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Growing Concern

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A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

OLA Education Series: Plant ID

N.E. Ohio: July 11, 2019 / Davis Tree Farm & Nursery / PAGE 32 Central Ohio: July 16, 2019 / Premier Plant Solutions / PAGE 7


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

ADAM CAPICCIONI Ohio CAT

ASK NOT WHAT OTHERS CAN DO FOR YOU... With Independence Day taking place earlier this month, and Memorial Day having just passed, I felt the urge to write about something a bit off topic in this month’s article: Patriotism. Technically speaking, patriotism is defined as the quality of being patriotic; or showing devotion to and vigorous support for one’s country. That being said, I feel that patriotism cannot simply be defined by any one book, or person. In fact, I’m pretty sure that if you asked any two random people on the street, both would have varying definitions of what the word actually means.

known veterans like Pat Tillman, this characteristic is the common bond that filled their hearts with the will to protect their country’s people and freedom. Take it a step further, these unselfish acts – performed by the minority of people – tend to be the catalyst that awakens the patriotism in the rest of us. I like to think that this is where the saying “RedBlooded American” comes from.

For me, patriotism has always been this immeasurable characteristic that reveals itself through unselfish acts, such as an individual serving their country and its people. From early colonists fighting the tyranny of England, to well-

A term that tends to walk hand-in-hand with Patriotism is Civic Pride, or the pride that one has for their community. Civic Pride tends to manifest itself through the actions of individuals, or groups, which make their communities stronger. continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS J U L Y 2 0 1 9 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com DESIGNER / EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Adam Capiccioni, Ohio CAT Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb COVER: Landscape Ohio! Merit Award winner, J. Barker Landscaping Company.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN

Ask Not What Others Can Do For You...

5 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 8 PERENNIAL FOCUS Astible: Update

12 FISCAL FITNESS

When to Start Taking Social Security

17 FOR SAFETY SAKE

Creating a Tick-Resistant Garden for your Staff & Clients

22 PLANT OF THE MONTH

Chamaecyparis pisifera: Japanese falsecypress

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Adam Capiccioni

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Domenic Lauria

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Treasurer Brian Maurer, LIC

29 FEATURE ARTICLE

Immediate Past President Marie McConnell

34 DIRECTIONS 35 ADVERTISING INDEX

DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Cameron Maneri Joshua Way

Collectives: Business Model of the Future?

4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

JULY

AUGUST cont...

NOVEMBER

JULY 11, 2019 PLANT I.D. CLINIC (NE Ohio)

AUGUST 22, 2019 SNOW & ICE CLINIC (NE Ohio)

NOVEMBER 13, 2019 DORMANT PRUNING (Central Ohio)

This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. Sponsored by Davis Tree Farm & Nursery. See page 32 for more details.

Join us at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Heights for our annual Snow & Ice Management Clinic, featuring Industry Experts, our Mini Trade Show, and more. Registration and Sponsorship Opportunities are available. See pages 26 & 27 for more details.

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Held at Willoway Nurseries in Avon, Ohio.

SEPTEMBER

JULY 16, 2019 PLANT I.D. CLINIC (Central Ohio)

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 OLA FACILITY TOUR (NE Ohio)

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Held at Premier Plant Services in Hilliard, Ohio.

This clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews covering the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. Sponsored by Premier Plant Solutions. See page 7 for more details.

AUGUST AUGUST 1, 2019 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC Join us at Bob-O-Link Golf Club in Avon, OH for the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic! Proceeds from this event benefit our OLA Scholarship Fund. Our golf outing was created to help generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. Call the OLA at 800-335-6521 for sponsorship opportunities. See page 20 for more details.

Joins us for our annual Landscape Facilities Tour. Location TBD. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002.

OCTOBER OCTOBER 1, 2019 PLANT HEALTHCARE DAY This full-day workshop combines all aspects of Plant Health Care (PHC) for both technicians and managers, with live demonstrations of PHC techniques – services based on the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and proactive tree care management. Held on the grounds of Secrest Arboretum.

NOVEMBER 19, 2019 DORMANT PRUNING (NE Ohio)

DECEMBER DECEMBER 12, 2019 STONE VENEER CLINIC (NE Ohio) This hands-on clinic will teach the basics of mixing mortar, installing and grouting stone veneer. The techniques you will learn can be applied to both manufactured and natural stone. The demand for veneers has increased and this is a great opportunity to learn how to apply it in house. Sponsored and hosted by Mason Steel in Walton Hills.

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS

OCTOBER 24, 2019 (Tentative) OLA FACILITY TOUR (Central Ohio)

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following members:

By establishing uncompromising technical and safety standards and making sure that employees have the best possible training and excellent equipment, Ahlum & Arbor delivers exceptional quality and value to their clients. Joins us as we tour Ahlum & Arbor’s facility to find out what has made them so successful.

REGULAR MEMBER Carmel Landscapes 15358 Kinsman Road Middlefield, OH 44062 440-321-9846 James Mudri Evergreen Landscapes, Inc. 12185 Newbury Road PO Box 351 Newbury, OH 44065 440-564-5606 Dan Harb The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 5


PR E S IDENT’ S C OL UMN continued from page 3

As an association, the OLA is big on both Patriotism and Civic Pride. It is why we recite the Pledge of Allegiance at every OLA meeting, why we’ve participated in community service projects focused on honoring those who died on 9/11, and why we continue to look for local projects to help assist with, as time and labor issues allow. It is also why some of our members continue to be so heavily involved in demanding H2B reform, while others dedicate their time to local workforce development. The lesson to be learned is, while there are many paths towards supporting your country, your community and your association, nothing is more important than being active and involved. Many of you might not know this, but our association was started by immigrants – Italians predominately – who didn’t come to America empty handed. With them, they brought their culture, two of the main pillars of which were: an appreciation for the arts and an emphasis on the importance of the extended family – not just the nuclear family, which western civilization tends to favor. Fast forward 50 years, and it’s amazing to see how those two ideologies have helped shape our association. Not only are many of us artisans in our own rights, but we continue to share our expertise with one another, which, in a way, amounts to looking out for our extended family. It also plays into our revised mission of elevating the profession through advocacy and education.

Growing High Quality Plants, People, and Relationships

In this new world we live in, instilling this core value of “working together” in our children may be the most patriotic thing you or I can do, if we want to continue making our country great in the years to come. Teaching them that diversity is a good thing and that everybody has the freedom to have a different opinion is important, but teaching them that despite those differences we must all find ways to work together is invaluable. In closing, our youth learn by the example we set. If we want them to understand that they are responsible for their actions and to grow up holding themselves, and others, to higher standards, perhaps we need to start acting accordingly, rather than being so divided and unwavering when it comes to every… single… topic... Hopefully I haven’t come across as “too political” here. It is not my intent. We all have opposing views, but if we all work together we can make this country a better place to live.

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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PL ANT OF THOLA E M ON TH EDUCATION SERIES

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COURSE DATE JULY 16, 2019

PLANT I.D. (CENTRAL OHIO)

This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover

the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be LOCATION PREMIER PLANT SOLUTIONS covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test, including: 6981 SCIOTO DARBY CREEK RD. perennials, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, as well as trees and shrubs - both evergreen HILLIARD, OH 43026 and deciduous.

AGENDA 8:30AM - 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 9:00AM - 3:00 PM CLINIC 12:15PM - 1:00PM LUNCH COST MEMBERS BEFORE 07/02/19 - $79 AFTER 07/02/19 - $109 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 07/02/19 - $109 AFTER 07/02/19 - $139

Those who should attend are plant installation staff, maintenance staff, garden center staff, foreman, and anyone studying to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar is hands-on training with live plant material. Attendees will need their own notepad and pen, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Register online at www.ohiolandscapers.org/education/plantid.html

INSTRUCTED BY

Jack Johnston Premier Plant Solutions

Jason Veil Secrest Arboretum

Robin Knaup Premier Plant Solutions

Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds or credits will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly.

2019 PLANT I.D. CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/09/19 (CENTRAL, OHIO)

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

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PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Astilbes brighten shady gardens with brilliant midsummer color, holding their plume-like flowers high above attractive, deep green foliage.

ASTILBE UPDATE Astilbe is a mainstay of the shady garden but they will also thrive in full sun if sufficient water is supplied. There are many cultivars on the market but I’ve been trialing some of the newer ones, thanks to my friends at DeVroomen. ‘Look at Me’ is a large, fluffy, pale pink inflorescence that resembles cotton candy on a red stick (stem). Bred to be only 15-17” high, it stands out in the landscape, even when nestled behind Daylilies and into Geranium ‘Rozanne’. It shows best when planted in a grouping of three or more. In my garden, it is usually in bloom from mid-June to early July. Mine is planted on a south-facing hill that gets morning sun but afternoon shade. Astilbe ‘Freya’ flowers are hot pink above bronzy-green foliage. Its spiky flower is much narrower than that of ‘Look at Me’ but a bit taller at 20”. It also blooms a week or two later. Although I eagerly await the flowers, I enjoy the bronze foliage in May

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

when it echoes the color of the new fronds of Dryopteris erythrosora (Autumn Fern). Astilbe ‘Sugarberry’, a member of the Short and Sweet series, is the shortest of the cultivars I want to mention. Only 10” tall but 14” wide, its plumes are a bit unusual, being a spiky, triangular shape. The pale pink plumes bloom in mid-June and definitely benefit from being shaded so the sun doesn’t bleach the color. Mine are planted at the top of a south-facing hill but are shaded by the foliage of Hibiscus ‘Pinot Noir’ and the large heads of Allium christophii. Nearby is Berberis ‘Concorde’, a sterile purple barberry, the color of which complements that continued on page 11 of this Astilbe.


The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 9


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PEREN N I AL FOCUS continued from page 8

‘Freya’

Astilbe ‘Mighty Red Quin’ is a chinensis hybrid meaning that it blooms even later than the aforementioned cultivars. The foliage emerges bronze and ages to dark green, topped in midsummer with 4’ tall, bushy spikes of cherry red flowers. Mine have struggled but only because I have planted them in a less than ideal situation – too dry but the survivors are spectacular because of both color and height.

‘Look at Me’

Many of the cultivars I have mentioned have chinensis heritage. I tend to plant these more often than the Arendsii because they are more drought tolerant, bloom later – usually mid-July – and are rhizomatous rather than clumping, thus working better as a slow moving groundcover. Regardless of which one you use, happily, they are all deer and rabbit resistant. ‘Freya’ foilage

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

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F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

WHEN TO START TAKING SOCIAL SECURITY Social Security can be an important component of your retirement income. But at what age should you start collecting payments? That has been one of the most asked questions in our office the past year. There is no one “right” answer, because everyone’s situation is different, but one thing is certain: Timing is everything. You can begin accepting Social Security benefits as early as 62, but your monthly checks will be 25 to 30 percent smaller than if you wait until your “full retirement age,” which is 66 to 67. And once you reach your full retirement age, your monthly payments will increase 8 percent each year until they “max out” when you turn 70. The chart to the right illustrates just how much your benefit may vary, depending on when you begin taking it. In deciding when to take Social Security, you will need to consider a variety of factors, including your life expectancy and your other sources of revenue, such as income from employment and withdrawals from your IRA, 401(k) or continued on page 15 other retirement accounts.

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

EFFECT OF EARLY OR DELAYED RETIREMENT Social Security Benefit Payable Based on Age Birth Year: 1960 and later Full Retirement Age: 67 Credit For Each Year Delay (percent): 8 62

63

64

65

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66

67

70

93% 100% 124%

* % rounded to the nearest full percentage point. Source: Social Security Administration, Office of the Chief Actuary.


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F ISCAL FI TN ESS continued from page 12 You even have the option of delaying your benefits past your full retirement age, thereby locking in an even higher monthly check. If you plan to work during retirement, you may want to delay collecting Social Security because your earnings could have a negative effect on your benefits. However, there are also instances where taking benefits before you reach full retirement age most likely will pay off. If you start collecting at the earliest opportunity, which is age 62, you’ll receive a permanently reduced benefit, but you could make out better overall if you live long enough to offset the reduction. You can’t predict how long you’ll live, but if you’re facing a potentially significant reduction in life expectancy and are short of income, taking Social Security early may be appropriate. Just be sure you budget for a reduced benefit. It is important to make an informed decision regarding how much income you may forfeit over your lifetime based on when you claim benefits and the strategies you employ. From there you can determine which strategy best fits your retirement income plan. Once you reach age 70, there is no benefit to continuing to wait to file for Social Security, which makes it the last great age to start collecting if you haven’t already. Even if you have substantial income from other sources and don’t need the money to support your lifestyle, there’s no point in waiting anymore. You can always donate it to a worthwhile charity or use it to fund a gifting program to your children. Note that while waiting until age 70 to collect will give you your largest possible monthly Social Security benefit, it’s only a good idea to wait that long if you’ve got the ability to cover your expenses from other sources. It makes no sense to skimp painfully through your 60s in order to get a bigger payday in your 70s and beyond.

If you expect to live beyond that age, it would be financially worth your while to delay drawing benefits. Check out the Social Security Administration’s life expectancy calculator at www.ssa.gov/oact/population/longevity.html to help you decide. When it comes to calculating a start date for Social Security benefits, however, there’s not an age that’s appropriate for everyone. Consider your own financial need, health and postretirement plans before making the call. Scenarios illustrated are hypothetical in nature, results may vary. Past performance is not indicative of future results.

Calculate your break-even age to better determine when you should start drawing Social Security. Your break-even age occurs when the total value of higher benefits (from postponing retirement) starts to exceed the total value of lower benefits (from choosing early retirement).

Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com

Here’s an example: If you are eligible to collect a reduced $900 benefit at age 62 plus 1 month, and your benefit would increase to $1,251 at age 65 and 10 months, your estimated break-even age is 75 years and 5 months.

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16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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F OR SAFETY SAK E

CREATING A TICKRESISTANT GARDEN FOR YOUR STAFF & CLIENTS Ticks are the perpetrators of Lyme disease, a potentially disabling infection of the joints and nervous system. As 75% of cases occur in our clients’ backyards, we have the opportunity to be especially vigilant. Here are some important facts about ticks and ways to make your clients’ gardens resistant to them.

THE TICK AND ITS LIFE CYCLE The blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, formerly known as the deer tick, takes two years to complete its life cycle. Females lay 2,000 – 3,000 eggs in May then die. The eggs hatch in July or early August and the larvae feed on mice, chipmunks, and birds that may be infected with the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Some birds, including the American Robin, Carolina Wren, House Wren and Veery, carry the spirochete short-term. Mice may be infected for life. The larvae drop off their host animals, molt to nymphs,

and overwinter in places such as rodent burrows and leaf litter. The nymphs appear the following spring. They molt to adults and then feed on larger animals such as deer, humans, and pets. Although deer are immune to the disease and can’t infect the tick, they are important to its life cycle, as 90% of adult ticks feed on deer. The tick spreads the bacteria into a human’s bloodstream when it bites and remains attached for 24 to 48 hours. Female adults are active in temperatures as cold as the mid 30s, so it’s possible of people, or their pets, to attract them very early on in the spring. continued on page 18 The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 17


FOR SAFETY SAKE continued from page 17

LYME DISEASE SYMPTOMS & TREATMENT

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Early symptoms of lyme disease include a skin rash, fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, headache, fatigue, and muscle and joint pain. Within three days to a month, you may see a characteristic “bulls eye” rash, called Erythema migrans, appearing as a red circular patch at the site of the bite. The disease is rarely fatal but can cause heart irregularities, facial paralysis, and impairment of the nervous system. Once diagnosed, antibiotics result in a full and rapid recovery when treated promptly. Early treatment is crucial to prevent permanent damage.

HABITATS WHERE TICKS ARE COMMON

grasses perennials ferns vines roses dwarf conifers bog & marginals shade & ornamental trees

Ticks prefer cool, wet, shady places and are mostly found in densely wooded areas. They like stonewalls and woodpiles, but are also found in grassy, or brushy areas. The unmaintained edge between woodland brush and your clients’ lawn, called the ecotone, is the next highest in tick population. Ornamental vegetation and the lawn have the least number of ticks. Ticks don’t like open, sunny areas. Knowing the ticks’ favorite habitats can help you make your client’s property more tick-resistant.

HOW TO CREATE A TICK-RESISTANT GARDEN Here are some landscaping changes that you might suggest to keep your client’s property as close to a tick-free habitat as possible:

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• Barriers (i.e. fences) to areas where deer, rodents and ticks are common, such as a forest. Suggest to your clients that they make these areas off-limits to family and guests. • The creation of a three-foot barrier of woodchips or rock to separate the off-limits area from their lawn. • Situating woodpiles away from their home, or site them on the woodchip barrier. • Proper spring cleanups, including removal of all leaf litter. • The creation of a tick-safe zone, a nine-foot barrier of lawn between the woodchips and patios, gardens, and play sets. • The pruning of trees to let in more sunlight, thus creating open, sunny areas. • Consistent lawn mowing. • The trimming of shrubs near walks and patios. • The removal of groundcover directly around treebases. • Surrounding gardens with fieldstone, gravel or lawn paths. • Constructing fences to keep deer out. • Suggesting deer-resistant plants for their landscapes. • Removing any exotic-invasive species of plants that deer love to browse, such as Japanese barberry (Berberis thunbergii).


MORE TIPS TO PREVENT BITES & DISEASE In addition to creating habitats that will keep your clients safe, there are important precautions your staff members can take, as well, such as: • • • • • •

Wearing light-colored clothing so they can see ticks clearly. Wearing long-sleeved shirts and pants. Tucking their pant legs inside socks or boots. During breaks, checking their body for ticks. Placing their clothes in a hot drier, daily, to kill ticks. Using an insect repellent containing 20% to 30% DEET, (10% for children), avoiding hands, eyes, and mouth. Always following the instructions on the label. • They should NOT try to remove a tick from their body with heat or alcohol. Using fine-tipped tweezers, they should grasp the mouthparts of the tick as close to the skin as possible and then pull straight out.

DEER-RESISTANT PLANTS Bear in mind, no plant is completely resistant to deer, and the best way to short-circuit the tick’s life cycle is to have a fenced property that eliminates deer completely. That said, deer-resistant plants may help if you use enough and place them strategically to surround the ones deer love to eat. Here are a few of the plants recommended by Penn State Extension:

To attract butterflies and hummingbirds: Fountain Grass (pennisetum alopecuroides), Goldenrod (Solidego sp.), Lavender (lavandula sp.), Mint (mentha sp.), Nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus), Ornamental Onion (Allium schoenoprasum), and Pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium.) For the cut flower garden: Blue Salvia (Salvia farinacia), California Poppy (Eschscholzia californica), Daffodil (Narcissus sp.), Foxglove (Digitalis sp.), Iris (Iris sp.), Larkspur (Consolida ambigua), Statice (Limonium latifolium), and Veronica (Veronica sp.) For dry borders: Blue Flax (Linum perenne), Globe Thistle (Echinops sp.), Hen and Chicks (Sempervivum sp.), Lambs Ears (Stachys byzantine), Red Valerian (Centranthus ruber), Rose Campion (Lychnis coronaria), and Russian Sage (Perovskia atriplicifolia.) While spring is almost over, your clients are anxious to spend as much time as possible outside. By implementing a tick-resistant garden, you can minimize the risk of Lyme disease to your staff and your clients. Written by Pamela T Hubbard, Penn State Master Gardener of Monroe County, for the Penn State Extension. https://extension.psu.edu. The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 19


GOLFER REGISTRATION PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH 2019 EVENT SPONSORS DINNER SPONSOR

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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Golden Mop’

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

CHAMAECYPARIS PISIFERA JAPANESE FALSECYPRESS

Identifying many of the small evergreen shrubs utilized in our landscapes can be a tough task for many a landscaper. Often, we are right there with you! While Pines, Arborvitae, and Spruce are easy to recognize, it can be much more difficult to determine Dwarf Junipers and Falsecypress. The challenge would be less if each plant would maintain one type of leaf, but many display several types commonly referred to as “juvenile” and “adult” leaves. Botanists call this change in morphology “heterophylly” and believe the leaves change from their juvenile form (lower on a branch) to adult forms (towards the end of branches) due to different exposure to light. The terms you will find used in describing evergreen leaves on these plants are: awl-like (think of the tool, wide at base then coming to a sharp point); scale-like (think fish scales, layered and flat against each other); or needle-like (long and skinny with uniform thickness from base to tip). Our plant this month, Chamaecyparis pisifera, may display heterophylly depending on the cultivar, but will most likely display awl-like leaves that are laid down flat against the stem, but are not sharp-to-the-touch, like most Junipers.

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

This softer texture makes planting dwarf forms of Japanese falsecypress more enjoyable than planting Junipers, which often leave your arms covered in itchy, little, red bumps after stabbing you a million times. Now, before we get too deep into Japanese falsecypress, we want to remind readers that there are several Chamaecyparis species common to our landscapes, specifically C. lawsoniana (Lawson falsecypress), C. obtusa (Hinoki falsecypress), and C. thyoides (White Cedar). You will also find a plant


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called Alaskan Cedar, or Nootka falsecypress, listed as Chamaecyparis nootkatensis. This beautiful tree has undergone numerous name changes, as botanists continue to bicker, and has been known as Cupressus, Chamaecyparis, Xanthocyparis, but is now placed as Callitropsis. All of the aforementioned plants are landscape worthy, and over time, we have – or will – cover them all. This month though, we want to discuss Japanese falsecypress. Japanese falsecypress comes in several great cultivars, with one of the oldest being perhaps one of the most fun names to say, Chamaecyparis pisifera ‘Filifera’ (Green Threadleaf falsecypress). Along with a similar cultivar, C. pisifera ‘Filifera Aurea’ (Gold Mop falsecypress), these two have been used in our landscapes for decades. And, while the straight form of this species – in its native habitat (a couple of islands in Japan) – will reach monstrous proportions (100 foot tall, 5 foot diameter trunk), these cultivars will be large shrubs at best.

There are three major groups to place these plants in, listed botanically as “forms.” As mentioned, one is C. pisifera forma filifera along with C. pisifera forma plumosa (Plume sawara falsecypress) and the third is C. pisifera forma squarrosa (Moss Sawara falsecypress). Most of the cultivars you purchase won’t be listed by their full name (including their form), but they can be traced back to each of the three dominant forms. ‘Golden Mop’ is in the threadleaf group and tends to stay more compact and smaller than the old fashioned ‘Aurea’. This plant will make attempts to form a leader and stretch tall, but a simple “off with its head” will keep it in the 3 to 6 foot range. The gold leaves remain colorful year round. It is a much improved version over ‘Aurea.’ ‘Aureovariegata’ is like green threadleaf, reaching upwards of 15 feet tall, and adds some creamy-white highlights to the leaves, offering visual interest to the back of a shrub border. continued on page 24 The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 23


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

C. pisifera forma plumosa ‘Plume Sawara Falsecypress’

continued from page 23 ‘Boulevard’ is in the plumosa group, with leaves that look like they’d be incredibly pokey, but are rather soft to the touch. This long-time cultivar reaches 10 feet tall – maybe a bit more – with slightly less width. Each plant has a unique habit in that, as it stretches up, you should be prepared for a lot of needle drop from the interior. This is normal though, and you can simply pull these out, or just leave them to fall off eventually. ‘Baby Blue’ is a new dwarf version of ‘Boulevard,’ staying under half the size and maintaining a tidier look for the smaller garden. ‘Lime Pie’ is a nice moss form that stays very small compared to most at 3’ tall and wide. If you make sure it is in as much sun as possible it will reward you with little punches of bright, lime-green throughout the garden. It is very useful as an accent plant repeated across a landscape. Chamaecyparis has Greek roots in chamai (dwarf or close to ground) and kyparissos which is Greek for Cypress tree. This is a reference to this plant looking like true Cypress trees, but smaller. The specific epithet has Latin origins in pissum (pea) and ferre (to bear) which is a reference to the little nonornamental immature cones which resemble little peas spotted across the plant.

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

We’d recommend keeping any of these cultivars in as much sun as possible (especially yellow forms) but they can tolerate some shade. Once established, these are drought resistant and very tough shrubs that require little-to-no care, given proper sighting. It may be possible to see some Juniper blight show up on them, but that can typically be traced back to poor sighting in overly wet soils. Keep the soil well drained and diseases should stay away. For insect issues, the only one we’ve ever observed is bag worm infestation, which again, can be traced back to the stress of overly wet soil. With a great selection of cultivars available and a fairly low maintenance habit, we suggest giving some of these great falsecypress a try in your next design!

Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in horticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.


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F EATURE ARTI CLE

Collectives

B U S I N E S S M O D E L O F T H E F U T U R E ? by The PitchBox Team

Fours years ago I wrote this article, describing how the vast majority of landscape businesses are still jostling for first place in the same race, or the same space, rather than thinking outside the box and finding niche opportunities. Four years later and things have improved, but there’s still a way to go and there are other forces at play that need to be considered. The days of the one-stop-shop, a company that supposedly “specializes” in both design and construction, in all aspects of residential, commercial, school and government projects is proving to be more of a cliche than an effective reality. This generalist approach, trying being “everything to everyone,” precludes them from being able to offer consistently good outcomes and impeccable customer service in all areas, to every client. It’s not to say clients don’t want a single port of call to assist with their project; the issue is that the quality of the outcome suffers when a business tries to appeal to every corner of the market and produce everything in-house. Businesses large and small that offer the holy trilogy of design, construction and maintenance are finding that if they don’t

focus their super powers into a specific corner of the market, such as only working on commercial projects, their aspirations to dominate the market will soon be extinguished by those who do. Though not impossible, it’s complicated and expensive to develop the capacity to solve every problem in-house, to a consistently high standard. Getting everybody in the organization, with such varying needs and agendas, consistently rowing in the same direction is near impossible, at least, within the one company entity. Large established companies that have split into or acquired multiple separate brands (“Groups”) are leading the way by example. Rather than a single entity, their individual brands each deal with a specific area of expertise within a specific sector continued on page 30 The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 29


F EATURE ARTI CLE

continued from page 29 of the industry; and they’re on call to join forces in relevant, efficient combinations as needed. When not needed by the parent company, they become available to team up with others outside the group. Overlay these trends with the fact that the labour force itself is changing rapidly. People are increasingly exchanging their jobs and the promise of a long term career as an employee for greater personal freedom and control over their financial future. They’re becoming consultants, specialist sub-contractors, “guns for hire” that you can plug into a project on an as-needed basis. With a website and a social media feed, individuals or partners have the ability to quickly build their own brand, build a following and exceed their previous salaries, sometimes within months. We’re seeing these micro businesses coming together to work in the same team (“Collectives”) on a contractual or cooperative basis, both on one-off and successive projects as they build long term, trusting working relationships with each other. In my opinion, the “Collective” as a business in and of itself is a business model for the future.

Like the larger “Group” entities that own multiple brands, there are efficiencies to be found by collaborating on-demand with specialized brands. Collectives find strength in numbers, but rather than a parent company owning the entire organization, they find flexibility and agility in cooperative agreements and the shared values of their members; people seeking greater freedom and control over their lives than they experienced as employees, locked into a long term career path. In all the above cases, the lesson seems to be specialize, in the real sense of the word. The ones who are winning are simplifying what they do, “doubling down” on a specific aspect of landscape that they’re either extremely capable in or have identified as a lucrative niche, a piece of real estate they want to own. Some examples I’ve seen are specialists in small gardens, vertical gardens, nature play, plunge pools, plants for hire, event landscapes, sensory gardens, aqua play, classic formal, outdoor gyms, courtyards, rooftops, and beer gardens. These businesses aren’t claiming to be everything to everyone and that doesn’t mean they’re missing out on work. It means they’re building a recognizable brand with a distinct value proposition, and this gives them the chance to build efficiencies into everything they do. They become the “go to” continued on page 33

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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This Plant ID Clinic is a hands-on training opportunity for you and your crews that will cover the basics of Plant ID for plants typically used in Zone 6 in Ohio. Many of the plants that will be covered are on the plant list for the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test, including: perennials, groundcovers, ornamental grasses, as well as trees and shrubs – both evergreen and deciduous. Those who should attend are plant installation staff, maintenance staff, garden center staff, foreman, and anyone studying to take the Landscape Industry Certified Technician’s Test. GENERAL INFORMATION: This seminar is hands-on training with live plant material. Attendees will need their own notepad and pen, and will need to dress appropriately for outdoor practical training. Continental breakfast and lunch are included. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly. Register online at www.ohiolandscapers.org/education/plantid.html

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Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds or credits will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly.

2019 PLANT I.D. CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 07/04/19

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

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FEATURE ARTI CLE

continued from page 30

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Every industry has its challenges, every market is a living organism with gaps opening and closing, waiting to be filled or needing to be re-invented. Is your existing brand “sticky,” that is, do people know exactly what you offer that others don’t so they’re attracted to you every time, they choose you first? Or are you still trying to be everything to everyone (in which case, potentially not anything to anyone)?

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The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 33


D I RECTI ON S

SANDY MUNLEY Executive Director

SUMMER EVENTS FORE… OR, FOURSOME THAT IS! It is time to round up your golf team and plan for a great 18 holes of golf with plenty of food, fun, and friends at the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic. The Classic is scheduled for Thursday, August 1st. The golf committee, OLA Board and OLA staff are always looking for ways to keep the Golf Classic exciting, so this year we have chosen a new venue for this event! The Classic will be held in Avon at Bob-O-Link Golf Club. It will be here before you know it, so be sure to register your team now! The early pricing ends July 11 and registration closes on July 18. As always, there will be many fun games and raffles, including Poker – where you will have a chance to win some money! Here is how it will work: Your team can buy into the game for $20 in the morning before golf. You will receive 3 playing cards. At a designated hole, you will receive another card. At a second designated hole, you will receive your fifth card and have the opportunity to trade in cards for a small fee to improve your hand. The hands will be judged at the pavilion after golf and the winning team will receive a cash prize! Doesn’t that sound like fun? Also, we heard you loud and clear! The Winking Lizard will return as the caterer for lunch and dinner because of the rave

34 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

reviews we continue to receive about the Lizard! Lunch will include fresh grilled hamburgers and sausage sandwiches. Dinner will still be an All-U-Can-Eat buffet of BBQ chicken and ribs, but this year, will be served with Caesar salad, potato salad, green bean almondine, and garlic bread. Yum! If you do not golf, you can purchase a dinner ticket and join us for an early dinner at 3:30 pm. Please show your support by golfing, sponsoring a tee and/or donating a door prize (valued at $25 or more). OLA staff will be happy to purchase gift cards on your behalf so that you don’t have to leave the comfort of your office – just send us a check, call in your credit card number, or ask us to invoice you for sponsoring a tee or door prize. (Golf registration must be paid at the time the reservation is made.) There is an option to do this online as well. www.ohiolandscapers.org/olagolf.html Another way to support OLA Scholarships and enjoy the entire day is to be a volunteer at the event. We need people to help with registration, contests, pavilion set-up, take down, etc. Please give us a call in the OLA office for details on volunteering. The OLA Scholarship Golf Classic is always a huge event, for a great cause, where everyone has fun! Whether you are a hacker or a pro, it is the place to be on August 1st!


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OLA will have a booth at the 52nd Annual NGLCO Field Day, so come out to see us and support the nursery growers! Field day will be once again hosted by Debonne Vineyards in Madison on Tuesday, August 13th. Chalet Debonne Vineyards is the largest estate winery in Ohio, boasting over 175 acres of vines. Visit the trade show exhibitors and tour the winery and their Micro Brewery, the Cellar Rats Brewery. For more information go to www.NGLCO.com.

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OLA SNOW AND ICE MANAGEMENT CLINIC Here I go talking about snow... but you have to admit that this is the time of year to plan for the winter season and make your purchasing decisions. This year’s Snow & Ice Management Clinic is planned for August 22 at Woodside Event Center in Broadview Heights. The committee has some cool things up their sleeves, with a focus on sidewalk operations. Keeping sidewalks clean is a safely priority, but it is often difficult to keep employees excited about being on a sidewalk crew. Learn what some successful companies are doing to ease the pain of keeping them clear! We have great support from our supplier members and there will be a lot of equipment for you to see, as well! I look forward to seeing you at our summer events!

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O’Reilly Equipment

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Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

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Three Z Supply

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VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

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Zoresco Equipment Company The Growing Concern | July 2019 | 35


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Profile for Sandy Munley

The Growing Concern July 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

The Growing Concern July 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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