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Growing Concern

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MAY 2 0 1 9

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

OLA Education Series: Plant ID

N.E. Ohio: July 11, 2019 / Davis Treefarm & Nursery / PAGE 7 Central Ohio: July 16, 2019 / Premier Plant Solutions / PAGE 30


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

ADAM CAPICCIONI Ohio CAT

ACCOUNTABILITY IS KEY Spring is here – with summer right around the corner – and I’m sure that all of us have hit the ground running with a culture of complete accountability. Right? Alright, so maybe not all of us… Within any well-managed company, everyone should know what the term accountability means and what they are accountable for on a daily basis. That being said, accountability can be defined as the quality or state of being accountable, especially an obligation or willingness to accept responsibility, or to account for one’s actions. Unfortunately, in many instances, people have become accustomed to viewing accountability as something that belittles them, or happens when performance wanes, problems develop, or results fail to materialize. After all, when things are sailing along smoothly, people rarely ask, “Who is accountable for this success?”

This misperception needs to be changed. Communicating praise when it comes to our employees’ accountability should be just as common as it is when we’re communicating dissatisfaction. And, this change needs to come from management, because the values and processes associated with accountability – in any company – are communicated from the top down, as leadership sets the bar when it comes to what each individual is responsible for. As many of you know, I’m a huge sports fan, and it just so happens that this topic aligns well with how professional sports organizations tend to function. As is the case in our industry, free agents (employees) move from team to team continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | May 2019 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS M AY 2 0 1 9 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com DESIGNER / EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Adam Capiccioni, Ohio CAT Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb COVER: Landscape Ohio! Awards entry in the category of Residential Installation with Swimming Pools from Brothers Grimm Landscape & Design Company.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Accountability is Key

8

PERENNIAL FOCUS

lris Cristata: Dwarf Iris

12 FISCAL FITNESS

Retirement Trends and Your Financial Future

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association.

17 FOR SAFETY SAKE

OFFICERS President Adam Capiccioni

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

22 PLANT OF THE MONTH

President – Elect Domenic Lauria

29 FEATURE ARTICLE

Treasurer Brian Maurer, LIC

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

The Basics of Safe Trencher Operation Quercus Petraea: Sessile Oak

Hiring & Retaining Young Professionals in the Landscape Industry

34 DIRECTIONS 34 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 35 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Immediate Past President Marie McConnell DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Cameron Maneri Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

JULY

AUGUST cont...

NOVEMBER

JULY 11, 2019 PLANT I.D. CLINIC (NE Ohio)

AUGUST 22, 2019 SNOW & ICE CLINIC (NE Ohio)

NOVEMBER 13, 2019 DORMANT PRUNING (NE Ohio)

This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. Sponsored by Davis Tree Farm & Nursery. See page 7 for more details.

Join us at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Heights for our annual Snow & Ice Management Clinic, featuring Industry Experts, our Mini Trade Show, and more. Registration and Sponsorship Opportunities are available. See pages 26 & 27 for more details.

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Held at Willoway Nurseries in Avon, Ohio.

JULY 16, 2019 PLANT I.D. CLINIC (Central Ohio) This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. Sponsored by Premier Plant Solutions. See page 30 for more details.

AUGUST AUGUST 1, 2019 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC Join us at Bob-O-Link Golf Club in Avon for the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic! Proceeds from this event benefit our OLA Scholarship Fund. Our golf outing was created to help generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. Call the OLA at 800-335-6521 for sponsorship opportunities. See page 20 & 21 for more details.

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER 19, 2019 DORMANT PRUNING (Central Ohio)

Joins us for our annual Landscape Facilities Tour. Location TBD. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002.

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Held at Premier Plant Solutions in Hilliard, Ohio.

OCTOBER

DECEMBER

OCTOBER 1, 2019 PLANT HEALTHCARE DAY

DECEMBER 12, 2019 STONE VENEER CLINIC (NE Ohio)

This full-day workshop combines all aspects of Plant Health Care (PHC) for both technicians and managers, with live demonstrations of PHC techniques – services based on the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and proactive tree care management. Held on the grounds of Secrest Arboretum.

This hands-on clinic will teach the basics of mixing mortar, installing and grouting stone veneer. The techniques you will learn can be applied to both manufactured and natural stone. The demand for veneers has increased and this is a great opportunity to learn how to apply it in house. Sponsored and hosted by Mason Steel.

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 OLA FACILITY TOUR (NE Ohio)

OCTOBER 24, 2019 (Tentative) OLA FACILITY TOUR (Central Ohio) By establishing uncompromising technical and safety standards and making sure that employees have the best possible training and excellent equipment, Ahlum & Arbor delivers exceptional quality and value to their clients. Joins us as we tour Ahlum & Arbor’s facility to find out what has made them so successful.

LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY CERTIFIED TECHNICIAN TEST DATES Wed, Aug. 7, 2019 WRITTEN TEST 2:30 pm (OSU ATI, Wooster) Application Deadline: 6/1/19

Thurs, Aug. 8, 2019 HANDS-ON & WRITTEN TEST Day Long Event (OSU ATI, Wooster) Application Deadline: 6/1/19 The Growing Concern | May 2019 | 5


PR E S IDENT’ S C OL UMN continued from page 3 every season. We see it every year as part of the challenge of running a seasonal business. In the pros, players know they must maintain a strong sense of commitment. They have standards that they must adhere to and assignments that they need to execute, or else they will either get traded, put on waivers, or flat out let go.

Your success brightens our day... and night.

This system works well in most instances because the player’s coaches have established credibility and communicated who is accountable for what. They hold their players accountable for not living up to the teams’ standards by defining acceptable results, rather than just saying, “Hey, go out there and play.” In our industry, while we don’t have the luxury of an unlimited pool of professionals banging down the door to be a part of the team, it’s probably safe to say that we could all afford to make some slight adjustments to our culture that will help the superstars shine. We can certainly make acceptable standards and desired outcomes known, even during the busy season. We can also make changes that effectively remind our employees of these standards on a daily basis, making sure they are aware when they miss the mark, but also praise them when they exceed it. I assure you, your employees will be so-much-more open to accepting constructive criticism when it is coupled with the acknowledgment of jobs well done. In the end – as is the case with most coaches – I think it’s fair to say we are all results driven people who want to keep our players happy and committed. And while the characteristic of communicating accountability effectively comes easy to some, for others it is something we must first be made aware of, and then take the initiative to learn. Changing pace for a second, we have a number of great programs coming up this summer and fall, which I hope you will all take advantage of. For the most up-to-date information, you can always visit www.ohiolandscapers. org/calendar. Next on our agenda are the annual Plant I.D. Clinics, followed by our 19th Annual Scholarship Golf Classic. Mark your calendars now, bring your crews, and invite your colleagues.

At Cascade Lighting, your success is our top priority and it’s been that way since we set up shop over 20 years ago. We’ll partner with you to provide expert advice on the best lighting solution to fit your project and budget. Our team also offers design and technical support at no additional cost. And to ensure the job gets done on time, our warehouse stocks a huge inventory of products ready for same day shipment.

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Wishing all of you a successful 2019 season, and as always, please feel free to contact me with any comments, questions, or suggestions.

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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PL ANT OF THOLA E M ON TH EDUCATION SERIES

Sponsored & Hosted by

COURSE DATE JULY 11, 2019

PLANT I.D. (NE OHIO)

This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover

the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be LOCATION DAVIS TREE FARM & NURSERY covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test, including: VALLEY CITY, OHIO 44280 perennials, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, as well as trees and shrubs – both evergreen

AGENDA 8:30AM - 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 9:00AM - 3:00 PM CLINIC 12:15PM - 1:00PM LUNCH COST MEMBERS BEFORE 06/27/19 - $79 AFTER 06/27/19 - $109 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 06/27/19 - $109 AFTER 06/27/19 - $139

and deciduous.

Those who should attend are plant installation staff, maintenance staff, garden center staff, foremen, and anyone studying to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar is hands-on training with live plant material. Attendees will need their own notepad and pen, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Register online at www.ohiolandscapers.org/education/plantid.html

INSTRUCTED BY

Wendy Moore Davis Tree Farm

Shelley & Jim Funai Russ Luyster, OCNT Stan Hywet Hall & Gardens / Tri-C Impact Grounds Maint.

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds or credits will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly.

2019 PLANT I.D. CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/04/19

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/PLANTID


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Iris cristata is an excellent plant for early spring bloom in a shaded area of the rock garden, perennial border or woodland garden.

IRIS CRISTATA DWARF IRIS

One of the challenges of designing a perennial garden is ensuring a variety of textures. The linearity of the foliage of the genus Iris is a wonderful component of textural variety. Siberian Iris have narrow leaves but those of Miniature Bearded Iris and most of the Dwarf Iris species are short and wide. The best known of the dwarf Iris species is Iris cristata (Crested Iris). A North American native of the woodland edge, and hardy to zone 3, this tough dwarf has shallow rhizomes that creep close to the surface; therefore, the clump increases to form a sizeable clump within a few years, particularly in humusy, well-drained soil. It is much slower to naturalize in dry soil although it is tolerant of such a site, once established.

The short (4-6”) but wide leaves are very attractive and a good reason to include this iris in your designs. Although the blooms are lovely, we can only admire them for a very short period, usually a week, perhaps two if rain does not destroy the flowers. In my garden, they bloom in early May. The blooms of the species are pale blue with a yellow crest. I have several cultivars: ‘Eco White Angel’, ‘Eco Orchid Giant’, and ‘Powder continued on page 10

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

‘Eco White Angel’

continued from page 8 Blue Giant’ and I thoroughly enjoy them in that fleeting window of time. Although partial to heavy shade is recommended, I do have a clump in full sun but it is an area that is irrigated on a regular basis. Iris cristata is an excellent edger, either along a garden path or near the lawn because it is basically a clumper even though it has rhizomes. A clump is easily divided if you wish to transplant part of it. It looks great in a shady rock garden, the perennial border, or in a woodland garden where it complements other woodland plants such as Phlox divaricata, Uvularia sessilifolia, and Geranium maculatum. ‘Powder Blue Giant’

Some of my Iris cristata are planted beside Alchemilla mollis that blooms just as the Iris finish their bloom and with Astrantia major that blooms even later. Others are planted as an underpinning of some Phlox paniculata. I highly recommend that you add Crested Iris to your repertoire of perennials. Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in

‘Eco Orchid Giant’

10 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

RETIREMENT TRENDS AND YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE The face of retirement is changing as medical advances are stretching lifespans and delivering longer and healthier lives filled with increased vitality. In this new, more dynamic era of retirement, recognizing and managing risks is crucial to having a happy, financially secure retirement. These are among the findings of Rewriting Retirement, a new Wealth Insights report from RBC Wealth Management.

CONFIDENCE COMES FROM PLANNING According to investors surveyed for the report, the primary concern for pre-retirees was outliving their assets. Retirees, on the other hand, said their biggest concern was maintaining their desired quality of life. In this way, the report shows that goals for many people evolve as they move into and through their retirement years. In either case, respondents said they felt more assured of their future when their wealth management decisions are based on a plan.

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

In fact, 84 percent of respondents with a plan said they were confident in achieving their financial goals for retirement, as opposed to just 45 percent without a plan. Indeed, a wealth management plan can help you prioritize and quantify goals, validate financial strategies—and provide a roadmap to help you thrive in the retirement you envision and adapt as life and circumstances change. continued on page 14


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FI SCAL FI TN ESS

continued from page 12

LEARN TO MANAGE DIFFERENT TYPES OF RISK

INFLATION RISK

Your wealth management plan can help keep you focused on your goals and provide the foundation for managing risks by putting you in the driver’s seat of the aspects of your financial life you can control.

MARKET RISK

Older Americans often experience greater effects of inflation, primarily because they require more health care and health care costs generally increase faster than inflation and cost of living adjustments. Aside from health care, a modest three percent rate of inflation will cut the purchasing power of your money to half of what it is today in 23 years.

While markets rise and fall regularly, low or negative returns can have a significant impact on a portfolio early in retirement. As you draw down assets, the effects from those early bad years may be amplified, leading to an earlier depletion of assets versus a portfolio that experiences challenging markets later.

Being invested for growth throughout retirement, making prudent withdrawals from retirement accounts and including lifetime income streams in your planning may help you enjoy a long and comfortable retirement.

Diversifying through a proper asset allocation can help protect against big market swings, balancing risk and reward for the long term. Inconsistent returns highlight the need to rebalance regularly to keep your asset allocation aligned with your longterm goals and evolving needs.

PLAN FOR THE FUTURE YOU WANT

BEHAVIORAL RISK

Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com

Experienced investors understand that volatility and market corrections happen from time to time. Yet an all too common emotional response is to sell stocks during down markets, to help minimize losses. However, behavior such as this can cause investors to lose money twice: once when they sell securities and once when they are no longer in the market to participate the following recovery. Understanding how your emotions affect your choices may help you avoid making costly mistakes.

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Please contact your financial advisor to learn more about the forces shaping retirement and the steps you can take to manage risk and preserve your lifestyle when you retire.

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16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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F OR SAFETY SAK E

THE BASICS OF SAFE TRENCHER OPERATION Thanks to advances in technology, trencher manufacturers are producing better and safer equipment today than ever before. But no matter how sophisticated the trencher is, the operator must learn and follow all operating procedures provided by the manufacturer. Here are some of the main safety precautions that operators, supervisors and managers must incorporate into their daily routine in order to ensure the safest possible working environment.

OPERATOR RESPONSIBILITY

PRE-WORK EQUIPMENT INSPECTION

Equipment operators are responsible for ensuring equipment is operated safely and properly, and for ensuring the safety of coworkers and bystanders. However, safety must start with the supervisors and managers requiring that all operators are properly trained on each piece of equipment they operate. Having and enforcing safety policies and procedures and providing the needed training are essential to safety on the job and key to reducing the number of injuries and fatalities that happen each year.

Before operating a piece of equipment, the operator first needs to read and thoroughly understand the equipment operator’s manual. Next, the unit must be in good operating condition. Make sure all guards and shields are in place and operator presence systems are functioning. Be aware of potential hazards such as exposed belts, chains and shafts. Check for leaks, but be cautious when checking leaks in pressurized hydraulic systems. A good way to determine if leaks exist is to look under the unit after it has set overnight. Never use your bare hands to continued on page 18 The Growing Concern | May 2019 | 17


FOR SAFETY SAKE

continued from page 17 check for leaks. High-pressure fluid escaping from a small hole in a hose or fitting can penetrate your skin. Hydraulic fluidinjection poisoning can lead to amputation, or even death—so be careful. Be sure that all safety switches are connected and working according to the manufacturer’s design. The operator’s manual and the unit’s safety signs are designed to make operators aware of certain hazards associated with the operation and service of the unit. Replace these as they become worn, damaged or misplaced.

LOADING AND TRANSPORTING The tow vehicle must be able to handle the Gross Vehicle Weight Rating (GVWR) of the loaded trailer as well as the tongue load. Make sure the trailer and tow vehicle are properly connected, and that the towing vehicle’s parking brake is set prior to loading equipment on trailer. With everyone clear of the loading area, lower the equipment throttle and slowly load the machine onto the trailer. Lower all attachments not held by stow locks, set the parking brake if supplied and secure the machine to the trailer with tiedowns. Reverse the procedure for unloading the unit. Always follow all state and federal D.O.T. regulations.

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

JOBSITE PREPARATION Before beginning any job, mark the proposed trench path with white paint and contact your local one-call service or the national 811 number to have all underground utilities located and marked. In most cases, this should be done at least 48 hours prior to start of job, but check your local and state regulations for one-call regulations and notification. Knowledge of the laws in your area is important. Some states may not require all underground utility owners to be members of the one-call system. In those instances, utility owners must be contacted separately. It is your responsibility to prevent damage to underground utilities. Walk the jobsite and look for signs of buried utilities that may have been missed. These could include trench lines, utility risers or pads, meters, lines coming down utility poles, and manholes. Other items often overlooked are yard lights, power to outbuildings and invisible dog fences. Some of these may be an inconvenience if damaged, while others can cause serious injury.


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POTENTIAL HAZARDS Start trenches away from obstructions such as curbs, slabs and fences that digging teeth may catch. Stop trenching to make trench observations such as trench depth. Clear objects such as landscaping fabric, cable and wire from the work area. Operate only with personal restraint bar or trench cleaner in place. If trenching must be done on a slope, travel only up and down a slope. If operating across a slope cannot be avoided, swing all attachments toward the uphill side and lower them as much as possible. Avoid turning on slopes. If operating a walk-along trencher, never stand on the downhill side of the equipment. Always wear your seatbelt, if equipped. Never remove, weld on or alter the Rollover Protection System (ROPS). If working in dense underbrush or around trees, be aware of low-hanging branches that can snag control levers or catch on attachments.

THE DANGER ZONE You, as the operator, must be aware of coworkers and bystanders at all times. Inform coworkers and bystanders to stay at least 6 feet (2 meters) from the farthest reach of any attachment,

including a backhoe. Bystanders and coworkers closer than 6 feet (2 meters) can enter the trencher attachment danger zone and may trip and fall into the trench or onto the attachment. Also, the trench could cave in, causing entanglement with the attachment. When working in rocky conditions, the attachment can throw rocks from the trench and strike coworkers or bystanders. When operating a machine with a drilling attachment, the danger zone should be extended to 10 feet (3 meters). Never stand on or grab a rotating shaft with your hands. Other danger zones to look for include such areas as the plow and backhoe attachments, as well as the pinch point on articulating frame units. Stay away from these areas. Safety is a personal choice that each of us must make. These choices can make a difference on whether we get to go home at the end of each day. This article originally ran on the Ditch Witch press release site. For more information about trenchers and safe operation, visit www.ditchwitch.com. The Growing Concern | May 2019 | 19


REGISTRATION PL ANT GOLFER OF TH E M ON TH

August 1, 2019 Bob-O-Link Golf Course Avon, OH 4-person Scramble Shot gun start 9am

Each Golf Registration Includes: • • • • •

18 Holes of Golf Golf Cart Live Leader Board Game Day Contests Driving Range

• • • •

Continental Breakfast Lunch Dinner Beverages

19th Annual OLA Scholarship Golf Classic 2019 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/18/19

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Firm _______________________________________________________ Contact ____________________________________________ Address ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ City ________________________________________________________________________ State ___________ Zip _______________ Phone (______)____________________ Fax (______)____________________ Email ___________________________________________

NAME OF GOLFER (Correct Name is Mandatory or Forfeit Shall Occur)

COMPANY

____________________________________________

___________________________________________________

2

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3

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4

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wName of Team Captain _____________________________

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Number of Golfers

____

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X $30

= $ ______

Tee Sponsorship (includes signage)

...

$100

Number of Tees

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X $100

= $ ______

TOTAL

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/OLAGOLF

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AVAILABLE COMMEMORATIVE GIFT SPONSOR

LONG PUTT CONTEST SPONSOR

HOLE-IN-ONE SPONSOR

AVAILABLE

AVAILABLE DRIVING RANGE SPONSOR

LONG DRIVE CONTEST SPONSOR

Thank You

TO OUR MAJOR AND CONTEST SPONSORS Sponsorship Opportunities We are excited to be holding our 19th annual golf outing at Bob-O-Link Golf Course on August 1, 2019. But, we need your help to make it a success! This event helps to generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. Call us to find out more about sponsorship features and benefits. Tee Sponsorships Sponsorships

(Your company name will appear on a sign at your designated tee)

Door Prize(s) Please Specify: Item(s) will be:  shipped to OLA

Commemorative Gift Gift

$100

$1500-$2,000

(Your company name will appear on giveaway item.)

Long Putt Contest Contest

$350

Cornhole Sponsor

$350

(Your company name will appear on a sign at your contest hole)

 dropped off at OLA

Cash Donation $ Let us shop for you!

(Your company name will appear on a sign at your contest hole)

CONTACT INFORMATION Name Company Address City State

Zip Code

Phone Email Address

Payment Information

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Register online, by mail, by phone, or by fax: Phone 440-717-0002 or 1-800-335-6521 • Fax 440-717-0004 • www.ohiolandscapers.org


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College Sessile Oak is one of the most important species in Europe both economically and ecologically. Oak timber is traditionally used for building, ships and furniture.

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

QUERCUS PETRAEA SESSILE OAK

In our travels through Central Europe, perhaps what we have found most interesting are the similarities between the Eastern Czech forests and our own native forests, despite the difference in climatic conditions. Both regions have a familiar feel; a mix of Oak, Beech, and Maples, with some evergreens tossed in for fun. The major difference tends to be that the dominant forest Evergreen here is White Pine – perhaps Juniper in southern Ohio – while the dominant Evergreen in Central Europe is the Fir. Now, we love our Oaks, Beeches, and Maples! Who doesn’t? But, as most of us are coming to realize, we cannot continue to rely solely on these major genera to get our landscapes through the era of global trade. As you know, Oak wilt (Bretziella fagacearum) – a wide spread fungal disease throughout much of Ohio – is quickly killing members of the Red Oak group, and at a somewhat slower pace eradicating members of the White Oak group.

of Oak wilt management is the selection of trees that are less susceptible, as well as the concept of not overplanting Oak species as monocultures. Theoretically, this is true of all pest management strategies. Anyone still planting the same tree species throughout an entire parking lot, drive, street, etc., should be kicked rather swiftly in the shin. All we do when we plant monocultures is encourage pest issues to bring sadness into our lives!

That said, plant health care has never been more technical, or more important, than it is in today’s world. On the forefront

So, back to Oaks and Europe… On our excursions, we have come to know two dominant species of Oaks in Central

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


Europe. One we were quite familiar with. The other we knew little about. You likely know one of them as English Oak (Quercus robur). Funny thing about common names is they tend to vary from place to place. While many of the English horticulturists we’ve asked call English Oak “Common Oak,” a lot of the Central Europeans call it “Pedunculate Oak.” Because it has no “pins” at the tips of its leaves, has rounded lobes, and the acorns mature/germinate within one year, English Oak is a member of the White Oak group. The other major Oak we find across Europe – and our plant of the month – is Quercus petraea, also known as the Sessile, or Durmast Oak. Quercus petraea is also a member of the White Oak group and is a beautiful tree, capable of reaching over 100 feet tall with age (we’re talking 800 years), but certainly should be considered as a large shade tree for use in the landscape. At first glance, the Sessile Oak looks very similar to an English Oak, but there are some key differences to assist in identifying it. The two common names lead to the ID feature that helps

the most; “Pedunculate Oak – for the English – refers to the long peduncle of the acorn, while “Sessile Oak” refers to the near lack of a peduncle holding the acorn directly on the stem. The reverse is true of the leaves. English Oak has rather short petioles and those of Sessile Oak are about double the length. Another noticeable difference: English Oaks have a more pronounced “auriculate” leaf base, which leads it to it resemble an ear lobe. Now, with Oak wilt being such a concern, it may seem odd that we’re recommending any Oaks for the landscape, but again, there is a time and place for everything, and with proper diversity in our urban landscape, we can be more resistant to all pests. One reason Oak wilt does not impact White Oaks as bad is because they are better at filling up old xylem tissue with “waste” products that block the interconnected tubes that were once used to transport fluids/ nutrients. This blockage makes it more difficult for a fungal infection to move through the tree, thus making White Oak group trees less of a concern – though they are still a concern. continued on page 24 The Growing Concern | May 2019 | 23


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

continued from page 23 Interestingly enough, it is the same blockage of old xylem tissue that makes White Oaks so popular for wine and whisky barrels. In fact, while Quercus alba (White Oak) is the Oak of preference in the United States, Quercus petraea is the most common in many parts of Europe. The common name of “Durmast Oak” has a number of references to where it may have arisen with perhaps the most plausible, Latin root “dur” meaning hard or strong and “mast” and Old English term for a tall straight tree (think mast of a ship). Along with being a very dense wood, Durmast Oak is also very strong with a slight flex to it, making it an ideal lumber for construction of buildings and ships as well as durable furniture. Just like ancestors of North America had many traditions, rituals, and life sustaining practices that revolved around local Oak species, we find similar traditions in Europe.

as the width at maturity. Expect – like most columnar plants – a much skinnier than tall plant, when young. Much like humans, most columnar plants get a little wider around the midsection as they age!

There is a columnar cultivar of Sessile Oak which is, in our opinion, better than some of the older columnar English Oaks. It is much less susceptible to the powdery mildew on the leaves that is so common to the English Oaks. The size of Q. petraea ‘Columna’ is around 40 feet tall and 15 feet wide (perhaps more with great age) but maintains close to slightly double the height

Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

While English Oak tends to exist on slightly denser, wetter, lowland soils, Sessile Oak is found more often on slopes and well drained soils. Both tend to be pretty adaptable. People tout both English and Sessile for similar reasons; primarily because they are fairly forgiving to conditions, expect the problems of powdery mildew common on the English. We hope you find a great place to try this tree out soon, and let us know what you think!

associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.


Since 1986, VanCuren Tree Services has been Northeast Ohio’s complete tree care specialist. We provide comprehensive services for any residential, commercial, or utility tree care need. The tree professionals at VanCuren Tree Services have helped home and business owners throughout Greater Cleveland and Northeast Ohio maintain the beauty, vitality, and safety of their trees. We are proud to offer a full range of tree care services, from tree and stump removal to storm damage clean up to utility work and beyond.

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SN OW & ICE M A NAG E M E N T

S P O N S O R S HI P EVENT INFORMATION AUGUST 22, 2019 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM LOCATION ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH 44147 PRESENTED BY

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT OPPORTUNITIES

The OLA would like to invite you to participate in our 2019 Snow & Ice Management Clinic! Our Snow & Ice Management Clinic is a can’t miss event for anyone in, or thinking about being in the snow and ice business. Designed for both business owners and employees, the clinic will include group discussions and great information from snow and ice industry experts.

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT INFORMATION

Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties are available to ALL Green Industry suppliers, including non snow and ice related businesses. All Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties include:

• • • • • • TO REGISTER CALL THE OLA OFFICE 440.717.0002 EMAIL THE OLA OFFICE INFO@OHIOLANDSCAPERS. ORG VISIT US ONLINE AT: WWW.OHIOLANDSCAPERS. ORG/EDUCATION/ SNOWANDICE

Your choice of exhibit size. (Subject to availability. See below for more details.) Your company name displayed on signage at the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on all email communications promoting the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on the Snow & Ice Clinic landing page of our industry website. Your company will be recognized at the event and will have the opportunity to pass out marketing materials to attendees. A complimentary copy of the event attendee list, including attendee’s company name, contact person, mailing address & phone number. BOOTH/EXHIBIT SIZES

Booths will be sold on a first-come, first serve basis, once last year’s sponsors have had the opportunity to renew. Exhibitors may set up their booths beginning August 22 at 7:00 am. and have until 8:00 am to complete set-up. All exhibit spaces will be located outdoors on pavement and should be interactive for attendees.

OPTION #1 10 x 10 BOOTH OLA Member - $400 Non Member - $600

OPTION #2 20 x 30 BOOTH (NEW THIS YEAR!) OLA Member - $500 Non Member - $700

OPTION #3 30x40 or 20x60 BOOTH OLA Member - $600 Non Member - $800

Includes: • 10 x 10 Exhibit Space • 2 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 20 x 30 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 30 x 40 or 20 x 60 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

PLEASE NOTE: 10 x 10 booths are for TABLETOP DISPLAYS ONLY. Absolutely no equipment will be permited in a 10 x 10 booth. 20 x 60 booths will be created by combining (2) 20 x 30 booths. The same can be done for extra 30 x 40 booths.

BOOTH SIZE REQUESTED

 10x10 Outdoor Exhibit Space

 20x30 Outdoor Exhibit Space

 30x40 Outdoor Exhibit Space  20x60 Outdoor Exhibit Space

CONTACT INFORMATION

Sponsor Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

PAYMENT INFORMATION

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

SNOW & ICE MANAGEMENT CLINIC Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Register online, by mail, by phone, or by fax: Phone 440-717-0002 or 1-800-335-6521 • Fax 440-717-0004 • www.ohiolandscapers.org


SNOW & I C E M A NAG E M E NT

R E G IS T R ATI O N SNOW BUSINESS SUCCESS

EVENT INFORMATION AUGUST 22, 2019 Whether you’re an owner, operations manager, dispatcher, or anyone in between, this is a can’t 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM miss event for any company focused on improving how they handle the “white side” of their business. Attendees will be treated to a diverse and interesting range of speakers, a mini trade show, roundtable discussions with their peers, a drawing for prizes and more. REGISTER NOW!

PRESENTERS Dustin Stewart / Brightview Landscape Services

LOCATION ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH 44147 AGENDA 8:30AM - 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST

Dustin will breakdown different properties, how to measure them and how to determine the size of equipment needed for each site. He will then discuss what information you need to provide your crews & sub-contractors , and how that information is disseminated to them while they are in the field.

9:00AM - 4:40PM CLINIC

Cheryl Higley / Snow & Ice Management Association (SIMA) Cheryl will discuss the use of emerging technologies, including new apps and desktop software, that will help your company stay more profitable during the white months.

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 08/08/19 - $99 AFTER 08/08/19 - $129

Speaker TBD / SIMA

NON MEMBERS

We will discuss the different types of equipment available to you to perform sidewalk operations, as opposed to counting on manual labor. We will showcase how the equipment is utilized and what it can do for your bottom line.

BEFORE 08/08/19 - $149 AFTER 08/08/19 - $179

ALSO FEATURING Outdoor Showcase: A demonstration what equipment is new when it comes to sidewalk operations. Mini Trade Show: Visit industry vendors. See what’s new. Displayed equipment, products & services. Panel Discussion & Roundtables: Featuring LMN & Aspire.

Special Price!

Register one person from your company and each additional person from the same company is only an additional $69!

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds or credits will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly.

2019 SNOW & ICE CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 08/16/19

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

Each additional person from your company is only $69

$

Each additional person from your company is only $69

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5.5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/SNOWANDICE


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28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


F EATURE ARTI CLE

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

HIRING & RETAINING YOUNG PROFESSIONALS IN THE LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY Nobody is surprised about the lack of labor pool available to the landscape industry. Many companies are struggling to recruit, hire, pay well, and provide benefits to the up and coming candidates who are seemingly over-educated to fill these physically demanding jobs. On top of that, construction has been seeing a labor shortage because young U.S. workers aren’t interested in replacing the aging workforce, even though it’s a well-paid industry that often doesn’t require a college degree, reports the Wall Street Journal. There is hope. Here are simple improvements you can make in your landscaping company to attract and retain younger generations, like millennials.

where people can come in with little to no work experience, step through an apprenticeship type of program and work their way up.

PROMOTE VOCATIONAL TRAINING

Bob Maffei, owner of Maffei Landscape Contractors in Cape Cod, developed an Master Craftsman Program where team members become a specialist in a particular landscaping discipline, and subsequently trains others to do the same.

Parents think that a child not going to college means that they will fail in life, which is a common misconception. In fact, the opposite can be true, but we need to setup systems

continued on page 31 The Growing Concern | May 2019 | 29


PL ANT OF THOLA E M ON TH EDUCATION SERIES

Sponsored & Hosted by

COURSE DATE JULY 16, 2019

PLANT I.D. (CENTRAL OHIO)

This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover

the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be LOCATION PREMIER PLANT SOLUTIONS covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test, including: 6981 SCIOTO DARBY CREEK RD. perennials, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, as well as trees and shrubs - both evergreen HILLIARD, OH 43026 and deciduous.

AGENDA 8:30AM - 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 9:00AM - 3:00 PM CLINIC 12:15PM - 1:00PM LUNCH COST MEMBERS BEFORE 07/02/19 - $79 AFTER 07/02/19 - $109 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 07/02/19 - $109 AFTER 07/02/19 - $139

Those who should attend are plant installation staff, maintenance staff, garden center staff, foreman, and anyone studying to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar is hands-on training with live plant material. Attendees will need their own notepad and pen, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Register online at www.ohiolandscapers.org/education/plantid.html

INSTRUCTED BY

Jack Johnston Premier Plant Solutions

Robin Knaup Premier Plant Solutions

Jason Veil Secrest Arboretum

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds or credits will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly.

2019 PLANT I.D. CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/09/19 (CENTRAL, OHIO)

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/PLANTID


F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 29 For example, The master craftsman in the Edging Crew uses a power edger to cut the contour of the bed edge; the craftsman works behind him, using a stick edger to refine the contour, and finally, the apprentice cleans up behind the craftsman to guarantee a perfect result.

RECRUIT MILLENNIALS WITH MILLENNIALS

Without a career ladder and SPECIFIC steps to get to the next level, the landscaping, snow and construction industries can’t compete with HVAC, roofing or other skilled manual labor.

Millennial Addie Stathatos, Media and Marketing Manager at Heaviland Landscape Maintenance, started her career in the green industry last year at Heaviland and spends her days posting engaging photos and videos to social media in order to attract more people within her demographic.

MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD

Young Professional Zech Strauser, Owner of Strauser Nature Helpers, wonders why more adults aren’t talking about horticulture as a career path. From his experience running and owning a company and working for someone else, he’s seen that there are ample options for entrepreneurship in horticulture and agriculture. “I go to middle schools and high schools to educate not just the students but also the teachers and counselors about how landscaping is a real job and one that can make you very wealthy. The true main reason for loss of interest is because of influencers. Our company is trying to fix that.” Zech said.

If you still haven’t jumped on the bandwagon of internet, social media, marketing automation and other technologies for recruiting… you are behind and missing out.

The types of content that get the most views and shares are not necessarily depicting the landscaping projects that they do. Instead, she focuses on showing the faces within the company having a fun time outside of work. This type of culture—attending BOMA horse race events, learning from industry experts like Bob Grover, full staff summer parties, company world cup watch parties, team building ax throwing competitions, crew of the month, industry partner appreciation nights, and recognition of team members depicts a culture that continued on page 32 keeps their applicant pipeline full.

The Growing Concern | May 2019 | 31


FEATURE ARTI CLE

continued from page 31

STAY UP TO DATE WITH TECHNOLOGY MILLENNIALS APPROVE OF

Adapting to technology is a great first start when considering your recruiting and hiring processes. Is it easy for candidates to find online reviews from other employees? How simple is it for them to apply online quickly and easily using a smartphone? Millennials learn quickly and they like a challenge. Allow them to participate in the development of new services, implementation of new software, and experimental projects to bring out their innovative side. Luke Melaragno is a millennial field supervisor at Mariani Landscape in Illinois. He’s proud to work at a company that’s rolled out several robot lawn mowing machines for a select handful of their customers. They’re also using drone footage to show their properties online which catches a lot of social media attention.

32 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

You can’t overlook mobile devices. People, not just the younger generations, are on their phones for hours each day. When you utilize a landscape management software like Aspire, or something similar, you give them the tools they need to communicate with you on a daily basis. One reason young people like these types of apps is that they automatically prompt them to tell their managers about their day, which highlights improvements that management can implement in real time. At the end of the day, millennials and younger generations are just like everyone else. They crave a sense of purpose through their job and it’s up to you as a leader to provide them with that level of satisfaction. This article was written by Kelly Dowell of Aspire, and was found on the Aspire web blog, located at http://blog.youraspire.com/hiring-and-retaining-youngprofessionals-in-the-lawn-and-landscape-industry.


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D I RECTI ON S

ON THE MOVE In March, we held our Landscape Ohio! Awards Gala at Windows on the River in the Flats of Cleveland. We moved the Gala to this location because we had outgrown the space at the Cleveland Botanical Garden. It was wonderful to have a larger more cohesive space. The event grew to host 221 people this year! Being held as spring is breaking, the Gala has become a wonderful celebration of our green industry professionals and the companies they work for. The committee, board and staff are working on a few tweaks to make next year’s Gala even better. I highly recommend attending this event next March to get new ideas, enjoy great networking, and get pumped up for the season! As you read in last month’s Growing Concern, George Hohman was honored at the Gala with the OLA’s Lifetime Contributions to the Landscape Industry Award. George has given so much back to the industry by serving on the OLA Board, being a destination of the OLA Landscape Facility Tour, being a speaker, and tirelessly working on legislative issues (especially H2B). Congratulations, George! I would also like to thank the OLA Board of Directors and OLA staff member Rick Doll for giving me a Lifetime Contributions to the Landscape Industry Award. I was so surprised and humbled to receive such an honor! They did a great job of keeping this a surprise. Rick worked really hard to interview my family members and the board got information from a few past board members (you know who you are). I cannot believe that Rick was able to get everything done without my knowledge. Thanks to everyone! It is a pleasure to serve such a wonderful group of people – I am blessed to work for and with a great group! Our OLA Scholarship Golf Classic is on the move, too! On August 1, 2019 the Classic will be held at Bob-O-Link Golf Course in Avon. We will be welcoming back the Winking Lizard as our caterer with all-you-can-eat barbecue chicken and ribs for dinner. Thanks to the great support we get from our sponsors, we will also continue to have the fun contests, prizes and adult beverages we previously offered. Be sure to register early to ensure your foursome has a spot in the outing! Last year, we had over 220 golfers!

34 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following members:

REGULAR MEMBER Lawn Leaders 9208 Cambridge Drive Parma, OH 44129 216-727-6863 Michael Hadam Malczewski’s Lawn Care, LLC 8901 Neowash Road Waterville, OH 43566 419-340-7268 Sarah Malczewski

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Address: P.O. Box 91, Newbury, OH 44065 Phone: 440.338.5005 Website: vancurentreecare.com

Profile for Sandy Munley

The Growing Concern May 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

The Growing Concern May 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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