribal attitude towards life. They don’t have a mind that is 36

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

not committed to any issue, to any ideals, ideologies - a mind that steps beyond the division of race, culture, that the religious man has invented.” Krishnamurti travelled extensively during his lifetime, giving talks to millions around the world. His home in Ojai’s orange groves was where he came to rest and reflect on life. In 1985 while on a speaking tour of India, Krishnamurti fell ill. He made the long, difficult trip back to Ojai so he could live out his final days in the valley where he lived for nearly 64 years. He died at Pine Cottage on February 17, 1986. Krishnamurti On the Core of His Teachings In 1980, Krishnamurti’s biographer, Mary Lutyens, asked Krishnamurti to write down what he considered to be the core of his teachings. What follows is what he wrote: The core of Krishnamurti’s teaching is contained in the statement he made in 1929 when he said ‘Truth is a pathless land.’ “Man cannot come to it through any organization, through any creed, through

any dogma, priest or ritual, not through any philosophical knowledge or psychological technique. He has to find it through the mirror of relationship, through the understanding of the contents of his own mind, through observation and not through intellectual analysis or introspective dissection. “Man has built in himself images as a fence of security— religious, political, personal. These manifest as symbols, ideas, beliefs. The burden of these images dominates man’s thinking, his relationships, and his daily life. These images are the causes of our problems for they divide man from man. His perception of life is shaped by the concepts already established in his mind. The content of his consciousness is his entire existence. The individuality is the name, the form and superficial culture he acquires from tradition and environment. The uniqueness of man does not lie in the superficial but in complete freedom from the content of his consciousness, which is common to all humanity. So he is not an individual. “Freedom is not a reaction; freedom is not choice. It is

man’s pretense that because he has choice he is free. Freedom is pure observation without direction, without fear of punishment and reward. Freedom is without motive; freedom is not at the end of the evolution of man but lies in the first step of his existence. In observation one begins to discover the lack of freedom. Freedom is found in the choiceless awareness of our daily existence and activity. “Thought is time. Thought is born of experience and knowledge, which are inseparable from time and the past. Time is the psychological enemy of man. Our action is based on knowledge and therefore time, so man is always a slave to the past. Thought is ever limited and so we live in constant conflict and struggle. There is no psychological evolution. When man becomes aware of the movement of his own thoughts, he will see the division between the thinker and thought, the observer and the observed, the experiencer and the experience. He will discover that this division is an illusion. Then only is there pure observation which is insight without any shadow of the past or of time. This timeless insight brings about a deep, radical mutation in the mind. “Total negation is the essence of the positive. When there is negation of all those things that thought has brought about psychologically, only then is there love, which is compassion and intelligence.”


To learn more about the KFA’s 50th Anniversary and read about the various events associated with its celebration, visit the KFA’s website at www.kfa.org.

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

37


THERE ARE SO MANY

REASONS TO BE

GRATEFUL

for Oak Grove School, but preserving an environment for students to ask the deepest and most formidable questions is at the top of that list; to directly confront fear, loneliness, self awareness and love; to flower from a deep truth within. Oak Grove’s expansive wooded campus and community of adults (parents, teachers, staff) support a safe space for deep inquiry, affectionate communication, and openness in the face of challenge, all while infusing our days with a sense of ease and joyfulness. DAY & BOARDING PRESCHOOL—HIGH SCHOOL FOUNDED BY J. KRISHNAMURTI

OAK GROVE SCHOOL The Art of Living and Learning

38

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

LEARN MORE OAKGROVESCHOOL.ORG


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

39


Becoming a parent Story by Elizabeth Memel

D

o you have to be a grown-up to raise a baby? The answer is: it depends on you. In order to ultimately become grown-ups raising children, adults will have to face their own egos’ struggle for superiority and control that they encountered when they were very young and so much weaker than their authoritarian parents. How and when might that evolve? When humans face their own early childhood suffering during the new stage called parenthood, they can be liberated if their blinders and kneejerk responses get removed. Then, parents may see their own offspring differently, honoring their child as an equal member in relationships. Thus, the natural integrity of infants can powerfully help form their lives. But the truth is, babies have this overwhelming effect on us. They enchant and touch us profoundly. Our own kin awaken indescribable emotions in us. We look at them peacefully asleep, their closed eyes rendering ease, or open and focused on our own eyes, rendering deep connections we hardly knew existed. Everyone wants to give babies attention, but what do babies have to pay attention to? First and foremost, themselves and what their own bodies are signaling. We’re all about putting on their shirts, diapering their bottoms, touching them with unconscious hands that they surely detect are less than present. We move them around, failing to notice that babies have a point of view, treating them more like objects than humans. Children have been objectified for generations, as evidenced by the popularity of “tiger moms” and others of that ilk. A question for all the ages: What has happened to the children? Who is taking care of them with authenticity as they begin their journey? Focus on raising yourself and your baby (and if there is one, the professional nanny in your family). Child development and adult development ideally happen in tandem when you choose methods from your inner mindful consciousness that can be tapped by finding like-minded people to support and care together.

40

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

WHILE GROWING YOURSELF


By committing to sharing the opportunity, we may see infants with new eyes. When babies are seen as competent human beings, they can be given choices, learning to become “active participants, rather than passive recipients,” as my teacher, renowned infant specialist and author Magda Gerber, described as the process of early autonomous development. Gerber, who passed away in 2007, was the founder of Resources for Infant Educarers (RIE) an organization that teaches her “Educaring ideas.” A father of a 6-month-old was awed by his son when a new kind of diapering experience was encouraged by “Educaring.” Instead of struggling to control the action, having to exert some force, Dad took a slower approach by respectfully asking his boy to lift up his legs to help his father clean his bottom. The baby’s very first response was enthusiastic cooperation, followed by more involvement in their caring relationship via more co-determination. Through humanized caregiving eyes and hearts, parent and child became educated, forming values of care and regard for themselves, each other and beyond. The simple act of diapering changed much more than just the diaper. Midcentury philosopher Martin Buber described the difference between the concepts of “I and you” and “I and it,” explaining that the emphasis on the latter creates a lack of contentedness so prevalent in our digitized society, which has put us all at risk. Instead of cultivating disempowering dependency and submission in their children, which can form unhealthy patterns of learned helplessness, parents can find ways to generate empathy and contentedness. Feeling understood is great preparation for understanding others. Put-downs and shaming are common types of emotional bullying that can beget more bullies. Parents cannot claim to be innocent bystanders to their children’s antisocial behaviors, including racism. “Kids will be kids” just doesn’t fly when children’s voices scream for caring attention and autonomy. When in life do we humans first buy into power struggles? Could it be when we were being diapered and disciplined? You can learn to establish respectful relationships for your loved ones from birth, with healthy patterns of mutuality. RIEcertified Parent-Infant Guidance family support groups are one of many ways to begin the new awareness of liberating growth for all participants. A guiding principle in RIE is: “When allowed to unfold on their own and in their own time, children discover, manifest and inspire the best in themselves and in others.” Elizabeth Memel, M.A., RIE Associate and student of early childhood educator Magda Gerber, has facilitated learning for those caring for babies for more than three decades. She is certified to teach the “Before Baby” and “Nurturing Nanny” courses taught in Upper Ojai. Inquire at lizmemel@ authenticbabies.com; www.rie.org. VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

41


Open Enrollment Starting March 2019

noahsarkpreschoolojai.com | 805 646 8745

42

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

43


An Ojai tradition for over 50 years 302 W. Matilija Street (805)646-3755 9:30 - Sunset daily

www.bartsbooksojai.com 44

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Sustainable Style

for Personal Well-being and a Healthy Planet

Organic and natural mattresses, organic cotton sheets, duvet covers, blankets, baby clothes, women’s clothing, wool pillows, comforters and toppers.

147 W. El Roblar Dr., Ojai • 805.640.3699 Open Tues-Sat 11-5

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

45


Kids Suits

46

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


1

Backcountry Tour. Ojai is a wonderful base camp for a variety of adventures into some of California’s most magnificent backcountry. Curious visitors might be surprised by the wealth of natural & cultural features to be found in this vast & mystical region. The self-guided backcountry tour starts in Ojai, rambles north on Highway 33, over Pine Mountain Pass, through Ozena Valley & Cuyama Valley to Cerro Noroeste Road, through the Mount Piños area, & returns on Lockwood Valley Road to Highway 33. Scenic stops, recreation opportunities, side trips & services along this loop are plentiful. The whole trip, with Ojai as base camp, is about 180 miles.

2

Bart’s Books. A world-famous outdoor bookstore where you can browse more than 100,000 hardcover & paperback books, with new stock daily. Serving Ojai Valley since 1964. Special search service available. Located at 302 W. Matilija St. (805) 646-3755.

3

Twice Sold Tales. Second-handbookstore next to the Ojai Library, 121 E. Ojai Ave., reselling books to benefit Friends of the Ojai Library. Most hardbacks are $2 & paperbacks are 50¢. The selection of books includes author-signed first-editions, new age, mystery, art, music and more. Open every day from noon to 4:45 p.m. (805) 646-4064.

4

Camp Comfort. The park is nestled in a valley astride the San Antonio Creek. RV & tent camping are available plus a country hall accommodating up to 340 people & a group barbecue area. 11969 N. Creek Rd., Ojai. (805) 654-3951.

5

Circle Drive. Highway 150 to Santa Paula; Highway 126 to Ventura; Highway 101 to Ojai turnoff; Highway 33 back to Ojai. Mountain, valley & ocean views.

6

Rotary Community Park – Permanent art installation in the park called “Voices of Ojai,” quotations from historical figures of Ojai’s past etched in stone. Other features include Ted Gall’s “Freedom Chase” horse sculpture, a tile park bench by RTK Studios, and a horse trough dedicated to former Ventura County Supervisor, Tom Clark.

7

Cluff Vista Park – A stop at this small park comprised almost entirely of California native plants is a must. Paul Lindhard’s stone monolith sculptures stand sentry, the park also has two beautiful water features.

8

Krishnamurti Library and Retreat. The Krishnamurti Library & Krishnamurti Retreat in Ojai are housed where Krishnamurti lived. The library is at 1070 McAndrew Road, (805) 646-4948. The retreat is at 1130 McAndrew Road, (805) 646-4773.

9

Krotona Library. A library serving both the public & research scholars. It houses an extensive collection of books on theosophy, comparative religion, philosophy, health & healing & other subjects. The library is open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays & Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., & Saturdays & Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. Closed Mondays & holidays. The Krotona Li-

15

M.E.S.A. Naturalists will guide you along eight miles of trails through 200-plus acres of oak woodlands, streams, chaparral & meadows. Available to school & community groups by reservation. Call (805) 646-8712.

16

10

The Ojai Foundation. 9739 Ojai-Santa Paula Road, six miles from the center of Ojai. A 40-acre educational retreat center at the foot of the majestic Los Padres mountains. The public is welcome to visit the lovely gardens or simply walk the land from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. Weekend programs & educational retreats take place in the fall & spring. Call (805) 646-8343.

11

Ojai Valley Museum and Visitors Center. 130 W. Ojai Ave. The only museum in Ojai, preserves & exhibits the art, history & culture of the Ojai Valley with a permanent history gallery & a changing gallery with rotating exhibits Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; & Sundays, noon to 4 p.m. Tours by appointment. (805) 640-1390.

12

Ojai Meadows Preserve. Ojai Valley Land Conservancy’s protected meadows & wetlands area with a hiking trail, plant nursery & spring wildflowers. Three minutes drive west from downtown Ojai, park on Maricopa Hwy and follow the easy path. 1601 Maricopa Hwy, Ojai. www.ovlc.org

Krotona Quest Bookshop. A unique selection of books on theosophy, metaphysics, psychology, health & healing. The bookstore also offers a large selection on spiritual philosophy, modern science & religions of the world. Special orders are available. Open Wednesdays through Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. & Sundays from 1 to 5 p.m. Closed Mondays, Tuesdays The Ojai Retreat. 160 Besant Road, Meiners Oaks. A 5-acre educational retreat center with 360-degree views, seven minutes from the center of Ojai. The public is welcome to visit the grounds and the three libraries from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily, after checking in with the office. 12 guest rooms, most with views. (805) Libbey Park. Features Ojai Music Festival, Ojai Tennis Tournament, Mexican Fiesta & other cultural events. Famed for the Libbey Bowl amphitheater. In downtown Ojai next to the post office.

Stopping Points 13

Los Padres National Forest. The nearly 2 million acres of coastal mountain terrain in the Los Padres National Forest is home to thousands of plant & animal species. It offers maps, guide books, campfire permits, wilderness permits & National Forest Adventure Passes. Ojai Ranger Station is located about one-half mile east of downtown at 1190 E. Ojai Ave. Call (805) 646-4348 for information.

14

Meditation Mount. A public meditation center whose mission is to promote meditation as an act of service to the world. There are daily meditations and monthly Full Moon Community Meditations, The grounds are at the end of Reeves Road. The grounds are temporarily closed since the Thomas Fire. Please contact them for the date of the 2019 reopening. 805-646-5508, www.meditationmount.org

17 18

Places to go and things to see in the Ojai Valley. Turn the page and locate each place on the map.

19 20

Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce. At 206 N. Signal St. M - F, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (805) 646-8126.

Sarzotti Park. Left on Park Road from Ojai Avenue when heading east. Playground, ball field, recreation center, barbecue pits & horseshoe pits.

21

Tennis. Libbey Park, downtown Ojai. Other locations include Matilija Junior High, 703 El Paseo Road in Ojai; Nordhoff High, 1/2 mile north of the “Y” intersection of Highway 150 & Highway 33; Ojai Valley Inn, call 646-5511; Soule Park, off Boardman Road; Ojai Valley Athletic Club (private club), end of Fox Street, call 646-7213.

22

Lake Casitas. Created by Casitas Dam, with 100 miles of shoreline with boating, camping, picnicking & fishing. For information about the lake, water park and campgrounds,

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

47


G

H

F 1

E D

18

C 11

10 9

I 7

6 4

B

A

22 Map compliments of the Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce & e.D Brooks MAP © 2012

48

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


J

15

K

L 8

19

14

13 16

2

5

DOWNTOWN OJAI

17 3 21 12 20

Stopping Points

Fun things to do and see in the Ojai Valley. See the previous page for descriptions.

Favorite Hiking Trailheads

A Sulphur Mountain Rd. B Old Baldwin Trail C Riverview Trail D Oso Trail E Cozy Dell Trail F Matilija Canyon, left at Matilija Canyon Rd., to end G. Rose Valley Falls H Foothill Trail I Pratt Trail, off N. Signal St. J Shelf Road - N. Signal St. K Shelf Road - Gridley Rd. L Horn Canyon, Thacher School, north end of McAndrew Rd. VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

49


Family Dentistry / Implant / Cosmetic / Clear Braces

Modern Age Dentistry has served the community in Ojai and Ventura for over 15 years. Modern Age Dentistry is highly rated across the web. Check out our Google reviews at each location!

• 207 Fox Street, Ojai, CA 93023 (805) 646-0163 • 7606 Fallbrook Ave., #13 West Hills, CA 91304 (818) 712-0073 • 3151 Glendale Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 660-1205

Book Online! www.ModernAgeDentistry.com

50

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Established in 1993 • License # 764241

805.658.0440 1500 Callens Road, Ventura, Ca 93003 kitchenplacesventura.com VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

51


212 E OJAI AVE - OJAI ARCADE

NOMAD Retirement Sale

»MAVI JEANS »FREE PEOPLE »FRANKIES »TIARE HAWAII »CAPRI BLUE »MONTCE SWIM »« KARIELLA.COM

52

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

After 23 years We are closing in June. Please stop by to say hello and goodbye and find a treasure from our sale. UP TO 70% OFF

Paintings • Jewelry • Clothing • Artifacts • Textiles

307 E. Ojai Ave. 805 646 1706 www.nomadgal.com

www.nomadfoundation.org


INTUITIVE READERS DAILY Tarot Readers Spiritual Counselors Astrologers

Buddhas to Birthday Cards

OJAI HOUSE m

a

and a Huge Selection of Crystals

est. 2000 ...

um

Bumperstickers to Beeswax

ys tical empori

Chair Massage & Energy Healing

OPEN DAILY 11-6

304 N. Montgomery Street, Ojai, CA

2 blocks north of Ojai Avenue & A World Apart!

805.640.1656 • OjaiHouse.com •

nutmegs_ojai_

Hours 10 - 6 Mon - Sat and 10 - 5 Sunday VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

53


Photo: Elmer-De-Haas

54

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Being Barbara by Karen Lindell

From its inception in 1947, the Ojai Music Festival has been a home-away-fromhome for such 20th century giants as Pierre Boulez and Aaron Copland as well as Southern California “locals”Arnold Schoenberg and Igor Stravinsky. This year the festival is directed by rising star, soprano and conductor Barbara Hannigan. A 180-degree swivel of the body has transformed Barbara Hannigan’s musical career. Body language at concerts can be inherently dismissive: Soloists generally face the audience, their backs to the musicians, while conductors face the orchestra, their backs to listeners. As a soprano soloist who often conducts at the same time, Hannigan is always facing forward, embracing everyone at some point. “Moving half of me to the left to take on the role of conductor … this new position, it feels as if the circle is complete,” Hannigan said. In 2011, after more than 20 years as a renowned solo soprano, Hannigan picked up a baton, and in the ultimate form of musical multitasking, has since split her time between conducting and singing, or both simultaneously. Ojai audiences will see and hear Hannigan in both roles when she helms the 73rd Ojai Music Festival June 6 to 9 as the event’s music director. Thomas W. Morris, in his 16th and final year as the festival’s artistic director, described why Hannigan was selected to lead the 2019 event: “I’m always looking for somebody you can’t easily categorize, who is passionate about music and an incredible artist. Barbara is all of those things. Her musical tastes, as a soprano and what she conducts, concentrate on the music of today and tomorrow. She is an artist of the future.” In keeping with the festival’s commitment to contemporary music,

Hannigan is a champion of new sounds. Throughout her career, she has performed more than 80 premieres, with many composers writing pieces just for her. Among the composers she has collaborated with are Hans Abrahamsen, Gerald Barry, Pierre Boulez, Pascal Dusapin, Henri Dutilleux and György Ligeti. She has worked with the Berlin Philharmonic, Munich Philharmonic, Gothenburg Symphony (where she was recently appointed principal guest conductor), Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Mahler Chamber Orchestra and Toronto Symphony Orchestra. Hannigan arrives in Ojai by way of Canada and Europe. The soprano, who spent 20 years living in Amsterdam before moving to Paris three years ago, is a Canadian native. She’s from Waverley, a small village in Nova Scotia where, as Hannigan lovingly says, she grew up surrounded by “a couple of lakes, churches, a school, a gas station, a volunteer fire department and a pizza parlor.” But despite the small-town scene, music was a strong presence in her life at school and home. Hannigan has a twin brother and older sister. Their mom, she said, “has tapes of us singing with her before we could talk, so singing is really my mother tongue.” She also remembers being fascinated by renowned classical pianists performing on “Sesame Street.” The spacious and uncultivated landscape of Canada, Hannigan said, is part of her

musical fiber, which she described in a 2014 documentary about her, “I Am a Creative Animal.” “There’s something disorganized about the nature of Canada, something uneven and perfect about that,” she said. Yet, while Hannigan prefers an unexplored wilderness of music choices, she is far from “disorganized.” Her dad was very organized, she said, while her mom was very creative, and Hannigan said she feels like she inherited the best of both. “The discipline and the organization to be able to allow the creativity to flourish is very, very important,” she said. Hannigan took piano and oboe lessons, but knew by the time she was 15 or 16 that she wanted to be a singer. At age 17, she attended a high school for the arts in Toronto, then earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music at the University of Toronto. As a teenager, she worked with a teacher who was a champion of contemporary music. “She suggested I look at scores in the library and listen to contemporary music,” Hannigan said. “When I started doing that, I was completely hooked.” At the University of Toronto, the head of the voice department, Mary Morrison, complimented her after performances, not on her vocal technique, but for taking risks, which instilled in her that “the most special thing is not to control, it’s to be free. Despite her devotion to modern music and risk-taking, Hannigan doesn’t like compartmentalizing music into era- or VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

55


genre-defined buckets. “I don’t define music as high-brow or low-brow, as contemporary or classical, even as new or old,” she said. “I just love what courage composers (and improvisers) have in the creation of their own authentic sound world, and as a performer, I do my best to be their channel and advocate.” Hannigan said she started conducting “as a one-off experience, albeit a big one-off,” at the Théâtre du Châtelet in Paris, as part of a festival celebrating Esa-Pekka Salonen. The program included Igor Stravinsky’s “Renard” and Ligeti’s “Mysteries of the Macabre.”

Photo: Elmer-De-Haas

“I really was investing only in that one concert, but … well, that experience was very powerful and it was a turning

point in my career,” she said. Singing and conducting “really feed each other,” Hannigan said. “My experience as a singer influences very much the way I conduct. I am working from the voice, from breathing, from total incorporation of sound. I think most instrumentalists are searching for a singing quality in their playing.” Other musicians have taken on the role of both conductor and player, but it’s unusual for a singer, especially a soprano, to conduct, Morris said. Flutist Ingrid Geerlings, a member of Ludwig, a Dutch ensemble Hannigan has worked closely with that will perform at the Ojai Music Festival, said Hannigan’s “way of conducting lets me 56

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

play free and melodious long lines full of expression. And her expressive arms … I want to play when I look at her.” Continuing to perform as a singer is very important to Hannigan. “My voice is still in its prime, so I need to use that instrument,” she said. “It gives me a kind of physical satisfaction as a human being to be singing and making music as a performer and acting those characters.” Yes, add acting to her résumé, because, as an opera singer, Hannigan forcibly and deeply inhabits the characters she sings. She has stomped around on the stage in a leather jacket, spiky boots and black wig for Ligeti’s “Mysteries of the Macabre” (a notoriously difficult piece to sing that she also conducts). As the title character in Alban Berg’s dark opera “Lulu,” another role she’s known for, Hannigan donned toe shoes to embody the character’s complex devilish, angelic personality. Hannigan is also committed to mentoring up-and-coming singers. Joining her at the Ojai Music Festival to perform will be singers from Equilibrium, a mentoring initiative for young musicians she started in 2017. Hannigan said she created Equilibrium because “Simply, I wanted to give back as much as I could to the development of classical music. There are many young-artist training programs, but … in any field, those first years where one is really on their own as a professional … can be really tough and also isolating.” Equilibrium, she said, focuses on developing skills that aren’t taught in music school. “What happens once you won the audition?” She addresses everything from performance anxiety to travel and staying healthy. The first Equilibrium participants were selected from a pool of applicants from 39 countries. Seven will participate in the Ojai Music Festival. As music director for the festival, Hannigan chooses all the musical selections and artists. She said the festival “gives performers license to

really dig deep into sharing what drives them.” For Hannigan, what drives her is exploration — and drama. “As I do for everything, I choose repertoire that I need to explore,” she said. “And I put pieces together in a dramaturgical way, not only because I am a singer and have spent my life dealing with storytelling, but also because I feel instrumental music in an emotional way, and am always looking for the storylines in every piece, whether it be a Haydn symphony, Terry Riley’s ‘In C’ or a suite of Gershwin songs.“


Stravinsky’s “The Rake’s Progress,” she said, is “a timeless fable … which touches me deeply. This opera is the first I ever sang, back in 1994, and I chose it as the first opera I’d ever conduct.” George Gershwin’s “Girl Crazy Suite” is from her 2017 album “Crazy Girl Crazy,” which won a Grammy Award in 2018 for best classical solo vocal album. It includes a trio of pieces: Luciano Berio’s “Sequenza III,” Berg’s “Lulu Suite” and “Girl Crazy Suite.” The Gershwin piece, orchestrated by Bill Elliott, features songs from the musical “Girl Crazy,” including “I Got Rhythm” and “Embraceable You.” Bonus: “The orchestra sings,” Hannigan said. Gérard Grisey’s four-movement “Quatre chants pour franchir

le seuil” (“Four Songs to Cross the Threshold”), which Hannigan will sing, is “a ritual for our time, crossing the borders from life to death and the afterlife,” she said. Steven Schick — the 2015 Ojai Music Festival music director — will conduct the piece. William Walton’s “Façade: An Entertainment” features poems by Edith Sitwell set to music, with Hannigan providing narration. She describes the piece as “English high tea, silliness and fun of the highest order.”

Despite all her achievements, Hannigan said she is uncomfortable being branded as a musical wonder woman. “I get these reviews sometimes saying I’m extraterrestrial or superhuman,” she said. “It’s always kind of nice to read those things. On the other hand, I find it frustrating because I work very hard and I prepare very hard, and that is the core of what I do: disciplined work.” Singing, she said, “is heightened speech; it’s cultivated screaming. I train myself to be able to scream really beautifully.”

The Ojai Music Festival June 6 to 9 at Libbey Bowl and other venues around town. www.ojaifestival.org.

Main photo: Musacchio & Ianniello. Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia

With the JACK Quartet, Hannigan will sing the vocals in Arnold Schoenberg’s “String Quartet No. 2,” known as a turning point in the shift to more atonal sounds in Western music. While composing the work in 1907-08, Schoenberg was “in the depths of despair” because his wife had left him, Hannigan said. “In this piece of music, he departed from harmony. This piece was the moment he stepped out into the void. There are a lot of people that will never forgive him … for what he did to music. On the other hand, it was his courage that freed sound for so many composers.” The last movement begins with the soprano singing (in German), “I feel air from other planets.” VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

57


JUNE 6-9 2019

BARBARA HANNIGAN music director

“Barbara Hannigan’s legend grows” - New York Times

A music gathering of transformative experiences and community in the outdoor splendor of the Ojai Valley • Staged production of Stravinsky’s neoclassical The Rake’s Progress OjaiFestival.org | 805 646 2053

• Hannigan performing and conducting her Grammy-winning Gershwin’s Girl Crazy Suite • West Coast conducting debut of Hannigan in works by Stravinsky, Debussy, and Haydn

Thanks to our partners

• Free community concerts in Libbey Park Gazebo • The US debut of LUDWIG, the Grammy-winning Amsterdam music collective

58

Single tickets on sale now

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


There’s always someThing new aT The

Museum of Ventura County

Explore the history, present and future of Ventura County and discover what makes us unique. Check out our events and exhibits at venturamuseum.org Museum of Ventura County • 100 East Main St. Ventura, CA 93001 • 805.653.0323 Agriculture Museum • 926 Railroad Ave. Santa Paula, CA 93060 • 805.525.3100

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

59


The Rainmaker Shower Custom Design & Installation

Tibet & Fine Cashmere Wear

Jewel Buddha Mud Lotus Collection Mud Cloth & Organic Cotton Clothing from India Handcrafted Jewelry Unique Pieces Made with Care by Artisans jewelbuddha.com (805)252-5882

OjaiRockstacker.com

805 279-7605

60

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Find us at Ojai local events Ojai Makers Market & more


Frameworks of Ojai custom picture framing

AU G U S T

L AU R E L

GALLERY

Hours: Monday ~ Friday 10 - 5 Saturday 11 - 3, or by appointment. (805) 640-3601 236 w. ojai ave, #203, ojai, ca 93023 info@frameworksofojai.com VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

61


The musings of MacNeil Billy MacNeil’s mind is a veritable cabinet of curiosities, where the quaintly familiar suddenly takes a bizarre turn. Story by Austin Widger Billy MacNeil lived the Los Angeles life for years as a graphic artist for The “Tonight Show,” but always knew he wanted to move to a place like Ojai to allow his art and music creativity to flourish. “Since I was a kid, I’ve been doing both artwork and music,” MacNeil said. “I performed music a lot more when I was younger, including working as a singing waiter for several years before settling in to my position at NBC/ Universal, which lasted 24 years.” MacNeil grew up in the Boston area. As a kid, he was always singing, doing impressions and drawing. MacNeil’s father often asked him to show off his singing and drawing talents for his friends. “I think getting that kind of attention, and at an early age, can sometimes lead you to believe that you’re more talented than most, and then as you get older you discover that you’re not that special, and there is a world full of people who are supertalented,” MacNeil said. “The best idea is just to embrace whatever you’re passionate about and apply the dedication and discipline that it takes to develop it to its full potential.” 62

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Once MacNeil moved to Los Angeles, he began working odd jobs in restaurants to pay rent. He was focused on his musical career and songwriting at that time, spending all his money in the studio in hopes of getting a record deal. While working as a singing waiter, MacNeil had one song recorded by one of his dad’s favorite singers, Andy Williams. For many years, Williams had annual Christmas specials and MacNeil wound up writing a Christmas song for one of them. After he wrote the music, MacNeil and a co-worker completed the lyrics together and they performed the song at the restaurant with some of the other waiters. One night, there was a bunch of 8-year-olds, MacNeil said. “I look up and like five or six of them were around the front of the baby grand piano and they were just singing the song. It was the first time we ever played it. The song was so catchy that by the time the waiters got to the third verse, the kids were already singing along.” After tasting a few fleeting moments of success in the music industry, MacNeil turned to his other passion: art. He got


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

63


the job at “The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson” in the early 1980s as a graphic artist, back when they still used drawing boards. NBC made the transition to computer stations in the mid-1990s, and the first software the team was introduced to was Adobe Photoshop. When the transition was made, the graphic artists stuck their computers at elevated stations. MacNeil was working with a stylus pad, with his arm raised at shoulder level every day. “So my arm started getting to the point where I couldn’t function,” MacNeil said. “I was having to lift my arm off my station at the end of the day and I couldn’t button a shirt; I couldn’t lift my arm above my head. I was like, I can’t do this anymore.” He had developed epicondylitis, or tennis elbow, from working incorrectly for so many years. He needed surgery and then 10 to 16 weeks to heal, his doctor said. “I decided to take advantage of the situation and move to Ojai because that’s where I wanted to live,” MacNeil said. It wasn’t until he arrived in Ojai and had the time that he fully realized the capabilities of Photoshop. When he worked for The “Tonight Show,” the art was about quantity over quality. The art would appear on screen for a few seconds, never to be seen again. It was great to get back to creating higherquality artwork, pieces that took hours and hours to complete, MacNeil said. MacNeil’s creative mind has flourished since he moved to Ojai. He created the piece he titled “Old Salt,” with a pelican in the foreground. He was inspired to create it after visiting a friend in Ventura. Every time he was there, he would see a pelican in the front yard of her neighbor’s house. He decided to dress up the bird as an old sea captain, well, because “who doesn’t like to see birds, animals and such dressed like humans? It’s been a common practice among artists for ages, I’m fairly certain.” 64

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

The idea for the can of sardines in the pelican’s pocket came from an experience MacNeil had in fourth grade. One day, his mother made him a sardine sandwich for lunch at school and he couldn’t bring himself to throw it away. The lunches were kept near the radiator and “by midafternoon, the whole room was ripe with the smell of sardines,” MacNeil said.

MacNeil created “Calling Doctor Van Gogh” for an article celebrating Vincent’s 160th birthday. He wanted to do something unconventional. He found a photo of a Vincent Van Gogh lookalike online and decided on an “ears, nose and throat” theme for the piece. He wound up receiving first place with the image in an online Photoshop contest with entries from around the world.


MacNeil designed the “Big Bang Theory” caricature of Sheldon for an online article for the show. “I have always been a fan of caricatures and have always admired those who could create them,” MacNeil said. “Especially those who could, with just a few strokes of the hand, capture the perfect likeness.”

in the room were created one by one on a blank canvas using various stock images. I began with the photo of the fireplace alone, which had books all across the mantel and nothing in front of the hearth,” MacNeil said. “Each other item, 40 of them total, was individually added to the overall image.”

When he first began creating caricatures, he went through a great deal of trial and error. The key to a good caricature is to attempt to exaggerate certain prominent features of an individual without the result being too unflattering, he said.

The type of image design he used to create the piece was an exercise in creating an image of a room by incorporating many photo elements from various sources, with the desired end result being an image of a room and all of its contents that appears to have been photographed as a whole.

One of MacNeil’s favorite pieces is called “Being Elwood Dowd” from the movie “Harvey.” As an admirer of Jimmy Stewart’s work, he was inspired to create it. MacNeil met Stewart while working on “The Tonight Show” and Elwood Dowd in “Harvey” is one of his favorite Stewart characters. “The entire room and all of the elements

“I feel, in some respects, that artwork created digitally using computer software such as Adobe Photoshop is somewhat looked upon differently than more traditional methods of expression, such as painting and sculpture,” MacNeil said. “It seems that a lot of people think of it as

a ‘shortcut’ or a means of expression for someone less talented, and that it takes less skill and time to produce something of quality than it does using conventional methods. This, of course, is not true, by any means.” MacNeil typically spends 20 to 40 hours on a piece, often working 10 to 15 hours without stopping because he simply gets engrossed in it. “Perhaps if more digital artists were exhibiting their work in the more traditional sense at art shows, out in public, people in general would appreciate not only the artwork itself, but the time, talent, skill and dedication it takes to produce it,” MacNeil said. “At the same time, the internet has obviously become an enormous venue for promoting art of any kind, and, hopefully, in time, the art lovers of the world will come to view all art, including that which is created on a computer, with the same level of appreciation.” VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

65


66


TWIN PEAKS RANCH Twin Peaks includes a main residence and three guest houses, two staff houses, a 60' swimming pool, and a tennis cour t. The spec tacular main residence is stucco and tile, with exposed hand-hewn beams used for the ceilings and trim. I t has three bedrooms, three baths, a study, a dining room and four fireplaces. On the work ing end of the ranch there is a stone barn, a stable, a tack room, corrals, a blacksmith shop, a ranch office and garages. Twin Peaks is unique in the Ojai Valley, a testament to its deep roots in tradition and the loving stewardship of its owners. As the host for the Ojai Play wright's Conference for many years, it has continually inspired a creative atmosphere. I t's breathtak ing beauty, historical significance and welcoming atmosphere will never be duplicated. TwinPeaksRanchCA.com

Price available on request

PAT T Y WALTCHER

(805) 340-3774

pattywaltcher.com VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

67


M

any an athlete has trained at the Ojai Valley Athletic Club, which was started in the 1970s by former Olympian Paula Jean Myers-Pope and husband Karl Pope. “She was an unusual person, and she was really, I believe, the person who made the Ojai Valley Athletic Club so successful,” Karl said of his late wife. “It was her personality and her ability to deal with people. Everybody liked her.” Paula Jean was a four-time Olympic medalist in diving, but her talent was almost never discovered. She was

raised in Covina and would dive out in the bay near Balboa Island with her mother. One day, when she was 12, “there was a coach from the Los Angeles Athletic Club who saw her, and came over and talked to her mother who was sitting on the beach,” Karl said. This coach saw potential in her, so Paula Jean began taking diving lessons from him. Just three years later, at age 15, Paula Jean made her first Olympic diving team. She went to the 1952 Games in Helsinki and earned a silver medal for the tower-diving event. “There’s a restriction

now in the Olympic Games where you can’t even be in the Olympic Games unless you’re 15,” Karl said. This was Paula Jean’s breakout onto the Olympic stage. At this young age, she had garnered international attention for her diving prowess. She also won national championships, one year winning them in all five diving events. In 1956, she again tried out for the Olympics, made the team and headed to Melbourne. She won bronze in tower that year, second only to prolific diver Pat McCormick. After the games, Paula Jean

enrolled at the University of Southern California where she dived with the men’s team because there weren’t any women’s sports there at the time. “She was better than the divers on the men’s team,” Karl said. “But she got a leadership scholarship or something, somebody finagled it around because they wanted her to go to USC.” It was there that Karl and Paula Jean met. One day, Karl’s friends spied Paula Jean moving in not far from Karl’s apartment. Karl’s friends pointed Paula Jean out and said she was training for the 1960 Olympic Games.

Paula Jean Pope Story by Austin Widger

The Olympic diving medalist who, with her husband Karl, founded the Ojai Valley Athletic Club.

68

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

69


Karl said he knew her, but his friends did not believe him. Finally, Karl went out and talked to her and they were married six months later. After the two graduated in 1959, Paula Jean began training in Orange County with Sammy Lee, a diver who had won two gold medals in 1948 and 1952. Lee was the first Asian-American ever to win an Olympic gold medal. Growing up, Lee and all other Asians, Latinos and African-Americans were only allowed to practice diving in his local Pasadena pool on Wednesdays. This was called “International Day” and was the day before the pool was drained on Thursdays. After Paula Jean won the U.S. tryouts in Detroit, she and Karl headed to Europe and met up in Rome. Karl attended the competition. “The gal who won on the springboard was clearly better,” Karl said. “Paula Jean took second, and Ingrid Kramer (who took gold) was from East Germany. There was some bias in the judging because … out of the seven judges, there were four who were from the Communist area, east of the (Berlin) Wall,” Karl said. In spite of that, Paula Jean walked away from the 1960 Olympics, her final Games, with two silver medals, narrowly losing to Kramer. Upon returning home, the couple started their family. Paula Jean gave birth to four children and they adopted a fifth. Around the same time, USC began trying to persuade Paula Jean and Karl to donate to the school. There was a 70

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

plaque in the athletic building that honored every male athlete who had been a champion or Olympian, but there were no women honored since there were no female sports at that time, Karl recalled. “A group of her alumni friends, they hit on her for money,” Karl said. “And we said, ‘We’re not giving you a dime until you put her plaque on there with the rest of those NCAA or Olympic athletes.’ And they did, so she was the first woman who was honored by the university for sports.” The couple eventually moved to Ventura and Karl went into the surfboard business with college friend Tom Morey. The two ran Morey-Pope surfboards in Ventura for 10 years. Morey later founded Morey Boogie, the bodyboard maker. With young kids and not liking Ventura’s wind and cold, the couple then moved to Ojai. “We liked Ojai anyway,” Karl explained.

Once in Ojai, Karl picked up tennis as a hobby and played at Libbey Park every morning during the week, something that Karl described as, “just like a little ‘club.’” One day, the group went to play at the park and all four courts were taken by tourists. Karl said: “Here we were, these cool guys, and we’re all sitting in the stands and grumbling about how we couldn’t play. And some guy in the back of the group says, ‘You know, they should build a tennis club in this town.’ And I went, ‘They? Who’s they?’ ” “They” turned out to be Karl and Paula Jean. The couple began the process of opening up the original Ojai Valley Racquet Club in the early 1970s. When Karl looked at an empty lot at the end of Fox Street filled with old cars and junk, he said, “Well, it could be done.” The Popes researched clubs around Southern California and submitted their plans.

However, their designs were turned down by city planners on multiple occasions. “The city planner, I gave him my dog-and-pony show, and he says, ‘Mr. Pope, we don’t want any white elephants in this town,’ Karl said. Finally, the club was approved. It started out as a simple facility with 10 tennis courts, a trailer and an outhouse. Karl’s engineering experience helped him with problem-solving as the club grew. He said Paula Jean, being an Olympian, helped promote it. Eventually, the original pool with a diving section was built and the outhouse removed. Upon request from the club’s members, the Popes added the clubhouse. “It just kept expanding and then I hired a guy who is still there, Rick Goeden,” Karl said. “He said: ‘I’d like to start a swim program. I’ve had a programbefore.’ I said: ‘Well, yeah.’ I didn’t think much about it. He’s done a wonderful job; he’s been there 33 years now.”


After many years of Karl and Paula Jean successfully running the club, Paula Jean fell ill with ovarian cancer at age 57. This was understandably difficult for Karl to talk about. “She died at 60,” he said. “That’s a bad disease. By the time you can detect it, it’s too late.” A grieving Karl sold the club in 1995. Looking back on that time, he said he wished he had kept it. The impact Paula Jean left on the community via the club is undeniable. Paula Jean had a diving program there and taught daughter Darcy how to dive. Darcy went on to Brigham Young University on a diving scholarship and won the NCAA diving championships. Looking back on what he started and the importance of the Ojai Valley Racquet Club to Ojai, Karl said: “The club has produced people like Rick. It has offered Rick a venue to do what he’s good at. There have been others who have done the same thing there, then gone on to be physical-fitness gurus. (There are) many different kinds of careers that basically started at the club. That’s one of the things I’m most proud of.”

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

71


THE SPRING COLLECTION

Artists & Galleries Anca Colbert Art Advisory Services Art adviser, curator, appraiser, writer, and accidental photographer. www.coloroflight.com www.artsabouttown.com By appointment anca.colbert@mac.com

Studio Channel Islands Dedicated to advancing the creative life of Old Town Camarillo and the communities within Ventura County. 2222 E. Ventura Blvd. Camarillo, CA 805-383-1368

Canvas and Paper An exhibition space showing paintings and drawings from the 20th century and earlier periods in thematic and single artist exhibits.

Karen K. Lewis Painter & printmaker; etchings, monoprints, figure drawings, plein air landscapes, still lifes and large-scale oil paintings.

www.canvasandpaper.org

805-798-9301

Martha Moran The Ojai Rockstacker Rock stacks, fountains & more for garden or desktop. Studio visits by appointment. martha@ojairockstacker.com

805-279-7605

August Laurel Gallery 307 E. Ojai Ave. 805-646-0967 www.augustlaurel.com

Poppies Arts & Gifts 323 E. Matilija St. in beautiful Ojai, California. We are behind the historic downtown Arcade. Stop in for local art and art events.

72

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Human Arts Gallery Folk art, jewelry, glass, art wearables, furniture, sculpture and more. 246 E. Ojai Ave. www.humanartsgallery.com

805-646-1525

www.studiochannelislands.org

www.ojaistudioartists.org

805-646-8877

Dan Schultz Fine Art Gallery & Studio Plein air landscapes, figures and portraits in oil by nationallyacclaimed artist Dan Schultz. 106 N. Signal St.

www.danschultzfineart.com

805-317-9634

OVA Arts Your Go-To Place For Gifts 238 E. Ojai Ave. Open daily 10-6

www.ojaivalleyartists.com

805-646-5682

Ventura County Pastel Artists “Spring into Pastels� mixed media show Sat., May 4 - Sun., May 5 11 am - 4 pm Bert Collins Studio 1545 Cuyama Road bobbib1@me.com 805-798-2403 Get listed on the Ojai Valley Guide, Artists & Galleries page For information contact

team@ojaivalleynews.com

805-646-1476

WU2 Creations Acrylics and watercolors by William & Karen Wu 852 Oak Grove Ct. (by appointment) www.wu2creations.com

805-649-5312

Firestick Pottery Creative workspace of clay artists & students Open 10-6 daily. Closed Tuesday 1804 E. Ojai Ave www.firestickpottery.com

805-272-8760


Derby & Derby, Inc.

“Big Company Capabilities, Small Company Service”

Investment & Insurance Planning and Services Since 1979 State of California Registered Investment Advisor

California insurance licenses #0575624, 0A38521 and 0L48881

Wealth Management Retirement Planning Estate Preservation Legacy Planning Life Insurance & Annuities Long-Term Care

(805) 646-3729

603 West Ojai Ave., Suite C PO Box 189, Ojai, CA 93024 vicki@derbyandderby.com

Donna Lloyd Vice President

Margaret Marapao CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™

Cindy Rodarte Administrative Executive

Victoria Derby Breen Owner/President

Securities offered through Securities America, Inc., member FINRA/SIPC. Advisory services offered through Derby & Derby, Inc., State of California Registered Investment Advisor. Derby & Derby, Inc. and Securities America, Inc. are separate entities.

Leading Personal Injury Accident Attorney for over Years

25

Julie S. Gerard Attorney at Law/Mediator 805-798-9165 www.jsglawgroup.com

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

73


Downtown on Matilija Street something is stirring. Pho with Bone Broth and Noodles perhaps. Randy Graham investigates.

Traditional Pho with Bone Broth & Handcut Noodles

R

ainbow Bridge Village Marketplace began as a small natural foods store and community gathering place in 1996. Twenty-three years later, it is a thriving enterprise composed of the Rainbow Bridge Market and Rainbow Bridge Connection. Sage, Mindful Meals and Elixirs is part of the Connection and is a welcome addition to the restaurant offerings in downtown Ojai. When asked how they arrived at the name for this new restaurant, co-owner Mary Trudeau says: “Sage is about the wisdom of food, food as medicine. We think of Sage as more than a restaurant. At Sage, a person can eat well and nurture both body and soul. We think of Sage as an investment in

74

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

our community, offering healthy and tasty food to our friends and neighbors in a sustainable way. It is a part of our lifelong dedication to health.” Sage has plenty of outside seating between the small patio in front and the large patio in the Arcade. As the restaurant is located next to the Dharma and Dog store, patrons are welcome to bring their dogs and order treats from the separate doggy menu. If you prefer dining indoors, there are 12 to 14 casual seats at the frontcounter area. The space along the walls leading from the front counter to the back patio on the Arcade provides opportunities to purchase bulk herbs, loose teas, chocolate, honey, balsamic vinegar and olive oils in bulk,

Mindful Meals & Elixirs as well as freshly made juices and elixirs bottled fresh every day. Trudeau says: “Right now we are open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday to Tuesday to launch the counter service and expect to expand those hours in the spring when the indoor dining room — Sage Lounge — will be complete. The lounge will then offer evening dining, bar and waiter service, and what we think will be one of the best culinary experiences in Ojai.” Speaking of culinary experience, executive chef Michael Chavez-Martinez brings a wealth of culinary expertise and years of study to Sage. He knows Ojai well and is the perfect choice for this new venture, having studied in France in his early years. He has

worked with chefs Anthony Bourdain, Jacques Pepin, Ludo Lefebvre and Mark Gold, UCLA associate vice chancellor for Environment and Sustainability. His travels through Europe, the United Arab Emirates and the United States give him a global outlook on food and dining. He is working on the final menu at the time of this writing, but assures me that the Sage menu will provide gourmet, organic and locally sourced ingredients with choices on the menu for a gamut of dietary needs, including vegan, vegetarian, gluten-free, Paleo and low-lectin cuisine. “Our breakfast/brunch menu will have 14 to 15 choices,” he says, “including our breakfast bowl. The breakfast bowl is made with a farm-fresh


Watkins Rib-Eye Skewers with King Oyster Mushrooms

Tuna Poke

egg, local, low-lectin greens, yuzu citrus fruit, harissa, sweet potato mousse, house granola, and comes with a choice of fresh-baked artisan bread.” The lunch menu features Rainbow Bowls, including

Vegan Pho, Traditional Pho, Kimchi Ramen Hot Pot, Ojai Greens, Power Bowl, Grain Bowl, and Tuna Poke. The lunch menu also includes yakitori-inspired skewers basted in-house with tare sauce. Individual skewers

include shishito peppers, marinated tofu and tempeh, beef, pork belly, chicken, tiger prawn and local black cod. You can purchase a variety of small plates such as potato confit, roasted baby yams, broccolini, cauliflower with Moroccan Ras El Hanout spice, Brussels sprouts with garam masala, heirloom baby carrots, baby beets, bone marrow and wild seasonal mushrooms. Their tonics and elixirs are like nowhere else in town. Choices include Calm Spirit, Spark, Woman’s Complete, Rose Beauty, Reishi Macaccino, Power Tonic, The Morning Shift, and Golden

Latte. Each is made with the finest, uniquely sourced and combined herbs. The Golden Latte is made with turmeric, Ashwagandha, holy basil, ginger, cinnamon, cardamom, allspice and shilajit, all of which assist with digestion and inflammation. Chef Michael says he looks forward to working with “the region’s local farms, farmers’ markets, organic bakers, and regional fish and meat purveyors, such as McGrath Farms, Rio Gozo and Watkins meats, to name a few. Sage Mindful Meals and Elixers is located at 217 E. Matilija St., (next to Dharma and Dog). For more information, call 805-646-9204.

Chef Michael Chavez-Martinez, and Commis and lead baker Francesca Lopez VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

75


Eggs: Locally sourced, grain-fed, free-range | Meat: Organic or Grass-fed Seafood: Wild, line-caught | Produce: Certified organic, and/or locally sourced

Inside Rainbow Bridge Village Marketplace

76

217 E Matilija St., Ojai, CA 93023 • 805.646.9204 www.sagemindfulmeals.com VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


OJAI 805-646-6116 • OAK VIEW 805-649-1057

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

77


SAKURA OJAI • Sushi, Sashimi • Special rolls • Teppanyaki • Soup & Noodles • Vegetarian Menu • Korean Food

Bimbimbap 78

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Ramen

219 E. Matilija St. Ojai CA 93023 Special Veggie Roll

805-646-8777

Mon - Friday Mon - Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

11:30 am - 2:00 pm 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm 5:00 pm - 10:00 pm 11:30 am - 9:30 pm 12:00 pm -9:00 pm


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

79


80

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Westridge Market

802 E. Ojai Ave • Open Daily 8am - 8pm • Phone 805-646-2762

Westridge Midtown Market 131 W. Ojai Ave • Open Daily 7am - 9pm • Phone 805-646-4082

www.westridgemarket.com

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

81


photo courtesy Roberto Suro

O

jai resident Arthur Grace began his professional career in 1973 as a staff photographer for United Press International. During his award-winning career in photojournalism, spanning three decades, he covered stories around the globe as a contract photographer for Time magazine and a staff photographer for Newsweek. His photographs have appeared in leading publications worldwide, including on the covers of Life, Time, Newsweek, Paris Match and Stern.

Newsweek in late 1988, Grace was asked to come up with a photographic concept to cover all the presidential candidates. “There was going to be a new president. Reagan had already had two terms so I came up with this idea of shooting all the candidates in black and white in candid situations with a twin lens Rolleiflex, using only available light,” Grace recalled.

This image of Bush appears in his book, “Choose Me: Portraits of a Presidential Race,” which featured all 17 candidates running in 1988. According to Grace, the kind of unrestricted access he had would be impossible today. “It was an amazing opportunity to get behind the rope line and actually see the candidates in real time,” Grace said.1974, Maine.

Over the past 25 years, Grace has published five photographic books: “Choose Me: Portraits of a Presidential Race,” “Comedians,” “State Fair ,” “ America 101 ,” and “Robin Williams: A Singular Portrait, 1986-2002.” Grace’s photographs have been exhibited in galleries and museums, both in the United States and abroad. His prints are in the permanent collections of the J. Paul Getty Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, and the High Museum of Art, among others. His color photojournalism archives are housed at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas. Grace and his wife, Debra, moved to Ojai in 2014. “We were looking for a place to semi-retire and were taken by the beauty and tranquility of the area, as well as its diversity and creative community,” he said. “We decided this was the place.” 1988, Vice President, George H. W. Bush While working as a staff photographer for

The Art of by Alicia Doyle

82

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Grace was working for the New York Times in 1974 when he was asked to capture a photograph about farming problems in rural Maine, especially among potato farmers. The problem was, the reporter had filed the story, but there was no artwork to go with it.

After driving most of the night from Boston he still had nothing. “By early afternoon, I’m in a panic going 70 miles an hour down this two-lane road, and I whiz by this old farmhouse and catch a glimpse of an elderly woman with white hair poking her head out the door. I slammed on the brakes, skidded about a hundred feet and turned around. By the time I pulled up to the house, she was standing out front.”

Grace

It turned out that the woman was living on a potato farm and agreed to be photographed for the story. As they were talking, her son came out of the house and stood beside her. Before Grace started shooting, the woman asked if her other son could be in the picture. “So, the other brother comes out, and he’s on one leg using a crutch. I knew when I was shooting the pictures – you just get a special feeling that comes over you as a photographer – that this was a special shot, stay calm and don’t blow it. I thanked them for letting me take their portrait, got their mailing address to send them a picture, and drove about 80 back to Boston to make my deadline.” Grace later put the image in his book, “America 101 ,” which came out in 2016. VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

83


84

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


1973, Belfast. When Grace volunteered to go to Northern Ireland to take photographs for UPI in 1973, car bombs and shootings were common. British photographers were being marked by the IRA, so American photographers were needed to replace them. “I was out one afternoon in a Catholic area of Belfast. A British soldier on patrol had taken up a position on a street corner and some local kids gathered around him. This one curious little boy reached out and slowly touched the trooper’s rifle.”

1973, Golan Heights. This picture was taken during the opening days of the 1973 Middle East War. Grace was working at UPI’s Europe, Africa and Middle East headquarters in Brussels when he was interrupted during a Saturday night party by a phone call from his boss informing him that war had broken out in the Middle East, and that he was to leave that night with a reporter and get to Israel by any means possible. Twenty-four hours later, they landed in the dark at Tel Aviv Airport. The next morning, Grace and another reporter were headed for the Golan Heights in a two-seater Peugeot

convertible with instructions from New York to get some pictures at the front. By the next afternoon, they found themselves stopped at a crossroads on the Golan debating which way to go. “All of a sudden, we hear somebody off to our right screaming in Hebrew and saw an Israeli soldier standing in his machine-gun nest frantically waving to us to get out of his way and pointing towards a low bunker behind him. Just as we pulled up, we heard a loud whistling noise from a Katyusha rocket and everyone dove for cover. A second later, there was a loud explosion. When we looked up, we saw that the spot where our car had stopped had a big hole in the ground.

“The minute we got inside the bunker, an Israeli officer asked us what we were doing there. He didn’t really want to hear our answer and immediately threw us out. Just as we stepped outside into the sunlight, a group of Israeli soldiers came around the corner of the bunker with a Syrian POW in tow. I shot as many frames as I could before he disappeared inside the bunker. Then we jumped into our car and floored it in the direction of Tel Aviv before anybody could take my film.” (The original negative for this photograph went missing after the war. Only a poor quality 4-by-5 copy negative remained.)

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

85


1974, Boston. In 1974, Boston began mandatory school busing. In preparation for any violence, the National Guard practiced crowd control at a local armory, and Grace was there to take the shot. On the opening day of school, there were minor skirmishes with police at South 86

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Boston High. One white student who was out of control was pushed down the hill by a motorcycle policeman. “I was right in front of him, and took this picture that was on the front page of the New York Times the next day.�


1982, Warsaw. In 1982, Grace was on assignment in Warsaw for Time magazine. Solidarity leader Lech Walesa was in prison, the Solidarity movement had gone underground and Poland was under martial law. “It was a bleak period. A lot of Poles I knew were depressed and really anxious about the future. Even so, the Solidarity movement was still alive and, from time to time, people would organize protest demonstrations. It took courage to go out in the open like that and risk arrest. Making a ‘V’ sign with their fingers was a show of resistance.”

1983, Grenada. This photograph was taken by Grace during the 1983 war in Grenada. A week after the invasion, Grace was surprised to find that one of the U.S. command headquarters was located at a beautiful beach resort that also housed journalists. “One day, I happened to be walking on the beach when I spotted an off-duty female U.S. soldier sunbathing with her rifle draped by her side and her portable radio by her head. I guess that’s what happens when you have a short-lived war on a beautiful Caribbean island. It was surreal.”

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

87


1987, Cleveland. In 1987, Grace was assigned by Newsweek to photograph a story on child poverty. A local welfare agency in Cleveland provided a number of families willing to be interviewed and photographed. “This story was one of the saddest I ever covered. You really felt the hopelessness of the people the more time you spent time with them.”

1980, Jimmy Carter. In the closing days of the presidential race in 1980, Jimmy Carter was holding a huge rally in Cleveland. Grace, who was covering the White House for Time magazine, was in the back of a flatbed press truck when Carter suddenly got out of his bulletproof presidential limousine to greet the throngs of supporters lining the street. “The next thing you know, Carter climbs onto the roof of the limo and sprawls out, attempting to shake as many hands in the pressing crowd as possible. You’ll never see a picture like this again with a president exposed like that, ever. Reagan was shot five months later and the curtain came down on this kind of photograph.” 88

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

89


90

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

91


Photos: Dawn Cole

Feros Ferio 92

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Nigel Chisholm of the soon-to-be-rejuvenated Jester and the currently vibrant Vine in downtown Ojai has reinvented himself again by turning The Vine into a tasting room to serve his own label of wines. Story by Richard Camp “The Vine will continue to be The Vine with its awesome bar, food and music,” says Chisholm. “The difference is that we will be now serving only my wine by the glass.” Chisholm, who segued to The Vine when the water main pipes burst in 2014 and flooded his Jester, has turned The Vine into one of the most popular spots in the Arcade, with live music nearly every night of the week, plus a weekly Trivia Night. Danny McGaw, Tim Arlon and Smitty and Julija are just three of the top-name musicians who keep raising the roof. Plus, he initiated a Monday night showcase that encourages and nurtures young

performers, giving them a space to share their talents with the public, some for the first time. Throughout all this, he managed to keep secret from friends and family his plans for taking on the wine business. “This has been a private and secret journey of two-plus years to get to this incredible point of serving my own wines in our little town, my home,” says Chisholm. Though Ojai is indeed his home now, he is a native of Birmingham, England, and his wine names and labels are an homage to his birth country and family. The Feros Ferio label is

a fresh take on the Chisholm family crest and it is also the Chisholm family motto, meaning “I am fierce with the fierce.” “While appearing to be a simple boar’s head inside an orange circle, it encapsulates most of the elements of importance in my life, including, in its most simplistic interpretation, the orange ‘O’ representing Ojai,” Chisholm explains. “My deepest gratitude goes to artists Dustin Byerley and Jeff Uzzel for creating this incredible branding and helping me throughout this process. They are a gift to any community.”

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

93


Chisholm’s grapes primarily come from the Santa Barbara/Santa Ynez Valley and Paso Robles, and reflect an eclectic array of choices on his wine tasting menu. White wine choices include a 2017 Innis Mhór chardonnay (named for an island off the east coast of Scotland) that harbors only a small hint of oak, with essences of apples and melon. A 2017 Rousay (named for another Scottish island) white is a blend of Viognier, Grenache blanc, Sauvignon blanc, Albariño, Rousanne and Loureiro. Put them all together and it produces a luscious blend that teases hints of passion fruit and pineapple. The red selections include three red blends: A 2016 Faray is a full-bodied, southern Rhone-style wine; a 2016 Calvay is a Bordeaux-style blend sourced from Sanger and Estelle Vineyards; and a 2012 Lewis is a classic Grenache-based Rhone style that Chisholm named for a friend’s birthplace on the Isle of Lewis. The 2013 Craigleith (an island in the Firth of Forth) Sangiovese is a new world interpretation of a Tuscan varietal: solid tannins, super dry with “fruit-forward berry flavors.” The 2012 Erchless Syrah is named after Chisholm’s ancestral home, Erchless Castle. It is rich and spicy, or as barista Jessi May Stevenson says, “Earthy and dirty!” It is indeed a lush mouthful. The only wine on the tasting menu that is not a Feros Ferio creation is a Viognier from Ojai’s End of the Road Winery. Chisholm’s friend winemaker Bob Levin takes great pains to ensure that his wines remain a completely Ojai experience, a point that was most important to Chisholm. “One of the beautiful things about tasting wine is experiencing the land and the climate, what the French call the ‘terroir,’” says Levin. “When we lost 90 percent of our grapes this year during the heat wave, we cut our production by 90 percent rather than buying grapes from the outside. We’re committed to staying true to producing only pure Ojai Valley wines.” 94

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

in each sip,” offers Levin. “We don’t add enzymes or oak or other manipulations.” This Viognier boasts flavors of apricot and honeysuckle, offering another unique selection in the winery’s tasting list. “We are honored that Nigel has selected our Viognier to stand alongside his delicious and well-crafted wines,” says Levin. Wine lovers can taste any five wines on the Feros Ferio tasting menu for $15, and folks can join the Feros Ferio Wine Club for free. The club offers a variety of perks, including discounts and free tastings. In addition, there is a Feros Ferio Wine and Beer Club that allows members to enjoy a 50 percent discount on Feros Ferio wines and select beers between 5 and 6 p.m. on Fridays.

Viognier is a different grape from Chardonnay or Riesling and naturally offers a different tasting experience. “What makes our Viognier distinctive is that the way we make it allows the grape to come through

The tasting room is open seven days a week from noon to 5 p.m., with what Chisholm calls a “full monty wine-tasting experience.” That also includes food options: a Mediterranean plate ($10), a charcuterie plate and a cheese-and-fruit plate ($13 each). The full bar is also open, with cocktails, more than 50 microbrewery beers, ciders and five alcoholic kombuchas. From 5 p.m. to closing, the space becomes The Vine again with its regular offerings. Generally, there are no tastings after 5 p.m., but Chisholm says there is a bit of wiggle room there. His wines will be available by the glass or bottle until closing. Feros Ferio is a welcome addition to the growing number of tasting rooms that have sprouted up in Ojai. It’s a labor of love for Chisholm, whose secret is out in the open now for all to enjoy. He proudly states at the top of his wine tasting menu: “From the rugged majesty of the Scottish Highlands to the industrial heartland of England to the infinite promise of California.” Hard to resist a journey such as that. Stop in at his comfortable place … the wine is fierce, the ambience welcoming and soothing. Cheers!


WINE TASTING AT VENTURA COUNTY’S ONLY RURAL WINERY

OPEN AT 11 AM FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

Open daily, lunch till late. 646-1700 ojaibevco.com

EVENTS@OLDCREEKRANCH.COM (805) 649-4132

OLDCREEKRANCH.COM @oldcreekranchwinery

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

95


96

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Under New Management

SUN - THURS 11-10 • FRI & SAT 11 - 11

Marché Gourmet

Delicatessen ESPRESSO • PASTRIES • CHEESE • WINE • SANDWICHES • SALADS • SOUPS

Great Sandwiches & Weekly Specials! Vegetarian, Vegan & Gluten-Free Options! Breakfast and Lunch 9 to 3 Daily Dinner Friday and Saturday 5 to 8 pm www.MarcheGourmetDeli.com info@marchegourmetdeli.com

133 E. Ojai Ave, Ojai, CA

805•646•1133

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

97


98

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Ojai Valley’s Original Mexican Restaurant Open Daily for Breakfast & Lunch 7 am - 2:30 pm Closed Wednesdays

805.646.0207 328 East Ojai Ave.

• Margarita Mondays 2 for 1 House Margaritas • Voted Best Salsa • Taco Tuesdays • Family owned since 1985 891 Ventura Ave., Oak View (805) 649-9595

715 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai (805) 640-1577

OJAI VALLEY NEWS

& OJAI VALLEY GREEN COALITION Experience the Festival in Libbey Park,

Saturday April 20th

Read the Official Program for Earth Day Ojai Advertise in the Earth Day Program For more information contact team@ojaivalleynews.com noel@ojaivalleygreencoalition.org

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

99


boku_halfpage_OVGspring19.pdf

1

2/28/19

10:05 PM

ONE SCOOP OF BOKU SUPERFOOD MORE NUTRITION THAN AN AVERAGE PERSON CONSUMES IN SEVERAL DAYS. VISIT US

Boku International, Inc. 987 West Ojai Ave Ojai, CA 93023 (805) 650-BOKU Store open 9-5 Monday-Saturday Walk ins /Locals receive 18% OFF

www.BokuSuperfood.com Ask us about ou r Honey C lub!

Visit our Honey Tasting Room: 206 East Ojai Avenue, in the Arcade, downtown Ojai www.heavenlyhoneycompany.com | 805-633-9103 100

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Authentic Cuban Cuisine

Sunday Brunch 10am-1pm Open 7 Days Live Music

June 3, 4, 5 7:30pm VenturaHarborComedyClub.com 805.644.1500

Chicago Style Speakeasy playing Live Blues & Jazz Thurs-Sat Adjacent to Ventura Harbor Comedy Club

1575 Spinnaker Dr. Ventura Harbor 805.642.9463 805Copa.com

ama’s This Ain’t Your M Grilled Cheese!

1575 Spinnaker Drive Ventura Harbor 11am-11pm 805.642.9463 805Copa.com VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

101


Dining and Agave Maria’s Restaurant & Cantina 106 S. Montgomery St. Mon-Fri 11am-9pm Sat 8am-9pm. Sun 8am-8pm www.agavemarias.com 805-646-6353

Copa Cubana Authentic Cuban Restaurant Live Music open 11am-11pm Sunday Brunch 10am-1pm 1575 Spinnaker, Ventura Harbor www.805copa.com 805-642-9463

102

Bonnie Lu’s Cafe 328 E. Ojai Ave. Serving breakfast and lunch Open 7am-2:30 pm Mon-Sun. Closed Weds. 805-646-0207

Food Harmonics “The first 100% organic and gluten-free restaurant” 254 E Ojai Ave www.foodharmonicsojai.com

805-798-9253

Casa De Lago Ojai Valley’s Original Mexican Restaurant. Margarita Mondays. Family owned since 1985. 2 for 1 House Margarita 715 E. Ojai Ave. 805-640-1577

Marché Gourmet Vegetarian, Vegan & Gluten-Free Options. Breakfast & Lunch 9-3 daily. Dinner Fri & Sat 5-8pm 133 E. Ojai Ave. 805-646-1133 www.marchegourmetdeli.com

The Nest Modern comfort food in the heart of the Ojai Valley. Dine In - Take Out 401 E. Ojai Ave. www.thenestojai.com 805-798-9035

Papa Lennon’s Original Italian cuisine, Best of Ojai winner, local wines & beers on tap 515 W. El Roblar Dr. www.papalennons.com 805-640-7388

The Ranch House Gourmet restaurant famed for original award-winning cuisine & extensive wine list. 500 S. Lomita www.theranchhouse.com 805-646-2360

Sakura Ojai Japanese Restaurant Sushi, Sashimi •Special rolls •Teppanyaki •Soup & Noodles •Vegetarian Menu • Korean Food 219 E. Matilija St. 805-646-8777

Sea Fresh Seafood Fresh fish market, sushi & oyster bar Celebrating 30 years in Ojai www.seafreshseafood.com 533 E. Ojai Ave. 805-646-7747

805 Bar & Grilled Cheese “This Ain’t Your Mama’s Grilled Cheese!” Gourmet Cuisine & Full Bar 1575 Spinnaker Drive, Ventura Harbor Daily 11am-11pm www.805copa.com 805-642-9463

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Tasting Eating and tasting in Ojai is often experienced outdoors, as our little town boasts over 20 restaurants and tasting rooms with outdoor seating options. Most establishments with outdoor dining are pet friendly. So get outside, and gormandize en plein air with your pooch. You are sure to make, or see, an acquaintance while you fortify yourself. Boccali Vineyard & Winery Tastings at Boccali’s Ojai Sat & Sun 11am-4pm. 3277 East Ojai Avenue www.boccalivineyards.com 805-669-8688

Heavenly Honey Tasting room. All natural pure honey. 206 E. Ojai Ave.

Majestic Oak Vineyard Tasting room 321 East Ojai Ave (Downstairs)

www.heavenlyhoneycompany.com

www.majesticoakvineyard.com

Ojai Beverage Co. Outdoor patio dining, great food! 655 E. Ojai Ave. Open 11am to 11pm www.ojaibevco.com 805-646-1700

Ojai Olive Oil Co. 100% organic-localsustainable Free tours & tastings: Sat 10 am -3 pm & Wed 1pm-4pm 1811 Ladera Road www.ojaioliveoil.com

Old Creek Ranch Winery Live Music. Food Trucks. Join our Wine Club 10024 Old Creek Ranch Road Ventura, CA 93001 www.oldcreekranch.com 805-641-4132

Topa Mountain Winery Tasting room 821 W. Ojai Ave.

Ventura Spirits Our tasting room is open every Friday from 1-5pm Sat and Sun 12-5 pm 3891 N. Ventura Ave, Ste B2A, Ventura 805-232-4313 www.venturaspirits.com

Get listed on the Ojai Valley Guide, Dining & Tasting page For information contact

www.topamountainwinery.com

805-640-1190

805-207-4847

805-794-0272

team@ojaivalleynews.com

805-646-1476

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

103


I

n the past 14 years I have become a breathing addict, a connoisseur of oxygen. It began on a mountaintop right here, in Ojai, just off Foothill Road, on a patch of raw land that was going to host our dream house. It was daybreak, and I had flown to LAX from New York the night before, then driven to Ojai at 5 a.m. with the single purpose of standing alone on the mountain, just to get the feel of the place. I think my first intake of air was more of a gasp as to the ambition of our undertaking; we were going to develop the land, put in a well, solar panels, bricks and mortar, build a house from scratch. At first, standing there, I was overwhelmed. Then my nose picked up the scent, on the hint of

a breeze coming off the Pacific to my West; it was the soothing aroma of wet sand and seawater. Inspiring. I lifted my arms above my head as if to welcome it, to take it in. Inhaled again, deep from my belly, allowing the briny elixir to fill me from toes to fingertips. Exhaled slowly, as if to savor its essence, again and again. Stretching my hands towards the clearblue October sky, as the moon descended behind the distant peaks. The action had the effect of calming me —affirming my decision to move from Amagansett, New York to this little valley 104

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

town in Southern California. Breathed in again; It was like sampling a vintage wine, heady and intoxicating. There were visions in the air that morning, some came to pass, others did not; and there was laughter and sadness in the decade to follow, but life is like the scent on the breeze, ever-changing, sometimes obvious, sometimes subtle. Still, we breathe, inhaling the beauty and sometimes the beast, drawing the oxygen from our blood and into the cells to make energy, the energy of life. In the past decade I have made breathing my inner art, learning how it is truly the union between mind, spirit and body. Oxygen is the healing tonic, the creator of fire and warmth, exciting and

breath, so easy and poetic to talk or write about, so difficult to obtain? Especially, when most of us don’t breathe correctly. Which takes me all the way back to elementary school, when the PE teacher said to me, “You’ve got to learn how to breathe again, like a baby.” I had broken my neck and been in a plaster body cast for two months; thin as a toothpick, the cast had compressed my abdomen, causing me to become a chronic chest breather. Sucking air in through my mouth in quick shallow spurts, the way many of us do as we age; a habit that can be attributed to anxiety, stress, and loss of tone and elasticity in the main muscle of respiration, the

of bad breathing habits. So … Let’s start with breaking the bad habits … Lying in your bed, palm of hand resting gently on your abdomen. Close your mouth and breath through your nose. Feel your abdomen rise and fall beneath your palm. This automatically has the effect of employing the diaphragm while lowering the breath from the chest to the belly. Now, slow down the exhalation. Take a little pause at the bottom, in other words, don’t breathe for a couple of seconds. This has an immediate calming effect upon the nervous system. Simple and, with practice, the average 12 to 18 breaths that we chug per minute will decrease to 10 or below, easing our nerves, reducing

OJAI

by Richard LaPlante soothing. I have experienced it, throughout my years, in many practices from martial arts to yoga. Finally understanding that it is the true connection between all living creatures, the stream of consciousness, the carrier of feelings and thoughts, and the doorway to life’s greatest treasure, peace of mind. Breath is life. Breath is stillness. But how do we find this elusive stillness through the

diaphragm, a domed-shaped sheet that divides the thorax from the abdomen. There I was … 10 years old, going on 60 in the breathing department, being instructed to, “Breathe like a baby.” Which, basically, means to breathe through your nose and deep in to the belly, causing the lower abdomen to rise and fall with each breath. It’s very simple and very basic, yet very easily forgotten over time, and as repetition makes the master, most of us become masters

anxiety, slowing our minds and making us more oxygen efficient. That’s breathing like a baby. Once you’ve mastered the baby breath, get out of bed, and find a mountaintop. I could recommend many but will leave you to your own exploration. Lift your arms to the sky as you inhale through your nose, sipping the air like a fine champagne, and breathe Ojai … And … whatever else you do on that mountaintop: Don’t build a house.


B

R

E

A T

B R E A T H

H

I

I S

S

L

I

F

E

S T I L L N E S S VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

105


A W N

CO

-I

EL

LK

W

Chinese Massage releases stress, increases circulation and energy

S

M

E!

Open daily from 10 am to 10 pm (except Tuesday open 11 am to 8 pm) Oriental Oil Body Massage 60 minutes $48

Reflexology Massage 30 min $24 40 min $30 60 min $40

Hot Stone Therapy 60 minutes $68

Sweet Combination Special 90 min $68 includes: 60 min full body plus 30 min foot massage

AA Relaxing Station • 323 E. Matilija Street, #112 (Massage & Reflexology only)

Bamboo Creek • 1002 East Ojai Avenue, Suite B

www.BambooCreekSpa.com 106

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

(805) 299-5899


Dear 11-year-old me, Pretty much Imagine you are now 14. You started . ler tal t jus the same girl, leyball, and high school, are playing vol ily. love your friends and fam rvivor. And, you’re a cancer su be easy. s ay alw to ng goi It’s not w, after a no But three years from ge with mom tta Co bunch of car trips to nurses and and dad, to see the best , your doctors you could ask for wn back. gro gorgeous curls will have ll . . . life. we . . . be to And life is going

Faith Orcutt

14 YEAR-OLD CANCER SUR VIVOR

Love, Faith

Our new Cottage Children’s Medical Center, featuring the Haselton Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, is now open at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital.

Serving California’s kids, like Faith, everyday.

Is home an option? What should I do? What if she falls and no one is there? What is Home Health? Why would I need to use hospice?

What is Independent Living? What is Skilled Nursing Care?

What is medication management? Do you have the number for______? Is mom eating enough?

How do I arrange transportation? Evacuations? What if she needs ongoing care? How can I remain working with all of this?

cottagechildrens.org

You have Questions? We have Answers. We are here to help. Call our Senior Advisor today: 805.646.1446

What is Long Term Care Insurance?

How will I pay for Assisted Living or Nursing

Home Care? The Rehab says mom

has to leave but she can’t be

alone — What do I do?

Help!

Assisted Living & speciAL needs 701 N. Montgomery Ojai, CA 93023 805.646.1446 GablesofOjai.com Lic.#

565800551

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

107


Cannabis Curious? Story by Alicia Doyle

O

jai is home to four places that offer CBD products, with three of them located within walking distance of each other in the 400 block of Bryant Circle, and another on North Ventura Avenue. The CBD offerings at these places are vast – from edibles to tinctures to balms – and can potentially help with a variety of issues, including insomnia, joint pain and anxiety. If you’re a resident of Ojai who has never explored these shops, or a visitor in town interested in what Ojai has to offer, the following is a glimpse of the CBD products you can expect to find. Cannabidiol, commonly referred to as CBD, is a non-intoxicating cannabis compound. Keep in mind

that these products are not intended to treat, cure or prevent any disease, and the folks in charge are not medical experts; so, if you have any concerns, talk to your medical provider first.

Sespe Creek Collective At Sespe Creek Collective, the majority of people shopping for CBD products are looking for pain relief, better sleep and ways to help diminish depression or anxiety, said Chelsea Sutula, president. Sespe Creek is known for carrying one of the largest selections of CBD-rich medicine in Southern California, always sourced from whole-plant cannabis, never industrial hemp, “and our medicine is lab

tested and labeled in accordance with California regulations,” Sutula said. A wide variety of products that contain CBD include peanut butter chocolate cookies, dark chocolate salted caramel almonds, and orange gummies. And for customers who don’t like edibles, there is a selection of capsules and drops – and even suppository cones. They also carry topical formulas that can potentially deliver hours of pain relief. “We’re not medical experts,” Sutula emphasized. “We can only share anecdotes and information research we’ve read, but sometimes people coming in have really high expectations of us being able to advise them like a doctor would, like how it’s going to interact with your chemo. We have a ton of expertise with the products … we know it’s safe and nontoxic, but for those real specific questions, they should talk to their doctor.” Customers must be over 21, or 18 with a physician recommendation, to enter the shop. Once inside, they are greeted by a friendly staff in a reception area, where new customers are entered into the computer system and wait their turn to go inside. Once there, they work one-on-one with a shop expert to determine the best CBD product for their individual needs. The shopping area is boutique-like, featuring a wide, open and inviting space, with plenty of floor room for people with wheelchairs and walkers to browse. The products are enclosed in glass, or placed upon tabletops, making it easy for customers to see. “The better-informed customers are always going to be easier to work with,” said Sutula, noting that Sespe Creek’s CBD products can be explored on their website. “We show all of our products with full descriptions and pictures, so it helps people who are new to peruse the menu ahead of time and get a sense of everything we have so they can dial it in faster in the store.” Sespe Creek Collective is located at 408 Bryant Circle, Suite C. Hours are Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sundays from 10 a.m.

108

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


to 5 p.m. For more information, call 855-722-9333, or visit sespe.org.

Shangri La Care Cooperative Blackberry and lemon gummies, caffeinefree ginger orange tea and cucumber water are among the many products that contain CBD at Shangri La Care Cooperative, Inc., where director Jeffrey D. Kroll requires all his staff to have a one-on-one relationship with everyone who walks through the door. “A first-timer will be impressed by the fact that we meet with people on a one-to-one approach,” he said, “and we are more of a wellness center than a head or smoke shop.” To enter, guests must be 21 with a valid ID, or 18 with a medical recommendation. Upon entry, guests go through a welcoming open reception area to enter the shop. This well-lit space is large enough for customers in walkers and wheelchairs to browse at their leisure. The products are showcased atop and inside glass containers, making it easy to see what’s available. The “friendly and knowledgeable” staff is happy to answer questions about all of their CBD offerings, which include sublingual tablets, capsules and suppositories. They also carry bath bombs, which can potentially help to regulate blood circulation, as well as boost the immune system while relaxing muscles and calming the mind. Other CBD products include oil drops, which are said to offer a fast-acting effect with zero psychoactive buzz effects. “Many people report to us that they have tried a mountain of quite expensive products, and our coaching and approach have saved their bacon in terms of health benefits,” Kroll said. Because these CBD products are made of the highest quality, he noted that customers should not expect pricing “to be as low as the black market.” “This is just not possible, for black market sellers pay no taxes – and do not test their products – and most operate out of their home,” he said, which is “totally illegal.” Shangri La Care Cooperative, Inc., is located at 408 Bryant Circle, Suite G.

Hours are Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Sundays from noon to 7 p.m. For more information, call 805-640-6464, or visit slcc.info.

Ojai Greens Lemon poppy mini-cookies and salted caramel almonds in dark chocolate are among the many edibles that contain CBD at Ojai Greens. If you prefer drops, they also carry tinctures, including lemon-ginger and peppermint flavors, as well as topical lotions and bath bombs for relaxation. “Our perfect customer would be anyone who’s open to holistic healing or someone who is used to taking pharmaceutical drugs who wants to get off of them and understand there’s another way,” said Matt Shoemaker, who is in charge of this family-owned business. Ojai Greens is a California-licensed medical cannabis dispensary that has been licensed by the city of Ojai to provide goods to qualifying patients. Customers must be 21 and over – or 18 with a medical recommendation – to enter with valid ID. “If it’s their first time, we love to educate all of our customers,” Shoemaker said. “We want to give them the full experience, the full tour, and show them all the different ways of using CBD products.” For instance, “Are they having trouble sleeping? Are they having trouble eating? Are they fighting chemo symptoms, or are they just looking to relax? Do they want a tincture, an edible? We plug them where it suits them best.” With no separate reception area, this chic shop features a giant open space with plenty of light that’s designed like “an Apple store hybrid,” Shoemaker said. Once inside, guests will see long, rectangular glass containers with lights illuminating the products, with iPads atop each so they can explore every product “in a no-pressure environment.” Ojai Greens is located at 410 Bryant Circle, Unit B. Hours are Monday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 805646-4420, or visit ojaigreens.com.

101 CBD Described as a “family-owned, healthfocused CBD store,” 101 CBD offers CBD oil in several formulations, including one that can potentially help with overall relief of pain due to ailments such as inflammation, arthritis, migraines and menstrual cramps. “We sell a range of sublingual oils, topicals for pain and skin treatments, and a line of massage oils and lotions,” said founder Justin Benton. “Customers also love our pet products for cats, dogs and horses. Coming soon are products for bath, body and hair, as well as hemp clothing and candles.” Located on North Ventura Avenue next to the Circle K on Highway 33, the shop features an open, welcoming space punctuated by emerald-green walls, where the staff provides “a relaxed and personal consultation with our knowledgeable staff,” Benton said. Based on each customer’s needs and experience, “we recommend the best products just for you,” he said, further noting that “with our focus on improving health, you will see much fewer products than in a dispensary. No need for ID or cash-only policies, either.” The most common reasons people come to 101 CBD “is because of pain, inflammation, anxiety and insomnia,” Benton said. “But that’s just a short list, as there are a myriad of other specific concerns described in studies that lead our customers to us.” He added that new customers may not know that CBD connects to a system of CBD-specific receptors throughout the bodies of humans – and other mammals – called the endocannabinoid system. “Yes, Fido has one, too,” Benton added. “Our staff loves to educate our customers on how to evaluate and compare CBD products for the most effective health benefits.” 101 CBD is located at 11420 N. Ventura Ave., Suite 107. For more information, call 805-642-5623, or visit 101cbd.org. VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

109


VOTED #1 DISPENSARY IN VENTURA COUNTY

Unsurpassed variety of CBD products Knowledgeable Staff Storefront & Delivery 21+ with ID 18+ with ID & Rec

408 BRYANT CIRCLE, SUITE C

OJAI

855-722-9333 sespe.org State License# M10-18-0000153-TEMP

110

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Shangri-La Care

Recreational and Medical Cannabis Dispensary License # M10-18-0000182

408 Bryant Circle, Suite G, Ojai Ca. (second driveway)

HOURS: Monday - Saturday 10am to 7pm • Sunday 12 to 7pm Follow us on Instagram @SLCC_Ojai

(805) 640-6464

To see our menu visit Weedmaps or www.slcc.info

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

111


OJAI MEDICAL CANNABIS CONFERENCE

Medi Canna Con OJAI MEDICAL CANNABIS CONFERENCE

Saturday, May 4, 2019 9am—5pm

Ojai Valley Woman’s Club 441 E. Ojai Ave.

David Bearman, MD

Cannabis in Health and Disease

James Adams, PhD Medical Uses of Full-Spectrum Cannabis The Entourage Effect of Cannabis

Margaret Peterson, MD

The Human Endocannabinoid System

Susan Marks, RN, BSN, PHN

The Safe and Effective Cannabis Patient Experience

CA Acupuncture Board CE Provider #1526 5.5 Category 1 CEUs pending

Tickets at O j a i H e r b a l . o r g

SERVING THE OJAI VALLEY FOR OVER

40 YEARS

John Aaron

Architectural Illustration 2-D & 3-D Editorial Art Inquiries: modernarf@gmail.com modernarf.smugmug.com 805.861.8546 Coming in 2019: Painting Boulder: A Coloring Book of the City’s Iconic Architecture

MEDICIAL ARTS

PHARMACY

• Two on-site labs • Professional compounding for humans and animals • 24 hour refill service placed through our web site

OJAI’S ONLY DRIVE THRU PHARMACY 1320 Maricopa Hwy Ojai,CA 93023 (next to Ojai Community Hospital)

Chris Platt Hanh Platt Owners & Pharmacists 112

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Phone: 805-646-7211 | Fax: 805-646-6480

MedicalArtsRXOjai.com


FEATURED PRACTICIONERS

Mind, Body & Spirit Bamboo Creek Spa Give the gift of Relaxation! Mon- Sat 10 am-8 pm Sun 11 am-8 pm Walk-ins welcome 1002 E. Ojai Ave. #B www.bamboocreekspa.com

805-299-5899

Leslie Bouché, C.Ht. Hypnotherapist. Find your calm center. Release negative thinking, emotional reactivity, anxiety, fear, and unhelpful behaviors.  Improve sleep and comfort.  leslie@lesliebouche.com

www.lesliebouche.com 805-796-1616

Krotona Institute of Theosophy Library & Research Center School of Theosophy 2 Krotona Hill, Ojai info@krotonainstitute.org

805-646-1139

The Day Spa of Ojai Indulge your body & mind’s well-being with extraordinary services & unrivaled hospitality. 209 N. Montgomery St. www.thedayspa.com 805-640-1100

Myra Miller, Ph.D. Whole Life Health & Wellbeing. Personal Retreats • Mind-Body, Emotional & Life Difficulties • Trauma • Spiritual Development

Dr. John R. Galaska, PsyD, BCN, Cht Professor of Psychology Neurofeedback, Biofeedback, Hypnosis. BeCalmofOjai.com facebook.com/BeCalmofOjai 805-705-5175

Judy Gabriel Energy Landscaping, Using intuitive vision and energy dowsing, Judy brings health to your body, land, business, or home. Judy@EnergyLandscaping.com 805-798-4111

Laurel Felice, L.M.T. Swedish, deep tissue, reflexology, reiki, craniosacral and pregnancy massage with a reverent & joyous balance of hands & heart.

Jacalyn Booth Certified Colon Hydrotherapist and Ojai Digestive Health Professional Gentle and Effective 805-901-3000

laurelfelice54@gmail.com

www.MyLivingSanctuary.org

www.ojaidigestivehealth.com

www.ojaihealers.com 805-886-3674­­­

The Little Garden Day Spa. Angella W Winspear, CMT, CLDT A range of healing treatments that include Lymphatic Drainage therapy and Infrared. 805 890-9813

Nut Meg’s Ojai House Fair Trade, Recycled, UpCycled, Spiritual, Organic, Green, “Functional Art “ for your Home & Garden. Open 11:00am - 6:00pm 304 N. Montgomery St. mgojai62@gmail.com www.ojaihouse.com 805-640-1656

Get listed on the Ojai Valley Guide, Artists & Galleries page For information contact

team@ojaivalleynews.com

805-646-1476

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

113


Gridley Trail (22W05)

Words and pictures by Perry Van Houten

Spring is the ideal time of year to hike this 6-mile-long trail in the Ojai front country. Temperatures are bearable and wildflowers typically make a good showing. The rocky trail climbs moderately past avocado orchards into low chaparral and trees, terminating at Nordhoff Ridge at 3,775feet elevation. (The avocados are private property, so don’t pick them!) Gridley Spring, 3 miles up, is the site of a former trail camp removed by the U.S. Forest Service in 2013. It’s still a pleasant spot to stop for lunch. Just south of the spring is a section of trail where ferns, maples and other vegetation uncommon in the area grow. To get to the trailhead, take Gridley Road north to its end at a private gate. There’s limited parking along the road, but no facilities. The first mile of the trail was adopted by the Ojai Valley Land Conservancy in April 2017 under the Forest Service Adopt-A-Trail Program. The trail provides access to OVLC’s Valley View Preserve via the Fuelbreak Road Trail.

Three Classic Ojai Spring Hikes 114

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Horn Canyon Trail (22W08) An abundance of blooms and the sound of flowing water along this popular trail make Horn Canyon a great springtime outing. There are four creek crossings very early in the hike, so be prepared for some rock hopping and possible wet feet. At about 2.5 miles, the trail passes through “The Pines” campground, where a historic grove of Coulter pines stood for many years. Most of the drought-stricken, bark beetle-infested trees were removed a few years ago. What was left burned in the Thomas Fire. The trailhead is located on the grounds of The Thacher School. If the Thacher gate is open, you can drive directly to the trailhead; if not, park on the shoulder of Thacher or McAndrew roads and follow the letters “HC” painted in white along the road that bears to the right.

Say goodbye to winter and head for the great outdoors.

Ventura River Preserve Trails Proximity to town and a network of varied, wellmaintained and signed trails make the Ventura River Preserve instantly appealing, especially when the grasses are green and the flowers are blooming. If you want to get away from the hustle and bustle without driving far, head for the nearly 1,600-acre preserve. Opened in 2003 by the Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, the Ventura River Preserve offers trails that run along the riverbank, loop trips that take you through oak forests and peaceful meadows, and lofty adventures that take you high above the Ojai Valley. El Nido Meadow, off the Wills Canyon Trail, features an expanse of purple needlegrass, the state grass of California. The Ventura River Preserve can be accessed from three distinct trailheads: the Oso Trailhead, off Meyer Road; the Riverview Trailhead, on Rice Road; and the Baldwin Road Trailhead, off Highway 150. Parking is free at all three trailheads. Spring and summer hours are 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

115


116

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Voted Best Horseback Riding

OJAI VALLEY TRAIL RIDING COMPANY Premier Horseback Riding Explore California’s Shangri-La on horseback! Escape into nature and experience a majestic tour of one of the most beautiful places on Earth, on horseback! We have trail rides suited for the beginner to the advanced rider all year round!

River Valley Trail Rides • Forest Trail Rides • Pony Rides

(805) 890-9340 ~ Call for reservations 3.5 Miles from Downtown Ojai - Open 7 days a week! www.OjaiValleyTrailRidingCompany.com ~ Ojai City License #14950

S.P.A.R.C. SECOND CHANCE STORE

374 E. MAIN ST. VENTURA, CA 93001 (805) 648.8915 email: sparcsecondchancestore@gmail.com

Stop in and browse some of our Hand Picked Furniture items or Gently Used Clothing.

Are you thinking about adopting a cat or a dog? If so stop in at the

S.P.A.R.C

Second Chance Store We’ll have plenty to choose from!

(Pet adoptions once every month - call for details)

We Also Carry

Treasu res Galore ! A large selection of household items, decor, pictures, books and much more! S.P.A.R.C is a California 501C3 non-profit corporation, all donations are tax deductible. Tax ID: 45-4185395

“Like” us on facebook to see our weekly specials

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

117


H

ow often do we stop to be in gratitude and appreciation to our Mother Earth for those incredible Instagram shots of luscious meadows packed with the glorious color of spring wildflowers? The upcoming Ojai Earth Day celebration on April 20 in Libbey Park is a time to show our appreciation, remember strides taken by past leaders to protect our precious planet and an opportunity to learn more about our personal contribution. Fifty years ago, the undercurrent was in motion to rally around environmental protection, even before the oil spill that hit close to home in Santa Barbara on Jan. 28, 1969, tragically killing more than 10,000 seabirds, dolphins, seals and sea lions. The anniversary of this oil spill is a poignant memory that triggered the inception of the first Earth Day. Leading up to the creation of Earth Day in 1970, a rare political alignment was happening with support from both Republicans and Democrats, as well as people from all walks of life. A tremendous energy of cooperation was coalescing in various circles at the same time, which originally gave us two distinct dates for the international celebration. At a 1969 United

Story by Cynthia Louise Grier Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Conference, peace activist John McConnell proposed March 21, 1970 — the spring equinox — be declared a day to honor the Earth and the concept of peace. This date was sanctioned by United Nations Secretary General U Thant and was celebrated in San Francisco as the first International Earth Day. Coinciding with McConnell’s movement, Sen. Gaylord Nelson from Wisconsin was inspired to

create a separate Earth Day on April 22, 1970, after seeing the horrific destruction of the Santa Barbara Channel 800-square-mile oil slick. Nelson announced the idea to the media for a summit and “national teach-in on the environment” and was successful in persuading Pete McCloskey, a conservationminded Republican congressman, to serve as his co-chair, along with Harvard’s Denis Hayes as national coordinator. Nelson approached McConnell with the idea of making April 22 Earth Day concur with the beginning of the summit, but McConnell declined, wanting to keep the vernal equinox as the date. On Jan. 28, 1970, the first anniversary of the Santa Barbara oil spill, an Environmental Rights Day was held with a reading of the Declaration of Environmental Rights, written by Rod Nash. Meanwhile, Hayes went on to build a national staff of

118

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

85 promoting simultaneous April 22, 1970, Earth Day events across the United States, which resulted in more than 20 million people across the country gathered to focus on awareness and eco-consciousness. That day did more than just produce awareness. Both McCloskey and Hayes, along with Sen. Alan Cranston, Paul Ehrlich, David Brower and other prominent leaders, endorsed the Declaration of Environmental Rights, laying the groundwork for the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species acts. The April date stuck and, today, more than 1 billion people in more than 193 countries will be gathering. It is fitting that the Ojai Valley Green Coalition, whose mission is to educate and advance a green, sustainable and resilient way of life for the Ojai Valley community, will be the host of this year’s Ojai Earth Day in Libbey Park on Saturday, April 20, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Coalition hopes to raise the bar on awareness within our valley at a time when it has become even more urgent. According to Hayes, “Despite that amazing success and decades of environmental progress, we find ourselves facing an even more dire, almost existential, set of global environmental challenges, from loss of biodiversity to climate change to plastic pollution, that call for action at all levels.”

Cynthia Louise Grier is the Earth Day Event Coordinator, Ojai Valley Green Coalition.


Ojai Day 2018 photos courstesy Michelle Ellison and Steve Adams. VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

119


For over 60 wineries & 250 wines, more than 35 craft breweries, Lakefront VIP Lounge with Hors d’oeuvres, a selection of local restaurants, fine artisan vendors, silent auction, fine crystal souvenir wine glass, free boat rides and all-day entertainment!

OjaiWineFestival.com 120

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


The Happy Valley Cultural Center Presents

Chamber On The Mountain An extraordinary musical experience in a setting of extraordinary beauty Busch Piano Trio

Tomer Gewirtzman

Omri Epstein, piano Mathieu van Bellen, violin Ori Epstein, cello

Pianist Sunday Sept. 22, 2019 3:00 pm

Sunday May 5, 2019 3:00 pm Photo: Blake Ezra

Photo: Christian Steiner

General Admission $25

Purchase advance reservations at www.ChamberOnTheMountain.com Performances take place at Logan House (adjacent to the Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts) Chamber On The Mountain | 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd. (in Upper Ojai) | Ojai, CA 93023 | (805) 646-9951

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

121


VENTURA

County Fairgrounds

Swap

MEET $1.00 Admission

Antiques • Collectibles Farmer’s Market Vendor Space Available Every Wednesday 7am to 2pm FREE PARKING For Information Call Sue Adams

818.590.5435 Every Wednesday 7am to 2pm 10 West Harbor Blvd

www.snauctions.com 122

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

123


March

Art Exhibit

Feb. 15 through April 28 Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org “From the Earth: Ceramic Art” features works by more than 30 local ceramic artists, and also includes the work of great local artists who are gone, but not forgotten, Beatrice Wood, Frank Noyes and Otto Heino. Ceramic demonstrations will take place at the museum most weekends throughout the exhibit.

Calendar M A RCH - J U LY 2019

Ojai Playwrights Conference Benefit Gala

May 4, 4 p.m. Aspen Grove Ranch, Ojai (805) 640-0400 www.ojaiplays.org OPC celebrity guest artists will perform under a big-top tent at the ranch and the annual celebration will include cocktails, an auction and farm-to-table fare.

March 1 through April 4 Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org Works by artists Dyan Berk and Michael Stiler will be on display in the gallery.

Art Raffle and Gala

KFA Evening Talk

Chamber Music Concert

March 31 at 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org Pianist Natasha Kislenko and violinist Chavdar Parashkevov will perform a concert of classical music.

April “The Miser”

April 5 through April 28 Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 640-8797 www.OjaiACT.org Paul Sulzman will direct Molière’s farce, “The Miser,” in a commedia dell’arte interpretation of this hilarious classic about greed.

Art Exhibit And Raffle

April 5 through May 5 Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org The sixth annual “Great Art Theft” exhibit will be on display in the galleries and showcases. Local artists have donated art which will be raffled off to benefit the Art Center during a gala reception May 5 from 1 to 4 p.m.

124

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Art Exhibit

May 4 and 5, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. West Hills Gallery, 1545 Cuyama Road, Ojai (805) 798-2403 bobbib1@me.com Ventura County Pastel Artists will display their artwork in an exhibit titled “Spring into Pastels” at Bert Collins’ studio with a reception for the artists being held May 4 and an open house on May 5. Pastels as well as other media will be featured.

Art Exhibit

March 30, 7:30 to 9 p.m. Pine Cottage, 1070 McAndrew Road, Ojai (805) 646-2726 www.kfa.org Ravi Ravindra will deliver a talk on “Self-inquiry and Self-transformation.”

hosts its annual free gathering featuring several events. This is its 50th anniversary celebration.

Barbara Hannigan at the Ojai Music Festival - June 6-9, Libbey Bowl Town Talk

April 7, 4:30 to 6 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org/ “Meet the Curators” will be the title of this Town Talk, featuring the co-curators of the current exhibit, “From the Earth: Ceramic Art.” Richard Flores is a ceramic artist and instructor. Kevin Wallace is an author and the director of the Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts.

Native Plant Sale

April 13, 9 a.m. to noon Ojai Meadows Preserve Nursery (805) 649-6852, Ext. 2 info@ovlc.org The Ojai Valley Land Conservancy will hold a sale of native plants at its nursery on Besant Road.

“Feasting on History and Art”

April 13, 5 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390, Ext. 203 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org Advance reservations are required for this annual event. Attendees meet at the museum for wine and appetizers and find out their dinner destination, which will be at a private home with either a rich history and/or interesting art collection. Then, dessert is served at a third location, which this year will be the Smith-Hobson house, aka Ojai City Hall.

Earth Day

April 20, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Libbey Park (805) 649-6852, Ext. 2 info@ovlc.org Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, Ojai Valley Green Coalition and others are organizing this event featuring speakers, vendors, children’s activities and more.

Ojai Valley Tennis Tournament April 23 through 28, various times, matches start at 8 a.m. each day Libbey Park and various venues (805) 646-7241 www.ojaitourney.org “The Ojai” is the oldest amateur tennis tournament in the United States. This will be the 119th annual tournament.

May 5, 1 to 4 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org The “Great Art Theft” exhibit will end with the donated art being raffled off to benefit the Art Center during a gala reception.

Art Exhibit

May 10 through June 6 Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org Works by artist Tammy Bennett will be on display in the gallery. A reception will be held May 18 from 4 to 6 p.m.

Ojai Valley Garden Tour

May

May 11, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Various locations (805) 646-8126 www.ojaichamber.org The Ojai Valley Chamber of Commerce sponsors this annual tour of private gardens located around the Ojai Valley.

NHS Spring Dance Concerts

Art Exhibit

May 3, 7 p.m.; May 4, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Matilija Auditorium, 703 El Paseo Road, Ojai (805) 640-4343, Ext. 1861 www.nhsdance.com These dance concerts will feature 90 dance students from Nordhoff High School in a show titled “Phrases Rendered.” All pieces are based on common phrases, such as “two in the hand, one in the bush,” “walking on egg shells,” etc.

KFA Gathering

May 4 and 5, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Oak Grove School, 220 W. Lomita Ave., Ojai (805) 646-2726 www.kfa.org The Krishnamurti Foundation of America

May 17 through July 28 Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org “Founding Familias” will feature some of the families that first settled the Ojai Valley. How the original families and their descendants shaped the valley will be explored in this exhibition. An opening reception will be held May 17.

“Luzonica Birds of the World”

May 18 at 11 a.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060


www.lpforest.org/wheeler Erin Koski, director of Luzonica, will bring birds from near and far to promote understanding, appreciation and conservation.

Chamber Music Concert

May 19 at 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org A concert of classical music will be performed by the Singer Chamber Players: David Singer on clarinet, cellist Virginia Kron and pianist Miriam Arichea.

“Art in the Park”

May 25 and 26, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Libbey Park (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org Some of the finest artists in Ojai and from around California will showcase their work at the Ojai Art Center’s annual “Art in the Park.” Admission is free.

Memorial Day Breakfast

May 27, 7 to 10 a.m. American Legion Hall, 843 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai (805) 640-0277 pattibagley@gmail.com Free breakfast for all veterans will be served by the American Legion Auxuliary #482 ($4 for all others).

Memorial Day Concert

May 27, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Libbey Bowl, Ojai (805) 646-0076 pattibagley@gmail.com A free concert will be held in Libbey Bowl, beginning with patriotic music, followed by singers and speakers, honoring the fallen.

June National Trails Day

June 1, 8 a.m. to noon Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, 370 Baldwin Road, Ojai (805) 649-6852, Ext. 2 info@ovlc.org For more information on this volunteer event, go to their website or call or email.

“Hiking: Be Prepared”

June 1 at 11 a.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060 www.lpforest.org/wheeler Learn practical hiking tips backed by more than 20 years of hiking experience from James R. Caballero.

Rattlesnake Avoidance Training

June 2, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ojai Valley Land Conservancy, 370 Baldwin Road, Ojai (805) 649-6852, Ext. 2 info@ovlc.org OVLC will host a Rattlesnake Avoidance Training Class for Dogs. For more informa-

tion, go to their website or call or email.

Ojai Music Festival

June 6 through June 9, various times Libbey Bowl and other venues (805) 646-2094 www.ojaifestival.org The 73rd annual Ojai Music Festival will feature works selected by this year’s music director, Barbara Hannigan.

Art Exhibit

June 7 through July 3 Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 646-0117 www.ojaiartcenter.org The Fiber Artisan Exhibit will be on display in the gallery. A reception will be held June 14 from 4 to 6 p.m.

“Wonderful World of Bees”

June 8 at 11 a.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060 www.lpforest.org/wheeler Learn about the fascinating world of bees and its impact on the eco-system from entomologist Anna D. Howell.

KFA Evening Talk

June 8, 7:30 to 9 p.m. Pine Cottage, 1070 McAndrew Road, Ojai (805) 646-2726 www.kfa.org Mukesh Gupta will deliver a talk on “Is There a Completely Different Way of Living?”

Wine Festival

June 9, noon to 4 p.m. Lake Casitas (800) 648-4881 www.ojaiwinefestival.com Rotary Club of Ojai West will host its 33rd annual Ojai Wine Festival, featuring award-winning wineries and breweries, plus food, crafts, silent auction, live music, dance floor, and more.

“Mama Mia!”

June 14 through July 14 Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m. Ojai Art Center Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St. (805) 640-8797 www.OjaiACT.org Tracey Williams Sutton will direct “Mama Mia!,” a singing and dancing tribute to the superstar group ABBA® which is jampacked with energy and fun.

“Last Days of the Dinosaurs”

June 15 at 11 a.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060 www.lpforest.org/wheeler Learn how dinosaurs lived and died, even the sounds they made, from Richard Wade, scientist, artist and educator.

“Nature Walk with Julie Tumamait”

June 16 at 11 a.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060 www.lpforest.org/wheeler Identify the plants found in the Wheeler Gorge Campground and learn how they are used for food, medicines, ceremonies and games from Chumash Elder Julie Tumamait.

Lavender Festival

June 29, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Libbey Park (805) 646-3424 www.ojaivalleylavenderfestival.org The Ojai Valley Lavender Festival will feature a marketplace of lavender plants and products, plus cooking demonstrations, music and more.

“Saving the California Condors”

June 29 at 11 a.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060 www.lpforest.org/wheeler Learn what issues face this most endangered species and if they can truly be returned to the wild from Vince Gerwe, of Friends of the California Condor.

“Bats You Never Imagined”

June 29 at 1 p.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060 www.lpforest.org/wheeler Learn all about bats from Ranger Kris Mashburn who will introduce her pet bat and present a slide show with vampire bats and many others.

July Independence Day Events

July 3 and 4 Various times and locations See www.ojai4thofjuly.com for more information.

“Reptile Presentation”

July 6 at 11 a.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060 www.lpforest.org/wheeler Southwestern Herpetological Society will present live and impressive lizards and snakes and give advice on which reptile to pick as a pet.

“Into the Wild”

July 6 at 1 p.m. Wheeler Gorge Visitor Center, 17017 Maricopa Highway (805) 640-9060 www.lpforest.org/wheeler Reservations are required for this Naturalists program on respecting and protecting wildlife in our local forest, led by Gordie Hemphill, scouter and president of the LPFA Ojai Chapter.

Ongoing Events Certified Farmers’ Market

Every Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Matilija St. city parking lot behind the Arcade (805) 698-5555 Open-air market featuring locally grown produce, plants, musicians and handmade items, including soaps, baskets, beeswax candles and olive oil.

Ojai Historical Walking Tour

Every Saturday, October through June, 10:30 a.m. Depart from Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org Approximately one-hour tours of historical and cultural attractions in downtown Ojai.

First Friday Free

First Friday of each month, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org Admission to the museum is free the first Friday of each month.

Third Friday in Ojai

Third Friday of each month, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Ojai Valley Museum, 130 W. Ojai Ave. (805) 640-1390 www.ojaivalleymuseum.org Free admission and something extra every month.

Old-Time Fiddlers

Second and fourth Sunday, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. Oak View Community Center, 18 Valley Road, Oak View (805) 797-6563 www.calfiddlers.com Join the California State Old-Time Fiddlers, District 8, for a fun-filled afternoon of listening or dancing to country, western and bluegrass music. Free admission and parking.

Healing in America

First Tuesday, 7 to 8:15 p.m. Holistic Healing Center,107 W. Aliso St., Ojai (805) 640-0211 www.healinginamerica.com Guided meditation and healing circle offers an opportunity to escape stress and receive energy healing from trained practitioners.

Arts and Crafts Show

First Saturday of each month, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (except January) Parking Lot at Nordhoff High School, 1401 Maricopa Highway, Ojai (805) 640-4343 gduncan@ojaiusd.org Artists may reserve a 10-foot-by-10-foot booth space for $50, payable to the nonprofit Nordhoff Parent Association (NPA) to participate in this monthly Arts and Crafts Show. Booth fees are due one week prior to the show date and will benefit the school’s arts program.

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

125


126

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

127


EMERGENCY HEALTHCARE IN OJAI WHEN AN EMERGENCY OCCURS, TIME IS CRITICAL The highest level of Emergency Care is provided at Ojai Valley Community Hospital.

GRAND AVE.

RD

CU

YAM

AR

MA

D.

W. OJAI AVE.

Ojai Valley Community Hospital

L ST.

W. OJ AI

Vons Shopping Center

128

Post Office/Downtown Arcade E.

V JAI A W. O

SIGNA

R IC OPA HWY.

.

CH UR

CH

RD .

R. /

DEL NOR TE RD .

BLA

VE

RO

SIGNAL ST.

EL

A

Ojai Valley Inn & Spa

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Libbey Park

1306 Maricopa Hwy., Ojai, CA 93023 805/646-1401 | cmhshealth.org A not-for-profit organization.


OJAI DOOR & WINDOW

942 E. OJAI AVE. OJAI, CA 93023 P (805) 646 5032 • F (805) 646 1708

www.ojaidoorandwindow.com

Will your CDs roll over and play dead? A record number of CD dollars will be looking for a home in the new year. Maturing certificates of deposit will return billions to investors, many of whom will be forced to reinvest those funds.

BLOOD ORANGE/ CHRISTINE & THE QUEENS . APR18

But your CD money doesn’t have to roll over and play dead. Wells Fargo Advisors currently offers a host of CD alternatives with potentially higher yields, all with their own benefits and risks.

ZEDD W/ WHETHAN, YUNG BAE . APR 19

For more information on CD alternatives, please feel free to contact me and let’s try to put a little life back into your investment dollars.

RÜFÜS DU SOL W/ SG LEWIS. . APR 20 THE 1975 W/ PALE WAVES . . . . APR 21

CDs are federally insured up to $250,000 — short-term investments and offer a fixed rate of return. Any exchange from CDs to another investment may incur a greater degree of risk to capital than with certificates of deposit.

KALI UCHIS & JORJA SMITH . . . . . . . . . . .MAY 17 TRAIN / GOO GOO DOLLS . . JUN 11 REBELUTION W/ PROTOJE . . . JUN 16 SLIGHTLY STOOPID . . . . . . .AUG 04 JOJO SIWA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 11

Andrew I. Snett Managing Director – Investments 5820 Canoga Ave., Ste. 100 Woodland Hills, CA 91367 818-226-2275 • 1-800-400-1177 CA Insurance Lic. #0B28466

THE AVETT BROTHERS . . . . AUG 24 IRATION W/ PEPPER . . . . . . . .AUG 25 MARK KNOPFLER. . . . . . . . . SEP 20

Investment and Insurance Products:

NOT FDIC Insured

NO Bank Guarantee

GARY CLARK JR . . . . . . . . . . SEP 27

MAY Lose Value

Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member FINRA/SIPC. © 2009, 2017 Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. All rights reserved. 0117-06041 [81035-v2] (3791701_513551)

TICKETS AVAILABLE: SB BOWL OR AT AXS.COM / SBBOWL.COM / GOLDENVOICE.COM

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019 SBB_OVG_190307_v1.indd 1

129

3/6/19 7:21 PM


Tires and Wheels Alignments, Suspension Brakes and Oil Change.

STAY LOCAL BUY LOCAL

Mention our ad and get

$20

off a set of 4 tires

’S

FRED

FREDS TIRE All Major Tire Brands Available From Trucks to Teslas

30 YEARS IN THE OJAI VALLEY

Serving the Ojai Valley, Ventura and Santa Barbara communities

0pen Monday through Friday 8:00 AM – 5:30 PM • Saturday from 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM. 545 N. Ventura Ave. Oak View CA 93022 Visit

Phone: 805-649-2830 us online @ Fredstireman.com FOREIGN & DOMESTIC AUTO REPAIR

CASH FOR CARS LOCAL BUYER LOOKING FOR CLASSICS, COLLECTIONS, LATE MODEL, ESTATES RUNNING OR NOT CALL JIMMY- ANYTIME

805-705-4674 ESTIMATES BY PHONE 130

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Voted Best Auto Repair in the Ojai Valley

Putting the Art in the Fine Art of Auto repair

OJAI VALLEY IMPORTS 646-6106 996 EAST OJAI AVENUE ovimports@sbcglobal.net


coastal

softub and spa

warehouse

Made in America 5,000 sq ft Showroom 65 Models, 5 Brands Spas & Swim Spas 6019 Olivas Park Dr. Suite A, Ventura CA 93001 805-654-9000 Open Monday - Saturday

SPECTACULAR SPRING SALE!

spa-warehouse.com

Residential & Commercial Free Estimates Re-Roofs Repairs

Your trusted roofing company Locally owned and operated • 22 years experience

805 -707- 3111 - office 805 -707- 3044 - mobile aegmroofing@yahoo.com aegmroofing.com L ic#1050091

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

131


40 Years of Experience “Thank You Ojai We are committed to giving all of our clients the BEST service possible” Best Designer/ Draftsman

805-640-0262 kerrymillerdesigns.com 132

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

805.646.1373

info@titus-painting.com

Ojai Custom Paint Inc. lic# 983959 VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

133


O Between Megalopolis and Wilderness By Jim Churchill

134

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

ne way to exist in the world is to divide people into “from here” and “not from here.” I did that for a very long time. I was a local snob. I took pride in my connection to local geography, history and gossip, and I was comforted by the sense of superiority I derived from that. The sense of superiority was specifically in relation to tourists — people “Not from Here.” Over the years, my stance has softened. Farming has done that for me. From January into May, I sell tangerines and avocados to all comers at the Ojai Farmers’ Market. I’ve had basically the same spot for some 20 years. It is a great place to see people. I see the schools of visitors who float through our town,


they continue to bear fruit every year. The Ojai Pixie trees in the orchard used to be 25-foot-tall giants. They are on a rootstock called Troyer, which turns out to yield very large trees. They got to be too tall — too dangerous and expensive to harvest, too tall and dense to treat for Asian citrus psyllid — so for three years we had a pruning crew work on them and now the trees are basically 16 feet high and we hope to keep them that way.

like colored fish nosing and darting here and there. And I see the locals who float through the market in shifting dyads and other arrangements. The visitors are just as lovely and inquisitive and happy to be at the market as the locals, and their money (as they say) all spends the same. So maybe having a stand at the Farmers Market helped cure me of my local snobbism. The reason I get to have a stand at the Ojai Farmers’ Market is because I get to have an orchard. Because of the orchard, we have the tangerines and avocados I get to sell at the market. I know this seems an obvious thing to say, verging on tautology, but there was never a plan to set things up that way. I get to have an orchard because chance blew my parents here in the 1950s, and my dad bought land in 1970. The tax structure in the 1970s favored certain people getting into small-scale agriculture and my dad, an educational filmmaker, along with doctors and airline pilots and other middle-class successful professionals (that used to be a thing, a successful middleclass professional), planted an avocado orchard. When I became unemployed elsewhere in what I assumed was my life’s path as some form of urban knowledgeworker, my mom suggested I might like to come back to Ojai and “run the ranch.” And so I did, 41 years ago and, over the years, Lisa and I morphed into farmers.

like — it sits between megalopolis and wilderness, and is characterized by people working the land. It’s not suburbs, it’s not commerce, it’s not recreational, it’s not wilderness. A pastoral working landscape can be a deep pleasure to experience. People respond to the sight and sometimes to the smells and sounds of a working landscape with delight. (Sometimes, of course, the smells and sounds are less than delightful.) The most beautiful part of our orchard is the avocados. It’s the oldest part — most of the trees were planted in 1974, a few of them date from the 1950s, and it has not stayed static. In 1989, it froze to sticks. You could stand in the middle of it and see landscape 360 degrees around. It was originally planted to be one variety of avocado with an upright growth habit. Then, most of the trees were grafted to another variety with a more spreading habit, so now all the trees are too close together. It makes for a wonderful canopy, as well as a giant management problem trying to keep them pruned in such a way that

So I get to experience the magic of the working landscape every day, whether it’s harvest season or farming time. I get to experience it at 3 a.m. when the frost alarm wakes me up to start the wind machines; I get to experience it in July when it’s been 100-plus degrees for weeks; and I get to experience it at 6:30 on a foggy morning when we’re getting ready to harvest. I came to realize at the Farmers’ Market that people come from near and far to visit here because — in part — of the extraordinary beauty of our working landscapes. We have these orchards that occupy the East End of the valley and snake up Matilija Canyon. They are beautiful and they smell good. The production of food is primal. it soothes people’s souls to be in touch with it. And so we arrive … not as locals or tourists, but as co-enthusiasts, all of us digging the beauty and bounty of this place.

Left: Heading to harvest before the trees were shortened Above: Ojai Certified Farmers’ Market Below: Avocado trees after the freeze of 1989

Or, more specifically, we became orchardists. An orchard may be the archetype of a working landscape as an object of pleasure. A working landscape is just what it sounds VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

135


Duette® honeycomb shades

Her curiosity: limitless. Your window fashions: cordless. Discover innovative window fashions from Hunter Douglas that enhance safety at the window. Ask today about a wide array of cordless operating systems including the ultimate in operating convenience, PowerView® Motorization.

Chisum's Floor Covering 118 Bryant St Ojai, CA ~B

~B

M-F: 10:00 am - 5:00 pm Sat: By Appointment Only Sun: Closed (805) 646-2440 www.chisumsfloorcovering.com Contractors License #242944 ~B

~B

~B

~B

Ask us about special savings on select Hunter Douglas operating systems.

~C

~C

©2019 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 16CSMAGDUC2

136 VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019 ©2019 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas or their respective owners. 16CSMAGDUC2


Greg Rents - Party Rentals

NEW Frozen Drink Machine  Tables - Chairs - Patio Heaters

(805) 649-2590 www.gregrents.com

Have questions about the drought? As the CMWD Board considers a Stage 4 Drought Declaration, the District will be providing information to customers on what Stage 4 will mean. We’ve set up a webpage that we will update with details on conservation efforts, water usage restrictions, and other important facts.

Learn more: www.CasitasStage4.org VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

137


FAIRWEATHER HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING, INC.

805-658-8385

Proudly serving the Ojai Valley and itʼs surrounding areas for all their HVAC needs. 30 years of installation and service experience for high effieciency gas furnaces, heat pumps and air conditioning systems.

SENIO

ARY L IT

•We stand behind all our installations with outstanding warranty and service programs. •Customer satisfaction, safety and quality are our #1 priority. •We service all brands of HVAC residential and commercial equipment. AND MI R •Full line of Daikin Mini-Split systems ready to install. •24 hour emergency service. •Honesty is ALWAYS the best policy. D C O U NT

S

IS

CL #892661

“We Aim To Please”

CALL US TODAY TO GET YOUR PROJECT UNDERWAY! Dave Meisch, Owner Lic. # 536193 • topgunojai.com Office: (805)-646-8209 • Mobile: (805) 302-3460

138

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

139


Small Business Coverage We’re small business owners too. Let’s talk insurance options. Call in, click in or walk in for a quote today.

Bob Daddi Insurance Agent

805-646-0101 | bob.daddi.gxql@statefarm.com | Lic#0619549 140

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


GARDEN DESIGN PLANT SALES • CONSULTATION Australian and South African Native Plants Drought Hardy • Beautiful • Tough

Growing Grounds

Casitas Springs, Ojai Valley

By Appointment 805-649-3362

www.australianplants.com jo@australianplants.com

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

141


NOW OPEN! 2812 Camino Dos Rios, Newbury Park, CA (RIGHT OFF WENDY DRIVE, NEXT TO WENDY’S)

805-262-0756

Ventura Store 2323 E. Main St, Ventura (CORNER OF SEAWARD & MAIN)

Travis & Audra Escalante

would like to thank everyone for all the kind words and thoughts for all that happened during the fire. I was just doing what I felt led to do, "SERVE OUR COMMUNITY”. So from both of us, and the entire AMERICAN MATTRESS MAN family, you’re very welcome and thank you.

Travis Escalante

Owner, AMERICAN MATTRESS MAN MyAmericanMattress.com PSALM 4:8

805-653-2323

www.myamericanmattress.com

MON-FRI 10AM-7PM • SAT. 10AM-6PM • SUN. 12PM-5PM 142

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Haney Landscape Custom Designs & Inspiring Installations

Water-Wise Landscapes

Randy Haney

805-640-8607 HaneyLandscape.com CA State License #551409

Since 1989

Pavers & Concrete Outdoor Rooms & Kitchens Fireplaces Lighting & Irrigation Pools & Spas

HOLISTIC, REGENERATIVE GARDENS

Organically improving gardens through water catchment systems, composting, compost teas & extracts, and mulching. Native and Mediterranean garden specialists. Are you ready to switch to an appropriate Southern California landscape?

(805) 640-1827

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

143


Tucked away on 220 verdant acres lies The Farmhouse, Ojai Valley Inn’s new expansive culinary and event center. by Alicia Doyle

The Farmhouse Revealed D

esigned to celebrate the wonder and art of food through worldclass culinary experiences, The Farmhouse takes form as a series of natural indoor-outdoor spaces, each with a unique personality that flows seamlessly into the next. Renowned chef, author and James Beard Foundation Award winner Nancy Silverton will serve as The Farmhouse’s premier culinary ambassador, curating a series of experiential, culinary-driven

144

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

events slated throughout 2019. “With the opening of The Farmhouse at Ojai Valley Inn, we’re thrilled to provide exceptional culinary experiences in a venue that is truly groundbreaking in the greater Southern California region” said Chris Kandziora, vice president of marketing at Ojai Valley Inn. “We’re confident that this endeavor, in partnership with Nancy Silverton and our team of extraordinary culinary


talent, will bring Ojai Valley Inn to the national forefront as an esteemed West Coast culinary destination.” In her role as debut culinary ambassador of The Farmhouse at Ojai Valley Inn, Silverton will cultivate select bucketlist-worthy epicurean events, bringing together the crème de la crème of the culinary world and giving guests the opportunity to experience master classes, book signings, talks and workshops. Highlights of these events include book signing and family-style lunch with former New York Times restaurant critic Ruth Reichl; a unique opportunity to “Eat Like Phil” with television writer and producer Phil

Rosenthal, host of Netflix’s popular “Somebody Feed Phil” series, during a multi-course lunch of menu items that highlight his travels and finds; and a celebration of pasta with acclaimed chef, pasta master and culinary storyteller Evan Funke. In addition to Silverton-authored signature events, The Farmhouse offers a robust calendar of exceptional culinary programs and events. Highlights from the standout lineup include: a day with wine icon Rajat Parr, complete with tastings, book signing and a gardenparty-style dinner with library releases; an interactive five-course dinner prepared and served by winemakers

Maggie Harrison of Antica Terra and Lillian and Brad Grimes of Abreu; and a special-occasion dinner designed by and celebrating the cuisine of two-time James Beard Foundation Award winner chef Gavin Kaysen. Featuring a path of sun-splashed nooks dotted with ancient native olive trees, The Farmhouse is home to an organic chef’s garden cultivated by beloved local landscape designer Scott Daigre. In his role, Daigre will design the content and layout for the “inspiration garden” on a seasonal basis, including the procurement of plants, seedlings and seeds to provide year-round interest and inspiration.

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

145


Ojai’s national reputation as a visitor destination and desirable place to live continues to grow with recent features in major publications, including Condé Nast Traveler, Sunset, Men’s Journal, The New Yorker, The New York Times and The Washington Post.

Moving to Ojai? For the best in local real estate check out Ojai’s only weekly real estate supplement with open house map, inside the Ojai Valley News every Friday. Free online at ojaivalleynews.com

146

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Magnificent East End 40 Acre Estate with Sweeping Views Newly Offered at $5,995,000 One of the most magnificent estates in Ojai's desirable East End, a private retreat on 40 acres with sweeping valley, mountain and celestial views, is minutes from town.

This exceptional property offers an artisanal Tuscan villa, on a single level, with gracious indoor-outdoor living and spectacular views from every room. Surrounded by vineyards, olive groves, a mandala lavender farm, a shaded dry garden, a terraced orchard and acres , of natural beauty and hiking trails. Special features include active solar hot water, a solar heated infinity pool & spa, a custom wine cellar, 3 fireplaces, 16 FT ceilings, a zero EMF sauna, pet fencing and an EV charging station. Included also: guest house level site with site plan, tests, and reports. An abundant well and a private water system supplies the entire property.

Gated Private Lane

Lavender Farm

Unrivaled Vistas

OjaiVilla.com

Sherry Stuckey, M.B.A. REALTOR and Managing Broker 226 Ojai Avenue, 101-255 Ojai, CA 93023

Experience More:

Call: 805.216.3700 Or Visit: www.LuxCoast.com CalBRE 01440724 VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

147


THE WILLIAMSON-VANKEULEN GROUP LET US SHOW YOU WHAT LIVING OJAI IS ALL ABOUT!

MAJESTIC MEDITERRANEAN ESTATE

MARC WHITMAN MASTERPIECE

10710 ENCINO DRIVE

SPACIOUS FAMILY COMPOUND

10976 ALTO COURT

ANNE WILLIAMSON • 805.320.3314 REALTOR OF THE YEAR 2014 • DRE #01448441

109 N BLANCHE ST. #100 OJAI, CA 93023

CASSANDRA VANKEULEN • 805.798.1272 REALTOR, DESIGNER • DRE #01929366

LAUREN VANKEULEN • 805.798.2397 REALTOR • DRE #01973956

WWW.THEWILLIAMSONVANKEULENGROUP.COM | 1.833.BUY.OJAI

148

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

12768 BLUE HERON CIRCLE


VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

149


SANTA BARBARA • CASA LOMA Historic al 1920’s built Spanish e state that enter tained such prominent gue sts as Charle s Lindbergh, Jimmy Doolit tle, Amelia Earhar t and Hap Arnold. This unique home sits on a 26,5 0 0 square foot lot and feature s a three-level, 6 bed, 3 bath re sidence, and a legal gue st apar tment with its own 2 beds, 1 bath, living room and dining room.

VENTURA • RINCON Upgraded Mus sle Shoals Beach t wo stor y luxur y duplex with third floor roof top deck featuring breathtaking panoramic ocean, island, mountain and Pacific Coast Highway views. Bot tom unit offers t wo beds, one bath, open concept kitchen and large double sliders to the patio terrace and backyard. Top unit has three beds, separate private patio deck and large master suite.

3030 Samarkand Drive $2,700,000 Nate Minkel 805.794.9588 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

HUGE PRICE REDUCTION

MOORPARK Sprawling 3.67 acre s with a 3+2 home, duplex with 2+1 each, and a 2+1 modular. 10763 Ternez Drive $1,295,000 Nate Minkel 805.794.9588

OCEAN VIEW LOT

VENTURA Spectacular cit y and islands views from this unique, over / acre parcel in Ondulando. 660 Skyview Terrace $549,000 Nate Minkel 805.794.9588

6670-6672 W Pacific Coast Highway $2,395,000 Nate Minkel 805.794.9588

IN ESCROW

IN ESCROW

VENTURA Spacious upgraded 2 bed, 3 bath condo located near prime Downtown Ventura.

OJAI Duplex offering a 3+2 and 2+1, yard, garage and storage in the hear t of Meiners Oaks.

903 Vallecito Drive $675,000 Nate Minkel 805.794.9588

163-165 Pueblo Avenue $599,000 Nate Minkel 805.794.9588

SOLD

SOLD

OAK VIEW Luxur y eque strian e state with a detached gue st house on 2. 26 acre s.

OJAI Industrial farm house st yle e state with mountain views and a vineyard!

Sold for $1,295,000 Nate Minkel 805.794.9588

Sold for $2,200,000 Residences and $600,000 Vineyard/Business Nate Minkel 805.794.9588

NATE MINKEL 805.794.9588 nminkel@livsothebysrealtyca.com DRE 01483520 #thelifeyoulove

for accuracy. LIV Sotheby’s International Realty is independently owned and operated and supports the principals of the Fair Housing Act. Nate Minkel represented the buyers of 240 France Circle, Ojai.


VENTURA Award winning, custom-built home combining Green building components and spectacular views. This 3 bedroom, 2 / bath home is stunning and efficient. Built in 20 05 with floor to ceiling glas s walls, it ’s an enter tainer’s dream or a great place to coz y up to a fire and rela x. Open floor plan upstairs incorporate s the kitchen, dining and living space with a large additional media /family room. The home utilize s sustainable, recycled and renewable re source s, high-efficiency glas s with tinting, natural cros s ventilation and thermal chimney de sign, solar energ y and hydronic radiant in-floor heating. 465 Mint Lane $1,995,000 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

IN ESCROW

NEW LISTING

VENTURA Large custom home on a corner lot. Great location, ver y close to hospital and shopping.

VENTURA This Ralston Village condo is in a prime location with easy acce s s to the 101 freeway.

SUBMIT ALL OFFERS

VENTURA Stunning hillside home with 3 bedrooms and 2 baths, completely renovated.

3333 San Luis $825,000 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

375 Mariposa Drive $1,359,000 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

NEW LISTING

IN ESCROW

VENTURA Per fect for first time buyers. Remodeled interior make s for a easy move in.

VENTURA Spacious upgraded 2 bed, 3 bath condo located near prime Downtown Ventura.

194 W Prospect $467,500 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

903 Vallecito Drive $675,000 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

NEW LISTING

VENTURA This proper t y is one of the cleane st you’ll see. Prime loc ation near shopping. 43 Madera Avenue $639,000 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

SUBMIT ALL OFFERS

JUST LISTED

VENTURA This beautiful 4 bed, 2 bath horse proper t y sits on 1 acre. Easy acce s s to the 3 3 and 150.

NORTHRIDGE Inviting 3 bed, 2 bath condo in a loc ated in a gated communit y with pool and tennis cour ts.

10464 Santa Ana Road $745,000 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

17241 Roscoe Boulevard, Unit 5 $479,000 Larry Krogh 805.312.0512

LARRY KROGH 805.312.0512 lkrogh@livsothebysrealtyca.com DRE 01305510 #thelifeyoulove

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

151


ROSALIE ZABILLA “Live where you Love”

See more at 11480SulphurMountain.com Cool California Bungalow nestled on one of the sweetest spots in downtown Ojai! This vintage charmer blends the best of the classic and contemporary. The lightfilled, open floor plan is wonderful for entertaining. 3 beds, 1 bath and an additional upstairs loft. Beautifully landscaped backyard and versatile live/work zoning. This property is also a legal B&B and Seller has architectural plans for an amazing Accessory Dwelling Unit addition. Offered at $725,000

Gated and private Spanish-style estate on 110+/- acres with the most beautiful views in Ojai! Main house has Great Room with open-beam, soaring ceilings and never-ending windows as well as a sprawling Gourmet Kitchen. 4 beds and 2 baths Guest House and a sunny Art Studio. Very private, solar-powered with approx. 200 olive trees and 20 fruit trees. Offered at $3,490,000

See more at 310Aliso.com

ROSALIE ZABILLA

805.455.3183 HomesByRosalie.com Rosalie@HomesByRosalie.com

DRE: 1493361

SANTA BARBARA BROKERAGE | SANTA YNEZ VALLEY BROKERAGE | MONTECITO BROKERAGE Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity. SIR DRE: 899496

152

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Joan Roberts Broker Associate/Realtor • DRE#00953244

261 - 263 East Villanova Road, Ojai Authentic Montana Log Cabin with Log Cabin Guest House on 1.4 Acres. Main cabin is approx 2,700 square feet with soaring ceilings, 3 + 3 plus a 1 + 1 guest house. There is also a large permanent teepee on the grounds. This property is a beautiful work of art for the discerning buyer. $1,300,000

30 years local experience

Residential • Land • Investment

805-223-1181

Roberts4homes@gmail.com VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

153


I

admit it! I’m addicted to coffee. I mean real coffee. Strong and black!

Several years ago, my dear wife bought my favorite coffee mug at Rains Department Store. On it there is a black-and-white photo of downtown Ojai, looking west, when Ojai was still called Nordhoff. The photo is mainly of the thennew Arcade. How do I know this? Because at the far left edge of the photo is the post office bell tower as it’s being built. It has scaffolding all around it and the domed top has yet to be added. So, the photo was most likely taken

LOOK BACK IN OJAI with Drew Mashburn in late 1916 or early 1917 because construction was completed prior to the first Ojai Day that was held April 7, 1917. Edward Drummond Libbey of Libbey Glass had the common-looking, old, western-style downtown — with its wooden boardwalks and false fronts — made over to create the beautiful downtown architecture we have today. But, he didn’t mess with the Ojai State Bank or the Jack Boyd Memorial Club that were prominent structures on Main Street and east of his 154

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

new and grand post office. I’m not sure as to why, but I suspect that they were simply too magnificent in appearance to justify changing, or he had a gut feeling that if he did, he’d get his new-to-town butt kicked by longtime Nordhoff folks who loved those old buildings. The Ojai State Bank’s architectural style was neoclassical with tall, heavy columns that looked like something out of ancient Rome to me. I understand it was built of brick. After Libbey had the Arcade, Pergola and Post Office in the downtown area done over

Edward had dared to change the appearance of this sacredto-the-community men’s-folk clubhouse, I’m fairly sure his hide would have been stretched above its fireplace mantel. But, change is inevitable. I’m not sure exactly when, but the Ojai State Bank was acquired by the Bank of America. It set up shop in the old building for a number of years and, somewhere along the line, the bank wound up owning the Jack Boyd Memorial Club. In fact, in 1956, the Bank of America decided to build a new bank on the lot occupied by the

downtown to witness the Boyd Club being raised up off its foundation and onto the trailer and big truck used to move it east on Ojai Avenue. Believe it or not, Mom and Dad didn’t let me hang alone downtown at that age, but I was aware the Boyd Club was going to be headed up Park Road. We lived on East Aliso Street and our home backed up to Sarzotti Park. My neighborhood buddies and I rode our bikes down the street and watched the crew move the old building from Ojai Avenue onto Park Road. We probably drove the crew

Want to know what it smells like under the Jack Boyd Center? in the plaster/stucco-sided Mission Revival style of his liking, the old bank must have really clashed with them in appearance. It was located where the public parking lot is at the east end of the Pergola. The Jack Boyd Memorial Club sat on the east side of the Ojai State Bank and along Ojai Creek (aka East Barranca). It was a masculine-looking building with a dark roof of wooden shingles and its covered porches were supported by very thick wooden posts. The Craftsman Bungalow-style building was built in 1903 to be a clubhouse for men. If ol’

Jack Boyd Memorial Club. The bank needed to rid itself of the old clubhouse. The Lions Club offered to take it off the bank’s hands, but members changed their minds when they heard that the city of Ojai was tossing around the idea of building a community recreation center. Upon hearing this, the Lions suggested that the city take ownership of the old men’s clubhouse and have it moved to a suitable site. That happened in February 1957. It was decided the Jack Boyd Memorial Club would be moved to Sarzotti Park. I was a few months short of being 6 years old, so I wasn’t

crazy because, as they ever so slowly moved the building, we kept circling around the truck, trailer and building to witness all we could. We were enthralled with what was going on. At one point, several of us youngsters ditched our bikes and crawled under the trailer because we wanted to see the bottom of the building. I don’t know what the heck we were thinking and some adult guy chased us out from under there. Kids! The building was offloaded onto heavy, wooden-beam cribbing to where it sits today. I’m not positive, but I think it took two trips to get all of the


Drew Mashburn knows! building from Ojai Avenue to Sarzotti Park. I only recall the one section of building being moved. Guess what? As the building sat there for a few months being readied for lowering onto a new foundation, us kids got under it several more times! After all these years, I can still recall how it smelled. It had a strong smell of musty, old wood. Yet, it was a pleasant smell. The building sat on that cribbing for what seemed like a lifetime to me. I could hardly wait to have it open into the new recreation center I had heard it was going to become. My buddies and I would go up there often to check on the progress of the building being permanently set in place.

One time, two of my East Aliso Street buddies (Mike Payton and Mark Kingsbury) were behind the building. I think it was Mike who climbed up a tall pine tree in the row of pines that ran from the western side of the park clear to the east side and just south of the building. Mike was throwing down pine cones to Mark and me. There was all kinds of scrap lumber scattered around the building. Mike flung down a pine cone from his lofty position. Mark and I stepped back in an attempt to catch it. I stepped onto a 16d nail that was protruding through a piece of scrap wood. When I lifted up my foot, the wood lifted off the ground as well. It really freaked me out! I really buried that big ol’ nail

into my heel. I think it went clear up to my tailbone. All I could think about was what Mom had told me about stepping on a rusty nail … that being, you can get lockjaw from it! I pulled the nail and chunk of wood loose, then hightailed it for home at close to the speed of sound. Mark could usually run as fast as me, but he was no match for my speeding frame that day. I think I must have left a sonic boom. I believe it was in about April that the building was set onto its new foundation, then opened for public use that summer. My puncture wound had healed by that time and I didn’t get lockjaw because Mom made me get a dang tetanus shot. So, I was one of the first of the neighborhood

kids to get to use the new recreation center, which became known as the Boyd Club, now the Boyd Center. Oh, I almost forgot. Unfortunately, the Ojai State Bank building was demolished in 1960. I know that its big Roman-looking columns were saved, but I have been unable to locate them. By the way, in case any of you know of a coffee mug for sale with a photo of the Ojai State Bank and the Jack Boyd Memorial Club on it, please let me know where my wife might purchase it for me. Drew Mashburn is a volunteer at the Ojai Valley Museum. VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

155


www.Ojai byKristen.com

WWW.507GRIDLEY.COM

ENJOY AN UPSCALE LIFESTYLE IN THIS COUNTRY-STYLE, TWO-STORY CRAFTSMAN HOME WITH ATTACHED GUEST SUITE IN OJAI, JUST MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN OJAI. NESTLED ON A COUNTRY ROAD, AMONGST BEAUTIFUL MATURE LANDSCAPING, THIS HOME IS SITED FOR PRIVACY.

Experts in all phases of hardwood sales, custom fabrication, installation, stairs, recoats, and finishes. www.artizenfloorcorp.com

156

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


PROFESSIONAL PEST CONTROL TERMITE

GENERAL PEST

Organic Pest Control Ants • Spiders • Fleas Roaches • Beetles Silverfish • Earwigs Bed Bugs • Wasps Rodents • Gophers • Moles Dead Animal Removal

Tent Fumigation Heat Treatments Localized Drywood & Full Subterranean Treatments Full Termite Inspections for Escrow & VA Loans Wood Repairs

WWW.ERTPC.COM RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • AGRICULTURAL • INDUSTRIAL SINGLE, MONTHLY, BI-MONTHLY & QUARTERLY SERVICES

Call for Free Estimates!

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED 80 YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE OVER 3 GENERATIONS

805.633.9266

Payment Options Available!

155 E. EL ROBLAR DR • MEINERS OAKS VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

157


Vivienne Moody CA DRE Lic. # 00989700

(805)

798-1099

www.

Stunning Vistas Luxurious privacy in Upper Ojai ~ Coming Soon ~

OjaiViv.com

vmoody10@sbcglobal.net

We List... and Sell.

Ojai Bungalow

www.Bear-Creek-Ranch.com

Orchards & Outbuildings

Cabin + more on 39 amazing acres

Riki Strandfeldt CA DRE Lic. # 01262026

(805) www.

794-6474

Riki4RealEstate.com

riki4realestate@aol.com 158

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Over 12 acres + well

Craftsmanship

3000 sq ft Industrial-Ag Bldg.

Creekside Village Condo Ground floor 3rd bedroom


FRED DRENNAN IS ....

Worried

in Ojai

As you know, I’m a worrier. I worry about a lot of things. Lately, I started worrying about getting old. A few weeks ago, we went on a really fun bicycle tour with 10 other bicyclists. On the last day, we had dinner in a nice restaurant in Deadwood, S.D. We all snapped digital pictures of each other and promised to exchange our photos. I was enjoying the first batch of shared shots when I came across a close-up photo of a wrinkly old bald guy wearing reading glasses. Who in the heck was that? I didn’t remember him being on the tour. I started to call in the wifey to see if she could solve the mystery when I realized the old guy was me! Looking at yourself on a 24-inch HD monitor can be downright scary. My heart rate revved up a notch. I went into the bathroom, looked in the mirror and made a closer inspection. There was no denying it, I wasn’t getting older, I was old. Maybe plastic surgery was in order. I took my thumb and index finger and pulled back the folds of skin next to my ears. I immediately looked 15 years younger, but now my eyes looked all wrinkly. I then used my middle finger to pull back the folds of skin next to my eyes. I then looked at my wrinkled forehead and realized I didn’t have enough fingers because my forehead was twice as big as before.

on you can’t help but notice how they propagate. Just looking at them makes me worry. This often leads to a lively discussion and inspection with the other Masters Swimmers. Does this one look suspicious? Are the black ones skin cancer? Before long, I realized the other swimmers just accepted that cataracts and liver spots aren’t that big of a deal. They can be easily fixed. I had myself really stressed out for nothing. I decided I needed to change direction. Being a child of the ’60s, I remembered a book called “Be Here Now.” I never read the book, but I liked the title. Greatest three words of wisdom I ever heard. When I find myself worrying too much, I just say to myself, “Be here now.” Live in the moment. It works. I decided seniors have advantages. Recently, we went to the movies and I didn’t even have to ask for a senior

discount. The other day, I was entering our club and a young lady opened the door for me. We went grocery shopping and the bagger asked if I needed help getting them in the car. After this comment, I started paying attention to my posture. Cooper, our family dog, is showing signs of old age. His muzzle is turning grey and he’s getting rather thick around the middle. In human years, he would qualify for a senior discount. But Cooper doesn’t know he’s old. He totally lives in the moment. When I get his leash off the hook to walk him down to the dog park, he knows playtime is about to begin. I decided he has the right idea. Old age is what you make it. Just keep learning, eat right, exercise and make sure you get plenty of playtimes. Oh, I almost forgot, no more close inspections in the mirror.

My worrying went to the next level. What else has snuck up on this 71-yearold? I started thinking about all of the things going “on the blink.” Recently I went to my eye doctor because things were getting blurry. He said I was “pre-cataract,” meaning cataract surgery is around the corner. Another consequence of spending most of my time outdoors is “liver spots.” Sitting in the Jacuzzi at the club with your Speedo VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

159


Cheryl & Ray Deckert Broker Associates

Maria DePaola Sheryl Whipple Realtor Partner Realtor Associate

Robert Perron Realtor Associate

Paul Johnsen Realtor Associate

1003 N. Drown Avenue - $849,000

4 bedrooms/2 bathrooms, 1,392 total sq. ft. on .44 acres Located in downtown's highly sought-after Ojai Village, this 3 bedroom home boasts original, refinished hardwood floors, newer quartz counter tops and cabinets in the kitchen, spacious rooms, and partial mountain views. Behind the main home you will find a 1 bed/1 bath, 252 square foot legal second dwelling suitable for a studio, guest quarters or whatever your needs may be. Sitting on almost one-half acre of level land, this property has plenty of room to accommodate horses, a gentleman's farm, or a delightful vegetable or flower garden. This one has location, land and looks. Don't let it pass you by!

www.BestBuysInOjai.com ~

Phone: 805.272.5221 ~ Email: Team@DeckertDePaola.com

BRE #01761150, 00780642, 01877842, 01962884, 02019595, 02018091, 01859199

160

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


Directory of Advertisers 101 CBD........................................................ 111 805 Bar & Grilled Cheese.............................. 101 Aaron, John.................................................... 112 Ace Hardware................................................. 137 AEGM Roofing............................................. 131 Agave Maria’s................................................... 99 Agora Foundation............................................ 43 American Mattress......................................... 142 Andrew Snett, Wells Fargo Advisor............... 129 Anne Williamson, REALTOR...................... 148 Artizen Floors................................................ 156 August Laurel Gallery...................................... 61 Australian Native Plants................................. 141 AZU Restaurant............................................. 101 Bamboo Creek Spa......................................... 106 Bart’s Books...................................................... 44 Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts.................. 59 Besant Hill School............................................ 32 Bikini Factory................................................... 46 Blanche Sylvia ................................................. 46 Blue Iguana & Emerald Iguana ....................... 30 Boccali’s Restaurant.......................................... 77 Boku Superfood.............................................. 100 Bonnie Lu’s Restaurant.................................... 99 BookEnds Bookstore........................................ 45 Brittany Davis Gallery...................................... 16 Bryant Circle Mini Storage............................ 157 Buena Tile........................................................ 11 Camouflage...................................................... 52 Canvas & Paper.................................................. 9 Casa de Lago.................................................... 99 Cash for Cars................................................. 130 Casitas Municipal Water District................... 137 Cassandra VanKeulen, REALTOR................ 148 Cate School...................................................... 33 Celebrating Women Center........................... 106 Chamber on the Mountain............................ 121 Char & Jerry Michaels, REALTORS................ 2 Chisum’s Floor Covering................................ 136 Coastal Softub................................................ 131 Coast Supply Co............................................. 139 Community Memorial Hospital..................... 128 Copa Cubana.................................................. 101 Cottage Hospital............................................ 107 Day Spa of Ojai................................................ 31 Derby & Derby................................................ 73 Donna Sallen, REALTOR............................. 162 EverReady Termite & Pest Control............... 157 Fairweather Heating & Air............................ 138 Fig Bungalow................................................... 25 Food Harmonics............................................... 79 For Your Home................................................ 66 Frameworks of Ojai.......................................... 61

Fred’s Tireman................................................ 130 Friend’s Ranches............................................... 79 Gabriela Ceseña, REALTOR............................ 4 Green Goddess Gardens................................ 143 Greg Rents..................................................... 137 Haney Landscape........................................... 143 Heavenly Honey............................................. 100 Humane Society of Ventura County.............. 116 Indian Summer................................................ 46 Jes MaHarry Jewelry........................................ 15 Jewel Buddha.................................................... 60 Jim & Rob’s Fresh Grill.................................... 90 JJ’s Sports Zone................................................ 97 Joan Roberts, REALTOR.............................. 153 Jones & Co....................................................... 53 JSG Law........................................................... 73 Kariella............................................................. 52 Kathy Hoff, REALTOR................................ 156 Kerry Miller Designer/Builder....................... 132 Kitchen Places.................................................. 51 Krishnamurti Foundation of America.............. 38 Kristen Currier, REALTOR.......................... 156 Krotona Institute.............................................. 33 Larry Krogh, REALTOR............................... 151 Lauren Van Keulen, REALTOR.................... 148 Lavender Festival............................................ 123 Lavender Inn.................................................. 116 Lisa Clark, REALTOR.................................. 149 Lisa Phelps Landscaping................................ 141 Majestic Oak Vineyard..................................... 91 Marché Gourmet.............................................. 97 Mary Owens, REALTOR................................ 24 Medical Arts Pharmacy.................................. 112 Modern Age Dentistry..................................... 50 Moksha Festival.............................................. 127 Monica Ros School.......................................... 32 Montessori School............................................ 42 Nate Minkel, REALTOR.............................. 150 Noah’s Ark Preschool....................................... 42 Nomad Gallery................................................. 52 Nora Davis, REALTOR.................................... 6 Nutmeg’s Ojai House....................................... 53 Oak Grove School............................................ 38 Ojai Art Center.............................................. 123 Ojai Beverage Company................................... 95 Ojai Business Center...................................... 141 Ojai Custom Painting.................................... 133 Ojai Door & Window.................................... 129 Ojai Medical Cannabis Conference............... 112 Ojai Music Festival........................................... 58 Ojai Olive Oil Company.................................. 80 Ojai Rock Stacker............................................ 60 Ojai Valley Athletic Club................................. 17

Ojai Valley Green Coalition........................... 126 Ojai Valley Imports........................................ 130 Ojai Valley Inn................................................... 8 Ojai Valley Museum......................................... 59 Ojai Valley Trail Riding Company................. 117 Ojai Wine Festival.......................................... 120 Ojai Youth Entertainers Studio...................... 123 Old Creek Ranch Winery................................ 95 OVA Arts......................................................... 61 Papa Lennon’s.................................................. 97 Patty Waltcher, REALTOR......................67, 164 Poppies Art & Gifts......................................... 60 Priscilla in Ojai................................................. 53 Rainbow Bridge SAGE ................................... 76 Ranch House Restaurant.................................. 98 Rancho Royale............................................... 116 Ray & Cheryl Deckert, REALTORS............ 160 Riki Strandfeldt, REALTOR......................... 158 Rosalie Zabilla, REALTOR........................... 152 S.P.A.R.C....................................................... 117 Sakura Ojai....................................................... 78 Santa Barbara Bowl........................................ 129 Sea Fresh Seafood............................................ 78 Serendipity Toys............................................... 45 Sespe Creek Collective................................... 110 Shangri-La Care Cooperative........................ 111 Sharon McClung, REALTOR........................... 2 Sherry Stuckey, REALTOR........................... 147 State Farm Insurance, Bob Daddi.................. 140 Stephen Adelman, REALTOR...................... 153 Studio Channel Islands.................................... 59 Sunset School................................................... 33 Susan Cummings............................................... 5 Terramor........................................................... 45 The Gables..................................................... 107 The Hut........................................................... 95 The Nest........................................................... 96 Tomatomania................................................. 126 Tonya Peralta, REALTOR............................... 12 Topa Topa Mountain Winery.......................... 90 Top Gun Builders........................................... 138 Turf Exchange................................................ 133 Ventura County Museum................................. 59 Ventura Harbor Comedy Club....................... 101 Ventura Music Festival................................... 121 Ventura Spirits.................................................. 91 Ventura Swap Meet........................................ 122 Villanova Preparatory School........................... 39 Vivienne Moody, REALTOR........................ 158 Westridge Markets........................................... 81 Whitman Architectural Design........................ 30 VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

161


1109 Del Prado Court This home has a spacious open floor plan with lovely light filled gourmet kitchen & a stunning master suite!

1234 Mariano Drive Located in the quaint Oaks West neighborhood, you will enjoy this large family home with a pool!

11249 N. Ventura Avenue Beautifully remodeled Classic Bungalow situated on horse property, gated and private!

Build To Suit! Zoned C-1 Wonderful opportunity to build your dream home or business on this beautiful, flat, useable lot!

162

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019


4158 Grand Avenue This East End gem is an entertainers dream with a pool & majestic mountain views!

804 N. Montgomery Street This 1923 Craftsman Style home is tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac in the heart of downtown Ojai!

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

163


Patty Waltcher 25 ye a r s o f e x p e r i e n ce m a tc h i n g

p e o p l e a n d p ro p e r t y i n t h e O j a i Va l l e y

R EGINALD J OHNSON M ASTERPIECE Designed in 1914 by Reginald Johnson, this impeccable, historic home will take you back to a time and place of peace and serenity. On a 25 acre income-generating ranch with a productive well, it is fully upgraded while maintaining the integrity of a 1914 home. Includes a 2 br gatehouse, a 2,500 sq ft redwood barn, a separate studio, a pool and a pickle ball court. 1563GridleyRdOjai.com

I will help you discover the home that brings peace to your mind and heart (805) 340-3774 164

VOLUME 37 NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2019

Profile for Ojai Valley News

Ojai Valley Guide Spring 2019  

Ojai Valley Guide Spring 2019