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Early Fall 2017

Official Publication of the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |1


In a world full of nails, bring the hammer.

When long lists of chores stretch out in front of you, hit them head on with some big muscle. That’s where the 6M comes in. It’s the mid-spec utility tractor built to stand toe to toe with big jobs on hardworking beef and dairy operations. No complaints, no quitting, no slowing down. Get up to 10,696 (4850 kg) pounds of hitch lift capacity, a maximum of 30 gpm (113 lpm) of pressure and flow compensated hydraulic power that cycles heavy loads fast, and a heavy-duty, full-frame chassis designed to lift, load, and carry the toughest stuff out there.

More power. More getting work done. The 6M.

The rugged 6M. Available in 110 to 195 engine horsepower. With three transmission choices – including the CommandQuad™ – and the option of cab, open station, 2WD and MFWD. Talk to your dealer about getting more done with America’s Tractor. 2 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

JohnDeere.com/6M


20

31

Features 14 Young Cattlemen’s Conference Shaping the Future of the Industry

19 Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation Scholarship Applications Available

25 OCA & OBC Offer Spring Semester Internship Opportunities

17

BEST Program 2017-2018 Show Schedule

20

31 Ohio State Fair Results & Highlights

18

OCA Seeking Industry Leaders

Editorial

Koehler Farms Mother and Son Work Side By Side

News & Notes

4

Harsh Realities

8

Your Dues Dollars at Work

6

OCA News & Views

16

OCA News

24

Up the Alley

28

NCBA News

26

Forage Corner

52

Breed News

54 On the Edge of Common Sense

55 Your Checkoff Dollars at Work

66

63

Letters to the Editor

65

Beef Briefs

Ohio CattleWomen Update

57

Best of the Buckeye Ohio State Fair Results

Reference 8 OCA County Affiliate Presidents 9

Allied Industry Council

23

Ohio Fall Feeder Cattle Sales

68

Calendar of Events

72

Parting Shots

72

Advertisers’ Index

On the Cover

Photo taken at the 2017 Ohio State Fair by Emily Henes, OCA Staff

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |3


Harsh Realities

Ohio Cattleman 10600 U.S. Highway 42 Marysville, Ohio 43040 Phone 614-873-6736 • Fax 614-873-6835 www.ohiocattle.org beef@ohiobeef.org

By Elizabeth Harsh, Ohio Cattleman Editor

A Valuable Partnership

Editor Elizabeth Harsh Managing Editor Lauren Corry Sales Representative Stephanie Sindel

Ohio Cattleman magazine (USPA: 020-968, ISSN: 15430588) is published six times per year: Winter issue, mailed in January; Expo preview issue, mailed in February; Spring issue, mailed in April; Summer issue, mailed in July; Early Fall issue, mailed in September; and Late Fall issue, mailed in October; for $15 a year to OCA members only. It is dedicated to reporting facts about Ohio’s cattle including marketing, production and legislative news. All editorial and advertising material is screened to meet rigid standards, but publisher assumes no responsibility for accuracy or validity of claims. All rights reserved. Circulation for the Early Fall 2017 issue is 3,157. Published at Minster, Ohio 45865 by the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, 10600 US Highway 42, Marysville, Ohio 43040. Periodical postage paid at Marysville, Ohio and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Ohio Cattleman, 10600 US Highway 42, Marysville, Ohio 43040. CHANGING YOUR ADDRESS: Please send old as well as new address to Ohio Cattleman, 10600 US Highway 42, Marysville, Ohio 43040.

Advertising

To schedule advertising write to: Ohio Cattleman, 10600 US Highway 42, Marysville, Ohio 43040, or call 614-873-6736. All advertising material for the Late Fall Issue must be received by September 8, 2017.

Ohio Cattleman Advertising Rates

Full Page $460 2/3 Page 1/2 Page $260 1/3 Page 1/4 Page $145 1/8 Page Business Card $65 Classified Ad Four Color $270 One Additional Color $90

$345 $175 $105 $50

Ohio Cattlemen’s Association members will receive a 10% discount when advertising their farm products, such as cattle, hay, corn, etc. ...

Call today to place your ad: 614-873-6736

4 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

As this update is written, OCA’s Young Cattlemen’s Conference (YCC) is taking place with 25 young cattle producers from across the state participating in the leadership development program. They are a talented bunch that are passionate about their industry and we expect great things from each of them. Thankfully they still let me be a part of the conference, considering that my kids are now much closer to their age than I am. The YCC program is a great networking opportunity that provides information ranging from understanding the checkoff, to beef production and market outlook info, to carcass evaluation and marketing. The policy side of our business is emphasized with a trip to the Statehouse that focuses on the importance of engaging and being informed on the issues both state and national. NCBA V P of Government Affairs Colin Woodall opened the conference with a great Washington, D.C. update. As a fellow registered lobbyist, Colin also shared that most folks think lobbyists rank just above cockroaches and just below used car salesmen. And no doubt, there are lobbyists that have rightfully earned that ranking. However, he made it clear that NCBA’s policy staff lobby and work on behalf of beef producers and that they take their direction from the policy set by members, just the same way that OCA operates. NCBA and OCA staff wake up each morning thinking about how to assist the beef industry, the same industry that most of our staff are also a part of. During the YCC Conference we talked about several priority issues for the beef industry. One issue that has been a focus as of late, is an Electronic Logging Device (ELD) exemption for livestock haulers. The first deadline for compliance with the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) mandate is at the end of this year. As the deadline nears, the livestock industry has united to work toward a solution that makes sense for livestock haulers. The rule would require commercial motor vehicles to use ELDs, which along with Hours of Service requirements, would limit the flexibility for truck drivers hauling livestock. Recognizing that our industry faces different circumstances than many others and it is crucial for livestock to arrive at their destination as soon as possible, livestock groups, including OCA, have been working toward an exemption for livestock haulers. An appropriations bill that includes a one year exemption to the rule for livestock and insect haulers recently passed the House appropriations committee. Language included in the bill gives the livestock industry extra time to work with the Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration (FMCSA) for more flexibility and the fair regulation of livestock transportation. Though the exemption still needs approval in the Senate, its passage in the House is encouraging and welcomed news for the livestock industry. The ELD issue alone, if not handled appropriately, has the potential to negatively impact the value of feeder calves marketed in Ohio, depending on their final destination. OCA will continue to partner with NCBA and others to work this issue. While ELDs might seem a bit “one off” from the more traditional industry issues, it illustrates the broad range of issues that need to be addressed. Teaching our next generation of beef industry leaders to be engaged and how to be the most effective addressing issues, is certainly a great use of time. And every YCC it seems I can always count on learning a thing or two from them. v


8051

Sire: G A R New Design 5050 | Dam: C V A F Cathy 2400 Bred to Mr HOC Broker 5/5/2017, safe with a heifer calf.

Y85H

Sire: SVF/NJC Built Right N48 | Dam: KKK Lil Chyna P28 Bred to WS Beef King W107

043X

Sire: STF High Dollar NH486 Dam: STF Desmarque SL57 (STF Desa Rae daughter)

Bred to CDI Rimrock 325Z

D77H

Sire: MCM Top Grade | Dam: Drake Bahama Mama September 2016 Open Heifer

D53H

Sire: SVF Steel Force S701 Dam: RHFS Miss Legend Y78H Bred to CCR Wide Range 9005A

ZWT7

Sire: STF High Dollar NH486 Dam: STF Miss WT79

( a Hooks Shear Force 38K daughter )

Bred to CDI Rimrock 325Z

SATURDAY

October 7th 1:00PM EST

SALE LOCATION: Rolling Hills Farms Sale Facility Belle Center, OH SALE CONTACTS: Bob Hoovler (937) 538-1329 Marcia Hoovler (937)538-1537

Sale Managed by CATTLE IN DEMAND Graham Blagg 530.913.6418 | Todd Alford 706.207.9454 www.CattleInDemanD.Com

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |5


OCA Officers

President • Joe Foster Vice President • Sasha Rittenhouse Secretary • Elizabeth Harsh Treasurer • Bill Tom Past President • Frank Phelps

OCA News & Views By Joe Foster, OCA President

Following the Issues

OCA Directors

Aaron Arnett Director At-Large Marysville • Term expires 2017 Tom Karr Director At-Large Pomeroy • Term expires 2018 J.L. Draganic Director At-Large South Solon • Term expires 2019 Scott Alexander District 1 Bowling Green • Term expires 2017 Kelvin Egner District 2 Shelby • Term expires 2018 Pete Conkle District 3 Hanoverton • Term expires 2019 Troy Jones District 4 Harrod • Term expires 2017 Frank Phelps District 5 Belle Center • Term expires 2018 Pam Haley District 6 West Salem • Term expires 2019 Brad Thornburg District 7 Barnesville • Term expires 2017 Sasha Rittenhouse District 8 New Carlisle • Term expires 2018 Jim Jepsen District 9 Amanda • Term expires 2019 Bill Tom District 10 Spring Valley • Term expires 2017 Craig Shelton District 11 Lynchburg • Term expires 2018 Joe Foster • District 12 Gallipolis • Term expires 2019

Elections are held each year in November. If interested in serving on the OCA Board, please call the OCA office.

OCA Staff

Elizabeth Harsh Executive Director Lauren Corry Director of Communications & Managing Editor Cambell Parrish Director of Public Relations & Consumer Marketing Stephanie Sindel Director of Member Services & Youth Programs Ron Windnagel Director of Accounting & Operations Emily Henes Project Manager Amber Shoemaker Administrative Assistant & Youth Program Coordinator 6 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

In following the “The Japanese Beef Tariff” issue in the press, we can see many different perspectives and possible consequences. We should let this serve as a reminder that all markets for our beef, especially export markets, are very volatile. So many times we get bounced around because of raw politics as opposed to market fundamentals. In the last issue of our magazine I spoke of the excitement about renewed access to the China beef market. Wow, things can change in a hurry! Let’s get back to the different perspectives and possible consequences. Some would have us believe this will be totally devastating to our industry, while others see it as a minor speed bump. I surely don’t have the answers on this issue, but we need to keep in mind there are many factors at play here. The tariff increase applies to frozen beef, which is around half of the beef we export to Japan. What impact will a weaker US dollar have on the competitiveness, even when the tariff is increased? Will US beef be shipped fresh or chilled as opposed to frozen? I can go on and on with the different scenarios, but I am going to stop here before I get you folks lost in the weeds with me! I feel one of our biggest allies here will be the Japanese consumer. This tariff rate increase is the result of “safeguards” put in place in 1994. One has to wonder who benefits from the safeguard. Surely not their own consumers who will likely pay a higher price for their US beef. This will be interesting to watch! I want to totally change directions here and share my warm appreciation for the many volunteers in our industry. As we roll through fair season and attempt to get our feet back under us, I want to thank the thousands of volunteers across the state that do so much for agriculture. While these industry-minded folks are busy year round, nothing puts them centerstage like fair season. In reflecting through the years, we all can remember the 4-H advisor, neighbor, cousin, FFA advisor, community leader, etc. that pitched in to help. We need to make time to thank them because the collective input those thousands of people have on our agricultural industry is enormous! One of the highlights of my year is helping serve the Ohio Agricultural Council Hall of Fame Breakfast held during the state fair. For me it is one of those events where you get to visit with some of the people who have had a very positive impact on Ohio Agriculture. Many of whom you only bump in to every year or so, and always look forward to catching up. As I have listened to the inductees’ comments over the years, a common theme is always volunteerism. There is always a reflection on how they worked together with others in some form or fashion to help move the needle toward a better agriculture. Congratulations to the 2017 inductees to the Ohio Agricultural Council Hall of Fame, and thank you for your continued commitment to our industry! v


As a registered seedstock producer whose breeding program is built around ET and AI, we have a responsibility to prove great females. Each year we do exactly that! If you are a student of pedigrees, you’ll see stacked generations of proven females at Maplecrest Farms. The females are bred to be versatile, functional and pass those traits on to their progeny.

Progressive breeding programs ensure genetic improvement. But it’s all talk unless we can prove it!

Lot 1 • Maplecrest Eva L4200 • 18134376 • L4200 is the #3 $Weaning dam in the breed! She has a +11 CED and her numbers rank her in the top 1% for WW, YW, CW, Marb, $W, $F, $G, $QG and $B.

Lot 4 • Maplecrest MCD Eva 6146 • 18764776 • 6146 is a unique daughter of GAR Prophet and offers a stacked pedigree for predictable growth and carcass merit superiority. She combines impressive 50K scores for growth and carcass with a weaning ratio of 110 to help place her in the top 1% for Milk, $W, $G, $QG; 2% Marb; 3% WW; 4% YW; 10% RE, $F, $B. Plus, she’s got double digit CED!

14TH ANNUAL FEMALE PRODUCTION SALE

Lot 2A • Maplecrest Blackcap A6244 • 18765072 • This outstanding young donor prospect is a full sister to the sire GAR Drive, now at ST Genetics. A6244’s dam is quickly earning elite donor status in our program. A6244’s numbers rank her in the top 1% for $G; 2% for $QG, RE, Marb; and 4% $B, plus she has +12 CED.

Saturday, September 23, 2017 6 PM • At the Farm, Hillsboro, Ohio

SELLING • 80 Lots of Angus & Sim-Angus Females • Select Offering of Commercial Females

Lot 8 • Maplecrest Forever Lady 6197 • 18773041 • This attractive daughter of GAR Sure Fire offers a unique blend of calving ease, positive growth and solid carcass merit. 6197’s numbers rank her in the top 1% for CED, CEM; 2% SC, RE, $G; 4% $W; 5% $QG, $YG.

John, Joanie, Lindsey & Lauren Grimes 2594 State Route 73 • Hillsboro, OH 45133 • (937) 764-1198 John’s Cell: (937) 763-6000 • Fax: (937) 764-1617 • mcfarms@cinci.rr.com www.MaplecrestFarms.com • Ben Wheeler: (606) 301-1961 • Adam Hall: (740) 336-8142

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |7


Your Dues Dollars at Work

OCA County Affiliate Presidents

Adams......................................Jeremy Tomlin Allen...........................................Brad Heffner Ashland..................................... Matt Stewart Athens/Meigs/Washington.... Jamey Rauch Auglaize.......................... Charles Sutherland Brown............................................Alan Scott Butler.............................................Dean Lake Carroll................................ Johnna Campbell Champaign.............................. Andy Maurice Clark....................................... Linde Sutherly Clermont......................................Chris Smith Columbiana/Mahoning/Trumbull................. .................................................Duane Nickell Crawford.....................................Kurt Weaver Darke.......................................... Brad Wilcox Fairfield......................................Dale Decker Fayette.......................................J.L. Draganic Fulton................................... Rick Coopshaw Gallia.......................................... Scott Payne Greene.....................................Ethan Randall Hancock................................Charles Beagle Hardin....................................Marcia Hoovler Henry.......................................Tim Brinkman Highland.................................. Craig Shelton Hocking.................................. Jo Ann Murtha Huron......................................Barrett French Jackson................................ Justin Spengler Jefferson................................... Tyler Ramsey Knox......................................Chuck Dudgeon Lawrence............................. Nathan Lambert Licking......................................... Steve Davis Logan.........................................Troy Selhorst Madison................................ Quinton Keeran Marion..................................... Dustin Bayles Mercer........................................Neil Siefring Miami...................................Robert Karnehm Montgomery......................Duane Plessinger Morrow........................................Russ Mayer Muskingum................................... Adam Heil Noble..................................... Pernell Salings Ohio Valley...................................... Ben Cline Perry......................................Jason Poorman Preble...................................... Rodney Mann Putnam............................. Dennis Schroeder Richland................................... Dave Fackler Seneca............................................ Jason Fox Shelby......................................... Jason Gibbs Stark............................................Steve Lewis Vinton.............................Teresa Snider-West Williams.................................. Robin Herman Wood...................................... Brett Reynolds Wyandot........................................Mike Thiel

8 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

A review of actions by the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association Legislative & Regulatory • • •

• • • • • •

Met with new members of the Ohio House and Senate Ag Committees. Joined a letter to the leadership of the U.S. House and Senate Ag Committees stressing the need to provide funding in the Farm Bill to create a U.S. Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) vaccine bank. Attended a joint hearing of the Ohio House and Senate Agriculture Committees during the Ohio State Fair and co-hosted a reception for the committee members and central Ohio VIPs to promote Ohio Ag and the fair. Hosted several public office holders and candidates at the beef barn during the 2017 Ohio State Fair. Supported and attended fundraisers for various members of the Ohio congressional delegation. Signed several letters of support for individuals nominated for key positions in the Trump administration. Worked with NCBA and state affiliates to seek an exemption for the mandated Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) that are to be in place by the end of 2017 for truck drivers hauling livestock. Submitted comments to the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service in support of allowing dentition and documentation of actual age to be used in determining carcass grades. Submitted comments to the U.S. EPA to support withdrawal of the 2015 WOTUS rule.

Youth • • • • •

Presented three $1,000 Best of the Buckeye (BOTB) academic scholarships during the Ohio State Fair. Sponsored by Ohio Ag Equipment and Ohio Cat. Announced the 2017-18 OCA BEST sanctioned show schedule. Sponsored beef awards for the 4-H Livestock Judging Contest held during the Ohio State Fair. Co-sponsored a dinner for the state fair market animal exhibitors and their families. Distributed BOTB press releases and ordered awards for all Ohio State Fair exhibitors and breeders.

Programs & Events • • • • •

Represented Ohio cattlemen at the NCBA Summer Business Meeting in Denver, Colorado. Hosted the OSU Football team for a meal featuring beef. Finalized plans for the Cattlemen’s Gala Celebration and Fundraiser on August 26. Hosted the 2017 OCA Young Cattlemen’s Conference August 10-12. Planned and hosted the first of several Beef Industry Update meetings scheduled for August through September.

Association • • •

Emailed OCA e-newsletter for July and August. Shipped copies of The Ring directory to County Extension offices. Shipped 2017 Ohio Feeder Calf special sales brochures to Ohio auction markets. v


OCA’s Allied Industry Council 2017 Membership Listing

The following companies support the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association as Allied Industry Council members. If your group is looking for educational speakers, consider contacting the companies marked with an asterik (*). When seeking goods for your cattle operation, please remember the companies that support Ohio’s beef industry. OCA values the partnership that exists with this group of Allied Industry Council members.

ABS Global Inc. Mike Allerding, Roger Sundberg, Brian Good, Buck Owen, Aaron Short 2252 South Swinehart Road Apple Creek, OH 44606 Phone: 330-466-2588 Fax: 330-698-3036 E-mail: roger.sundberg@genusplc.com brian.good@genusplc.com mark.owen@genusplc.com aaron.short@genusplc.com mike.allerding@genusplc.com

Website: www.absglobal.com

*ADM Animal Nutrition Dan Meyer 3262 Evergreen Drive Wooster, OH 44691 Phone: 330-466-3281 E-mail: dpmeyer@sssnet.com Website: www.admworld.com Travis Smith 554 Pleasant Valley Road NW Sugarcreek, OH 44681 Phone: 937-537-1164 E-mail: travis.smith@adm.com Ag Credit David White 1100 East Center Street Marion, OH 43302 Phone: 419-435-7758 E-mail: dwhite@agcredit.net Website: www.agcredit.ent

*Allflex USA, Inc. David McElhaney 149 Pittsburgh Grade Road Hookstown, PA 15050 Phone: 724-494-6199 E-mail: dmcelhaney@allflexusa.com Website: www.allflexusa.com Alltech Melisa Rayvid 90 Parah Drive St. Albans, VT 05478 Phone: 802-524-7460 E-mail: mrayvid@alltech.com Website: www.alltech.com Reese Windham Phone: 440-364-2687 E-mail: rwindham@alltech.com Duff George Phone: 717-327-9470 E-mail: dgeorge@alltech.com American Angus Association Alex Tolbert 986 Curry Pike Harrodsburg, KY 40330 Phone: 706-338-8733 E-mail: atolbert@angus.org Website: www.angus.org Clint Mefford Phone: 816-383-5143 E-mail: cmefford@angus.org

AgLand Co-op Dale Stryffeler 219 Third St.; PO Box 604 Marietta, OH 45750 Phone: 330-556-8465 Fax: 740-373-2878 E-mail: dstryffeler@agland.coop Website: www.agland.coop/

Animal Profiling International Ray Rogers & Pete Hausser 6040 North Cutter Circle, Ste. 317 Portland, OR 97217 Phone: 503-247-8066 (Ray) 970-372-2302 (Pete) E-mail: rrr@animalprofiling.com Website: www.animalprofiling.com

Ag Nation Products Bob Clapper, Marie Clapper P.O. Box 30127 East Canton, OH 44730 Phone: 800-247-3276 E-mail: agnationprods@aol.com Website: www.agnation.com

Armstrong Ag & Supply Dean Armstrong 269 Cove Road Jackson, OH 45640 Phone: 740-988-5681 E-mail: armstrong.agri@yahoo.com

*AgriLabs Ezra Swope 2086 Potter Creek Road New Enterprise, PA 16664 Phone: 814-977-6167 Email: eswope@agrilabs.com Website: www.agrilabs.com

Beck’s Hybrids Bruce Kettler & Ryan Moore 6767 E. 276th St. Atlanta, IN 46031 Phone: 1-800-937-2325 E-mail: bkettler@beckshybrids.com rmoore@beckshybrids.com Website: www.beckshybrids.com

BioZyme, Inc. Lindsey Grimes 8863 West Berrysville Rd, Hillsboro, OH 45133 Phone: 816-596-8779 E-mail: lgrimes@biozymeinc.com Boehringer-Ingelheim Ryan Schroer 486 Township Road 1275 Ashland, OH 44805 Phone: 812-243-5128 Email: ryan.schroer@boehringer-ingelheim.com Website: www.boehringer-ingelheim.com Brent Tolle 791 Brashears Point Road Taylorsville, KY 40071 Phone: 502-905-7831 E-mail: brent.tolle@boehringer-ingelheim.com *Cargill Animal Nutrition Bradley Carter 444 Twp Rd. 1101 Nova, OH 44859 Phone: 330-234-2552 E-mail: bradley_carter@cargill.com Neil Bumgarner 2510 Lincoln Ave. Point Pleasant, WV 25550 Phone: 304-615-9239 E-mail: neil_bumgarner@cargill.com Tom Rohanna 449 Ross Street Waynesburg, PA 15270 Phone: 412-217-8939 E-mail: tom_rohanna@cargill.com Website: www.cargill.com COBA/Select Sires Duane Logan, Kevin Hinds, Abby Mayer, Bruce Smith, Julie Ziegler 1224 Alton Darby Creek Road Columbus, OH 43228 Phone: 614-878-5333 E-mail: julie@cobaselect.com duane@cobaselect.com abby@cobaselect.com bruce@cobaselect.com kevin@cobaselect.com Website: www.cobaselect.com CompManagement, Inc. Adam Rice PO Box 884 Dublin, OH 43017 Phone: 614-760-2450 Fax: 614-790-8210 E-mail: Adam.Rice@sedgwickcms.com Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |9


DHI Cooperative Inc. Brian Winters 1224 Alton Darby Creek Road; Suite A P.O. Box 28168 Columbus, OH 43228 Phone: 1-800-DHI-OHIO E-mail: brian.winters@dhicoop.com

F.L. Emmert Company Ken Rod 2007 Dunlap Street Cincinnati, OH 45214 Phone: 513-721-5808 E-mail: krod@emmert.com Website: www.emmert.com; www.showbloom.com

*Hubbard Feeds Inc. Tom Linn 1402 Mohican Tr. Wapakoneta, OH 45895 Phone: 567-204-3065 E-mail: toml@hubbardfeeds.com Website: www.hubbardfeeds.com

Tim Pye 62189 Institute Rd. Lore City, OH 43755 Phone: 912-682-9798 E-mail: tim.pye@dhicoop.com Website: www.dhicoop.com

David Westhoven 1096 Arcadia Blvd. Westerville, OH 43082 Phone: 954-261-5730 E-mail: dwesthoven@emmert.com

Jeremy Baldwin 46 Stonebridge Drive Winchester, IN 47394 Cell: 765-730-5459 E-mail: jeremy.baldwin@ridleyinc.com

Franklin Equipment Troy Gabriel 7570 Fishel Dr. South Dublin, OH 43016 Phone: 614-389-2161 Cell: 614-537-2897 E-mail: tgabriel@gabriellogan.com Website: www.franklinequipment.com

Darl Bishir 628 W. North Street St. Marys, OH 45885 Cell: 419-236-0656 E-mail: darl.bishir@hubbardfeeds.com

Elanco Animal Health Jon Sweeney 9655 W 200 N Michigan City, IN 46360 E-mail: jsweeney@elanco.com Website: www.elanco.com Katie Oney 294 Blue Jacket Circle Pickerington, OH 43147 Phone: 614-725-6332 E-mail: katie.oney@elanco.com Engelhaupt Embroidery Linda & Tom Engelhaupt, Leslie & Chris Gardisser 134 South Main St Bellefontaine, OH 43311 Phone: 937-592-7075 Emails: linda@engelhauptembroidery.com leslie@engelhauptembroidery.com tom@engelhauptembroidery.com chris@engelhauptembroidery.com Website: engelhauptembroidery.com Evolution Ag Doug Loudenslager 13275 US 42 Plain City, OH 43064 Phone: 740-363-1341 Fax: 740-363-6968 E-mail: dougl@evolutionagllc.com Website: www.evolutionagllc.com Farm Credit Mid-America Tara Durbin 7835 Lancaster-Newark Rd. Baltimore, OH 43105 Phone: 855-838-0260 E-mail: tara.durbin@e-farmcredit.com Website: www.e-farmcredit.com David Sanders 1540 US Highway 62 SW Washington Court House, OH 43160 Phone: 740-335-3306 E-mail: david.sanders@e-farmcredit.com Fennig Equipment Gary Fennig 1456 St. Anthony Rd. Coldwater, OH 45828 Phone: 419-953-8500 E-mail: afennig@bright.net Website: www.fennigequipment.com

10 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Heartland Bank Brian Fracker 44 W. Locust St. Newark, OH 43055 Phone: 740-349-7888 Cell: 740-403-6225 E-mail: frackerb@heartlandbank.com Website: www.heartlandbank.com Joel M. Oney 67 North Stygler Road Gahanna, OH 43230 Phone: 614-475-7024 Cell: 330-464-1804 E-mail: oneyj@heartlandbank.com Matt Bucklew E-mail: bucklewm@heartlandbank.com Heritage Cooperative Allan Robison, Cy Prettyman, Stef Lewis & David Monnin 304 Bloomfield Avenue Urbana, OH 43078 Phone: 937-652-2135 E-mail: arobison@heritagecooperative.com slewis@heritagecooperative.com dmonnin@heritagecooperative.com CLPrettyman@landolakes.com Website: www.heritagecooperative.com Highland Livestock Supply Curt and Allison Hively P.O. Box 190 New Waterford, OH 44445 Phone: 330-457-2033 E-mail: info@highlandlivestocksupply.com Website: www.highlandlivestocksupply.com Hilliard Lyons Patrick Saunders 352 Second Ave.; P.O. Box 1151 Gallipolis, OH 45631 Phone: 740-446-2000 E-mail: psaunders@hilliard.com Website: www.hilliard.com

Perry Owen 3373 St. Rt. 127 South Eaton, OH 45320 Cell: 937-726-9736 E-mail: perry.owen@hubbardfeeds.com JD Equipment Inc. Matthew Damschroder 1200 Delmont Road Lancaster, OH 43130 Phone: 740-653-6951 E-mail: mattdamschroder@jdequipment.com Website: www.jdequipment.com K Buildings Doug Hemm 18018 State Route Venedocia, OH 45894 Phone: 937-216-5620 E-mail: doug.hemm@kbuildings.com Website: www.kbuildings.com *Kalmbach Feeds Jeff Neal, Kyle Nickels & Cheryl Miller 7148 State Hwy 199 Upper Sandusky, OH 43351 Office: 419-356-0128 E-mail: jneal@kalmbachfeeds.com kyle.nickels@kalmbachfeeds.com cheryl.miller@kalmbachfeeds.com Website: www.kalmbachfeeds.com *Kent Feeds Patrick Barker 5433 Sunrise View Circle Liberty Township, OH 45044 Phone: 513-315-3833 E-mail: patrick.barker@kentww.com Website: www.kentfeeds.com Joseph Wright 677 Jee Road Winchester, OH 45697 Phone: 937-213-1168 E-mail: joseph.wright@kentww.com Phil Reppart 4481 Firestone Road Shreve, OH 44676 Phone: 330-201-0991 E-mail: philip.reppart@kentww.com


McArthur Lumber & Post Rick Jakmas 31310 State Route 29 McArthur, OH 45651 Phone: 740-596-2551 E-mail: rick@mcarthurlumberandpost.com Website: www.mcarthurlumberandpost.com

Ohio Soybean Council Jennifer Coleman 918 Proprietors Road Suite A Worthington, OH 43085 Phone: 614-476-3100 E-mail: jcoleman@soyohio.org Website: www.soyohio.org

McBurney’s Livestock Equipment Chris McBurney 1494 Campbellsburg Road New Castle, KY 40050 Phone: 502-6673495 E-mail: chris@cattleeq.com Website: www.cattleeq.com

*PBS Animal Health Becky Vincent 2780 Richville Drive Massillon, OH 44646 Phone: 1-800-321-0235 E-mail: bvincent@rjmatthews.com Website: www.pbsanimalhealth.com

*M. H. Eby, Inc./Eby Trailers Kirk Swensen & Steve Rittenhouse 4435 State Route 29 West Jefferson, OH 43162 Phone: 614-879-6901 E-mail: kirk.swensen@mheby.com steven.rittenhouse@mheby.com Website: www.mheby.com

POET Biorefining - Marion Duane McCombs 1660 Hillman Ford Rd. Marion, OH 43302 Phone: 740-383-9774 E-mail: duane.mccombs@poet.com Website: www.poet.com

*Mercer Landmark Chad Knapke, Randy Seeger, Joe Siegrist & Travis Spicer 426 W. Market St.; P.O. Box 328 Celina, OH 45822 Phone: 419-733-6434 (Chad) 419-230-9832 (Randy) 419-305-2451 (Joe) 419-733-9915 (Travis) E-mail: chadk@mercerlandmark.com randys@mercerlandmark.com jsiegrist@mercerlandmark.com travis@mercerlandmark.com Website: www.mercerlandmark.com Merck Animal Health Seth Clark 18161 Hackett Road Dalton, OH 44618 Phone: 330-465-2728 E-mail: seth.clark9@merck.com Website: www.merck-animal-health.com Multimin USA, Inc. 2809 East Harmony #190 Ft. Collins, CO 80528 Phone: 970-372-2302 Fax: 970-631-8945 E-mail: kimber@multiminusa.com Website: www.multiminusa.com Thomas Carper 7710 N State Route 56 Vevay, IN 47043 Phone: 540-336-2737 E-mail: tcarper@multiminusa.com Ohio CAT Linda Meier, Chad Wiseman, Alan Rhodes, Brian Speelman & Bill Kuhar 5252 Walcutt Court Columbus, OH 43228 Phone: 614-851-3629 E-mail: lmeier@ohiocat.com cwiseman@ohiocat.com arhodes@ohiocat.com bspeelman@ohiocat.com bkuhar@ohiocat.com Website: www.ohiocat.com

Priefert Ranch Equipment Candice Davidson, Kayla Gray, & Steve Campbell P.O. Box 1540 Mt. Pleasant, TX 75456 Phone: 903-434-8973 E-mail: cdavidson@priefert.com kgray@priefert.com scampbell@priefert.com Website: www.priefert.com *Purina Animal Nutrition Patrick Gunn 3461 S. 50 W. Greenfield, IN 46140 Phone: 316-967-4345 E-mail: pgunn@landolakes.com Website: www.purinamills.com David Newsom 5955 Mill Oak Dr. Noblesville, IN 46062 Phone: 317-677-5799 Email: dknewsom@landolakes.com Mark Stehno Phone: 417-207-7440 Email: mjstehno@landolakes.com

Richwood Bank Chad Hoffman, Cody Johnston & Emily Davis 28 N Franklin Street Richwood, Ohio 43344 Phone: 740-943-2317 (Chad) 740-436-0607 (Cody) 740-943-2317 (Emily) E-mail: choffman@richwoodbank.com cody@richwoodmarketing.com edavis@richwoodmarketing.com Website: www.richwoodbank.com Rock River Laboratory Megan Kelly P.O. Box 1039 Wooster, OH 44691 Phone: 330-462-6041 Email: megan_kelly@rockriverlab.com Website: www.rockriverlab.com StandAlone Feed, LLC Jonathan Hjelmervik P.O. Box 16459 Lubbock, TX 79490 Phone: 806-778-5527 E-mail: jonathan@standalonefeed.com Website: www.standalonefeed.com ST Genetics Aaron Arnett 6669 Falling Meadows Drive Galena, OH 43021 Phone: 614-947-9931 E-mail: aarnett@stgen.com Website: www.stgen.com Straight A’s Nikki McCarty 9036 Leopard Road NW Malvern, OH 44644 Phone: 330-868-1182 E-mail: nikki@ranchcity.com Website: www.ranchcity.com Summit Livestock Facilities Angie Dobson 3823 W 1800 S Remington, IN 47977 Phone: 800-213-0567 E-mail: adobson@summitlivestock.com Website: www.summitlivestock.com

Quality Liquid Feeds Joe Foster 6056 El Camino Drive Plain City, OH 43064 Phone: 614-560-5228 E-mail: jfoster@qlf.com Website: www.qlf.com

Sunrise Cooperative, Inc. Phil Alstaetter 2025 W State Street PO Box 870 Fremont, OH 43420 Phone: 937-575-6780 E-mail: palstaetter@sunriseco-op.com Website: www.sunrisecoop.com

Reed & Baur Insurance Agency LLC Jim Rogers & Paula Rogers 2097 E State Street, Suite A Athens, OH 45701 Phone: 1-866-593-6688 E-mail: pdillon@reedbaur.com jrogers@reedbaur.com Website: www.reedbaur.com

Umbarger Show Feeds Eric King 502 West Township Road 58 Tiffin, OH 44883 Phone: 317-422-5195 E-mail: eking@umbargerandsons.com Website: www.umbargerandsons.com

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |11


*United Producers, Inc. Hayley Beck, Sam Roberts & Bill Tom 8351 N. High Street Suite 250 Columbus, OH 43235 Phone: 614-890-6666 (Hayley) 937-477-0060 (Sam) 1-800-456-3276 (Bill) E-mail: hbeck@uproducers.com sroberts@uproducers.com btom@uproducers.com Website: www.uproducers.com

Weaver Leather Livestock Lisa Shearer, Angela Shoemaker, & Taylor Banbury 7540 CR 201; PO Box 68 Mt. Hope, OH 44660 Phone: 330-674-1782 ext. 206 (Lisa) 330-674-1782 ext. 251 (Angela) E-mail: lisas@weaverleather.com angelas@weaverleather.com taylorb@weaverleather.com Website: www.weaverleather.com

*Zoetis Animal Health Leesa Beanblossom 7174 Auld Road Bradford, OH 45308 Phone: 937-447-3044 E-mail: leesa.l.beanblossom@zoetis.com Website: www.zoetis.com Mindy Thornburg 56201 Boston Rd. Barnesville, OH 43713 Phone: 330-201-1318 E-mail: mindy.thornburg@zoetis.com Ted Holthaus 1700 Cardo Rd. Fort Loramie, OH 45845 Phone: 937-489-1548 E-mail: ted.holthaus@zoetis.com

Visit each AIC member’s website easily from www.ohiocattle.org! Know someone that might be interested in joining the Allied Industry Council? View the complete member benefits on the OCA website.

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Sunday, September 24, 2017

2 p.m. Claylick Run Sale Facility Newark, OH Sponsored by the Ohio Shorthorn Breeders’ Association

Mike Carper 740-815-2216

Quinton Keeran 740-808-3381

Dave Greenhorn 937-470-6552

Jason Workman 419-651-2442

Jeff Winkle 937-694-1871

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |13


Young Cattlemen’s Conference

Young Cattlemen’s Conference participants learned about current issues in the beef industry at the Ohio State House. Pictured back row from left: Nick Erf, Huron; Matthew Horst, Wayne; Sam Preston, Licking; Gus Baldosser, Seneca; Devin Coon, Jackson; Chase Gostomsky, Darke; Drew Baus, Wood. Pictured middle row from left: Alex Finney, Crawford; Dale Hamilton, Licking; Jessica Christman, Stark; Luke Vollborn, Gallia; Lance Neville, Gallia; Brandon Corry, Greene; Kyle Bunn, Guernsey; Andrew Owens, Gallia; Kyndall Williams, Morrow. Pictured front row from left: Brandie Finney, Crawford; Brandee Painter, Licking; Halee Allen, Highland; Courtney Vollborn, Gallia; Amanda Neville, Gallia; Brooke Weeks, Clark; Paige Weeks, Highland; Ben Klick, Stark; Joseph Wright, Adams.

Shaping the Future of the Industry T

he 2017 Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation Young Cattlemen’s Conference (YCC) hosted 25 cattlemen and women for a 3-day leadership development program in Columbus and the central Ohio areas, Aug. 10-12. The conference was made possible by Farm Credit Mid-America and the Ohio Soybean Council. YCC kicked off Thursday evening at the Legends Lane Reproductive Services in Alexandria with a beef dinner and participants were present for the 2017 Ohio State Fair Commercial Cattle Show carcass contest awards presentation. Guest speaker, Colin Woodall, Senior Vice President, Government Affairs, National Cattlemen’s Association (NCBA), gave 14 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

attendees a Washington, D.C. policy update on the issues that the industry is facing. Conference attendees also participated in a spokesperson training program by Ryan Goodman, Director of Grassroots Advocacy and Spokesperson Development, NCBA. Goodman lead participants through a media training session that strengthened their communication skills, taught attendees how to tell their beef production story, and become a more effective cattle industry leader. Ohio Beef Council staff led a discussion regarding its role in checkoff collection and beef promotional efforts in Ohio. OCA staff also discussed the

value of membership and the role OCA has in legislative and regulatory issues. Participants had the opportunity to have lunch at Cameron Mitchell’s The Pearl restaurant to learn about current checkoff funded beef promotions. Following lunch, participants traveled to the Ohio State House where they met with Representative Brian Hill (District 97). Representative Hill, who chairs the House Agricultural and Rural Development Committee, spoke about current Ohio legislation affecting the beef cattle industry and answered questions from the group. The final day included a session with Dr. Lyda Garcia, Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University Department of Animal Sciences, for a Mini-BEEF


Pictured left: Participants had the opportunity to tour the Ohio State football team’s practice facilities on Saturday morning. Pictured right: YCC Participant, Andrew Owens, Gallia County, talks with Representative Brian Hill during a visit to the Statehouse.

Pictured top: Rob Stout of Legends Lane Reproductive Services, Alexandria, Ohio, leads a tour of his operation’s facilities on Thursday evening. Pictured bottom: Dr. Lyda Garcia takes participants into the meat cooler at the Ohio State University to discuss wholesale and retail cuts of beef.

509 class. Dr. Garcia provided handson learning on how meat is graded, fabrication of wholesale and retail cuts, and other issues that can affect beef quality and pricing. Participants also viewed champion carcasses from the 2017 Ohio State Fair. A special tour of the Ohio State University Woody Hayes Athletic Center was a highlight of the program thanks to a continuing relationship between OCA and the OSU football team. Participants learned about the history of OSU football and walked through training and practice facilities. YCC participants wrapped up their morning with a state of the beef industry update with John Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator. The purpose of the YCC is to offer emerging Ohio beef industry leaders and young producers the opportunity to build their own leadership skills as they network with beef industry leaders, government officials, businesses and media. Young beef producers interested in attending the 2018 YCC should contact the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation at 614-873-6736 or email beef@ohiobeef.org. v

Pictured above: YCC Participants had the opportunity to eat lunch at The Pearl, a Cameron Mitchell Restaurant (CMR) in the Short North of Columbus, Ohio. CMR is a partner of the Ohio Beef Council.

Pictured above: Attendees participate in communications training presented by NCBA’s Ryan Goodman, Director of Grassroots Advocacy and Spokesperson Development. Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |15


OCA News

Continued on page 18

OCA’s Replacement Female Sale Consignments Due Oct. 2, 2017

Regardless if you are a buyer or a seller, now is the time to consider being involved in the third annual Ohio Cattlemen’s Association Replacement Female Sale scheduled for Friday, Nov. 24, 2017. The sale will be hosted at the Muskingum Livestock facility in Zanesville and will begin at 6 p.m. According to John Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator, these are truly dynamic times for the beef cattle industry. The immediate future looks bright. The nation’s beef cow herd has gone through an extended period of contraction but currently appears to be stabilizing with an eye towards potential expansion. Now is a great time to own breeding females. The demand for quality bred females

16 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

should be strong in the coming months which present opportunities for both the buyer and seller. The buyer of bred females can add numbers and quality genetics with documented health records to their herd. By purchasing bred females as opposed to saving heifer calves, the buyer can recover a larger portion of their investment more quickly by selling the resulting calves during the strong feeder calf market expected in 2018. The seller can also capitalize on the strong demand for quality females in today’s market. Consignments can be bred heifers, bred cows, or cow-calf pairs. Females must be under the age of five as of Jan. 1, 2018, and may be of registered or commercial background. Consignments

for the sale are due to the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association by Oct. 2, 2017. Sale information can be obtained by contacting the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association at (614) 873-6736 or at their web site located at www.ohiocattle.org. Questions about the sale can be directed to John F. Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator at (740) 289-2071, Extension #242 or by e-mail at grimes.1@osu.edu. This sale is an excellent option for both buyers and sellers to help contribute to the improvement of Ohio’s beef cow herd. v


Oh, the 2017-2018 Show Schedule

Places You’ll

Show! November 25-26

Heart Of it All • Lima

Lebanon

December 9-10

Ohio AGR Holiday Classic • Columbus

January 6-7

Springf ield

Scarlet & Gray Midwest Showdown • Columbus

January 27-28

Clark County Cattle Battle • Springfield

London

February 10-11

Madison County Winter Classic • London

February 17-18

War at Warren • Lebanon

Columbus Lima Millersburg

March 3-4

Holmes County Preview • Millersburg

March 16-18

Ohio Beef Expo • Columbus

May 5

BEST Banquet • Columbus

Ohio Cattlemen’s Association www.ohiocattle.org • 614-873-6736 • beef@ohiobeef.org

#ohiocattle

To create your online user & cattle profiles and to make show entries prior to each show visit best.ohiocattle.org. All cattle must have an EID tag to participate in a BEST sanctioned show. Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |17


OCA News

Continued on page 25

OCA Seeking Industry Leaders OCA Director Nominations due October 1

Nominations for the OCA board of directors are due by October 1, 2017. OCA districts 1, 4, 7, 10 and one at-large position are up for election this fall. Refer to the map outlining the districts. Ballots will be included in the OCA membership renewal mailing planned for 2018. Only those OCA members in the district up for election will receive a ballot to vote for their director. All OCA members will receive a ballot to vote for the one at-large director. Currently serving in the director positions up for election are district 1, Scott Alexander, Tontogany; district 4, Troy Jones, Harrod; district 7, Brad Thornburg, Barnesville; district 10, Bill Tom, Washington C.H. and at-large Aaron Arnett, Galena. The term is for three years, and directors can serve a maximum of two terms.

Per the OCA bylaws, “Each OCA member shall have the right to nominate one candidate for director from the member’s district.” County affiliates may also nominate candidates for district director. Please make sure the individual nominated has agreed to have their name placed in nomination. A nominating committee appointed by the OCA president will nominate at-large directors. For additional information concerning district director nominations or a copy of the director position description, contact the OCA office at 614-873-6736. v

The Buckeye Hereford Association & The Switzerland of Ohio Polled Hereford Association Have teamed up to bring you a hereford weekend! Saturday September 30th - Field Day hosted by Green Valley Farm at the farm in Pleasant City Sunday October 1st - Ohio Hereford Futurity at the Guernsey Co. Fairgrounds in Old Washington

Rick VanFleet and his family are hosting the Buckeye Hereford Association Field Day on September 30, 2017 at the farm in Pleasant City. There will be educational speakers, a small judging contest, food, and fun for the whole family. You need not be a Hereford Breeder to attend. Anyone who raises or is interested in beef cattle is welcome to attend. Rick will be expecting you about 1PM. Please plan to join us for an afternoon of fun, food and fellowship Then grab a hotel in nearby Cambridge. We have a Buckeye Hereford block reserved at a great rate of $75 at the Fairfield Inn in Cambridge! Join us the next morning at the Ohio Hereford Futurity in Old Washington, just 10 miles from the hotel to the fairgrounds. The Switzerland of Ohio Polled Hereford Association always feeds us well and the show will start at 1PM. As details and speakers are finalized we will post them on the www.BuckeyeHerefords.com webpage as well as on the facebook page. Feel free to give us a call should you have any questions.

BHA/SOPHA Field Day - Rick VanFleet (c) 740-541-8729 (h) 740-732-4783 Green Valley Farms- 18081 Halleys Ridge Road - Pleasant City, Ohio 43772 Ohio Hereford Futurity - Lisa Keets (440) 320-6193 Guernsey County Fairgrounds - 335 Old National Road - Old Washington, Ohio 43768 18 |Hereford Ohio Cattleman | Early Field Day.indd 1 Fall Issue 2017

8/17/2017 10:04:10 AM


Ohio Cattlemen’‘ ’s Foundation News Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation Scholarship Applications Available Several college scholarships are currently available to beef industry youth. These scholarships are administered through the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation in conjunction with the following organizations and individuals. Applications are now being accepted for the following scholarships and are due October 31, 2017. Note: Applicants are only eligible to receive one Foundation scholarship per calendar year.

Tagged for Greatness

Four $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to a college student who is enrolled in an agricultural program or a graduating high school senior who plans to study agriculture at a college or university. This scholarship is made possible by the sale of Ohio’s beef specialty license plates. For information on purchasing beef plates, contact the Foundation office at 614-873-6736.

Cattlemen’s Country Club

Three $1,000 scholarships will be awarded to a college student who is enrolled in a two-year or four-year program or a graduating high school senior who plans to attend a college or university majoring in an agricultural or non-agricultural program. This scholarship is made possible by proceeds from the beef putt-putt golf course at the Ohio State Fair.

Saltwell Expo Scholarship

One $1,000 scholarship will be awarded to a college student who is enrolled in an agricultural program or a graduating high school senior who plans to study agriculture at a college or university. This scholarship is sponsored by Saltwell Western Store, owned by Jay and Sally Puzacke and the Ohio Beef Expo. The scholarship is funded by a percentage of sales from the official line of Expo clothing sold

through Saltwell’s trade show booth at the Ohio Beef Expo.

William A. Cleland, Sr. Memorial Scholarship

One high school senior or college student who is enrolled in a two-year or four-year program will be awarded a $1,000 scholarship. Students must be majoring in an agricultural program to receive the scholarship, with preference going to those with beef related degrees. This scholarship was created in honor of Bill Cleland, Sr. who passed away in October 2014.

Noah Cox Memorial Scholarship

One $1,000 scholarship will be awarded to a college student who is enrolled in a two-year or four-year program or a graduating high school senior who plans to attend a college or university majoring in a agricultural or non-agricultural program. This scholarship was created in honor of Noah Cox who passed away in May 2017.

will be given to applicants attending a school in Ohio. Applicants’ majors may vary; however, preference will be given to a major in agriculture, specifically relating to beef. Applicants must be maintaining a 2.75 GPA or higher. Visit www.ohiocattlewomen.com for more information. Applications due Dec. 15, 2017.

To Apply

Interested students can download the applications at www.ohiocattle.org or www.ohiocattlewomen.com. All completed applications for the first four scholarships must be returned to the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation office by October 31, 2017. Questions can be directed to ehenes@ohiobeef. org or by calling 614-873-6736. v

Ohio CattleWomen

Up to five $1,000 scholarships will be awarded annually to outstanding college junior or senior students in a four-year program (20172018 school year). Priority Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |19


Koehler Farms Mother and Son Work Side By Side

Story & photos by Amy Beth Graves

J

oe Koehler and his mother, Rose, were kicking around the idea of making changes to their commercial cattle operation a few years ago when a friend offered some advice … along with the use of his bull. At the time, the Fairfield County family was raising predominantly Angus cows bred to registered Simmental bulls. The bull offered to the Koehlers was a Charolais that belonged to Stan Smith, an Ohio State University Extension educator in Fairfield County. Stan, who was honored with the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association’s Industry Service Award this year, had been suggesting the Koehlers breed their cows with a Charolais bull to give the calves more weight. And it just happened that he needed someone to house his Charolais bull in the summer.   The Koehlers took him up on his offer and the next year when they weaned their calves, it was obvious which ones had been bred to the Charolais bull because they were so much bigger.   “We were sold after that. It intensified what we were doing. We sell feeder calves, and pounds at weaning is money. Using Charolais bulls has been the biggest improvement on the farm,” said Rose, who is retired after working at a nearby truck company. 20 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Six years later, the Koehlers are still breeding about 60 predominantly Angus cows to Stan’s bull and two Charolais bulls purchased from a breeder in western Iowa. In the past, the farm would keep back a couple of their herd’s better heifers to breed but now they sell them all and buy about four Angus-Simmental bred heifers at OCA’s Replacement Female sale held in Zanesville every year.

For the past few years, a Fairfield County producer has bought all of Koehler’s calves every October when they reach between 600-700 pounds. The Koehlers follow a strict regime to get the calves ready for that producer. Calving is in the middle of March with the calves tagged the day they’re born. When the calves

are 45-60 days old, they’re dewormed and fly tagged and the males castrated. The Koehlers have found that castrating the males early makes them easier to handle. “It seems to be easier on the calves and on us because some of those calves are pretty big,” Rose said, noting that her son primarily does the tagging and other hands-on tasks.   In early August, the calves are weaned and then the Koehlers precondition them by starting them on feed and giving them any necessary vaccinations.  “The buyer likes to purchase them like that because he doesn’t have to worry as much about them getting sick. They’re ready to go on feed because we’ve done all the work,” Joe said.   Koehler Farms got its start in 1978 when Rose and her now deceased husband, Joe, bought 23 acres near Rushville. Both had grown up on farms and wanted to live in the country. While they preferred cattle, they started in the hog business with 50-60 sows because it was a quick turnover. “Our intent was that we were going to buy a larger farm and this was temporary but we’re still here today,” Rose said, noting that another 77 acres has been added to


the farm over the years along with a couple of barns. She has three children -- Joe, Bob and Chris (Kemmerer) -- and four young grandchildren who all live nearby and help out on the farm. Her son Joe helps run Rose’s farm along with his own, a 160-acre farm just up the road where he lives with his wife, Azure, and their children, 8-year-old Evelyn, 6-year-old Stella and 1 ½ year-old Denver. Mother and son have their own cattle and share the bulls.   “Our goal was always to get into the cattle industry. We started when Joe was about 7-8 years old and started showing steers in 4-H. We were able to build (up the cattle side) and do away with the hogs,” Rose said. Interested in continuing to farm, Joe headed off to Ohio State University to pursue a degree in agriculture. It was while taking classes there that his father, a long-time vocational-ag teacher, died of cancer in 2001. It was a difficult time for the family and Joe, who had always been a hard worker on the farm, took on a larger role. “At the time he was taking classes at Ohio State, working in a lab and running home every weekend to help out. It was a hard time for us. Then when he got a six-month internship for Pioneer Seed in Napoleon, he came home every weekend to work on the farm,” Rose said of her son, shaking her head as she pondered the trip that was more than three hours each way. Azure, who met Joe at Ohio State where she got an RN degree, marveled at his work ethic and commitment to his family. Joe graduated from Ohio State in 2004, with a major in crop science and minor in production agriculture. “Joe is the hardest worker I’ve ever met and that’s what drew me to him. I like having my kids see that,” said Azure, who works as a nurse practitioner at a family practice in Lancaster. Today, Joe continues to work hard on the farm in Rushville as well as at his full-time job as a Natural Resources Conservation Service district conservationist in Licking and Perry counties. He takes what he’s learned from his job and from

the fellow farmers he meets through work to help improve Koehler Farms. Over the years, he’s cleared overgrown areas, reseeded and fertilized them and converted them into pasture. The cattle are fenced out of creeks and woods. At his farm alone, Joe has put in more than 10,000 feet

“Our goal was always to get into the cattle industry.” - Rose Koehler of fence and water lines so he can create more paddocks for the cows. Typically, the animals are moved about every six days and pulled out of the pastures for awhile in the summer to allow the grass to grow back up. This summer, however, abundant rain allowed the family to keep the cattle in the pasture. Joe said another major improvement to the farm has been storing and wrapping their hay. About eight years ago they built a hay barn and starting wrapping their hay, which hugs the property line with Fairfield Union High School. “We rent hay ground and are always trying to save money. Storing and wrapping hay has vastly improved the quality of our hay and we have very little waste,” Rose said, noting that another major improvement was the addition of high-quality minerals for the cattle. Right now, the farm is at a comfortable size. Instead of growing the number of cows, the Koehlers are focused on improving their herd and

are proud of the animals they raise. “What we have is pretty demanding. We just want to do the best job we can with the animals we have. Mom can walk out there and say this cow is out of this bull and who her mother is. We make sure we really know them,” Joe said. For Rose, she loves bringing the grandchildren with her in the Polaris when checking on the cows four to five times a day. Both Evelyn and Stella particularly like seeing what their cows are up to -- Joe bought them each a cow at OCA’s bred cow sale. “They ID their baldy cow and always check out their calves and get excited when they’re born. It gives them interest in the cows,” Rose said. Next year starts the next generation of Koehlers showing at the county fair -- Evelyn will be the first grandchild to show a 4-H market steer. Joe can’t help but reflect on how far he’s come since he first showed so many years ago. “I couldn’t have gotten started without the start Mom and Dad gave me …,” he said as his voice trailed off. Showing it’s a true family operation, Rose quickly chimed in. “I couldn’t do it without Joe. I hope I gave him the financial start to keep going,” she said. “All three of my kids are excellent workers and that’s one thing Big Joe and I instilled in our kids, and I’ve heard a lot of comment about what good workers they are.” v

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |21


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10600 US HWY 42 Marysville, Oh 43040 • 614-873-6736 • beef@ohiobeef.org 22 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |23


Up the Alley By John Grimes, OSU Extension Beef Coordinator Program support provided by OCA

How Fast and Long Will It Grow?

C

ow-calf producers, stocker operators and feedlot owners are obviously different participants in the beef industry. Each has very different production concerns based on their location in the beef food chain. While each has their own unique perspective, they also share a common requirement to be successful. None of them can make a profit without a healthy, fast growing calf that can efficiently put on pounds. While the growth rate of the calf is important to each of the previously mentioned industry segments, there is another growth rate that may be even more important to them. Since the beginning of 2014 when the nation’s beef cow herd had reached lower numbers that had not been seen in over a half a century, the herd has steadily grown. The U.S. beef cowherd was at 31.2 million head on January 1, 2017. CattleFax expects the nation’s cowherd to grow to 32 million head by the beginning of 2018 which would be the largest since 2008. The beef cowherd is expected to expand into 2018 albeit at a slower pace. Any additional herd growth past next year will be very dependent on two very important factors: cow-calf profitability and weather conditions across the country’s major production regions. Producers have responded to the record calf prices of 2014 and 2015 as expected by rapidly increasing their herd sizes. Weather has obviously played a big role in expansion in key beef producing states in the Midwest and far west. The upper Midwest is the current exception to this trend as Montana and the Dakotas are very dry. The significant changes in cattle numbers have created major market price variations over the past several years. The basic economic principles 24 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

of supply and demand certainly can provide a road map for price expectations in the immediate future. History tells us that as numbers increase, there will be downward pressure on prices. The rapid cowherd expansion will provide plenty of beef available to consumers. Profitability levels of the pork, broiler, and turkey industry will provide plenty of competition from these proteins in the market place. This competition will occur both domestically and abroad. The competing proteins will likely offer the U.S. consumer a less costly meat option, but it appears that our consumers prefer the taste of beef and will buy our quality product at almost any price point. The beef industry must continue to deliver a high-quality product to justify the extra expense for the consumer. Foreign trade will be an important factor for the beef industry as we move forward. CattleFax expects U.S. beef exports to increase 8 percent in 2017 with steady growth for the next several years. The Chinese market has also opened to U.S. beef this year for the first time since 2003. The potential for growth there is significant, but the U.S. beef industry will have to adjust to China’s traceability requirements and restrictions on hormones and beta agonists to fully capitalize on this market. Trade agreements between our government and other nations and regions around the globe will greatly impact exports in the future. The most recent example of the importance of trade agreements comes from Japan. Beef imports during the first quarter (April 1-June 30) of Japan’s fiscal year, from the United States and other countries covered under Japan’s “safeguard” mechanism, were large enough to trigger an increase in

the duty charged on imports of frozen beef. The rate will increase from 38.5 percent to 50 percent for the remainder of the current fiscal year, which runs through March 31, 2018. Japan was the top export market for U.S. beef in 2016, valued at $1.5 billion. According to data compiled by U.S. Meat Export Federation, first quarter U.S. beef sales to Japan increased 42 percent over 2016. Larger calf crops will also put a strain on our current infrastructure. Annual cattle harvest is becoming an issue because of packing plant capacity limitations. Weekly packing plant capacity was much larger the last time our harvest numbers were this large. If market-ready animal numbers build up in feedlots because of the lack of packing plant capacity, prices for fat cattle will be negatively impacted. So what does all of this mean? While the rate of the beef herd expansion is slowing, the increased size of the calf crop is the biggest challenge facing the beef industry. Beef demand faces stiff competition from pork and poultry for the consumer’s protein dollars. It is more important than ever for a strong push to grow beef demand from beef checkoff-funded and other industry partner efforts. U.S. beef exports have been positive recently and this trend needs to continue. Producers need to do what is under their control to impact potential profitability. This includes producing a healthy, fast growing feeder calf, following seasonal market price patterns when buying and selling cattle, and considering marketing strategies such as forward selling, value-added programs, and retained ownership. Sounds simple, doesn’t it? v


OCA News

Continued on page 56

OCA and OBC Spring Semester Internship Opportunities, OCA Welcomes Fall Intern The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association and the Ohio Beef Council have always had the goal of providing great opportunities for young people interested in developing a career in the agricultural and beef industries. The organizations will be offering five internship positions for the Spring 2018 semester, beginning in January and continuing through the latter part of April depending on the position need. Each internship will require approximately 20 hours per week and are flexible based upon academic course schedules. Each successful intern will receive a $1,000 scholarship. Interested applicants should forward a cover letter and resume to the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Attn: Internship, 10600 U.S. Highway 42, Marysville, Ohio 43040 or email Cambell Parrish at cparrish@ohiobeef.org, prior to Oct. 1, 2017. For more information call 614-873-6736.

Industry Relations Intern

The primary responsibilities of this intern will include assisting with the preparation and implementation of the Ohio Beef Expo’s Trade Show. This intern will also assist with communications of the Ohio Beef Expo including advertising and event photography. This position will assist with preparation of the Ohio Cattleman magazine and the OCA Annual Meeting & Banquet including developing award winners’ press releases.

Public Relations Intern

This position will focus on assisting with the public relation need of the Ohio Beef Expo. This intern will work to update content on www.ohiobeefexpo.com prior to the

event as well as work with the onsite webmaster during the event. This intern will also be responsible for all press releases about the Ohio Beef Expo both prior to and after the event.

Member Services Intern

The Member Services Intern’s responsibilities will focus on coordinating OCA’s membership campaign and working with the County Cattlemen’s organizations. This intern will assist with County Leader programs including membership updates and newsletters. Additionally, this position will help coordinate the Genetic Pathway and Membership Booth areas at the Ohio Beef Expo and will work with industry leaders.

Youth Activities Intern

This position will focus on assisting with coordinating the Ohio Beef Expo Junior Show including fundraising and show management. In addition, the successful candidate will assist with the Beef Exhibitor Show Total (BEST) Program by attending shows and helping coordinate the program.

Beef Improvement Intern

The Beef Improvement Intern’s responsibilities will include assisting with Ohio Beef Expo’s breed shows and sales. This position will provide support for the OCA Seedstock Improvement Sales through catalog preparation and advertising. The successful candidate will also work with the OSU Extension Beef Team to execute advanced winter educational programs.

Devin Roth

Devin Roth, Hancock County, is serving as the fall intern for the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) and Ohio Beef Council. She is the daughter of Chris and Robin Roth of Jenera, Ohio. Growing up, Roth raised and showed crossbred steers in 4-H and FFA and served as the Hancock County Beef Princess and Beef Queen. Roth is currently studying agricultural communication at The Ohio State University with a minor in Human and Animal Interactions and plans to graduate in May, 2018. She is the owner of Devin Rachelle Photography, LLC which specializes in high school senior, newborn and wedding photography. Her main responsibilities as an intern will include assisting in coordination of beef industry update meetings, various communication efforts and fall youth events. “Growing up in an agriculture family has impacted my life greatly and inspired me to be an advocate for the cattle industry.” v To apply: Send a cover letter and resume to the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Attn: Internship, 10600 U.S. Highway 42, Marysville, Ohio 43040, or email to Cambell Parrish at cparrish@ohiobeef.org prior to Oct. 1, 2017. For more information call 614-873-6736. Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |25


Forage Corner Glen Arnold, OSU Extension Field Specialist; Rory Lewandowski, Eric Richer and Sam Custer, OSU Extension Educators

Manure on Hay Fields

W

hen hay is harvested nutrients are removed from the field. A ton of alfalfa removes approximately 13 pounds of phosphorus (as P2O5) and 50 pounds of potash (as K2O). According to the National Agricultural Statistics Service, Ohio harvested 2.6 tons per acre of alfalfa in 2016. Many hay fields are not pure alfalfa. The acidic soils of the southern and eastern parts of the state make it difficult to maintain an alfalfa or clover stand so a mixed stand of grass and alfalfa/clover is common. Stands in older fields are often just mostly grass. A grass hay crop will remove just as many nutrients per ton as an alfalfa crop. The big difference is that the annual yields from grass hay fields are usually about 1.3 tons per acre lower than alfalfa fields. Livestock manure can be used as a fertilizer source to replace nutrients removed through hay harvest. Pen pack beef manure will contain approximately 7.9 pounds of nitrogen (mostly in the organic form), 4.4 pounds of phosphorus (P2O5) and 6.6 pounds of potash (K20) per ton according to OSU Extension bulletin 604. Note that these are older book values and your actual farm manure nutrient levels can vary depending upon the animal’s ration, the amount and type of bedding material used and how manure is stored and handled. The recommendation is to sample and test manure at least on a yearly basis. This will provide a more reliable indication of the actual nutrient content of the manure on your farm. For more information about how and when to sample manure, Penn State Extension has a good publication available on-line at www.extension.psu.edu/plants. Assume a livestock producer wants to use pen pack beef manure to replenish the nutrients in a hay field

26 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

where he harvested three tons per acre of hay. Since alfalfa and grass hay both remove similar amounts of nutrients per ton, we can assume the three tons of hay removed per acre contained 39 pounds of P2O5 and 150 pounds of K2O. If pen pack beef manure was used to replenish these nutrients, 8.8 tons per acre would be sufficient to replace the phosphorus. However, a rate of 22.7 tons per acre would be needed to replace the potash. The 22.7 ton per acre manure application rate would result in almost 100 pounds of P2O5 being applied per acre, far more than was removed in the three tons of hay A farmer would need to be cautious about using this practice repeatedly and growing the soil phosphorus level. It takes about 20 pounds of phosphorus applied to a field to raise the soil test level one pound per acre or two parts per million. So if the soil test level is low, the additional phosphorus from the manure would not raise the soil phosphorus level much in a single year. The key to using livestock manure to replace the nutrients removed through hay harvest is to get even distribution of the manure across the entire field. Having mowed hay fields as a teenager, where bedded pack manure was applied, I would strongly urge an even distribution pattern across the field. Avoid large clumps that will plug the mower or interfere with regrowth. If you are unsure how many tons per acre your solid manure spreader applies, make a heavy plastic piece that is 56 inches by 56 inches. Fasten it to the ground with weights on the corners and apply manure across the plastic. Fold up the plastic and weigh the manure captured. Many people use a bathroom scales for this. One pound of manure captured on

the plastic is equivalent to one ton of manure applied per acre. Thus, if you captured 10 pounds of manure the application rate was 10 tons per acre. It is common for extension offices to have farmers ask; “Can manure be applied between cuttings”? The answer is “yes”. Farmers commonly use liquid swine and dairy manure between cuttings to replace soil nutrients and “boost” regrowth of the forage crop in northwest Ohio. There is the potential to damage the crowns of the forage plants but most farmers seem to like the results of the manure application. Solid manure could also be applied between cuttings instead of waiting until fall to apply the manure. The manure application should take place as soon as the hay is baled. Liquid beef manure is also being used to replace nutrients in hay fields. Liquid beef manure we have sampled has contained 40 pounds nitrogen (about half in the organic form and half in the ammonium form), 35 pounds of phosphorus (P2O5) and 30 pounds of potash (K20) per 1000 gallons of product. Applied with a drag hose, this can be an excellent fertilizer for a forage. A final cautionary note regarding manure application to forage fields: If manure is coming from a herd with animals infected by Johne’s disease, that disease can be transmitted by manure to healthy cattle. According to a publication from the US Dairy Forage Research Center at Madison Wisconsin and authored by Michael Russelle and Bill Jokela, the Johne’s bacterium can survive on hay. Therefore, those authors recommend that in herds with Johne’s, manure should not be applied as a topdressing on fields that will be harvested as dry hay. v


Beef IndustryMeeting Update Series August 30 - Henry County 6:30 pm Fairgrounds, Ag Hall

821 S Perry Street - Napoleon, Ohio 43545

August 31 - Knox County 6:30 PM Dudgeon Family Farm

g n i t e e M Find a ! September 5 - Darke, Shelby Counties u o Y r a e N 8230 Grove Church Road - Gambier, Ohio 43022

6:30 Pm Diehl Cattle / Charlie Diehl

9847 Gettysburg Rd. S.E. - Bradford, Ohio 45308

September 6 - Montgomery County m o r f n e m e l t t a 6:30 PM All c g counties are surroundeind to attend. September 7 - Gallia, Jackson Counties invit Rob’s Restaurant 705 Arlington Rd. - Brookville, Ohio 45309

6:30 PM Bob Evans Farm Event Barn, Rio Grande 10854 SR 588 - Rio Grande, Ohio 45674

September 12 - Adams County 6:30 PM Fairgrounds, Administration Building

836 Boyd Avenue - West Union, Ohio 45693 Check our website for more details: www.ohiocattle.org

September 20 - Madison County TBA Fairgrounds, Coughlin Community Building 208 Elm St., London, Ohio 43140

October 5 - Hardin County

6:30 PM Rolling Hills Farms - Show & Sale Facility

17838 County Road 65 - Belle Center, Ohio 43310

All cattlemen are invited to attend to learn about Producer education TopicS and enjoy a Beef Dinner sponsored by allied industry council members. To RSVP & for more information contact: 614-873-6736 or beef@ohiobeef.org Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |27


NCBA News

Kendal Frazier, NCBA CEO

Unholy Alliances

B

y now you’ve probably seen that there’s a determined effort by activist organizations to undermine the beef industry. Groups like Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and Public Justice are attempting to change the way we do business and they’ve banded together with groups like R-CALF and other like-minded organizations to target state beef councils and their work to promote beef. We might disagree on policy matters within the industry, but it’s another thing entirely to target the volunteer-led state beef councils through unholy alliances with animal rights activists and others intent on driving beef producers out of business. You read that correctly: R-CALF and like-minded groups have joined with activist organizations like Public Justice. In this case the Public Justice/R-CALF alliance is litigating a case against the Montana Beef Council. We’ve seen this trend increase lately. It was first begun by HSUS activists who used their deep pockets to buy influence in the beef industry and gain standing to file lawsuits against the checkoff in an all-out effort to end beef promotion, and ultimately, the production of beef in the United States. HSUS, Public Justice, R-CALF and others have been unsuccessful in the halls of Congress and they aren’t making progress among consumers or beef producers at the ballot box, so they’re spending their time and money to perpetuate misinformation and engage in a guerilla campaign against beef and the checkoff. They know ending the checkoff eliminates the only self-help program designed and led by beef producers and they know that’s all that stands between them and more meatless diets. We 28 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

must work together to stop HSUS, Public Justice and their collaborators. We must stand together to prevent these activists from pushing cattle off the land, sliding beef off the plate and driving cattle producers off the ranch. Don’t believe everything you read; this fight is about stopping the activists from achieving those goals. And that’s all it’s about. I’ve said it before, but I’ll repeat it again so it’s clear: HSUS does not care about beef producers or the checkoff. They care about stopping the production and consumption of meat! Every member of the beef community that collaborates with this group, for any reason, is helping them achieve that goal. They will stop at nothing to change your way of life, drive beef producers out of business and irreparably harm the social and economic fabric of rural America. HSUS, Public Justice and their armies of urban lawyers would love nothing more than to remove beef from the plates of consumers. These activists are working to drive good cattlemen and cattlewomen out of business by promoting a meatless agenda and they’ve joined forces with some of your neighbors who have sold out and are helping them to accomplish that goal. We need to stand together and shine a light on these alliances between R-CALF and their activist partners at Public Justice and elsewhere. These shams must be exposed for what they really are. It’s time to stand together to stop the attacks, misinformation and propaganda. It’s not in our nature to challenge our friends and neighbors, but there’s too much at stake to continue in silence. v


Angus

n o i e t l c a u S d o r P Bob Dragani Family 7180 Plymouth LaPorte Trail

8TH ANNUAL

Reg. 17231453

Sire: N Bar Emulation EXT Dam: Bohi Pure Pride 6096 MGS: SAV 8180 Traveler 004

Double R Bar Lady Z129 Reg. 17230687

She Sells!

Sire: SAV Iron Mountain 8066 Dam: Appalachian Lady US50 MGS: N Bar Emulation EXT

Double R Bar Eriskay Z194 Reg. 17231464

Sire: N Bar Emulation EXT Dam: Sinclair Eriskay 2C11 7883 MGS: DHD Traveler 6807

She Sells!

SEPT. 24, 2017 Sunday • 1 pm EDT

Selling Over 125 Head!

Special Guests: Kingsway Angus & Patton Farms

Double R Bar Pure Pride Z190

She Sells!

Plymouth, IN 574/453-1169

Spring Cow Calf Pairs • Fall Pairs • Bred Heifers ET Heifers • Donors • Elite Pregnancies

Double R Bar Lady A127 Reg. 17448961

Sire: Sitz Upward 307R Dam: Whitestone Lady X087 MGS: GAR Predestined

She Sells!

Double R Bar War Party D350 Reg. 18680927

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage OA36 Dam: SJH War Party of 72 2532 MGS: Werner War Party 2417

She Sells!

Dbl R Bar Enchantress D339 Reg. 18680926

Sire: Quaker Hill Rampage OA36 Dam: Tanner Enchantress 2X3 2351 MGS: Sitz Upward 307R

She Sells!

“Indiana’s Largest Registered Seedstock Operation”

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |29


BECOME A MEMBER OF THE

Ohio Young

Cattlemen’s Association • 2 issues of Ohio Cattleman Magazine • intro to advocacy & public policy • networking & career development opportunities • VARIOUS SoCIAL EVENTS

Ohio Young Cattlemen are eligible for annual drawings that include:

- Cowboy Boots - Sale credit for OCA member cattle sales - Registration for NCBA Convention - Registration for OCA Annual Meeting and Banquet

INTERNSHIPS & SCHOLARSHIPS

FOR STUDENT MEMBERS

Let’s Get Connected!

Follow us on Social Media #ohiocattle

For More Details visit www.ohiocattle.org or call 614.873.6736 10600 US Highway 42 Marysville, OH 43040 30 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


2017

Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |31


32 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


Top Five Overall Heifers

Judge: Parker henley, Urbana, Il

Grand Champion Heifer Champion Chianina UDE Stylish Lady 9D ET Abbie Collins, Montgomery County

Third Overall Heifer Champion ShorthornPlus SULL Sophia 6250D ET Kathy Lehman, Richland County

Fourth Overall Heifer Champion AOB PZC Jewel 601 ET Kathy Lehman, Richland County

Judge: Shane Bedwell, Holt, MO

Grand Champion Market Animal Champion Div. 3 Crossbred Addison Jones, Allen County

Third Overall Market Animal Res. Div. 3 Crossbred Elizabeth Heintz, Auglaize County

Reserve Champion Heifer Champion MaineTainer MLCK Melania 178D Erin Dilger-Lawrence, Licking County

Fifth Overall Heifer Champion Limousin TASF Dignity 035D Erin Dilger-Lawrence, Licking County

Top Five Overall market animals

Reserve Grand Champion Market Animal Champion Chianina Montana Hulsmeyer, Allen County

Fourth Overall Market Animal Champion Div. 4 Crossbred Lane Underwood, Hardin County

Fifth Overall Market Animal Champion Div. 2 Crossbred Delaney Jones, Allen County Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |33


Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Angus Jr. Show

Breeding Cattle Show Results

Champion Female SSF Ellen BC 1236 Marcus VanVorhis, Wood County Reserve Champion Female SCH BOY Ellie 621 Hadley LeVan, Champaign County Champion Bred & Owned Female Claylick Run Bardot D016 Kacey Felumlee, Licking County Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Female Paradise Erica 614 Caroline Winter, Pickaway County

Chianina Jr. Show

Champion Bull LMF Vision 416 Ethan Miller, Gaston, IN Reserve Champion Bull Miller Confidence 1671 Alaina Miller, Gaston, IN Premier Breeder Jamie King, Seneca County Premier Exhibitor Jamie King, Seneca County

Reserve Champion Female JSUL Who Dat 6474D ET Ashley Buell, Licking County

Chianina Open Show

AOB Jr. Show

Angus Open Show

Champion Female SSF Ellen BC 1236 Marcus VanVorhis, Wood County Reserve Champion Female Maplecrest Lady A 6240 Carly Sanders, Highland County Champion Cow/Calf Pair Wogan Farm Lady 292 Emily Wogan, Licking County 34 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Reserve Champion Female Miss Charlie 18D Abbie Collins, Montgomery County

Champion Chianina UDE Stylish Lady 9D E Abbie Collins, Montgomery County Reserve Champion Female GARW Miss Jalynn 6090D Kathy Lehman, Richland County Premier Breeder Pryor Club Calves, Weirton, WV Premier Exhibitor Pryor Club Calves, Weirton, WV

For more Results from the Ohio State Fair visit

www.ohiostatefair.com


Gelbvieh Jr. Show

Champion Female Velvet 339Z 504C Lara Rittenhouse, Clark County Reserve Champion Female KVEE Delilah 673D Brooke Nicely, Muskingum County

No Picture Available Champion Bull OHMV Double Time D411 Hunter Sheeley, Highland County Champion Balancer Female Velvet 912U 521C Lara Rittenhouse, Clark County Reserve Champion Balancer Female Anissa Lara Rittenhouse, Clark County

Champion Balancer Bull KVEE Eddie 742E Jared Knicely, Muskingum County

Hereford Jr. Show

Gelbvieh Open Show Champion Balancer Female Velvet 912U 521C Lara Rittenhouse, Clark County Reserve Champion Balancer Female Anissa Lara Rittenhouse, Clark County

Champion Female Velvet 339Z 504C Lara Rittenhouse, Clark County Reserve Champion Female HLEE Autumn Rose 407C Halee Allen, Highland County

Champion Female JSC Precious Time 70D Maddox Cupp, Fairfield County Reserve Champion Female SF OBD 2214 Downunder Frani LeVan, Champaign County Champion Bred & Owned Female HFJ Ellie Paige 401D Jacob Wiechart, Putnam County Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Female Creek 118 109 Fancy 706E McKenna Baney, Wayne County

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |35


Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Hereford Open Show

Champion Female Showtime Maggoe 613 ET Hadley Hendrickson, Mooreland, IN Reserve Champion Female Purple LJ R Greena 27 Morgan Love, Fairfield County Champion Cow/Calf Pair RR 11 35 22 Z Cassie 69 C Andrew Osborn, Clinton County Reseve Champion Cow/Calf Pair JLCS X 53 Freda 969 WA 27 J & L Cattle Services, Ashland County

Champion Bull WCC Salton Sea C304 ET Flatter Hereford Farms, Greene County Wilson Cattle Company, Cloverdale, IN Reserve Champion Bull UHF 10Y Home Boy U26 Ralph Ullman & Son, Monroe County Premier Breeder Ralph Ullman & Son, Monroe County Premier Exhibitor Ralph Ullman & Son, Monroe County

36 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Limousin Jr. Show

Reserve Champion Female TINY Diva ET Emma Gurney, Seneca County Champion Bred & Owned Female TMOO Blackberry TM04D Trent Moor, Coshocton County Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Female Miss Ahoy TV 52 A Abigail Thornton, Fairfield County

Champion LimFlex Female CELL 5407C ET Hannah Ziegler, Wyandot County Reserve Champion LimFlex Female TINY Debra Emma Gurney, Seneca County Champion Bred & Owned Female Miracle Levi Hartschuh, Crawford County Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Female Millie Zara Levi Hartschuh, Crawford County

Limousin Open Show

Champion Female TASF Dignity 035D Erin Dilger-Lawrence, Licking County Reserve Champion Female TINY Dorcas ET VanHorn Limousin, Morgan County

Champion Bull TINY Debate ET Van Horn Limousin, Morgan County Reserve Champion Bull J BAR J Delegate 621D ET Circle L Limousin, Wayne County Premier Breeder Van Horn Limousin, Morgan County Premier Exhibitor Van Horn Limousin, Morgan County


Junior & Ohpibeintors, Beef Ex Dear Beef Cattle Exhibitors,

Maine-Anjou Jr. Show

Maine-Anjou Open Show

Wow…Another year has come and gone at the great Ohio State Fair. I truly hope you found this year’s fair as rewarding as I did. I can’t tell you how much enjoyment I get watching the exhibitors, especially the junior exhibitors bring their cattle to the show ring. A huge shout-out and thank you to the staff. I am the luckiest director on the grounds with the staff that I have. There is NO WAY the shows would be the success they are without them.

Champion Female TJSC Lucky Lady 85D Caitlin Schaub, Auglaize County Reserve Champion Female BPF Miss Wisdom 3D ET Abbie Collins, Montgomery County

Reserve Champion MaineTainer Female GARW Miss Cookie 6006 ET Kathy Lehman, Richland County Champion Bred & Owned Female HFC Miss Sadie Bricen Hess, Highland County Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Female GOF Miss Styling Rose Abbie Collins, Montgomery County

Champion Female BPF Miss Wisdom 3D ET Abbie Collins, Montgomery County Reserve Champion Female TJSC Lucky Lady 211D Ali Muir, Auglaize County

Champion Bull MCCF Eeyore Ali Muir, Auglaize County

Another significant accomplishment was the Commercial Cattle show. There were 27 pens of 3 with 6 junior exhibitors. What an outstanding display of how Ohio cattle feeders do their part to provide the world one of the most wholesome, safe proteins available. Congrats to Sam Roberts and the greater United Producers, Inc. team for a successful show. I am so proud of the junior beef exhibitors from around the great state of Ohio. They are the reason I keep coming back to the fair. They are the future of our industry, and what great stewards of the industry they are. I am fortunate to get around the country and observe youth exhibitors in action. No other place in this great country do we have the ability and talent we have right here in the Buckeye State. Thank you to the parents for entrusting your youth with us. I’d be remiss if I did not thank Elizabeth Harsh and the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association and Ohio Beef Council for their incredible support. Our industry is in good hands and I am grateful for all that you do. We are blessed to be part of the Ohio cattle industry. Every facet of our industry is truly at the forefront of doing our part to not only be leaders…But to ensure the world has safe, wholesome and fairly priced food. Thanks once more for allowing me to serve you over the past few years and for putting up with me. It has been my honor and privilege. Kindest Regards,

Champion MaineTainer Female MSTS Miss Fire 9D Jackson Shane, Miami County Reserve Champion MaineTainer Female GOF Miss Styling Rose Abbie Collins, Montgomery County

Bill Tom Beef Department Superintendant Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |37


Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Champion MaineTainer Bull MCCF Enchanter Ali Muir, Auglaize County Premier Breeder Ali Muir, Auglaize County Premier Exhibitor Ali Muir, Auglaize County

Santa Gertrudis Open Show

Champion Bull Rolling Oaks Grover David Alderson, Williamsport, TN Reserve Champion Bull RS Buzz Randall Strickmeyer, Verona, KY Champion Ohio Futurity Bull LF Royal Magnus Nickolous Black – Miami County Premier Exhibitor David Alderson, Williamsport, TN Premier Breeder Flat Willow Farms, Statesville, NC

Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Female SULL Crystal’s Style Kyle Piscione, Medina County Champion Bred & Owned Female HSC Miss Ruby’s Payday Allison Herr, Fulton County

Shorthorn Open Show

Shorthorn Junior Show

Champion Female Miss Grandview 555 David Alderson, Williamsport, TN Reserve Champion Female RS Extra Randall Strickmeyer, Verona, KY

38 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Champion Female CR Cumberland 612 BS Emily Dahse, Gallia County Reserve Champion Female KFSC Prissy Sunrise Sweet Olivia Wood, Clinton County Champion Bred & Owned Female FPK Cindy Beauty Fulton Kennedy, Adams County

Champion Female GCC Turner’s Margie 542 ET Gavin Cender, Warren County Reserve Champion Female CR Cumberland 612 BS Emily Dahse, Gallia County Champion Cow/Calf Pair GCC Turner’s Margie 542 ET Gavin Cender, Warren County Reserve Champion Cow/Calf Pair HSH Jasmine Paige Phillips, Clark County


Champion Bull DL Patriot Desirae Logsdon, Fairfield County Reserve Champion Bull GCC WF Chicago Greenhorn Cattle Company, Warren County Super Cow Greenhorn Cattle Company, Warren County Get of Sire Cedar Lane Farm, Greene County Breeders Herd Turner Shorthorns, Perry County Premier Exhibitor Cedar Lane Farm, Greene County Turner Shorthorns, Perry County Premier Breeder Turner Shorthorns, Perry County

Champion ShorthornPlus Female SULL Sophia 6250D ET Kathy Lehman, Richland County Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Female CF Mona Magic 475 Andy Brautigam, Shelby County

Champion ShorthornPlus Bull LSF BlackJack Leemon Stock Farms, Hoopeston, IL Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Bull FFDL Hot Buckshot Desirae Logsdon, Fairfield County

Simmental Junior Show

Champion Female EJS Enticing Lady 608D Rachel Dickson, Licking County Reserve Champion Female H & E Suzie Q D676 Austin Hunker, Huron County Champion Bred & Owned Simmental Female Y-NOT Mias Lullaby 20D Hannah Topmiller, Warren County Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Simmental Female SSF Steelin’ Looks S10D Garrett Stanfield, Adams County

Champion SimSolution Female TJSC Smile 402D Justin Reed, Sandusky County Reserve Champion SimSolution Female Miss Mya Shelby Manning, Darke County Champion Bred & Owned Female YNOT GLINDA 3C Hannah Topmiller, Warren County Reserve Champion Bred & Owned Female HHSC Mildred Hunter Harris, Adams County

Simmental Open Show

Champion Female Ried Banded Mae Kylie O’Brien, Wood County Reserve Champion Female EJS Enticing Lady 608D Rachel Dickson, Licking County Champion Cow/Calf Pair Lazy H Miss Playmate C8 Austin Henthorn, Washington County Reserve Champion Cow/Calf Pair Swain Marlee 423B Prestige Cattle Company, Perry County

Champion Bull Lazy H / RJ Undisputed C33 Austin Henthorn, Washington County Reserve Champion Bull B Hondo Brady Clemens, Muskingum County Premier Exhibitor Ferguson Show Cattle, Geauga County Premier Breeder Ferguson Show Cattle, Geauga County

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |39


Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Miniature Hereford Open Show

Champion Percentage Female FBFS Daisy 18 2D Kiersten Wilcox – Darke County Reserve Champion Percentage Female Maplecrest BLK Cap 550C Kinsey Crowe, Preble County Champion Cow/Calf Pair RHFS Exotic Diamond C17H Rolling Hills Farms, Hardin County Reserve Champion Cow/Calf Pair Classic Ms. Built Right Tyler Brown, Marion County

Champion Percentage Bull GARW The Machine 6210D Bailey Garwood, Columbiana County Reserve Champion Percentage Bull SBS Fully Loaded Clement Strausbaugh, Knox County

40 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Champion Heifer TAC Samantha’s Tuff C 4 Wiley Farm, Knox County Reserve Champion Heifer 4 Wiley Amber Mount 4 Wiley Farm, Knox County

Champion Bull KAP Fletcher’s Mystic Edge Mike Oehlhof, Richland County Reserve Champion Bull GMH Stauch Jeffrey Grudosky, Portage County Premier Exhibitor David Thompson, Williams County Premier Breeder 4 Wiley Farm, Knox County


Market Beef Show Results

Champion Angus Steer Carly Sanders, Highland County Reserve Champion Angus Steer Maggie Pollard, Defiance County

Champion Maine-Anjou Steer Elizabeth Heintz, Auglaize County Reserve Champion Maine-Anjou Steer Colleen Minges, Butler County

Champion Simmental Steer Caroline Blay, Portage County Reserve Champion Simmental Steer Madison Paden, Guernsey County

Reserve Champion Chianina Steer Lane Underwood, Hardin County

Champion Shorthorn Steer Carter McCauley, Guernsey County Reserve Champion Shorthorn Steer Tanner Cordes, Montgomery County

Champion AOB Steer Lindsey Pugh, Stark County Reserve Champion AOB Steer Danielle Whitted, Portage County

Champion Hereford Steer Angie Distl, Clark County Reserve Champion Hereford Steer Hayden Smith, Holmes County

Champion ShorthornPlus Steer Kinzee Shafer, Preble County Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Steer Kendal Widman, Crawford County

Champion Market Heifer Isaac Gehret, Darke County Reserve Champion Market Heifer Hannah Schroeder, Putnam County

Division I Champion Crossbred Zoey Shriner, Perry County Division I Reserve Champion Crossbred Kady Davis, Carroll County

Division II Reserve Champion Crossbred Division V Reserve Champion Crossbred Hadley Levan, Champaign County Avery McGuire, Champaign County

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |41


Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Prospect Calf Show Results

Grand Champion Steer Wyatt Osborn, Highland County Reserve Champion Steer Logan Souder, Brown County Third Overall Steer Cayden Hesler, Adams County Fourth Overall Steer Hunter Brown, Adams County Fifth Overall Steer Oakley Cattle Company, Guernsey County

Grand Champion Heifer Cedar Lane Farms, Greene County Reserve Champion Heifer Campbellco, Greene County Third Overall Heifer Bricen Hess, Highland County Fourth Overall Heifer Parry Show Cattle, Highland County Fifth Overall Heifer Raelene Frame, Guernsey County

Outstanding Beef Breeding Exhibitors

Kyle Piscione, Medina County, finished first in the 2017 Outstanding Beef Breeding Exhibitor.

42 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Carly Sanders, Highland County, finished second in the 2017 Outstanding Beef Breeding Exhibitor.

Sydney Sanders, Highland County, finished third in the 2017 Outstanding Beef Breeding Exhibitor.


Congratulation beef cattle exhib s, scholarship win itor ners: Bricen Hess, Hig

hland County Emma Johnson, Pickaway County Garrett Stanfield , Adams County

Outstanding Record Books

Elected Officials Visit the State Fair

Outstanding Record Book- Wyatt Osborn, age 9 of Highland County; Hayden Smith, age 10 of Holmes County; Sydney Sanders, age 11 of Highland County; Luke Jennings, age 12 of Clermont County; Dawson Osborn, age 13 of Highland County; Victoria Waits, age 14 of Fayette County; Colleen Minges, age 15 of Butler County; Brooke Egbert, age 16 of Auglaize County; Isaac Gehret, age 17 of Darke County; Lindsey Pugh, age 18 of Stark County.

Skillathon Winners

Carly Sanders, age 9 of Highland County; Kaylee Jennings, age 10 of Clermont County; Sydney Sanders, age 11 of Highland County; Justin Mason, age 14 of Holmes County; Kyle Piscione, age 16 of Medina County; Adam Kinsman, age 17 of Fulton County; Kady Davis, age 18 of Carroll County; Dawson Osborn, age 13 of Highland County. (Not pictured: Erica Grum, age 12 of Licking County and Taylor Stephen, age 15 of Morrow County.)

Outstanding Market Exhibitors

Pictured Top: U.S. Senator Rob Portman attended the Ohio Ag Council Hall of Fame Breakfast with Ohio Beef Ambassador, Alyx Flott, Waynesburg, Ohio; OCA President, Joe Foster, Gallipolis, Ohio; and Dona Tullis, Ohio CattleWomen, London, Ohio. Pictured Middle: Senator Larry Obhof (22nd District) visited with intern, Nick Erf, Bellevue, Ohio; and Evan Smith, Canal Winchester, Ohio while staffing the Beef Store.

Carly Sanders, age 9 of Highland County; Hayden Smith, age 10 of Holmes County; Sydney Sanders, age 11 of Highland County; Montana Hulsmeyer, age 12 of Allen County; Luke Brinksneader, age 13 of Darke County; Alex Linder, age 14 of Richland County; Allison Davis, age 15 of Carroll County; Lori Millenbaugh, age 16 of Crawford County; Kady Davis, age 18 of Carroll County. (Not pictured: Morgan Mazey, age 17 of Wood County.)

Pictured Bottom: Lieutenant Governor of Ohio, Mary Taylor met with the Sanders family of Leesburg, Ohio: Dave, Mindy, Carly and Sydney.

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |43


Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Sale of Champions Grand Champion Market Beef

Exhibited by: Addison Jones, Allen County Live Weight – 1298 Carcass Weight – 841 Dressing Percentage – 64.8% Backfat (inches) – 0.45 Ribeye (area, square in.) – 14.2 Yield Grade – 2.8 Quality Grade – Low Select Purchased by: Steve R. Rauch Excavating and Demolition Sold For: $50,000

Reserve Grand Champion Market Beef

Exhibited by: Montana Hulsmeyer, Allen County Live Weight – 1285 Carcass Weight – 790 Dressing Percentage – 61.5% Backfat (inches) – 0.35 Ribeye (area, square in.) – 11.6 Yield Grade – 3.3 Quality Grade – High Select Purchased by: The Kroger Co. Sold For: $36,000

top Three Outstanding Market Beef Exhibitors

Allison Davis, Carroll County finished first in the 2017 Outstanding Market Beef Exhibitor. The $2,000 prize was sponsored by Steve R. Rauch Excavating and Demolition. 44 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Sydney Sanders, Highland County finished second in the 2017 Outstanding Market Beef Exhibitor. The $1,500 prize was sponsored by The Kroger Co.

Carly Sanders, Highland County finished third in the 2017 Outstanding Market Beef Exhibitor. The $1,000 prize was sponsored by the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences.


Ohio Beef Council at the State Fair!

Capital City Burger Battle Returns: The Ohio Beef Council (OBC), Columbus Clippers and Ohio ProStart partnered for the 2017 installment of the Capital City Burger Battle at the Ohio State Fair on Sunday, July 30th. Fairgoers had the opportunity to learn more about preparing beef, along with receiving samples of steak fresh off the grill. Over 1,500 steak samples were distributed to consumers visiting the central park area of the fairgrounds. Simultaneously, culinary students from across the state of Ohio showcased their creativity and skills during a burger cookoff. This competition evaluates students in the following areas: menuing, marketability, cleanliness, safety, use of time, taste and appearance. Foodservice professionals from Columbus State, Sullivan University, The Rusty Bucket and Sweet Carrot Restaurants served as judges for the seven competing teams. The premise of this competition was developed to allow small teams of students a fun way to showcase all they learn while in the ProStart program. Building knowledge and confidence with preparing and handling beef is a valuable skill to have on a résumé for an up and coming chef. To help create an inviting atmosphere, OBC brought back “Big Matt,” the official announcer at Huntington Park. Matt shared facts, figures about Ohio’s beef industry and engaged with contestants. The Clippers promotional team was on hand with mascots and inflatable pitching machine to add to the fun, fair environment that attracts consumers of all ages.

Hosting Consumers in the Beef Barn: For many state fairgoers, the closest they will get to a farm are the barns at the fairgrounds. With this in mind, OBC seeks to create engaging displays, activities and materials that will resonate with attendees of all ages. OBC staff created a multitude of new signage to enhance the barn’s curb appeal for

passing attendees, inviting them in to meet farmers and learn more about where their beef comes from. After stepping into the barn, consumers were able to pick-up information on beef recipes, sustainability, nutrition and production. The most exciting addition to this year’s beef barn activities was a 3D video experience. This interactive video allowed viewers to simulate life on the farm and its various activities such as mixing feed, climbing a grain bin, feeding cattle and even sorting cattle on horseback.

Heartland Cuisine Stage: A mainstay of the Ohio State Fair is the Heartland Cuisine Culinary Stage in the Taste of Ohio Café. Each year, Ohio’s commodity groups come together to showcase their respective products on the culinary stage in front of fairgoers throughout the fair. Those attending a demonstration get to learn more about how to more easily prepare, handle and feature dishes presented by professionals from across the state. Beef was represented by several individuals and in a variety of ways that can reach a variety of taste preferences as well as budgets. There were seven beef demonstrations spread across the duration of the fair. Here is what attendees had the chance to learn about: - Grilled Flat Irons with 4 Different Sauces - One Pot Tortellini and Ground Beef Casserole - Spaghetti Next with Fresh Pesto - Beef Sirloin Kebabs - Tuscan Flank Steak - Breaking down Ribeye Roll

BEEF

COUNCIL

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |45


Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Breeding Cattle Showmanship Champions - Session 1

Session 1 Junior Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Carly Sanders, Highland County, Champion; Sydney Sanders, Highland County, Reserve Champion; Kate Liggett, Tuscarawas County, 3rd Place; Hudson Drake, Ross County, 4th Place; and Blake Herdman, Highland County, 5th Place.

Session 1 Intermediate Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Jacob LeBrun, Scioto County, Champion; Katelyn Cowdrey, Brown County, Reserve Champion; Allison Herr, Fulton County, 3rd Place; Austin Hunker, Huron County, 4th Place; and Sarah Millikan, Henry County, 5th Place.

Session 1 Senior Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Kyle Piscione, Medina County, Champion; Rachel Dickson, Licking County, Reserve Champion; Haley Frazier, Jackson County, 3rd Place; Cade Liggett, Tuscarawas County, 4th Place; and Hannah Ziegler, Wyandot County, 5th Place.

Breeding Cattle Showmanship Champions - Session 2

Session 2 Junior Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Emma Yochum, Highland County, Champion; Blake Herdman, Highland County, Reserve Champion; Hudson Drake, Ross County, 3rd Place; Karlie Kennedy, Adams County, 4th Place; and Ethan Davies, Wood County, 5th Place.

Session 2 Intermediate Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Chris Tooms, Muskingum County, Champion; Alyson Simpson, Adams County, Reserve Champion; Gavin Puckett, Highland County, 3rd Place; Fulton Kennedy, Adams County, 4th Place; and Colby Manning, Darke County, 5th Place.

Session 2 Senior Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Bricen Hess, Highland County, Champion; Austin Garner, Butler County, Reserve Champion; Kyle Piscione, Medina County, 3rd Place; Kathy Lehman, Richland County, 4th Place; and Ashley Peter, Defiance County, 5th Place.

The market beef 10-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Hayden Smith, Holmes County, Champion; Taylor Poff, Geauga County, Reserve Champion; Tatumn Poff, Geauga County, 3rd Place; Logan Schroeder, Defiance County, 4th Place; Tyler Egbert, Auglaize County, 5th Place; Garrett Agle, Clark County, 6th Place; Darby Ayars, Champaign County, 7th Place; Holden LeVan, Champaign County, 8th Place; Collin Brodman, Wyandot County, 9th Place; and Henry Strow, Wood County 10th place.

The market beef 11-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Madison Paden, Guernsey County, Champion; Sydney Sanders, Highland County, Reserve Champion; Karly Goetz, Ottawa County, 3rd Place; Delaney Jones, Allen County, 4th Place; Jacob Wiechart, Putnam County, 5th Place; Grant Belleville, Wood County, 6th Place; Kelly Hinds, Tuscarawas County, 7th Place; Kendal Widman, Crawford County, 8th Place; Cadin Spreng, Ashland County, 9th Place; and John Goebel, Williams County, 10th place.

Market Beef Showmanship Champions

The market beef 9-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Lance Brinksneader, Darke County, Champion; Carly Sanders, Highland County, Reserve Champion; Taylor Barton, Clinton County, 3rd Place; Emma Yochum Highland County, 4th Place; and Wyatt Osborn, Highland County, 5th Place. Alexis Watkins, Wyandot County, 6th Place; Roger Winner, Darke County, 7th Place; (Not pictured: Aubrey Clark, Pickaway County, 8th Place).

46 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


Market Beef Showmanship Champions

The market beef 12-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Harrison Blay, Portage County, Champion; Montana Hulsmeyer, Allen County, Reserve Champion; Kinzee Shafer, Preble County, 3rd Place; Lane Underwood, Huron County, 4th Place; Brice Phelps, Union County, 5th Place; Hanna Schroeder, Putnam County, 6th Place; (Not pictured: Brooklyn Conrad, Butler County, 7th Place; Luke Schroeder, Defiance County, 8th place).

The market beef 13-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Luke Brinksneader, Darke County, Champion; Mckalynne Helmke, Tuscarawas County, Reserve Champion; Rachel Hostetler, Logan County, 3rd Place; Dawson Osborn, Highland County, 4th Place; Hayden Belleville, Wood County, 5th Place; Avery McGuire, Champaign County, 6th Place; Brock Retcher, Defiance County, 7th Place; Cory Derr, Wyandot County, 8th Place; Emily Singer, Defiance County, 9th Place; and Molly Brodman, Wood County, 10th place.

The market beef 14-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Victoria Waits, Fayette County, Champion; Mallory Peter, Defiance County, Reserve Champion; Carson Shafer, Preble County, 3rd Place; Alex Linder, Richland County, 4th Place; Drew Browning, Muskingum County, 5th Place; Lewis Winner, Darke County, 6th Place; Addison Jones, Allen County, 7th Place; Olivia Monnin, Shelby County, 8th Place; Kade Gowitzka, Richland County, 9th Place; and Tanner Shipley, Adams County, 10th place.

The market beef 15-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Allison Davis, Carroll County, Champion; Colleen Minges, Butler County, Reserve Champion; Caroline Blay, Portage County, 3rd Place; Carver Gostomsky, Darke County, 4th Place; Tanner Cordes, Montgomery County, 5th Place; Caden Hess, Highland County, 6th Place; Zach Retcher, Defiance County, 7th Place; Savanna Holzen, Miami County, 8th Place; Riley Huelskamp, Shelby County, 9th Place; and Jacob Levering, Morrow County, 10th place.

The market beef 16-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Lori Millenbaugh, Crawford County, Champion; Brooke Egbert, Auglaize County, Reserve Champion; Layne Lassnick, Lake County, 3rd Place; Quinton Waits, Fayette County, 4th Place; Hadley LeVan, Champaign County, 5th Place; Maggie Pollard, Defiance County, 6th Place; Addie Shaffer, Lake County, 7th Place; Emily Paden, Guernsey County, 8th Place; Elizabeth Heintz, Auglaize County, 9th Place; and Micayla McClure, Hamilton County, 10th place.

The market beef 17-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Anne Thompson, Clinton County, Champion; Kassidy Thompson, Miami County, Reserve Champion; Hannah Ziegler, Wyandot County, 3rd Place; Morgan Mazey, Wood County, 4th Place; Caroline Vonderhaar, Preble County, 5th Place; Samantha Augustine, Ashland County, 6th Place; Adam Kinsman, Fulton County, 7th Place; Stephanie Birney, Harrison County, 8th Place; Colby Watson, Champaign County, 9th Place; and Isaac Gehret, Darke County, 10th place.

Congratulations! See you next year.

The market beef 18-year-old Showmanship Champions pictured from left are Caleb Horn, Fairfield County, Champion; Brooke Hayhurst, Wayne County, Reserve Champion; Alex Witt, Greene County, 3rd Place; Kady Davis, Carroll County, 4th Place; Bricen Hess, Highland County, 5th Place; Carter Smith, Holmes County, 6th Place; Lindsey Pugh, Stark County, 7th Place; Austin Garner, Butler County, 8th Place; Danielle Whitted, Portage County, 9th Place; and Brianna Ellish, Miami County, 10th place.

Congratulations to Kyle Piscione of Burbank, Ohio for being named the 2017 Ohio State Fair Breeding Cattle Supreme Showman – session 1

2018 Ohio STate Fair July 25 - August 5

Congratulations to Bricen Hess of Sardinia, Ohio for being named the 2017 Ohio State Fair Breeding Cattle Supreme Showman – session 2

Congratulations to Allison Davis of Carrollton, Ohio For being named the 2017 Ohio State Fair Market Beef Supreme Showman.

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |47


Re s u l t s

& Highlights

Judging Contest Results Sr. Beef Individuals

Non-Reasons Beef

The Jr. beef high individuals pictured from left are Macy Thorne, Knox County, 1st Place; Carter Lampe, Wood County, 2nd Place; Annmarie Nietz, Wood County, 3rd Place; Kendra Marty, Wayne County, 4th Place; Emma Yochum, Highland County, 5th Place; Logan Isler, Marion County, 6th Place; Hayden Belleville, Wood County, 7th Place; Kolton Arnold, Tuscarawas County, 8th Place; Kate Liggett, Tuscarawas County, 9th Place; Jacob Isler, Marion County, 10th Place.

The Sr. beef high individuals pictured from left are Katie Feldmann, Warren County, 1st Place; Josh Starner, Fairfield County, 2nd Place; Ashlyn O’Brien, Wood County, 3rd Place; Kirsten Harp, Highland County, 4th Place; Gavin Lochard, Darke County, 5th Place; Bekah Muselin, Marion County, 6th Place; Allie Pastor, Fairfield County, 7th Place; Cade Liggettt, Tuscarawas County, 8th Place; Garrett Brown, Warren County, 9th Place; Carla Smith, Delaware County, 10th Place.

The non-reasons beef high individuals pictured from left are Alyssa Betts, Belmont County, 1st Place; Sarah Millikan, Henry County, 2nd Place; Makayla Abrevaya, Warren County, 3rd Place; Jonah Starner, Fairfield County, 4th Place; Sierra Betts, Belmont County, 5th Place; Kirsten Sanders, Washington County, 6th Place; Camren Fedderka, Henry County, 7th Place; Haley Favorite, Warren County, 8th Place; Chris Tooms, Muskingum County, 9th Place; Madison Brueschber, Henry County, 10th Place.

Jr. High Individuals

Sr. High Individuals

Jr. High Team

The Jr. beef high individuals pictured from left are Macy Thorne, Knox County, 1st Place; Carter Lampe, Wood County, 2nd Place; Annmarie Nietz, Wood County, 3rd Place; Kendra Marty, Wayne County, 4th Place; Emma Yochum, Highland County, 5th Place; Logan Isler, Marion County, 6th Place; Hayden Belleville, Wood County, 7th Place; Kolton Arnold, Tuscarawas County, 8th Place; Kate Liggett, Tuscarawas County, 9th Place; Jacob Isler, Marion County, 10th Place.

The Sr. overall high individuals pictured from left are Josh Starner, Fairfield County, 1st Place; Ethan Cockerill, Ross County, 2nd Place; Sydney Mazey, Wood County, 3rd Place; Katie Feldmann, Warren County, 4th Place; Ashlyn O’Brien, Wood County, 5th Place; Eric Anderson, Ross County, 6th Place; Gavin Lochard, Darke County, 7th Place; Jenna Siegel, Marion County, 8th Place; Lewis Winner, Darke County, 9th Place; Karsyn Ball, Lawrence County, 10th Place.

The Jr. overall high team was Wood County C. Team members included Addie Young, Brooke Simon, Garrett Ziegler and Carter Lampe. Coach: Ivan Belleville

Jr. Beef Individuals

Sr. High Team

The Sr. overall high team was Wood County 1. Team members included Kylie O’Brien, Sydney Mazey, Ashlyn O’Brien and Karter Converse. Coach: Ivan Belleville

48 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


Sponsored by: Commercial Cattle Show

The 2017 Ohio State Fair Commercial Cattle Show participants exhibited 27 pens of three for a total of 81 head of commercial steers and heifers on August 30, 2017 during the fair. Judging the event were Dick and Bob Jurgens of Illinois. The show was managed by United Producers, Inc. and the Ohio Cattlemen’s Association served as a sponsor.

Commercial Cattle Jr. Show

Grand Champion Overall & Champion Lot of 3 Steers Austin Wiseman, Morgan County Average Weight: 1,345 lbs. Reserve Champion Lot of 3 Steers Cameron Young, Logan County Average Weight: 1,297 lbs. Reserve Champion Overall & Champion Lot of 3 Heifers Austin Wiseman, Morgan County Average Weight: 1,235 lbs.

Commercial Cattle Open Show

Grand Champion Overall & Champion Lot of 3 Steers Phelps/O’Connor Farms Limousin, Logan CountyAverage Weight: 1,376 lbs. Reserve Champion Overall & Reserve Champion Lot of 3 Steers Fred Voge, Preble County Average Weight: 1,403 lbs.

Champion Lot of 3 Heifers Fred Voge, Preble County Average Weight: 1,274 lbs. Reserve Champion Lot of 3 Heifers Austin Wiseman, Morgan County Average Weight: 1,235 lbs.

Commercial Cattle show Carcass Results

The 2017 Ohio State Fair Commercial Cattle Show also featured a carcass evaluation competition. The awards banquet for the carcass competition was held in conjuction with the OCA Young Cattlemen’s Conference on Aug. 10.

Jr. Show Carcass Results

Champion Carcass Austin Wiseman, Morgan County Average Carcass Weight: 826 lbs Yield Grades: 3, 3, 3 Quality Grades: Pr, Pr, Ch Average Pen Price: $202.00 Base Price $192.00 Reserve Champion Carcass Austin Wiseman, Morgan County Average Carcass Weight: 763 lbs. Yield Grades: 3, 3, 2 Quality Grades: Pr, Ch, Ch Average Pen Price: $197.00 Base Price: $191.00

Open Show Carcass Results Champion Carcass Austin Wiseman, Morgan County Average Carcass Weight: 826 lbs Yield Grades: 3, 3, 3 Quality Grades: Pr, Pr, Ch Average Pen Price: $202.00 Base Price $192.00 Reserve Champion Carcass Fred Voge, Preble County Average Carcass Weight: 693 lbs. Yield Grades: 2, 3, 3 Quality Grades: Ch, Pr, Pr Average Pen Price: $201.67 Base Price: $191.00 Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |49


Thank You,

OCA steak barn & food pavilion Volunteers! Adena FFA Ansonia FFA Clifton United Presbyterian Crawford County Cattlemen J.L. Draganic Jackie Dugan Fayette County Cattlemen Gallipolis FFA Greenville FFA Heartland Bank Jim & Dee Jepsen Liberty Union FFA Logan County Cattlemen’s Association Madison Co Madison County Cattlemen Mapleton FFA Meadowbrook FFA Mohawk FFA Morgan FFA Northeastern FFA Ohio Cattlemen’s Association Board of Directors Ohio Beef Council Operating Committee OSU Beef Team Frank Phelps Rabbits & Roosters RG Drage FFA Bev Roe Bill Sexten Stan & Connie Smith Stark County Cattlemen Union Local FFA United Producers, Inc. Weaver Leather Livestock

50 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


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Breed News Featuring our members’ success at local, state and national shows

Angus Achievements Registration Open for 2017 Angus Convention

Registration is open for the 2017 Angus Convention, which will take place Nov. 4-6 in Fort Worth, Texas. Visit the convention website, www.angusconvention.com, to register and make hotel reservations for the three-day event. During the Angus Convention, Angus breeders and commercial cattlemen are invited to learn from world-class speakers and educational seminars, network at the trade show and enjoy social events and entertainment with fellow cattle producers from across the country. Delegates elected to represent their state during the Association’s Annual Convention may attend the Association business meetings for free; however, participation in convention education, meals, entertainment and trade show requires a full convention registration. For more information, visit www.angus.org and www.angusconvention.com.

Ohio Couple Inducted into Honorary Angus Foundation

The National Junior Angus Association (NJAA) recently recognized Paul and Lynn Hill, Champion Hill Angus, Bidwell, Ohio, as the newest inductees into the Honorary Angus Foundation at the National Junior Angus Show (NJAS) in Des Moines, Iowa. Paul is a former chairman of the Angus Foundation Board of Directors, a role he served in for four years. In addition, he was very active in raising money for the junior program and other fundraising efforts. Hill was also one of the driving forces behind hiring Angus Foundation president Milford Jenkins, and he also spearheaded the $11 million Vision of Value: Campaign for Angus. Paul began his career as a 52 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

herdsman for Briarhill Angus Farms in Union Springs, Ala., in 1971. Briarhill dispersed 10 years later, and Paul served as a herdsman for herds in Connecticut, South Carolina and Virginia. In 1990, Paul became herdsman for Marshall Reynolds. The two became business partners in 1993, founding Champion Hill Angus. The herd, which included 200 donor cows and 900 recipients, had a year-round breeding program to maximize the use of recipients and supply the demand for show heifers. After many successful years in the Angus business, Paul and Lynn retired in February 2017 to spend more time with their family, dispersing the Champion Hill herd. According to the American Angus Hall of Fame, Hill’s sale, which sold 850 cattle, set a world record.

Gelbvieh Gatherings The Big Red Classic

The 2017 Gelbvieh Junior Classic took place in Grand Island, Nebraska June 25-30. Lara Rittenhouse, New Carlisle, Ohio, and her heifer, TJB Velvet 339Z 504C ET, earned the title of Reserve Champion Senior Gelbvieh Female.

Hereford Happenings 2017 Junior National Hereford Expo

The 2017 Junior National Hereford Expo was held July 15-21 in Louisville, Kentucky. Emily Beanblossom, Bradford, Ohio, earned the titles of Grand Champion Cow-Calf Pair and Champion Bred and Owned Cow-Calf Pair with HH Pearls Uno 576A and her bull calf at her side. Kathy Lehman, Shelby, Ohio, showed her owned horned heifer, KLL KLD Tula Rose 611D to the Reserve Champion Division 1 finish.

Grand Champion Cow-Calf Pair & Champion Bred and Owned Cow-Calf Pair with HH Pearls Uno 576A exhibited by Emily Beanblossom, Bradford, Ohio.

Shorthorn Success

National Junior Shorhorn Show & Youth Conference takes place in Tulsa Several Ohio juniors gathered in Tulsa, Oklahoma to exhibit at the 2017 National Junior Shorthorn Show and Youth Conference July 3-8. Ben Harner, Xenia, Ohio, earned the title of Division I Champion with his owned purebred heifer, BRH Proud Fool 1720. Division II Reserve Champion went to GCC Homecoming Queen 69 ET and was exhibited by Collin Britton, Bowling Green, Ohio. Seaman, Ohio native, Fulton Kennedy showed his heifer, FPK Cindy Beauty 161, to the Division V Reserve Champion spot in the bredand-owned show on July 7. During the Purebred Market Steer Show, Tanner Cordes, Farmersville, Ohio, and his steer, TL Trigger II ET, were deemed Champion Purebred Market Steer.

TL Trigger II ET exhibited by Tanner Cordes, Farmersville, Ohio won Grand Champion Purebred Market Steer at the 2017 National Junior Shorthorn Show.

In Showmanship, Kolten Greenhorn, Waynesville, Ohio, earned 3rd overall in the Prospector


I division; Samantha VanVorhis, Bowling Green, Ohio was selected as 3rd overall in the Prospector II showmanship division; and Kathy Lehman, Shelby, Ohio, was chosen as the Champion Intermediate Showman. After a busy week and success in various contests, the Ohio Junior Shorthorn Association won the Outstanding State Organization title.

Ohio, finished as 13th overall senior and Halee Allen, Hillsboro, Ohio, placed 14th. In the intermediate division, Rachel Dickson, St. Louisville, Ohio, earned the 6th place spot. Finally, Abbie Dickson, St. Louisville, Ohio, earned the 19th overall showman title in the Junior division. v

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ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS. Alex Tolbert, Regional Manager Kentucky Ohio Tennessee 273 Chinn Lane Harrodsburg, KY 40330 706.338.8733 atolbert@angus.org

On the Edge of Common Sense By Baxter Black, DVM

Jumper

Betty said her dad had a bull that kept jumpin’ the fence. She wondered if I knew any surefire cures for fence jumpin’ bulls. I asked her what they’d tried already. “Well,” she said, “One of Fred’s friends (Fred was her dad) suggested tyin’ a chain to the ring in his nose. So Dad did, a ten-foot log chain. Didn’t faze him! That bull could stand flat-footed and jump a five-wire fence! “Dad improved on the idea by wiring a ten pound window weight to the end of To subscribe to the Angus Journal, the chain.” call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report on “How did that work?” I asked. RFD-TV Monday mornings at 7:30 CST. “No better,” she answered, “But it made him easier to track! Dad revised the idea by replacing the window weight with a gunny sack. The bull still jumped the fence but the sack hung up in the bob wire. At least they could find him the next mornin’.” Maybe, I thought to myself, we’re hangin’ the weight a little far forward. “So,” I asked Betty, “What kinda bull is it?” 3201 Frederick Ave. | St. Joseph, MO 64506 “Purebred Angus. Modern breeding, big and tall. I don’t know his registered 816.383.5100 | www.ANGUS.org name but Dad calls him Jumper.” © 2016-2017 American Angus Association “Did you try one of those old fashion yokes?” I asked, remembering how we kept the milk cow from poking her head too far through a fence. Are you “That would sure make our cows uncomfortable when he went to breed she pointed out. “In all fairness, the neighbors don’t object too much. M_Tolbert.indd 1 8/30/16 9:24one,” AM He’s a pretty good bull.” “Humm,” I said, “You might could take advantage of that. If he’s not Ohio breedin’ your cows, maybe Fred could make a little off him when he’s ‘On the Cattlemen’s Road’ so to speak.” Foundation “Like what?’ she asked, her ears perkin’ up. “How ‘bout a sign on his side advertising FRED’S MOBILE ALL License Plate NATURAL INSEMINATION SERVICE. ‘If you see this bull breeding your Program cow, please call BR 549 Covington, Oklahoma.’” Show your pride as an Ohio cattle producer   “I doubt it,” said Betty, shakin’ her head, “I’m afraid he’s destined to be and support Ohio’s youth by purchasing the Beef meat loaf if Dad can’t keep him home.” license plate. Plates are available through the “But what if Jumper finds out your intentions and escapes for good?” I Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. asked. By purchasing an Ohio Beef license plate,   “You don’t know my dad! He’d find him eventually. He’d put out an APB. you will be supporting the Ohio Cattlemen’s Then some mornin’ I’d be settin’ at the breakfast table in a stupor reading the Foundation Scholarship Program and making a label on a milk carton and there he’d be! Beneath his photograph would read: positive difference in the future of the industry by IF YOU SEE THIS BULL draggin’ a ten foot log chain in his nose, please call supporting those youth who have been “Tagged this number. He answers to the name JUMPER.“ v for Greatness.” The Beef plate will cost $25 annually, in www.baxterblack.com  addition to regular registration fees. With each Ohio Beef license plate sold, $15 goes directly to the Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation. The plates are also available for commercial farm trucks. Call 1-866-OPLATES or visit www.OPLATES. com for more information. A reliable business partner is difficult to come by. Contact Alex Tolbert to locate Angus genetics, select marketing options tailored to your needs, and to access Association programs and services. Put the business breed to work for you.

Tagged for Greatness?

54 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


Your Beef Checkoff Dollars at Work

2014 Ohio Fall Feeder Cattle Sales

Investing in Beef Safety, Nutrition and Promotion Five New Advocate All-Stars

In late May, the Beef Advocacy Training and Engagement team hosted five select Masters of Beef Advocacy (MBA) graduates at NCBA headquarters for the sixth Top of the Class training, an in-depth one-onone training with industry experts in media training, social media strategies, blogging, presentation skills, developing a brand and culinary demos. Additionally, these advocates heard from subject matter experts on sustainability, nutrition, beef safety, market research and animal care to further their knowledge on trends and issues in the beef industry. These grads have unique backgrounds, ranging from a grilling connoisseur from Las Vegas to a rancher who hails from “10 miles past nowhere,” Wyoming. Top of the Class graduates, now totaling 29 high-level advocates, will apply their knowledge and expertise to future advocacy endeavors and engage with an inquiring consumer audience. Are you interested in enhancing your skills as a beef advocate? Complete the online MBA program today to become more confident in connecting with consumers as well as joining a vast network of advocates from around the country. Register for this free, self-paced learning platform at beef.org/MBA.

Dubai Trade Show Perfect Vehicle for U.S. Beef

The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF), contractor to the beef checkoff, participated in the Middle East’s most important trade show, Gulfood. USMEF’s appearance was funded by the beef checkoff and the USDA. By promoting both U.S. beef and lamb, the event leveraged checkoff dollars in a location where both are highly prized. The show brought buyers and sellers together to discuss business needs, reinforce relationships, become informed about trends, and demonstrate current and new products. Learn more about this effort and more www.usmef.org.

Beef - A Wise Choice!

The new Beef WISE study found that lean beef, as part of a healthy, higher-protein diet, can help people lose weight while maintaining muscle and a healthy heart. The Beef WISE Study adds to the growing body of research demonstrating the role of lean beef in heart-healthy diets and strong bodies. This includes another beefcheckoff funded study called BOLD (Beef in an Optimal Lean Diet), and independent research DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension). In recent years, higherprotein diets have become a popular diet strategy for weight loss. Dietary recommendations such as the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans may suggest that eating patterns with lower intake of red meats are associated with a reduced

risk of obesity. However, these recommendations to limit red meat are based primarily on observational studies, whereas clinical trials such as the three mentioned largely found no detrimental impact of lean red meat consumption on markers of cardiometabolic health during weight loss or weight maintenance. The WISE study, made possible by a research grant from your checkoff, demonstrates that lean beef doesn’t have to be restricted in a higherprotein diet and is just as effective as other protein choices in supporting healthy weight loss and leaner bodies. In order to get this good news out to health and fitness leaders, your checkoff sent custom emails along with a press release to approximately 150 targeted media outlets and reporters. These selected outlets cover health and fitness for consumers or are nutrition/sciencefocused publications. Be proud of your checkoff’s work in this arena as this study is great news for people who enjoy beef but may have been told they should avoid it while following weight loss diets. It underscores, once again, lean beef can be part of a healthy, higherprotein diet for weight loss. v

The Ohio Beef Council and the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board are responsible for developing programs that increase the demand for beef. For more information, contact the Ohio Beef Council at 614-873-6736, beef@ohiobeef.org or visit www.ohiobeef.org. Ohio Beef Council Operating Committee: Bev Roe, Hamilton, Chairman • Jamie Graham, Patriot, Vice Chairman Sam Roberts, South Charleston, Treasurer • Jim Beattie, Greenwich • Henry Bergfeld, Summitville • Kathy Davis, Perrysville • Barb Watts, Alexandria Dave Felumlee, Newark • Randy Hollowell, Covington • Brent Porteus, Coshocton • Todd Raines, Seaman • Allan Robison, Cable Bill Sexten, Washington C.H. • Neil Siefring, Coldwater •Stan Smith, Canal Winchester• Elizabeth Harsh, Executive Director Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |55


OCA News

Continued on page 71

OCA...Networking on Your Behalf OCA makes your voice heard on all important issues facing the beef industry. Pictured are (1) Sasha Rittenhouse, OCA Vice President and Dean, College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, Cathann A. Kress; (2) District 10 director, Bill Tom meets with Senator Kenny Yuko; (3) Congressman Bob Gibbs and Pam Haley, district 6 director pictured at an event in Holmes County; (4) Sasha Rittenhouse, OCA Vice President and Representatvie Rick Carfagna after the House and Senate Joint Ag Committee Hearing on Aug. 2 at the Ohio State Fair.

3

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56 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


Ohio’s Premier BRED, Born & Raised Steer and Heifer Youth Event Sponsors Heifer Division

scholarship

steer Division

2017 Ohio State Fair Results The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) hosted the Best of the Buckeye shows at the Ohio State Fair, July 26 - Aug. 6, 2017. The Best of the Buckeye program, coordinated by OCA in conjunction with the Ohio Beef Expo and Ohio State Fair, had a strong show with more than 260 head of cattle nominated by youth and breeders to date. The program recognizes top Ohio bred and born registered steers and heifers, along with the breeder and exhibitor, in each breed division at the two shows. Best of the Buckeye provides Ohio seedstock breeders with an enhanced marketing opportunity for

Ohio bred and born registered steers and heifers, creates a source of more moderately priced show steers and heifers by providing a program with awards and prestige, and attracts new participants interested in showing at the Ohio Beef Expo and/or the Ohio State Fair. This year’s generous sponsors are Garwood Cattle Company, LLC, heifer division; Jones Show Cattle and R & D Jones Excavating, steer division; and Ohio Cat and Ohio Ag Equipment, scholarship division. $30,000 will be presented between the two shows in the form of premiums, scholarships

and awards. Every winning Best of the Buckeye exhibitor received a basic premium of $300 for champion, $200 for reserve champion, and $100 for third overall. Ohio breed associations also contributed additional premiums. OCA would like to thank these sponsors for contributing to a successful year of the Best of the Buckeye program. Visit ohiocattle.org/best-of-the-buckeye for more information.

Heifer Division Sponsor

Best of the Buckeye Heifers - Sponsored by Garwood Cattle Company

Champion Angus Heifer Exhibited by Sydney Sanders, Leesburg, Ohio Bred by Maplecrest Farms, Hillsboro, Ohio Total Premium: $500*

Reserve Champion Angus Heifer Exhibited by Carly Sanders, Leesburg, Ohio Bred by Maplecrest Farms, Hillsboro, Ohio Total Premium: $325*

Third Overall Angus Heifer Exhibited by Darcy Howser Mt. Orab, Ohio Bred by Maplecrest Farms, Hillsboro, Ohio Total Premium: $175*

Champion Chianina Heifer Exhibited by Kathy Lehman, Shelby, Ohio Bred by Garwood Cattle Company, Columbiana, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Chianina Heifer Exhibited by Allison Davis, Carrollton, Ohio Bred by Massie Creek Cattle, Cedarville, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall Chianina Heifer Exhibited by Tucker Shepard, Napoleon, Ohio Bred by Schroeder Show Cattle, Col. Grove, Ohio Total Premium: $100

No Picture Available Champion Hereford Heifer Exhibited by Maddox Cupp, Lancaster, Ohio Bred by Jones Show Cattle, Harrod, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Hereford Heifer Exhibited by Kyle Piscione, Burbank, Ohio Bred by Soehnlen Cattle Company, Navarre, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall Hereford Heifer Exhibited by Kady Davis, Carrollton, Ohio Bred by Pugh Central Station, Louisville, Ohio Total Premium: $100 Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |57


Champion Limousin Heifer Exhibited by Emma Gurney, Attica, Ohio Bred by VanHorn Limousin, Malta, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Limousin Heifer Exhibited by Emma Gurney, Attica, Ohio Bred by Emma Gurney, Attica, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Champion Lim-Flex Heifer Exhibited by Emma Gurney, Attica, Ohio Bred by VanHorn Limousin, Malta, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion High % Maine-Anjou Heifer Exhibited by Caitlin Schaub, Wapakoneta, Ohio Bred by Jones Show Cattle, Harrod, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion High % Maine-Anjou Heifer Exhibited by Hanna Schroeder, Col. Grove, Ohio Bred by Ali Muir, Waynesfield, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall High % Maine-Anjou Heifer Exhibited by Avery Wood, Sabina, Ohio Bred by Cameron Alexander, Sabina, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion MaineTainer Heifer Exhibited by Kathy Lehman, Shelby, Ohio Bred by Garwood Cattle Company, Columbiana, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion MaineTainer Heifer Exhibited by Kinley Kreis, Adamsville, Ohio Bred by Kinley Kreis, Adamsville, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall MaineTainer Heifer Exhibited by Alyson Simpson, West Union, Ohio Bred by Alyson Simpson, West Union, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion Shorthorn Heifer Exhibited by Sarah Harner, Xenia, Ohio Bred by Ben Harner, Xenia, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Heifer Exhibited by Emma Zeedyk, Hicksville, Ohio Bred by Hadley Levan, Woodstock, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall Shorthorn Heifer Exhibited by Fulton Kennedy, Seaman, Ohio Bred by Fulton Kennedy, Seaman, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer Exhibited by Ashley Peter, Hicksville, Ohio Bred by Boyert Show Cattle, Seville, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer Exhibited by Reed Hanes, Celina, Ohio Bred by Hunt Farms, New Madison Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall ShorthornPlus Heifer Exhibited by Madison King, Bellefontaine, Ohio Bred by Durban Cattle Company, W. Jefferson, Ohio Total Premium: $100

58 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


Champion Simmental Heifer Exhibited by Allison Herr, Metamora, Ohio Bred by Jones Show Cattle, Harrod, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Simmental Heifer Exhibited by Hannah Topmiller, Pleasant Plain, Ohio Bred by Hannah Topmiller, Pleasant Plain, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall Simmental Heifer Exhibited by McKaylynne Helmke, New Phil., Ohio Bred by Neil Wise, New Phil., Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion % Simmental Heifer Exhibited by Hudson Drake, Chillicothe, Ohio Bred by Hara Farms, Dublin, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion % Simmental Heifer Exhibited by Matthew Koverman, Minford, Ohio Bred by Hara Farms, Dublin, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall % Simmental Heifer Exhibited by Austin Hunker, Bellevue, Ohio Bred by Garwood Cattle Company, Columbiana, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion AOB Heifer

Reserve Champion AOB Heifer Exhibited by Lauren Schulte, Ottawa, Ohio Bred by Levi Richards, Pemberville, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall AOB Heifer Exhibited by Mason Love, Baltimore, Ohio Bred by Mason Love, Baltimore, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Exhibited by Samantha VanVorhis, Bowling Green, Ohio Bred by Samantha VanVorhis, Bowling Green, Ohio

Total Premium: $300

Best of the Buckeye Scholarships - Sponsored by Ohio Cat and Ohio Ag Equipment The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association Best of the Buckeye program awarded three $1,000 academic scholarships to participants pursuing an agriculture-related post-secondary degree, thanks to the scholarship sponsor Ohio Cat and Ohio Ag Equipment. Recipients were awarded their scholarships at the Ohio State Fair, prior to the selection of the Overall Grand Champion Market Beef, on Aug. 5, 2017. Scholarships were awarded based on academics and extracurricular activities and applicants submitted an essay along with their scholarship application answering, “How will you stay involved with the cattle industry through college and in the future, and how will programs like Best of the Buckeye help you achieve this?” The 2017 Best of the Buckeye academic scholarship recipients:

Scholarship division Sponsors

Pictured at the Ohio State Fair where the Best of the Buckeye Academic Scholarships were awarded are Todd Pugh, Chairman - Best of the Buckeye Committee; Linda Meier, representing Ohio CAT; Kinley Kreis; Jordan Johnson; Kady Davis; Mark Hara,Vice-Chairman - Best of the Buckeye Committee

Kady Davis, Carrollton

Kady is the 19-year-old daughter of Todd & Kim Davis of Carroll County. She is currently a sophormore at The Ohio State University and plans to receive a degree in Animal Sciences in the spring of 2020.

Jordan Johnson, Gallipolis

Jordan is a 2017 graduate from Gallipolis High School and will be attending Ohio State, main campus this fall majoring in Agricultural Communcation. He is the 18-year-old son of Stoney & Amy Johnson of Gallia County.

Kinley Kreis, Adamsville

Kinley is the 19-year-old daughter of Ron & Tonya Kreis from Muskingum County. She graduated from Tri-Valley High School in 2017 and will be attending the University of Findlay this fall majoring in Animal Science & Biology.

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |59


Best of the Buckeye Steers - Sponsored by Jones Show Cattle and R & D Jones Excavating steer Division SponsorS

Champion Angus Steer Exhibited by Carly Sanders, Leesburg, Ohio Bred by Hara Farms, Dublin, Ohio Total Premium: $550*

Reserve Champion Angus Steer Exhibited by Ty Hawley, Jeromesville, Ohio Bred by Ty Hawley Show Cattle, Jeromesville, Ohio Total Premium: $350*

Champion Chianina Steer Exhibited by Montana Hulsmeyer, Harrod, Ohio Bred by Jones Show Cattle, Harrod, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Chianina Steer Exhibited by Kate Hornyak, Chardon, Ohio Bred by Grauer Show Cattle, Shiloh, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall Chianina Steer Exhibited by Alex Linder, Norwalk, Ohio Bred by Grauer Show Cattle, Shiloh, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion Hereford Steer Exhibited by Hayden Smith, Millersburg, Ohio Bred by Smith Show Cattle, Millersburg, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Hereford Steer Exhibited by Noah Smith, Fremont, Ohio Bred by Hill & Hollow Farms, Bradford, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall Hereford Steer Exhibited by Jacob Wiechart, Ft. Jennings, Ohio Bred by Hickory Lane Show Cattle, Cloverdale, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion Maine-Anjou Steer Exhibited by Colleen Minges, Oxford, Ohio Bred by Scott & Barb Stockslager, W. Alexandria, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Maine-Anjou Steer Exhibited by Kassidy Thompson, Troy, Ohio Bred by Thompson Show Cattle, Troy, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall Maine-Anjou Steer Exhibited by Adam Kinsman, Archbold, Ohio Bred by Morgan Cattle Company, Mt. Perry, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Steer Exhibited by Madison King, Bellefontaine, Ohio Bred by Durban Cattle Company, W. Jefferson, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall Shorthorn Steer Exhibited by Logan Schroeder, Defiance, Ohio Bred by Turner Shorthorns, Somerset, Ohio Total Premium: $100

Champion Shorthorn Steer Exhibited by Cole Foor, Pataskala, Ohio Bred by DJ Show Cattle/Cornerpost Farms, Bloomville, Ohio Total Premium: $300 60 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


Champion ShorthornPlus Steer Exhibited by Garrett Agle, South Charleston, Ohio Bred by Agle Family Cattle, South Vienna, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Steer Exhibited by Luke Schroeder, Defiance, Ohio Bred by Turner Shorthorns, Somerset, Ohio Total Premium: $200

Third Overall ShorthornPlus Steer Exhibited by Kyle Piscione, Burbank, Ohio Bred by Piscione Cattle, Burbank, Ohio Total Premium: $100

*Additional premiums for the Angus divisions were sponsored by the Ohio Angus Association.

Champion Simmental Steer Exhibited by Morgan Mazey, Weston, Ohio Bred by Prestige/Goff Show Cattle, Crooksville, Ohio Total Premium: $300

Reserve Champion Simmental Steer Exhibited by Zach Retcher, Defiance, Ohio Bred by Jones Show Cattle, Harrod, Ohio Total Premium: $200*

Congratulations

to all Best of the Buckeye Exhibitors,

&Thank You

to all PARTICIPATING breeders!

4 Wiley Farm, Mt. Vernon 4C Show Cattle, Oregonia 5 H Farms, Hinckley Adams Family Show Cattle, Springfield Agle Family Cattle, South Vienna Cameron Alexander, Sabina Austen Show Cattle, Ashland Bihl Farms, Washington C.H. Boyert Show Cattle, Seville

Byland Polled Shorthorns, Loudonville Campbellco, Cedarville Cassell Cattle Company, Mt. Vernon Cedar Lane Farm, Cedarville Champion Hill, Bidwell Charmont Farm, Russellville Chippewa Valley Angus Farm, Rittman Clark Show Stock, Covington Claylick Run, Newark

Jared Cluxton, Ripley Conley Cattle Co., Springfield Devin Coon, Jackson Creek Bottom Farm, Navarre DaLin Show Cattle, New Carlisle Kelsey Decker, Pickerington Dickson Simmental Cattle, St. Louisville Diven Springs Farm, Hillsboro DJ Show Show Cattle & Cornerpost Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |61


Farms, Bloomville Double L Farm, Hamilton Durban Cattle Company, West Jefferson DWK Cattle, Minerva EarlHaven Farms, Utica Eckert Farm, Stockport Esquire Cattle Company, New Philadelphia Esselburn Grain & Cattle, Shreve Farno Polled Herefords, Eaton Foster Farms Shorthorns, Amanda Frazier’s Farm, Fredericktown Gahler Farms, Graytown Garwood Cattle Company, LLC, Columbiana Isaac & Paige Gehret, Yorkshire Godown Farms, New Paris Grauer Show Cattle, Shiloh Green Oak Farms, New Paris Greenhorn Cattle Co., Waynesville Emma Gurney, Attica Hara Farms, Dublin Ben Harner, Xenia HC Farm, Marengo Helsinger Polled Herefords, Germantown Heritage Farm, Ft Jennings Herr Show Cattle, Metamore HFS Angus, Radnor Hickory Lane Show Cattle, Cloverdale Hill & Hollow Farms, Bradford Hilltop Farms Show Cattle, Oak Hill Holley Cattle Company, Gibsonburg Howser Farms, Mt. Orab Hunker Genetics, Bellevue Hunt Farms, New Madison Johnson Show Cattle, Gallipolis Johnston Farms, Wauseon Jones Show Cattle, Harrod JTR Farms, Germantown Kasler Cattle Company, Millfield

Ke-Car Farms, Danville Kennedy Farms, Seaman Josie Kidwell, Walhonding Kiesewetter Livestock, Piqua Kingsway Angus, Tiffin Kitzmiller Farm & Cattle, Homeworth Kinley Kreis, Adamsville Lawrence Cattle Co., Hebron Levanderosa Farms, Woodstock Cole Liggett, Dennison Mason & Morgan Love, Baltimore M & L Cattle Co., New Philadelphia Shelby Manning, Union City Maplecrest Farms, Hillsboro Massie Creek Cattle, Jamestown Nick McConnell, Mt. Vernon McLaughlin Shorthorns, Woodsfield McMahan Show Cattle, Marion Meadow View Farm, Cambridge Miller Family Show Cattle, West Unity Whitney Miller, Shreve Colleen Minges, Oxford Zachary Minges, Hamilton Minges Show Cattle, Okeana Monnier Cattle, Houston Morgan Cattle Co., Mt. Perry Muddy Fork Cattle, LLC, Wooster Muir Cattle Co., Waynesfield Mullett Angus, Coshocton Katrina Nicholl, DeGraff Osage Farm, Wilmington Paradise Cattle Company, Ashville Brandee Painter, Hebron Phelps Farms, Milford Center Pilot Knob Farms, Sabina Piscione Cattle, Burbank Abbygail Pitstick, South Solon Power Up Syndicate, Mentor Prestige Cattle / Goff Show Cattle, Crooksville Prince Farms, Conover Prospect Cattle, Hillsboro

Pugh Central Station, Louisville Hannah Randolph, Richmond Reed Show Stock, Lindsey Levi Richards, Pemberville Rocking F Cattle Co., West Unity Rocking G, Bethel Ruffing Family Farms, Republic RVC Farms, Cedarville Schroeder Show Cattle, Columbus Grove Shaffer Farms, Fredericktown Shane Show Cattle, Casstown Elizabeth Shatto, Fort Loramie Sherman Farms, Cardington Showcase Cattle Co., Winchester Alyson Simpson, West Union Smith Show Cattle, Millersburg Soehnlen Cattle Company, Navarre Richie Souvenier, Grand Rapids Garrett Stanfield, Manchester Stertzbach Cattle Company, Louisville STJ Ruffing Cattle Co., Republic Shannon Strow, Custar Taylor Made Cattle, Grove City Thiel Farms, Upper Sandusky Thompson Show Cattle, Troy Thunderstruck Farms, Bowling Green Toussaint River Angus Farm, Oak Harbor Turner Shorthorns, Somerset Ty Hawley Show Cattle, Jeromesville VanHorn Limousin Farm, Malta Samantha VanVorhis, Bowling Green West End Cattle Company, Cumberland Winegardner Show Cattle, Lima Christina Winter, Ashville Neil Wise, New Philadelphia Y-Not Cattle, Pleasant Plain Yochum Family Cattle, Hillsboro

Ohio’s Premier BRED, Born & Raised Steer and Heifer Youth Event Sponsors: Heifer Division

scholarship

steer Division

Selling Best of the Buckeye Eligible Calves this Fall? FEEL FREE TO USE THE LOGO WHEREVER APPLICABLE IN YOUR CATALOGS AND sale PROMOTIONS! 62 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Need the logo? We would love to share. Just contact us.


Letters to the Editor

®

Dear Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Thank you for the plaque. I have grown to enjoy livestock judging more and more each year and with the plaque I was awarded gives me more drive than ever to continue to pursue my livestock judging career. Thank you again. Sincerely, Ethan Cockerill Dear Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Thank you for donating meal coupons for our Bigs & Littles day at the Ohio State Fair on July 28th. Your generosity was very much appreciated by our Bigs and Littles, and also by everyone connected with Big Brothers Big Sisters of west Central Ohio. Warm regards, Fran Biaglow Dear Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Thank you for sponsoring my first place plaque for the Ohio State Fair livestock judging contest. Your donations are greatly appreciated by everyone they go to. It is very kind that you did this, even when you did not have to. Thanks again. Sincerely, Addie Young

LET RANGER® DO THE HEAVY LIFTING

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Dear Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Thank you so much for choosing me to be a recipient of the Best of the Buckeye academic scholarship. I really enjoyed showing my Best of the Buckeye Hereford Heifer throughout the winter and also at the Ohio State Fair. In a few short days, I will be starting my second year at The Ohio State University and am looking forward to using this scholarship money to further my education. Thanks Again, Kady Davis Dear Ohio Cattlemen’s Association, Thank you for sponsoring the plaque I won for being he Beef high individual in the non-reasons division of the 4-H judging contest at the Ohio State Fair. Your support is greatly appreciated and I hope you continue in the future. Thanks again, Alyssa Betts

©2017 Cargill, Inc. All rights reserved.

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |63


Farm Science Review

JOIN. Engage.

#MyFSR

SEPTEMBER 19–21

2017

Inspire.

If your business is agriculture, our business is you!

Molly Caren Agricultural Center London, Ohio Tuesday and Wednesday, 8 a.m.–5 p.m. Thursday, 8 a.m.–4 p.m.

Tickets available pre-show for $7 online or from OSU Extension offices and local agribusinesses. $10 at the gate. Children 5 and under are free.

JOIN TODAY!

Call 614.873.6736 or visit www.ohiocattle.org Ohio Cattlemen’s Association

10600 US Highway 42 • Marysville, OH 43040 Visit our website to learn about our summer events!

fsr.osu.edu

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Beef Briefs AgCredit Visits Washington D.C. to Advocate for Timely Farm Bill & Strong Farm Safety Net

AgCredit staff, directors and members joined more than 600 Farm Credit leaders from across the country who traveled to Washington, D.C., recently to meet with lawmakers to advocate for timely passage of a strong Farm Bill that includes a farm safety net. The group communicated how it is critical for policy makers to maintain a strong farm safety net that includes affordable crop insurance. Farm Credit System leaders collectively talked about the need to continue the United States Department of Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency guaranteed and direct loan programs, increasing the volume of loans available and increasing the loan size limits for the guaranteed loans. During Congressional office visits, Farm Credit leaders discussed the need for strongly supported programs tailored to the unique needs of rural America to attract more private investment in rural infrastructure (agricultural research, healthcare, broadband, housing, energy, transportation, financing and water), as part of the Farm Bill or as part of stand-alone legislation.

Continued on page 67

one of North America’s largest farmer owned and operated livestock marketing cooperatives, recently announced a collaborative agreement to benefit livestock farmers across the Midwest. UPI will now utilize AgriClear as its digital marketing solution for online cattle transactions, which will bring innovative livestock marketing technology to current and future UPI members. “We’re very excited to partner with UPI to power a unique, modern solution for the cattle industry. The combination of UPI’s marketing expertise, vast network and commitment to evolving technology to meet member needs, along with AgriClear’s leading-edge cattle trading platform, is an offering unlike any other in North America,” said Nevil Speer, Vice President of

U.S. Operations, AgriClear. “This alliance provides cattle buyers and sellers with full transparency throughout the payment process along with a mechanism to trade cattle based on their true value.” “UPI prides itself on providing leading-edge marketing solutions that provide real value to producers. Joining forces with AgriClear to expand the package of services available to UPI cattle producers is a natural evolution of our growing spectrum of options for producers of all sizes throughout the Midwest and beyond. We are constantly seeking to provide producers with a competitive advantage in an ever-changing and evolving marketplace directly or through innovative partnerships,” added Mike Bumgarner, President & CEO UPI.

While attending the fly-in, AgCredit’s delegation visited with Congressman Gibbs (7th District).

AgriClear and United Producers Inc. Announce Strategic Alliance AgriClear, North America’s premier online cattle transaction and payment platform, together with United Producers Inc. (UPI),

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |65


Dates to Remember: Ohio Cattleman Late Fall Advertising Deadline

September 8 OCA Award Nomination Deadline

September 15 Farm Science Review

September 19-21 Spring Internship Application Deadline

October 1 OCA Board of Directors Nomination Deadline

October 1 Ohio Cattlemen’s Camp

October 14-15 Foundation Scholarships Application Deadline

October 31 Call 614-873-6736 or email beef@ohiobeef.org for more info

66 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

Ohio CattleWomen Update

Amy Coffman, Ohio CattleWomen President

Summer Recap As the fair season starts to wind down, I’d like to express my thanks to several ladies who took time out of their busy schedules to help staff the Cattlewomen’s Store at the Ohio State Fair. We could not have done it without you. It’s a good time to get to know people and the young cattlemen and women who are showing. Our Summer Conference was held in Denver in July. Below, I have included some of the things we covered in our ANCW meetings. Ladies, I’d love to have more members from Ohio join ANCW. You can join ANCW online or include national dues with your state dues. In June, we held the Region 1 meeting here and we’ve been asked to hold it again. Our National President is Penny Zimmerman from Minnesota. She is empowering Cattlewomen all over the states and was even invited to speak on a panel at the Canadian Beef Industry Conference. The panel’s theme is: “Working together, trading together and learning from each other.” I had the opportunity to attend the Summer Conference and the first Women’s Leadership Certification Class, which will continue in January in Phoenix. The Collegiate Beef Advocacy Program is the program created by ANCW for beef industry advocates interested in bridging the gap between farm and fork. This program connects collegiate leaders to the beef industry, where they have unlimited access to leadership, peers, cattlemen and cattlewomen and beef industry professionals. Participants will grow as individuals, strengthen leadership skills, establish networks and receive a scholarship. As a state affiliate, we can designate our collegiate candidate(s) and a working group chair. If you know of a college student that would be an asset to our organization, please contact us. In August, our very own Opal Holfinger was inducted into the Ohio Agricultural Council Hall of Fame for her outstanding contributions to the Ohio agriculture and beef industries. Congratulations, Opal! v


Beef Briefs Good and Lahmers Promoted to New Positions at Select Sires

Dr. Tony Good, former chief veterinarian, has been promoted to vice president of production operations effective July 1, and Dr. Elizabeth Lahmers assumed the role of chief veterinary officer after serving as associate veterinarian. Good began his employment at Select Sires by working summers while attending the College of Veterinary Medicine at The Ohio State University in the early 1990s. After his graduation in 1995, he became an associate veterinarian at Select Embryos and continued as a veterinarian at Select Sires until 2002. After taking a brief break to operate a private practice specializing in embryo transfer, he rejoined Select Sires in 2004 and was promoted to chief veterinarian in 2007. During his time at Select Sires, Good has promoted information sharing among collection crews, developed the veterinary internship program and managed Select Sires’ biosecurity program by supporting diagnostic testing for more than 1,800 bulls. He has been instrumental in animal welfare guidelines and an audit program in partnership with Validus. “I just want to serve the agricultural community that I grew up in, in the most positive fashion possible, with the most passionate team of people in the A.I. industry,” said Good. Lahmers grew up on her family’s farm, Wabash-Way Holsteins and started working at Select Sires nine years ago. She played a key role in designing and implementing protocols for incoming bulls from the Aggressive Reproductive Technologies™ (ART™) program and advanced the use of ultrasound in preventative care. She insures the bulls and bull herds are managed to comply with regulations governing the international trade of semen. Her expertise in barn ventilation has been instrumental to new barn construction at Select Sires.

“I’m honored to be the chief veterinarian, and I am looking forward to leading our team and serving Select Sires in this capacity,” said Lahmers.

Purina Animal Nutrition and Performance Livestock Analytics Work Together to Offer Cattle Producers Real-time Decision Tools

Purina Animal Nutrition and Performance Livestock Analytics (PLA) are joining forces to give Purina customers access to Performance Beef™ software. Built for farmer-feeders and feedlots, this software gives producers the data they need to make real-time, profitfocused decisions. “Performance Beef™ software allows producers to capture and analyze the large amount of feed data generated today,” says Anthony Robinson, associate marketing manager with Purina Animal Nutrition. “The new software subscription service eliminates data collection and entry, and helps optimize operation costs.” With easy-to-read charts and graphs, Performance Beef™ software: monitors feedyard performance, organizes feed inputs, automates delivery, eliminates batch sheets, and and helps uncover insights. The software also connects producers to their closest advisors. When a producer shares data through Performance Beef™ software, their Purina representative can make timely nutrition recommendations to enhance profit potential. Purina customers can access a proprietary software model for a monthly fee. After set-up, cattle producers can access their information from any device anywhere in the world. “Performance Beef™ software is a convenient tool to help put cattle producers in control of performance and profitability potential,” says Robinson. “Producers can be

confident they’re making the right decisions for their operation at the right time.”

New Applicator Gun Offers Easy and Accurate Deworming

Boehringer Ingelheim (BI) introduced a new applicator gun for its Synanthic® (oxfendazole) bovine dewormer suspension. The applicator gun allows cattle producers to more easily and accurately deworm their cattle against damaging internal parasites. The durable gun is made of metal and holds up to tough conditions and the wear and tear of handling cattle. It also features a dial-a-dose system that gives producers the option to easily adjust dosage units for different cattle weights. The gun is made specifically for use with SYNANTHIC. SYNANTHIC is a broad-spectrum anthelmintic effective for the removal and control of lungworms, roundworms and tapeworms in cattle. SYNANTHIC is a low-dose product, requiring just five mL per 550 pounds of body weight. With the new dial-a-dose system, producers are able to quickly adjust between three and 15 mL, providing more accurate dosing and reduced product waste, with less processing time and stress. “We have a responsibility to use dewormers as judiciously as possible to help prevent resistance,” said Mitch Johnson, senior marketing manager at BI. “SYNANTHIC uses a concentrated solution, which allows for a lower dose, so you can get more deworming done with less dewormer. We invested in the new applicator gun to make the application experience the best it can be for both the animal and our customers.” Contact your BI representative to learn more about the applicator gun and how it can help ease your deworming process. v

Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |67


Calendar of Events Visit www.ohiocattle.org for a complete list of events

Mark Your Calendar! OCA Annual Meeting & Awards Banquet

Saturday January 20, 2018 Nationwide Hotel & Conference Center Lewis Center, Ohio

Visit www.ohiocattle.org for event and program details!

September 2-3 Memories in the Making Sale 5 Darke, Shelby Counties - Beef Industry Update Meeting 6 Montgomery County - Beef Industry Update Meeting 7 Gallia, Jackson Counties - Beef Industry Update Meeting 8 Ohio Cattleman Late Fall Issue Advertising Deadline 10 Grauer Show Cattle Online Sale 10 Schaeffer and Tice Private Treaty Sale 10 Goettemoeller Private Treaty Sale 12 Adams County - Beef Industry Update Meeting 12 Boyert / Core Steer Online Sale 12 Green Oak Farms Online Sale 15 OCA Awards Nomination Deadline 18 Hoobler Farms Online Sale 19 Garwood Online Heifer and Steer Sale 19-21 Farm Science Review, London, Ohio 20 Madison County - Beef Industry Update Meeting 20 LeVanderosa Farms Online Sale 23 Maplecrest Farms Annual Production Sale, Hillsboro, Ohio 23-24 Ohio Feeder Calf Roundup 24 Vollborn and Call Online Sale 24 Double R Bar Ranch Angus Production Sale, Plymouth, Indiana 25 DaLin Show Cattle Online Sale 25 Ohio Shorthorn Fall Showcase, Newark, Ohio 26 Agle Family Show Cattle Online Sale

October 1 OCA Director Nomination Deadline 1 OCA & OBC Spring Internship Applications Due 2 OCA Replacement Female Sale Consignments Due 5 Hardin County - Beef Industry Update Meeting 14-15 Ohio Cattlemen’s Camp, London, Ohio 31 Ohio Cattlemen’s Foundation Scholarships Application Deadline

1-800-837-2621

#ohiocattle 68 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017

www.cobaselect.com


Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |69


70 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


OCA News OCA Award Nominations

September 24

Raised & Sold by Vollborn Cattle Co.

Open House September 23-24

Due Sept. 15, 2017

The Ohio Cattlemen’s Association (OCA) is seeking nominations for cattlemen across the Buckeye state excelling in their operations. There are six distinguished awards available in the following categories: Environmental Stewardship, Commercial Producer, Young Cattleman, Seedstock Producer, Industry Service and Industry Excellence. Nominations are due by September 15, 2017. Fellow industry leaders, county cattlemen’s associations, soil and water conservation districts, county Farm Bureaus and other local agricultural organizations are encouraged to nominate local cattlemen deserving of any of the above mentioned awards. The six distinguished awards will be presented at the OCA Annual Meeting & Awards Banquet set for January 20, 2018 at the Nationwide Hotel & Conference Center, Lewis Center, Ohio. Previous OCA award winners may be viewed on YouTube under the OCA channel. Descriptions of each award are available along with applications for nomination and can be downloaded at www.ohiocattle.org. Nominations may also be sent to you directly by contacting beef@ohiobeef.org or call 614.873.6736 for more application details. v

Vollborn & Call Online Sale

2:00 - 7:00 PM

516 Gabriel Road Bidwell, Ohio 45614

Grand Champion Supreme Heifer Raised & Sold by Vollborn Cattle Co.

Grand Champion AOB Best of the Buckeye Raised & Sold by Vollborn Cattle Co.

Reserve Champion Charolais Bull Tennessee Agribition Raised by Vollborn Cattle Co.

Supreme Champion Female Gallia Co. Fair Champion Cow Calf Pair NAILE Owned by Call Show Cattle

Top Selling Charolais Female Tennessee Agribition Raised & Sold by Vollborn Cattle Co.

Several Calves are Best of Buckeye Eligible

Reserve Champion Market Steer Gallia Co. Fair Raised & Shown by Call Show Cattle

2017 Calves Sired By: Monopoly Original, Monopoly 4, Ready To Roll, Here I Am, High Ho Silver, Man Among Boys, Lone Ranger, I-80, and SAV Bismark

Like our Facebook page for updates

Luke Vollborn 740-441-5740 Fred Vollborn 740-339-2578

Barry Call 740-645-1660

Add OhioCattle on Snapchat! Early Fall Issue 2017| Ohio Cattleman |71


Parting Shots

Advertisers’ Index American Angus Association ........................... 54 Armstrong Ag & Supply...................................... 28 Buckeye’s Finest Sale...........................................5 Buckeye Hereford Association.....................18,51 Callicrate Banders............................................. 51 Cargill.................................................................. 63 Caudill Seed........................................................ 64 COBA/Select Sires............................................. 68 Dickinson Cattle Co........................................... 51 Double R Bar Ranch........................................... 29 Farm Science Review......................................... 64

OCA Executive Director, Elizabeth Harsh visited with Congressman Bill Johnson at his fundraiser on July 24.

Highland Livestock Supply................................ 19 Hilliard Lyons...................................................... 12 Jeff Pope............................................................. 51 John Deere.............................................................2 Kalmbach............................................................ 76 Karr Farms.......................................................... 56 Maplecrest Farms.................................................7 Multimin.............................................................. 16 Newport Laboratories........................................ 73 Novak Town Line Farm....................................... 51 O’Connor Farms Limousin................................. 51 Ohio Beef Council............................................... 22 Ohio Shorthorn Fall Showcase.......................... 13 OCA members snapped a picture with JT Barrett while serving beef to the OSU Football Team.

Ohio Shorthorn Breeders’ Association............. 70 PBS Animal Health............................................. 12 Reed & Baur Insurance Agency........................ 65 Ridley Crystalyx.................................................. 53 Stay Tuff.............................................................. 69 Umbarger.............................................................74 Valentine Farms................................................. 51 Vollborn & Call.................................................... 71

OCA had the opportunity to serve beef during the Ohio State Football Dinner at the Meyers’ house. OCA members and staff gathered for a picture with Coach Urban Meyer.

Long-time advocate of the beef industry, Opal Holfinger, Troy, Ohio, was inducted into the Ohio Ag Council Hall of Fame on August 4, 2017. 72 | Ohio Cattleman | Early Fall Issue 2017


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