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Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative Official publication | www.midohioenergy.com

Snowy days, sweet treats ALSO INSIDE Youth Tour changes lives Festive holiday dinner party Amish Country cookie tour

DECEMBER JANUARY 2018


Have a safe and energy-efficient Christmas

• Try LED lights—they stay cool, reducing the risk of fire, and use up to 80% less energy than traditional bulbs. • Use timers inside and out to give your decorations—and your electric bill—a break.

ohioec.org/purpose

• Avoid running cords under rugs or in places where your animal friends might be tempted to chew.


OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

INSIDE 4

GROWTH OPPORTUNITY Participants in the annual electric cooperative Youth Tour of Washington, D.C., say it was a life-changing experience.

26 SWEET AND FESTIVE The Christmas Cookie Tour of Inns is a unique tradition in Ohio’s Amish Country.

40 BEATING THE BLAHS We offer some strategies to help combat the doldrums that inevitably bring folks down during the long winter months.

Cover image on most issues: Spend time with your loved ones enjoying the sweet things winter brings. The Christmas Cookie Tour of Inns and Coons Homemade Candies are two such offerings found in the pages within.

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 1


UP FRONT

Winter is coming T

he reliable delivery of electricity to our homes and businesses is always important. We understand that even the slightest interruption of power supply is inconvenient — possibly worse. Over the years, Ohio’s electric cooperatives have built a strong foundation of reliable delivery of service. We pride ourselves on being responsive when a problem arises, despite the fact that because our power system is such a complex network, the cause of power outages isn’t always obvious. Your co-op, together with the other electric cooperatives across Ohio, formed Buckeye Power to generate your electricity and to deliver it across the high-voltage regional grid. The grid transmits power across long distances from power plants to local communities, and your cooperative delivers it to you from there. Those high-voltage transmission structures are generally owned and operated by the larger investor-owned utilities like AEP, Duke, FirstEnergy, and Dayton Power & Light, and that transmission network is critical to local power reliability. Over the past several years, Buckeye Power has worked with those other utilities to improve the reliability of delivery to cooperative members across Ohio. I’m pleased to report that we’ve made significant progress. The number of outages on the transmission network has been cut nearly in half over the past 10 years. That remarkable success is a result of close coordination with other utilities, correcting problem areas, and making investments in new facilities as they’re needed. Winter is a time when the reliability of your power delivery is more important than ever, and you can rest assured that your cooperative is ready to meet your needs. Improvements over the past several years have put our delivery network in the best shape it’s ever been. Despite that, Mother Nature may still overwhelm us from time to time (particularly when ice forms on our lines), but just as your cooperatives have helped out others that were ravaged by hurricanes earlier this year, we know that if we need help this winter, there are others ready to pay back the assistance that we’ve provided. Wishing you all a merry Christmas and a happy new year.

2

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

Pat O’Loughlin PRESIDENT & CEO OHIO'S ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

The number of outages on the transmission network has been cut nearly in half over the past 10 years.


December 2018 • Volume 61, No. 3

OHIO

COOPERATIVE LIVING

Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives 6677 Busch Blvd. Columbus, OH 43229 614-846-5757 memberinteract@ohioec.org www.ohioec.org Patrick O’Loughlin Patrick Higgins Jeff McCallister Rebecca Seum Anita Cook

President & CEO Director of Communications Managing Editor Associate Editor Graphic Designer

Contributors: Colleen Romick Clark, W.H. “Chip” Gross, Patrick Keegan, Catherine Murray, Adam Specht, Damaine Vonada, and Diane Yoakam. OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING (USPS 134-760; ISSN 2572-049X) is published monthly by Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. It is the official communication link between the electric cooperatives in Ohio and West Virginia and their members. Subscription cost for members ranges from $5.52 to $6.96 per year, paid from equity accruing to the member. Nothing in this publication may be reproduced in any manner without written permission from Ohio Rural Electric Cooperatives, Inc. All rights reserved.

For all advertising inquiries, contact GLM COMMUNICATIONS 212-929-1300 sales@glmcommunications.com

MORE INSIDE DEPARTMENTS 8 POWER LINES CALL OF DUTY: Ohio co-op line crews again rally to help their North Carolina brethren after another hurricane blows through.

13 GOOD EATS HOLIDAY DINNER PARTY: Gather friends and family to celebrate the season with these festive dishes that are sure to impress.

18 EFFICIENCY EXPERT CLEANING YOUR FOOTPRINT: As our energy supply gets cleaner,

heating and transportation choices make an even bigger difference.

19 LOCAL PAGES

News and important information from your electric cooperative.

23 CO-OP OHIO NEW LEADER: Southeast Ohio native Jeff Triplett has been

named CEO at Marietta-based Washington Electric.

24 CO-OP PEOPLE REINDEER GAMES: Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative members

bring Christmas spirit to holiday events across the state.

31 OHIO ICON

COONS CANDIES: The Harpster shop is a popular stop for travelers on Route 23, and its legion of fans extends nationwide.

32 WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE SURVIVOR STORY: Thanks to a comeback from the brink of

extinction, these are the good old days for bald eagles. The fact that a product is advertised in Ohio Cooperative Living should not be taken as an endorsement. If you find an advertisement misleading or a product unsatisfactory, please notify us or the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, Consumer Protection Section, 30 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Periodicals postage paid at Columbus, OH, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to editorial and advertising offices at: 6677 Busch Boulevard, Columbus, OH 43229-1101

Cooperative members: Please report changes of address to your electric cooperative. Ohio Cooperative Living staff cannot process address changes. Alliance for Audited Media Member Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

36 CALENDAR WHAT’S HAPPENING: December events and other things to do.

38 MEMBER INTERACTIVE SANTA LOVES PETS: Readers give their fur babies a chance to

share their wish lists.

IN THIS ISSUE Oxford (p.4) New London (p.4) Delaware (p.4) Greenville (p.4) Marietta (p.23) Wooster to Millersburg (p.26) Harpster (p.31)

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 3


LETTERS FROM

YOUTH TOUR BY ADAM SPECHT

Y

outh Tour is a once-in-a-lifetime experience for high school sophomores and juniors from electric cooperative families. Every year, more than 1,00 delegates from across the country meet in the nation’s capital to learn about public service, our nation’s rich history, and the electric cooperative story. Who better to tell the Youth Tour story than the delegates themselves? We asked our alumni from this past summer’s trip a simple question: How did Youth Tour change you? Here’s a sampling of what they had to say.

4

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018


o cited to g s very ex a w I t , a n a e yon r beg know an outh Tou h I didn’t Before Y g u r hand, I o e th th n o . Eve n the O . h lf ig h on the trip s wa t of myse ticipation s though y a lw a all, my an d eet I ha ous to m ous, and very nerv was nerv s a en go on w v I e . n ld perso r I shou e th e h as a shy w ed o. question n to do s people. I e decisio th e d a m ut I ne of the trip, b ould be o w r u o T I was e Youth new that I know th I never k . Little did fe e great li d y a m le and m trips of p t s o e e b p f e o th realized t a lot ple that I ing. I me o o e tg p u o w e o s any n met so m friends. I . sn’t shy onfident that I wa a more c to in as. e m knew I w changed t I never a th The trip f how n o o ecause oing pers at first b g ill and outg in o I g e d caus w I doubte I went be y d e. p a Though p a m h I as, I’m mories w e I m s e u o th nerv and my life. t this trip t trips of e s e rg b fo e r th e nev one of truly was This trip nner it. Colin Co ve er forget erati p I will nev o o C ic ctr ral Ele

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Faith Griffiths (right) with some new friends on the 2018 Youth Tour.

Colin Conner poses with the Kennedys at Madame Tussau ds wax museum.

“You are the future. Every person sitting in this room is a leader.” I was sitting in a huge ballroom with hund reds of young people fro m around the country . I felt a sense of being a sm all part of something mu ch larger. The moment felt surreal. Youth Tour put thing s in perspective for me. Growing up in a sm all town, I’ve always been around a relatively sm all circle of people in my day-to-day life. Sudd enly, I was surrounde d by people from all over the country. I was ma king jokes with a girl from Alaska and dancing with a group from Texas. Be ing around so many people, all with different back grounds and experie nces, all with a common goal of being the next ge neration of leaders, was one of the most memorab le experiences of my life . This trip provided so many unique opportu nities. Besides all of the fun trips to museums an d monuments, I learne d a lot about leadersh ip and service alongside yo uth from across the co untry. Being around all the se people renewed my inspiration and hope for the future. I loved the community in the gro up of youth I was wi th; I know they are the next ge neration of leaders, an d I could not have been happier to be amon g them. Faith Griffiths Firelands Electric Co operative

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 5


y r from m the lette d e n, iv to e g c n I re ashin ing to W lled whe o ri g th at s s a d a w e w I p I jum said ling and tive that e v ra a e as tr p w o d I o t e c s lov al. Bu ve alway n’s capit o ti on a a e n b e D.C. I ha ared to go to th c s to s e a c w n I . the cha ut the trip ngers. ous abo lete stra p m o also nerv c h it w s y ix da on lunch bus for s orientati e th t a asingly g ng incre er sittin li b e m fe e r, m e I re e I was broth ad. Whil om and e m h a y e m d h ri wit aw e long tor and s about th e projec th anxious Tour t a th p u u o oked past Y lo e I , th g f lt the n o ti ea advice ryone fe uraging how eve o lk t c u n o e d b e n a th up a ta rote to open . They w rs ts e n b e d m e tu m ed s better. y and urg iately felt d same wa e e m im ents gav other. I our stud T to each th u o Y h the e former tions wit ice of th onversa c rt nds. The adv ta ie s fr make urage to to o e c m e d th came me helpe ause I be nts and c e e d b r tu s u r o T othe uth The tour ed by Yo angers. g tr s n a h n h it c w s I wa oing tha open ore outg oing and m tg e u b o to re mo dence the confi gave me . f my life. s before st time o ie I ever wa p p a h new was the with my back, this venture d a t ever n n l re Looking il ence I w as a diffe ri w e y p a x d e an n that Every Tour was t back o e th g u o to Y . g s in friend ive anyth would g . forget; I entley in a g Hanna B tive do it all a pera o o C bus and d lidate Conso

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Hanna Bentley and Sebastian Kirkpatrick represented Consolidated Cooperative on the ’18 Youth Tour.

Youth Tour was an unforgettable expe rience that has changed me for the better. Before going on the tour, I had never visited Washington, D.C., and had never seen any of the be autiful monuments and memorials that our nation’s ca pital has to offer. Bu t throughout that week, I got the chance to experie nce it all. From the White Ho use to the Martin Lu ther King Jr. Memorial, I saw so much beauty and fel t so much emotion from our co untry’s history. Youth Tour gave me a deeper appreciation for ou r na tion and reminded me of all that has been done to allow me to live happily and freely. The tour als o he lpe d me gain leadership sk ills and confidence. Me eti ng 44 strangers and living with them for an en tire week was definitely a new ex perience for me, bu t I now look back at it as one of my best memories. The trip changed me in so many ways, an d I will never forget the memorie s and friendships tha t I made. Kloey Murphey leads off the popular O-H-I-O pose at the U.S. Supreme Court Building.

To learn more about Youth Tour 2019 or other youth programs that your cooperative might offer, call your co-op office or visit its website. 6

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

Kloey Murphey Darke Rural Electr ic Cooperative

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POWER LINES

PITCHING IN T

he 2018 hurricane season was a busy one in the southern part of the United States and, as always, Ohio electric cooperatives were decisive and quick to respond with aid to their fellow co-ops in need. Hurricane Michael was particularly destructive as it came to shore in Florida’s western panhandle in midOctober and tore eastward through Georgia and the Carolinas before heading back out to sea. While several Florida co-ops bore the full brunt of the storm, seeing unprecedented damage to their systems, the storm hit hard in North Carolina as well, where systems were still recovering — and still waterlogged — from Hurricane Florence’s rampage the previous month. Just weeks after 54 Ohio linemen spent nearly two weeks in North Carolina after Florence, EnergyUnited Membership Corporation requested help with its power restoration efforts after Michael came through. Ohio cooperatives sent 45 linemen, including three supervisors, along with 18 bucket trucks and three digger derrick trucks, to Madison, North Carolina. EnergyUnited, with about 125,000 consumermembers in 19 counties, is one of the 20 largest electric cooperatives in the U.S., and more than 38,000 of its members lost power after Michael — part of more than 326,000 North Carolina co-op members without electricity at the peak of the outage. “Our co-ops were looked to as a saving lifeline that EnergyUnited had to have in the moment, and they were so thankful for our help,” says Dwight Miller, who organized Ohio’s mutual-aid efforts. Miller is director of safety training and loss prevention at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, the statewide organization that provides services to co-ops in Ohio, and he says the Ohio crews demonstrated a high level of skill and training while working to restore power in the Tar Heel State. “Once again, our crews set an example of safety for this large co-op,” Miller says. “The folks there were

8

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

Ohio co-op crews again head south to help with hurricane relief BY JEFF MCCALLISTER


amazed at how efficiently our guys worked, but yet how safety was such a high priority to each crew.” Joseph Brannan, CEO of North Carolina Electric Cooperatives, passed along both praise and a hearty thanks to the Ohio crews. “We appreciate your generosity and quick action to send help early as we prepared for and then responded to what we knew would be a historic storm that would have a devastating impact on our state,” Brannan wrote in a letter of thanks. “An army of crews … demonstrated a true commitment to cooperation among cooperatives.” He described the efforts as “heroic” and noted that there had been no reports of serious injuries to any of the crews during the restoration effort. “We appreciate your willingness to come to our aid, and in the cooperative spirit, North Carolina’s co-ops stand ready to come to yours whenever the call comes our way.”

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 9


POWER LINES

DEDICATED TO SERVICE BY JEFF MCCALLISTER

In the early days of mining gold, miners rubbed their ore against a small tablet of slate or schist — a “touchstone” to test the purity of the gold they worked so hard to bring to the surface. When retail electric competition began coming into vogue in the late 1990s, potentially putting smaller electric cooperatives in a difficult position against larger utilities, co-ops across the country needed a collective brand to raise awareness among their members. They decided that the symbol of the touchstone was perfect — it was, after all, what distinguished the genuine article from worthless lookalikes. The result was Touchstone Energy, which has grown in its 20 years from a relatively small group into a nationwide alliance of 750 electric cooperatives. Its mission has also evolved as it has grown, according to Doug Miller, vice president of statewide services at Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives, who serves as president of the Touchstone Energy board of directors. “Everything Touchstone Energy does is aimed at helping electric cooperatives to better engage and serve their members,” Miller says. “Even the smallest electric cooperative can leverage the power of a huge network with a national identity to access services that foster a positive and productive member relationship.” Among the programs Touchstone offers in its quest to help co-ops provide the best service — the gold standard in service — are training programs for co-op employees in areas such as service excellence, member engagement, and energy advising. If you visit your co-op’s website or pay your bill online, there’s a good chance that website was built through through the co-op’s partnership with Touchstone Energy. “Every Ohio cooperative is part of this national network of electric cooperatives,” Miller says. “By working together, Touchstone Energy cooperatives stand as a source of power and information to their 32 million member-owners every day.”

Touchstone touches A few of the services Touchstone Energy provides: • The Co-op Connections Card, which provides member discounts at local and national businesses • Research on member satisfaction, renewable energy, and the cooperative difference • High-level customer-service training for all co-op employees • Website templates, advertising material, and energy efficiency educational materials • A best-practices library that leverages the national network successes

10   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2018


DECEMBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   11


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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

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Holiday dinner party

Gather friends and family to celebrate the season with these festive dishes that are sure to impress!

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 13


CRANBERRY GLAZED HAM Prep: 15 minutes | Cook: 2¾ hours | Servings: 16–20 3 cups fresh cranberries 3 tablespoons whole-grain Dijon mustard 1⁄2 cup packed brown sugar 1⁄4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 3⁄4 cup water  6- to 8-pound cooked ham  Combine all ingredients except ham in a medium saucepan. Set over medium heat. Stir occasionally for 5 to 6 minutes, until most of the cranberries have popped and sauce has thickened. Remove from heat and cool 5 minutes. Puree sauce with an immersion blender or food processor. If too thick to spread on ham, add more water.  Heat the oven to 325 F. Place ham on roasting rack and use a sharp knife to score top of ham vertically and horizontally to make a crosshatch pattern. Using a brush or spoon, coat top of ham with cranberry sauce. Roast ham in oven for approximately 20 minutes per pound. 20 minutes before it’s done, add second coating of cranberry glaze to ham. Cook until a thermometer reads 140 F. Serve with remaining glaze.  Per serving: 401 calories, 20 grams fat (7 grams saturated fat), 15 grams total carbs, 4 grams fiber, 38 grams protein.

14

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018


WINTER PANZANELLA SALAD Prep: 30 minutes | Cook: 90 minutes | Servings: 8 1⁄2 teaspoon thyme 1 loaf crusty bread, cubed 1⁄4 teaspoon salt + extra 1 large butternut squash for sprinkling 1⁄2 cup olive oil + extra for roasting 1⁄4 teaspoon pepper 1 small shallot, finely chopped  1 large bunch lacinato (Tuscan) 1 clove garlic, finely chopped kale, stems removed and torn 1 tablespoon honey into pieces 2 tablespoons white balsamic 1 cup dried cherries  vinegar 4 ounces goat cheese 1 teaspoon dried sage Place cubed bread on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and toss; bake at 400 F for 10 to 15 minutes, until toasted. Transfer bread to a large bowl, reserving baking sheet.  Cut butternut squash in half lengthwise. Scoop out and rinse off seeds; set aside. Rub flesh sides of squash halves with olive oil, place skin-side up on separate baking sheet, and bake 45 to 60 minutes at 350 F, or until a fork easily pierces straight through. Peel and cube butternut squash once cooled. Place seeds on reserved baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, sprinkle with salt, and toss; bake at 325 F for 10 minutes. Transfer seeds to a small bowl. In a small dish, whisk remaining olive oil, shallot, garlic, honey, vinegar, sage, thyme, and 1⁄4 teaspoon salt. In a large bowl, combine bread, kale, and dressing. Toss and let marinate for 5 minutes. Toss in butternut squash and dried cherries; top with crumbled goat cheese and toasted seeds. Serve immediately. If intending to have leftovers, keep wet and dry ingredients separate until ready to serve.  Per serving: 366 calories, 18 grams fat (5 grams saturated fat), 44 grams total carbs, 3 grams fiber, 7 grams protein.

BUTTERY SWEET POTATOES WITH CANDIED ORANGES Prep: 15 minutes | Cook: 1 hour | Servings: 6 1⁄2 cup sugar 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and sliced 1⁄4 inch thick 2 tablespoons orange juice 2 large oranges, sliced 1⁄4 inch 1 teaspoon vanilla thick, seeds removed 1⁄4 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1⁄2 cup unsalted butter Heat the oven to 400 F. In a 9 x 13-inch baking dish, layer potato slices, overlapping slightly. Top evenly with orange slices. In a small saucepan, melt butter and sugar over medium heat. Stir in orange juice and vanilla. Immediately pour over potatoes and orange slices. Cover dish with aluminum foil and bake 30 minutes. Uncover and bake an additional 20 to 30 minutes more, or until potatoes are tender and browned, spooning juices over oranges halfway through uncovered baking time. Sprinkle nutmeg over top and serve warm. Per serving: 350 calories, 16 grams fat (10 grams saturated fat), 52 grams total carbs, 6 grams fiber, 2 grams protein.

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 15


PEAR ALMOND GALETTE Prep: 30 minutes | Cook: 60 minutes | Servings: 8 11⁄2 cups all-purpose flour 1⁄2 cup salted butter, cold, sliced thin 6 tablespoons ice-cold water 1⁄4 teaspoon almond extract 2 to 3 firm, ripe pears (Anjou, Bartlett, or Comice) 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon lemon juice Frangipane: 1 large egg white 3 tablespoons powdered sugar 3 tablespoons finely ground blanched almonds 2 teaspoons melted butter 1⁄4 teaspoon almond extract  With your hands, lightly combine flour and butter until it resembles large chunks. Add water and extract. Quickly mix with hands until dough starts to form. Large butter flecks should remain visible. Dust the working surface with flour. Using a rolling pin, roll out dough to 1⁄8-inch-thick circle. Transfer to a baking sheet and refrigerate until the next step is done. Cut pears in half lengthwise. Remove cores, stems, and seeds. Slice pears thinly at a diagonal, keeping slices together in stacks.  To make frangipane, whisk egg white and sugar in a bowl until frothy and smooth, about 1 minute. Add almonds, melted butter, and almond extract. Whisk to incorporate.  Preheat oven to 400 F and remove dough from refrigerator. Spread frangipane evenly over dough. Fan out pear stacks, leaving a 2-inch border around dough edge. Fold border over pears, overlapping where necessary and pressing gently to adhere folds. Bake 50 to 60 minutes, or until crust is lightly browned and crispy. Serve warm or at room temperature. Per serving: 270 calories, 16 grams fat (9 grams saturated fat), 29 grams total carbs, 3 grams fiber, 4 grams protein.

16

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018


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DECEMBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   17


THE EFFICIENCY EXPERT

CLEANING YOUR FOOTPRINT BY PAT KEEGAN

Heat pumps are an example where improved technology can help you out. Heat pumps are about 1.5 times more efficient than they were in the 1970s, and they’re functioning better in colder temperatures. Heat pumps take care of your cooling needs too, and can do so with about half the energy they required in 1990. Of course, the best choice for home heating and cooling depends to a large degree on the climate where you live. In more extreme climates, you’ll need more heating or cooling capacity, and that can justify splurging for the more energy-efficient models. As our energy supply becomes cleaner, thanks to investments in state-of-the-art environmental controls at power plants and the addition of community solar options around the state and nation, electric vehicles are becoming a better environmental choice. The environmental advantage depends upon how electricity is generated in different locations, and there are other factors to consider when looking at an electric vehicle. The fuel cost of an electric vehicle is, on average, half as much per mile as a gasoline vehicle. Electric vehicles generally require less maintenance, but the batteries eventually need to be replaced. Battery costs are dropping, but potential buyers should note that there will still be a hefty bill. Electric

vehicles cost more up front than their gas counterparts, but the cost is coming down with every new model. As you make your decision on a heating system and new vehicle, remember there are other things you can do to reduce the environmental impact of your energy use. You can insulate and seal the air leaks in your home. You can set the thermostat a little lower in the winter and a little higher in the summer. You can also check with your local electric co-op to see if they offer additional energy-saving tips. For more of Pat Keegan’s efficiency advice, visit www. collaborativeefficiency.com/energytips.

PHOTO BY DAN HUSTED, COURTESY OF LAKE REGION ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE

The decisions about how to heat your home and how to fuel your transportation needs are among the most important environmental decisions you can make. Choosing options that are more efficient can not only save you money but can reduce your environmental impact, as well.

Electric co-ops have pioneered community solar programs, where members subscribe to a community project and the co-op installs a large array that is much less costly per kilowatt than smaller rooftop projects.

GOING GREEN GOING GREEN GOING GREEN GOING GREEN GOING GREEN Improvements in the technology and state-sponsored renewable energy requirements have encouraged the development of wind generation.

18

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

The network of electric vehicle charging stations is growing rapidly.


MID-OHIO ENERGY COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT & CEO

GIVING BACK IS THE CO-OP WAY A

s some of you might know, cooperatives across the globe adhere to the same Seven Cooperative Principles that guide all of our decisions — from how we run the co-op to how we engage with our local communities. “Concern for Community” is the seventh principle, and it is one that all employees of Mid-Ohio Energy value year-round. But during the holiday season, concern for community seems especially important.

Electric cooperatives have a proud history of giving back. Each year we sponsor community-based events, offer youth scholarships (see Page 21 for details) and Community Fund grants, and partner with local schools. We return capital credits (revenue that exceeds operational costs) to our members when possible, including $710,000 in 2018. This spring, we supported local economic development efforts with a $10,000 grant to Marion CAN DO! to boost their strategic marketing efforts to attract new jobs and businesses. The community room at our Kenton headquarters fills a community need by providing a versatile meeting and training space for dozens of community-based groups and events each year. Mid-Ohio Energy members help us give back, too. Through the Community Fund program, members can

round up their energy bills to the next dollar amount, and the extra change goes toward helping those in need, right here in our community.

Our commitment to give back also extends beyond the borders of our community. Through Project Ohio, we have donated equipment and John Metcalf sent lineworkers (including PRESIDENT & CEO Mid-Ohio Energy’s own lineman, Barry Boes) overseas so they can help bring power to thousands of people who have never experienced the benefits of electricity. Our lineworkers travel throughout Ohio and other areas of the country to help restore power when severe weather impacts large populations. So many families go without on a daily basis and struggle to make ends meet. This struggle can be especially hard during the holiday season. There are many ways you can give back to the community that go beyond dollar donations. Take some time to go through your closet and find clothes that no longer fit or have lost their use. Bag them up and take them to your local donation center or church clothing drive. Volunteer for a local food or toy drive, deliver meals to the sick and the elderly, or simply make a meal for a neighbor in need. No matter how great or small the act, every time we give back, we strengthen our community. So take the time to give back this holiday season. You’ll be glad you did.

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

19


MID-OHIO ENERGY COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Community Fund grants assist fire departments in Marion

Statement of Nondiscrimination In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender identity (including gender expression), sexual orientation, disability, age, marital status, family/parental status, income derived from a public assistance program, political beliefs, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity, in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA (not all bases apply to all programs). Remedies and complaint filing deadlines vary by program or incident. Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g., Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.) should contact the responsible Agency or USDA’s TARGET Center at (202) 720-2600 (voice and TTY) or contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

A pair of Community Fund grants were awarded to fire departments in Marion this fall. The City of Marion Fire Department (top) received a grant for $919.96 to help the department purchase an iPad to help with training as well as conducting fire investigations. The Marion Township Fire Department (bottom) received a grant of $1,000 to help fund the cost of a bulletproof vest for the department, to help protect its first responders in case of an “active shooter” situation.

To file a program discrimination complaint, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, AD-3027, found online at http://www.ascr.usda.gov/complaint_ filing_cust.html and at any USDA office or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by: (1) mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; (2) fax: (202) 690-7442; or (3) email: program.intake@usda.gov USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

YOUTH PROGRAMS

HIGH SCHOOL SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS: Interested in a life-changing leadership experience in Washington, D.C.?

June 14–20, 2019 20 OHIO OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • MARCH 2017 20 COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

What is Youth Tour? The Ohio’s Electric Cooperatives Youth Tour is an annual leadership program sponsored by Mid-Ohio Energy. It’s a weeklong, all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C., that gives exceptional high school students the opportunity to meet with their congressional leaders at the U.S. Capitol, make new friends from across the state and country, and see many of the famous Washington sights. Electric cooperatives from 43 states will send about 1,800 delegates this year. Will you be one of them?

For more information and to apply, visit MidOhioEnergy.com/YouthTour or call Mike Augenstein at 419-767-9017.


2019 GRADS

FOR RULES AND APPLICATIONS:

You could win up to $4,650 in our Children of Members Scholarship program!

Visit MidOhioEnergy.com/Scholarships Call the co-op at 888-363-6446 Stop by the co-op office Pick them up from your guidance counselor Deadline to apply: Feb. 8, 2019

Graduating Seniors: Have you overcome unique and significant personal challenges on your way to academic excellence?

FOR RULES AND APPLICATIONS: Visit www.MidOhioEnergy.com/Scholarships Call the co-op at 888-363-6446 Stop by the co-op office Pick them up from your guidance counselor Deadline to apply: Feb. 8, 2019

You could win a $500 scholarship in the ®

Touchstone Energy Achievement Scholarship

MARCH 2017 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING

Program!

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 21


MID-OHIO ENERGY COOPERATIVE LOCAL PAGES

Theft of power: costly and dangerous It is estimated that up to $4 billion of electricity is stolen annually nationwide. And just like shoplifting, it’s the honest people who end up paying for it. In Ohio, theft of electricity is a first-degree misdemeanor if the value of the stolen electricity plus any equipment repair is less than $300. It’s a fourthdegree felony if more than $300 or the offender was previously convicted of the charge. Tampering with an electric meter carries similar penalties. The offender doesn’t have to be caught in the act. The law states that reconnecting a meter disconnected by a utility or tampering with a meter is prima facie evidence that the user intended to defraud the utility. Conviction can mean from six months in jail and a $1,000 fine to five years in jail and a $2,500 fine. Since we are a not-for-profit cooperative, someone who steals electric power is stealing directly from your pocket. But revenue loss isn’t the only risk. Theft of electric power requires the thief to take significant risks and endangers not only him or herself, but also our employees and anyone who happens to be nearby the tampered equipment or lines that the thief may have left exposed and unsafe. If you know or suspect someone of stealing, let us know (anonymously, if you prefer) by calling our offices at 1-888-363-6446.

Mid-Ohio Energy hopes that your holidays are merry and bright! Our offices will be closed Dec. 24–25 and Jan. 1. For emergency service, please call 1-888-363-6446.

MID-OHIO ENERGY COOPERATIVE, INC.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Robert Imbody CONTACT

Chairman

1-888-363-6446 www.MidOhioEnergy.com

Dan Harris

HEADQUARTERS OFFICE

John Thiel

1210 W. Lima St. Kenton, Ohio 43326

Max Strine

DISTRICT OFFICE

2859 Marion-Upper Sandusky Road Marion, Ohio 43302 OFFICE HOURS

Mon.–Fri., 7:30 a.m.–4 p.m. 22

Vice Chairman

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

Secretary Treasurer

Trevor Fremont Tony Hastings Gene McCluer Eugene Royer Brice Turner Trustees

John Metcalf President/CEO

HAVE A STORY SUGGESTION?

Email your ideas to: member@midohioenergy.com


O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO O CO-OP O CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP COP OHIO CO-OP NEWS & NOTES FROM AROUND THE STATE O-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP OHIO CO-OP

Washington Electric names new GM The Washington Electric Cooperative board of trustees has appointed Jeffrey M. Triplett as the cooperative’s general manager/CEO. He succeeds Jack Bragg, who has accepted a position as president and CEO of Shelby Energy Cooperative, Inc., in northern Kentucky. Triplett most recently worked for Power System Engineering, Inc. (PSE), advising electric utilities in regard to technical, financial, and strategic matters. Before joining PSE, Triplett worked as the engineering manager for Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative and as a power delivery engineer for Buckeye Power Inc., the generation and transmission provider for Ohio’s electric cooperative network. Triplett is a native of southeast Ohio. “Washington Electric Cooperative is in the process of replacing several substations and performing other major upgrades to our system,” Board Chairman Paul Fleeman says. “Jeff ’s engineering background brings the experience and expertise we need, and we are excited to have him lead us through these and other important projects.”

Co-op sponsors Friday night lights Elgin and Ridgedale local schools in Marion County, both on co-op lines, held “Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative Night” events during home football games this year. Co-op employees handed out concession stand vouchers to fans, the proceeds of which were donated to the schools’ athletic boosters. Mid-Ohio Energy also presented a check for $1,000 to each school, an amount approximated to cover the cost of powering the football stadium and facilities for the entire home football season.

Co-op connects with community Logan County Electric Cooperative promoted several programs designed to engage with members and the community. A drawing broadcast on Facebook Live on Nov. 9 awarded two members with a pair of tickets to watch the Ohio State football Buckeyes battle Michigan in Ohio Stadium. As part of their Operation Round Up® program, the co-op sponsors “Energizing Education” grants to K–12th grade teachers with innovative learning ideas that fall outside the scope of the regular school budget. Members also have the opportunity to give back to the community with two co-op-sponsored programs: “Holiday Utility Gifts” allows members to pay a portion of or the entire LCEC bill for a member having financial difficulties, and the co-op is also collecting donations for the Toasty Tots program, administered by the Logan County Family and Children First Council.

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 23


CO-OP PEOPLE

REINDEER GAMES Dan and Linda Downs conjure the Christmas spirit across Ohio BY DAMAINE VONADA

D

an and Linda Downs had an easy time scheduling this year’s Christmas open house at Pine Acres Reindeer Farm for Dec. 22 — turns out, it’s the only Saturday before Christmas that their reindeer weren’t already booked. “We’re busy taking reindeer to events throughout Ohio from Thanksgiving through Christmas,” Dan Downs says. The Downses, who own an independent insurance agency, not only breed reindeer at Pine Acres Reindeer Farm, but also live on the 35-acre farmstead and are members of Mid-Ohio Energy Cooperative. The farm is just outside the village of La Rue and features a custommade metal sculpture of a reindeer. Fittingly enough, Pine Acres was once the site of a Christmas tree farm, and its grove of Scotch pines provides a picture-perfect setting for the reindeer herd, which Dan started in 2003. “He kept looking at the computer one night,” recalls Linda, “so I asked him what he was doing. Dan said, ‘Looking at reindeer. I’m going to buy a pair.’ I told him, ‘Oh, sure you are.’” Faster than Linda could say, “On Donner and Blitzen,” two reindeer named Fritz and Flossie were on their way from Minnesota to La Rue.

24

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018

Dan is well-known for putting up elaborate Christmas lights. One year, when he overdid his display, he had to call the staff at Mid-Ohio, who came out and replaced the transformer that had served the farm with one that could handle three houses. Although Dan purchased the reindeer as pets that could enhance his annual lighting extravaganzas, people soon began asking him if the reindeer could appear at Yuletide festivities. “The reindeer were intended to be just a hobby,” Dan says. “Things took on a life of their own and turned into a seasonal business.” The Downses’ herd currently consists of three males — Comet, Tinsel, and Toto — and eight females named Velvet, Candy Cane, Holly, Ivy, Mishka, Nanook, Twig, and Jellybean. “Santa only has nine reindeer, so I tell everyone we have two spares,” Dan says. Since reindeer are native to arctic and subarctic regions, Dan and Linda put fans in the reindeer pens to help keep them comfortable during summer. Like elk, moose, and deer, reindeer belong to the Cervidae family of hoofed, ruminant mammals, and as a precaution, the Downses installed 8-foot-high tensile wire fencing to ward off Ohio’s


ubiquitous white-tailed deer and the diseases they can carry. Reindeer are herd animals that have been domesticated and used in many ways — including pulling sleds — for thousands of years. “We always take two reindeer to events, because they don’t do well when separated from their group,” Dan says. Sporting red or green halters and sleigh bells, Pine Acres reindeer have been holiday attractions at places ranging from Liberty Center mall near Cincinnati to the Kenton Christmas parade to the Christmas Cruise Thru in Hicksville. “I like going to Hicksville,” says Linda, “because we usually have reindeer there for four nights, and the lights are awesome.” The couple also gets great satisfaction from annually hosting a Christmas open house inside a beautifully decorated Pine Acres barn. In the spirit of the season, the old-fashioned country celebration is free to the community, and Dan and Linda furnish all the refreshments and entertainment. Santa pays a visit, and of course, the reindeer play a starring role. “People tell us it made their Christmas,” Dan says. “Of course, we’re always exhausted by Christmas Day, but we get a lot of enjoyment out of it.” For more information about Pine Acres Reindeer Farm, search for the Pine Acres Reindeer Farm & Event Center on Facebook or call 740-361-1620. DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 25


Sugar, spice, and INNS so nice The Christmas Cookie Tour is a unique Amish Country tradition BY DAMAINE VONADA

26

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018


T

hroughout the nation, baking — and eating — Christmas cookies is as timehonored a tradition as mistletoe and candy canes during the holiday season. In Ohio’s Amish Country, the Christmas Cookie Tour of Inns elevates the beloved

custom to a whole new level. Every December, 12 of the region’s hotels, inns, and bed-and-breakfasts not only open their doors to hundreds of visitors, but also serve all of them cookies. Twelve hundred tickets were available for this year’s Cookie Tour, being held Dec. 8 and 9, so each of the participating inns will have a whopping 100 dozen cookies on hand. That equates to a whole lot of baking and good cheer. “The Christmas Cookie Tour is like a big holiday party with 12 separate stops,” says Laurie Judson of the Holmes County Chamber of Commerce and Tourism Bureau.

Continued on Page 28

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 27


Hotels and inns across Ohio’s Amish Country dress up for the Christmas Cookie Tour each holiday season. This year’s tour includes: The Wooster Inn 801 E. Wayne Ave., Wooster Comfort Suites 965 Dover Road, Wooster Grapevine House 2140 Main St., Winesburg Berlin Encore Hotel & Suites 4365 State Route 39, Berlin The Barn Inn 6838 County Road 203, Millersburg Hotel Millersburg 35 W. Jackson St., Millersburg Farmhouse Frocks 65 W. Jackson St., Millersburg Holiday Inn Express & Suites 1005 S. Washington St., Millersburg Comfort Inn Millersburg 1102 Glen Drive, Millersburg Amish Country Inn 4956 Township Road 312, Millersburg Woodside Inn 4575 Township Road 312, Millersburg Continued from Page 27

28

Home to the world’s largest population of “Plain People” (some 36,000), Amish Country extends through several northeast Ohio counties, with Holmes County as its hub. The Amish Country Lodging Council organized the first Christmas Cookie Tour in 2008 to showcase the area’s accommodations and assist local charities. While only 150 tickets were offered that first year, the one-day event raised $1,000. Since then, the Christmas Cookie Tour has expanded to two days and has garnered more than $125,000 in donations to organizations such as LifeCare Hospice and the Holmes County Education Foundation.

Every inn serves its own specialty cookie and supplies the recipe in a souvenir booklet. While sampling cookies ranging from signature Amish treats like whoopie pies to French-inspired chocolate mocha madeleines is the signature event, the tours have a wider appeal than just satisfying your sweet tooth. They also present an opportunity to escape the holiday rush and retreat to a place where the pace is measured in hoof beats. “People really like being able to connect with our local innkeepers, and the Cookie Tours are very festive events that people can enjoy with their family and friends,” says Judson.

“The Cookie Tour definitely has grown in popularity,” says Judson. “We have many folks who come back year after year, and it’s now part of their holiday traditions.”

The inns are decked out in their Yuletide best, and since the Christmas Cookie Tour is a drive-it-yourself event, guests can take their time oohing and aahing at each

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018


stop’s decorations, getting design ideas, and delighting in the merry and bright ambiance. There’s also quite a bit of caroling during the tours. “The inns will play Christmas music or have a pianist, and people just start singing along,” Judson says. Another bonus: Many of the inns feature local vendors and artisans selling Christmas present possibilities that can be as practical as freshly shelled walnuts or as whimsical as animal-shaped pincushions. Just as the cookies vary from year to year, so do the tours’ themes and inns. The 2018 tour will channel “Christmas of Yesteryear.” Four of the stops — Berlin Encore Hotel and Suites; Holiday Inn Express and Suites, Millersburg; Comfort Suites, Wooster; and the Amish Country Inn near Millersburg — just opened this year and demonstrate the

wide variety of lodging experiences available in Amish Country, from chain hotels to cozy B&Bs. “Past Christmas Cookie Tours tended to focus on inns in Sugarcreek, Walnut Creek, and Berlin,” says Judson. “We shifted direction a bit this year because many ticketholders like to stay overnight on Saturday, and a lot more things are open on Sunday in Millersburg and Wooster.” The 2018 Christmas Cookie Tour of Inns, Saturday, Dec. 8, and Sunday, Dec. 9. Tickets cost $45 and are good for either or both days. For tickets or to learn more about the 2018 Cookie Tour, call 330-674-3975 or visit www.christmascookietour.com.

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 29


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Coons HOMEMADE Candies OHIO ICON

Harpster

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAMAINE VONADA

Location: Adjacent to U.S. 23, about 14 miles north of Marion. Provenance: In 1917, Joseph Coons and his wife, Nellie, opened an ice cream parlor in the tiny Wyandot County community of Nevada. Their homemade ice cream was quite popular throughout the summer, but when temperatures began to plummet, so did sales. Needing a product to sell during winter, the enterprising couple made a deal with a German confectioner who had just immigrated to the United States: In exchange for room and board, he’d teach them about making candy. “He learned to speak English, and they learned how to make toffee,” says Charlie Coons, who is Joseph and Nellie’s great-grandson and the owner of Coons Homemade Candies. Successive generations of the Coons family made toffee and other candies in Nevada until the 1980s, when

Charlie Coons relocated the candy factory and retail store to the Harpster area. Today, Coons operates both facilities with the assistance of his grown children. Daughter Rae Coons helps to manage the factory, while daughter Dani Coons McKain and her husband, Jim, members of North Central Electric Cooperative, make up the family’s fifth generation of candy makers. Significance: Now famous for its Old English toffee, Coons Homemade Candies not only still uses Joseph and Nellie’s 101-year-old recipe for milk-chocolate-coated toffee, but also continues to hand-pack each box of candy. “We probably make more toffee than any other candy business in Ohio,” says Coons. The company’s legion of devoted toffee-lovers extends nationwide, and its combination candy and gift shop has become a popular destination for locals as well as long-distance travelers on U.S. 23. Currently: In addition to toffee, Coons Candies produces buckeyes, chocolate-covered cherries, nut and coconut clusters, and creamy walnut caramels. It also makes more than 20 different kinds of fudge, including holiday flavors such as pumpkin pie and cranberry nut. Coons ships both toffee and assorted chocolates in its signature vintage-style candy box. It’s a little-known fact that: Among the secrets to the success of Coons toffee is placing almonds inside, rather than on top of, the chocolate. “Putting the almonds inside our toffee is one reason it tastes so good and fresh,” says Dani Coons McKain. “Exposed nuts age and get rancid.” Coons Homemade Candies, 16848 County Road 113, Harpster, OH 43323. Candy and gift shop open daily. For additional information or to place orders, call 740-496-4141 or visit www.coonscandy.com.

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 31


WOODS, WATERS, AND WILDLIFE

SURVIVOR S

T O R Y

For bald eagles, these are the good old days STORY AND PHOTOS BY W.H. “CHIP” GROSS

I

f you have a concern for wildlife, it’s easy to get caught up in the plight of current endangered and threatened species — so much so that we sometimes forget to celebrate the victories of those species that have stepped back from the brink of extinction or extirpation. The return of soaring bald eagles to the skies of Ohio and to the nation as a whole is definitely one of those victories.

bald eagle nests are scattered across the state, and the population is estimated at 700 to 1,000 birds and growing. Spearheading the recovery effort of Ohio’s bald eagles during the late 20th century was Denis Case, a wildlife biologist with the Ohio Division of Wildlife. Now long retired, Case lives in southeast Ohio, where he has been a member of South Central Power Company since 1974.

“Today, there doesn’t seem to be the general public commitment to environmental issues that was so prevalent back in the 1960s and 1970s,” Case says. “I think people need to be reminded that significant strides can be made and that environmental action does work. The return of the bald eagle, due to pesticide regulation and A replica of the Great Nest, the largest habitat protection, is a solid example.  bald eagle nest ever recorded in Ohio, is

Bald eagles once were plentiful in the Buckeye State. Though no studies of the population were undertaken until the 1920s, it’s likely that several thousand of the majestic birds nested and fished along the shores of Lake Erie, the Ohio River, and other river systems in between.

The largest bald eagle nest ever recorded in Ohio — the Great Nest — was located along the Lake Erie shoreline near Vermilion. on display at Lorain County Metro Parks’ “In the 1980s, we set a goal Constructed in 1891 and of achieving 20 nesting enlarged by various pairs of Carlisle Reservation near LaGrange, Ohio. pairs of bald eagles in eagles through the years, the Ohio by the year 2000. At nest gradually grew to an the time, I thought that amazing 8.5 feet across and number might represent the maximum nesting population 12 feet deep. It was 81 feet off the ground, and when the we could ever achieve. We reached that goal in a couple of nest finally blew down in a 1925 storm, it weighed an years — sooner than expected — and I was obviously a little estimated 2,000 pounds. off the mark on how many pairs of eagles the state could Ohio’s bald eagle population began taking a nosedive ultimately support. Sometimes, it’s nice to be wrong.”   during the mid-20th century — a result of the pesticide Bald eagles were removed from the federal endangered DDT accumulating in the environment. The poisonous species list in 2007 and Ohio’s state endangered species compound caused eagle eggs to thin, resulting in list in 2012, but they still have special protections under breakage during incubation. But when DDT was the federal Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. outlawed for agricultural use in the U.S. in 1972, eagles began their comeback. It was none too soon, as only four If you’d like to see a bald eagle in the wild, grab a pair of nesting pairs remained in Ohio as late as 1979. binoculars and visit Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge or Magee Marsh Wildlife Area. Both refuges are located One of the wildlife management techniques used to between Port Clinton and Toledo along State Route 2. bolster the struggling bald eagle population during the 1980s and ’90s was fostering, or the placing of captive-bred W.H. “Chip” Gross, a member of Consolidated Electric Cooperative, is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor; he can be reached for eaglets into wild nests. It was a slow, difficult, expensive, comment at whchipgross@gmail.com. painstaking strategy — but it worked. Today, some 300

32   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2018


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DECEMBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   35

10/29/18 10:42 AM


DECEMBER 2018 CALENDAR NORTHWEST

DEC. 1–30 – North Pole Express, 12505 Co. Rd. 99, Findlay, Fri. and Sat. 5:30–9:30 p.m., Sun. 5:30–8:30 p.m. Adults $3, children $2. Take a ride on a quarter-scale locomotive through our festive decorated property, view operating model trains, and see Santa and Mrs. Claus (on select days). 419-423-2995 or http://nworrp.org.

DEC. 9 – “Bells, Brass, and Bows,” 7 Town Square, Lima, 7:30 p.m. $10–$30. The Lima Symphony Orchestra and the Lima Symphony Chorus present their beloved holiday concert featuring traditional favorites, sacred carols, and familiar standards. 419-222-5701 or www. limasymphony.com.

DEC. 6–9, 13–16 – Winter Wonderland Light Display, Sandusky Co. Fgds., 901 Rawson Ave., Fremont. Drive-through Thur./Sun. 6–8 p.m. Walk-through Fri./ Sat. 6–9 p.m. $1 per person; kids under 12 free. Donations of items accepted for food pantry. 419-332-5604 or www.sanduskycountyfair.com.

DEC. 9 – Van Vert Area Boychoir: Christmas Concert, Trinity Friends Church, 618 N. Franklin St., Van Wert, 2 p.m. 419-238-1962.

DEC. 7 – First Friday, downtown Sidney. Participating shops and restaurants stay open later, with many offering a discount. 937-6586945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

DEC. 9 – Winter Festival of Crafts, Franciscan Ctr. at Lourdes University, 6832 Convent Blvd., Sylvania, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. A beautiful setting for our last show of the year. Pick up that last-minute holiday gift or decoration that will make your holiday bright! 419-842-1925 or www.toledocraftsmansguild.org.

DEC. 7 – WinterFest and Santa’s House, St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church, 120 W. Sandusky St., Findlay, 6–8 p.m. Free. Take a horse-drawn wagon ride around downtown, meet with Santa, and enjoy hot chocolate and sweet treats. www.visitfindlay.com.

DEC. 13 – Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker: Dove of Peace Tour, Lima Civic Ctr., 7 Town Square, Lima, 7 p.m. Presenting world-class Russian artists, hand-painted sets, and a two-person Dove of Peace with a 20-foot wingspan, the ballet brings the Christmas spirit to life for all ages. 800-320-1733 or www.nutcracker.com.

DEC. 1 – Christmas of Yesteryear, downtown Sidney, afternoon and evening. The historic downtown is all lit up for your enjoyment, with horse and carriage rides, shopping, and dining. 937-658-6945 or www.sidneyalive.org.

DEC. 8 – Christmas Carousel Ride-A-Thon, Merry-Go-Round Museum, 301 Jackson St., Sandusky, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Free admission with $1 carousel rides. Wood carving, ice carving, kids’ crafts, face painting, holiday movies, cookies, and visits from Santa. 419-626-6111 or www.merrygoroundmuseum.org.

DEC. 13–16 – American Girl Live!, Marathon Ctr. for the Performing Arts, 200 W. Main Cross St., Findlay, Thur./Fri. 6 p.m., Sat./Sun. 2 and 6 p.m. $26. A musical inspired by American Girl’s characters and their stories. Exciting tales of friendship and bravery and come to life. 419-423-2787 or www.marathoncenterarts.org.

DEC. 1, 7–8 – “Yuletides of Yesteryear” Holiday Lantern Tour, Sauder Village, 22611 St. Rte. 2, Archbold, every half hour from 4 to 8:30 p.m. Adults $13, children $7, under 6 free. Take this holiday trolley tour to learn about American Christmas holiday traditions over the years. Reservations required. 800-590-9755 or www. saudervillage.org.

DEC. 9 – Band Concert: “Christmas on the Silver Screen,” Marathon Ctr. for the Performing Arts, 200 W. Main Cross St., Findlay, 3 p.m. Free. The University of Findlay Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble will join to present their annual Christmas concert, featuring well-known holiday songs from the movies. 330-595-4650 or www.marathoncenterarts.org.

DEC. 15 – Train Town Show and Swap Meet, Allen Co. Fgds., 2750 Harding Hwy., Lima, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Free parking; handicap accessible. Vendors, rail fan items, toy trains, operating layouts, and Santa Claus! 419-228-7141.

DEC. 1 – High School Holiday Choir Festival, Secrest Auditorium, 334 Shinnick St., Zanesville, 7:30 p.m. Six local high school choirs perform individually and together as a group. kim.tatman@mvesc.org or www.secrestonline.com.

DEC. 8 – Simply Christmas, Wagnalls Memorial Open House, 150 E. Columbus St., Lithopolis, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Pictures with Santa, children’s crafts, hot cocoa and cookies, 10 a.m.–noon; vendor shopping and holiday music, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Holly-day Shop Hop in the Village, including specials, door prizes, treats, and more, 10 a.m.–6 p.m. 614-837-4705 or find “Simply Christmas” on Facebook.

DEC. 1 – Christkindlmarkt: A Christmas Fair with German Flair, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 203 E. Mansfield St., New Washington, 10 a.m.–2 p.m. Free admission. Handmade crafts and ornaments, teacher gifts, Christmas cookies and sweet treats, hot lunch and drinks, entertainment. 419-492-2182 or www.facebook.com/stjnw.

CENTRAL

DEC. 1, 8 – Christmas Candlelighting, Roscoe Village, 600 N. Whitewoman St., Coshocton, 6 p.m. Free. Share in the evening’s tradition of lighting the 30-foot Christmas tree and your own candle as everyone softly sings “Silent Night.” Candlelit guided tour of the Village follows at 7 p.m. (admission fee). 800-877-1830 or www.roscoevillage.com. DEC. 7–8 – Lawn and Rural Equipment Expo, Roberts Ctr., 123 Gano Rd., Wilmington. Featuring lawn, landscape, small farm, and rural lifestyle equipment. www.omeda.org/powershow/. THROUGH DEC. 29 – “Experience the Magic,” Robbins Hunter Museum, 221 E. Broadway, Granville, Wed.–Sat., 1–4 p.m. Free. Seven Christmas trees dressed and ready to dazzle you for the holiday season. 740-587-0430 or www.robbinshunter.org. THROUGH JAN. 1 – “A Storybook Christmas,” Zanesville and Muskingum Co. locations. Visit over 100 unique stores and attractions, and explore the beautifully decorated streets and parks. Stop by to enjoy the nightly light and music show at the courthouse, Sun.–Thur. 6–9 p.m., Fri./Sat. 6–10 p.m. 740-4558282, 800-743-2303, or www.visitzanesville.com. THROUGH JAN. 2 – State Auto’s Christmas Corner, 518 E. Broad St., Columbus. Free. Historic life-sized Nativity display. See website for choir schedule and lighting times. christmas@ stateauto.com or www.stateauto.com/Christmas. NOV. 30–DEC. 2 – Christmas at the Palace: The Gift of Family, Marion Palace Theatre, 276 W. Center St., Marion, Fri./ Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. $12–$22. This annual holiday show features local talent in song and dance, instrumental solos and group numbers, heartfelt vignettes, silly sketches, and more. 740383-2101 or www.marionpalace.org.

DEC. 7–8 – Pets and Family Photos with Santa, 19 N. High St., Canal Winchester, Fri. 6–9 p.m., Sat. 5–8 p.m. Proceeds benefit Friends For Life Animal Haven. www.canalwinchesterohio. gov/239/Christmas-in-the-Village. DEC. 8 – Annual Holiday Cookie Walk, Fairfield County Genealogical Research Library, 503 Lenwood Dr., Lancaster, 1–4 p.m. Stock up for the holidays! Great variety for $4 per pound. 740-653-2573. DEC. 8 – Care Train Benefit Concert, featuring Cardinal Health Orchestra and the Marysville Symphonic Choir, Marysville H.S. Auditorium, 800 Amrine Mill Rd., Marysville, 7:30 p.m. Free admission. Cash donations appreciated and matched by Cardinal Health. 937-738-7946 or www.caretrain.org. DEC. 8 – Care Train of Union County Live/Online Auction, McAuliffe’s Ace Hardware, 1299 W. Fifth St., Marysville, 9 a.m.– 3 p.m. Benefits financially needy families, seniors, and disabled this holiday season. 937-738-7946 or www.caretrain.org. DEC. 8 – Nativities Open House, The Pines Christian Church, 6775 U.S. Hwy. 42, Mt. Gilead, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. See more than 2,000 Nativity sets. Free food and entertainment. 419-362-6903 or http://pineschristianchurch.net. DEC. 8 – Pickerington Community Chorus: Handel’s Messiah, Peace United Methodist Church, 235 Diley Rd., Pickerington, 3 p.m. $10, Srs./C. $8. The chorus will be accompanied by an eightpiece string orchestra. www.pickeringtoncommunitychorus.com.

WEST VIRGINIA

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Oglebay Winter Festival of Lights, Oglebay Resort and Conference Ctr., 465 Lodge Dr., Wheeling. Worldfamous light show covering 6 miles and featuring larger-than-life displays. Per car donation is requested and is valid for the entire festival season. Experience the show like never before with new 3D Sleigh Bans! Prepare to be amazed as holographic eye wear transforms every point of light into a magical display. 877-436-1797 or www.oglebay-resort.com/festival.html. DEC. 1–28 – Celebration of Lights, Morris Park, Fairmont, Fri.–Sun., 6–10 p.m. Suggested donation of $10 per car. See over 420 holiday light displays in this drive-through tour. 304-366-4550 or www.celebrationoflightswv.com. DEC. 1–31 – Christmas Fantasy Light Show, Krodel Park, Point Pleasant, 6–9 p.m. 304-675-3844.

36   OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING  •  DECEMBER 2018

DEC. 8–9, 15–16 – Dickens of a Christmas, Ohio Village, 800 E. 17th Ave., Columbus, Sat. 5:30–9 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. $6-$14. Capture the spirit of holidays past. Charles Dickens’s festive and enduring vision comes to life through jolly carols, decorations, and traditions inspired by his colorful tales. 800-686-1541 or www. ohiohistory.org. DEC. 9 – Christmas Open House, Deer Creek State Park Lodge and Conference Ctr., 22300 State Park Road, Mt. Sterling, 11 a.m.– 3 p.m. Featuring 18 Christmas trees decorated by central Ohio garden clubs, including one by the Pickerington Garden Club with the theme “A Historical Christmas in Pickerington–Violet Township.” Free cookies and hot chocolate; restaurant on site. czbz@hotmail.com. DEC. 9 – Handel’s Messiah Oratorio, Central Trinity United Methodist Church, 62 S. Seventh St., Zanesville, 6 p.m. This is the 89th annual production performed by the Zanesville Civic Chorus and Orchestra. A freewill offering is taken and given to a local charity each year in the “spirit of Handel.” www. centraltrinityumc.com. DEC. 9 – Lancaster Community Band: Holiday Concert, Faith Memorial Church, 2610 W Fair Ave., Lancaster, 2 p.m. Free admission. 740-756-4430. DEC. 15 – The Four Freshmen: “A Fresh New Christmas,” Secrest Auditorium, 334 Shinnick St., Zanesville, 7:30 p.m. A dynamic show featuring one part symphony, four parts harmony, and plenty of Christmas cheer. 740-588-0871, www. zanesvilleconcertassociation.com, or www.secrestonline.com. DEC. 16 – Winter Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Makoy Event Ctr., 5462 Center St., Hilliard, 10 a.m.–4 p.m. $3, under 12 free. This large show will feature artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. www. avantgardeshows.com.

PLEASE NOTE: Ohio Cooperative Living strives for accuracy but urges readers to confirm dates and times before traveling long distances to events. Submit listings AT LEAST 90 DAYS prior to the event to Ohio Cooperative Living, 6677 Busch Blvd., Columbus, OH 43229 or events@ohioec.org. Ohio Cooperative Living will not publish listings that don’t include a complete address or a number/ website for more information.


COMPILED BY COLLEEN ROMICK CLARK

NORTHEAST

rides, juried craft show, and tours of decorated museum buildings. Church service and tree lighting ceremony Saturday only. 800-2626195 or www.historiczoarvillage.com. DEC. 1–2 – Dalton Holidays Festival, Dalton High School, Sat. 9:30 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Free admission. Parade Sat. at 2 p.m., craft show, pageant, contests, Mrs. Claus Pantry, food, and more! 330-933-7083 or www.daltonfestival.org. DEC. 1–2, 6–9, 13–23, 26–30 – Deck the Hall, Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens, 714 N. Portage Path, Akron, 5–8 p.m. $7–$22, under 6 free. Over 1 million lights illuminate the estate in a spectacular display, and the historic Manor House is decorated to reflect a “Winter Wonderland” theme. Tree lighting in the courtyard with Santa each day at 5:30 p.m. 330-315-3287or www.stanhywet.org.

THROUGH JAN. 7 – Steubenville Nutcracker Village and Advent Market, 120 S. 3rd St., Steubenville. Free. Over 150 unique, life-size Nutcrackers on display at Fort Steuben Park. Market booths open on weekends. 740-283-1787 or www. steubenvillenutcrackervillage.com. DEC. 1 – Christmas Down on the Farm, Tis the Season and Schrock’s Heritage Village, 4363 St. Rte. 39, Berlin, noon–5 p.m. Bring the family out for a sleigh ride, visit with Santa, make a gingerbread house, and more. Enjoy the sights and sounds of the holidays with Christmas lights, cookies, and lots of family fun. 330893-3604 or www.schrocksvillage.com. DEC. 1–2 – Christmas in Zoar, 198 Main St., Zoar. $8 per person; 12 and under free. Musical entertainment, horse-drawn wagon

SOUTHEAST

DEC. 1–2, 7–9 – Candlelight Holiday Tours of Malabar Farm, 4050 Bromfield Rd., Lucas, Fri./Sat. 5–9 p.m., Sun. 12–5 p.m. Tour Louis Bromfield’s Big House, all decked out for the holidays. $5, C. (6–17) $3, under 6 free. 419-892-2784 or www. malabarfarm.org/events/. DEC. 7–8 – Tim Zimmerman and The King’s Brass Christmas Concert, Ohio Star Theater, 1387 Old Ohio 39, Sugarcreek, 7 p.m. $39–$55. www.dhgroup.com/theater. DEC. 7–8, 14–17, 19–23 – Holiday Lantern Tours, Hale Farm and Village, 2686 Oak Hill Rd., Bath. Tours depart every 20 minutes beginning at 5:30 p.m. Take a lantern-lit tour of the village and visit historic homes, bustling with holiday preparations. Experience the sights and sounds of the season through a series of charming holiday vignettes presented by costumed players. www.wrhs.org/ events/holiday-lantern-tours-12-2018.

DEC. 8–9 – Winter Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Federated Church–Family Life Ctr., 16349 Chillicothe Rd., Chagrin Falls, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. This large show will feature artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. www.avantgardeshows.com. DEC. 9 – A Celtic Christmas: Featuring Clash of the Tartans, Wadsworth Public Library, 132 Broad St., Wadsworth, 2 p.m. Free admission, but reservations recommended. The all-female Celtic and American folk band will perform music from Scotland, Ireland, and England that celebrates the holidays and winter. 330-722-2541. DEC. 9 – Christmas Train and Toy Show, Lakeland Community College (AFC) Main Gym, 7700 Clocktower Dr., Kirtland, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m. Adults $6, Family $15, C. (6–12) $3, under 6 free. Active military free. Over 300 tables with model trains of all gauges, antique toys, and diecast toys. Operating train layouts in many different scales and dioramas. Meet Santa Claus, 12:30–2 p.m. 440256-8141 or www.christmastrainshow.com. DEC. 9 – Massillon Train and Toy Show, Massillon Knights of Columbus Hall, 988 Cherry Rd. NW, Massillon, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. $5, under 13 free. Free parking. Over 150 dealer tables. All gauges and parts, running layouts, farm and vintage toys, diecast models, NASCAR items, and more. Food and drink available. www.cjtrains.com. DEC. 15–16 – The Nutcracker, presented by Holmes Ctr. for the Arts, Ohio Star Theater, 1387 Old Ohio 39, Sugarcreek, Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. 330-473-2879 or www.holmescenterforthearts.org.

Secret Santa or bring a toy in exchange for a dozen sugar cookies that you can decorate on site. 740-435-3335 or www.deerassic.com.

DEC. 8 – Pancakes with Santa and Craft Show, Pickaway-Ross Career and Technology Ctr., 895 Crouse Chapel Rd., Chillicothe, 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Also includes pictures with Santa and gift-wrapping DEC. 1 – Logan Santa Parade, Main St., Logan, 2–7 p.m. Watch service. robin.bussey@pickawayross.com or tracey.eyre@ for Santa at the end of the parade, and visit with him afterward in pickawayross.com. Worthington Park. 740-385-6836 or http://hockinghillschamber.com. DEC. 8 – Terry Lee and the Rockaboogie Band, Paxton Theatre, DEC. 1–2, 8–9, 15–16 – Santa Train, Hocking Valley Scenic Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 W. Canal St., Nelsonville, 11 a.m. and 125 E. Main St., Bainbridge, 7 p.m. $15. A high-energy band built around the lighting-fast, piano-pumping music of Terry Lee. www. 2 p.m. $14–$18. 740-249-1452 or www.hvsry.org/trainlist. paxtontheatre.com. DEC. 2 – National Road/Zane Grey Museum Holiday Open DEC. 14 – Phil Dirt and the Dozers, Majestic Theatre, 45 E. Second House, 8850 East Pike, Norwich, 1–4 p.m. 740-872-3143 or www. St., Chillicothe, 8 p.m. $20–$22. Fans of all ages can enjoy this familyohiohistory.org. friendly stroll through the oldies-but-goodies along with some of the DEC. 1–2, 8–9 – Holidays at Adena, Adena Mansion and Gardens, band’s Christmas favorites. www.majesticchillicothe.net. 847 Adena Rd., Chillicothe. www.adenamansion.com. DEC. 31 – New Year’s Eve Gospel Sing, Harvest Christian THROUGH JAN. 1 – Dickens Victorian Village, downtown DEC. 7 – Rock for Tots, Elk’s Lodge, 42 W. Second St., Chillicothe. Fellowship, Cambridge. 740-704-1487 or www.gospeljubilee.org. Cambridge. Stroll the streets to view scenes depicting life in 1850s The annual concert/auction raises funds to benefit children in the DEC. 31 – New Year’s Eve Train and Fireworks, Hocking Valley England, featuring life-sized, handmade mannequins wearing real community and surrounding areas. www.rockfortots.net. Scenic Railway, Nelsonville Depot, 33 W. Canal St., Nelsonville, vintage clothing. 800-933-5480 or www.dickensvictorianvillage.com. DEC. 7 – John Berry Christmas Concert, Majestic Theatre, 10:30 p.m. $28–$30. 740-249-1452 or www.hvsry.org/trainlist. THROUGH JAN. 1 – Holiday Light Show, Guernsey County 45 E. Second St., Chillicothe, 7:30 p.m. $25–$55. www. Courthouse, Cambridge, 5:30–9 p.m. nightly. Four different light majesticchillicothe.net. and music shows performed each evening. 800-933-5480 or www. DEC. 8 – Merry TubaChristmas, Ariel Theatre, 426 Second Ave., dickensvictorianvillage.com. Gallipolis, 2 p.m. Free. Tuba and euphonium players of all ages DEC. 1 – Little Dickens Day/Cookies with Santa, Deerassic Park gather to perform traditional Christmas carols especially arranged Education Ctr., Cambridge, 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Make a $5 donation to for those instruments.740-446-ARTS or www.arieltheatre.org.

SOUTHWEST

drive-through light display. 513-868-1234 or http://pyramidhill.org/ holiday-lights.

your holiday spirit soaring with singers and dancers, humor and joy, magic and music. www.cincinnatisymphony.org.

DEC. 1–2, 8–9, 15–16 – Ornament Blow, 11925 Kemper Springs Dr., Cincinnati, 15-minute slots between 10 a.m. and 8 p.m. $35. For age 5 and over. Professional glassblowers teach you how to blow your own ornament from hot molten glass. Reservations required by phone or email: 513-751-3292 or neusoleglassworks@hotmail.com.

DEC. 8–9 – Dayton Christkindlmarkt, 1400 E. Fifth St., Dayton, Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 12–4 p.m. Celebrate the centuries-old Christmas market tradition that originated in Germany. 937-2239013 or www.daytongermanclub.org.

DEC. 1–31 – Light Up Middletown, Smith Park, 500 Tytus Ave., Middletown, 6–10 p.m. daily. A drive-through fantasy light display! See Santa and Mrs. Claus every Fri. and Sat., 7–9 p.m., through Dec. 23. www.lightupmiddletown.org.

THROUGH JAN. 1 – Christmas at the EnterTRAINment Junction, 7379 Squire Court, West Chester. Take a “Journey to the North Pole” where you’ll meet Santa and Mrs. Claus. 877-898-4656. THROUGH JAN. 1 – Holiday Lights on the Hill, 1763 HamiltonCleves Rd., St. Rte. 128, Hamilton, Mon.–Thur. 6–9 p.m. $20 per car; Fri.–Sun. 6–10 p.m., $25 per car; members $15. A 2-mile

DEC. 5, 12, 19, 26 – Vernon McIntyre’s Appalachian Grass, Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Cincinnati, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Free admission. Enjoy dinner and an evening of lively bluegrass music. Reservations recommended. 513-385-9309 or www. vinokletwines.com. DEC. 7 – Christmas on the Green, downtown Piqua, 6–9 p.m. Community caroling, horse-drawn carriage rides, children’s activities, and live entertainment. 937-773-9355 or www. mainstreetpiqua.com. DEC. 7–9 – Cincinnati Pops Orchestra: Holiday Pops, Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Cincinnati, Fri./Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 and 7 p.m. Kids’ tickets just $15. Cincinnati’s holiday tradition returns! Send

DEC. 8–9 – Springfield Antique Show and Flea Market, 4401 S. Charleston Pike, Springfield, Sat. 8 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.–4 p.m. $3, under 16 free. One of the Midwest’s best antique shows. 937-3257621 or www.springfieldantiqueshow.com. DEC. 14–15 – Oxford Musicians Holiday Concert: “Songs of the Season,” 10 S. College Ave., Oxford, 7 p.m. Adults $10, children $5, under 6 free. A cash bar opens at 6:30 p.m. www.oxarts.org/events. DEC. 16 – Winter Avant-Garde Art and Craft Show, Oasis Golf Club and Conference Ctr., 902 Loveland-Miamiville Rd., Loveland, 10 a.m.–5 p.m. $3, under 12 free. This large show will feature artists and crafters selling their original handmade items. Full concession stand on site. www.avantgardeshows.com. DEC. 21 – Winter Solstice Sunset Observance, Serpent Mound, 3850 St. Rte. 73, Peebles, 4–5:30 p.m. 937-205-0094 or www. serpentmound.org.

DECEMBER 2018  •  OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING   37


MEMBER INTERACTIVE

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Santa 3

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Send us your picture! For March, send “Change in the Weather” by December 20; for April, send “Mud season” by January 15. Upload your photos at www.ohioec.org/memberinteractive and remember to tell us your co-op name and to identify everyone in the picture. 38

OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018


11

Loves Pets 1. Our children, Kavin (10) and Kale (7), were reading ’Twas the Night Before Christmas to their elf when our 13-year-old dog, Charlie, wanted to be in on the action. Kara Wiley Pioneer Electric

8. Santa’s helpers Hoda and Ziva say, “Happy Holidays!” Bill and Sheri Courter

Cooperative member

Guernsey-Muskingum Electric Cooperative member

2. Macy was adopted from Shauna’s Rescue last November. She was so scared and distrusting, but she surprised us with her immediate love for Santa. Kim Mego South Central Power Company member

3. My dog, Cindy Ellen, on Santa’s lap. Both are very patient! Bobby Barnett

South Central Power Company members

9. Santa has his lap full with my daughter’s dog, Maggie. Maggie asked for a new collar or a new toy! Mark Dinges 10. Santa (Marty Plas) spent one of his days off from the North Pole at the Dog Days of Summer in downtown Wellington last July. Lorie Wilber Lorain-Medina Rural Electric Cooperative member

11. A goldendoodle Christmas: Winnie, Scarlet, and Molly, all decked out. Cheryl Burke Midwest Electric member

Buckeye Rural Electric Cooperative member

4. Puppy’s first Christmas with Santa. Daniel Slusser Midwest Electric member

5. My daughter, Jenna, and our dogs, Shilo (left) and Penny, are ready for Christmas celebrations. Pam Grine Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative member

6. This is our girl Scarlet with Santa. I believe she is trying to convince Santa she was a good girl all year. Rebecca Starner North Central Electric Cooperative member

7. Bosco was exhausted after opening all his toys from Santa. Nancy Painter South Central Power Company member

DECEMBER 2018 • OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING 39


BEATING THE WINTER

“blahs” BY DIANE YOAKAM

I

f the dark, dreary days of winter have you longing for the dog days of summer, you’re not alone. As much as one-fourth of the population suffers from some form of the “winter blues.” Fortunately, there are strategies to help reverse the doldrums that appear this time of year.

Eat well The decrease in sunlight means that the body doesn’t absorb the same amount of vitamin D from the sun as during the warmer months. Low levels of vitamin D can cause fatigue, back and muscle pain, depression, and frequent illness. The optimal diet to combat the winter blues includes plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, eggs, and other vitamin D-rich foods. Fatty fish, such as salmon and tuna, provide a hearty helping of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids, which also boost mood. Cutting back on sugar intake helps, too — large blood sugar swings can adversely affect mood and cause weight gain that could further aggravate feelings of bleakness.

Ramp up endorphins Regular exercise, laughter, and aromatherapy amplify endorphin production and release, reducing the perception of sadness while providing a clearer state of mind. Working out, especially outdoors in the fresh air when possible, at least 20 to 60 minutes four to five times weekly, is especially effective. Gathering with friends on a regular basis, listening to mood-boosting music, and

enjoying the aroma of lavender or vanilla, have all been linked to endorphin release.

Boost serotonin Light therapy has been shown to be an effective strategy for beating the winter blues. A decrease in sunlight can disrupt the body’s circadian rhythm and cause levels of serotonin, a neurotransmitter responsible for feelings of well-being and happiness, to drop. Creating a brighter environment at home, with at least 30 to 60 minutes of daily exposure to daylight bulbs, has been proven effective against depressive symptoms.

Sleep effectively Dawn simulators are a useful option for those having difficulty getting out of bed on dark winter mornings. The bedside alarm clocks contain a natural-light attachment that comes on gradually to mimic the sunrise, so that the body wakes up naturally and maintains normal circadian rhythm. Going to bed at the same time each night and waking at a regular time each morning allows the body to keep in rhythm and obtain adequate rest, essential to health and well-being of both body and mind. DIANE YOAKAM is a registered and licensed dietitian from Van Buren.

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OHIO COOPERATIVE LIVING • DECEMBER 2018


Co-ops return money to their members!

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That’s right — co-ops are not-for-profit, so when there’s money left after bills are paid, it is returned to members as “capital credits,” or “patronage capital.”

Ohio electric co-ops returned nearly $32 MILLION to members in 2017.

$

Nationally,, electric co-ops returned $1 BILLION to members in 2016, and $16 BILLION since 1988.

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS Members paying their bill generates the operating revenue for the co-op. When all the bills are paid, the extra money at the end of each year, called “margins,” is returned to each member. The co-op’s board approves a return to members, called “capital credits” or “patronage capital.”

ohioec.org/purpose


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Ohio Cooperative Living - December 2018 - Mid-Ohio  
Ohio Cooperative Living - December 2018 - Mid-Ohio