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Growing Concern

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A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

OLA Hospitality Suite

January 16, 2018 / Hampton Inn & Suites across from MGIX

Unconventional Sources for Finding New Employees

OLA Meeting / January 25, 2018 / St. Michael’s Woodside PAGE 7


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

MARIE MCCONNELL Lake County Nursery

LET THE JOURNEY BEGIN Hi, I’m Marie! Many of you have met me at various OLA functions, at a tradeshow, maybe touring our nursery, or quite possibly from the community. I have the honor of being your 2018 OLA President. The shoes of past presidents are big! The past few months of phone calls, emails and text messages, offering assistance as I start my journey, have been much appreciated. Thank you for having confidence in me. I expect this journey to be humbling, exciting, and a learning experience. Just remember – or should I say remind me – I am just Marie! When I was asked if I would accept this journey, my life was in turmoil. (Something I can share in person. Just stop and ask!) I needed something to give me a focus; a purpose, a new journey, something to make me smile again. Needless to say, I didn’t ask many questions. I just jumped in with both feet. I have a great support system and they won’t let me down, right? The answer is YES. They haven’t and won’t let me down, because the OLA is a group like no other. We are a knowledgeable and caring group, with expectations set so high we must have a great team to achieve the goals we’ve set forth.

Being a Green Industry Professional is like no other. We are friends, competitors and neighbors! We can sit at the table and not worry about sharing our stories, offering advice, or even sharing our equipment and/or people. We surround ourselves with other likeminded professionals, making sure we are all successful. In my eyes, it truly is the greatest profession to be associated with. So, let this journey begin. It’s a new year, and the challenges and opportunities go as far as the eye can see. How do you view your new year? Resolutions? Fear of what’s to come? Are the yearly goals you’ve set in your personal and professional life achievable? I have found that the only way to achieve what’s in front of me is to have a “can do attitude.” It’s something I take to heart. I don’t believe in resolutions. Instead I pick a “word of the year” and try to implement it by making it part of my goals continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS J A N UA R Y 2 0 1 8 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON AL G REEN I N D UST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr.

It’s tradeshow season! Come visit the OLA at booth #1341, January 15-17, at this year’s MGIX show. Also, make sure to join us at our annual Hospitality Suite, after the close of the show on the 16th.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Let the Journey Begin

9 PERENNIAL FOCUS

REGULAR WRITERS Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA, Suncrest Gardens ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org.

16 FOR SAFETY SAKE

DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association.

21 SPECIAL GUEST COLUMN

OFFICERS President Marie McConnell

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Adam Capiccioni

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Jazzing Up the Perennial Garden

12 FISCAL FITNESS

What Your Spouse Should Know About Financial Accounts Brine Handling and Personal Safety 4 CORE Elements to Business Success: Autonomation

22 FEATURE ARTICLE

The One Trait All Top Talent Possesses

26 PLANT OF THE MONTH Picea Pungens: Colorado Spruce

30 DIRECTIONS 31 ADVERTISING INDEX 5 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Treasurer Domenic Lauria Immediate Past President Cathy Serafin, ASLA, RLA DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Brian Maurer, LIC Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

JANUARY 2018

FEBRUARY

JANUARY 15 -17, 2018 MGIX – formerly known as CENTS

FEBRUARY 2 -11, 2018 GREAT BIG HOME AND GARDEN

Tradeshow with educational sessions held at the Greater Columbus Convention Center. Visit OLA in Booth #1341. For more information contact the ONLA at 800.825.5062.

Explore this year’s music themed gardens created by some of Northeast Ohio’s top landscapers. If you are interested in volunteering to help construct this year’s OLA garden, or would like to staff the garden during show hours, please contact the OLA at 440.717.0002 as soon as possible. Spots do fill up quickly.

JANUARY 16, 2018 OLA HOSPITALITY SUITE (Central Ohio) Come network with others in the Green Industry. Hosted by OLA. This social event is held at the Hampton Inn and Suites, 501 North High Street, in Columbus, OH, from 5 pm to 7 pm. The Hampton Inn is directly across the street from the Columbus Convention Center. Visit the OLA in booth #1341 at MGIX to get your invite!

JANUARY 25, 2018 OLA COMMITTEE MEETINGS Committee meetings are a great way for you to get involved with your association. We have a number of committees – from golf, to education, to our annual awards program – that could use your experience. If you’d like to join a committee, call us at 440.717.0002 before January 12, 2018. Our first meetings will be held at 3pm, prior to the start of our January meeting.

JANUARY 25, 2018 OLA MEETING: UNCONVENTIONAL SOURCES FOR FINDING NEW EMPLOYEES As long as laborers are viewed as “warm bodies” that is who will show up to work for you. William Eastman of GreenMark Consulting Group will discuss conventional and unconventional methods for attracting new employees. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside. See page 7 for more details.

FEBRUARY 22, 2018 LANDSCAPE BUSINESS BOOTCAMP Spend a day with business owners who have done it as they walk you through the core concepts of building a better business. This program is meant for business owners, managers, employees and anyone else seeking to improve their business expertise in the landscape industry. See page 20 for more details.

MARCH MARCH 8, 2018 OLA MEETING (NE Ohio) Ultimate Networking – Learn From Your Peers. A series of roundtable discussions on various topics to help increase your bottom line. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Hts., OH. For more info, go to www.ohiolandscapers. org/meetings/march2018.

MARCH 12 & 13, 2018 FOREMAN TRAINING Foremen have to walk the fine line in working side by side with employees while having to direct, motivate and critique them. In this seminar, they will learn how to more effectively handle tight deadlines, tight margins and increase customer satisfaction. Held in both NE and Central Ohio. See page 25 for more details.

MARCH 22, 2018 21st ANNUAL LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS GALA Join Ohio’s landscape community for an elegant, fun-filled evening of celebrating as we reveal the 2017 Landscape Ohio! award winners. This annual Landscape competition, held at the Cleveland Botanical Garden, was created to increase awareness of quality landscaping and how it improves our environment. Includes dinner and awards presentation. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002, or email us at info@ohiolandscapers.org.

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following new members to the association:

REGULAR MEMBERS Cardinal Building & Design Co. 7340 Cardinal Lane Chagrin Falls, OH 440-247-6611 Edmund Leopold M.J. Design Associates 8463 Estates Ct. Plain City, OH 614-873-7333 Molly and Joel John

STUDENT MEMBER(S): Cuyahoga Community College Nikki Barrett / Cuyahoga Falls, OH Sarah Rex / Cleveland Hts., OH Kerry Nickels / Cleveland, OH James Brewer / Fairview Park, OH Ohio Hi-Point Career Center Creighton Bradley / Mechanicsburg, OH

The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 5


P RESI DEN T’S COLU M N continued from page 3

for the year. If you get the chance, Google My One Word, a book written by Michael Ashcaft and Rachel Olsen. It is a simple book with a simple premise – stop making lists, which can discourage change, and pick just one word that inspires you. Yes – one word! In 2018 my word is TRUST. Habits take 45 days to form; and these words are not just for this year alone. They should resonate in your professional and personal life for years to come. It might just work, give it a try. It has helped me narrow my focus, keep me on track, and become ever more successful in most things I touch. So, a little bit about myself, before I go. I have been in the green profession all my life. I started in high school, am a proud graduate of OSU/ATI (the friendships and experiences of which have lasted me a lifetime), and worked for some other nurseries in the past, gaining knowledge all along the way. Now, I am back working with my cousins and lifelong friends, as I continue my life’s passion at my family’s business, Lake County Nursery. For Lake County, I do marketing and sales to the Midwest, with a focus on Northeast Ohio. Every day, I come to work with a smile on my face, making sure it shows through the phone and in person. I have two wonderful daughters, Laura and Autum, a sonin-law, Nathan, and a beautiful 4-year-old granddaughter, Elizabeth. I live on Lake Erie, so my passion for the water runs deep. (Want to go boating, jet skiing, or just experience life on the lake? Just ask!) In closing, this is one of 12 articles I have to write and I am always up for suggestions, as this is NOT my strong suit. Seriously, this is YOUR magazine and we would love to know more about what you’d like written in its pages. Feel free to send suggestions to me, directly, at mariem@ ohiolandscapers.org, or to our communications manager, Rick Doll, at rick@ohiolandscapers.org.

Always, Marie McConnell

6 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


OLA MEETING ANNOUNCEMENT

MEETING INFORMATION HELD AT ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH AGENDA (JAN 25, 2018) REGISTRATION / NETWORKING FOOD / CASH BAR 6:00 PM TO 7:00 PM MEETING & PROGRAM 7:00 PM TO 9:00 PM COST TO ATTEND OLA MEMBERS: FREE NON-MEMBERS: $30

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SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR OLA MEETING’S ARE AVAILABLE! CALL 440.717.0002 FOR INFO. 2

CEU’S

UNCONVENTIONAL SOURCES FOR FINDING NEW EMPLOYEES January 25th, 2018

SPEAKER: WILLIAM EASTMAN / GREENMARK CONSULTING As long as you view laborers as “warm bodies” that is who will show up to work for you. In looking for quality help, you must start with the mindset that landscaping is a career. You need to look for people who want to be creative, but who also want to work outside – not in a cubicle, staring at a screen. Our January meeting’s presenter will discuss traditional and non-traditional ideas for you to start implementing when looking for your next star employee. In many scenarios, it might seem like 2 out of 10 new hires are keepers. His goal is to help you start building a consistent pipeline of winners. Some of the concepts he will discuss include; •

Building Your Presence & Reputation: How your business is perceived in the local community is what will it attract, repel, or have no impact on the quality of job candidates you see. Are you known for what employees want: positive association, a compelling future and the ability to contribute?

Solidifying Your Traditional Approach: It is smart to build an ongoing recruiting process through traditional sources such as state and local government agencies, as well as commercial sources like Craigslist, LandscapingJobs.com, etc. What’s even more important is having a consistent presence with compelling hiring ads.

Going where no one else is going: While this can be high risk, it can also be high reward. He’ll discuss alternate places to look for a dependable workforce, such as: notifying your client base, using social media as an ongoing hiring ad campaign, initiating hiring contests, using Webscape to build candidate lists, visiting Interfaith communities – such as Hispanic churches – and more...

In the end, always keep in mind: Your growth plan is your employee’s career development path. Join us January 25th at St. Michael’s Woodside to learn more.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

WILLIAM EASTMAN / GROWTH CONSULTANT Bill Eastman has been a Business Management Consultant with GreenMark since 2016. Bill is also the Managing Partner of Intellectual Property at the GrowthWorx – a business research and product development company headquartered in Richmond, Virginia. Bill brings to GreenMark 36 years in the consulting and training industry. Over his career, he has assembled a library of best practices for growth oriented companies looking to build a model of organizational excellence. The gWORX team in collaboration with GreenMark Consulting Group and its Landscape Business Success™ platform have developed a suite of business best management practices for landscape-snow contractors to improve, grow and increase their profits.

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/MEETINGS/JANUARY2018


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PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb

JAZZING UP THE PERENNIAL GARDEN Discussions of perennial garden design always focus on differences of form, height, size and type of foliage, color, and time of bloom. More recently, a lot of attention has been paid to extending seasonal interest with deadheads. So, even after taking all of those characteristics into consideration, is the garden interesting even if nothing is in bloom? I don’t think we give enough weight to the importance of variegated foliage. Therefore, I am going to offer several suggestions, starting with ornamental grasses.

groundcover. ‘Everest’ is similar but has a narrower leaf while ‘Ice Cream’ and ‘Frosted Curls’ have extremely narrow leaves. On the other hand, if you want a leaf that is even wider than that of ‘Ice Dance’, try Carex siderosticha ‘Variegata’. It will spread slowly. All of these Sedges have relatively unremarkable blooms.

ORNAMENTAL GRASSES

Although touted as suitable for partial shade or full sun, I would grow Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Avalanche’ or ‘Overdam’ in full sun because they tend to lean toward the light when planted in shade. The foliage of ‘Overdam’ has white edges and is three feet tall while that of ‘Avalanche’ has a white stripe down the middle of the leaf and grows three to five feet tall. The variegation is subtle when seen from a distance and almost looks blue-gray. The inflorescences of Calamagrostis bloom in early summer and last throughout the growing seasons.

The first variegated ornamental grass that often comes to mind is Miscanthus (Maiden Grass). However, it is commonly used so I wish to offer grasses that may not come to mind so quickly. Particularly in shade, I use several different Carex (Sedge) cultivars. For years, ‘Ice Dance’, with its green and white foliage, has been a standby for me. It is extremely versatile, growing well in sun or shade, in dry to moist soil. In dry soil, it holds its ground but does not move; in damp soil, it travels, acting as a

continued on page 10 The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 9


P EREN N I AL FOCU S continued from page 9

An unusual choice for a sun-loving grass is Arundo donax ‘Peppermint Stick’. You would swear that you are looking at giant, variegated cornstalks because they grow six to twelve feet tall. The height and strong variegation make this grass a standout in the garden. Plant it in the back of the bed and then plant something else with strong variegation in the middle and/or the front of the bed. This is another versatile grass, thriving in wet to dry soils but at its best in moist soil. If you want green and yellow variegation, Carex muskingumensis ‘Oehme’ could be the answer. Taller at two feet than the sedges mentioned above, it is more upright and more horizontal than other sedges. It is also more aggressive so siting is crucial. I’ve seen it used as a partial border in a perennial garden but the gardener mentioned that he had to keep after it so it wouldn’t take over. I want you to know about it but would give it a space of its own or pair it with another aggressive plant and let them fight it out. You can’t go wrong with Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureo-Variegata’, The clumps will be wider than those of most Carex and prefer partial shade although will tolerate full sun as long as there is sufficient moisture. Planted on a slope, it resembles a waterfall. Planted intermittently as a border, it is absolutely striking.

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All of the grasses I have mentioned so far are hardy to at least Zone 5, but I want to bring one tropical grass to your attention. Its color is burgundy red with a pink edge. Pennisetum setaceum ‘Fireworks’ is a real eye-catcher and I use it to energize pastel gardens. This is a sun lover that is not a water guzzler. Its purplish inflorescence is also extremely attractive.

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Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties

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ORNAMENTAL GRASSES ON DISPLAY

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1. Carex siderosticha ‘Variegata’ has pearly, straplike leaves resembling striped ribbon waiting to be wrapped around a package. It sports fuzzy green flowers with green stamens in late spring. 2. Calamagrostis acutiflora ‘Avalanche’ is a variegated grass with beautiful creamywhite vertical stripes along the center of the leaf blades. Its foliar variegation is most pronounced in climates with cool summer nights. 3. Arundo donax ‘Peppermint Stick’ is the ne plus ultra of variegated grasses. It’s the tallest, with the biggest leaves and the broadest stripes. No ornamental grass provides more of a show! 4. Carex muskingumensis ‘Oehme’ is a clumping palm sedge that grows on generally upright triangular stems adorned with horizontally radiating green leaves variegated with narrow yellow margins. 5. Pennisetum setaceum ‘Fireworks’ is colorful, upright growing grass with variegated stripes running the length of the blade. 6. The brightly variegated golden foliage of Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureo-Variegata’, with green stripes near the leaf margins, give this forest grass its distinctive look.

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The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 11


F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

WHAT YOUR SPOUSE SHOULD KNOW ABOUT FINANCIAL ACCOUNTS Handling a household’s financial affairs is another one of those tasks that usually falls to one spouse or the other. Of course, there are some couples who are equally engaged in the process of budgeting, bill-paying, saving, and investing. But in many families, those jobs are the exclusive domain of just one partner. Within households, most couples divide and conquer. Maybe you do the laundry and your spouse always handles the trash. Or perhaps one is in control of all things yard-related, but the other always does the grocery shopping. The key risk you run in single-handedly managing your family’s financial affairs, however, is that you could leave your spouse out of the loop. If something were to happen to you, would he or she know how to manage the family nest egg? And even if you expect that your spouse will have to turn to a

12 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

financial advisor for help when you’re gone, would he or she even know where to look for advice?

WHOM TO CONTACT The first step in leaving your spouse well prepared is to draw up a list of your important financial contacts: financial planners, insurance agents, accountants, and attorneys. Include their names, phone numbers, and e-mail addresses, and also provide a brief overview of what they’ve helped you with. continued on page 15


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ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Looking for Classified and Help Wanted ads? Want to post one of your own? You’ll find them at ohiolandscapers.org or myohiolandscape.com. HELP WANTED ADS Help Wanted ads are posted on both our industry website and our consumer website, along with bi-monthly postings via social media. CLASSIFIED ADS (I.E. Equipment for sale) Classified ads are posted on our industry website ohiolandscapers.org COST MEMBERS: $35 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. NON MEMBER: $70 plus $3 for each 10 words for 30 days. Please send all inquiries and ad content to: info@ohiolandscapers.org or call the OLA office at 440-717-0002.

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www.masonsteel.com The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 13


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FI SCAL FI TN ESS continued from page 12

WHERE TO FIND EVERYTHING

WHICH ASSETS TO TAP FIRST

Even if you’re not an investment junkie, you’re probably holding a number of different accounts scattered across several different financial-service providers. You may have it all straight in your head, but it could seem like a confusing mess to your spouse. Try to streamline your investment accounts as much as you possibly can. Your partner will have a far easier time managing the family nest egg if something should happen to you.

Some of your assets can be tapped at any time, while others may carry penalties and tax costs if your spouse withdraws the money prematurely. To prevent your spouse from making a serious and costly mistake, it pays to clearly delineate which of your assets are liquid and which are not. As a general rule of thumb, you’ll want to keep at least six months’ worth of living expenses in highly liquid securities, such as money market funds, CDs, or money market alternatives. If you’re retired and drawing upon your portfolio for living expenses, aim for three years’ worth of living expenses in highly liquid accounts.

In addition to streamlining your portfolio, it also makes sense to develop a filing system that makes sense to both of you. Start by creating a folder – either paper or electronic – for each separate account, and be judicious about what papers you store in each. (Stash: Brokerage and mutual fund statements, along with trade confirmations. Trash: Annual reports, prospectuses, and marketing literature.) Once you’ve done that, create a master directory, listing all of your accounts and account numbers (don’t forget lifeinsurance policies), the names and phone numbers of any individuals you deal with at various financial institutions, and any URLs and passwords you need to gain access to your accounts. Store this information in a safe place, such as a safety-deposit box or in a password-protected file on your computer, and let your spouse know that it’s there.

HOW YOU ARE DOING Even if you don’t inform your spouse of every investment decision you make, you should take time periodically to give him or her the big-picture view of where your finances stand. How much do you have overall, and how much of that is liquid (that is, in cash or in securities that you could easily convert to cash)? Are you on track to meet your shared goals or do you need to increase your savings rate? Deciding how much to spend each month and how much to save and invest is a basic decision for every household and both partners should be involved.

WHERE TO GO FOR HELP If you’ve been an investment do-it-yourselfer but expect that your spouse will have to seek outside help in managing your financial affairs after you’ve gone, it can’t hurt to lay the groundwork for that possibility. Scout around for financial planners who share your investing philosophy and have served clients with needs similar to yours. If you would like a free pamphlet, titled “My Financial Navigator,” email or call my office. This helps organize your assets, accounts, important contacts and financial information into one easy reference guide.

Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office. 7601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370

Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com

Securities and advisory services offered through L.M. Kohn & Company Registered Broker/Dealer Member FINRA/SIPC/MSRB 10151 Carver Rd. Suite 100 – Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 Phone: (800) 478-0788

The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 15


FOR SAFETY SAK E

BRINE HANDLING AND PERSONAL SAFETY Completion fluids containing compounds such as calcium chloride (CaCl2), calcium bromide (CaBr2), and zinc bromide (ZnBr2) are made by dissolving these and other salts in water. The high concentrations of dissolved salts in CBFs impart a strong affinity for water—to the point where they will readily absorb water from the air (hygroscopic). This strong tendency to absorb water is the basis for most of the safety precautions that should be observed when working with any clear brine fluid.

CONTACT WHILE HANDLING

HEAT OF SOLUTION

There are certain use and handling precautions that should be followed when personnel are working with these fluids. Fluid contact with the skin can cause slight irritation and redness upon a short, single exposure. Continued or prolonged exposure can cause superficial to severe burns of the skin. The fluids can also cause potential eye injury if contact occurs. Contact with the eyes can cause moderate to severe irritation to permanent corneal injury.

Another aspect of working with clear brine fluids which calls for respect, is that the addition of dry CaCl2 or CaBr2 salt can generate excessive heat of solution. If solid CaCl2 is added too rapidly while preparing an 11.6 lb/gal brine, enough heat can be generated to raise the solution temperature to more than 200°F. Care must be taken to avoid being burned by the hot liquid or equipment.

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

continued on page 18


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Join us for a series of training sessions that will help you to better understand the new and current products available on the market, as well as how to quote them in your bids and make money selling them.

For 2018 seminar topics & dates, go to... Training.ValleyCitySupply.com or call 330-483-3400

The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 17


F OR SAFETY SAK E continued from page 16

TOXIC FUMES

PRECAUTIONS TO BE TAKEN AT THE WELL SITE

Two circumstances exist where toxic fumes can be released:

These few tips can create a safer environment:

1. Brines are not flammable, but they can release chlorine and/or bromine gases in fires fueled by other sources. 2. Oxidizers such as calcium hypochlorite, which is commonly used as a polymer breaker, can release chlorine and/or bromine gases under acidic conditions. Chlorine and bromine gases are both heavier than air and will settle into lower or confined spaces and displace all breathable air.

• Pipe wipers not only reduce fluid loss when pulling pipe, they also minimize the danger of fluid dripping onto the floor and crew. • Bristle type floor mats should be used wherever the floor may become wet with clear brine fluid. • All spills should be cleaned with soap and fresh water in order to remove any slippery residue.

SAFETY EQUIPMENT

Recommendations to follow in the event of contact:

The type and amount of safety apparel recommended will vary with the specific task being performed. However, hard hats, goggles or safety glasses with side shields, rubber gloves, and rubber boots should be the minimum safety apparel worn when working with, or in the vicinity of, clear brine fluids. An overview of necessary equipment might include: • Goggles/safety glasses with side shields • Face shields may be used in conjunction with goggles or safety glasses, but should not be used alone as they are primarily used to protect the face and throat. • Safety showers and eyewash stations should be easily accessible to each area of high activity. Portable eyewash units are highly recommended for remote locations. • Rubber gloves prevent direct contact of any brine fluid with the hands and arms. A popular alternative to these gloves is thin latex gloves that are worn under cotton knobbies. • Rubber boots should always be worn around brines. The hygroscopic nature of the brines can dehydrate and cause severe shrinkage in leather boots. • When splashing is likely, such as when tripping pipe, slicker suits are recommended. Extra time should be allowed for completing projects to prevent personnel from overheating. Slickers should be worn properly and should be periodically cleaned. • Dust masks should be available when mixing dry additives. • Moisturizing creams can help prevent the loss of moisture to brines when used beforehand and can help replace the oils and moisture that may already have been lost.

IF IMMEDIATE TREATMENT IS NECESSARY • If eye contact occurs, irrigate the eyes with flowing water immediately and continuously for at least 15 minutes. Consult with medical personnel as soon as possible. • In case of contact with the skin, immediately flush skin with plenty of water for at least 15 minutes while removing contaminated clothing and shoes. Consult with medical personnel as soon as possible. • Wash clothing thoroughly. Destroy contaminated shoes. • As fluids can cause slipping hazards on surfaces, sand or other absorbent material should be applied to any fluid spills to reduce the possibility of falls. Once the spilled fluid has been absorbed, the material should be placed in containers for disposal.

Originally published in the U.S Safety and Environmental portion of The Engineered Solutions Guide for Clear Brine Fluids and Filtration, by Tetratec Technologies. More can be read at http://solutionsguide.tetratec.com.

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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MAGAZINE

The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 19


BootCamp Introduction GREENMARK L A N D S C A P E

S N O W

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GUIDE IT • RUN IT • GET IT •DO IT • Manage the internal & external customer delivery experience

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CORE 1: GUIDING THE BUSINESS The power of purpose, creating smart metrics & the law of the good deal.

CORE 2: Steven A.RUNNING CohenTHE BUSINESS

processes to run at capacity & managing sustainable growth. ChiefStandardizing Innovation Officer CORE 3: GETTING Group THE BUSINESS GreenMark Consulting Defining a brand that surrounds prospects with marketing and drives the sales pipeline. scohen@greenmarkgroup.com CORE 4: DOING THE BUSINESS Direct: 610.905.3637 Managing the internal and external customer experience to become top of mind.

COST w w w. gre e nEach m acore r k bincludes o o tc am p. com landscape business courseware & GreenMark’s Landscape Business Success Toolkit ™ MEMBERS BEFORE 02/08/18 - $199 Bill Eastman is GreenMark’s Growth Steven Cohen, Principal of GreenMark AFTER 02/08/18 - $249 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 02/08/18 - $249 AFTER 02/08/18 - $299 SPONSORS PRESENTER

Consulting Group, is a business management and operations consultant with more than 25 years of landscape & snow industry experience. He has an extensive background in managing crossfunctional business operations, business strategy and market growth projects.

Consultant. He has spent over 3 decades working with the Fortune 500 building a library of best practices for fast and sustainable growth – the secret behind how small businesses became market leaders.

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STEVEN COHEN © 2016 GreenMark Consulting Group

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4

THE CORE ELEMENTS

TO BUSINESS SUCCESS

CORE #2 / RUNNING THE BUSINESS

AUTONOMATION

This is the second of 4 articles on CORE 2: RUNNING THE BUSINESS. I selected this cobbled together word – Autonomation – from my days installing Lean Manufacturing in Detroit – smart automation. The idea is simple, instead of just automating mundane tasks, the goal is to extend and multiply human performance using technology. My focus here is on the core functions of a landscape business and how to automate and integrate using technology. The drives, two decisions: Programs and Operating Systems. Get these right and the hardware decisions are simple. Starting with programs, you have two general choices: run everything off a spreadsheet, or purchase/license software. If you are under $500,000 in revenue, automation by spreadsheet is possible. Beyond that... good luck. 3 Major Software Functions: • Financial • Production • Marketing, Sales, & Service (CRM) Automating the financial processes is the best place to start. Smart buying decisions are based on cost, financial and managerial accounting features, and integration with production and sales. All the best-selling accounting software packages provide the information to satisfy the bank and government requirements (Financial Accounting). What separates great from good is the added function of breaking down costs into activities. This management accounting feature is critical for determining unit costs and profitability. I recommend you check out the following choices to see what fits: QuickBooks, Zoho Books, and Xero.

Unlike the financial software decision, your production software choices are more varied, and there are several software companies building landscape and arbor specific programs. The key features are inventory control & purchasing, demand planning & forecasting, scheduling & project management, and quality control. The goal of any system should be to buy raw materials only when there is a production demand, so that raw materials and equipment are available when needed – not early or late, or when production is close to full capacity through scheduling. Every job/project has a budget and is tracked. Waste is controlled. I recommend you check out the following choices to see what fits: LMN, Jobber, Service Autopilot, and Zoho Project. Marketing, Sales, and Service programs are referred to as CRM tools (Customer Relationship Management). The goal is to have one location for all of your marketing activities, including social media and email campaigns. Once you have found potential customers, these packages move them into the sales funnel. This allows you to manage the sales process and close deals quicker with higher margins. Finally, it provides a process to stay in

WILLIAM EASTMAN GreenMark Consulting Group

touch with customers and establish the basis for continual upselling. I recommend you check out the following choices to see what fits: LMN, Jobber, Service Autopilot, and Zoho CRM. Let’s close out the program issue asking this: do you install, or go to the cloud? The answer is based on your technology. If you have more than one computer and no network – cloud. That leaves us with the OS (Operating System) issue. GreenMark operates on all the OS choices: Apple, Windows, Linux, and Android. Don’t assume it has to be Apple OR Microsoft, and that’s it. If you are operating a cloud based system using mobile technology, your choice of OS doesn’t really matter. Microsoft and Apple have license fees for their OS and programs like MS Suite. When you add it up – about $400 a desktop or laptop. What if you eliminated the fees and went with a Linux OS? If you own an android phone – you are running an open source device. I recommend you check out Ubuntu, Fedora, and Mint before paying licensing fees. Next month: We will look at the various techniques for Managing Cash Flow.

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F EATURE ARTI CLE

The One Trait All Top Talent Possesses by Mark Borrasso / Success Coach at LandOpt

When you’re on the hunt for the perfect team member to fill a role in your business, your options can seem endless. You may feel it’s easier to understand the theory of relativity than it is to find the right person to join your team. But there is one trait that serves as the clear differentiator between a good employee and a great one: a growth mindset. To understand what a growth mindset is and why it is so important for your business, it’s helpful to turn to science. Neuroplasticity refers to the brain’s ability to rewire itself to compensate for and adjust to changes in its environment. People who possess a growth mindset experience high levels of neuroplasticity as their brains take in, process, and apply new information. In other words, their brains, much like those of babies and young children, welcome new information and use it as a catalyst for growth and change.

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

At the other end of the spectrum is the fixed mindset crowd – those individuals with low neuroplasticity. These people believe they have learned all there is to learn, and that because they have achieved mastery in a specific area or discipline, there is no real benefit to pursuing or applying new information. The fixed mindset person is, by nature, inflexible and unwilling to adapt to change. It should then come as no surprise that the team members who experience the greatest personal success and who most effectively contribute to the success of organizations


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are those who welcome change and who are highly adaptable – the growth mindset population. Growth mindset individuals are the people you want on your teams for three compelling reasons.

THEIR MISTAKES ADD VALUE Failure is as necessary for learning as soil is for plant growth. The richest and most meaningful learning occurs on the other side of failure. Yet, the leaders and managers in many businesses exhibit woefully low tolerance for failure and the mistakes that lead to it. Psychological safety, a term coined by a group of behavior management specialists and researchers in the late twentieth century, refers to the ability of an organization to provide a safe place for team members to take risks and make mistakes. Businesses that rate high in psychological safety send the clear message to their employees that their growth and development matter, and that they recognize and understand mistakes are inevitable and natural. Growth-minded individuals, in turn, feel supported when they make mistakes and are committed to learning from those mistakes so they are not repeated. Businesses that prioritize psychological safety boast high performing, highly successful teams.

THEY BOOST THE BOTTOM LINE It makes good financial sense to hire growth-minded people. But why? The answer again lies in neuroscience. It takes between forty and fifty repetitions before a habit becomes imprinted in the brain. Incorrect learning of skills can cause a team member to lose valuable time and the business to lose valuable profits as more money and resources are poured into retraining the employee. As a rule, growth-minded individuals travel the continuum from beginner to expert and diagnose incorrect training much more quickly than their fixed mindset counterparts, dramatically shortening the training process and preserving profits. And when the collective genius of a group of growth-minded team members is harnessed, there is no telling the innovative, game-changing ideas that will be generated – ideas that pave the way for growth. There are countless examples of groups in organizations throughout virtually every industry being able to overcome persistent obstacles to growth in a fraction of the time it took individuals to overcome similar obstacles. It makes sense: take those forty to fifty repetitions times five, ten, or even twenty, and the results are staggering. continued on page 24 The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 23


F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 23

“Failure is an opportunity to grow”

GROWTH MINDSET

“I can learn to do anything I want”

“Challenges help me grow” “My effort and attitude determine my abilities”

“Feedback is constructive” “I am inspired by the success of others”

“Failure is the limit of my abilities”

FIXED MINDSET

“My potential is predetermined”

“I’m either good at it or I’m not” “Both feedback and criticism are personal”

“I stick to what I know” “I do not like or enjoy being challenged”

“I like to try new things”

“When I’m frustrated, I give up”

THEY DEMAND IT Today’s workforce is teeming with young, energetic people who fit the millennial demographic. Even more than their Gen-X and baby boomer counterparts, millennials pursue jobs with the expectation of growth opportunities. The data is telling – a recent Gallup poll determined that nearly 60% of millennials, versus about 40% of non-millennials, deem the availability of learning opportunities an extremely important consideration when job hunting, with an overwhelming 87% stating learning and development while in a job are important. Yet, 71% report they are disengaged at work. (more on the findings here: http://www.gallup.com/ businessjournal/193274/millennials-jobs-developmentopportunities.aspx.)

on investment. Considering the cost to replace and train a team member is estimated to be twice to three times that team member’s salary, catering to and actively pursuing the growth mindset is one area where businesses quite literally cannot afford to fail.

Why the discrepancy? Many businesses fail to reward the growth mindset many millennials possess. They fail to invest in and provide rich, abundant learning and development opportunities. As a result, they fail to attract and retain precisely the type of employee who brings the greatest return

As a success coach, Mark Borrasso guides select landscape contractors through the

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Human beings are wired to learn, grow, and change. Those who possess and embrace a growth mindset and who use mistakes and failures as learning opportunities experience the greatest degrees of personal and professional success. They also tend to be the top thinkers and performers. Can your business afford any less than the best?

LandOpt business process with coaching, training and mentoring support. For more information, visit www.landopt.com or contact Borrasso at mark.borrasso@ LandOpt.com or 412-580-7509.


OLA EDUCATION SERIES

COURSE INFO MARCH 12, 2018 INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY 4100 ROCKSIDE ROAD INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131 MARCH 13, 2018 WOLF CREEK COMPANY 6700B HUNTLEY ROAD COLUMBUS, OHIO 43229 AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:00AM - 8:30AM CLINIC 8:30AM - 4:30PM LUNCH 11:30AM - 12:15PM COST MEMBERS BEFORE 02/26/18 - $159 AFTER 02/26/18 - $189

Foreman Training

Production and maintenance landscape foremen have unique needs as they have to wear two hats: a worker and a leader. Foremen have to walk the fine line in working side by side with the employee and having to direct, motivate and critique at the same time. Managing former peers and friends can be especially difficult, dealing with problems and obstacles can take skills that can only be developed by stepping out of the work environment for a few days, learning best practices, applying it in a learning environment through role play, and then going back and applying it on the job. In this dynamic seminar, foremen will learn: • The central role of the “worker-leader” • How to supervise friends, peers, and former equals • How to communicate with their superiors • How to generate accountability from their team • How to motivate and delegate at the same time

• How to implement and follow work schedules • How to budget and complete jobs on time • How to manage problem behavior • How to produce client focused work • And more....

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ARMANDO ACTIS / PROFESSOR Professor Actis provides management, inside sales & public relation training based on his education & experience in the landscaping & construction industry at Rendel’s Inc, where he is currently the Training & Project Manager for the Joliet Branch. He provides end user operation, application and maintenance training - training anyone from the casual user to the professionals in OSHA, safe & correct usage of landscaping and construction equipment. He was Equipment Manager and judge for ILCA’s (Illinois Landscape Contractors Association) Certified Landscape Technician exams at Joliet Junior College.

NON MEMBERS BEFORE 02/26/18 - $189 AFTER 02/26/18 - $219 SPONSORED BY

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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Picea pungens is a species of spruce tree native to the Rocky Mountains of the U.S., but has been widely introduced elsewhere as an ornamental tree in many places far beyond its native range.

PICEA PUNGENS COLORADO SPRUCE Our friends in the nursery business are not going to be thrilled about this, but we’re going to say it anyway. We all must chill out on the planting of Colorado Spruce. I know, it seems kind of weird to begin the Plant of the Month article by telling you not to plant the Plant of the Month, but we have great reason to do so, and hope you will continue to read to find out just why we would make such a strong statement about this long-time landscape staple. First, let’s acknowledge what is so great about Picea pungens. In truth, what most people really like is the cultivar P. pungens ‘Glauca,’ better known as “Colorado Blue Spruce” – or simply as “Blue Spruce” – is its color. The only time we’ve come across someone who doesn’t love the rich, chalky-blue coloring of this plant is in Dr. Dirr’s writings, where he states that putting a Blue Spruce in the front yard detracts from the rest of the plants, as well as the house. It seems a bit drastic to condemn the plant due to people simply repeating poor design principles, but like most plant nerds, Dr. Dirr makes a lot of drastic statements of opinion.

The symmetrical cone of blue, its ability to maintain dense foliage, with proper cultivar selection staying well within a height and width appropriate for the landscape – it is darn near impossible to find a good replacement to the accent of a well-placed Blue Spruce. If you’ve ever seen P. pungens ‘Baby Blue Eyes’ in a shrub border, especially in winter, there is no mistaking how this plant embodies a true accent plant. The plant comes in many forms. Weeping forms that exist, such as ‘The Blues,’ which is a true weeping plant and can be staked to a height of your choosing and allowed to weep from there. continued on page 28

26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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continued from page 26 Dwarf and globe forms exist, like the old standby ‘Globosa,’ which is a shrub at best, staying under 3 feet tall. Or, perhaps ‘Montgomery,’ which stays in a globe form for many years, slowly morphing into a Hershey’s Kiss shape – around 6 feet tall and wide. There are even ground-cover forms, such as ‘Blue Wave,’ newly released from Klyn Nursery, which stays under 15 inches tall and spreads like a true ground-cover shrub. You’ll find mention of using a dwarf Blue Spruce as accent plants in the perennial garden in the much acclaimed book by Tracy DiSabato-Aust, The Well-Designed Mixed Garden. We are not suggesting that Blue Spruce isn’t beautiful. We are not suggesting that Blue Spruce should disappear. What we are asking is for you to consider the name of the state this tree is named after. Picea pungens actually has a pretty small native range in isolated higher elevations in the Central and Southern Rocky Mountains, specifically: Idaho, Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. Consider for a moment the cultural conditions for a plant in higher elevations in the Rocky Mountains; dry with seasonal rains only, very well drained soils with high amounts of gravel and large soil pores (breathes great), and low humidity. Now, think about living in Ohio. You’d be hard pressed to say that we have high porosity soils that drain great, and you’d be sent to the looney bin if you claimed we don’t have high humidity in the summer.

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

While a friend visiting from a dry climate may complain about the humidity – and we can tell them, “Suck it up, it’s not that bad” – we can’t do the same to our plants. Rule one of keeping disease and insect issues at bay is keeping your plant happy – Right plant, Right place – you’ve heard it a million times. Well, our point here is that there are not nearly as many “right places” for Blue Spruce as there are Blue Spruces in our landscapes. So what happens to a stressed out Blue Spruce? A number of issues will show up on stressed plants, including insects and diseases. In our experience, investigating people’s declining Blue Spruces has led us to believe that they rarely suffer from one issue alone. They are in a culturally stressful situation, there is usually some form of mechanical damage to the plant, and the secondary invaders have moved in to bring the tree to its knees. Insects that will move in on a stressed tree include two types of Gall Forming Adelgids (related to Aphids), which usually account for the aesthetic damage, and Spruce Spider Mites. Spider Mites are related to true insects and feed by removing important fluids from the leaves of the tree. This causes a general browning towards the ends of branches (often confused as a disease) and eventual death of the leaves. Their damage can become quite an issue for the tree.


Disease concerns are high when it comes to Blue Spruce, as diseases typically result in the slow, agonizing trip down the “death spiral,” an analogy we use to explain how cultural and mechanical issues lead to stresses, in-turn helping to introduce insect and disease issues, which then continue to pile up, until a plant spirals out of control, eventually succumbing. We can divide the disease concerns into three groups. Needlecasts cause an infected tree to throw off diseased leaves. Most often, these fungal pathogens infect current year’s growth, and after a year of infection, the tree will shed these leaves. The symptom you will see is a sparse tree with only current year’s leaves and bare branches from there back. There are two common genera of Needlecast fungi, Rhizosphaera and Stigmina. Tip blight is another group of diseases, most often caused by the Phomopsis species of fungi. While this is more common on other evergreens, especially Austrian Pine, it can impact a stressed Blue Spruce. The symptom to look for is nearly the opposite of a needlecast. Tip blight will cause browning and dropping-off of current year’s growth.

in the lower branches, at least at first, Cytospera species of fungi slowly work their way up the tree adding to the death spiral. Our climate is changing. Our average summer is getting more humid and most of us do very little to improve the conditions of our urban, compacted soils. The cultural conditions for Blue Spruce are not improving, so we are simply urging caution that you be certain you provide the absolute best chance for your plants to thrive. We suggest full sun exposure, the most well-aerated/well-draining soils you can find, and do not plant in mass – no more soldier rows. Blue Spruce is a beautiful plant with many awesome cultivars. Unfortunately, this beauty has caused it to be over planted and has helped disease issues spread. Tyr and diversify your landscapes, saving the Blue Spruce for just the right location. And stay tuned-in over the coming months. We’ll offer you some great alternatives for the Blue Spruce! Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai

Perhaps the worst group are the Canker diseases. These fungi infect the branches and cause sunken cankers along stems, which eventually bleed white, resinous sap down the tree. Usually found

is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.

The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 29


DI RECT I O NS

WELCOME 2018! First off, the OLA would like to thank you – our members – for being so involved in 2017. Attendance to our clinics, meetings, and participation in the Landscape Ohio! Awards program was very strong. We sold out nearly every event we held and in some cases had to come up with creative ways to make more room – as was the case with the LO! Awards Gala, our annual Snow & Ice Clinic and our Pruning Clinics. Based on this continuing trend, in 2018 we recommend you sign up early for things you are interested in attending. We are mindful to not allow class sizes to get too big, so that you and your employees get the full value for your investment of time and money. For an up-to-date list of future events, or to sign-up for event notifications, please visit www.ohiolandscapers.org. Moving onto 2018, we are very excited to welcome our newest board members – Stephanie Gray (LIC) of BrightView, Philip Germann of GreenLawn Specialists and Joshua Way of Toledo Lawns. All three attended our new board member orientation in December, bringing a lot of positive energy and new ideas with them! We’re looking forward to their contribution over the coming years. Unfortunately, when we say hello to new board members, we also have to say goodbye to a few. This year we are saying goodbye to three board members, including two past presidents. Bryan Taynor of Hidden Creek Landscaping (Past President), Steve Moore of S.A.M Landscaping (Past President), and Mike Ahern of Working With Nature, Inc. have all officially ended their terms on the OLA board. We’d like to thank each of them for the hard work and dedication they have put into helping this organization grow over the years. For those of you who were unable to attend our annual meeting held in November, we had the honor of electing our newest board officers, including the OLA’s third-ever female president, Marie McConnell, Sales Representative for Lake County Nursery. Marie’s motto is that it’s about the experiences – that all aspects of life should focus on putting smiles on faces and making your corner of the world a more colorful place. Nothing is more evident once you meet Marie, which she hopes you will take the opportunity to do at an upcoming meeting.

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

SANDY MUNLEY

Executive Director The Ohio Landscape Association

Shifting gears just a bit, this is a time of year filled with great expectations, when the holiday season comes to an end, followed by a period of resolutions to make changes in our personal and professional lives. It is by all means – a new year! And, whether your resolution is to exercise more, lose weight, learn a new skill, be a better friend, parent, spouse, employer... we all tend to be a bit hard on ourselves when it comes to these matters, bullied by our inner critic that says we’re not doing good enough in one way, or another. Just keep in mind, as you read in this month’s feature article, some of the richest and most meaningful learning occurs on the other side of failure. With that in mind, the OLA would like to suggest that one of your professional resolutions this year be to get more involved with your association – and one of the best ways you can do so is by becoming part of an OLA committee. OLA committees really are the driving force behind much of what we do here. From educational event planning, to marketing and public relations, to our annual Scholarship Golf Classic and beyond, there is always a committee that can benefit from your prior experiences – successes and failures – and that is in need of fresh, new ideas. Furthermore, as is the case with all of our new board members, being part of a committee is the stepping-off point towards being considered for a position on the OLA Board of Directors. Prior to moving into their board positions, Stephanie was


ADV E R TIS ING INDEX

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Abraxus / Royalton Supply Botson Insurance Group, Inc. Briar Rose Nurseries, Inc. Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc. LO! Magazine Advertising Mason Structural Steel, Inc. Medina Sod Farms, Inc. ONLA/MGIX O’Reilly Equipment, LLC Premier Plant Solutions Shearer Equipment Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc. Unilock Valley City Supply VanCuren Tree Services, Inc. Zoresco Equipment Company

involved with the education committee, and both Joshua and Philip were part of our memberships committees. It’s an excellent place to begin if you are really looking to make a long term difference. In closing, in 2018 we have a really great team in place, from our staff, to our board, to our committees – and to you – our members. We are poised for continued growth this year, but it’s not something we can do alone. So please, get involved with a committee, invite your industry friends to join the association, and help make 2018 our best year ever. Together we can all get better and make a stronger, more profitable industry that will attract better employees. The Growing Concern | January 2018 | 31


9240 Broadview Road Broadview Hts., OH  44147-2517

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01/18

n d Technicia e fi ti r e C y str scape Indu ates 2018 Land Test D

Certification is an important tool for all landscape companies and individuals in the landscape field. That’s why the Landscape Industry Certified Technician program deserves your attention. A Landscape Industry Certified Technician is a proven landscape professional who has been certified through an internationally supported testing program that is administered by the National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP) and licensed to Ohio – a partnership of The Ohio State ATI, Ohio Landscape Association and Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association.

ST DATES WRITTEN TE bus IX – Colum G M , M 1P 17 Jan. 16, 7/ /2 12 n Deadline: Applicatio ster e ATI/Woo M, Ohio Stat 18 4/ Jan. 25, 1P /0 01 e: n Deadlin Applicatio

view Hts. , OLA/Broad Feb. 6, 1PM 01/16/18 n Deadline: Applicatio i ’s/Cincinnat M, Thornton Feb. 22, 1P 1/18 /0 02 e: lin n Dead Applicatio

ster e ATI/Woo , Ohio Stat 18 8/ Aug. 9, 7AM /0 06 e: n Deadlin Applicatio ster e ATI/Woo , Ohio Stat 18 1/ Oct. 2, 9AM 09/1 n Deadline: Applicatio view Hts. , OLA/Broad Oct. 9, 9AM /11/18 09 e: n Deadlin Applicatio

TEST DATE HANDS-ON ster ate ATI/Woo M, Ohio St 18 8/ Aug. 9, 7A /0 06 n Deadline: Applicatio Wooster TI/ A e at St PM, Ohio Aug. 8, 2:30 06/08/18 n Deadline: Applicatio

By earning your Landscape Industry Certified Technician certification, you send a message to clients and employees that you meet or exceed the industry standard. For additional information about testing, registration, or to obtain study materials, please visit LandscapeCertifiedOhio.org, or call the Ohio State ATI at 330.287.7511, or 330.287.0100.

STAND OUT! Encouraging Professional Standards and Promoting the Green Industry

The Growing Concern January2018  
The Growing Concern January2018  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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