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YOUNGSTOWN: BUILDING THE PERFECT MACHINE A new partnership between Youngstown State University and the Youngstown Business Incubator will help Ohio manufacturers save time and money

INSIDE:

> A look at the development of Miami’s AIMS Institute > Stark State and ShaleNET prepare students for oil & gas industry > Terra State Community College couple graduates together

Summer 2014 Volume 2 Issue 3


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ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

This is a quarterly e-newsletter designed to connect Ohio higher education to the business community. In this publication, you will learn about the efforts of the Ohio Board of Regents to move students from the classroom to the workforce; and about research and idea development happening within the University System of Ohio that is benefiting Ohio businesses.

ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business | Volume 2 Issue 3


ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

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’ve been asked whether things in the higher education world tend to slow down during the summer. While you’d think that would be the case, it often feels as though we are busier than ever. Helping Ohio’s students – and in turn, its businesses – succeed is a year-round job, and as you’ll see in this issue of ConnectED, there are plenty of things happening on our campuses to make that success a reality.

RED BORDERS

In this issue, we’ll learn about a partnership between Youngstown State University and the Youngstown Business Incubator, and how Miami University is bringing a touch of Silicon Valley to Cincinnati. We’ll also meet a married couple who, in addition to sharing a life together, shared the stage at Terra State Community College’s most recent commencement ceremony. Enjoy this issue of ConnectED, and enjoy the summer. If there is a story you’d like to see in a future issue, let us know. We may be busy, but we’re never too busy to stay ConnectED with our readers.

John Carey

Chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents

Youngstown State University Hybrid Manufacturing Partnership between YSU and the Youngstown Business Incubator will help Ohio manufacturers save time and money

Two Degrees of Marriage Husband & wife share the stage at Terra State commencement

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Miami University AIMS Higher A look at the development of the AIMS Institute

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Stark State and ShaleNET Prepare Students for Career in Oil & Gas Industry Linking talent & opportunity

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Ohio Employer Teams Up With ABLE to Help Workers Advance Careers Candle-lite invests in its people

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Featured Story - Summer 2014

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ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business | Volume 2 Issue 2


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YOUNGSTOWN:

BUILDING THE PERFECT MACHINE T

he process of efficiently designing, manufacturing, and testing individual machinery components can be time-consuming and expensive, especially as the complexity and the need for multiple iterations increase. A longstanding and successful partnership between Youngstown State University (YSU) and the Youngstown Business Incubator (YBI) has obtained funding through the Ohio Development When completed, this will be the(ODSA) combustion laboratory Evendale Services Agency’s EdisonatAdvanced Manufacturing Program to develop an innovative where the UC researchers will work on emissions technology. approach called precision hybrid manufacturing to rapidly produce specialized machinery components for manufacturing companies. A rendering courtesy of GE Aviation.

Manufacturing 101

One of the traditional methods of fabricating machinery components is called subtractive manufacturing – cutting, grinding, and drilling metal or other raw materials into the required shape. In contrast, additive manufacturing (sometimes called 3D Printing or Rapid Prototyping) is a process of selectively adding materials layer-by-layer to build a component. The YSU-YBI precision hybrid manufacturing process combines both additive and subtractive methods. First, an additive process turns metal into what is referred to as a “near net shape,” a close approximation of the final part, which is then finished using traditional machining or other subtractive methods to reach the exact specification. Hybrid manufacturing is especially useful when a company requires a small number of highly customized parts – particularly when multiple designs need to be quickly created and evaluated for performance. “Any industry that uses low-volume metal parts that are unique or require some type of customization should at least evaluate this technology,” said YBI Chief Operating Officer Barb Ewing. “In general, aerospace, automotive, and tool and die manufacturers can greatly benefit from this partnership.” This new project is housed at the YSU Center for Innovation in Advanced Manufacturing, which evaluates advanced manufacturing techniques for the benefit of companies in the Mahoning Valley and across Ohio. “Adoption of this hybrid approach will reduce the lead time and significant investment in tooling that are required, particularly for low-volume production,” said


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Guha Manogharan, assistant professor in the department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, who is YSU’s technical lead on this project. YSU students stand to gain, as well, as several aspects of the project, such as design for additive manufacturing, sustainability, and the economics of hybrid processes, will be taught through YSU workshops and manufacturing courses. “This project allows us to incorporate advanced design and manufacturing practices into our curriculum, which immediately prepares our students with valuable skills for their careers,” said Manogharan, who plans to include elements of this project in the manufacturing practices courses he teaches.

A History of Collaboration

Featured Story - Summer 2014

The new YBI/YSU partnership is just the latest in a string of collaborative projects. Over the last 10 years, YSU faculty and students have helped numerous YBI companies incubate business ideas. According to Ewing, YSU provides “technical support and an understanding of a wide array of technologies,” while YBI brings “an understanding of the nuances of taking new products to market.”

THE NEW PRECISION HYBRID MANUFACTURING PROJECT ADDS YET ANOTHER REASON FOR MANUFACTURING COMPANIES TO LOOK TO YOUNGSTOWN.

“The inclusion of students provides a trained workforce for the future growth of industrial participants,” said Martin Abraham, dean of YSU’s College of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Previous YBI/YSU collaborations have helped turn Youngstown into a hotspot where manufacturers can learn how to integrate new technologies into their operations. The YSU/YBI partnership has helped Youngstown earn the designation from the State of Ohio as a Hub of Innovation and Opportunity for Advanced Materials and Software. More importantly, the partnership helped

ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business | Volume 2 Issue 3


ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

to bring the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute (also known as America Makes) to Youngstown. “Without YSU’s support,” Ewing said, “YBI simply wouldn’t have been in a position to have provided them with a facility.” The new precision hybrid manufacturing project adds yet another reason for manufacturing companies to look to Youngstown.

YSU STUDENTS STAND TO GAIN, AS WELL, AS SEVERAL ASPECTS OF THE PROJECT WILL BE TAUGHT THROUGH YSU WORKSHOPS AND MANUFACTURING COURSES.

This initiative builds upon a successful proposal to the National Additive Manufacturing Innovation Institute to help metal casting companies understand how to optimize the use of additive manufacturing technology in the foundry industry. “Any company that can take advantage of rapid manufacturing for components will be able to do so without having to invest in equipment or machinery,” Ewing said. “There are a number of different applications, so companies will be able to take time to learn for themselves how the technology can be adapted to meet their specific needs with very little cost or risk to their existing operations.”

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ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

TWO DEGREES OF MARRIAGE Husband & wife share the stage at Terra State commencement

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t’s a common sight at college commencement ceremonies everywhere – joyful and often tearyeyed parents beam with pride from the audience while their son or daughter crosses the stage to receive a hard-earned degree. At the spring commencement ceremony at Terra State Community College, however, the tables were turned. It was Ron and Betty Berger’s two sons who cheered from the crowd as Mom and Dad – yes, both of them – received degrees in health information technology and plastics technology, respectively. “We occasionally have family members graduate together, but not often do we have a husband and wife,” said Dr. Jerome Webster, president of Terra State. “It did feel kind of strange having our kids there in the audience while we were the ones graduating,” said 52-year-old Betty. The uncommon feat wasn’t planned that way originally, said Ron. Betty enrolled first, and earned her degree – along with

“Our kids are grown now, and to go back and get a degree” ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business | Volume 2 Issue 3


ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

certificates in medical coding and medical scribe – in three years. Ron, 57, graduated summa cum laude after three semesters. Last fall, they realized they were on schedule to graduate at the same time. For Betty, it was her first time returning to the classroom since her high school graduation. “Our kids are grown now, and it just seemed like a good time to go back and get a degree,” she said. “I’ve always been intrigued with the medical field, but I knew that nursing wasn’t something that I would get into. Health information technology was a perfect match for me. Now I’m sending out resumes and studying to take my (Registered Health Information Technician) exam.” Ron, who has spent several years working as a lab technician in the plastics industry, decided to return to school to update his skills and improve his hiring potential in a competitive job market. He attended the University of Toledo in the 1970s and studied chemistry, logging about 70 percent of the credits needed to graduate. He said

it just seemed like a good time

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ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

“We both would say that Terra State does a very good job of making you not feel intimidated as an older student.” finishing that degree is still on his to-do list. “I always thought not having a degree was holding me back a little bit, and long-term I’d still like to get my chemistry degree,” Ron said. “But this degree enhances what I’ve already been doing. As a lab technician, you’re doing various tests but you may not always understand why. This degree helped me learn more about the ‘why’ of the things I do in the lab.” Both Betty and Ron said they were lucky to be able to attend classes full time, although they were a little intimidated to return to school, thinking they would stand out in a sea of younger students. But they quickly found out that they weren’t the only non-traditional students on campus. “We both would say that Terra State does a very good job of making you not feel intimidated as an older student,” Ron said. “We always felt very comfortable there, and it actually makes you feel younger to be back in college. Your mind is more active and you’re devoting your time to learning.” Today, the Bergers are devoting their time to becoming productive members of the workforce. “We’re looking for something within an hour radius. I’d like to stay as a lab technician somewhere, and I also learned the color matching aspect of the industry, so that will open the door for a color lab tech job somewhere,” Ron said. Betty said she would like to work in a doctor’s office or a hospital, and added that Terra has helped them with their re-entry into the job market. “Terra has a job board that we have used a couple times, and they work with you on developing your resume and sharpening your interview skills,” she said. Armed with a post-secondary education in two in-demand fields, the Bergers look forward to whatever lies ahead. “We are confident that Ron and Betty have accumulated the knowledge and skill to be competitive in today’s job market, and we’re very excited about their future,” President Webster said. “They are one motivated couple.” The Bergers encourage other non-traditional students to share in their motivation and return to the classroom. “It’s definitely worth it, and you’re never too old,” Ron said. “I would encourage anyone to go back to pursue a degree. If I can do it, anyone can do it,” Betty said.

ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business | Volume 2 Issue 3


ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

Miami University AIMS Higher M

iami University views education and cultural immersion as equally important, and this desire for well-balanced future innovators led Miami officials to envision a program where students had the opportunity to learn in a multidisciplinary environment and understand a broad array of topics on a basic level. The ongoing desire for an environment where students can pursue a topic of interest for deeper learning eventually led to the development of the Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies (AIMS Institute). The AIMS Institute was born of innovative thinking and a focus on digital media opportunities, with one overarching ambition of the AIMS creators being to develop an experiential learning environment, and to create “awesome citizens,” according to Artie Kuhn, the institute’s assistant director. Miami students can currently apply to the AIMS San Francisco Digital Innovation Center. According to the Center’s program director Dr. Glenn Platt, San Francisco was chosen so the Center would be located in the mecca for those interested in startups, digital innovation, and new economy thinking and doing. The Center, originally modeled after the Miami University-Luxembourg campus, focuses not only on digital innovation, but also on entrepreneurship. Students who participate in the AIMS programs have the opportunity to intern with key businesses located near the Center, as well as the ability to participate in business pitches to alumni and staff. Many students choose to find an internship where they can learn more about an area in which they hope to pursue a career. For those that participate in the business pitches, students have the opportunity to work in groups to design a start-up business and pitch the idea to alumni. The winning group is then placed in a real-world incubator to face all the challenges a regular start-up would encounter, while the students who don’t win also have the opportunity to move on to internships in Silicon Valley.

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ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business The experience allows students to learn the traits of both success and failure, while ultimately teaching them what they are capable of achieving. After graduation, many find jobs and stay in the San Francisco area, which creates a dilemma for the program leaders – with the immersive digital environment located on the west coast, many students choose to not return to Ohio. Miami’s solution is to duplicate the San Francisco environment in Cincinnati. The AIMS faculty and staff, along with the Miami Director of Career Services, Michael Goldman, have secured funding and businesses willing to invest. Cincinnati is comprised of a diverse and thriving business ecosystem with nationally ranked incubators and accelerators, and faculty and staff know it is imperative to provide an immersive experience there. A small cohort of students will begin studying at the center in Cincinnati in the fall, with the first full cohort of students scheduled to begin in 2015. This immersion experience gives students hands-on opportunities in a variety of digital careers to find their best fit. There are several innovative technologies being utilized in the AIMS program, all of which focus on new technology development or old technology improvement (pictures of a few of the innovations accompany this article). Miami is exploring 3D scanner technology with an innovative display system from zSpace, Inc., which allows virtual interaction with 3D objects. One eventual goal is virtual dissections or disassembly in some of the pre-med, biology, anatomy, physiology, psychology, and engineering courses.

Photo: AIMS Center Students are able to grab and virtually disassemble 3D objects with a stylus.

Utilizing CAVE (Cave Automatic Virtual Environments), students are working with technology that has been around since the early 1990s but has traditionally been found in research universities, large corporations, or military training facilities due to cost. CAVE uses motion-tracking cameras on a user’s head and hands to dynamically update the 3D display on each wall, and perfectly matches the user’s height and field of view to increase realism. Along these lines, Nvis Inc. is partnering with Miami to provide high-end, wide field-of-view systems that could allow exploration of a full-scale reconstruction of businesses or buildings.

Grocery stores are one of many virtual environments used for research studies in Miami’s Huge Immersive Virtual Environment facility (HIVE). A combination of HIVE and CAVE technologies has also led students to partner with local businesses to develop a virtual environment outdoors using headsets and body sensors. The new Center, partially funded through a partnership with the Ohio Means Internships and Co-ops grants program*, is a blend of innovation and experiential learning, and the ability to utilize a grant focused on expanding internship and co-op opportunities for students is viewed as an amazing start for Miami’s investments in experiential learning and the new Center. The collaboration between the Center and Miami Career Services has provided unique funding avenues while furthering the goal of

ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business | Volume 2 Issue 3


ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce President/CEO, Brian Carley gets an up-close view of a GE Engine.

ensuring students learn for the future and are equipped to pursue careers after graduation. So what does the immediate future hold for Miami students who will experience this new Center in the heart of Cincinnati? It holds hands-on learning and collaboration with local businesses, the development of new ideas, and the creation of innovative solutions. In other words, for students at the AIMS Institute, the sky’s the limit.

MEANS

internships &co-ops *The Ohio Means Internships & Co-ops (OMIC) grants program is helping more college students connect with companies and communities in Ohio through internship and co-op opportunities, and also assisting campuses in expanding current programs. In many cases, OMIC grant money provides scholarships to students who successfully complete internships or co-ops, wage assistance to businesses offering additional internships and co-ops, and money to campuses to enhance and expand workforce development programs. The goal is for campus expertise to increase, students to gain workforce readiness, and connections with businesses to flourish. OMIC grants aim to attract and retain both talent and businesses in Ohio.

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ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

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Stark State and ShaleNET Prepare Students for Career in Oil & Gas Industry T

he oil and natural gas boom in the United States is creating many jobs nationwide. Key words such as “shale oil” or “shale gas” are often brought up whenever the oil and gas industry is mentioned. But what does it all mean – and how can students prepare for a career working in the growing field? Stark State College offers a stackable credential model covering non-credit, one-year certificates and Associate of Applied Science degrees with articulation into a Bachelor of Science degree in technology management through Pennsylvania College of Technology. This allows students flexibility to enter and exist as needed while addressing industry needs. In the 2014 spring semester, there were 68 declared oil and gas majors. The college is currently registering for fall; thus far, there are 21 additional majors. In 2013 the college offered a dual enrollment Introduction to the Petroleum Industry class at one high school and one career center. This fall, the college will have the Introduction to the Petroleum Industry course offered as dual enrollment at two high schools and two career centers with anticipated enrollment of 70 students. This spring the college had its first petroleum AAS degree graduate and two students received their one-year certificate.

ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business | Volume 2 Issue 3


ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

“The ShaleNET grant has been instrumental in allowing Stark State College to develop its oil and natural gas programs.” -Dan Schweitzer,

ShaleNET Hub Coordinator Of the 45 non-credit students, 28 have found employment, with four continuing on to credit programs. Another way that Stark State has positioned itself at the forefront of the area’s top schools for oil and gas training is by partnering with ShaleNET. Originally launched in 2010 with a Community Based Job Training grant awarded to Westmoreland County Community College by the U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration, ShaleNET created an effective and efficient entry-level training program featuring five high demand upstream occupations, including roustabout, welder’s helper, CDL, floor hand and production technician. ShaleNET was developed with the long term goal of expanding the network beyond the Marcellus Shale play to unconventional shale plays throughout the US and globally. The demands of the workforce include linking the talents of the underserved, displaced, veterans, and TAA individuals into jobs. The collaboration between the public workforce system, and the training providers, like Stark State, seek to close that gap. “The ShaleNET grant has been instrumental in allowing Stark State College to develop its oil and natural gas programs with delivery modality allowing the student flexibility to move throughout the ShaleNET college hubs or move throughout the industry and still be able to continue their education,” said Dan Schweitzer, ShaleNET Hub Coordinator at Stark State. Eastern Gateway Community College and Kent State University at Tuscarawas are the only other Ohio schools offering noncredit ShaleNET courses, but other Ohio institutions are developing classes with direct and indirect impact on the industry. For more information, visit http://www.starkstate.edu/ oilandgas.

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OHIO EMPLOYER TEAMS UP WITH ABLE TO HELP WORKERS ADVANCE CAREERS When Brenda Landrum dropped out of high school more than 30 years ago, she didn’t think she needed that diploma. What she needed instead was to help her family financially, and that meant getting a job. Over the years, she thought about pursuing a GED, but her odd work schedule left little time for preparatory classes. Luckily for Brenda, her employer – Candle-lite – is known for investing in its people. When a group of Candle-lite employees expressed an interest in GED completion, the management team contracted with Southern State Community College’s ABLE program to offer classes at its site that coordinated with the employees’ shifts. At one time, Candle-lite hired people without high school diplomas, but those employees were not eligible for promotions or pay increases. For Brenda, that meant that although management regarded her as supervisor material, her advancement in the company was limited. Today, Brenda has successfully completed the GED preparatory classes, earned her diploma, and accepted a supervisory role with the company. “I’m so glad I did it,” she said. “The instructors didn’t make you feel dumb. They were so patient and helpful. There are other people here who don’t have their GED and I tell them to just do it. I’m proud to work for a company that cares about their employees.”

ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business | Volume 2 Issue 3


ConnectED: Connecting Higher Education to Business

A special thank you to all of those who contributed stories and articles: Youngstown State University Hybrid Manufacturing Barb Ewing Guha Manogharan Martin Abraham Youngstown Business Incubator

Youngstown State University

Youngstown State University

Ed Herderick rp+m

Two Degrees of Marriage Ron & Betty Berger

Terra State Community College Alumni

Jill Fick

Terra State Community College

Miami University AIMS Higher Dr. Glenn Platt Artie Kuhn

Michael Goldman

Miami University AIMS Institute

Miami University

Miami University AIMS Institute

Stark State and ShaleNET Prepare Students for Career in Oil & Gas Industry S. Kathleen Steere Irene Motts Dan Schweitzer Stark State College

Stark State College

ShaleNET

Ohio Employer Teams Up With ABLE to Help Workers Advance Careers Marquita Mitchell Karyn Evans ABLE Program Manager

Southern State Community College ABLE Administrator

Thank you for reading ConnectED. We appreciate any suggestions or ideas to improve this newsletter. We welcome story ideas, links to articles of interest, and news releases. Please send story ideas to Jeff Robinson at jrobinson@regents.state.oh.us.

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ConnectED - Summer 2014  

This is a quarterly e-newsletter designed to connect Ohio higher education to the business community. In this publication, you will learn ab...

ConnectED - Summer 2014  

This is a quarterly e-newsletter designed to connect Ohio higher education to the business community. In this publication, you will learn ab...

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