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Growing Concern DECEMB ER 2 0 1 9

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A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

The Entry Deadline for the Landscape Ohio! Awards is here. Submit your projects by December 13th, 2019.

OLA Meeting: Onboarding - One Key to Employee Retention January 9, 2020 / St. Michael’s Woodside / PAGE 7


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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

ADAM CAPICCIONI Ohio CAT

CLOSING OUT 2019 Wow, what a year it’s been! I honestly can’t believe this is my final contributing article as president of the Ohio Landscape Association. I knew going into my presidency that writing an article each month would be one of the most challenging tasks of my professional career. Truth be told, I haven’t written a paper since I attended college. That said, as I step down from my position on January 1st, I want to express many thanks and provide a quick run-down of 2019 in this article. First off, the positive experience throughout this past year would not have been possible without the unwavering support of our Executive Director, Sandy Munley, our Communications & Event Manager, Rick Doll, and our Board of Directors. The longevity of our staff, along with their loyalty and dedication, is a testament to the culture

and mission of the Association. I also want to thank our Board’s predecessors for shaping the mission and leadership of the Association. The continued success of the OLA would not be possible without such a dedicated staff or the Board members we have had throughout the years. As president, my vision was not only to “make a difference,” but to become a better association member by giving back in an effort to support this wonderful organization. Through the guidance and sharing of others’ experiences in leadership, I’ve sincerely come to appreciate that, for a non-profit organization to be successful, all parts of the organization must be viewed as mutually valuable, and must work together in a balanced, intentional manner, in order to accomplish the longevity we’ve sustained. continued on page 6 The Growing Concern | December 2019 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS D E C E M B E R 2 0 1 9 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com DESIGNER / EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Adam Capiccioni, Ohio CAT Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb Windows on the River. Home of the 2019 Landscape Ohio! Awards Gala.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Gratitude

5 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 8 PERENNIAL FOCUS

The Holiday Bookshelf: 2019 Edition

14 FISCAL FITNESS

Understanding Bonds

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association.

18 FOR SAFETY SAKE

OFFICERS President Adam Capiccioni

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

22 PLANT OF THE MONTH

President – Elect Domenic Lauria

27 FEATURE ARTICLE

Treasurer Brian Maurer, LIC

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

11 Good Safety Meeting Topics for Winter Liquidambar Styraciflua: Sweetgum 6 Steps to Successfully Adding De-Icing to Your Snow Removal Operations

30 DIRECTIONS Milestones

31 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Immediate Past President Marie McConnell DIRECTORS Doug Ellis Dr. James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Cameron Maneri Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

DECEMBER 2019

JANUARY cont...

MARCH

DECEMBER 12, 2019 STONE VENEER CLINIC

JANUARY 23, 2020 COMMUNICATING DESIGN CONCEPTS QUICKLY

MARCH 9 & 10, 2020 FOREMAN TRAINING

This hands-on clinic will teach the basics of mixing mortar, installing and grouting stone veneer. The techniques you will learn can be applied to both manufactured and natural stone. The demand for veneers has increased and this is a great opportunity to learn how to apply it in house. Sponsored and hosted by Mason Steel.

DECEMBER 13, 2019 LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS ENTRY DEADLINE Don’t miss the opportunity to become an award winning landscape contractor. Entries for the 2019 program are due in the OLA office by 5pm on Dec. 13. For rules, regulations and entry information go to ohiolandscapers.org. landscapeohioawards.html. Questions? Contact OLA at 440.717.0002. See outside, back cover.

JANUARY 2020 JANUARY 9, 2020 OLA MEETING: ONBOARDING AS A KEY TO EMPLOYEE RETENTION Join us for our first meeting of the new year as Todd Pugh, CEO & Founder of Enviroscapes, discusses the importance of having a strong employee onboarding process and how it leads to better employee retention. Held at St. Michael’s Woodside. For more information concerning sponsorship opportunities, call the OLA at 440.717.0002. See page 7 for more information.

Looking to quickly convey to customers what their project might look like without submitting a costly design? Award-winning designer Kevin O’Brien (Lifestlyle Landscaping) shows you how. See page 26 for more information.

Foremen have to walk the fine line in working side by side with employees while having to direct, motivate and critique them. In this seminar, they will learn how to more effectively handle tight deadlines, tight margins and increase customer satisfaction. Held in both NE and Central Ohio.

JANUARY 20 - 30, 2020 SET-UP OF OLA DISPLAY AT THE GREAT BIG HOME & GARDEN SHOW

MARCH 26, 2020 23rd ANNUAL LANDSCAPE OHIO! AWARDS GALA

If you are interested in volunteering to help construct this year’s OLA garden please contact the OLA at 440.717.0002 as soon as possible and we will forward your information on to our Garden Commitee’s chairperson. This is a great opportunity to work alongside others in the industry, as well as contribute to the association.

Join Ohio’s landscape community for an elegant, fun-filled evening of celebrating as we reveal the 2019 Landscape Ohio! Award winners. This year, space will be available for those who have not entered the awards portion of the program. More info to come.

JANUARY 31 - FEBRUARY 9, 2020 OLA DISPLAY AT THE GREAT BIG HOME & GARDEN SHOW Explore this year’s One-tank Trips themed gardens created by some of Northeast Ohio’s top landscapers. If you are interested in volunteering to help staff the garden during show hours, please contact the OLA at 440.717.0002 as soon as possible. Spots fill up quickly. This is a great opportunity to help promote the industry, our association, and your company.

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following members:

REGULAR MEMBER Cuyahoga Property Maintenance 4754 Dorset Drive Independence, OH 44131 (216) 244-2043 Michael Kilton

STUDENT MEMBER Theodore Roosevelt High School Riley Pierce

2020 COMMITTEE MEETINGS OLA committees are a great way for members to get more involved with the association. We are always looking for new volunteers to help on our Awards, Education, Golf, Programs, Legislative & Membership committees! At our January meeting, we will be filling out our committees for the 2020 year. If you or someone on your team is interesting in joining a committee, please have them attend the January meeting. Committee involvement is also a great stepping stone towards working on the OLA board. For more info, call the OLA office at 440.717.0002, or email us at info@ ohiolandscapers.org.


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3

While there are many thanks to go around, I’d like to start by mentioning (not by name, as there are so many of you) all of the supporters who sponsored our educational events, meetings and other programs this year. Your contributions make what we do possible. I have had the pleasure to work with many of you over the years in support of our Plant ID Clinics, Plant Healthcare Clinics, Dormant Pruning Clinics, Safety Training Clinics, Snow and Ice Management Clinics, Sales Training Clinic, Stone Veneer Clinics, Scholarship Golf Classic, Landscape Ohio! Awards Program, and so on. Again, we can’t thank you enough!

Thanks to all of our new members and to those students who have joined the OLA, along with everyone who renewed their membership this year. (Note: If you haven’t renewed, you can still do so online or by calling the office.) We really appreciate everything you do and are here to support you, whether you’re a brand new member or have been with us for decades!

Next, I want to thank our committees. For every endeavor we take on, there is a committee behind it, which, by the way, is staffed by some exceptional volunteers. This year, all of our committees did a excellent job and really helped further the mission of the OLA. For those of you who don’t know, our Board thrives on strong committee involvement, and we are always looking for more members to contribute their minimal amount of free time, yet vast amount of expertise, in helping strengthen the Association.

As I move forward, reflecting upon my past years serving on the OLA Board of Directors, my desire to do more, be more, and serve more has been – and remains – ignited. Serving on the OLA Board of Directors has been one of the most valuable experiences I have had to date. Thank you, OLA, for allowing me to fulfill my promise and to leave my mark! I look forward to my continued involvement on the Board next year, as Immediate Past President. Have a great December and an even better 2020 everyone!

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Finally, as we move into 2020, I would like to welcome the new 2020 Board President, Domenic Lauria. I’m confident that he is going to do great things and help keep the OLA strong! Good luck, Domenic!


OLA MEETINGS SERIES

EVENT INFORMATION

DATE & LOCATION JANUARY 9, 2020 ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH AGENDA REGISTRATION / NETWORKING FOOD / CASH BAR 6:00 PM TO 7:00 PM GENERAL BUSINESS 7:00 PM TO 7:30 PM PROGRAM 7:30 PM TO 9:00 PM COST TO ATTEND MEMBERS: NO CHARGE NON MEMBERS: $30 REGISTER TO ATTEND BY JANUARY 2, 2020

SPONSORED BY GOLD SPONSORS

OLA JANUARY MEETING

Onboarding: A Key to Employee Attraction & Retention Enviroscapes hit a wall 3 years ago. They struggled to recruit and retain the front-line employees necessary to operate. The results were slowed growth, smaller profits, and most importantly an over-worked, over-whelmed, burnt-out management staff. With the future growth of a good business in jeopardy, they recognized the need to change. At that moment, Enviroscapes began focusing on the personnel side of the business, visualizing what they wanted their team and culture to look like. They changed their philosophy to “Team first - Client second,” knowing that if they built a great team, they would undoubtably be able to take care of their clients. 3 years later, through dedication and discipline, Enviroscapes – for the first time – had a waiting list of new hires. CEO and Founder, Todd Pugh, will share some of the tools that were developed throughout this process, including specifics related to their onboarding process. You will be able to take away strategies and tools that you can put to work in your company.

GUEST SPEAKER

TODD PUGH, CEO AND FOUNDER ENVIROSCAPES At fourteen, owner Todd E. Pugh began mowing lawns to earn spending money and begin saving for college. After graduating from The Ohio State University, he incorporated his growing business and he renamed it Enviroscapes. Strong business values and ethics have enabled Enviroscapes to grow from its first $5.00 per week mowing client into a multi-million dollar landscape company that ranks in the top 2% of all landscape companies nationwide. Enviroscapes is known nationwide by its peers for award winning landscapes and being a trend setter in LEAN business practices.

ABOUT ENVIROSCAPES Enviroscapes mission is to build a World Class Organization by creating a culture that fosters growth for landscape professionals, stimulates innovation and, as a result, delivers World Class

SILVER SPONSORS EMMETT EQUIPMENT CO. KURTZ BROS., INC BRONZE SPONSORS DAVIS TREE FARM & NURSERY HEARTLAND SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR THIS YEAR’S MEETING SCHEDULE ARE NOW AVAILABLE. CALL 440.717.0002 FOR INFO. 1.5 CEU’S

Landscape Services. Their team consists of passionate people who love working outdoors and love the Landscape & Snow Business. Enviroscapes performs work out of 6 Service Locations (Akron, Austintown, Boardman, Canton, Louisville and Columbus), employing 250 team members in peak season and 150 year round. They have a diverse book of business with revenues coming from 70% Commercial Maintenance and Snow and Ice Removal, 20% Design/Bid Build and 10% Utility Service Work. The company’s focus is to have fewer clients, with higher revenue from each, so a better level of service can be provided.

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/MEETINGS/JANUARY


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb

Photo courtesy of BrightView Landscape Services.

THE HOLIDAY BOOKSHELF 2019 EDITION

Winter and the holidays are coming all too quickly. If you are looking for books to give as holiday gifts, I have some suggestions for you.

THE LIFELONG GARDENER: GARDEN WITH EASE & JOY AT ANY AGE

Once I started reading the book, I was discouraged by what seemed to be simplistic, rah-rah motivational “speaking” but once I read further, I found several ideas that make this book worthwhile.

Gattone, Toni Timber Press, 2019 Portland, OR.

The theme of this book is “Garden smarter, not harder,” a line taken from an article that the author read when she was flat on her back after moving a heavy concrete pot. By now, we are all aware that gardening is good for our health but many of the chores involve either heavy labor or repetitive motions. Therefore, Toni suggests ten adaptive gardening rules. From experience, I would say that one of the most important is taking time to stretch your muscles before going into the garden. Another is switching chores every thirty minutes so that you are using different parts of your body.

As much as I love gardening, my body reminds me that I’m not as young as I used to be. For the last 5 years, I have, therefore, been trying to find ways to cut back on maintenance.

continued on page 10

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PEREN N I AL FOCUS continued from page 8

A third rule is asking for help and this is where I think smart landscapers can expand their business. You know which of your clients are avid gardeners. Meet with them at the end of the year and ask if there is anything your business can do for them to make gardening easier. Knowing our limits is crucial. I no longer wish to climb ladders to prune my climbing Roses so my crew does it for me. Lucky me! For a landscaping business, this might mean training your crew how to prune so that you can offer this service. The tips that Toni offers about reducing back pain, knee pain, and hand pain are just as important for landscapers as they are for home gardeners. She also includes a list of exercises designed specifically for gardeners. One tip she doesn’t mention is wearing a hard wrist brace when pruning to prevent carpal tunnel syndrome. I have found it to make a huge difference, particularly in the spring when there is so much pruning to be done. The tools we use are crucial to our health and there is an extensive discussion of ergonomics and of tools that do not require bending. Toni highly recommends the hori hori knife. I’ve been using it for years and keep it in stock for my clients. She also recommends trying out different pruners, particularly if you have small hands. Squeezing a pair of pruners that open too wide puts extra pressure on your finger muscles. Gardener profiles examine people’s physical limitations and how they can deal with them. For those with limited mobility, raised beds are often the answer. It’s never too soon to start revising the garden with an eye to lessening maintenance. Toni suggests that one needs to be honest about what chores cause discomfort and which can be eliminated or relegated to hired help or friends. Always to be considered are safety (rethinking hardscape and lighting), comfort, accessibility, sustainability (rethinking the amount of lawn), time, and what most gives joy. There are several tips about achieving each of these factors. In the section on Right Plant, Right Place, Toni suggests selecting plants that have lower water requirements or require lower maintenance. One of her solutions is substituting flowering shrubs for perennials but there are several perennials that are very low maintenance. It’s really a matter of plant knowledge.

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Two options offered for the aging gardener are gardening vertically and/or in containers and several options are discussed. Long ago, I decided that I would discontinue the use of terracotta containers that needed to be moved into the garage for the winter to prevent cracking. Now, all my containers are either concrete, freeze-proof glazed ceramic, fiberglass or resin. I disagree that concrete containers crack in cold climates. Some of mine are thirty-five years old. Although this book is aimed at the aging or partially disabled gardener, I think landscapers and designers should read it so that they are more informed about services they can offer and ways of designing to make gardening easier for their clients. Timing is important. Are there specific times of the year when your client will be outdoors more than others? That is when you want the garden beds to look their best so select plants that will be at their best during that time. If you can choose plants that have more than one season of interest, even better.

DEER-RESISTANT DESIGN: FENCE-FREE GARDENS THAT THRIVE DESPITE THE DEER Chapman, Karen Timber Press, 2019 Portland, OR.

The two most asked questions I encounter are “What will grow in dry shade?” and “What won’t the deer eat?” The author ‘s impetus for writing this book was her move to a new home in suburban Seattle where the soil is heavy clay, the winters are wet, and the deer abound. However, each chapter describes gardens in varying areas of this country and owners who have different strategies for dealing with deer. Very important is the knowledge imparted in Karen’s introduction where she discusses strategies and realities. For


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instance, while mushrooms and acorns are favored foods, they are only available in certain seasons and understory forest plantings may have been browsed so heavily that fawns can’t reach what is left. Deer repellent sprays can be effective but not if you wait too late. Karen advises spraying in late winter to alert the deer that certain plants are not palatable. Then, of course, you will need to respray once the plants foliate and again when the flowers bud. If you are a dog lover, train your dog to do its business on the perimeter of your garden; to the deer, the smell will indicate the presence of a predator. The trunks of young woody plants need a different type of protection. They need to be wrapped or surrounded with wire caging to prevent deer from rubbing or scraping (pawing the ground and urinating there to deposit olfactory markers). Karen mentions two strategies that are fence-like but would not be considered fences by most of us; they are, however, much less expensive than traditional fences. One is the use of lines of fishing wire strung between tree trunks to create an almost invisible fence. They occasionally need to be repaired if the deer breach them. The other is a lattice of rebar that was attached to an existing concrete retaining wall. This is also

virtually invisible. If you need an actual fence, one possibility is a five-foot double fence instead of a single eight-foot fence. When gates cannot be installed across a driveway, one of the homeowner-strategists installed a cattle grid, virtually impossible for deer to walk on. Karen and many of the other gardeners in her book took note of the routes the deer favored. Some have designed barriers for those areas with plants that are rarely damaged or seldom severely damaged on the Rutgers New Jersey Agricultural Experimental Station rating system. The barrier plants keep deer on their chosen plants and away from other areas with more tasty plants. Others have planted vulnerable perennials such as Daylilies on very steep slopes, a tactic that seems to discourage the deer from browsing. The last chapter of the book is a collection of combinations for containers. Many of the plants chosen could also be used in the ground. This book is not an encyclopedia of plants that the deer don’t usually eat, although the end of each chapter lists each continued on page 12 The Growing Concern | December 2019 | 11


PEREN N I AL FOCUS continued from page 11 designer’s or homeowner’s top ten plants. The book is much more; it is a selection of well-designed gardens that have dealt with deer issues as well as other animal issues. The discussions of each garden are fascinating because the author clearly outlines the initial design problems and the solutions. The diagrams of each property and the accompanying photographs are extremely helpful.

GARDENTOPIA: DESIGN BASICS FOR CREATING BEAUTIFUL OUTDOOR SPACES Johnsen, Jan The Countryman Press, 2019 New York, NY

Transforming a landscape from ordinary to charming is challenging but Jan Johnsen has been doing this for many years and, in her book, she offers hundreds of ideas and techniques to do just that. As any good designer would do, she starts you off with examining the garden’s layout, moves to consideration of the hardscape, i.e. walls, patios, and walks, discusses theme gardens as a way to get creative, shares her theories on color and how to harness it imaginatively, and then, finally, talks about plants. Everything she mentions will help you create a compelling garden. I think her suggestion of using visualization as a starter is excellent because it is helpful in deciding what one’s goals are. For the most part, each of Jan’s ideas is one page long with a photograph to illustrate the idea. This arrangement makes it very easy to read and absorb the knowledge she is imparting. Who knows which of her ideas will trigger your imagination? While I was reading the page on repetition and seeing the photograph of three upright terracotta pots, it suddenly occurred to me that I could use that idea for a client who has a shaded brick wall that needs bright color. Perhaps I can find magenta containers for her. Artists use trompe l’oeuil all the time. Jan reminds us that landscape designers should also be using it. We can make

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a small space seem larger or a short path seem longer by playing with perspective. The converse is also true. A few pages later, she touches on keeping axial lines narrow if we want them to seem long. She also has several ideas about curves and circles in the landscape. The idea of pooling and channeling as a way to affect pace on a walkway in one that I had never considered. I loved her discussion of exclamation points. All too often, tall conifers are used only as hedges but Jan points out that a few could be used as vertical “punches”. There are, of course, numerous vertical structures or ornaments that could be used for the same purpose. It’s merely a matter of imagination. As landscape designers, we frequently encounter patios or decks that are too small, so Jan suggests that bigger is better. She also suggests using tape to outline the dimensions of furnishings to ensure that new ones will fit. Her discussion of hardscaping is full of ideas and tips for installation. Individualizing a garden to reflect the personality and taste of the owner should be fun and this is where the idea of theme gardens enters. Jan quotes Gertrude Jekyll to reflect this sentiment: “The garden should fit its owner of his or her tastes,just as one’s clothes do; it should be neither too large nor too small, but just comfortable.” Sounds to me like the tale of the three bears. The theme could be anything from a stroll or pollinator garden to a whimsical or evening garden. The list of possible themes is endless. In the chapter on color, Jan emphasizes that color not only sets mood but changes with the available light. Color is also an opportunity to play. There is no color combination that can’t be yours. Don’t restrict your color to flowers; remember that foliage color may change with the seasons or could act as a foil to flower color. For some of us, plants are the full part of a design, but knowledge in this area is crucial. Plants are what excite most clients and they often make the mistake of buying plants without thinking about their cultural needs. This is where our experience can really help them. Jan shares some of her favorites as well as maintenance tips but stresses how important the quality of the soil is. Gardentopia is a feast for the eyes and the brain. I can hardly wait to implement some of these ideas.


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F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

UNDERSTANDING BONDS “The only thing I understand about bonds is that I’ll never get rich by investing in them.” Here are some pretty simple and straight forward explanations to help with this perceived-complex investment class.

A BOND IS A PROMISE Have you ever lent money to a friend, relative or colleague and received their promise to pay you back? Well, that promise, when combined with interest (a payment above and beyond the actual money lent to reward you for your loan) and specific repayment terms, is a bond. It is a promise to pay back (from the bond issuer) the money borrowed (from the bond buyer), with all the terms for repayment spelled out in advance so there is no confusion. But bonds – and other products in the fixed-income market – come in many forms of promises. For example, certificates of deposits, or CDs, are a similar promise to pay you back your money, along a predetermined

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set of terms. However, a CD is issued by a bank and is thus exempt from many securities rules, which is generally why it is not specifically classified as a bond. Buying a CD is believed to be one of the safest forms of investment because it carries government-issued FDIC insurance, providing a level of safety to the owner. If you can understand a CD, then you can just as easily understand the fundamental concepts of a bond. Generally speaking, the longer the investment term and/or the greater the risk of repayment, the higher the interest rate. At the other end of the risk spectrum is that loan to a friend. The person’s word is the only thing that backs up their promise to pay so the level of risk is greater. It’s this interest payment to you, above your investment amount, that should adequately compensate you for the risk that you have taken continued on page 16 in the investment.


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The Growing Concern | December 2019 | 15


F I SCAL FI TN ESS

continued from page 14

THE BOND PROMISE CAN SATISFY ALL INVESTMENT NEEDS There are numerous other investment options for fixed-income investors that generally lie between these two illustrations. Some examples: corporate bonds, government-sponsored enterprises (sometimes referred to as “agency”) bonds, mortgage-backed bonds and municipal bonds. The U.S. Treasury is believed to issue the most secure, or safest, bonds because they are backed by the U.S. Government’s promise – that word again – to pay the investor. Just how big is the bond market? The bond market has largely been dominated by the United States, which accounts for about 39% of the total market. As of 2017, the size of the worldwide bond market (total debt outstanding) is estimated at $100.13 trillion, according to Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA). SIFMA Fact Book 2018 – https://www. sifma.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/US-Fact-Book-2018SIFMA.pdf So, back to where we started. You may not get rich owning bonds, but now you should at least have a good fundamental understanding of what bonds are and what the promise of the bond may mean. Bonds may not give you the excitement, or the potentially higher return, of an equity offering, but you will likely, in the vast majority of cases, have a much better understanding of what you have invested in. I call it “the ability* King Financial Inc. does not provide legal or tax advice, consult an attorney or tax professional regarding your specific situation. The information herein is general and educational in nature and should not be considered legal or tax advice. ** Scenarios illustrated are hypothetical in nature, results may vary. Past performance is not indicative of future results.

16 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

to-sleep-better” investment. In the meantime, you are better protected in your overall investment strategy and you know what and when you will receive in return for your investment. As an aside, interest income, and the compounding effect of the same, can provide some very attractive returns in the long term. As with all investment vehicles, bonds carry certain risks. Default risk is the risk that an issuer will not be able to meet the interest and principal payment obligations when they are due. It is important to note, however, that in the event of insolvency of the issuer, bondholders will generally be repaid before equity holders. Another risk to consider is market risk, or the risk of interest rates rising, thus reducing the value of the bonds, if you were to sell them before maturity. Liquidity, or the ability to sell the investment quickly and at a fair price, is another risk. Reinvestment risk should also be considered. This is the risk that interest and principal payments received may have to be reinvested at a lower interest rate. As always, consult with your financial advisor for information specific to your individual situation. Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com. Securities and advisory services offered through L.M. Kohn & Company, Registered Broker/Dealer, Member FINRA/SIPC/MSRB, 10151 Carver Rd. Suite 100 – Cincinnati, Ohio 45242, (800) 478-0788


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F OR SAFETY SAK E

11 GOOD SAFETY MEETING TOPICS FOR WINTER TOOLBOX TALKS ARE EASY WAYS TO AVERT INJURIES THAT COST YOU MONEY AND DOWNTIME.

Toolbox talks take a matter of minutes, yet they have the power to prevent an injury or even save a life. When covering specific hazards, stick to those most relevant to the day’s work. In four-season climates, winter poses unique safety challenges, so use some of your safety meetings to go over hazards related to snow, ice and cold and how to manage them. Need some ideas? Here are 11 good topics to help fill the winter calendar.

RECOGNIZING HYPOTHERMIA AND FROSTBITE

WINTER PPE

THE IMPORTANCE OF WARMING UP.

Multiple loose-fitting layers, hard hat liners, thermal socks, thermal gloves or gloves large enough to fit a glove liner and work boots with good tread are must-haves. Encourage workers to avoid wearing a cotton T-shirt as a base layer, since cotton absorbs moisture; a thin wool, silk or synthetic layer next to the skin is best.

Construction is physical work, and just as athletes should warm up before exercise, construction workers should, too, especially if they’re about to work in cold temperatures. If your company leads a morning group warm-up or stretch, remind everyone about it. If not, consider demonstrating a few good stretching exercises.

18 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Working outside in the cold, especially if it’s also wet or windy, can lower the body’s core temperate and/or freeze the skin. Workers need to know the risks and warning signs of hypothermia and frostbite and what to do in the event of trouble.

continued on page 20


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FOR SAFETY SAKE

continued from page 18

CARBON MONOXIDE POISONING

OFF-THE-JOB DRIVING

Many pieces of fuel-burning equipment can emit this potentially deadly gas, including fuel-powered heaters and generators. If they must be used indoors or in confined spaces, ensure adequate ventilation and monitor CO levels with a CO monitor. Workers should wear appropriate PPE, which may mean a supplied-air respirator or a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). They should also know the symptoms of CO poisoning. Initial symptoms may include chest tightness, headache, fatigue, dizziness, drowsiness or nausea.

Simply getting to and from work can be dangerous in bad weather. Remind workers to drive defensively, leave extra space between themselves and the vehicle in front of them, avoid braking on slippery roads, steer in the direction they want the front of the car to go during a skid, and keep water, a shovel, a blanket, road salt or sand and other emergency supplies in the trunk just in case.

FIRE SAFETY Temporary heating equipment and the fuel used to power it increases the risk of fire on a construction site. Make sure the site has an adequate number of fire extinguishers and that everyone knows where they are. Train workers on the procedure for reporting a fire and evacuating the jobsite.

SAFE SHOVELING If workers must resort to shoveling by hand, they should warm up first, then push the shovel instead of lifting it or scoop small amounts at a time, lifting with the legs, keeping the back straight and avoiding twisting.

POWER LINE SAFETY Remind workers that contacting downed, energized power lines can cause electrocution. So can touching objects that are touching these lines.

20 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

FALL PROTECTION Falls are already the number one cause of death in construction, and slippery conditions only make them more likely. Remind workers to use a personal fall arrest system when necessary and to make sure their safety belts are properly tied off.

THREE POINTS OF CONTACT Whether they’re climbing a ladder or getting in or out of the cab of their equipment, the “three points of contact” rule can help eliminate falls.

NEAR MISSES Near misses can happen in any season — and when they do happen, they should be treated as warnings, since they are usually the result of unsafe conditions or behaviors. Tell workers why and how to report them. This article was writeen by Marianne Wait, an editor and writer who creates content for Fortune 500 brands. It originally ran on the United Rentals Safety Blog, located at www.unitedrentals.com.


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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College Liquidambar Styraciflua, Sweetgum

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

LIQUIDAMBAR STYRACIFLUA SWEETGUM

Our Plant of the Month this go-around is inspired by a recent visit we made to Brotzman Nursery, which included a guided tour by Tim Brotzman himself. During our tour, we took part in a great conversation concerning the impact that mass marketing campaigns from “name brand” plant manufacturers have on our industry. Often – on the landscape contractor side of things – we don’t realize the impact these name brand plant factories have on our industry, as a whole. Think of how many similar (“similars” as Tim calls them) cultivars of Hydrangeas have flooded the market in recent years. And, every year there is a whole new load of them with very little long-term testing as to their usefulness and longevity in the landscape. The fact is, there isn’t a single person out there that can tell us how these plants will fare during our winters, because they haven’t seen a truly nasty, cold one, yet. So here we are, planting away white-potted plant after whitepotted plant, with no knowledge of their long term success, despite someone telling us they’re a “winner.”

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Local nurseries, like Brotzman’s, have spent decades researching which plants survive the long-term ups and downs of an Ohio winter – from the crazy extremes of an early or late freeze to the multitude of planting conditions (crazy wet and crazy dry clay). And, while they spend generations figuring out the best-of-the-best, more and more often they are getting out-marketed by the silly “white pots.” If it’s true that it comes down to a marketing scenario, then perhaps we need to do a better job educating our clients in our marketing endeavors that it takes more than fancy pictures to determine what is local and what is hardy. continued on page 24


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PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

continued from page 22 As our tour with Tim continued, we came across a beautiful cultivar of Liquidambar styraciflua called ‘Worplesdon’ which blew our minds! The back story to this discovery is actually quite interesting. A few years back, we visited a walled city in the Czech Republic, which was settled in the 1200s and borders Austria, called Znojmo (znoi-mow). Being a border city, there is a crazy network of medieval tunnels that the citizens would hide in during raids from Austria. The coolest attribute of these tunnels is the clever connections to the fireplaces and chimneys of the houses above. During any given siege, invading troops would see smoke rise from what were abandoned homes, which would completely take them off-guard, as it was thought this was a ghost town. So, right about now you’re probably asking yourself, “What does this have to do with a tree?” Well, it was in this city that we found the cultivar ‘Worplesdon’ and had no idea what it was. We found the trees growing as street trees in the middle of town, and from what we could tell it had to be a Sweetgum, though we had never really seen the deeper, dissected leaves that make this cultivar look more like a Silver Maple than a Sweetgum.

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Another tidbit Tim shared with us makes this story even more interesting. Liquidambar is native to North America. However, just like we love exotic plants, so does the rest of the world and Sweetgums are actually quite popular in Europe. So in England, in a town to the southwest of London, a nursery discovered an odd-leaved form of Liquidambar growing and propagated it. This town is called, wait for it… Worplesdon, and thus an American native had a change in morphology and was discovered in England. Now it has traveled across Europe, as it is very popular over there, but is almost impossible to find here, that is until we found it at Brotzman’s Nursery! Much like the species, this cultivar should be treated as a large, shade tree. Also like the species, Sweetgums get some of the best fall color displays available on any tree, or shrub. Expect a riot of reds, oranges, peaches, and deep-purples on the same plant at the same time. We found some literature that states ‘Worplesdon’ is fruitless, but after a quick call with our friend in the Czech Republic who does street tree inventories this statement was refuted. This cultivar (and likely many of the other cultivars) will still fruit, as the plant is monoecious and will bare both male and female flowers.


Another cultivar with some interesting leave morphology is ‘Rotundiloba.’ In contrast to the deeply dissected leaves of ‘Worplesdon,’ ‘Rotundiloba’s’ are rounded off, making them quite dissimilar to the species. Often, ‘Rotundiloba’ is also listed as fruitless, but we have witnessed firsthand several plants that reverted enough to produce fruit, some with full-branch reversion to the normal leaf morphology. This cultivar will require a watchful eye over the years to cull out any reversions. Perhaps the most unique cultivar of the Sweetgums is ‘Slender Silhouette,’ which is basically a green totem pole. These plants can reach to heights 60 feet, though usually stick closer to 40, and likely won’t be much more than 6 feet wide, from bottom to top. Talk about a perfect niche plant for the urban landscape when you need something with great height, but also want to plant close to a building. With at least three stories of coverage, and able to be within three or four feet of the building, you can’t compete with this pillar of green. We can find this tree as a native plant on much of the East coast into the lower Midwest, all the way down to Florida and across Texas and Mexico. Usually found in a flood plain, or on low land, it seems to prefer wet soils, but can withstand fairly dry, infertile soils. It is likely best to try to offer protection from harsh winter winds, as they can kill off the leaf buds and cause some witches brooming. Our advice, get out and visit your local nurseries this winter and discover some of the incredible plants they have to offer that don’t come with fancy royalty costs. These nursery growers know how to select great plants. We just need to remember the tried and true are often better than the new and shiny “white pots.”

Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.

The Growing Concern | December 2019 | 25


FOROLA SAFETY SAK E EDUCATION SERIES

EVENT INFORMATION DATE & LOCATION JANUARY 23, 2020 INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIV. 4100 ROCKSIDE RD, INDEPENDENCE, OH 44131

AGENDA REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST 8:30AM - 9:00AM CLINIC 9:00AM - 5:00PM COST MEMBERS BEFORE 01/09/20 - $129 AFTER 01/09/20 - $159 NON MEMBERS BEFORE 01/09/20 - $159 AFTER 01/09/20 - $189

LANDSCAPE DESIGN CLINIC

Communicating Design Concepts Quickly Most of us are landscape designers and contractors, not artists. We need to be able to communicate our ideas quickly to a client & move on with what we do best, installing & maintaining beautiful landscapes. This clinic will teach you the fundamentals of creating a 3D sketch that will excite your client and shorten sales time. This is the ideal way to show how portions of a larger project will look or to sell small enhancement projects when a traditional landscape plan isn’t necessary. • • • • • •

Learn how to test ideas with a client on the first appointment to avoid producing design plans & concepts they don’t like, or want. Gain confidence by having another sales tool available in their ‘sales toolbox.’ Learn to not be afraid of hand rendering. (You’ll be done by the time others turn their computer on.) Learn the essentials of quick rendering & what tricks to use when time is short and stress is high. Learn how line weight, color and perspective come together to give your rendering believability. Be able to create client enthusiasm that will give your company a competitive edge.

INSTRUCTED BY

KEVIN O’BRIEN / LANDSCAPE DESIGNER: LIFESTYLE LANDSCAPING Kevin is a landscape designer specializing in creative & naturalistic residential gardens. His built projects have earned awards at the local, state and national level via the OLA, The Ohio Nursery & Landscape Association, The Perennial Plant Association, National Association of Landscape Professionals and the American Horticultural Society. He has been featured in Lawn & Landscape Magazine, Grounds Management Magazine, Cleveland Magazine, Cleveland Home Décor, Green Industry Pro Magazine, Landscape Contractor Magazine as well as local news media. Kevin enjoys sharing what he has learned over his career to further elevate the art and craft of landscape & garden design. He has spent the past 20 years at Lifestyle Landscaping, Inc. North Ridgeville designing and selling residential work.

2020 Landscape Design Clinic / REGISTRATION CLOSES 01/16/20

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE

FEE

$

$

$

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

6.526 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association REGISTER ONLINE AT CEU’S OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/DESIGNCLINIC.HTML


FEATURE ARTI CLE

steps to successfully adding anti-icing to your snow removal operations If you’ve been considering whether or not to add anti-icing to your snow and ice management operations, you’re not alone. Many other contractors have been debating the same question. In most cases, the answer is straightforward: anti-icing is an essential tool of the trade, allowing snow professionals to optimize their storm management and deliver level of service goals in the timeliest manner. Used appropriately, anti-icing will increase operational efficiency, reduce material cost and boost profits. The challenge is in effectively integrating it into your operations. Anti-icing is one of three fundamental snow fighting strategies: anti-icing, deicing and snow removal. It is a proactive, preemptive strategy of spraying a light application of a liquid deicer directly to the pavement just prior to or at the onset of a storm. This bottom-up strategy inhibits ice from bonding to the pavement, similar to the way butter coats a frying pan and keeps food from sticking. It is commonly reported that it takes four times more salt and 50 percent more resources to break an already established ice-to-pavement bond than to prevent it in the first place. In most cases anti-icing has been proven to significantly reduce the time, labor and materials required to clear the surface after a snow event.

So why are many contractors reluctant to adopt this essential tool? Some will tell you salt is cheap and works fine, the equipment is too costly, that it won’t work in their region, or their customers won’t buy-in when actually it is fear of change that is the primary obstacle. No matter the excuse, it’s time to park your misperceptions and follow these six steps to anti-icing success.

GET THE NECESSARY TRAINING As with any profession, the snow professional has to know the tools of his trade, how and when to use them, and stay abreast of innovation in technology, or he is setting himself up for failure. Anti-icing technologies have been around for decades continued on page 28 The Growing Concern | December 2019 | 27


F EATURE ARTI CLE continued from page 27 and their value validated thoroughly. There is an abundance of information out there for the forward thinking professional. Most of it originates in the municipal sector, but private sector industry associations and leading manufacturers are beginning to offer value added training and educational resources on liquid applications tailored to the commercial market. All the commercial contractor has to do is tap into them.

• Per Push/Per Event: Liquid applications can be priced in a similar manner as other services. Regional supply of certain deicers may be a factor in pricing. • Seasonal or Lump Sum: This is the easiest contract type to include liquid strategies without major changes. Be sure to include provisions for seasons that fall short or exceed a reasonable threshold.

EDUCATE YOUR CUSTOMER TO GET ‘BUY-IN’

CHOOSE THE RIGHT TOOLS FOR THE JOB

There is a long list of benefits to the property owner from antiicing which are a good starting point for a discussion and to obtain their ‘buy-in’ for using liquids on their properties. Here are a few tips for approaching the subject with the property owner: • Assess the property with the customer, identifying priority target areas and concerns. • Understand the customer’s real motivation, and prioritize their needs. Even though a customer may stress cost, it is often not their primary concern. • If cost really is their top priority, ask them to consider the potential cost of lost business due to slower result times, increased risk of slip-and-fall liability, and increased costs from property damage resulting from excessive salt usage, all mitigated by anti-icing. Anti-icing also provides a huge benefit for LEED certified properties. • Discuss the types of materials to be used, as well as the timing of operations and outcomes the customer can expect. It often helps to have pictures that show the difference between a surface that has received an antiicing treatment and one that has not.

Ultimately, successful snow fighting depends on utilizing the right tool for the job at the right time. Although liquid deicers are extremely effective when used properly, they are not intended to replace solids. Anti-icing expedites plowing and deicing strategies, and is just another tool in the toolbox.

As a professional you should retain the right to use the best tool for the job, especially when using it improves the outcomes for the customer, so obtaining property owner ‘approval’ may not always be necessary, depending on the type of contract involved. Utilizing anti-icing strategies provides the contractor a wider window in which to execute snow fighting operations and affords greater flexibility within some types of contract structures to deliver level of service goals at an equivalent or lesser cost. • Time and Materials: This is the most challenging contract type to incorporating anti-icing services because, if billed in the customary way, both materials and time decrease. However, if executed properly, the contractor should be able to service more accounts in the same timeframe. Establish a rate and determine if it is an applied or unapplied rate.

28 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Liquid Deicers: It is important to know your tools, as well as when and how to use them. To select the best liquid deicers for the application, the contractor needs to know the eutectic and effective temperatures, chemical properties, and functional capabilities of the deicer he intends to use. From a cost perspective it is also important to understand the regional availability of various deicers. As a general rule, magnesium chloride is more available west of the Mississippi River and in the Northeast. Calcium chloride is more available in the Great Lakes region. Use Purpose-Built Equipment: Deicing liquids and brine solutions have different compositions than other liquids, and can cause pump failures, clogged nozzles and other issues in sprayers not designed to handle them. Agricultural sprayers may seem like a cost-effective solution, but many have tried and failed going this route. Purpose-built sprayers for winter applications are specifically engineered for deicing chemicals and application rates, and most importantly for winter temperatures and conditions. They typically offer features tailored to ice management needs such as multiple independently controlled spraying zones for surface and curb applications and hose reel spray wands for treating areas inaccessible to trucks.

KNOW WHEN TO UTILIZE ANTI-ICING STRATEGIES Every storm is different and presents unique challenges. When deciding to utilize anti-icing strategies, it is essential to monitor storm specific conditions prior to and during the event. Those conditions include surface temperature, the amount of moisture present and anticipated, the time of day and impact of solar radiation on the surface, anticipated traffic during the application timeframe, the type of deicing chemical being used, and duration of the coming storm.


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It is a best practice to execute anti-icing measures just prior to or at the onset of a storm, paying very close attention to the amount of moisture present to minimize premature dilution. Anti-icing with salt brine is most effective at surface temperatures between 15 to 32 degrees Fahrenheit. Blended enhanced brines, calcium and magnesium chloride brines can be effective at lower temperatures. Anti-icing is typically not recommended for events with high moisture content, freezing rain, mist or rain turning to snow, or very cold temperatures with dry blowing snow, although with advanced knowledge and the presence of other factors it may be possible.

START SMALL – THINK BIG It is important when integrating new methodologies into your winter operations to not bite off more than you can chew. This is especially true when thinking of adopting liquid strategies. A phased approach provides the snow contractor an opportunity to get used to the new tools and applications gradually. For instance, SnowEx® suggests starting with stockpile treating and pre-wetting solids at the spinner when deicing before making the move to incorporate anti-icing strategies. When you are ready to make that move, sidewalks are a good place to get your feet wet. Sidewalk equipment is more affordable and provides feature capabilities such as treating curb-to-sidewalk transitions, unattainable with solid deicer applications. The application

scope is smaller, the risks more manageable and the potential ROI greater. Once comfortable with handling the new materials and equipment the next step will be much less daunting. It is often easier and involves less risk to begin by purchasing reputable brine or engineered liquids that offer reliable supply and consistency. This approach involves less initial start-up cost and offers maximum flexibility to learn the ropes. Over the long run, and with the proper equipment, the contractor who learns to make and store his own brine will optimize cost effectiveness.

TRAIN YOUR CREWS There are increasing resources and training programs on antiicing in the industry. Seek them out and use them to train your crews. Hand in hand with this training, implement monitoring and control mechanisms to track material usage. If your team doesn’t understand the value of the process, and if you don’t track the amount of material used, they won’t dial back on the amount of salt spread, and you will not reap the savings you should by incorporating anti-icing into your operations. Education is the key to success. For manufacturer, property owner and contractor alike, anti-icing offers a ‘win-win’ for all. Article written by Pam Buckley of Douglas Dynamics and first appeared on the GreenIndustryPros website located at www.greenindustrypros.com. Permission to reprint given by AC Business Media.

The Growing Concern | December 2019 | 29


D I RECTI ON S

MILESTONES It is that time of year again! With the holidays upon us, the OLA would like to thank all of our members for their continued dedication to the industry and our organization. At our annual meeting on November 21st, we applauded members celebrating significant membership milestones. Additionally, the annual meeting is also when our membership votes to approve the slate of board members that will serve in 2020. Congratulations to all! 55-YEAR MEMBER

25-YEAR MEMBERS cont...

10-YEAR MEMBERS

The DiSanto Companies, Inc.

Ohio CAT R.B. Stout, Inc. Vizmeg Landscape, Inc.

The Arms Trucking Co. Cardinal Building & Design Co. Combs Landscaping Cornerstone Landscaping, Inc. E.F. Pouly Company ForeverGreen Lawn Care, Inc. Grasshopper Property Maintenance, Inc. Hidden Creek Landscaping, Inc. MRLM Landscape Materials/JTO, Inc. Perry Lawn Care & Landscaping D. Peterman Landscaping & Snow Plowing Rice’s Tree Service & Landscaping Sharp Edge Tree & Landscape Thompson Landscape & Design Western Reserve Landcare, Inc.

45-YEAR MEMBER Marshall Equipment Company

20-YEAR MEMBERS 40-YEAR MEMBER Tony DiVincenzo Landscape

35-YEAR MEMBERS Abate Landscaping and Greenhouses Supers Landscape, Inc.

30-YEAR MEMBERS American Turf Landscaping Fleck & Sons Landscape Service Ianiro Landscape Development Impullitti Landscaping, Inc. Outdoor Concepts Landscape Contracting, Inc. Sohars/RCPW, Inc. Turfscape, Inc. The Yard Works, Inc.

25-YEAR MEMBERS

Bobcat of Akron--A Division of Leppo CareWorks CDL-Training Consultants Century Equipment Chesterland Nurseries Ditch Witch Mid-States Eastside Landscaping, Inc. The Lawn Barbers, Inc. Mueller Lawn and Landscape Petitti Landscaping VanCuren Services, Inc.

5-YEAR MEMBERS 15-YEAR MEMBERS Cutting Edge Lawn & Landscape, Inc. GreenSource LLC Huggett Sod Farm Lewis Landscaping & Nursery, Inc. Moscarino Landscape + Design SACS Consulting & Investigative Svcs.

Avon Landscaping, Inc. Best Truck Equipment - Mower Division Calanni Landscaping LLC Chagrin Pet, Garden & Power Equipment Hunter Green Services, Inc. New Beginnings Landscape, Inc. Oberlander’s Tree and Landscape, Ltd.

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

Buckeye Body & Equipment C.P.’S Lawncare, LLC CC’S Landscaping, Inc. Chardon Welding, Inc. Columbus Hardscapes LLC DeCesare Landscaping & Design, LLC Dworken & Bernstein Co., LPA Earth & Waterscapes, Inc. Hedge Landscape, LLC Ken Helmlinger Company Millcreek Gardens LLC N.F.L. Group Rocscape Landscaping, LLC Schonhut Landscape Services


ADVERTI SI N G I N D E X

29

Abraxus Salt

23

Art Form Nurseries

2

Botson Insurance Group, Inc.

11

Davis Tree Farm & Nursery, Inc.

23

Frank Brothers Landscape Supply, Inc.

19

Mason Structural Steel, Inc.

19

Millcreek Gardens

The 2020 board will be comprised of:

2020 OFFICERS

President - Domenic Lauria, Vizmeg Landscapes President-Elect - Dr. James Funai, PhD., Cuyahoga Community College Treasurer - Brian Maurer, LIC, Brian-Kyles Landscapes of Distinction Secretary - Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Assn. Immediate Past President - Adam Capiccioni, Ohio CAT

2020 DIRECTORS

Keith Clapper, LIC, Schill Grounds Management Ryan Drake, J.F.D. Landscapes Stephanie Gray, LIC, BrightView Landscape Services Cameron Maneri, Kurtz Bros., Inc. Rob Morel, Morel Landscaping LLC Joshua Way, Toledo Lawns

Congratulations to our officers and directors! I am looking forward to working with each of you in the coming year. If you are interested in being more involved with OLA, we will hold committee meetings on January 16th, immediately before the January evening meeting. If you would like to join a committee, please contact me so that we can send you an invitation to this meeting where you can find out more. You can call me at 440-717-0002 or send an email to sandy@ ohiolandscapers.org. Happy Holidays to you and your families!

15 MRLM 19

O’Reilly Equipment

15 ONLA 13

Premier Plant Solutions

21

Salt World

21

Sohar’s / RCPW, Inc.

17 Unilock 6

Valley City Supply

9

VanCuren Tree Services, Inc.

25

Zoresco Equipment Company The Growing Concern | December 2019 | 31


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Profile for Sandy Munley

The Growing Concern December 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

The Growing Concern December 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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