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Growing Concern

The

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A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E O H I O L A N D S C A P E A S S O C I AT I O N

Facility Tour

Central Ohio: October 24, 2019 / Ahlum & Arbor / PAGE 7

OLA Education Series: Snow & Ice Management Clinic N.E. Ohio: August 22, 2019 / St. Michael’s Woodside / PAGE 12-13


Since 1986, VanCuren Tree Services has been Northeast Ohio’s complete tree care specialist. We provide comprehensive services for any residential, commercial, or utility tree care need. The tree professionals at VanCuren Tree Services have helped home and business owners throughout Greater Cleveland and Northeast Ohio maintain the beauty, vitality, and safety of their trees. We are proud to offer a full range of tree care services, from tree and stump removal to storm damage clean up to utility work and beyond.

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PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N

ADAM CAPICCIONI Ohio CAT

SUCCESS IS NO ACCIDENT After contending with what is now Ohio’s second soggiest spring, and wettest year ever, I hope that everyone is getting the opportunity to enjoy the warmer, DRIER weather. No doubt, the damp conditions have been a challenge, requiring many of us to make some unwanted sacrifices in either our personal or professional lives – and quite possibly both. So, as you emerge from the “Monsoon of 2019,” I thought this would be a really good time to discuss the concept of sacrifices and how they play an integral part in getting what you want for your business, or personally. In our industry, it’s pretty safe to say that everyone who is successful now was a beginner at some point. Each of us went through our own growing pains, making all sorts of stupid mistakes along the way. Many of us likely failed on our first, second, and quite possibly third attempts. And, if there is one thing we learned in all of those mistakes, it was that none of this is ever a ‘smooth ride.’

leads me to tell the new guys, “Give up being perfect.” If you are waiting around to learn as much as you can, so that everything goes perfect, then you will never start… and you will never finish. What’s the saying, “Nothing ever goes as planned?” In this industry, you can almost bet that when you encounter your first obstacle, the plan goes out the window, which brings me back to sacrifices…

I certainly had my share of challenges and ‘mistakes made’ in the past, but I’ve learned to use those missteps as motivation to strive forward and be a better me. It’s that experience that

When things go south, you have one of two choices to make; stay the way you are and do nothing different (which requires no sacrifice at all, but usually is accompanied with continued on page 6 The Growing Concern |

August 2019 | 3


TAB LE OF CON TEN TS AU G U S T 2 0 1 9 WWW. OH I OLA N D SCA P E R S. OR G OH I O’ S P R OF E SSI ON A L G REEN I N D U ST R Y A SSOCI AT I O N OHIO LANDSCAPE ASSOCIATION 9240 Broadview Road Broadview Heights, Ohio 44147 Phone: 440.717.0002, or 1.800.335.6521 Fax: 440.717.0004 Web: www.ohiolandscapers.org and www.myohiolandscape.com DESIGNER / EDITOR Rick Doll, Jr. REGULAR WRITERS Adam Capiccioni, Ohio CAT Michael J. Donnellan, King Financial, Inc. Jim Funai, LIC, Cuyahoga Community College Shelly Funai, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens Sandy Munley, Ohio Landscape Association Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, Bobbie’s Green Thumb COVER: Landscape Ohio! Honor Award winner, The Pattie Group Inc., for their entry in the category of Water Features.

FEATURES

3 PRESIDENT’S COLUMN Success is No Accident

5 WELCOME NEW MEMBERS 8 PERENNIAL FOCUS Eryngium: Sea Holly

14 FISCAL FITNESS

Establishing Investing Goals

19 FOR SAFETY SAKE

Safety Audits: Required or Redundant

22 PLANT OF THE MONTH Davidia Involucrata: Dove-Tree

27 FEATURE ARTICLE

Are These Mistakes Affecting Your Bid-Win Ratio

30 DIRECTIONS 31 ADVERTISING INDEX 4 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

ADVERTISING INFORMATION Submission deadline: 10th of the month, prior to the month of publication. For advertising rates and ad specs, please call 440.717.0002, 1.800.335.6521, or email Rick Doll Jr. at rick@ohiolandscapers.org. DISCLAIMER The Ohio Landscape Association, its board of directors, staff and the editor of The Growing Concern neither endorse any product(s) or attests to the validity of any statements made about products mentioned in this, past or subsequent issues of this publication. Similarly, the opinions expressed in The Growing Concern are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views of the Ohio Landscape Association. OFFICERS President Adam Capiccioni

OLA STAFF Executive Director Sandy Munley

President – Elect Domenic Lauria

Communications & Events Manager Rick Doll, Jr.

Treasurer Brian Maurer, LIC Immediate Past President Marie McConnell DIRECTORS Doug Ellis James Funai, LIC Philip Germann Stephanie Gray, LIC Cameron Maneri Joshua Way


C AL ENDAR OF EVEN TS UPCO M I N G OLA MEETINGS , EDUC AT I ON SE MI N A R S, A N D OT H E R G R E E N I N D UST R Y EV ENT S

AUGUST

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

AUGUST 1, 2019 OLA SCHOLARSHIP GOLF CLASSIC

OCTOBER 1, 2019 PLANT HEALTHCARE DAY

NOVEMBER 21, 2019 OLA ANNUAL MEETING (NE OHIO)

Join us at Bob-O-Link Golf Club in Avon, OH for the OLA Scholarship Golf Classic! Proceeds from this event benefit our OLA Scholarship Fund. Our golf outing was created to help generate funding for our scholarship program, targeting qualified students interested in a vocation within the green industry. Call the OLA at 800-3356521 for sponsorship opportunities.

This full-day workshop combines all aspects of Plant Health Care (PHC) for both technicians and managers, with live demonstrations of PHC techniques – services based on the principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) and proactive tree care management. Held on the grounds of Secrest Arboretum.

Held at St. Michael’s Woodside. Speaker/Topic to TBD. Sponsorship opportunities still available. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002.

AUGUST 22, 2019 SNOW & ICE CLINIC (NE Ohio)

OCTOBER 24, 2019 OLA FACILITY TOUR (Central Ohio)

DECEMBER DECEMBER 12, 2019 STONE VENEER CLINIC (NE Ohio) This hands-on clinic will teach the basics of mixing mortar, installing and grouting stone veneer. The techniques you will learn can be applied to both manufactured and natural stone. The demand for veneers has increased and this is a great opportunity to learn how to apply it in house. Sponsored and hosted by Mason Steel.

Join us at St. Michael’s Woodside in Broadview Heights for our annual Snow & Ice Management Clinic, featuring Industry Experts, our Mini Trade Show, and more. Registration is open and there are only a few Sponsorship Opportunities that are still available. See pages 12 - 13 for more details.

By establishing uncompromising technical and safety standards and making sure that employees have the best possible training and excellent equipment, Ahlum & Arbor delivers exceptional quality and value to their clients. Joins us as we tour Ahlum & Arbor’s facility to find out what has made them so successful. See page 7 for more details.

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER

The Ohio Landscape Association is delighted to welcome the following members:

SEPTEMBER 19, 2019 (Tentative) OLA FACILITY TOUR (NE Ohio)

NOVEMBER 13, 2019 DORMANT PRUNING (Central Ohio)

REGULAR MEMBERS

Joins us for our annual Landscape Facilities Tour. Location TBD. Sponsorship opportunities still available. For more info call the OLA Office at 440.717.0002.

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Held at Willoway Nurseries in Avon, Ohio.

Trinity Landscapes 1101 Carr Road Ostrander, OH 43061 740-513-9063 Christopher Lewis

NOVEMBER 19, 2019 DORMANT PRUNING (NE Ohio)

LMN Software 201-180 Enterprise Road Markham, Ontario L6G 0E6 CANADA 888-347-9864 David Chalmers

Dormant Pruning of Landscape Plants is a half-day, hands-on clinic and a timely training opportunity for you and your crews to learn the proper pruning techniques. Held at Premier Plant Services in Hilliard, Ohio.

OLA’s NEW MEMBERS

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

JTI, Inc. 7400 Oak Leaf Road Oakwood Village, OH 44146 440-232-4311 Andrew Startenbach The Growing Concern | August 2019 | 5


PR ES I DEN T’S COLUM N continued from page 3

feelings of unhappiness, restlessness, disappointment, and frustration), or you can go with that feeling of ‘I want to be more,’ and decide that you want it badly enough to give up some things – for the time being – in order to make your dreams a reality. I know is sounds very ‘dad’ of me, but it really is true; nothing comes easy. To get from where you are now, to where you should want to be, you will have to make sacrifices, even though it’s something every one of us wishes we didn’t have to do. Unfortunately, it just doesn’t work that way. In addition – from my experience – making sacrifices and putting forth effort alone are not enough to aquire true success. Good decision making is also required. Learning from mistakes is something everyone should do. Some people say, “Yeah, I learn from my mistakes,” but after a span of time, they forget about their mistakes. Our human brains are just too big and profound. I keep notebooks where I have written down analyses of mistakes and discoveries I’ve made, and refer to them the next time I set off on similar ventures.

At the same time, I write things down that I have found to work well, so that the next time I don’t have to rely on recall. George Santayana, a philosopher, was once quoted, “Those who cannot remember the past are doomed to repeat it.” In closing, whether it’s the large project you are designing/ bidding on, the prospect that you have been networking with to earn their future business, or that summer beach body you’ve been thinking about in preparation for your next vacation; to get from where you are now, to where you want to be, there will undoubtedly be sacrifices you will have to make. Despite how badly many people want a particular change in their life; many are unwilling to make the necessary sacrifices to get it. Are you one of those people? Hopefully some of you will make some sacrifices with your laborers’ and managers’ time this fall, as we have an exceptional lineup for our Snow & Ice Clinic in August, as well as our Plant Healthcare Day happening in October! We hope to see you there!

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OLA MEETINGS SERIES

EVENT INFORMATION DATE & LOCATION OCTOBER 24, 2019 AHLUM & ARBOR TREE PRESERVATION 1740 WALCUTT RD, COLUMBUS, OH 43228 AGENDA REGISTRATION 5:00PM to 5:15PM FACILITY TOUR 5:15PM to 7:30PM NETWORKING/SOCIAL HOUR/ FOOD SERVED 7:30PM to 8:30PM COST TO ATTEND MEMBERS: NO CHARGE NON MEMBERS: $30 REGISTER TO ATTEND BY OCTOBER 17, 2019

HOSTED BY

CENTRAL OHIO FACILITY TOUR

AHLUM & ARBOR TREE PRESERVATION Ahlum & Arbor Tree Preservation is a family-owned, full-service arboriculture firm serving both residential and commercial clients in central Ohio for more than 40 years. They specialize in tree preservation, of which their services include; tree pruning, tree removal, plant health care, consultations on various difficult and challenging tree situations, as well as GIS inventory management. David Ahlum founded Ahlum & Arbor over 40 years ago, so he could develop a business with the quality standards and professionalism he envisioned. Chris Ahlum continues to carry on the legacy of exceptional quality standards and professionalism on which his father built the business. Ahlum & Arbor’s mission is to provide quality tree care in efforts to enhance and preserve the natural beauty of trees and the environment, generation after generation. They do this with experience, passion, and by adhering to professional standards day in and day out.

THE AHLUM & ARBOR DIFFERENCE By establishing uncompromising technical and safety standards and making sure employees have the best possible training and excellent equipment, Ahlum & Arbor delivers exceptional quality and value for their clients. Ahlum & Arbor is one of few companies in the State to be accredited by the Tree Care Industry Association (TCIA).

Join us, October 24th, 2019 as Chris Ahlum and his team give us a peek into what has made them so successful. SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FOR THIS YEAR’S MEETING SCHEDULE ARE NOW AVAILABLE. CALL 440.717.0002 FOR INFO. 2.25 CEU’S

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/MEETINGS/CENTRALOHIOFACILITYTOUR


PEREN N I AL FOCUS

BOBBIE SCHWARTZ, FAPLD Bobbie’s Green Thumb Eryngium planum, commonly called Sea Holly, is a coarse, clump-forming perennial that features a summer bloom of steel-blue, thistle-like flower heads.

ERYNGIUM SEA HOLLY When searching for a perennial that will survive in a hot, dry, sunny site, we need look no further than the genus Eryngium. Although most of the species are native to Europe and Morocco, they are hardy to at least zone 5 with some hardy even to zone 2, and, therefore, extremely useful here in northern Ohio. They are also tolerant of soil with high salt levels and thus useful in landscapes near streets and sidewalks that may be heavily salted during the winter. The species most often used in our landscapes is Eryngium planum (Flat Sea Holly), a native of the Russian steppes and hardy to zone 5. This one has silver-blue flower heads surrounded by bracts of the same color and grows two to three feet high. It stays in bloom from July until September and the deadheads make wonderful winter sculptures. Be aware, however, that leaving the deadheads will ensure that the seeds will then disperse and you will have more plants.

This is also an excellent plant for the cutting garden since the flowers last for quite a long time in either fresh or dried arrangements. Like most Eryngium, the leaner and drier the soil, the better. Eryngium tends to flop where the soil is richer and moister. I have grown the cultivar ‘Blaucappe’ (‘Blue Cap’) for a number of years and have been quite happy with it. Its stems continued on page 11

8 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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PEREN N I AL FOCUS

Eryngium planum ‘Blue Glitter’

continued from page 8 are particularly blue when temperatures are cool and the holly-like structure of its foliage adds a different texture to the garden’s composition. Another commonly grown species is E.alpinum (Alpine Sea Holly) which is native to the Alps and hardy to zone 4. This species is a bit shorter than E.planun, being only one to two feet high. Again the basal foliage is heart-shaped but the stem is supposedly bluer. There are more bracts surrounding the flower head and is the most ornamental of the Eryngium. An underused species is E.bourgatti (Mediterranean Sea Holly). This native of the Pyrenees, hardy to zone 5, is a compact plant that grows only one to two feet high and has dense, coarse, spiny foliage with silver veins. The bracts are also spiny and much longer than the silvery-blue flower heads which are small but multitudinous. E.varifolium (Moroccan Sea Holly) is similar with its conspicuous white veins but this one is more difficult to find and also more demanding in its cultural requirements, needing gritty, well-drained soil.

Leaf Sea Holly). The former tends to grow three to four feet tall although it can grow as tall as six feet. Its stiff narrow leaves give the appearance of yucca foliage while the creamy white button flower heads with gray bracts quickly inform us that this is not a Yucca. The latter reminds me of the Sonoran Desert Agave although the foliage of the Eryngium is much narrower but just as spiny. Both species are hardy to zone 5 and are considered as collector’s items. Don’t let the spines of the Sea Hollies scare you away. Their unusual texture and the steel to violet blue color are worth adding to the landscape.

Bobbie Schwartz, FAPLD, owner of Bobbie’s Green Thumb in Shaker Hts., Ohio, is a landscape designer, consultant, freelance writer, and lecturer whose specialties are perennial gardens and four season landscapes. In addition to being an Ohio Landscape Association (OLA) member, she is an active member of the Ohio Nursery and Landscape Association (ONLA) and Perennial Plant Association (PPA). Bobbie is a Past President of the Association of Professional

There are two native American species that are fun to use in the landscape because of their unusual appearance. They are E.yuccifolium (Rattlesnake Master) and E.agavifolium (Agave

Landscape Designers (APLD). Bobbie’s new book, Garden Renovation: Transform Your Yard into the Garden of Your Dreams, was published in November 2017 by Timber Press.

The Growing Concern | August 2019 | 11


SNOW & ICE M A NAG E M E N T

SPONSORSHIP EVENT SPONSORS A & A HYDRAULIC & EQUIPMENT ABRAXUS SALT AG-PRO COMPANIES ASPIRE BAKER VEHICLE SYSTEMS, INC. BIGFOOT LANDSCAPE MATERIALS BOTSON INSURANCE GROUP BURNS JCB OF OHIO CHARDON WELDING CLASSIC AUTO GROUP ENTERPRISE FLEET SOLUTIONS ENVIROTECH SERVICES, INC. FISHER ENGINEERING HEARTLAND KRYSTOWSKI TRACTOR LEPPO RENTS LMN MARSHALL POWER EQUIPMENT OHIO CAT O’REILLY EQUIPMENT SIMA SOUTHEASTERN EQUIPMENT VERMEER MID ATLANTIC, LLC WINTER EQUIPMENT ZORESCO EQUIPMENT CO. BOOTH SIZE REQUESTED

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT OPPORTUNITIES

The OLA would like to invite you to participate in our 2019 Snow & Ice Management Clinic! Our Snow & Ice Management Clinic is a can’t miss event for anyone in, or thinking about being in the snow and ice business. Designed for both business owners and employees, the clinic will include group discussions and great information from snow and ice industry experts.

SPONSORSHIP/EXHIBIT INFORMATION

Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties are available to ALL Green Industry suppliers, including non snow and ice related businesses. All Sponsorship/Exhibit opportunties include:

• • • • • •

Your choice of exhibit size. (Subject to availability. See below for more details.) Your company name displayed on signage at the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on all email communications promoting the event. Your company logo, linked to your company’s website, on the Snow & Ice Clinic landing page of our industry website. Your company will be recognized at the event and will have the opportunity to pass out marketing materials to attendees. A complimentary copy of the event attendee list, including attendee’s company name, contact person, mailing address & phone number. BOOTH/EXHIBIT SIZES

Booths will be sold on a first-come, first serve basis, once last year’s sponsors have had the opportunity to renew. Exhibitors may set up their booths beginning August 22 at 7:00 am. and have until 8:00 am to complete set-up. All exhibit spaces will be located outdoors on pavement and should be interactive for attendees.

OPTION #1 10 x 10 BOOTH OLA Member - $400 Non Member - $600

OPTION #2 20 x 30 BOOTH (NEW THIS YEAR!) OLA Member - $500 Non Member - $700

OPTION #3 30x40 or 20x60 BOOTH OLA Member - $600 Non Member - $800

Includes: • 10 x 10 Exhibit Space • 2 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 20 x 30 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

Includes: • 30 x 40 or 20 x 60 Exhibit Space • 3 Exhibitor passes • Breakfast and Lunch

PLEASE NOTE: 10 x 10 booths are for TABLETOP DISPLAYS ONLY. Absolutely no equipment will be permited in a 10 x 10 booth. 20 x 60 booths will be created by combining (2) 20 x 30 booths. The same can be done for extra 30 x 40 booths.

 10x10 Outdoor Exhibit Space

 20x30 Outdoor Exhibit Space

 30x40 Outdoor Exhibit Space  20x60 Outdoor Exhibit Space

CONTACT INFORMATION

Sponsor Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

PAYMENT INFORMATION

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card

SNOW & ICE MANAGEMENT CLINIC Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147 Register online, by mail, by phone, or by fax: Phone 440-717-0002 or 1-800-335-6521 • Fax 440-717-0004 • www.ohiolandscapers.org


SNOW & I CE M A NAG E M E NT

R EG IS T R ATI O N SNOW BUSINESS SUCCESS

EVENT INFORMATION AUGUST 22, 2019 Whether you’re an owner, operations manager, dispatcher, or anyone in between, this is a can’t 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM miss event for any company focused on improving how they handle the “white side” of their business. REGISTER NOW!

PRESENTERS PRESEASON PLANNING Dustin Stewart / Brightview Landscape Services (Galloway, OH) Dustin will breakdown different properties, how to measure them and how to determine the size of equipment needed for each site.

LOCATION ST. MICHAEL’S WOODSIDE 5025 EAST MILL ROAD BROADVIEW HEIGHTS, OH 44147 AGENDA 8:30AM - 9:00AM REGISTRATION / BREAKFAST

STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES IN SNOW & ICE Jacob Silvis / The Silvis Group, Inc. (Mt. Pleasant, PA)

9:00AM - 4:40PM CLINIC

Jake will discuss the importance of having documented processes and procedures in place, as well as how to train your team to ensure effective and efficient snow operations meet & exceed your clients’ expectations.

COST MEMBERS BEFORE 08/08/19 - $99 AFTER 08/08/19 - $129

UTILIZATION OF EQUIPMENT TO MANAGE SIDEWALKS James Hornung / Elbers Landscape Service, Inc. (Buffalo, NY) James will discuss the different types of equipment available to you to perform sidewalk operations, as opposed to counting on manual labor.

NON MEMBERS BEFORE 08/08/19 - $149 AFTER 08/08/19 - $179

MAKING TECHNOLOGY WORK FOR YOUR SNOW BUSINESS A panel discussion featuring experts from both LMN & Aspire.

BREAKFAST SPONSORED BY

ALSO FEATURING Outdoor Showcase: A demonstration what equipment is new when it comes to sidewalk operations. Mini Trade Show: Visit industry vendors. See what’s new. Displayed equipment, products & services. Cancellations made 8 to 14 days prior to the course start date will be subject to a 30% cancellation fee. NO refunds or credits will be issued for cancellations 7 days or less prior to the course, no shows, or cancellations on the day of the course. If, for any reason, the course is cancelled, enrollees will be notified, and fees refunded in full. Register early as class size is limited and will sell out quickly.

2019 SNOW & ICE CLINIC / REGISTRATION CLOSES 08/16/19

(Make checks payable and send to: Ohio Landscape Association, 9240 Broadview Rd, Broadview Hts., OH 44147)

Company Contact Address City State Phone (______)

Zip

Fax (______) Email

NAME OF ATTENDEE (S)

FEE

$

Each additional person from your company is only $69

$

Each additional person from your company is only $69

$

TOTAL DUE

$

 Check No. (Enclosed)

Charge to my:

Acct. No. Name on Card

Exp. Date

Security Code

Signature

Billing Address + Zipcode for Card 5.5 CEU’S

 MasterCard  Visa  AMEX  Discover

REGISTER ONLINE AT OHIOLANDSCAPERS.ORG/EDUCATION/SNOWANDICE


F I SCAL FI TN ESS

MICHAEL J. DONNELLAN King Financial, Inc.

ESTABLISHING INVESTING GOALS When investing, you should establish short, intermediate and long-term goals. Review these goals frequently to make sure your current investments are helping you reach those financial goals. Your goals could be a vacation, a new car, a new home, college education for your children, starting your own business, retirement or a number of other possibilities. Of course, everyone wants to reduce his or her taxes and secure a comfortable retirement. You can’t plan a trip without knowing your destination. The same applies with your financial goals. You won’t know how much to save unless you know specifically what you are saving for. Take the time to dream. Put your goals on paper and visit them frequently. Setting specific goals gives you the information needed to build a structured savings and investment plan, the surest way to turn your goals into reality. The first step is the biggest and most difficult to make. Once you get started by making the first investment or savings deposit, the hard part is over.

Once you have a clear picture of what your goals are, you need to assign price tags. When determining the cost of your goal, look beyond today’s costs to what it may cost in the future. If you don’t factor the impact of inflation into the price tag of your goal, you may come up short. With an inflation rate of 3%, something that costs $10,000 today may double in cost in 24 years. Fortunately, when you are saving for the future, time is on your side. The longer you give yourself to reach a goal, the more your earnings can generate earnings. Waiting five years to start saving for a long-term goal could mean you will have to double the amount you have to save each month. continued on page 17

14 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association


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F ISCAL FI TN ESS

continued from page 14 Once you’ve determined your financial goals and how your time horizon, risk tolerance, and liquidity needs affect them, it’s time to think about how your investments might help you achieve those goals. When considering any investment, you’ll need to think about what it offers in terms of three key investment goals: Growth: In investing terms, growth (also known as capital appreciation) is an increase in the value of an investment. In other words, you can sell it for more than you paid for it. If you buy a stock that costs $10 a share and eventually sell the stock for $12 a share, that extra $2 represents capital appreciation, or growth. Income: Some investments make periodic payments of interest or dividends. Those payments represent investment income, which can be spent or reinvested. For retirees, income obviously is a key investment goal, but it can be important for other reasons as well. For example, income payments can help offset the impact of the ups and downs of a growth-oriented investment.

is to tailor each investment to what you want it to do for you. You may choose to have a single investment goal for a given financial goal, as in the example of making stability a priority for short-term money. Or you may prefer to combine several investments to achieve a balance among stability, income, and growth so that you maximize your overall returns at a level of risk that you’re comfortable with and that suits your financial goal or goals. Over time, you may need to update your investment plan. No matter what your investment goal, get in the habit of checking up on your portfolio at least once a year, and more frequently if the market is particularly volatile or when there have been significant changes in your life. You may need to rebalance your portfolio to bring it back in line with your investment goals and risk tolerance. Talk to your financial advisor for ideas and recommendations specific to your goals and needs. Scenarios illustrated are hypothetical in nature, results may vary. Past performance is not indicative of future results.

Stability: This is sometimes known as capital preservation or protection of principal. An investment that focuses on stability concentrates less on increasing the value of that investment and more on trying to ensure that it doesn’t lose value. If you plan to spend a certain amount of money soon and want to make sure the money is there when you need it, stability might be your primary investment goal.

Michael J. Donnellan is President of King Financial, Inc. specializing in stock selection and retirement planning. Feel free to contact him with any questions or comments at the M3 Wealth Management office at 17601 W. 130th Street – Suite 1 in North Royalton, Ohio. Phone number (440) 652-6370 Email: donnellan@m3wealthmanagement.com.

With each individual investment, there is a relationship between growth, income, and stability. The more an investment offers in one of those areas, the more you usually have to trade off in terms of the other two. The key to setting investment goals

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F OR SAFETY SAK E

SAFETY AUDITS REQUIRED OR REDUNDANT? Safety Audits are a step forward as organizations become more proactive with their health and safety programs instead of only being reactive when something unexpected happens. While there is no specific standard or requirement by OSHA for safety audits, OSHA’s position is that self-audits are an important part of an effective [safety] program. OSHA does require that employers take responsibility for accident prevention and any safety program should include processes (like safety audits, job site inspections, equipment inspections, etc.), that demonstrate there are preventative measures in place.

WHAT IS A SAFETY AUDIT? A safety audit is an in-depth, impartial review of a company or organization’s health and safety program, procedures and processes. Safety audits report on a safety program’s effectiveness, completeness and reliability.

WHAT SHOULD BE REVIEWED? Although every safety audit should be specifically tailored to the organization, program and time-frame provided, here are the top issues that are recommended for review during any safety audit: • Is information about the safety program’s effectiveness and reliability tracked?

• Does the health and safety program cover all regulatory and industry requirements? • Are there hazard identification, assessment, prevention and control procedures? • Have communication and emergency procedures been established? • Is there a safety training and education program and is employee training comprehensive and effective? • Is the safety program aligned with and in support of the company’s goals? • How is employee participation addressed in the program? • What documentation is there to support proof of continued on page 21 compliance? The Growing Concern | August 2019 | 19


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FOR SAFETY SAKE continued from page 19

WHY ARE SAFETY AUDITS IMPORTANT? According to OSHA, “Employers derive many benefits from effective safety and health programs that provide for audits, including reduced absenteeism, lower workers’ compensation premiums and payments for medical treatment and disability, and favorable treatment from OSHA. Employers with effective programs have fewer and less serious hazards and thereby face reduced exposure to OSHA citations and penalties as a result.”

WHO CONDUCTS A SAFETY AUDIT? Safety audits should be conducted by trained personnel that can be neutral and objective when conducting and reporting on the results of the audit. A great approach is to assign 3 – 5 people representing a variety of departments to complete the audit, as long as those individuals are not assigned to audit their own department. Another option is to hire qualified consultants to complete the audit.

HOW IS A SAFETY AUDIT CONDUCTED? Here are the basic guidelines to get started with an audit of the safety program. 1. Determine the scope and timeframe of the audit. 2. Prior to the audit, inform all personnel who might be affected by the audit to ensure they will be available. 3. Review past audits and notes regarding past problem areas and corrective/preventative actions that have been taken. 4. Review all company, local, state and federal requirements. 5. Prepare an outline for the audit including items to review, inspections to be made and questions to be answered. 6. Conduct documentations reviews, walk-throughs, inspections, and interviews as appropriate. 7. Compile all pertinent audit data to prepare a concise report of the audit outcome, including positive findings, areas of deficiency and recommendations for improvements. To get started, OSHA has prepared a Safety and Health Audit Tool that can assist any organization with preparing for and completing a safety audit.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD SHOULD YOU AUDIT? At least one comprehensive safety audit should be scheduled every year. A different, but effective, approach is to schedule targeted safety audits throughout the year. For example, every department may have their own safety audit completed on a

rotating schedule throughout the year, and then a comprehensive company-wide safety audit on high-level procedures can be conducted at the end of the year. Any safety audit schedule should be on a regular schedule, documented as such and effectively communicated to all employees.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER A SAFETY AUDIT? Acknowledge departments, managers and supervisors who participated in the safety audit and highlight positive findings. Recommendations should be developed for each deficient area found during the audit. Corrective action should be taken to immediately correct hazards and preventative action should be implemented to ensure procedures are in place to prevent future issues. All recommendations and actions taken should be documented and saved for future reference. Follow-up reviews should be scheduled to ensure all corrective and preventative actions were implemented and are effective. Holding regular safety meetings, toolbox talks or safety moments with your crews, teams and staff is a great way to ensure that your company is off to a great start meeting and exceeding all of OSHA’s compliance standards. This story originally appeared at https://blog.weeklysafety.com/blog/safetyaudits. WeeklySafety.com is a website dedicated to providing safety topics in several formats so you have just what you need when you need it. The Growing Concern | August 2019 | 21


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

JIM FUNAI, LIC Cuyahoga Community College Davidia involucrata ‘Dove Tree’

SHELLEY FUNAI, LIC Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens

DAVIDIA INVOLUCRATA DOVE-TREE

If you’ve ever seen Davidia involucrata in-flower, there’s no doubt you’ve tried to find a specimen for your own landscape and failed, as have we. The struggle in finding it is for good reason, as it isn’t the hardiest of plants for us here in the ‘zone formally known as 5.’ Yes, in case you weren’t aware, the USDA moved nearly all of Ohio to Zone 6 (-10°F low) beginning with the year 2012, based on historical data. The problem is, they must have disregarded all of the data from 2009, 1996, 1994, and 1982 thru 1985; all of which had numerous days well below -10°. Since the adjustment, we’ve had Zone 5 winters in both 2014 and 2015. It seems the USDA only likes to remember the good times. For these two Northeast Ohio gardeners, we’re sticking with Zone 5 as our guide in hopes we avoid springtime heartbreak over a dead specimens. For the sake of this discussion, we’ll consider Davidia involucrata marginally hardy, meaning if we have a Zone 6 winter it should be just fine, but with global climate change, the chance of a “polar vortex” and too many unknowns in the climate future, we’d be safe and plan for a very protected site for it. Even better, there is a naturally occurring variety of this plant known as vilmoriniana, which has demonstrated cold hardiness down to -15°F.

22 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

That said, if you are lucky to find Davidia involucrata var. vilmoriniana, attention should still be paid to siting it correctly in the landscape. Well-drained soil is a must as this tree is native to hillsides in east/central China and loves a well-drained soil that remains consistently moist. We’d suggest full sun for this plant, though in its native habitat it can be found in partial sun. And if we didn’t mention it, remember the winter protection; full on blasting wind is going to end this tree’s life before it begins. Patience is also


key, as it usually takes a year or two after transplant to get up to speed on flower production. When flowers emerge in spring, the effort will pay off. The flower is really a cluster of purple-tipped stamens, rather non-descript, but flanked by two large white bracts (think flowering Dogwood). The two bracts are unequal in size, with the larger reaching about 7 inches long by 4 inches wide and the shorter closer to 4 inches long by 2 inches wide. The effect of these flowers – on pendulous peduncles (stem) – is that of a white dove flying through the air, or as some call this tree – a handkerchief (that someone has pinched in the middle and is holding in the air?). Another common name, which also comes from observing the flower, is The Ghost Tree. Most report that the tree flowers heavy in alternate years and lighter in off years, but even a lighter bloom is show stopping. Expect up to 2 weeks of the show before flowers fade and give way to a non-ornamental, nut-like thing (drupe) that becomes an orangey-brown specked with red.

The hunt for this tree is not confined to modern times. From the day it was discovered by western plant explorers, this tree has been a difficult one to find. The namesake of this tree is a priest named Armand David, who in 1869 found the tree in the mountains of the Sichuan Province of China. He sent specimens home to Paris, where Henri Baillon identified it as a new species and named it after Father David. Therefore, if you look up the plant in the Dirr book, you’ll see “Baill.” Immediately after the name, Dr. Dirr always gives credit to the person who named the plant. Dove-tree was not seen again until another plant explorer named Augustine Henry found one in the Yangtze Valley. He sent specimens to Kew Botanical Garden to confirm the plant still existed. E.H. Wilson, who was sent by famous plant explorer Sir Harry Veitch to find additional specimens, sent seeds back to enter the plant into European trade. Keep in mind; this was at a time where China had just opened its borders to plant explorers, who had a serious fever for all continued on page 24 plants Chinese. The Growing Concern | August 2019 | 23


PL ANT OF TH E M ON TH

C. pisifera forma plumosa ‘Plume Sawara Falsecypress’

continued from page 23 European plant explorers were all over the country trying to find new plants to introduce. This is why all the names above show up in a lot of plant names. David, Wilson, Veitch, and Henry are all honored in hundreds of different plant names from introductions they made to our industry. The reason we are honoring this plant this month roots itself in a recent trip we took to Europe, where we happened to view the largest specimen of this tree either of us had ever seen. In Innsbruck, Austria, at the Royal Hofgarten (Palace Garden which was started in 1410) The Kings of the Tyrol empire collected plants from around the world in their garden. While no one is sure when this specific tree was planted, it has reached a height of about 40 feet, which is as tall as most will get. It was late June, so we had missed the spring flower display, but to see one of this size was very exciting.

So, why are we obsessing over a rare plant? Well, other than being plant nerds, there is important ecological reasoning we are urging you to use in demanding different plants. The more diversity in our landscapes, the more resilient they will be to climate change and global trade. With a constant influx of diseases and pests, along with unstable climate conditions, we need more than a bunch of arborvitae and pears to fight back. Nurseries aren’t growing this tree because contractors aren’t asking for it. So, we ask you – the contractors – to engage your nurseries more and ask for more rare plants. Give them a reason to grow it. And nurseries, we ask you to grow different plants and engage your contractors to expand their horizons. Improving our environment is a team effort, and if change doesn’t come from us, it won’t come at all! Jim Funai is full-time faculty at Cuyahoga Community College, a NALP accredited associate of applied science in hoticulture degree program. He is

Another great specimen, which we have been fortunate to see in bloom, can be found at Longwood Gardens, to the southwest of the main fountains, just south of the Idea Garden. That specimen is variety vilmoriniana which is the hardier variety.

24 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

pursuing a PhD in Landscape Engineering and Forestry and is a Licensed Arborist. Shelley Funai is Grounds Manager at Stan Hywett Hall and Gardens in Akron, Ohio, which offers a historic estate designed by Warren H. Manning and a beautiful manor house museum. She is Landscape Industry Certified in Ornamental Plant Care.


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26 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

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F EATURE ARTI CLE

ARE THESE MISTAKES AFFECTING YOUR BID-WIN RATIO?

By Lonnie Fritz, Caterpillar Inc.

“You can’t win ’em all.” That phrase applies to many things in life and business – and most certainly to construction bids. But if you’re not winning enough, it may be time to take another look at your process. Are you making mistakes that are possibly causing your bids to be rejected and your company to miss out on quality, highly profitable jobs? Here are five common (and easy-to-avoid) errors we see contractor firms make: 1. Responding to every RFP. Wayne Gretzky once said, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” That’s a great philosophy for hockey – not so much for contractor bidding. A scattershot approach wastes time and energy, and you risk winning work you can’t do well or profitably. Instead of bidding on every job that comes along, focus your efforts just on those that are a good fit for your business.

When deciding to bid, consider other questions and factors such as the following: • Is there sufficient time to prepare the bid for this project? • If awarded, would near future projects be compromised due to a lack of labor, materials, or equipment? • Is this project consistent with the company’s current business plan? • Are there enough qualified personnel to prepare the bid? • Is the likelihood of winning the bid worth the investment? • How does the competition compare? • What relationship is present with the project owner/client? • What is the public view of the project? continued on page 29 The Growing Concern | August 2019 | 27


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F EATURE ARTI CLE

continued from page 27 2. Overlooking the fine print. The devil is in the details. Don’t let something simple like forgetting to submit all the required documents, missing a mandatory pre-bid meeting or failing to sign on the dotted line lead to your bid landing in the reject pile. Always have someone double-check the quantities provided, your work, your math and your spelling. And definitely don’t miss the bid deadline! 3. Overestimating your capabilities. Winning the work, then figuring out how to complete it, is risky. Did you factor in the costs of buying, renting or repairing equipment needed for the job into your bid? Can you get new machines on site in time? Before submitting a bid, honestly evaluate your equipment needs. If necessary, get on your equipment dealer’s schedule for delivery or maintenance so you can avoid costly delays. • What equipment/labor is available during the proposed construction time frame? • Are adequate subcontractors and suppliers available? • Are you utilizing accurate historical field data to apply to the current estimate?

4. Staying silent. Are you clear on everything that’s required for the job? Do you have all the information you need to prepare an accurate bid? Don’t assume that you know the answers or that you can get clarification once you’ve won the work. Ask questions, attend pre-bid meetings, participate in site visits and reach out to your contact directly to confirm any project details that are in question. • Do you have the most current bid specifications, plans and addenda? 5. Rushing a bid. It’s easy to make mistakes when you throw together a last-minute bid. You may miss certain requirements, set your price too low, overlook risks or make errors that cause your bid to be rejected outright. Always take the time to prepare a bid you feel confident in – otherwise, you might be better off passing on the opportunity, dedicating yourself to the next one. Will avoiding these five mistakes guarantee a 100% success rate for your bids? Of course not – but it will put you in the best position to win every time. This story was written by Lonnie Fritz, Market Professional, Construction Industries, Caterpillar Inc. and origianlly ran on the ForConstructionPros website at https://www.forconstructionpros.com.

The Growing Concern | August 2019 | 29


D I RECTI ON S

GET YOUR CAMERAS OUT! I am not quite sure where summer went, but we are rounding third and heading home towards fall and the back-to-school season. If you have not been taking photos of your work, there is no time like the present to start. Photos of your work are important for you to build your portfolio, but also important so you can enter our Landscape Ohio! Awards Program. If you haven’t already heard, our awards program is the bomb. I might be a little biased, but many people have told me how much they love this program and the Gala that highlights the award recipients. We have 18 categories, so whether your projects are large or small, design/build or landscape management – there is a category that will be the right fit for what you do best. Our entry deadline is not until December 13, so you have plenty of time to put your entries together once things slow down a little bit. Complete details can be found on the awards page of our website – ohiolandscapers.org. Be sure to read all the rules and regulations. If something is unclear to you, just give us a call and we will be more than happy to explain things to you. There are no dumb questions. If you haven’t entered before, it may seem overwhelming, but it isn’t if you let us help you through the process. Here are some tips for selecting and entering your project: Enter projects that are more than just a good job. Enter your exceptional work. Enter projects that really set you aside as a professional. While it is not a photo contest, good photos are a must, so that the judges can see the work that you do and compare it to the other projects entered in any given category. The best photos are taken on a day that is slightly overcast. When the sun is too bright, some areas in your photos will be “burnt out” while others will be cast in dark shadows. Neither one of these scenarios will allow for the judges to see the detail of your work. Another thing to consider when taking photos is setting the stage. I always suggest thinking about landscape photos you see in magazines. Clean up the area, remove all debris,

30 | Official Publication of The Ohio Landscape Association

SANDY MUNLEY Executive Director

put away hoses, open umbrellas, uncover the barbecue grill, move any toys, garbage cans, and miscellaneous items that don’t belong in the photo. Put out pillows, set the table and add accessories that make the landscape look inviting where appropriate. You are not being judged on the staging, but let’s face it, the judges are human and first impressions count! Plus, this type of staging makes a much better photo to use on a winner’s plaque. Consider the category you enter. Any of the “Residential Landscape Installation” categories are judged on the entire landscape. They place an emphasis on the plant material you use, as well as the design, creativity, workmanship, and other components in the landscape. If your project has only a small amount of plant material and more hardscapes, you should enter it in a Garden Structures and Pavements category. Projects near, or around a swimming pool need to be entered in the “Residential Landscape Installation VI,” or a specialty category such as “Water Features” (if a water feature is also included), “Landscape Lighting,” or one of the “Garden Structure and Pavements” categories. If you are entering a landscape maintenance project, make sure the site is free of leaves and other debris. Be sure that mow lines are straight, edging is perfect, etc. Some Landscape Maintenance projects may be mostly seasonal color. If that is the case, I would suggest entering in the “Best Use of Color.” When you create the descriptions of each slide, please paint a picture of the project with the words you choose. You cannot


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talk the judges into an award, but a description explaining what special features are in a photo, or what problem you have solved for a client, is far more helpful and interesting than telling them, “looking east across the patio.”

Lastly, enter more than one project. You will dramatically increase your odds of winning. Or consider entering a project that you think is really awesome in more than one category. For example, you might enter a project that is a beautiful landscape with lush plant material and a patio in “Residential Landscape Installation, Category III”, which is for projects valued at $50,000 to $100,000, then you can enter the patio portion of that project in one of the “Garden Structures and Pavements” categories based on the retail value of just the patio portion of the project. Remember that you cannot win if you do not enter, and there is no shame in entering and not winning. Our judges are very selective. You can also purchase tickets to attend the Gala, held each March, even if you do not enter. It is a great evening to network and be inspired watching the slide show of landscape projects. Now, get out there and take photographs!

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The Growing Concern August 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

The Growing Concern August 2019  

The Official Monthly Publication of the Ohio Landscape Association

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