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Growing Concern

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MAR C H 2 0 1 9

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

OLA Education Series: Foreman Training March 11, 2019 / Cleveland, Ohio & March 12, 2019 / Columbus, Ohio

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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

ADAM CAPICCIONI Ohio CAT

THE IMPORTANCE OF SAFETY During my travels this winter season – primarily on the commute between my home and office – I regularly noticed people not taking the few extra minutes necessary to brush the snow off of their windshield, windows, brake lights, or headlights. This is so confusing to me, because performing this simple task could prevent something catastrophic from occurring. More so, it also communicates to those around us that we want to be safe on the road – hopefully something that will rub off on them. To that end, I often wonder how frequently we, as leaders, communicate AND demonstrate the importance of safety to our employees. I know that crew leaders often discuss the importance of safety with their subordinates – be it in everyday conversation or during training programs – and to my knowledge, most companies have a safety and health training program, but are you REALLY setting the example and holding people accountable? And, do you solely focus on the technicians, or are your office and management personnel included, too? While most employees are expected to start the job with the skills necessary to do the job, it’s the employer’s responsibility to

ensure that each employee knows how to be safe doing that job. Relying on their previous employer having done the training or the word of the new employee who says they have done safety training in the past is not a recipe for success. For one, you don’t have any clue when it comes to the quality of the training they received. And two, you also have no idea what, if any, bad habits they may have developed along the way. A good training program should consist of the Who, What, and When as far as documentation is concerned. Personally, I feel there are a couple types of rules this documentation should cover. General safety, i.e., making sure equipment is always used with proper guarding and that there is no continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS M A R C H 2 0 1 9 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens COVER: Landscape Ohio! Awards entry, in the category of Residential Installation, courtesy of Yard Smart, Inc.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN The Importance of Safety

8 PERENNIAL FOCUS The Impact of Orange

12 FISCAL FITNESS Bond Fund Risk

16 FOR SAFETY SAKE

How to Implement an Accident Prevention Plan

22 PLANT OF THE MONTH

Halesia carolina: Carolina Silverbell

27 FEATURE ARTICLE

Seven Green Profession Trends in 2019

34 DIRECTIONS 35 ADVERTISING INDEX 35 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Adam Capiccioni

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Domenic Lauria

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Treasurer Brian Maurer, LIC Immediate Past President Marie McConnell DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Cameron Maneri Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

MARCH

MARCH cont...

AUGUST

MARCH 11 LMN BUILD A BETTER LANDSCAPE BUSINESS SEMINAR

MARCH 21 22nd ANNUAL LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS GALA

AUGUST 1 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC

Industry experts will show you how to take the guesswork out of running your landscape business with proven best practices and practical rules for success. All in just a single day. Held in Cleveland, OH at a location TBD. See outside back cover for details.

Join Ohio’s landscape community for an elegant, fun-filled evening of celebrating as we reveal the 2018 Landscape Ohio! award winners. This annual landscape competition was created to increase awareness of quality landscaping and how it improves our environment. This year’s Gala, held at Windows on the River, includes dinner and awards presentation. See page 33 for more details.

MARCH 11 & 12 FOREMAN TRAINING Foremen have to walk the fine line in working side by side with employees while having to direct, motivate and critique them. In this seminar, they will learn how to more effectively handle tight deadlines, tight margins and increase customer satisfaction. Held in both NE and Central Ohio. See page 7 for more details.

MARCH 14 OLA MEETING (NE Ohio) Ultimate Networking – Learn From Your Peers. When people gather together in-person to share ideas and learn from one another – the good, “old-fashioned” way – great things happen! Join us for a series of roundtable discussions covering various topics pertaining to your company and the betterment of the industry. See page 20 for more details.

Join us at Bob-O-Link Golf Club in Columbia Station for the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic! Proceeds from this event benefit our OLA Scholarship Fund. Our golf outing was created to help generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. Call the OLA at 800-335-6521 for sponsorship opportunities. Registration opens in spring of 2019.

APRIL APRIL 11 SAFETY TRAINING DAY Safety is key to a successful company and this class features sessions on Proper Equipment Utilization and Operation, Basic First Aid and also teaches the Dangers of Distracted Driving and tips from the State Highway Patrol on Safe Hauling and Loading. Participants will select a tract custom designed for either Design/Build/Install or Landscape Maintenance. See page 17 for more details.

LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY CERTIFIED TECHNICIAN TEST DATES Tues, Mar. 19, 2019 WRITTEN TEST 9:30 am (ONLA, Westerville) Application Deadline: 3/1/19

Thurs, Apr. 18, 2019 WRITTEN TEST

JULY

9:30 am (OLA Broadview Heights, OH) Application Deadline: 4/1/19

JULY 11 PLANT I.D. CLINIC

Wed, Aug. 7, 2019 WRITTEN TEST

This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. Sponsored by Davis Tree Farm & Nursery. Registration opens in Spring of 2019.

2:30 pm (OSU ATI, Wooster) Application Deadline: 6/1/19

Thurs, Aug. 8, 2019 HANDS-ON & WRITTEN TEST Day Long Event (OSU ATI, Wooster) Application Deadline: 6/1/19

The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 5


PR E S IDENT’ S C OL UMN continued from page 3

“horseplay” on the job. Then, specific operator related issues such as riding lawn mower safety and proper equipment tie down, etc.

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Along with a safety training program, there should also be a safety disciplinary policy in place. A disciplinary policy isn’t necessarily required, but I highly suggest it. The policy should be in writing, and employees should be informed and trained properly before it can be enforced against them. To be effective – and fair – these policies should also be imposed on management. Gathering employee input is a great idea, too. You can use a report form, suggestion box, or get input verbally during safety meetings. Management should have procedures to address any issues identified and notify individuals what actions can and will be taken. In addition to leading by example, management should give employees resources and incentives. Finally, recognize that an effective program implies a level of commitment from the top down. Time for inspections, training, maintenance, proper equipment guarding, PPE, safety recognition, and incentive programs that reward safety efforts are all your part of the bargain. It also doesn’t hurt to have reminder statements posted on your shop/office walls, such as, “Supervisors and employees are expected to work safely and bring up safety issues,” or “Nothing is important enough to do unsafely.” Our safety motto at Ohio CAT reads, “Safely home. Everyone. Every day.” Establishing a quality safety program at your place of business will take some time and involve some resources. However, you will be pleasantly surprised with the results. You will have happier employees, as they will know you are committed to safety on the job. The reward you receive will surely exceed the cost of your investment in safety protection. The objective of any safety program is to reduce the frequency and severity of accidents, to comply with state and federal OSHA regulations, and to provide a safe and healthy workplace. Keep an eye out for the opportunity to sign up for the safety training clinic occurring this year! We are currently confirming the details.

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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OLA EDUCATION SERIES

COURSE INFO MARCH 11, 2019 INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131 MARCH 12, 2019 WOLF CREEK COMPANY 6700B HUNTLEY ROAD COLUMBUS, OHIO 43229 AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00AM – 8:30AM CLINIC 8:30AM – 4:30PM LUNCH 11:30AM - 12:15PM COST MEMBERS BEFORE 02/25/19 - $159 AFTER 02/25/19 - $189

Foreman Training

Production and maintenance landscape foremen have unique needs as they have to wear two hats: a worker and a leader. Foremen have to walk the fine line in working side by side with the employee and having to direct, motivate and critique at the same time. Managing former peers and friends can be especially difficult, dealing with problems and obstacles can take skills that can only be developed by stepping out of the work environment for a few days, learning best practices, applying it in a learning environment through role play, and then going back and applying it on the job. In this dynamic seminar, foremen will learn: • The central role of the “worker-leader” • How to supervise friends, peers, and former equals • How to communicate with their superiors • How to generate accountability from their team • How to motivate and delegate at the same time

INSTRUCTED BY

ARMANDO ACTIS / PROFESSOR Professor Actis provides management, inside sales & public relation training based on his education & experience in the landscaping & construction industry at Rendel’s Inc, where he is currently the Training & Project Manager for the Joliet Branch. He provides end user operation, application and maintenance training – training anyone from the casual user to the professionals in OSHA, safe & correct usage of landscaping and construction equipment. He was Equipment Manager and judge for ILCA’s (Illinois Landscape Contractors Association) Certified Landscape Technician exams at Joliet Junior College.

NON MEMBERS BEFORE 02/25/19 - $189 AFTER 02/25/19 - $219 SPONSORED BY

• How to implement and follow work schedules • How to budget and complete jobs on time • How to manage problem behavior • How to produce client focused work • And more....

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2019 FOREMAN TRAINING / REGISTRATION CLOSES 03/04/19 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

 MARCH 11, 2019 / CLEVELAND  MARCH 12, 2019 / COLUMBUS

$

 MARCH 11, 2019 / CLEVELAND  MARCH 12, 2019 / COLUMBUS

$

 MARCH 11, 2019 / CLEVELAND  MARCH 12, 2019 / COLUMBUS

$

$

TOTAL DUE  Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No.

Name on Card

Exp. Date

6

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/FOREMANTRAINING


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Belamcanda blooms for weeks in late summer, and its season of interest is extended into fall with the interesting seed pods which develop.

THE IMPACT OF ORANGE Back in the early 60’s, Danish Modern furniture and décor was all the rage. As engaged couples do, Niki and I chose a china pattern called Solar and put it on our wedding registry. A year after our marriage, the pattern was discontinued but we have continued to add pieces, usually finding them on Ebay. The combination of yellow and orange continued into our choice of furniture. After we moved into our current house, our color preferences changed. I am reminded of all this by the declaration of the Pantone Color of the Year for 2019 – Living Coral. In one way, it boggles my mind because so many of my clients declare that they love all colors except orange. However, when I query further, asking about softer shades such as peach, apricot, or salmon, I sometimes get a different answer. In another way, I understand the choice. Shades of orange can change a color scheme from ordinary to interesting or even exciting.

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

For instance, one of my beds was initially shades of pink, blue, purple, and white. Once I added Papaver orientale ‘Pizzicato’, the color of orange sherbet, Penstemon barbatus with its strong orangey-red tubular blossoms, and ‘Twinny Peach’ Snapdragons that are a pinky and peach bicolor, the bed became much more interesting. I also found that the softer shades of orange tempered the strong color of the Penstemon. continued on page 10


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PER EN N I AL FOCUS

continued from page 8 Last summer, when I attended a workshop at Inniswood Gardens in the Columbus area, one of the beds flaunted a vivid combination of Belamcanda chinensis (Blackberry Lily) and Echinacea ‘Merlot’. Orange and dusky rose are not commonly found together but the strength of the colors was tempered by the green seed pods of the lily plus a bit of a yellow-flowered daisy, probably one of the Rudbeckia. To ensure that you are happy with adding orange to your garden, start with annuals such as Dahlias, Impatiens, Dwarf Snaps, Zinnias, or Lantana. Assuming that you do like what shades of orange can do for your garden, then move on to perennials.

Bells) which will be happy in partial shade and even in sun as long as it receives sufficient moisture. ‘Caramel’ is golden orange; ‘Peach Flambé’ is bright peach in warm weather but becomes plummier in winter; ‘Southern Comfort’ varies between apricot, copper, and amber and has been one of my standbys. Heucherella ‘Buttered Rum’ and ‘Sweet Tea’ will always need partial shade. The best annual for a wide selection of shades of orange is Coleus. One of my favorites has been ‘Sedona’. Give orange a try. I don’t think you’ll be sorry.

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts.,

The orange in your garden can be perennial flowers such as Agastache, Lilium, Echinacea, or Phlox, just to name a few. However, my favorites of the perennials are poppies, even though their bloom is fleeting, and Kniphofia (Poker Plant), particularly ‘Mango Popsicle’ and ‘Orange Vanilla Popsicle’.

Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation:

Don’t forget that you can introduce orange foliage into the garden. The easiest perennial for this purpose is Heuchera (Coral

10 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 11


F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

BOND FUND RISK Over the recent months the potential of a falling stock market, rising interest rates and a slowing economy have compelled many mutual fund investors to move their money from equity funds to bond funds and from aggressive bond funds to more conservative options. But perhaps those clients seeking security and income should be skipping funds altogether and consider the simplicity and income offered by certificates of deposit. Here are factors favoring CDs over bond mutual funds. Bond funds are especially prone to at least two risks that can hurt performance and reliability. The first is rising interest rates, which will usually cause a decline in the values of bonds held within the mutual fund— and a drop in the fund’s net asset value. What good is a bond fund paying a 5% yield if the price (net asset value) drops 7%? The second is a deterioration in the ability of the bond issuers to make expected interest payments, and return the principal to the bondholders upon maturity.

These issues are damaging enough to investors who hold individual bonds. But those who own bond mutual funds while either (or both) events are occurring can experience significant losses, especially if net redemptions from the bond fund force the managers to liquidate positions at reduced prices. However, with FDIC-insured certificates of deposit the risk to principal and interest is about as close to zero as fixed income investors can get, regardless of the behavior of other investors. And yes, in a rising interest rate environment, owners of broker-sold CDs may see a decline in value of the investments on their monthly statements. But that decline will evaporate as the CD maturity date draws closer and the estimated worth of the CD nears its originally-issued face continued on page 14

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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FI SCAL FI TN ESS

continued from page 12 value. For better or worse, most bond mutual funds are perpetual, as there is no defined date or promised future value. But CD owners can take comfort in the knowledge that if they hold their securities to maturity, they will get their interest and principal as expected. According to Morningstar, mutual funds are only required to report their portfolio holdings twice per year, and the information may not make it into the public until up to two months after each reporting date. Often the information represents just a “snapshot” of what the fund held on a given date in the past. Not only is it difficult to know what’s in most bond funds, but there may be a disconnect between the fund’s name and the perceived investments. For instance, “government” bond funds might own mortgage-backed securities or zero-coupon Treasuries. They may also employ such strategies as leverage and derivatives to enhance returns. There is usually nothing inherently wrong with these investments, but they may add a layer of risk to the bond fund that will only be discovered and discussed when things go wrong.

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

CDs offered directly from banks and credit unions usually have a fixed penalty for early withdrawal, often six to twelve months’ worth of interest. That means that if interest rates rise after investing in a CD, you can withdraw the money before maturity in pursuit of higher yields elsewhere, possibly incurring only a small loss on the withdrawal. Comparing an intermediate-term bond fund with an average duration and effective maturity of 3 years to a CD with a 3-year maturity, I am finding the CDs have, in most cases, a higher yield compared to the 30-day SEC stated yield on many bond funds. And the potential risk and volatility inherent in investing in a bond mutual fund compared to the certainty of a CD wouldn’t be worth the investment. According to the latest information available from the Investment Company Institute, the average asset-weighted bond mutual fund expense ratio is 0.48 percent, and it’s 0.18 percent for exchange-traded bond funds. Those figures appear to be reasonable, but in the current low interest rate environment those expenses eat up a substantial portion of the yield generated by the fund’s portfolio, reducing the overall return. Certificates of deposit have no ongoing


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expense ratio; therefore, all of the interest paid by the CDs goes directly to the owner. We have been comparing bond funds to CDs, but if you are looking for a little more yield than CDs, individual bonds offer many of the same benefits as CDs. Bonds could be purchased from issuers such as the U.S. Government, corporations and foreign governments. Of course, talk with your tax and financial advisors for information specific to your goals and risk tolerances. Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com Securities and advisory services offered through L.M. Kohn & Company Registered Broker/Dealer Member FINRA/SIPC/MSRB 10151 Carver Rd. Suite 100 – Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 (800) 478-0788 The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 15


FOR SAFETY SAK E

HOW TO IMPLEMENT AN ACCIDENT PREVENTION PLAN Injury and illness prevention programs are a major focus for modern firms. Companies call these by different names, often based on the state where they operate. They might be called accident prevention programs, injury and illness prevention programs, or safety and health programs, but they usually all derive their origins from federal guidelines. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration puts out guidelines to help companies and their workforces address safety and health issues in the workplace. The original guidelines, published in 1989, are currently under review. A draft is completed, and public comments are finished. It’s possible the new guidelines are going to be quite different from the previous ones. For example, based on the draft, there will now be seven core elements instead of the current four. The new guidelines are placing high value on making safety a proactive activity, according to OSHA. Continuous improvement is also a key part of the new guidelines.

GUIDELINE SOURCES Regardless of what is finally included in the new guidelines, employers can still follow a similar path to setting up an accident prevention program. For many, adopting the new guidelines will depend on what their state OSHA plans do. According to OSHA, 34 states have their own guideline programs for protecting worker safety and health, and 16 of those have programs specifically for construction. Some of the programs are voluntary, others are mandatory, some apply to all employers, while others only apply to certain industries. So, it’s important for firms in those states to follow their state plan. continued on page 18

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


OLA EDUCATION SERIES

COURSE INFO THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2019 TRI-C EASTERN CAMPUS 4250 RICHMOND ROAD ROOM EMHC 122 HIGHLAND HILLS, OH 44122

Safety Training Day

AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00AM – 8:30AM

This is a can’t miss event for anyone who uses equipment! This class will feature multiple types of machines utilized in the green industry and will teach you best practices and how to operate them in a safe manner. Safety is key to a successful company and this class features sessions on Proper Equipment Utilization and Operation, Basic First Aid and also teaches the Dangers of Distracted Driving and tips from the State Highway Patrol on Safe Hauling and Loading. Participants will select a tract custom designed for either Design/Build/Install or Landscape Maintenance and need to dress for the weather as part of this class with be outdoors with the equipment.

CLINIC 8:30AM – 4:30PM

Who should attend? Owners, Crew Leaders, Crew Members... Anyone working in the Green Profession.

BREAKFAST, LUNCH & SNACK ARE INCLUDED!

Why? Having ready, trained and enabled crews is key to spreading the culture of safety throughout your company.

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 03/28/19 - $99 AFTER 03/28/19 - $129

THIS EVENT SUPPORTED BY

The following companies have provided instructors, equipment and/or training materials to make this course possible:

CDL

NON MEMBERS BEFORE 03/28/19 - $129 AFTER 03/28/19 - $159

T R A I N I N G CONSULTANTS

SPONSORED BY

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds or credits will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2019 SAFETY TRAINING DAY / REGISTRATION CLOSES 04/04/19 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

$

$

$

TOTAL DUE  Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

7

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/SAFETYTRAINING


SAFETY SAKE F ORF OR S AFETY SAKE

continued from page 16 There are others who also put out guidelines that contractors can use in developing safety programs. For example, the National Association of Homebuilders offers its Home Builders’ Safety Program Manual. The association claims this “is a practical guide for small to mid-sized companies that assists them in adopting and maintaining a total loss-control safety program.” Having an accident prevention program not only helps to maintain a safer workplace, but also helps in financial transactions, contracts, and legal requirements of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970. When you are ready to implement one, here are some aspects to consider. Current OSHA guidelines show four core elements to include in your accident prevention plan: • • • •

Management commitment and employee involvement Worksite analysis Hazard prevention and control Training for employees, supervisors and managers

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

SUPPORT FROM THE TOP The emphasis on safety needs to start at the top. When management takes safety seriously, it sets the tone for the rest of the organization. Therefore, to implement your accident prevention plan you need to think about how to involve management, and then how to involve employees. Here’s how: • Hold meetings with all stakeholders where you discuss your plans for the safety and health policy, and seek input from them. • Make sure all of your managers and supervisors are wellversed in safety requirements and that they follow them. • When you can, involve your employees in assessing the safety of certain sites or certain areas of sites, and you can extend their involvement by making some employees responsible for safety monitoring. Through all of this, you need to make sure that you allow enough money, time, and training, as well as give people the proper authority they need to enforce safety requirements.


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DISCOVERING HAZARDS Landscape businesses operate on many different work sites. Unlike a manufacturing company where activities take place every day on the same property and in the same situations, landscaping activities take place in varied locations and under a wide range of conditions. So, your accident prevention plan is most effective when it is developed per site. Sure, you will also have to prevent accidents at your offices and warehouse or any other buildings that you operate from. However, each jobsite will offer different safety challenges and, therefore, your accident prevention program needs to take that into account. In fact, your contract documents may often require an accident prevention plan for each project. All of your good plans and forethought will have little effect on preventing accidents if people don’t understand what the requirements are and know how to follow them. For each jobsite, you will assess the hazards through worksite analyses. There are many ways to do this including involving your OSHA State on-site consultation program, or even

hiring outside professionals. You might also have enough experience with the kinds of hazards faced on the type of projects you do to handle the task yourself along with your employees. However you decide to do your worksite analysis, the net result should be that you know what items or processes you need to keep your workers safe. An important part of this is to make sure everyone understands it’s okay to bring attention to issues they perceive to be dangerous or out of place, without fear of retaliation. Reviewing your past records on accidents and illnesses will also shed some light on areas you may need to focus on as you do your worksite analysis.

PLAN FOR PREVENTION After you know what your existing and potential hazards are, you can set up some systems to help prevent them, or at least control them. When possible, you want to eliminate hazards. But, when you can’t do that, then you need to have systems in continued on page 21 place to control them. The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 19


OLA MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

MEETING INFORMATION HELD AT ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH AGENDA (MARCH 14, 2019) REGISTRATION / NETWORKING FOOD / CASH BAR 6:00PM TO 7:00PM MEETING & PROGRAM 7:00PM TO 9:00PM COST TO ATTEND OLA MEMBERS: FREE NON-MEMBERS: $30 REGISTER TO ATTEND BY MARCH 7, 2019

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Ultimate Networking

LEARNING FROM YOUR PEERS: A SERIES OF ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS March 14th, 2019 Social networking. Online education. Webinars. Forums. On-line meetings. LinkedIn. Virtual conferences. The opportunities for professionals to meet, learn and network have increased exponentially. The Internet creates a time-saving and cost-efficient medium for busy professionals and the firms for which they work. It is important to remember though, the value provided when people gather together in-person to share ideas and learn from one another – the good, “oldfashioned” way. The purpose of our Ultimate Networking Roundtable Meeting is to bring our industry together – as a group of forward-thinking companies and individuals – to actively discuss, share opinions on, and strategize towards solving the issues currently facing our profession. This year, our (3) sessions will focus on the following topics, among others: •

Customer Service

Team Leaders Expectations

Teamwork & Culture

Dealing with HOAs

Emerging Technologies

Social Media/Marketing

Training & Development

Owner’s Role

Recruiting Employees

Winter Operations

Retaining Employees

Equipment

Onboarding

Plants

Contracts

Join your peers, March 14th at St. Michael’s Woodside, for this unique opportunity to sit across from your employees, vendors, industry experts and even competition as we continue the process of bettering the profession of landscaping. Who knows better than someone who has walked in your shoes? IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN MODERATING ONE OF THE TABLES AT THIS YEAR’S MEETING, OR HAVE SUGGESTIONS FOR TOPICS YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEE COVERED, PLEASE CONTACT THE OLA AT 440.717.0002, OR EMAIL US AT INFO@OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG PRIOR TO MARCH 1st.

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR OLA MEETINGS ARE AVAILABLE! CALL 440.717.0002 FOR INFO. 2

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FOR SAFETY SAKE continued from page 19

• Standardize the response to hazards by setting up safe work procedures for the hazards you’ve identified. • Train people so they know what those procedures are. • Enforce the rules for safe work procedures, and you might even have employees help to establish a disciplinary system. • Be sure people have access to personal protective equipment and that they know how to use it, and when to use it. • Plan for emergencies and how you want people to respond when emergencies happen.

TRAINING YIELDS UNDERSTANDING AND COMPLIANCE All of your good plans and forethought will have little effect on preventing accidents if people don’t understand what the requirements are and know how to follow them. Employees, supervisors and managers are all key players in making your accident prevention plan effective. Make sure to 1) Let your employees know that they don’t have to do any job until they have received instructions on how to do it properly, and have been authorized to do it, 2) Tell them they shouldn’t start a job if it doesn’t appear to be safe.

Not only should you train employees initially on the potential hazards they face and how to protect themselves, but particularly for construction, this needs to be an ongoing process because construction happens in changing environments. Supervisors need to understand their roles in constantly assessing hazards and reinforcing good safety practices. Implementing an accident prevention plan is something that varies according to the potential job hazards and the complexity of the job. And a construction environment accident prevention plan is often constantly evolving to accommodate the changing hazards that occur at jobsites. That’s why if you can manage it, you can have much better results when everyone is a safety ambassador. When all of your people focus on not only their own safety, but the safety of others, the team effort is a cornerstone of having a proactive accident prevention plan. This article was written by Duane Craig, and originally ran on the Jobsite website at https://jobsite.procore.com/how-to-implement-anaccident-prevention-plan. Jobsite offeres contractors the ability to ask questions, share best practices and build their reputations.

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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College Carolina Silverbell is a good small tree for shrub or woodland borders. Its white, bell-shaped flowers bloom in April and May and are best seen from below the tree.

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

HALESIA CAROLINA CAROLINA SILVERBELL If you’ve ever had your doctor advise you to watch your blood pressure, you have the namesake of this month’s plant to thank for it. Born in 1677 near Bekesbourne, Kent, England, Stephen Hales grew up in a time when scientific discovery thrived. By profession, he was priest. By vocation, he was scientist, craving more and more information about how the natural world works. Hales was quite interested in the physics of how both plants and animals move liquids from one place to another, spending much of his life studying the forces at play. This led to two major discoveries and a number of important inventions intended for the medical field. His research led him to be the first person to define and measure blood pressure in the early 1700s. In that same vein, he was also the first person to develop a theory of transpiration in plants which is the physical process of moving water from the soil, into the plant, and through the leaves to carry nutrients up to the leaves. Though Hales died in 1761, John Ellis persuaded Carl

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Linnaeus to honor Hales in perpetuity in 1756, in the 10th edition of Systema Naureae, by naming a genus of beautiful woodland trees after him – Halesia. Halesia belongs to a small family of woody plants named Styracaceae – a distant relative of the Ericaceae (Heath, Rhododendron, and Blueberry) family. In the genus Halesia, there are 3 to 5 species, depending on who you ask. Taxonomists love to argue with each other, while the rest of us in the real world have to deal with the outcomes of their constant name changing shenanigans.


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One species, H. macgregorii, is native to Eastern China. The other 2 to 4 are native to North America. The most common, and only one normally found in commercial trades, is H. Carolina (Carolina Silverbell). The other undisputed species is H. diptera (Two Wing Silverbell), which is quite common in the southeastern United States. The two disputed species, H. tetraptera (Common Silverbell) and H. monticola (Mountain Silverbell), are claimed by some to be subspecies of H. carolina. And, while there are minor differences in the measurements of the flowers, fruits, and overall mature plant size, both the Carolina and Mountain Silverbells are all very similar and equally attractive. Silverbell is a nod to the heavy bloom of bright-white, pendulous, bell-shaped flowers. These flowers are borne in clusters along the previous year’s stem growth, with a prominent cluster of pistil and stamens in the center, resembling the clapper on a bell. The flowers are perfect (both male and female reproductive parts present in each flower), the majority of which will be pollinated by flying insects, resulting in a rather unique fruit.

It’s debatable if the fruit is ornamental, as it is a dried-up, brown, four-winged pod (two wings on H. diptera). Personally, we think the fruit is an interesting feature, as it hangs on for quite a long time. It is quite common, in fact, for the previous year’s fruits to still be hanging on when the new year’s flowers are in full bloom. After bloom, the two-year-old fruits will fall off, giving way to the new year’s bright, lime-green fruit, which will eventually turn to the deep-brown through summer, persisting through the next winter. Straight species Halesia carolina will typically attain a height of 20 to 30 feet, with a spread slightly less than height, and naturally forms a multi-stem form. To add a blush of pink, try ‘Arnold Pink’, a cultivar achieving the same size, but offering a rose-pink tone of flower. For a slightly smaller habit, try ‘Wedding Bells’ which behaves more as a large 15 foot - 18 foot shrub. A unique offering from Klyn is H. monticola ‘Variegata,’ which has a cream-yellow margin, offering some foliage interest during the summer months, after the flowers have faded. continued on page 24 The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 23


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

continued from page 23 All Silverbells will do well in full sun, but will likely be happiest with some shade. Typically, these plants are found through the greater Appalachian regions, preferring well-drained soils (not heavy clay) that are on the acidic side. Expect chlorosis to be an issue in high pH soils. A well amended planting bed or naturally well drained site is your best bet for a happy tree. A benefit of this plant is there are nearly no major pest issues, as long as the plant is in the right place.

We have not seen a lot of landscapes incorporating this beautiful native tree, but hope you are inspired to add it to a few designs this year. With around two weeks of bloom, nice fall color, and no pest issues – why not replace your next dogwood planting with this champion of the landscape?

Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD

Fall color is often a clean, bright-yellow, which really glows on a sunny day. We’ve found that the bright-yellow shows up great in shaded areas, offering a bit of “sunshine” on the gloomiest of fall days. You will find records of this plant reaching into the 50’ range, especially H. monticola, but don’t expect to see that in your lifetime from a newly planted tree. This plant won’t set any speed records. As for cold hardiness, it is native to Ohio and quite used to a polar vortex slipping south, with no damage recorded after enduring -25 degrees – proving to be very useful in our landscapes.

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.


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March 2019 | 25


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26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


F EATURE ARTI CLE

SEVEN GREEN PROFESSION

FOR 2019 This story, written by Jill Odom, originally ran on the Total Landscape Care website. www.totallandscapecare.com/landscaping/green-industry-trends-2019/

The beginning of the 2019 season is officially right around the corner and with it comes the new prediction of trends. Total Landscape Care spoke with some landscapers about these possible trends and their outlook on the future, and all of them agreed the future is looking bright. “The economy is still strong, and companies continue to invest in landscape enhancements,” says William Cruz, senior branch manager for Gachina Landscape Management. “There is still some concern regarding labor cost and manpower availability; however, continuous growth is expected in 2019 and this positive momentum provides an opportunity to analyze the challenges and develop new strategies.” Here are seven trends to watch for in 2019:

YOUNGER CUSTOMERS AND LANDSCAPERS As younger generations are becoming homeowners, the customer expectations are changing as well. According to Garden Research’s 2018 National Gardening Survey, those between the ages of 18 and 34 have set a record high, making up 29 percent of all gardening households. “Many younger people are not as concerned about how the lawn looks,” says Rachael Williams, residential account manager and horticulturist with James Martin Associates,

Inc. based in Vernon Hills, Illinois. “With small children and pets roaming the back yard, younger couples are looking for a more organic approach to gardening and maintaining their landscape. So, the challenges we face are keeping up with the new demands and updating our products and services to accommodate the new expectations.” Jan Johnsen, co-principal and owner of Johnsen Landscapes & Pools, based in Mount Kisco, New York, says that often, new homeowners underestimate how much care their landscape requires and the price of quality landscaping. “Sticker shock is common with younger customers,” Johnsen says. These younger generations are also entering the workforce, bringing with them a number of innovations such as smart irrigation systems and new methods for weed control. “This new generation embraces new technology better and many customers want to know about saving money with those new and improved practices,” Cruz says. continued on page 29 The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 27


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F EATURE ARTI CLE

Brad Lockwood, a 20-year-old York College junior, believes energy is one of the biggest challenges of his generation. He has built a solar charging station in his back yard that can mow about 10 acres a week.

continued from page 27

INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY

BATTERY-POWERED EQUIPMENT

Speaking of technology, landscapers can boost their efficiency by taking advantage of new technologies such as aerial photography, smart controllers and apps to track workers or control systems remotely.

One bit of technology that landscapers are seeing a push for is the usage of battery-powered equipment.Johnsen says that while her customers haven’t voiced a desire for battery equipment, she says if they knew about it, they would want it.

Johnsen says cell phone-controlled pools are big currently and that anything controlled by a smartphone will win out.

Williams says that call for a switch is coming more from the local municipalities.

“There are more apps available for anything from identifying insects, diseases and plants to estimating and measuring on site with a laser app,” Williams says. “These technologies will make it easier and more efficient for the landscaper to manage their properties.”

“Clients are voicing their concern to their local governments, who then issue new rules for landscapers to follow,” Williams says. “I expect that we will be seeing more of this in the future.”

James Martin Associates has also begun integrating robotic snow removal machinery as part of their equipment, but others are still withholding judgment to see how effective robotic equipment truly is. “The industry relies more on computers, smart phones and systems that offsets manual labor and paperwork, which in turn make the work more efficient,” Cruz says. “Those who don’t embrace new technology will get left behind.”

Cruz agrees that city ordinances are increasing the demand for battery-powered crews, but there is also interest from retirement communities, assisted living and nursing home centers. “As electrical equipment becomes more powerful and efficient, we are seeing a trend to have this in place, especially in environmentally-conscious areas such as the Bay Area. While some brands like Greenworks believe battery is the way of the future, other OEMs like Stihl prefer to cater to both gascontinued on page 30 and battery-powered crews. The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 29


FEATURE ARTI CLE

The pollinator-friendly gardens will contain perennial flowers and plants to attract butterflies, hummingbirds and other pollinators.

continued from page 29

LOW-MAINTENANCE LANDSCAPES

POLLINATOR GARDENS

A common theme among customers, is the fact that a majority do not have the time to properly care for their landscapes. This results in them either requesting a more low-maintenance design or hiring professionals to do the work for them.

A particular type of landscape that is predicted to continue to be requested are pollinator gardens, as more homeowners become aware of the peril that a number of pollinators, including bees and butterflies, face.

“People are either avid gardeners or not,” Johnsen says. “There doesn’t seem to be much of a middle (except for two weeks in spring). I think having others do the hard work is becoming more popular.”

“Not only are the younger clients interested in being more conscientious of pollinators, but many people in the older generation feel the need to be responsible for creating ecosystems in their backyard and communities,” Williams says.

Williams says that some would rather have a customized landscape program with them handling the mowing but leaving the pruning, mulching and garden care and such for the professional landscapers. While lower maintenance gardens can reduce the cost to maintain, it’s important to stress to customers this doesn’t mean there will be no maintenance.

Johnsen says she installs pollinator gardens and strives to educate everyone.

“Many large commercial and residential customers are thinking to divert their standard landscape into another direction: low maintenance landscapes with drought-tolerant and native plants, which require less maintenance and less water in the long term,” Cruz says. “Our role is to educate the customers about the levels of maintenance, regardless of the type of landscape they want to install.”

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

“I explain how we are in a crisis and everything we do for pollinators helps,” Johnsens says. Cruz agrees that more clients are interested in creating pollinator habitats within their landscape whether it be for butterflies, bees or just a general wildlife habitat. “In some instances, we are taking advantage of federal grants that cover a percentage of our clients’ new installation cost,” Cruz says. continued on page 32


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F E ATUR E AR TIC L E continued from page 30

ASYMMETRICAL DESIGN Another look that is anticipated to be popular in 2019 is asymmetrical design. “Asymmetrical is less formal and casual and gives the impression that it is easier to maintain,” Williams says. “A more symmetrical design suggests that the landscape is more complicated to maintain. Not true! That being said, a lot of newer homes are being designed to be less symmetrical – farmhouse style is very popular now. I think the asymmetrical design complements the newer housing design styles. A farmhouse style is generally a looser design.”

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Asymmetrical landscapes don’t mean you can’t have any symmetry but rather that it is less obvious and predictable.

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“You can create a more interesting landscape by choosing a design that uses asymmetrical balance and combines elements of varying weights,” Cruz says. “Particularly, new generations of homeowners and commercial landscape managers like the non-traditional landscape and prefer the diversity of plants. We, the professional landscapers, need to make sure that those asymmetrical designs and groups of plants are installed with specific irrigation root zone (all the plants in a group, i.e. lantana, manzanita, oleanders) and have almost the same lower rate of water needs.”

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SECLUDED SPACES Both Cruz and Johnsen report they have had more customers asking for private, secluded spaces. “People love to be nestled,” Johnsen says. “I was just asked to make an area smaller to create a cozy feeling.” While outdoor living spaces tend to be all about entertaining guests and family, these smaller retreats provide a quiet place for homeowners to relax, read or unwind. “Many residential estates and some commercial properties are asking for small, secluded spaces within the landscape area to celebrate family reunions, meetings, etc.,” Cruz says. “These areas are normally small Japanese garden styles screened with natural hedges for privacy. We are becoming more familiar with these kind of secluded areas as we are doing more business with different cultures from different parts of the world.”

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These smaller portions of the garden are easy to create by providing seating for two, surrounding the area with lush plants and using a wall or tall narrow plants to create privacy screen. A sense of calm can be created with a neutral palette and a simple water feature.

32 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS GALA

EVENT INFO THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 2019 WINDOWS ON THE RIVER 2000 SYCAMORE ST, CLEVELAND, OH 44113 AGENDA REGISTRATION/COCKTAILS 6:00PM – 6:45PM DINNER 6:45PM – 7:30PM PROGRAM 7:45PM – 10:00PM COST MEMBER: $75 PER PERSON * Includes champagne toast, dinner and awards show. CASH BAR.

MEMBERS ONLY EVENT

* Members in attendance may bring non-member guest

LANDSCAPE ENHANCEMENT AWARDS GALA

The Landscape Ohio! Awards Program is an annual Landscape competition, created by the Ohio Landscape Association, in effort to increase awareness of quality landscaping and how it improves our environment. In conjunction with this program, the OLA hosts a prestigious awards gala to recognize our designers, installers, and property owners. The 2019 gala will be held in the breathtaking Bridge View Room, at Windows on the River, in the heart of Downtown Cleveland. It is a semi-formal event inclusive of a cocktail hour, dinner buffet and awards presentation. It is also an excellent chance for industry professionals to get dressed up and celebrate the work being done by their teams and their peers. This year, the OLA is happy to announce that we will be able to offer a limited number of tickets to those who did not enter this year’s competition. This is a great opportunity for those of you who have been contemplating entering, but want to know more about the program, or for those of you just looking to spend an elegant night out with industry leaders and get inspired for spring.

MAJOR EVENT SPONSORS

The following companies have provided instructors, equipment and/or training materials to make this course possible:

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES * Opportunities to sponsor this year’s event are still available and we are always happy to accept the donation of door prizes. For more information, please contact the OLA office at 440.717.0002.

CATEGORY SPONSORS

Alvord’s Yard & Garden, Bedford Glens Garden Ctr., Belgard Hardscapes, Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Great Big Home and Garden Show, Heartland, Klyn Nurseries Inc., Kurtz Bros., Inc., Lake County Nursery, Premier Plant Solutions, SIMA, Unilock Ohio Inc., Valley City Supply, Wolf Creek Company. Cancellations made 14 days prior to the event date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds will be issued for cancellations 13 or less prior to the event, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the event. If, for any reason, the event is cancelled, attendees will be notified, and fees refunded in full.

2019 LANDSCAPE OHIO AWARDS DINNER GALA / REGISTRATION CLOSES 03/13/19 Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

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D I RECTI ON S

OLA GARDEN 2019 GREAT BIG HOME & GARDEN SHOW OLA members never cease to amaze me with their volunteer efforts and generous donations of time and treasure. The OLA had a garden at the Great Big Home and Garden Show again this February. And, as has happened for many years, competing companies join together for the greater good and create a masterpiece garden to benefit the entire membership. We received a lot of great compliments on the garden from attendees concerning the accessibility of our garden, the colorful plantings, the workmanship, and the fact that we labeled our plants. We gave out a few thousand postcards promoting the use of OLA members and our consumer website referral system. And, we were able to do all this with little monetary investment, thanks to those who volunteered their time and donated materials and use of equipment.

In addition, this year we included a colorful and interesting display about the great careers in the green industry. This display featured three banner stands with the main headline, “Love what you do! Do what you love!” Isn’t that a great message? This display was strategically placed where everyone who visited the garden area would have to pass by as they exited the garden area. Our goal was that patrons of the show would be inspired by all the beautiful gardens and then be inspired to consider working in our profession. With the workforce development display, we had two different brochures as take-homes. Our PR and Marketing Committee, Board of Directors, and Rick Doll (staff) did a fantastic job with the messaging and are committed to expanding on this idea by creating additional Workforce Development resources. As always, your ideas are welcomed!

2019 GREAT BIG HOME & GARDEN SHOW TEAM Our sincere appreciation to the following people & organizations that made this year’s garden possible: GARDEN DESIGNERS Ken Sasak & Kevin Sasak (Sasak Landscaping, Inc.) PROJECT MANAGER Ken Sasak (Sasak Landscaping, Inc.) ASSISTANT PROJECT MANAGER Kevin Sasak (Sasak Landscaping, Inc.) GARDEN CONSTRUCTION TEAM Herman Losely and Son, Inc. Howell’s Landscaping, LLC J.A.G. Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping Nick’s Landscaping & Dumpster Rental Rosby Resource Recycling Sasak Landscaping, Inc. Western Reserve Landcare, Inc. Yard Smart, Inc.

34 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

MATERIALS AND TRANSPORTATION Belgard Boyas Excavating Burns JCB Great Big Home and Garden Show Kurtz Bros., Inc. Mason Steel Pioneer Pride Sasak Landscaping, Inc. Vermeer Mid Atlantic Willoway Nurseries, Inc. Wolf Creek Company Again, many thanks to everyone involved in the garden! We appreciate all the people who came out to staff the garden as well. This is always a great opportunity to speak with the public. And a special thanks to Sasak Landscaping for going above and beyond to handle all the details and create a beautiful garden for the OLA!


ADVERTI SI N G I N D E X

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following members:

REGULAR MEMBER Dingey’s Lawn Services 1320 McFarland Rd., Unit C Cambridge, OH 43725 740-801-0429 Brandon Dingey

AFFILIATE MEMBER Gary Kessler (Delaware Area Career Center) 1610 State Route 521 Delaware, OH 43015 740-203-2242 Craig Everett (OSU Extension – Wood County) 639 S. Dunbridge Road, Suite 1 Bowling Green, OH 43402 419-354-9050

STUDENT MEMBER(S) Amanda Gainer – Columbia Station ( Tri-C) Kasandra Hernandez – Cleveland ( Tri-C) Megan Schafer – Lakemore ( Tri-C)

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MRLM

6

Oliger Seed, Co.

6

O’Reilly Equipment

9

Premier Plant Solutions

11

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

26

Unilock

11

Valley City Supply

25

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

15

Zoresco Equipment Company The Growing Concern | March 2019 | 35


9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

ENTER TODAY ENTER TODAY

03/19

CLEVELAND 11 March 2019

Profile for Sandy Munley

The Growing Concern March 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

The Growing Concern March 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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