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Growing Concern

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Segmental Retaining Wall Clinic November 1, 2017 / Indiana Wesleyan University PAGE 7

Sales Clinic with Marvin Montgomery November 14, 2017 / Indiana Wesleyan University PAGE 20


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME!

CATHY SERAFIN

ASLA, RLA

Suncrest Gardens

After an invigorating, sometimes hectic, 5 days in the Big Apple, I can truly say, “There’s no place like home.” Each time we visit New York City with our travel group, we are filled with anticipation for the exciting events, activities and places we will enjoy. And each time, the city does not disappoint. Our most recent visit included several stops that were ideal for Landscape Architects and garden enthusiast, alike. Early in our stay, we explored the Conservatory Garden, located in Central Park. These gardens are situated in the northeast corner of the park and underwent a complete renovation, reopening in 1987, through the efforts and generosity of the Central Park Conservancy. The gardens were designed by Gilmore Clarke and Landscape Architect, Robert Moses, with planting plans by Betty Sprout. They are the only formal gardens within the park and compliment the comprehensive landscape architectural design of Central Park by Frederick Lawn Olmstead. The gardens are appropriately designed for the scale of the site – maintained meticulously – preserving the historical character of the garden, which includes an extensive plant palette of very mature trees, shrubs, perennials and annual color displays.The gardens typify one of the New York descriptions I am fond of repeating when in the city, “New York scale.”

In a huge city, the size of Central Park – at 2.5 miles long and .5 miles wide – is the perfect scale for a thriving metropolitan area. New Yorkers treasure this park, and more importantly – use it. As we hiked the numerous trails, enjoying the green space, rock outcroppings, surprise obelisk and the surrounding city skyline, it was refreshing to see how clean the park is kept by its visitors. Besides Central Park, and at the top on our list this trip, was a visit to the 9/11 Memorial. Again, the “New York scale” of this memorial, with its new buildings, plazas and green spaces, is awe inspiring. It truly was amazing, considering the scale and impeccable design of the memorial is designed to reflect the individual experience of 9/11 – the memorial being personal to every unique visitor. The memorial site includes buildings 1, 2, 3 and 4 World Trade Center, the World Trade Center Transportation Hub, the National Memorial Plaza – 2 waterfall memorials – and the National 9/11 Memorial Museum. You cannot walk through this memorial without feeling the pain, respecting the rescue efforts, or applauding the perseverance of New Yorkers and Americans. continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS O C T O B E R 2 0 1 7 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr.

COVER: Landscape Ohio! Award’s Honor Award winner Jackie Ansara Landscape, for their Specialty Gardens submission, The Libbey Monument, in Toledo, Ohio.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN There’s No Place Like Home

8 FISCAL FITNESS

Life Expectancy & Retirement

12 PERENNIAL FOCUS Ornithogalum

16 FOR SAFETY SAKE Pruning Safety Tips

21 SPECIAL GUEST COLUMN

4 CORE Elements to Business Success: Building a Measurement System

22 FEATURE ARTICLE

3 Ways to Help Clients Get Landscapes Ready for Fall & Winter

28 PLANT OF THE MONTH

Weigela Florida: Flowering Weigela

32 DIRECTIONS 33 ADVERTISING INDEX 34 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA President – Elect Marie McConnell Treasurer Adam Capiccioni Immediate Past President Bryan Taynor DIRECTORS Brian Maurer, LIC Domenic Lauria Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Michael T. Ahern, LIC Steve Moore

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

OCTOBER OCT. 3, 2017 LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY CERTIFIED WRITTEN TEST 9:00am @ Ohio State ATI 1328 Dover Rd. Wooster, OH 44691

OCT. 10, 2017 LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY CERTIFIED WRITTEN TEST 9:00am @ OLA Offices 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, OH 44147

OCTOBER 26, 2017 MEETING / CENTRAL OHIO Franklin Park Conservatory & Botanical Gardens 1777 E Broad St. Columbus, OH 43203 Program TBD

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 1, 2017 SEGMENTAL RETAINING WALL TRAINING & CERTIFICATION Learn how to build Segmental Retaining Walls (SRW) that perform well over time! After completing the one-day course, attendees will have the option to take the written certification test. Register online, or call the OLA offices. See page 7

NOVEMBER 14, 2017 BE MORE THAN A SALESPERSON: BECOME A TRUSTED ADVISOR Marvin Montgomery, better known as the “Sales Doctor,” will conduct a one day sales training course that will provide participants with the necessary skills needed to build long term client relationships. Held at Indiana Wesleyan University, Independence, OH. Register online, or call the OLA offices. See page 20

NOVEMBER 16, 2017 MEETING / NE OHIO MILLENNIALS IN THE WORKFORCE Our industry has 4 generations working together for the first time ever. Hear from a Millennial about how we can all thrive! Presented by Steve Benzschawel, Generational Consulting, LLC. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside. For more info, call the OLA offices at 440.717.0002. See page 27

DECEMBER DECEMBER 15, 2017 LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS ENTRY DEADLINE Don’t miss the opportunity to become an award winning landscape contractor. Entries for the 2017 program are due in the OLA office by 5 pm on Dec. 15. For rules, regulations and entry information go to ohiolandscapers.org. landscapeohioawards.html. Questions? Contact OLA at 1-800-335-6521. See back, outside cover.

JANUARY 2018 JANUARY 15 -17, 2018 MGIX – formerly known as CENTS Tradeshow with educational sessions held at the Greater Columbus Convention Center. Visit OLA in Booth #1341. For more information contact the ONLA at 800-825-5062.

NOVEMBER 28, 2017 DORMANT PRUNING CLINIC / NE OHIO

JANUARY 16, 2018 OLA HOSPITALITY SUITE (Central Ohio)

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Instructed by Gail Reinhart and held at Willoway Nurseries in Avon, Ohio. See page 15

Come network with others in the Green Industry. Hosted by OLA. Held at the Hampton Inn and Suites, 501 North High Street, Columbus, OH, 5 pm to 7 pm, across the street from the Columbus Convention Center at the close of MGIX for the day. For more information contact OLA at 1-800-3356521, or visit OhioLandscapers.org.

NOVEMBER 28, 2017 DORMANT PRUNING CLINIC / CENTRAL OHIO Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Instructed by Gail Reinhart and held at Premier Plant Services in Hilliard, Ohio. See page 15

The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 5


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3

My personal favorite at the Memorial is the Transportation Hub Building, designed by Santiago Colatrava. The building is a bright white, with graceful arching wings – resembling a dove. Inside, there are windows which stream light through the spines of the oculus. In line with the building’s vertical structures, this building is pure, bright and uplifting – immediately invoking hope. If you get to visit the Big Apple, I implore you to make sure the 9/11 Memorial is on your agenda. As I’m sure is the case with many of you, in my husband and my travels, our work is always in the back of our minds. During the daily walking and Uberring of the streets of Manhattan, as contractors, we became painfully aware of how difficult and expensive it must be to build anything – hardscape or landscape – within such a congested city. Another one of my New York euphemisms is the “New York (cost) Factor, meaning – at a minimum – everything costs about three times what we would normally pay for goods or services at home. An architect friend of ours who lives and works on Long Island joined us for a day and shared some horror stories of just how difficult it is to work and build in the city. A few years ago, he contracted a larger scale project within the city for a regular client of his. The city required him to secure the permits for the construction from an architectural firm in Manhattan. Their fees alone – just to secure the permits for him – exceeded his architectural fees for the design. Yikes! To add to that, there is minimal parking, loading, and allaround general access to work on any project at street level, or even worse, on another level of a building. Several times, as we watched the slow pace of construction, or saw a truck loaded with material struggling to squeeze into anything that looked like it might be a parking space, we expressed our gratitude for how easy the same process is for us in Ohio! Yes, our five days were packed with excitement, the last highlight of which was going to see “Wicked,” one of my favorite Broadway shows. I love the music and thoroughly enjoy how the plot unfolds to tell the story behind the “Wizard of Oz.” Seeing “Wicked” in New York is, well, appropriate. Many lines seem even more meaningful, when you visit “The Big City” from the likes of Ohio – especially as the pace of running through

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

crowds and paying higher than usual prices for everything starts to wear on you. And while we go to New York for a vacation, we do love to come home. There truly is “no place like home,” especially when home is the wonderful, naturally beautiful state of Ohio! Enjoy the fabulous season of fall, and hold close to your hearts how great it is to call Ohio your home. Other places in the country may have milder winters, big city appeal, or other attractions, but in Ohio we enjoy a thriving economy for landscape professionals and get to live with people who possess great mid-western ideals and work ethics, as well. Thank you for your continued membership and participation in the Ohio Landscape Association! We look forward to seeing you soon! Your president, Cathy Serafin


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COURSE DATE & LOCATION NOVEMBER 1, 2017 INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIV. 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00 AM – 8:30 AM INSTRUCTION 8:30 AM – 3:30 PM LUNCH 12:00 PM – 12:45 CERTIFICATION (OPTIONAL) 3:45 PM – 5:45 PM COST CLASS & CERTIFICATION TEST MEMBER BEFORE SEPT. 18 - $249 AFTER SEPT. 18 - $279

SEGMENTAL RETAINING WALL INSTALLATION CLASS & CERTIFICATION Learn how to build Segmental Retaining Walls (SRW) that perform well over time! This one day program teaches hardscape contractors and installers essential concepts related to the design, construction, and performance of SRWs, providing the knowledge you need to install quality walls that meet customer expectations and ensure your long-term success. After completing the one-day course, attendees will have the option to take the written certification test and pursue certification accumulating installation experience. (Past experience can count.) Who should attend? — Design/Build Landscape Contractors, Installers, Foremen, Estimators and Owners, and Sales Representatives. Why a certification program? — You will prove your knowledge of SRW construction practices. Proper training reduces your risk of job site problems. You will receive 3rd party industry recognition by the National Concrete Masons Association (NCMA) that you have an understanding of the minimum requirements. This will be a marketing tool for you on future projects.

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NON-MEMBER BEFORE SEPT. 18 - $279 AFTER SEPT. 18 - $309 CLASS ONLY (NO TEST) MEMBER BEFORE SEPT. 18 - $119 AFTER SEPT. 18 -$149 NON-MEMBER BEFORE SEPT. 18 - $149 AFTER SEPT. 18 - $179

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AUSTIN KEAY / OBERFIELDS

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full. (ALL REGISTRATIONS MUST BE RECIEVED BY OCTOBER 2, 2017.)

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Class & Certification Test: $279

Class ONLY: $149

NON Members Class & Certification Test: $309

Class ONLY: $179

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

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F I SCAL FI TN ESS

LIFE EXPECTANCY & RETIREMENT People are living longer, meaning assets need to last longer, too. In 1970, American men could expect to live to an average of 67.1, women to 74.7, according to the Centers for Disease Control. By 1995, those numbers were 72.5 and 78.9 respectively. Now the numbers are 76 for men, 81 for women.

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

But those numbers are life expectancy from birth. For those already 65, life expectancy today is actually 17 more years for men and 20 for women, making the average life expectancy for the newly Medicare-eligible 82 for men and 85 for

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

women. And thanks to better health care, lifestyles and living standards, a 65-yearold man today has a 30% chance of living to 90—and a 65-year-old woman has a 40% chance of reaching 90, according to research by Ron Gebhardtsbauer, an


associate professor of actuarial science at Penn State University. In addition, the Census Bureau says that a person at 90 statistically has a further life expectancy of almost five years. If you are already close to retirement, there is only so much you can do to address this new planning metric. It’s difficult to acquire more money once in or near retirement, and you can’t dramatically, nor efficiently, increase the rate of return without piling on unacceptable levels of risk. The next logical option is to cut back on spending. One current problem is that interest rates are near historic lows. Retirees are finding it difficult to get yields on bonds above 3% unless they want to look at long term bonds or head out farther on the risk curve. A decade or two ago investors could buy 6% bonds and live on the interest. This new economy means the standard assumption that retirement income should be equal to about 70% of preretirement income in order to maintain a client’s standard of

living is also out the window. Dean Deutz, senior manager of wealth management initiatives at RBC Wealth Management in Minneapolis, says that 70% figure is also too low to provide a comfortable retirement. “Most of our clients are spending 100% of what they spent before retiring, sometimes 110% or even 130%.” Twenty years ago, Medicare covered most bills, and insurance, hospitals and drugs were cheaper, too, with Americans spending an average of $3,500 per year on medical care, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For a generation of people, many of whom worked for a single company for decades, company-sponsored retirement health insurance plans eliminated much of the worry and planning surrounding retirement medical issues. Fifteen years ago the cost of a year in a nursing home was just $48,000, a National Institutes of Health study says. But given our increasing longevity, abandonment of retiree health benefits by most major corporations, soaring medical costs continued on page 11 The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 9


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continued from page 9 (6%-7% on average per year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics) and political threats to Medicare—and with longterm hospitalizations and catastrophic illnesses looming like a shadow in every aging person’s mind—health care is suddenly a top issue in retirement planning. Now, over one-quarter of retirees will need nursing home care at a current cost of around $100,000 a year. Costs vary by state, but can easily be double or triple that for assisted-living or homes with private rooms. And try to project that cost in another twenty years!

Make sure periodic reviews are conducted on your portfolio. Talk with your financial advisor to review and rebalance when necessary. Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com

The bottom line appears to be that retirement is not a crisis, but it requires care, close periodic consultation, a willingness to pare expenses when markets slump and the ability to take on a bit more portfolio risk than planned. And stay as healthy and as fit as possible.

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The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 11


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Ornithogalum’s genus name comes from the Greek words ornis meaning a bird and gala meaning milk – for the white flowers.

ORNITHOGALUM Ornithogalum is a genus of bulbs that has been dismissed as unfit for the garden because one of its members – Ornithogalum umbellatum (Star-of-Bethlehem) – which naturalizes with great zest and is regarded by some as too aggressive. I beg to disagree with this assessment. Many of us prefer a tiny bulb that proliferates and carpets the ground plane, so that we don’t have to look at mulch. The white, starry flowers have a green stripe on the outside of the petals and are clustered (10 to 20 flowers on a stem), sitting just above the 6 to 12-inch high foliage that is green with a white mid-rib. Extremely hardy (to zone 4), the flowers close at night to protect the pollen. They thrive in full sun to part shade, prefer moist, well-drained soil but will tolerate dry, and go dormant after blooming.

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


In a group of plants that isn’t well known, Ornithogalum magnum is a stand-out that really shines. It is also deer and rodent resistant.

Ornithogalum nutans (Drooping Star-of-Bethlehem) is a species I discovered in 2010. Growing 12 to 18 inches high, it has small, nodding flowers, 3 to 12 on a stem. The catalog description says that the flowers are white inside and green outside with a white margin but mine are the same inside and out – white with a green mid-vein. This bulb supposedly produces offsets freely, but I have yet to see it increasing; I keep hoping because it is lovely.

a basal clump in spring but begin to disappear shortly before the flowers bloom. I have interplanted mine with Lupinus perennis in my upper garden. Sadly, this species has become very hard to find but it’s worth the effort.

I have grown the three species that are hardy in northeast Ohio. My favorite is Ornithogalum magnum (Giant Star Flower) because it is so striking and because it has definitely naturalized. Although it is listed in catalogs as growing 1 to 2 feet high, mine are 3 feet high and make a vertical statement in the garden. Numerous, tiny, star-like flowers bloom in huge pyramidal upright racemes. Flowers in each raceme open from bottom to top. Linear, grass-like leaves emerge in

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio,

All three species bloom in May and June and are left alone by deer and rabbits.

is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, will be published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 13


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DORMANT PRUNING CLINIC

COURSE INFO NOVEMBER 28, 2017 WILLOWAY NURSERIES 4825 CENTER RD. AVON, OH 44011 NOVEMBER 30, 2017 PREMIER PLANT SOLUTIONS 6981 SCIOTO-DARBY RD. HILLIARD, OH 43026 AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00AM - 8:30AM CLINIC 8:30AM - 12:00PM

The most important landscape maintenance practice is the control of plant size by the correct method of pruning to retain the natural branching characteristics of the plants and integrity of the landscape design. Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to get back to the basics and learn the proper way to prune in time for winter and early spring pruning. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar will include a lecture as well as hands-on training. Attendees will need to bring their own notepad and pen, hand pruning shears, a small pruning saw, and long handle lopping shears, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training.

INSTRUCTED BY

GAIL REINHART / HIDDEN CREEK LANDSCAPING

Gail joined the Hidden Creek Team in 2014, bringing with her over 15 years of experience in Horticulture, Sales, Project, and Operations Management, and Employee Development. She has an Associate’s Degree in Landscape and Turfgrass Management from Owens Community College and has spent time working out of state in Michigan and Delaware gaining knowledge of Golf Course and Retail Garden Center operations, and Residential and Commercial Landscape Management. Gail grew up on a 500acre farm in Northwest Ohio which cultivated her love of the outdoors.

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 11/14/17 - $69 AFTER 11/14/17 - $99 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 11/14/17 - $99 AFTER 11/14/17 - $129 3.5 CEU’S

GIVEAWAY ITEM

As an attendee, you will receive a gift provided by A.M. Leonard. to be determined closer to the date of your clinic. Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

International Society of Arborculture

2017 DORMANT PRUNING REGISTRATION Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE

FEE

 November 28, Avon, OH

 November 30, Hilliard, OH

$

 November 28, Avon, OH

 November 30, Hilliard, OH

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 November 28, Avon, OH

 November 30, Hilliard, OH

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 November 28, Avon, OH

 November 30, Hilliard, OH

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

MOREofINFORMATION ABOUT THIS EVENT, OR TO REGISTER, VISIT OUR WEBSTIE AT 15 | Official FOR Publication The Ohio Landscape Association WWW.OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/PRUNING.HTML


FOR SAFETY SAK E

PRUNING SAFETY TIPS Fall is the time of year to evaluate trees that may be dead or so weakened that they may not survive, and to determine if they need to be removed or pruned to remove deadwood or weakened limbs. Doing this before winter storms arrive may help to avoid potential damage to properties from falling trees and branches. The tools used for pruning and removing trees can include loppers, hand-held shears, pole pruners, saws, and of course – ladders. Many of these tools have sharp edges and pinch points. Examples of injuries that can occur during pruning work include falls, lacerations, slips, head/eye injuries, strain to shoulder/back, and repetitive motion injuries. Here are some recommendations to help reduce the risk of injuries during this year’s pruning activities:

• Inspection – All tools and equipment should be inspected prior to using – and preferably prior to leaving the shop – in order to make sure everything is functioning properly (e.g., blades sharpened, parts lubricated, etc.). This will help prevent accidents, as well as alleviate the issue of having your employees get out on a site, only to find that the tools they have don’t work properly – which may lead them to use the wrong tool for the wrong job.

• Owner’s Guide – Before using pruning tools, operators

• Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) – Workers should

should be fully trained on the equipment and should read and understand the operation and safety procedures in the operator’s manual provided by the manufacturer. When appropriate, have a crew leader or foreman demonstrate how to use the tool properly – including storage of the tool when it is not in use.

have access to – and use – the appropriate PPE, which may include well-fitting leather or other work-type gloves, long-sleeved shirt, long pants, sturdy shoes, and hearing protection/protective eyewear (e.g., when using hydraulic saws or loppers).

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

continued on page 18


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FOR SAFETY SAK E

continued from page 16 • Tool Choice – Teach your employees to choose the tool that is right for the job they need to complete. This may not always be the easiest tool to use, or the tool that accomplishes the job in the quickest amount of time.

• Weather – Employees should dress appropriately for the weather conditions of the day, including layers of clothing in the winter to prevent cold-weather related conditions like frostbite. On bright winter days, make sunscreen available. Employees should avoid using electric pruning tools or equipment in rainy, wet or dangerous weather conditions.

• Ladder Safety – make sure your workers know how to choose the right type of ladder for the job. Ladders should never be used to support more than their maximum load rating (user plus materials). There should only be one person on the ladder at a time. The proper length of a ladder is a minimum of 3 feet extending over the roof line

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

or working surface. All metal ladders should have slipresistant feet. Along with that, metal ladders will conduct electricity, so use only wooden or fiberglass ladders in the vicinity of power lines or electrical equipment. The ground under the ladder should be level and firm. Large flat wooden boards braced under the ladder can level a ladder on uneven or soft ground.

• Repetitive Tasks – Reduce the risk of muscle and joint injuries by encouraging short, frequent breaks when employees are completing repetitive tasks. Doing stretches before, during, and after work is also beneficial. Consider using battery-powered electric hand shears which distribute weight more evenly.

• Power Line – Workers should always be aware of power lines. It is recommended that only professional tree services prune or trim branches or trees within 10 feet of power lines.


l Outdoor Living a i t n e s s E

FIRE PITS

WOOD • GAS • FIRE BOWLS

• Slips and Falls – Workers can reduce the risk of slips and falls by using the three points of contact rule – meaning they always maintain one hand and two feet, or two hands and one foot, when climbing or descending ladders, trucks and equipment. Workers should not over-extending their reach, always keeping their trunk within the side rails.

• Emergency Plan – An emergency plan should be in place in the case of an incident. First aid kits should be easily accessible and the crew leader should be trained in first aid. As you begin pruning, follow these safety reminders. The last reminder is to always know where your other hand is located when holding a branch and cutting with your other hand! The author, Linda Fetzer, is an Extension Associate at Penn State Extension. She has worked in agricultural safety and health for 20 years. For more information about the Penn State Extension, visit https://extension.psu.edu. * A portion of this article comes directly from UMassAmherst’s site at ag.umass.edu.

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1323 W. River Rd. | Valley City, OH 44280 330.483.3400 | ValleyCitySupply.com The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 19


FOROLA SAFETY SAK E EDUCATION SERIES “If you want to improve your results utilizing simple tools that you can immediately apply, make Marvin your first call.” - Sam A. Misseri, Vice President - Business Development

GET MARVINIZED! COURSE DATE NOVEMBER 14, 2017

SALES TRAINING CLINIC

LOCATION INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH

It’s been proven that people buy from people who they know, like & trust. Marvin Montgomery better known as the “Sales Doctor” will conduct a one day workshop that will provide the participants with the necessary skills needed to build long term relationships and benefit from the Three R’s: Repeat Business, Referrals and Request.

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AGENDA You don’t want to miss this opportunity to send your entire team to “Get Marvinized.” 8:00AM – 8:30AM REGISTRATION / CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST Attendees will receive a complimentary copy of Marvin’s book “The Professional Guide to Sales Success.”

8:30AM – 4:00PM SALES CLASS 12 NOON LUNCH (LUNCH IS INCLUDED)

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For more than 30 years, Marvin Montgomery has earned widespread national recognition and praise for his informative, practical and stimulating programs that reflect his basic philosophy: “Preparation and practice are the keys to sales success.”

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Marvin’s captivating presentations have assisted hundreds of organizations to meet or exceed their sales goals using his training programs. Many of Marvin’s clients have said that getting “Marvinized” has truly made a difference in their company and Marvin has become a mandatory part of company training.

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6 CEU’S

2017 SALES TRAINING CLINIC Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

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NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

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MOREofINFORMATION ABOUT THIS EVENT, OR TO REGISTER, VISIT OUR WEBSTIE AT 20 | Official FOR Publication The Ohio Landscape Association WWW.OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/SALESTRAINING2017


4

THE CORE ELEMENTS

TO BUSINESS SUCCESS

CORE #1 / GUIDING THE BUSINESS

BUILDING A MEASUREMENT SYSTEM This is the second of three articles on CORE 1: GUIDING THE BUSINESS. Last month we covered creating a purpose, this month’s focus is building a Measurement System that tracks progress, defines results, and makes sense of accounting statements. So let’s start our journey at the beginning - MONEY! What are the causes of great financial performance? Today most of the measurement systems we implement follow a formula.

C+P+T=$

Customers demanding Production built by Talent creates Financial Performance

CUSTOMERS Measurements of how the customer perceives the quality of products and services you offer, the experience of doing business with you, and treatment they receive after they submitted a payment. • Marketing measures: Frequency of contact, open rate, and the balance of communications. • Sales measures: Close ratio, time to close, and sales price. • Service measures: Delivery on promise, recovery from failure, and front-line authority.

PROCESSES Measurements of how you build and deliver the products and services the customer purchased. Consider this: Margins are 80% scheduling, 15% job efficiency and 5% control of waste. • Scheduling measures: Overall project/job scheduling, scheduling elements within projects/jobs, and the sequencing of elements within projects/elements. • Efficiency measures: Actual time worked vs. available time, finished jobs/tasks, and work performed outside of change orders. • Waste measures: Scrapped materials (thrown away), returned tasks (fixed), and redone tasks (done over).

WILLIAM EASTMAN GreenMark Consulting Group

TALENT Measurements of how you get people to act like owners and work harder than their paychecks. Consider this: Standards are set at about 40% of a person’s ability. How many of your people are just cruising? • Leadership measures (includes management): Presence on the job site and in-touch with the work, their group’s contribution to the business, and how they represent the company. • Teamwork measures: Members commitment to the group, the group’s unofficial rules about working and supporting the work of other members, and self-management. • Skill Mastery measures: How well a person fits the job, how fast are they becoming competent, and how are they using technology to work on higher impact tasks.

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Measurements that differ from how the bank or your accountant looks at the business. There is nothing wrong with their approach. However, it is smart for the owner to use the lens of an investor – which they are. • Are you a good investment? What does an investor want to know – revenue, earnings, and net investment back in the business? (We will cover this in greater detail in later articles when we cover creating a financial legacy for your family.) If you want to build a measurement system that tracks performance and results, join us on the Ohio Landscape Association Group on Facebook and access tools to build an effective measurement system.

TO VISIT THE CLOSED FACEBOOK GROUP MENTIONED IN THIS ARTICLE GO TO WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/GROUPS/283132448827812


FEATURE ARTI CLE

3 WAYS TO HELP CLIENTS GET LANDSCAPES READY FOR FALL & WINTER Landscaping is a year-round job, but with fall and winter on the way, your clients will be asking about things like leaf cleanup, perennial bed maintenance and fall planting. The thing is, not all clients are aware of just how much work it takes to keep their landscape beautiful throughout the cooler months and healthy come springtime. That means the last days of summer and the early weeks of fall are a wonderful opportunity to educate customers and offer new services that will bring new customers into the fold.

PROMOTE HEALTHY LANDSCAPE CARE To many people, autumn means falling leaves and lots of raking. While that is part of fall landscape care, there are many more things that need to be done as well. Prepare a fact sheet or advise your clients about all the other late summer jobs, such as:

• • • • • •

Removal of dead branches Trimming and pruning of trees and shrubs Perennial bed cleanup Tilling and re-mulching Grass fertilization Lawn aeration

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

For many of these things—like grass fertilization—the common wisdom among homeowners is that it should only be done in the spring and early summer. Let your clients in on the truth: Grass fertilization, lawn aeration, pruning and all the rest will promote healthy growth though the fall months, which will result in a revitalized landscape in the spring. Your clients will see the difference once everything starts to grow again, and they’ll be quicker to call you back for more.

WHAT TO DO WITH ALL THOSE LEAVES? In the past, people raked and bagged leaves, tilled them into continued on page 25


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www.masonsteel.com The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 23


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24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


F EATURE ARTI CLE

continued from page 22 garden beds or mulched them into the lawn. These days, people are looking for greener, more sustainable alternatives. That’s where you come in: Offer to set up a compost bin. While homeowners love the idea of composting, many are intimidated by the process. When you start talking about microbes, nitrogen levels and other things, it starts to sound more like a science project and less like a green way to get rid of leaves and garden waste. Make it simple for your clients by explaining which additives—like bone meal or other nitrogen supplements—will hasten the decomposition process. You could also provide a guide that shows how to layer leaves and other organic materials, how often the compost should be turned and any other tips that will get your customers started.

Fall is also a great time to talk to clients about installing new patios, establishing new perennial and shrub plantings or creating a wonderful new water feature. Manufacturers often offer late-season discounts on many of the supplies necessary for these jobs. Promote new landscape features that are enjoyable in the fall and will be fresh and ready to go for spring. As the hot weather fades away, clients will be asking what they can do to get ready for falling leaves and blowing snow. This is your opportunity to make an impression with new services while making sure your clients’ landscapes will be beautiful throughout the winter months. Put your best foot forward, and you’ll draw in all kinds of new business!

OFFER DEALS ON LANDSCAPE FEATURES

About the Author: Jeff Caldwell is Brand Manager of Litchfield Landscape

What better way to spend autumn than watching the leaves fall from a quaint gazebo or shady pergola? Late summer and early fall are great times to offer end-of-season deals on outdoor architecture, such as Gazebos and Patios. These discounts can translate into attractive savings to clients. Plus, when it’s time for more landscaping work to be done, your clients will remember who installed their new feature, and they’ll give you a call.

Elements in Carrollton, GA. The company designs and creates custom outdoor shelters, including steel gazebos and pergolas, to solve your outdoor shade needs. They work with landscapers and architects worldwide. This article orginially ran in August 2014 at http://www.greenindustrypros.com.

The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 25


VOLUNTEERS & JUDGES

THANK to YOU our

Keith Balduff Mike Biskup, LIC Joe Boff, LIC Perry Bruggeman, LIC Sam Dardinger, LIC Laura Deeter David Dempster, LIC Rick Doll Jacob Edelen, LIC Jan Elliott Brian Feathers, LIC Tom Ferguson, LIC Bruce Flege, LIC Brian Franko, LIC Steve Fuller, LIC Bill Girtz, LIC Stephanie Gray, LIC

Jason Hall, LIC Kevin Hall, LIC Steve Hall, LIC Kent Hammond Chris Hayes, LIC David Hupman, LIC Jerrad Lee, LIC Joe Lewis, LIC Pat Lynch Mike Lynch, LIC Brian Maurer, LIC Kevin McCausland, LIC Roni Peterson Tom Premetsky, LIC Brian Raaker, LIC Bob Ramser, LIC Dave Richards, LIC

Tom Rieder, LIC Kim Sayers Joel Scott, LIC Devon Stanley, LIC Jeremy Steidl, LIC Ken Thiergartner, LIC Rory Tormey, LIC Ron Trenkamp, LIC Matt Virzi, LIC Clinton Walters, LIC Marlin Walters, LIC Mike Walters, LIC Frances Whited Bob Wilson Tony Wilson, LIC Pete Zaferes, LIC

PLATINUM LEVEL SPONSORS

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VOLUNTEERS JUDGES & SPONSORS 26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

SILVER LEVEL SPONSOR Leppo / Bobcat of Wooster

BRONZE LEVEL SPONSORS Brian Kyles Landscapes of Distinction Bryan Equipment Sales / Stihl, Inc. Buckeye Power Sales Ditch Witch of Ohio Environmental Management Inc.

Herman Losely & Son, Inc. Kubota Tractor Corp Medina Sod Farm Walters Landscape Solutions Wolf Creek Company

CONTRIBUTING SPONSOR Kim Sayers


OLA MEETINGS SERIES

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Steve tackles stereotypes and builds understanding between generations through a fun and humorous approach! His presentation will deliver a refreshing perspective and deeper understanding of our generational differences, and foster an engaging discussion to help strengthen relationships and ultimately improve the culture of your workplace. As the Baby Boomers ride off into the retirement sunset, Generation X is left to manage an empowered Millennial generation raised with a new set of attitudes and expectations about their work-life balance. A proud Millennial himself, Steve will energize your staff and get people talking!

ABOUT STEVE BENCH

Steve is founder of Generational Consulting, LLC which customizes keynote presentations and training sessions that deliver engagement strategies for attracting and retaining the next generation of workforce talent. Steve has shared his message with audiences across the country. Steve is also the creator of non-profit Badger Business Challenge, a Shark Tank-style business contest that puts kids in charge to create a new business and make the perfect sales pitch! Kids learn business concepts, practice soft skills and networking and compete for prizes!

RSVP TO ATTEND BY NOVEMBER 8, 2017. CALL THE OLA OFFICE AT 440.717.0002, OR REGISTER ONLINE AT WWW.OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/MEETINGS/NOV2017


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Weigela florida “Pink Princess” is a hardy plant, easy to grow and maintain, and grows to a height and width of up to 5-6 feet in appropriate conditions.

WEIGELA FLORIDA FLOWERING WEIGELA If you look in Dr. Dirr’s Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, you will see he lists this month’s plant by the common name “Old Fashioned Weigela,” a name that does it a great injustice. Quite the contrary, this month’s plant is a great example of taking the old, making improvements, and finding new uses for the betterment of our landscapes. The trick is overcoming past negative experiences with either the straight species, or some of the less-than-stellar cultivars. Perhaps it would help us to think of some of the Weigela on the market as “New Fashioned Weigela!” During a recent learning expedition to Klyn Nursery, to visit one of our horticulture heroes, Bill Hendricks, we actually had a discussion about “old fashioned plants.” While we may not be the trend setting industry the clothing industry is – we tend to be a bit too practical for that – a lot of us fall into the same trap of follow-the-leader towards the next new shiny trend.

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Just try to name all Coneflower cultivars. Or, take a stab at the Heuchera inundation. Perhaps you can rattle off the most recent Panicle hydrangea cultivars? Really, how many versions of “it turns pink in the fall” do we need? Please, don’t get us wrong. These are great plants, and new cultivars are fun and exciting, but we can go overboard with these obsessions. Don’t believe us? Try talking to someone who is a Daylily fanatic as they describe the difference between 50 “different” yellows. Yikes!


While there are a number of great plants that have come in fancy colored containers recently, it may be wise to remind ourselves that a great deal of that is simply good marketing and a mastery of Photoshop. Meanwhile, “Old Fashioned Plants,” sometimes referred to as Victorian Era plants – such as Weigela and Hydrangea – are experiencing a great resurgence in the market due to renewed interest in breeding new cultivars. The name of the straight species, Weigela florida, is credited to a German (Prussian) botanist, who was raised in Russia, named Alexander Bunge. Bunge completed a number of expeditions through Asia and Siberia in the mid 1800s, helping to fuel the Victorian Era obsession with exotic plants. The name Weigela is a tribute to another German scientist, Christian Weigel – probably pronounced “vei-ge-la” – though we both can’t seem to kick the habit of incorrectly pronouncing this plant as

“why-gee-LEE-ah” (we need to drop the lee-ah to why-GEEla). Florida, in botanical Latin, simply means flowering. Flowering is traditionally what this plant was loved for, though modern breeding efforts have created new colors in the flowers and foliage, and more importantly improved habit. Originally, the Weigela plants were a bit on the wild side and looked downright ratty, unless cut back annually. We’ll share some great improvements and ideas on how to make this “old fashioned” Victorian a renewed and important part of your plant repertoire. Keep in mind, with at least 170 named cultivated varieties – a number of them being identical – there needs to be some trials performed to pick the best-of-the-best. This is why we love to go on our learning expeditions. It is crucial to build a relationship with your plant producers to truly understand where they are sourcing their materials and how they are continued on page 30 The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 29


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

continued from page 29 propagating them. Some nurseries are simply plant factories, cranking out as many of what is popular as possible. On the other hand, some nurseries grow plants because they are true plant nerds that love discovering the best plants for our region. It is more profitable to purchase from reputable plant nerds than plant factories, you want the best of the best, not the cheapest from the big box. One of our favorites is NOT one of the latest versions of drunken spilt, wine and cheese options in a pretty white pot, but instead a self-proven champion of the garden, called “French Lace.” Discovered as a genetic mutation (sport) of a 1950’s cultivar named “Bristol Ruby,” this plant was cultivated in 1989 by French breeder, Andre Briant, who patented the name as “Brigela,” which sells under the name “French Lace.” This cultivar is a good 4 to 5 foot rounded shrub with deep-red flowers set on lime-yellow margined leaves. French Lace also develops some attractive fall color in the reds to oranges. While this cultivar is newer to us, here in the states, it has a great track record of performing in a range of gardens across the world.

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

“Wine and Roses” seemed to take the gardening world by storm when it hit the market around 2000, helping push the white pot to the forefront of consumers’ minds, but the plant fell a bit short of expectations. The deep purple of the leaves seemed to fade to a dark green by mid-summer and was likely rushed to market before actually proving itself. “Midnight Wine” was next in the series – and performs better – but makes one wonder if this group of breeders should put the wine down sometime before midnight. While the dwarf habit under 24” is nice, it still doesn’t seem to be the best of the dark-leaved versions. “Spilled Wine” continues in this debauchery, yet finally offers the best retention of deep purple leaves through the summer. Now that they’ve spilled the wine, one would hope they lay the series to rest – and hopefully make it through the hangover. We’ve personally found “Tuxedo” intriguing, as the white flowers jump out better with the same fading dark purple


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leaves of the wine series. We always found the dark-pink flowers of the wines to be not quite the right contrast to catch the eye. Time will tell how Tuxedo holds up but, we are hopeful. In our experience, if you want darker leaves and pink flowers, save some royalty fees and check out “Minor Black” and “Minuet.” If green leaves are more appropriate for your design, check out a newer plant named “Maroon Swoon.” Our visit with Bill was our first introduction to this one, and after holding the flowers of French Lace next to Maroon Swoon, you really appreciate the benefit of contrasting colors. The deep-red on top of deep-green, which lasts the majority of the summer, will create a beautiful contrast in the shrub border and provide great color for the garden.

5/14/2015 11:31:24 AM

margined in gold with hints of red, at times. While not a very strong flower producer, this plant is great in mass at the front of the border for foliage effect. So, give the “old fashioned” plants another go around and see what affects you can add to the landscape with these foliage and flowering, long time favorites.

Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in

On the dwarf side, “My Monet” was a favorite of ours – for a while – but it seemed to have some issues holding up its fullness and color. “My Monet Sunset” seems to be an improved version that stays under 24” and offers green leaves

Ornamental Plant Care. Contact Jim and Shelley via email at hortsquad@ gmail.com.

The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 31


D I RECTI ON S

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

SHARING One of my favorite things about the Ohio Landscape Association is the sharing that happens between our members! On September 20, we held our Annual Landscape Facility Tour at Brian-Kyles Landscapes of Distinction in Lorain, Ohio. If you missed this event, you missed a great opportunity to see inside of another landscape contractor’s business. OLA Landscape Facility tours are not just open houses where you get to see the brick and mortar. They are an opportunity to hear how a company runs its business, while getting to see the facility itself. The Brian-Kyles team did a fantastic job of sharing with this year’s attendees. The evening started out with company owner and president, Brian Maurer, addressing the entire group. He explained the history and family roots behind the company. We then split into 7 different groups that visited each of 7 stations. Each station focused on a different aspect of the company and had a team member talking about that part of the company. Everything from hiring and onboarding employees, to equipment maintenance, to snowplowing was discussed. The presentations were interactive with many questions from the attendees being answered. The evening ended with an hour of networking and food being served.

32 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Among many other things, Brian and his team have been focusing on education and certification. Many of the presenters at the various stations stressed how this culture and focus has improved employee retention, as well as the quality of the individual employees. I’m happy to add that, as of 10am on September 21, we’ve already received a phone call from one attendee who was so motivated by what Brian-Kyles is doing, that he wants to get certified as well! He specifically inquired about information concerning the Landscape Industry Certified Technician test. What a great outcome! We are so appreciative of the effort everyone at Brian-Kyles Landscapes of Distinction made to make the tour experience a good one for everyone! Sharing is not a once-a-year event with OLA. Members continue to share year round at our other events. We always try to incorporate opportunities to share at our events with roundtable discussions, panels and time set aside for casual networking. Make sure you are taking full advantage of all the opportunities OLA has to offer. We are looking forward to seeing you soon!


ADVERTI SI N G I N D E X

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SCA

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S S I F I E

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Looking for Classified and Help Wanted ads? Want to post one of your own? You’ll find them at ohiolandscapers.org or myohiolandscape.com. HELP WANTED ADS Help Wanted ads are posted on both our industry website and our consumer website, along with bi-monthly postings via social media.

Botson Insurance Group, Inc.

29

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

24

Irrigation Supply, Inc.

23

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

6

A

Abraxus Salt, Inc.

Medina Sod Farms, Inc.

35

Middlefield MFG / Mentor MFG

31

Millcreek Plants

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MRLM

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O’Reilly Equipment, LLC

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Valley City Supply

CLASSIFIED ADS (I.E. Equipment for sale) Classified ads are posted on our industry website ohiolandscapers.org

17

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

COST MEMBERS: $35 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. NON MEMBER: $70 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days.

24

Zoresco Equipment Company

Please send all inquiries and ad content to: info@ohiolandscapers.org or call the OLA office at 440-717-0002.

The Growing Concern | October 2017 | 33


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OLA’s NEW MEMBERS The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following new members to the association:

REGULAR MEMBERS ARO Landscaping, LLC 13832 Upper Lewisburg Salem Road Brookville, OH 45309 (937) 770-4077 Aaron Osswald/Rachel Osswald Central Liberty Landscaping 4694 Cemetery Road, Suite 312 Hilliard, OH 43026 (614) 429-5980 Kenneth Hamilton The Garden Companion, LLC 13721 Carlton Street Burton, OH 44021 (330) 507-2068 Sharon Wolfe

My Lawn Care, LLC 8325 Morningside Drive Poland, OH 44514 (330) 501-7733 David Perry III

Baron Law, LLC 5005 Rockside Road, Suite 600 Independence, OH 44131 (216) 573-3733 Dan Baron

The University of Akron 146 Hill Street Akron, OH 44325 (330) 972-7372 Andrew Henry

Beltz Lawn & Garden Equipment, LLC 1660 Canton Road Akron, OH 44312 (330) 733-7966 Ebenezer Yesian

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

Southeastern Equipment Co., Inc. 10874 E. Pike Road Cambridge, OH 43725 (740) 432-6303 Jon Wickline

A & A Hydraulic & Equipment 207 Depot Street Berea, OH 44017 (440) 826-9000 Dan McGivern

34 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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2017

M5-091

MIDDLEFIELD MFG

L3560

MENTOR MFG

15980 Georgia Road • Middlefield, OH

5782 Heisley Road • Mentor, OH

440.632.5590 • 800.722.1291

440.551.9051

Hours: M-F: 8am–6pm • Sat: 8am–4pm

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www.mfgkubota.com

KCDA-14-135761-5

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9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

ENTER TODAY ENTER TODAY

10/17

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS Frank Brothers Supply, Inc. 9718 Avon Lake Road Lodi, OH 44254 (330) 948-1006 Doug Frank

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Ohio’s most prestigious landscape enhancement awards program. 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Oh 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002 Toll Free: 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 OhioLandscapers.org MyOhioLandscape.com

DEADLINE TO ENTER DECEMBER 15, 2017

RULES, REGULATIONS & ENTRY FORMS AVAILABLE @ OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG

The Growing Concern October 2017  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association.