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wo A pr c e P a frica followi ), the n iation f envi esents a rrest of n Am ng st ati or honoronmen nother o two Bla a e t rican emenon’s prem the men t foll i er C r the li t for Afr minous ck men owin er in a publ ommiss fe and w ican Am signal at a P P h ilade g towa ic unres ion foun ork of D ericans of the inhiladelp lyears BAKER . h rds b t in o d ra c L i r r S cism . King a ess than easingl a Starb ecom ur c b efore on Calif FIE nd 5 and ing a omm two y dan ucks orni h 0 u p g w b i s e natio nitie o e fre y e r ed w convict a n wh s, we lice brut ears afte eks after ous ion i r the ality t we ere a still h even Vicente in days, perso have a at th Kern e t n B ng w rooyou 1993 hough enavi tent is jud2.loWhen t of see this logo scan 1. Get the app by scanning or download it was convic the stat d not t of theirged by t ay to go he whole picture with this QR code with your from Google Play the he co over c injur false. 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Be Blac and e k the bucks reside “ er p ourt f I r; Ju e n ’ k d v a w n n ow hot ould e seen , Thor vides o requ men (NA failur situat t and o) . (Carin dge G nto if t it h be co ire si in P ion ACP e of C E h gto loria O andc x po hilad wo ) our prov Bena within a appen i n said. Der nP l e h u d —De i i l n c d n i r ff a p rich J Cann f sw vid atio es d ick few ug or hia as an e offi ett/ on o n to ang John Detr ay to sc Pre rrick er w hter, Co es was b days,” little a thenwaiting d arres cers to Bak oit? side take erou son s a h she s n Joh t a s t o ers-f o s b a u o l w y y t emer t wo Or lw e s n stand e be order hem nt a nso imp s insig ays t genc rk. Thlo Verdu itting h aid gin nd C n, N coffe licit Step fired at explain ould be ht r hat t t h d a is g e y o l g t l e o, ct ow e, b hon o t EO bias egar he r m AAC Clar en time Saheed Vshot at b ack, defe ors that oom. Sh couple la in Dela i seri ding P ous a s for s ind stat underthe s “Every s k y n b a ous an w ss y a that dead nd rea uch o e that out o se said the girl e died a ter brou n ly. expl tereotyp day peo he w police o as shot a d shot ell, a me homeow c v l b h t y e g ain w f the the g a i r o es an ple o t d z f ffi as t2 are p orce nt n ealle n ea irl m ad hit h out a w h hy 1 aiof by t ary uCalifornia for a ast glad the culpcers in S 0 times d by poally-ill mer just o . GNumber A fo house July emb f cNewspapers olor e Volume133 36 Observer Southern Thursday, 12, 2018 d s e a e t 4-ye dGroup e r y e i t c a h o n h h o E a u r a i n l e n th rit re e gun. j a a n ar-ol edded find t t. serve ose w f SCA T AP e cas sponcrament d hit 8 ice office n in Brotside the uries fro nsic pat d Benav ve been ad on d Br hem ho f e a “ a n o A h t P e i m s r r i N s o d d , e i o s g s m ll to s way of St b k elv nnan es br truck irl’s i l o proYO QR . arbu le for b based on es, main. Or wh i n being ogist Walkf others. es at th whil s by me o often cks t reaki ly in y m But n juries w sodom conclud efly lost t e me h PHOUR TA CODE er w H t e d e h i n h o B a e e a i e ed t t e g a z . w s d s l c r r h h a e e t a s c e i i R i r e u d c o e c B y n no o l is k ty a NE. miss else ca of LET WIT ne m to cars. mption sault w al record y all late caused b , and se hat th train comm so dangcism an sues are ed h n we H vera O y W r s i h d i s d i i e re se th s bu took an en e R SM SEA ue to ng on i tting m rous w biases iscusse s on a wa are an d other the gir at indic canted, xual assa l d m d i o t l R f A h l r a p i l a s l e a c n i n ult a let ted wa d nj RT t e the licit b GO CH O y o r p cons ias anesources t just gomake simassing e sible some sai uries ma s first ho there wing they N OR OGLE P d , eque y p h ” acc a s nces d racism to discu away wi ply bre isodic ordin the purp have bee pitalized s no evid LAY DOW By Lauren Poteat of ou . If w ssion thou athin orted n cau . The g t o g t , r fail e refu y the s s educ our NNPA Newswire Washington Correspondent FRO NLO ure t tate cause of ed by he also o do se to, we ation ansoSupr r d As Donald Trump’s persistent “fake news” rhetoric continues M T AD e a t APP ’ll co eme h “an me so.” d 2. L H n C to fester in the media, Black publishers across the nation, recently E t o i O STO nurt’s atom LOG OK F rulin took charge of the conversation, giving way to a special forum RE By ANDREW DALTON O g O R TH entitled “Black Press vs. Fake News.” AP Entertainment Writer IS The forum took place during the National Newspaper LOS ANGELES (AP) - Jackson family patriarch Joseph Publishers Association’s (NNPA) annual convention. Dorothy Jackson has been buried in the same Southern California 3. S Leavell, the chairman of NNPA and publisher of the Chicago CAN cemetery as his late son Michael. SMthe Crusader, Crusader LOG and the Chicago Reader, moderated AGary A source close to the family who is not authorized to speak R T the dialogue aboutPmisinformation O W in mainstream media. publicly said Joe Jackson was laid to rest Monday in a private H O ITHnews?” Leavell said. “Our ceremony at Forest “What do we do in this NEage . ofatfake YOU of battling fake OS Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale. struggles and our truths have been the forefront cer i Ldied Jackson in Las Vegas at age 89 and AWednesday NGE s R G s r a news throughout history.” u Bloo TAB c baby by iwife ng thKatherine, LES eight children and dozens of is survived dlig e Jones h : t L Leavell continued: we battled the lie that weEwere Film“Inan1827, T was while re e state p (AP) _ grandchildren. Rev d Bam iew of i a human, spearheaded by theOR Bakerthree-fifths p g Jackie nothing more than Eldest on sy aA photo Cali of himself on T ndin risposted B nant spoJackson ake uesd reson Freedom’s Journal, thesfination’s foand eld first Black-owned stem suit g . Fres rsfieldand operated rniasunglasses a Instagram Monday afternoon in a black t S y o a no S Nat i r a n aaftsimilar a iv corre fi newspaper, which stepped in and showed us different. In 1895, h B g e Bas tate M e Na C C a h r she suit. while dressing one of his young twin sons in k t ketb o o en’s med e c b o o r a e s g g s Hea activist Ida B. Wells, who established the ‘Memphis aFree fi t k ll Co Speech’ l l s w e e a e e ys sh tion offi l d d eethe fiinled2009 in Michael d. says was entombed ach for a Jackson n inmausoleum t e refuted the fake news of her day—concerning the mythical rape i a s o m h n opulentlecemetery discresting at the o e ss str ethat tes w oflost he toldis also the final rimi aplace w woman.” ofthar WWhite wasnal InTaylor FREE! stitu and e n o Elizabeth Walt Disney. n e Con ill Reap u ffi ation hen she Leavell seque said that, throughout history, Black people have been anot ’t possib tion in ous posi cials sh laws nces T h l t e e ion eha er p victimized by the proliferation of fake news and misinformation, uit an w nvir Whe osition d she’d h chapi. S at the C as pregn including some of our most profound BlackJEuleaders onm like Marcus w w h a stic a n e h a lifo ntal Panther es nt ith ve il e Is Black s Garvey, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., leaders Fof acinthe g sues “lost e runnin he was a lower to eithe ays she rnia Co and Party and even today’s Black Lives Matter. ResidenKtsern Co. w rrec s r g h e s a t a v e s ake l “All these obstacles are nothing new to us,” Leavell said. “So, Depar r baby to stop en mo lary. eave told tha t n d m a t u ti or ac t e fight hs pr while Opin Donald StarTrump has been credited for popularizing the term on did nt of e to a cept betw egnan : plchildren Poli b ‘fakeionnews’ know n o t iFree C uck this too is ‘fake news.’” a o towe ce R c r meals for ages 18 and younger, will be e t e r C s , e 2 n al eco har mme ectio n in CEOdialogue, additional Blaon mm Joining in included in Fa ging ICspeakers ck the og ruby e ns a t10, mate CoCommunity dithru  provided now FNCF tal C E Ag nd ptuthe atelyAugust en AApoloof ents n rash Association Sarah Glover, the Mpresident National of s an le fell r d e . ” rres gizethe C c Development Corporation. o d la Th o s m m ted Black Journalists; Deborah Gray-Young, the managing partner enserved unit e Caa.m. to 8:15            The meals willmbe t on mweekdays, 7 lifor ter y of D. Gray-Young, Inc.  Consulting; Dr. Julianne Malveaux, nia Reha Fellowship a.m. and 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Firstth New e la Christian an economist and sociopolitical commentator; and A. Scott ilita- Los She uit. bStreet,  Baptist Church (FNCFBC),  1555 Westws108th  riff Y S ays Washington, o Bolden, the managing partner of Uthe D.C., office He Wungblo Angeles (across the street from Washington Preparatory High rg o a Kill ing Any s Not d School). Inm o n e ates Continued on page A4 to             The meals are a component of the Summer Food Panelists discuss the affects of “fake news” on the Black community during the NNPA’s 2018 annual convention in Nor“Meet C EO & folk, Va. (Freddie Allen/AMG/NNPA) Service Program, sponsored by the California Department of Foun Education’s Nutrition Services Division. der o f             “We understand the value of good nutrition and the “ Ra m role it plays in the development of children,” said Dr. Norman S. Num page T A Q ber On akes Johnson, Sr., Pastor, FNCFBC.  “We are pleased to be one of the uiet e Plac from e sites selected to provide food to community residents through this program.” Mack’s family says he died Thursday night at Cedars Sinai instrumental in guiding the LAPD towards community-based             In accordance with Federal Law and Agricultural Bey o Medical Center after a long battle with cancer. 21st Century policing. Our department and our city are in a $10 nce Giv Department Policy, FNCF Community Development 0 ,0 e s 00 t Hist Tributes poured in for Mack, who was hailed for improving better place because of John’s legacy,” Beck said. Corporation does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, Sch orically o ools Blac the lives of people in disenfranchised communities and helping Civil-rights leader the Rev. Jesse Jackson called Mack “a civil k national origin, sex, age or disability.  to reshape the direction of the Los Angeles Police Department. rights giant and freedom fighter.”             For further information, please call (323) 756-2541. “John Mack’s wisdom, integrity, and kindness helped “Prayers for and condolences to the family of John Mack transform Los Angeles,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said in a statement and the city of Los Angeles for which he worked so hard to make Friday morning. “As a civil rights warrior, police commission fair and just for all of its residents,” Jackson said. president, and ally to all who love freedom and fairness, John Magic Johnson said Mack “changed so many lives in Los made history with a fierce determination to pursue justice, an Angeles.” unshakable commitment to equality, and an unbreakable bond Mack served as president of the Los Angeles Urban League with the community he worked tirelessly to uplift every day of from 1969 until he retired in 2005, when he was named president his remarkable life. He moved both spirits and systems — by of the board of police commissioners of the Los Angeles Police merging his gentle bearing with a fearless resolve to make change Department. He also co-founded Los Angeles Black Leadership that has touched and saved countless lives.” Coalition on Education in 1977 and was later appointed vice Outgoing LAPD Chief Charlie Beck also hailed Mack, president of the United Way Corporation of Council Executives. INDIANAPOLIS (AP) _ A judge has dismissed a lawsuit saying the city “lost a dedicated public servant today.” “Los Angeles lost one of its great heroes when John Mack filed by a pot-smoking Indianapolis church that wants marijuana “Former police commission president John Mack was passed away last night,” LA City Attorney Mike Feuer said in a to be recognized as a sacrament. The Indianapolis Star reported that the 3-year-old case in Marion Circuit Court was dropped Friday. The First Church of Cannabis filed the lawsuit on grounds that pot was considered a sacrament under Indiana’s Religious Freedom Restoration Act. In her dismissal, Judge Sheryl Lynch said the church’s love for marijuana does not count as practicing a religion. She also said allowing exemptions for illegal marijuana use and possession would negatively impact society. The pro-cannabis church’s attorney told The Star last week he plans to appeal should the church lose the case. The group has argued that the government has no right to decide which religious beliefs should be protected.

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Membee fear in osts of Klan wo), where s colleag cri ing warra in our ting. a co Joh with racre ry ha the the menson saiminatio with our lons, discuss mpany-w nted,’’ partners man ey wore rs of th to the he dead Co re whitehe serve ues rd to has relBAKERS respe sai g-stan n to d in a n or rac som to ide and y of the hoods toe Klan di arts of annfedera robes d as ct offer ding e imme meeti d Johns better ial sta Youn eased a FIELD, local m te so on d no a “fa temen ng arr Polic and gbloo Ca 12 ldier and auth embers cover ce-to- t. tw ested. e haven’tdignity.’’ commitm diate ne next we. “Add know t wa yone, d say -year- lif. 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This in fro in their ten Blac kill an rning Bl cont . ap ion th ion ent, a crimed the ext an costu k votery Black ack traine In the vid is curre in 20 peared e clip citing the ed to vo served nt of a d ha befor rel m If a po d uty mi d than eo, Youn ntly ba 06. e the eased M lynchKlan and te in th as a warnBlack m es and s, the man ning en only be lice gbloo cking his scond ever be coun on and ed from refused e next ele ing to an’s hom place a Klan author, trepren ing called cau ty De day d uc cripp Then he t lawsu se it co says detenelection tenture have sec a tree so to adhe ction. any Blac e and large focus, drVelma Treur, CEO,a “nobod sts mi le or asks its. tion rival. 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Mom of Boy Abandoned at Los Angeles Train Station in Custody

By AMANDA LEE MYERS Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) — A mother who abandoned her 7-year-old son at a bustling train station in downtown Los Angeles was arrested after she returned to the station about 19 hours later, police said Thursday. The boy wasn’t able to communicate with police, who said they were trying to determine if he had any “medical issues or developmental issues.” Workers at a cafe in Union Station first saw the boy and a woman eating together Wednesday evening. They began to worry later when he ran into their kitchen alone and they realized the woman was nowhere in sight, said Adrienne Garrett, supervisor at Cafe Crepe. Garrett said she and other workers looked for the woman to no avail, but she wandered back about 30 minutes later, prompting one worker to tell her that she should be taking care of her child. “We asked her to come back, but she literally walked out the front door,” Garrett said. “She did not even acknowledge anything at all. She was silent and kept walking — and that’s when we decided to get security.” Police bought the boy an ice cream and when he still appeared hungry, Garrett said she gave him some chicken fingers, French fries and apple juice. The mother was captured on surveillance video walking with the boy outside Union Station and was then seen walking away alone. A family friend watching a television news report about the case recognized the boy and called his family, who contacted police, said Detective Meghan Aguilar, a police spokeswoman. The boy was reunited with family members Thursday afternoon. A short time later, the boy’s biological mother returned to the train station. After officers recognized her from surveillance video, she was taken into custody, Aguilar said. The woman was booked on suspicion of felony child endangerment and remained jailed on $100,000 bail. Investigators are still looking into what would have caused the mother to leave her son at the train station and whether she ever tried to contact authorities. She could potentially face child abandonment or child neglect charges, police said. Garrett said she was heartbroken for the boy when he was left alone. “I don’t understand how anyone in their right mind would do that,” she said. “It’s a young boy, it’s the Fourth of July, and it’s Union Station — anything can happen. It’s really upsetting she felt comfortable leaving him here.”

This boy was abandoned last Wednesday at Union Station. He wasn’t able to communicate with police, who said they didn’t know if he had any “medical issues or developmental issues.”

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The Rev. Jesse Jackson called him a “civil rights giant and a freedom fighter.” John Mack dies at 81 years of age.

statement. “John was aleader who exuded strength and a listener who brought us together and sought to heal. He was my friend. He was inspiring.” “John Mack was a rock for decency, opportunity and equality,” Becerra said in a statement. “His hands touched the lives of so many. John’s impact will ripple for generations.” He was the recipient of numerous awards from the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Operation Hope, the Soutthern Christian Leadership and the California African American Museum. Indeed, Mack was a presence in many crucial moments in L.A.’s recent history, including a famous image of him leading then-President George H.W. Bush on a tour after the riots and, shortly after, calling for the resignation of then-Police Chief Daryl F. Gates. When Britain’s Prince Charles visited the city, Mack gave him a tour of an automotive training center run by the Urban League on Crenshaw Boulevard. “John understood that to truly change hearts and minds in the LAPD, he had to go to work on the inside,” attorney Rice said. “And because he was not someone who just shouted in anger and tore things down for the sake of tearing them down, the LAPD saw they could trust him. That’s rare leadership.”Over an extraordinary career that spanned decades, Mack helped lead the city past the infamous Rodney King beating and 1992 riots and later transformed himself into what one admirer called the “consummate inside agitator,” helping to oversee reform of the Los Angeles Police Department. In his fight for civil rights, he described himself as a “sane militant.” During his nearly 36 years as head of the Los Angeles Urban League, the L.A. affiliate of one of the nation’s oldest and most influential civil rights organizations, Mack played a role in guiding the city through dramatic, often tumultuous change: the rise of blacks into key and influential positions, including mayor; development in South L.A.; the riots after the King beating; a burgeoning black-Latino political coalition; and escalating tensions between Latinos and blacks over jobs and at schools — and even for gang turf. As the leader of the L.A. Urban League, Mack pressed the city’s corporate executives to increase minority hiring, support job-training programs and purchase goods from black- and Latino-owned businesses, Harris-Dawson said. Mack, who rose to become one of L.A.’s most influential black figures during his long tenure running the city chapter of the Urban League and later spent eight years on the Police Commission, died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles on Thursday night, family members and friends said. He was 81. The cause was cancer.

Lawsuit Dropped Over Church’s Pot Used as Sacrament

Flyers for Hate Group Passed Out

GAINESVILLE, Va. (AP) _ Recruiting flyers for the Ku Klux Klan are again being distributed in northern Virginia. Prince William County Police said Tuesday that they were investigating the distribution of pamphlets depicting hate propaganda over the weekend in Gainesville and Bristow. Police said the pamphlets were thrown at random through several residential streets and appeared to be recruiting material for the Klan. The pamphlets were thrown in bags that contain birdseed; police said the seed was likely just a means to weigh the bags down so they could be thrown from a vehicle. Police said the pamphlets did not contain any threats and did not appear to target anyone specifically. Similar recruiting materials were distributed in the Triangle area of the county in April.

Rodney King ExOfficer is Charged with DUI SANTA CLARITA, Calif. (AP) _ A former Los Angeles police sergeant who went to prison for his role in the beating of black motorist Rodney King is charged with driving under the influence of alcohol. Prosecutors on Thursday confirmed that 67-year-old Stacey Koon faces two misdemeanor counts for allegedly crashing his truck into a parked pickup truck on May 1 in the Castaic area northwest of Los Angeles. Koon wasn’t hurt. It’s unclear whether he has an attorney. Koon and three other LAPD officers were charged with using excessive force for a 1991 videotaped beating of King that made international headlines. Their acquittal on state charges led to rioting in 1992 that claimed dozens of lives.\ Koon and Officer Laurence Powell later went to prison on federal civil rights charges. Koon was released in 1995.

See Page A2

The Black Press of America is Facing Another Deadly Assault from Trump’s Tariffs on Canadian Newsprint


World & Nation

A2

THE VALLEY’S NEWS OBSERVER 

Thursday, July 12, 2018

A Letter from America’s Children

By Ron Harris NNPA Newswire Guest Columnist Dear U.S. Media, Democrats, Republicans, Independents and to the concerned Americans who poured out into the streets to protest Donald Trump’s cruel and faulty immigration policies, What about us? We understand and applaud your response to this administration’s malevolent separation of  immigrant  families from their children—policies and practices so un-American and shocking that they have come to dominate the national conversation.  Your immediate, visceral response to evil spurred you into action. But there is another evil, a pervasive, chronic and unrelenting wickedness that we, your children, live with every day. We are being shot down on the nation’s streets, locked away in juvenile facilities, poisoned by dangerous drinking water, threatened and harassed by neighborhood gangs, left homeless, either alone from abuse or with parents that cannot afford to put a roof over our heads. We live in neighborhoods bereft of adequate food sources and with fathers and mothers so wrought with financial and psychological instability they can’t provide our needs. And because our nation has lived with this reality so long, it has become almost accepted.  It has become quietly and unconsciously perceived as part of the norm, part of the landscape, like the air we breathe, until little by little it becomes so caustic that it kills us or chokes us into action.  Unfortunately for us, your children, you haven’t reached that point. There are 408,000 of us, American children, who also have been separated from our families and placed in the care of others, like the 2,000  immigrant  children who you took to the streets to protect.  Many of us languish  in foster care with little hope of ever being united with our parents or extended families.  As we watched the huge crowds that stretched across 700 U.S. cities  Saturday.  We saw the signs proudly held high that read, “Family Separations Are Cruel.” And we thought, “Yes, they are.” What about us?  Where is our march?  Where is our media coverage? Half of us currently in foster will be homeless within six months after growing too old for the system. We are unprepared to live on our own.  We have limited education and no social support. About a quarter of the rest will be homeless within two to four years of leaving the system. Some of us will become part of the 20,000 U.S. children annually forced into prostitution. Another two million of us this year will separated from our families and placed behind bars and in juvenile custody. Many of us, like Clarice, one of twin 14-year-old sisters in Montgomery County, Md., can’t go home because there is no suitable home to go to. Her parents are homeless, and authorities can’t release her to an unstable home. Other parents are dysfunctional or can’t provide the guidance we need.  So, we go behind bars because there are not enough treatment facilities for us. We want a march, too, one for better schools for all, because you recognize how the hopelessness created by faulty education diminishes lives and leads to incarceration – that 32 percent of white males in juvenile custody dropped out of school, and that nearly half of African-American and Hispanic male youth behind bars also quit. Media reported how families from El Salvador, Guatemala,

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Credo-The Black Press believes that America can best lead the world away from racial and national antagonisms when it accounts to every person, regardless of race, color, or creed full human and legal rights. Hating no person, fearing no person, the Black Press strives to help every person in the firm belief that all are hurt as long as any one is held back.

Ron Harris, an adjunct professor at Howard University, says that American children struggling with poverty, violence and homelessness, deserve media coverage, too. (Pixabay.com)

Honduras and Mexico are fleeing to the U.S. to escape gangs in their countries.  Many of us live in gang-infested neighborhoods, too.    In cities like St. Louis, Baltimore, New Orleans, Detroit, Cleveland, Las Vegas, Kansas City, Mo., Memphis, Newark and Chicago, the 10 U.S. cities with the highest murder rate, we have long understood their terror.  We understand their fear. In Chicago, a city rife with street gangs and where at least 16 children have been murdered in the first six months of this year, more than 50,000 people demonstrated for the rights of immigrants fleeing gangs in countries few of them have ever visited. Ironically, they never marched for the children slain this year in a city they traverse every day: Maysia Woodard, 12 mos.; Damarcus Wilson, 16; Deshawn James, 17; Rhomel Wellington, 17; Mateo Nathan Aguayo, 2; Joseph Smith, 16; Jose Agular,

14; Jayton Jones, 17; Erin Carey, 17; She’Vaughn O’Flynn, 12; Jechon Anderson, 11; China Lyons-Upshaw, 17; David Thomas 16; Parris Purdis, 17; Kyle McGowan, 17, and Jazmyn Jester, 15, who was among four people murdered and 13 others shot over 17 hours on a Tuesday and a Wednesday in May.  Where do families like theirs emigrate to escape the violence? Many of us live in poverty, one of every four children in Arizona, Georgia, California, Kentucky, Texas, Nevada, New Mexico and New York, one in three in the nation’s capital.  At least 2.5 million of us will spend some period of life this year homeless; maybe a month, maybe six months or maybe the whole year. Most of us will spend at least one day every month without food.  Look at us. Pivot your cameras and microphones to us, as

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Los Angeles News Observer Bakersfield News Observer The Valley’s News Observer 1219 20th St. Bakersfield, Ca 93301 Mailing Address P.O. Box 2341 Bakersfield, CA 93303 Phone (661) 324-9466 FAX. (661) 324-9472 emails- General info: observernews@gmail. com Advertising: observeradvertising@gmail.com Online: www.ognsc.com well. We are your children, and there is real evil that plagues us too.

Black Newspaper Publishers Take a Hit with

Trump’s Tariffs on Canadian Newsprint Ironically, the tariffs NORPAC wants in place will actually threaten paper producers and a range of related business. A coalition of these businesses, the STOPP Alliance, estimates some 650,000 jobs could be at risk—all to help one company that has no allies or supporters within the U.S. paper industry. The U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) is reviewing the facts in this case and is expected to announce its recommendations on what to do with the tariffs later the summer. In the meantime, members of Congress from both parties have introduced legislation to suspend the tariffs immediately. The STOPP Alliance has also created an online petition to

urge the ITC to end the tariffs. Consider adding your voice to this effort by clicking on this link. After all, the threat the duties on newsprint pose to daily and weekly print publications serving communities in urban and rural areas is especially acute. If there was ever a time when the country needed a range of authentic and “trusted” outlets to share news and perspectives, it is today. In today’s world, the newspapers that serve African American communities will continue to play a crucial role. Errant trade policies and duties championed by a single company must not be allowed to diminish the meaningful role of the Black Press of America.

learn more >

Black Newspaper Publishers Take a Hit with Trump’s Tariffs on Canadian Newsprint.

By Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr. President and CEO, NNPA Amid the rush to comprehend the ramifications of a fullscale international trade war initiated by the errant and backward tariff policies of the Trump Administration, there are results of the tariffs that need to be challenged by Black America. The financial sustainability of the Black Press of America is now facing a catastrophic and a possible deadly impact, because of these new tariffs. The current dispute over the rising costs of the paper product termed “newsprint,” because of tariffs on Canadian newsprint threatens the future of member publishers of the National Newspaper Publishers Association (NNPA) and could further isolate and disenfranchise African American businesses and communities in cities and towns across the United States. Import duties the U.S. Commerce Department is now applying to Canadian-made newsprint is already increasing costs enough to prompt layoffs and scaled-back news coverage by some of the nation’s major dailies and weekly publications. If these tariffs remain in place, scores of newspapers with smaller circulations, notably those that serve African American communities, could be forced to cease publishing a print edition or close altogether. During the past 191 years, the Black Press has survived, endured and overcome past firebombing and improvised explosive attacks, as well as other deadly manifestations of racial violence. The newsprint tariffs appear to have been put in place by the Trump Administration after being encouraged by the interests of a single paper mill in Washington State called NORPAC. NORPAC argues that Canadian government policies give Canadian paper producers an unfair advantage in the U.S. market. NORPAC says the added duties, or tariffs, at the border are protecting it. NORPAC can fight for its self-interest but the U.S. government has an obligation to consider the impact the tariffs are having on the nation as a whole, and in particular the impact on African American owned newspapers and businesses. We forthrightly oppose the Trump tariffs on newsprint and demand an end to the disastrous trade policies that are hurting our businesses and communities. Given that newsprint and labor account for most of the cost of running a newspaper, it is easy to see how jacking up the price of newsprint by more than 30 percent could spell the difference between these publications eking out a modest profit or going out of business. Around 2,000 newspapers have closed or morphed into something else in the last 15 years. The NNPA is proud that its 215 member-publications are moving forward even in the face of these new contrived dangers and obstacles in the marketplace. Our newspapers enliven and inform the debate within African American and other communities that we serve and help to empower with news,

BORN TO BE GREAT Dr. Benjamin F. Chavis, Jr., the president and CEO of the NNPA, says that the NNPA opposes the Trump tariffs on newsprint and demands an end to the disastrous trade policies that are hurting our businesses and communities. (NNPA)

information, and the reaffirmation of the vitality of Black cultural genius and excellence in all fields of endeavor. Our printed editions are especially important in communities where people are less likely to be able to afford or take full advantage of broadband Internet access. However useful today’s technological innovations are in sharing information, for many people, there is no substitute or affordable alternative to the local weekly newspaper of, by, and for the AfricanAmerican community. Our newspapers are the lifeblood for our communities. The tariffs threaten more than local newspapers. Newsprint is used for promotional materials by retailers and civic groups. It is used by book publishers and printers. Often these are small businesses serving local communities. If newsprint goes up in price, printers will get fewer contracts and have fewer customers.

To be ready for the jobs of the future, students need learning experiences that meet them where they are, engage them deeply, let them progress at a pace that meets their individual needs, and helps them master the skills for today and tomorrow. To learn more about ESSA and how you can get involved, visit www.nnpa.org/essa. Made possible by a grant from the

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Sports

Thursday, July 12, 2018

THE VALLEY’S NEWS OBSERVER A3

Top Storylines of NFL off Season imagining Graham doing the Lambeau leap multiple times per game with Aaron Rodgers throwing the ball to him. 3) It’s not often that we’ve seen productive playoff quarterbacks switch teams simultaneously. Cousins, Keenum and Alex Smith were among the free agent quarterbacks to switch teams this off season. Kirk Cousins joining the Minnesota Vikings will be just as interesting as Case Keenum joining the Denver Broncos or Alex Smith joining the Washington football team. There’s doubt that Kirk is walking into best situation and yet the toughest situation, because it’s Superbowl or bust for the Vikings seeing as how they made they NFC Championship last season. 2) The health of Andrew Luck is a major concern for the Indianapolis Colts. Having sat out, all of last season, the Colts brass and the NFL fans are waiting to see if Luck is healthy enough to

reclaim his position as one of the best quarterbacks in the NFL and lead the Colts back to the playoffs. 1) The most notable Free Agent additions of Ndamukong Suh, Marcus Peters and Aqib Talib to the Los Angeles Rams has to be the biggest storyline of the NFL off season. After winning the NFC West last season, they add 3 Pro Bowlers to this already potent team, in an effort to get them over the hump and into the 2019 Superbowl. We can hardly wait for this season to begin. The beginning of Training Camps is just around the corner with Pre-Season games to follow and then we’re are on to the regular season. Other storylines will surely arise prior to the beginning of the upcoming NFL season, though which storylines that have caught your attention to this point or which player are you looking forward to seeing ball out this season. Let us know What’s Good, by sharing your thoughts and feedback in the comment section below at www.whatsgoodinsports.com

Former NBA Player Lonnie Shelton Dead at 62 NFL’s Off Season captures hearts and minds of America. (Bing photo)

By Cameron Buford whatsgoodinsports.com It’s that time of year again, when grassy fields are being aerated, before being manicured and lines painted for little league football (yes, little league football still exists), high school and college football field alike. With all that being said it won’t be long now before NFL training camps open all across the country. If you are a fan of the game, just as we are here at What’s Good In Sports, you are eagerly anticipating this upcoming football season. Each off-season presents a unique set of storylines of it’s own, which will capture the attention of fans and impact teams in yet untold ways. This article will present a list of our Top 10 storylines for this upcoming NFL season, which we will be following up on intently; 10) The NFL kicks each season off with their annual Hall of Fame Game. Culminating the weekend is the Hall of Fame game itself. During the game, fans are introduced to the new Hall of Fame inductees. In his unique form, and in unprecedented fashion, recent Hall of Fame inductee Terrell Owens, has chosen to forego this inauguration ceremony to hold his own ceremony at his Ala Mater. 9) Have we seen the last of Dez Bryant? As of now, this former 1st round draft pick of the Dallas Cowboys and 3-time Pro Bowl is a free agent, after being cut in April of this year. There’s no doubt Bryant can still be a productive receiver in the league, though it appears his reputation may be preceding him. 8) 2007 was the last time the Except for the New England Patriots dazzled their competition with great receivers. Though they do a great job in finding a certain type of receiver to excel in their lineup, the return of Julian Edelman was certainly someone they were looking to have back in their lineup. However, Edelman will be serving a 4-game suspension for violating the NFL’s performance enhancing substances policy during his rehabilitation. 7) As he entered the NFL, most of any concerns were due to his potential off the field behavior. The Tampa Bay Buccaneers 2015 1st overall draft pick Jameis Winston reached the Pro Bowl in his initial season, the Buccaneers have yet to reach the playoff under his leadership and the Buccaneers brass fears were realized once Winston was recently suspended for 3 games for violating the league personal conduct policy. 6) Earlier this year at the owner’s meetings the NFL owners have implemented new rules for this upcoming season. A few rule

changes of note are; - 15-yard penalty for lowering head to initiate, make contact with helmet…? This rule is so vague that this is sure to cause confusion among offensive and defensive players alike. Because this happens on nearly every play, it will be interesting to see how this rule will this be enforced. Or to what level will the officials will try to emphasize this rule. - There’s a revised standard for a catch. Gone is the “survive the ground” requirement. Now a receiver must control the ball, establish himself in bounds and perform a football move - such as a third step or a lunge to make a catch legal. So many of those catches we knew to be a catch then, would now be a catch. A few of those controversial “non catches’ that would be a catch this season are the 2010 Detroit Lions receiver Calvin Johnson reversed TD play, the Dallas Cowboys receiver Dez Bryant 2014 catch called no catch, Pittsburgh Steelers receiver Jesse James reversed TD catch late in the 2017 season. - The NFL has granted permission for command center to eject players. Player ejections can now be ordered by Senior Vice President of Officiating Al Riveron of a player who has been penalized for a non-football act such as punching or fighting. Via his wireless microphone connection with referees Riveron will have the option to step in and demand an ejection on questions plays or cheap shots. 5) Each year we enjoy seeing which rookie acclimate themselves best in the NFL. A few of the rookies we will be keeping a keen eye on early is; - #2 draft pick Penn State Running Back Saquon Barkley will be filling a void the Giants will have for many years now. It will exciting to see how Barkley compliments Eli Manning and meshes with Odell Beckham Jr.. - The Arizona Cardinals drafted former UCLA Bruin Josh Rosen to be their franchise quarterback. Rosen will have a lot of talent around him and be given every opportunity to succeed in this very tough division. It will be interesting to see how far he can lead the Arizona Cardinals this season. - With the 11th pick of the NFL draft, The Miami Dolphins drafted 6’0” 204 lbs. Alabama Safety Minkah Fitzpatrick to pair him with current Safety Rashad Jones. This pick is expected to have an immediate impact by bringing awareness and toughness to the previously porous defense. 4) There have been multiple intriguing free agent signings that have captured the minds of NFL fans. The Green Bay Packers signing of 5-time Pro Bowler Jimmy Graham has NFL fans

Legal Notices PUBLIC NOTICE SUMMONS CITACION JUDICIAL NOTICE TO DEFENDANT AVISO AL DEMANDADO) GARY B. SMITH, an individual; DONNA RAY SMITH, AN INDIVUDAL; and DOES 1-100, Inclusive You are being sued by plaintiff (Lo Esta Demandando El Demandante) U.S. BANK NATIONAL TRUST, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST CASE NUMBER (Numero del caso BC680271 NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days, Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will no protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfor.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for fee legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org). the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or be contacting your local or county bar association. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIOS despues de que le entregue esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copla al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfthelp/espanol). En la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede ms cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de present-

PUBLIC NOTICE acion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede preder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su dueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que liame a un abogado inmedialamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede liamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, esposible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de obogados locales. The name and address of the court is El nombre y direccion de la corte es): Los Angeles superior court, 111 North Hill St, Los Angeles, Ca 90012, Stanley Mosk Courthouse The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es) MARK J. SARNI (164364); RCO LEGAL, P.S. 2121 Alton Parkway #110, Irvine, Ca. 92606 Telephone: (805) 379-8505 Fax: (714) 277-1565 Date: (Fecha) Oct 18, 2017 Clerk (Secretario) Shaunya Bolde, Deputy (Adjunto NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: you are served as an individual defendant. LOS ANGELES BAY NEWS OBSERVER (E) PUB: June 21, 28, July 5, 12, 2018

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A Key Player for the Seattle SuperSonics’ Championship Team and NBA All-Star Lonnie Shelton, a former NBA player best known for his time on the Seattle SuperSonics, is dead at the age of 62 following complications from a heart attack. He has been in a coma for the last month and died on Sunday. Shelton played for three  NBA teams  in his 10year NBA career. He played for the Knicks, Sonics, and Cavaliers. Shelton won an NBA championship in the 1978-79 season with the Sonics. In the 1981-82 season he made his lone All-Star game appearance. Shelton also played three years at Oregon State before entering the NBA. One of the more interesting tidbits about his playing career has to do with how Shelton ended up in Seattle in the first place. Back in the day, teams used to receive compensation when another team signed one of their own free agents. via Seattle Times “I know he really valued his time in Seattle,” Marlon Shelton

said Monday. “He thought really fondly of the city and the organization.” Shelton played his first two seasons in New York, but arrived in Seattle via an NBA rule that, at the time, allowed the league to award compensation to teams when another team signed one of their free agents. After New York signed center Marvin Webster, who helped lead Seattle on a surprising run to the NBA Finals in 1978 and whose loss initially appeared to be a potentially devastating blow to a rising Sonics team, the NBA awarded Shelton and the Knicks’ 1979 first-round pick to Seattle as compensation. (The terms were later reversed somewhat, with Seattle giving its 1981 first-round pick back to the Knicks). Shelton was mainly known as an enforcer, but the 6-foot8 power forward still averaged 12 points and 6.1 rebound for his career. He made the All-NBA defensive team in the 1981-82 season. 

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LA Lakers sign Lance Stephenson EL SEGUNDO, Calif. (AP) - The Los Angeles Lakers have signed veteran Lance Stephenson and second-round pick Svi Mykhailiuk. The Lakers announced the deals Tuesday. Stephenson agreed to a one-year, $4.5 million deal to join LeBron James, Rajon Rondo and JaVale McGee in the Lakers'

influx of veteran talent. Stephenson appeared in all 82 games for Indiana last season, averaging 9.2 points, 5.2 rebounds and 2.9 assists per game. The Lakers are his seventh NBA franchise entering his ninth season. The Lakers chose Mykhailiuk with the 47th overall pick in last month's draft. The Ukrainian shooter averaged 14.6 points, 3.9 rebounds and 2.7 assists per game for Kansas last season while setting the Jayhawks' single-season record with 115 3-pointers. Mykhailiuk has been impressive early in Las Vegas summer league play.

Slain Man's Wake Had Things He Loved: The Celtics, TV and Snacks NEW ORLEANS (AP) _ After a young New Orleans man was killed, his grieving family chose to remember him doing what he loved: sitting in front of a TV with his beloved Boston Celtics on the screen. The body of 18-year-old Renard Matthews, who died from a gunshot wound to the head on June 25, was dressed in a Celtics jersey at Sunday wake at the Charbonnet Labat Glapion Funeral Home in the Treme (treh-MAY') neighborhood. WDSU-TV reports his body was positioned in a chair and he had a video game controller in his lap. His favorite snacks were positioned on a nearby table and the floor. The 18-year-old Matthews will be buried Tuesday.


A4

THE VALLEY’S NEWS OBSERVER 

Thursday, July 12, 2018

Features

Facebook’s Discrimination Audit By Freddie Allen Editor-in-Chief, NNPA Newswire Civil rights beacon and ACLU veteran Laura Murphy laughed when she said that one of her co-workers called her, “The Olivia Pope of the Tech World.” Even though she finds the moniker amusing, it’s an accurate characterization that comes from a combination of her work in civil rights, crisis management, consulting and a track record for ultimately getting her clients to do the right thing at the end of the day, Murphy said. In 2016, facing allegations of rampant discrimination on their home-sharing platform, that sparked outrage among their users and birthed the #AirbnbWhileBlack hashtag, Airbnb executives tasked Murphy with leading “their effort to fight discrimination and bias.” In an effort to address their own problems with bias and discrimination on their platform, Facebook recently called on Murphy to lead their own civil rights audit. The NAACP recently criticized Facebook for the data collection breach that

affected 87 million Facebook users and its impact on African American users of the platform. In March, The New York Times reported that the “National Fair Housing Alliance  and affiliated groups in New York, San Antonio and Miami” sued Facebook in U.S. District Court in Manhattan alleging that, “Facebook’s advertising platform ‘continues to enable landlords and real estate brokers to bar families with children, women and others from receiving rental and sales ads for housing.” Mu r p h y detailed the actions that Airbnb took to address the concerns of their users in a commentary published on BlackPressUSA. com. Murphy said that the home-sharing platform called on former Attorney General Eric Holder, Harvard professor Dr. Robert Livingston to make recommendations. Murphy also worked with more than 20 civil rights organizations who have explored the intersection between the advancement of civil rights and the

Facebook Turns to Long-time Civil Rights Leader Laura Murphy to Lead Discrimination Audit

sharing economy. Airbnb also developed an “Open Doors” policy to assist guests who report discrimination on the platform and offered new training to help hosts learn to fight bias. Murphy was the first woman and the first African American to head the Washington office of the 300,000-member American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), according to her biography. Her parents were civil rights leaders and her brother, the famed Baltimore attorney Billy Murphy, represented Freddie Gray’s family in a civil suit against the city; Gray’s death after he suffered a spinal injury in police custody sparked outrage and protests nationwide; the 25-year-old had been arrested for what many called “running while Black.” Billy Murphy was seen as a calming force in the Black community and helped Gray’s family reach a million-dollar settlement with the city. Meanwhile, Laura Murphy sees her recent work with technology companies as a continuation of her family’s commitment to civil rights. “It’s kind of in my DNA to try to make things right,” Murphy said. According to Murphy, companies like Facebook have a business imperative to fight discrimination on their platforms. “This audit is a sign that Facebook is taking the criticism it

Pastors Swap Pulpits to Bridge Racial Divide By Holly Meyer The Tennessean NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) _ Christians tend to worship alongside people who look just like them. That is the case for the two First Baptist churches in downtown Nashville _ one mostly black and the other mostly white. So when their pastors exchanged pulpits earlier this spring, the Rev. Kelly Miller Smith Jr. and the Rev. Frank Lewis not only demonstrated their friendship, but they bridged the racial divide prevalent across the Christian landscape. “What we are doing today matters. What we are doing matters in our city,” Lewis said as he stood on his borrowed platform at the historically black First Baptist Church, Capitol

Meanwhile in Oregon...

Black Lawmaker Says Constituent Called 911on Her PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) - A black Oregon lawmaker says one of her constituents called police on her while she was canvassing a Portland-area neighborhood that she represents. State Rep. Janelle Bynum, who is running for re-election this fall, says she was knocking on doors and taking notes on her cellphone in Clackamas Tuesday when a Clackamas County sheriff's deputy showed up. Bynum tells The Oregonian/OregonLive that the deputy told her a woman called police because the lawmaker appeared to spend a long time at homes. Bynum says she has knocked on thousands of doors and this was the first time someone reported her to police. She called it “just bizarre.” The sheriff's office did not immediately comment on the incident. Bynum says she understands the woman’s concerns but said the woman could have tried talking to her first rather than calling police. THEY HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR Janelle Bynum can laugh with Deputy Sheriff Cambell about this all now.

Lawmakers Halt Lead Paint Ballet Measure By SOPHIA BOLLAG Associated Press SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) _ Paint companies on Thursday withdrew an initiative from the November ballot that would have limited their liability for lead paint cleanup and authorized billions of dollars in state bonds to pay for it. The decision came just ahead of the deadline to withdraw initiatives. Legislative leaders said it was the result of talks to avoid an expensive initiative battle and vvensure a thoughtful process to address the significant problems arising from the existence of lead paint in older homes across the state.” Lawmakers, the paint companies and other interested parties agreed to work together toward a resolution before the end of the legislative session in September, Assembly Speaker Anthony court rulings declared lead paint to be a public nuisance and required them to pay for cleanup. The ballot measure would have shifted the cost to clean up homes from the paint companies to California taxpayers. Democratic lawmakers agreed to drop at least some of the half-dozen bills they'd introduced targeting paint companies in retaliation for the initiative. Other issues remain under discussion, including liability for homes that were not part of the court case, said Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco. “Let's not forget that the real issue here is getting lead paint out of homes,” said Assemblyman Tim Grayson, D-Concord. Courts ruled in favor of 10 California cities and counties that argued ConAgra, NL Industries and Sherwin-Williams knowingly endangered public health by advertising and selling lead paint. A Santa Clara County judge found lead paint to be a public nuisance and required the three companies to pay $1.15 billion for abatement. A state Court of Appeal in November upheld the finding of public nuisance but said the companies only have to pay for abatement in homes built before 1951. The final bill for those homes has not yet been determined but is expected to reach into the hundreds of millions of dollars. The industry-backed ballot measure would have declared that lead paint is not a public nuisance, wiping out the liability from the existing lawsuit and any others filed by other cities or counties under the same legal theory. It included a $2 billion bond for lead abatement to be repaid from the state general fund for an average of $110 million a year for 35 years.

has received very seriously,” Murphy said. “If they are interested in their own survival in worldwide markets…those markets are going to be predominately people of color.” Murphy said that Facebook users want to know that the ubiquitous social media platform is operating in a way that respects civil rights and civil liberties. That’s especially true for Black Facebook users, who often spend more time on social media platforms than their White peers. According to the Pew Research Center, 69 percent of Black adults use at least one social media site, compared to 68 percent of White adults. Seventy percent of Black adults use Facebook, compared to 67 percent of White adults use Facebook. Fortythree percent of Black adults use Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, compared to 32 percent of Whites that use the picture and video-sharing social network. “Facebook has an added responsibility, because of their size and reach, to ensure that the platform isn’t being used to discriminate; that it isn’t fomenting misinformation,” Murphy said. “Given that employers and real estate companies are involved, a key part of the audit will include looking at what the company can do to eliminate discrimination in housing.”

Hill.

“It matters when God's people join together across different kinds of boundaries that we've grown up in and we say, `You know, it doesn't have to be this way,' “ Lewis said in his sermon. “We're going to be together and we're going to lift high the name of Jesus.” About a half-dozen blocks away, Smith called it a “blessing” and a “privilege” to preach at Nashville First Baptist Church that April 22 morning before launching into his sermon on the treasure in jars of clay from 2 Corinthians. The history of race and religion is long and complicated, says Baylor University professor Kevin D. Dougherty and North Park University professor Michael O. Emerson in their recent study, “The Changing Complexion of American Congregations.” In it, the sociology scholars point to the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. lamenting in 1956 about 11 a.m. on Sunday morning being the most segregated hour in Christian America. “The troubled history of American race relations birthed congregations and denominations divided by race,” reads the study published in June in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. “Baptists and Methodists both fractured along racial lines to create separate black and white denominations.” In Nashville, the two First Baptist churches share a long history. Nashville First Baptist allowed its black members, both slave and free, to hold monthly prayer meetings in the 1830s, according to church history. Eventually, they were able to hold separate services at another location. At the end of the Civil War, the black congregation petitioned to become an independent church, which happened in 1865. The church would go on, under the leadership of Smith's father, to play a pivotal role during the civil rights movement, including sit-in demonstrations in Nashville. “I think all of that combined just really knits a story together about the ongoing day-to-day work of racial reconciliation,” Lewis said. “I think you have to constantly work on it. It's a long journey. Every generation is going to face new challenges to that.” Today, it is not uncommon for the two congregations to come together on occasion. In 2015, Lewis delivered a message during the 150th anniversary celebration of First Baptist Church, Capitol Hill. On April 22, a joint choir performance capped the day of the Smith and Lewis pulpit exchange. “The hope is they see a genuine and a mutual friendship between the two pastors,” Lewis said. “If we can be friends, then that friendship should extend member to member in our congregations as well.” It is easier to find common ground for special fellowship events like a pulpit exchange than on a week in and week out basis, Smith said. “What we did on that Sunday is very important and very good,” Smith said. “The people at Nashville First Baptist were very receptive of me and our people were very receptive of Dr. Lewis coming and sharing with us as well.” But worship is not a sterile experience, Smith said. Believers bring their personal perspectives _ both historic and current-day _ with them to church and many want to worship alongside those who understand and share their worldview, he said. “It would be wonderful if we lived in a world, as sometimes said a colorblind world, where we can always worship and celebrate whatever's going on in the lives of people,” Smith said. “We just don't live in that space right now.” In their research, Dougherty and Emerson found a notable increase in the percentage of multiracial congregations in the U.S. These congregations are defined as having less than 80 percent of its members with the same race or ethnicity. About 1 in 5 Americans worship with a multiracial congregation, they found. At 12 percent in 2012, multiracial congregations have nearly doubled since 1998, the study says. Such congregations are more common among Protestants, including mainline, evangelical and black churches. “The attention given to multiracial congregations over the past two decades provides resources for congregations to better serve diverse constituencies,” the study says. “As U.S. society continues to diversify by race and ethnicity, the ability for organizations to adapt to changing demographics will only grow in importance.” Nearly 50 years ago, Belmont United Methodist Church opened its doors to an English as a second language program, said the Rev. Paul Purdue, senior pastor of the church. Ever since, it has brought people from all over the world across the church's threshold. “It's a beautiful thing,” said Purdue, who said a diverse group of pastors has shared the pulpit at the Belmont church. More than 100 people attend Belmont's Golden Triangle Fellowship. It is a Sunday service held in the community center that serves many refugees and is translated into Thai and Karen, a language spoken in Myanmar. Belmont also helped start a Korean Methodist church years back and it has a current relationship with a Hispanic Methodist congregation, too. On Pentecost Sunday, they worship together in three languages: English, Karen and Spanish. The English and Karen speaking congregations shared Communion on World Communion Day, too. “I think it's just part of our fabric,” Purdue said. In April, the Sunday shared by the First Baptist congregations ended with an intention to come together again. “This wasn't the first time our churches have done something like this, and it certainly will not be the last,” Lewis said. “It's a good friendship between our congregations that continues to grow.”

The Black Press Challenges Fake News Continued from page A1

of the global law firm Reed Smith. The panelists challenged Black publishers and their teams to not only report real stories, but to also report them right. “I’m not so much concerned about what is being said, as I am with what isn’t,” Malveaux said. “We [Black people] can define what news is…For example, ‘45’ is running around bragging about how low the Black unemployment rate is, but if you research the statistics and labor market correctly, you’ll see that a large number of Black people, have actually left the labor market altogether.” Malveaux continued: “This is the real story that needs to be told and not 45’s ‘fake news.’ This year alone over 150,000 Black women left the labor market, which represent the stories that nobody is telling.” According to a report by CNBC, nearly 70 percent of all American citizens are concerned about “fake news” being used as a weapon. What’s more, in a recent report by NBC, “fake news” or just overall lies, were shown to spread faster on social media than

the actual truth. Examining the critical role of Black media, which has long been the beacon of light in the Black community, alongside the new age of technology, Deborah Gray-Young, placed emphasis on millennials and their role in escaping the idea of “fake news.” “Black media is being dismissed and not being regarded for its true worth,” Gray-Young said. “It’s time we take a page out of Donald Trump’s book and reinvigorate our bases. Then we need to take a step back and reestablish trust, particularly among young people. We’re in a time now, where millennials are asking, ‘What’s the source of true information?’ That source is the Black Press and we need to do a better job explaining that.” Gray-Young continued: “And don’t forget about your social media. This is what young people are plugged into. It’s not just about what’s happening in the present moment anymore. Every time we report something we are participating in the documentation of history, and what comes up in Google searches are items with the highest ratings, which is what the public comes

to know to be the whole truth.” This is why the presence of the Black Press on social media is so pivotal, Gray-Young added. “Increase your SEO’s, tell your own stories and get plugged in,” Gray-Young said. Bolden said that in America, right now, “we don’t struggle with the ideals of what is right and what is wrong, but what is the truth.” Closing out the discussion, Chairman Leavell called on mainstream media and the general public to denounce the idea of “fake news” and its message, while encouraging all Americans to support the Black Press. “NNPA has served as a vanguard and a honest look into the lives and struggles of Black Americans for over forty years,” Leavell said. “The Black Press has been around for over 191 years. To say that there is no real news or reporting, just isn’t factual as history shows us different. Leavell continued: “As members of the Black Press it is our job to be that torch of insight and lead other generations on.”


Thursday, July 12, 2018

Entertainment

THE VALLEY’S NEWS OBSERVER A5

MeToo’s Tarana Burke

Laying Groundwork for the Long Haul NEW YORK (AP) — Not long ago, Tarana Burke took the podium in a hotel ballroom full of admirers — a scenario that’s become somewhat familiar this past year — and told a favorite childhood tale about the time she was forced to run a three-legged race with a cousin who wasn’t, like her, competitive or athletic. She wanted a different partner, because she didn’t want to lose. But her grandfather told her sternly: “We don’t leave anybody behind.” And so she ran the race with that cousin, and lost, but learned a memorable lesson about taking care of those less powerful. Burke took that lesson into her career as an activist and organizer, especially her work with survivors of sexual violence — work that led her to coin the phrase “Me Too,” more than a decade before it exploded as a global hashtag and a slogan for a sweeping social movement. Now, with more visibility than she ever dreamed possible, Burke finds herself in another race — to get the next phase of her own #MeToo work up and running before the spotlight dims. And an important part of that, she says, is to put the focus back where it started — before Harvey Weinstein and the movie stars and red carpets — on survivors, especially women and girls of color, who she says have always been disproportionately impacted by sexual violence. “The #MeToo movement is a survivor’s movement,” Burke says. “And it’s for everybody. I just want to make that point extra clear.” In other words, the movement doesn’t leave anybody behind, just like her grandfather told her. But beyond that, how do you take a cultural moment with a powerful mantra, and turn it into a sustainable, working movement? That’s what Burke, 44, is concentrating on now, nine months into the #MeToo era. She’s spending the summer working on final plans for programming at “me too.,” her organization that’s housed at the Brooklyn-based Girls for Gender Equity  , the nonprofit where she’s a senior director. The immediate goal: Launching a new online community in the fall, full of resources for survivors across the country. In a recent interview, Burke decried what she called a persistent false narrative about #MeToo. “After all this time, I still run into people every day who say, ’You’re anti-men,” Burke said from France, where she was speaking at the Cannes Lions Festival. “They say, ‘All you want to do is make people lose their jobs.’ And it just takes the focus away from what we’re doing.” “These misconceptions are out there, no matter how much visibility I have, and they’re super harmful, because people believe them,” she added. “So the work I am doing with the visibility I

This booking photo provided by Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office shows Chris Brown. The singer walked off stage after his concert in Florida and into the hands of waiting sheriff’s deputies, who arrested him on a felony battery charge and booked him into the Palm Beach County Jail. A sheriff’s spokeswoman said the entertainer was released after posting $2,000 bond on the battery charge issued by the sheriff’s office in Hillsborough County. No details about the allegations in the arrest warrant were immediately available. (Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office via AP)

have is to try to give people a broader perspective.” Burke has been on a head-spinning ride since the day last October, shortly after the Weinstein story erupted, when actress Alyssa Milano encouraged survivors of sexual assault or harassment to tweet #MeToo. The hashtag spread like wildfire, and it was quickly pointed out that the phrase had originated with Burke. Since then, she’s been balancing her work at Girls For Gender Equity with countless high-profile appearances, where she’s been hailed as a standard-bearer for the movement: the Golden Globes, the Oscars, the Time 100 gala where she was honored as one of the year’s most influential people, and many others. “Part of the challenge is trying to balance all these things,” she says, “managing this level of visibility and also knowing that we have to do a lot of groundwork.” Essential to that groundwork is fundraising. Whereas the legal defense fund of Time’s Up, the Hollywood-based group advocating for gender equity in the workplace, has raised upward of $20 million, Burke’s own group has nowhere near that kind of money. Tennis legend Billie Jean King and TV host Robin Roberts each gave $100,000, and Google has given a $250,000 “Google Rising” grant. But the biggest boost came in May, when Burke received a $1 million commitment — and plans to raise twice that, annually — from the New York Women’s Foundation. “I think a lot about what would have happened if we had been fully funded 12 years ago,” she told a cheering crowd at the foundation’s breakfast, where the grant was announced. With its new funding, “me too.” is not only launching the membership-based online community — with a planned October start date — but also developing programming, for later in the year, that will include elements like survivor healing circles. The group also plans to spend about half its resources supporting community-based groups across the country fighting sexual violence. Burke herself is constantly traveling and speaking, working to put the focus back on survivors, especially in marginalized communities, and away from figures like Weinstein, whose accusers have largely been white, famous actresses. “That’s what her work has been out in the world right now,” says Joanne Smith, Burke’s colleague and founder of Girls for Gender Equity. “To remind people — or tell people who never knew — why it is that we have to be so specific about girls of color and black girls in particular being impacted by sexual violence. Because those stories don’t get told.” Burke is aware that the celebrity component of the Weinstein story has in some ways fed a perception that #MeToo — the

broader cultural movement — has left some communities out. “There’s a lot of black women who don’t feel like they have a place in this #MeToo movement that ironically was started by a black woman,” says Nupol Kiazolu, a student activist in New York City, who took the stage at the Women in the World conference this spring and called on white women to stand with their black counterparts. “I don’t feel like this movement is inclusive enough as it should be. We have a long way to go.” Similar sentiments were explored at Brooklyn’s Billie Holiday Theatre in March, where actresses including Pauletta Washington and Simone Missick performed from the writings of 50 women and girls of color for a theatrical piece entitled “Our Place in the Movement.” “In so many (past) social movements, the voices of black women are almost non-existent,” said Indira Etwaroo, the theater’s executive director. “And so with the #MeToo movement it begs the question, where do we belong, what place do we have?” She noted that when three actresses — and Weinstein accusers — took the Oscars stage to present a segment on MeToo and Time’s Up, a black woman was not among them. Burke says it’s logical that #MeToo exploded into view when high-profile celebrities became involved. “That’s what the media does, cover celebrities,” she says. “That attention has caused people to make this connection that #MeToo is about white women in Hollywood.” But she also points out that when hundreds of thousands of women began using the #MeToo hashtag, “it went viral because of people — everyday people.” Ana Oliveira, president of the New York Women’s Foundation, says she’s been heartened both by Burke’s extensive experience with survivors of sexual violence, and her clearheaded plans. “Tarana is very clear that this is not about demonizing men,” Oliveira says. “And she’s not interested in building an empire, or a big national organization. She is interested in the sustainability of efforts that happen locally.” Burke says she tries to impress on people that this is an opportunity not to be squandered. “I suspect that in a year or two, it won’t be as newsworthy,” she says. “The thing that WILL be newsworthy will be the ways that we’re moving the needle to end sexual violence.” And for that to happen, the focus needs to shift back to where it started, she says — away from the accused, and onto the survivors. “Millions and millions of people literally raised their hands nine months ago to say #MeToo ... and their hands are still raised,” she says. “Because nobody is responding to them.”

FILE - In this April 24, 2018 file photo, social activist Tarana Burke, founder of the #MeToo movement, attends the Time 100 Gala celebrating the 100 most influential people in the world in New York. Burke, who toiled in obscurity for years, has had a head-spinning nine months since the day last October, shortly after the Harvey Weinstein sexual abuse accusations, when actress Alyssa Milano encouraged survivors to tweet #MeToo. (Photo by Evan Agostini/ Invision/AP, File)

Chris Brown Arrested for Felony Battery ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Singer Chris Brown walked off stage after his concert in Florida and into the hands of waiting deputies, who arrested him on a felony battery charge involving a nightclub photographer last year. Tampa Police released more details about the battery warrant Friday after Brown posted $2,000 bond to be released from the Palm Beach County Jail. The warrant accuses Brown of hitting Bennie Vines Jr., who was hired by a club in Tampa to take pictures during an event hosted by Brown in April 2017. Vines told officers Brown punched him while he was snapping photos. Brown was gone by the time officers arrived that night. Vines refused medical treatment, but he told the officers that he wanted to prosecute over a minor lip cut.

2nd Suspect Arrested in Slaying of Rapper XXXTentacion FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A second person has been arrested in the June shooting death of emerging rap star XXXTentacion, authorities in Florida announced Wednesday. Michael Boatwright, 22, is facing first-degree murder charges in the killing, the Broward Sheriff’s Office said in a news release. Boatwright was initially arrested last week on an unrelated drug charge, investigators said. Jail records didn’t list an attorney for him. Also charged in the killing outside a Deerfield Beach motorcycle shop is Dedrick Williams, 22. His lawyer has said he will plead not guilty. Authorities say robbery was the motive in the killing of the 20-year-old XXXTentacion, whose real name was Jahseh Onfroy. Detectives still want to talk with a third man, 22-year-old Robert Allen, who is described as a “person of interest” in the case and may know something about the killing. Allen is also wanted in Broward County on a felony warrant for violation of probation for possession of the drug flakka and carrying a concealed firearm, according to the sheriff’s office. XXXTentacion, who had dreadlocks and facial tattoos, and who pronounced his name “Ex ex ex ten-ta-see-YAWN,” was a platinum-selling rising star who tackled issues including prejudice and depression in his songs. He also drew criticism over bad behavior and multiple arrests, including charges that he severely beat and abused his girlfriend. Thousands of fans turned out last month for a music-filled memorial service held at a 20,000-seat arena that is home to the Florida Panthers hockey team.

Emails to Brown’s agents weren’t immediately returned. The entertainer is in the middle of his Heartbreak On A Full Moon Tour and was scheduled to perform in Tampa Friday night. Brown has been in repeated legal trouble since pleading guilty to the felony assault in 2009 of his then-girlfriend, Rihanna, ahead of the Grammys. He completed his probation in that case in 2015. In 2013, Brown was charged with misdemeanor assault after he was accused of striking a man outside a Washington, D.C., hotel. He was ordered into rehab but was dismissed for violating facility rules. Brown spent 2½ months in custody, with U.S. marshals

shuttling him between Los Angeles and the nation’s capital for hearings. After he completed court-ordered anger-management classes, Brown was accused of throwing a brick at his mother’s car following a counseling session. After Brown posted a picture to his 44 million Instagram followers in January showing his 3-year-old daughter, Royalty, cuddling with a pet monkey, California fish and wildlife agents seized the capuchin monkey named Fiji from his home in Los Angeles. Agents said then that Brown could face a misdemeanor charge carrying up to six months in jail for lacking a permit for the primate.

Whitney Houston’s Mom Expresses ‘Shock’ Over Sex Abuse Claims NEW YORK (AP) — Whitney Houston’s mother says allegations that her superstar daughter and her son were molested by her niece, Dee Dee Warwick, are “unfathomable.” In a statement to People magazine on behalf of herself and niece, singer Dionne Warwick, Cissy Houston revealed they first learned of the claims two days before the documentary “Whitney” premiered in May. In the film, Whitney Houston’s longtime assistant said the singer told her that cousin Dee Dee Warwick molested her as a child and Whitney’s oldest brother also claimed he, too, was molested. In the statement, Cissy Houston says Dee Dee Warwick may have had her “personal challenges,” but the idea that she would have molested her children is “overwhelming and unfathomable.” Dee Dee Warwick died in 2008. Whitney Houston died in 2012. The magazine hits newsstands on Friday.

FILE - In this Jan. 22, 2013, file photo American gospel singer and author Cissy Houston poses for a portrait in New York. Cissy Houston, Whitney Houston’s mother, said allegations that her superstar daughter and her son were molested by her niece are “unfathomable.” In a statement to People magazine on behalf of herself and sister, singer Dionne Warwick, Cissy Houston revealed they first learned of the claims two days before the documentary “Whitney” premiered in May. (Photo by Dan Hallman/Invision/AP, File)

Will Barr’s Racist Tweet Doom ‘Roseanne’ Emmy Chances? By LYNN ELBER AP Television Writer LOS ANGELES (AP) _ If “Roseanne” has a shot at Emmy honors, it's because television academy voters are willing to overlook Roseanne Barr's racist tweet that ended the revival after one triumphant season. Barr, the sitcom and its cast are vying for Emmy nominations to be announced Thursday morning. They were submitted for consideration before the show was axed and no one- including its lightning-rod star - asked to be withdrawn. The comedian could have “ducked and hidden” because of her online insult targeting former Obama aide Valerie Jarrett that prompted ABC to cancel the series despite its high ratings, said Tom O'Neil, author of “The Emmys.” Barr and others who worked on the show are hoping that attention will be focused on what they achieved and not the controversy, said O'Neil, editor of the Gold Derby awards handicapping website. The “Roseanne” revival threw a political twist into the mix: Barr's support for President Donald Trump was mirrored by her character, Roseanne Conner, who gleefully clashed with her liberal sister. Viewers liked the approach, making it the most-watched series last season with an average audience of 18.7 million tuning in on Tuesdays. Writers, directors and ensemble cast members including Laurie Metcalf, John Goodman and Sara Gilbert have reason to seek Emmy attention beyond ego: It's a chance to highlight “The Conners,” the spinoff featuring the cast minus Barr that's set to air next season on ABC. There will be other contests to scrutinize when Samira Wiley (“Handmaid's Tale”) and Ryan Eggold (“The Blacklist,” upcoming “New Amsterdam”) announce nominees for the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards beginning at 11:25 a.m. EDT Thursday. The ceremony airs Sept. 17 on NBC with Colin Jost and Michael Che of “Saturday Night Live” as hosts. The growing dominance of streaming services including Hulu and Netflix, combined with premium cable networks HBO and Showtime, continue to overshadow the broadcast networks that were once the definition of television. Although they air the annual awards in rotation, ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox are fighting for viewers and a place at the Emmy banquet. In the best drama series contest, last year's champ was Hulu's “The Handmaid's Tale,” which is expected to defend its title against previous two-time winner “Game of Thrones.” The

HBO fantasy saga missed airing within the 2017-18 eligibility window due to its production schedule but is back in contention for its next-to-last season. “Handmaid’s Tale” star Elisabeth Moss, winner of last year's top drama actress award, is likely to end up competing one more time against another Elizabeth _ Claire Foy's British queen in Netflix's “The Crown,” with Foy abdicating the role as the saga progresses. Mandy Moore, whose “This Is Us” character Rebecca endured the death of Milo Ventimiglia's Jack, could reap her first nod. Ventimiglia may end up vying with formidable NBC series castmate Sterling K. Brown, who won the award for drama series actor last year and a trophy the year before for “The People vs. O.J. Simpson.” On the comedy side, the contest is wide open with the absence of three-time HBO winner “Veep” and its powerhouse star Julia Louis-Dreyfus _ six lead actress trophies for the show _ because of production timing. FX's “Atlanta,” which earned best acting and directing trophies for creator-star Glover, is expected to compete with Amazon newcomer “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and NBC's “Will & Grace,” the other big sitcom revival. Glover may have an unexpected rival in Bill Hader, star of HBO's hitman comedy “Barry.” “Mrs. Maisel” star Rachel Brosnahan has considerable buzz for an acting nod, but she'll be face serious competition likely including Tracee Ellis Ross of ABC's “black-ish” and Allison Janney of CBS' “Mom,” fresh off an Oscar win for “I, Tonya.” Every year offers another measure of how the 20,000-plus member Academy of Television Arts & Sciences is inching toward diversity. In 2015, “How to Get Away with Murder” star Viola Davis became the first actress of color to win top drama series honors. Last year, when Brown and Glover won, Lena Waithe became the first African-American woman honored for comedy series writing, for “Master of None,” sharing the award with series co-creator Aziz Ansari, who is of Indian heritage. If “Roseanne” ends up in the running, the comedy about a blue-collar family's struggles will show voter openness to economic diversity as well _ a rarity on TV and in the Emmys. In its original 1988-97 run, “Roseanne” failed to earn a single best comedy-series bid, with some observers pointing

toward the industry's ingrained preference for sitcoms about affluent characters, such as the much-honored “Frasier.” Or “Will & Grace,” which in its original 1998-2006 run earned 83 nods and won 16 Emmys, compared to 26 nominations and four trophies for “Roseanne.” While “Roseanne” was slighted, its cast wasn't. Metcalf received four nods and won three times for her portrayal of Barr's

sister, Jackie, while John Goodman, who played husband Dan Conner opposite Barr, was nominated seven times (without a win). Barr herself was nominated four times and claimed the top acting award once.


Local Illegal Marijuana Market Still Thrives in Los Angeles A6

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By MICHAEL BALSAMO Associated Press LOS ANGELES (AP) _ A slight marijuana smell wafted out as a steady stream of customers walked into a warehouse, its doors and windows covered by bars. Suddenly, police swooped in. “Sheriff’s department! Search warrant!” a Los Angeles County deputy shouted as the team thundered through the front door and began hauling out people in handcuffs.

The Compton 20 Cap Collective just south of Los Angeles that was raided earlier this spring is one of hundreds of illegal marijuana stores operating in LA County, where marijuana is legal for anyone 21 and over and retailers must be licensed to sell to them. Broad marijuana legalization arrived in California at the start of the year. From the beginning, there was concern the legal market would be undercut by the massive black market that has existed for decades.

Thursday, July 12, 2018

And that’s what’s happening. Nowhere is it a bigger problem than in the state’s biggest legal local marijuana market: Los Angeles County. The number of outlaw dispensaries in the county greatly outnumbers about 150 licensed storefront retailers. That reality is a buzzkill for those trying to play by the rules. Legal pot shops are losing customers who can get products more cheaply at illegal outlets that don’t charge or pay taxes, said Adam Spiker, executive director of the Southern California Coalition, a trade organization that represents cannabis growers, distributors and dispensary owners. It’s an “unfair competitive situation for licensed businesses,” Spiker said. “I think if you turn the tables and took cannabis out of the equation - if it was another industry that didn’t have the stigmas - the government would do everything they could to give those licensed business paying taxes a level playing field.” One of the selling points for legalization was it would generate a tax windfall for state and local governments. However, during the first quarter, the state reported only $34 million from cultivation and excise taxes, putting it on pace to fall well below the $175 million forecast for the first six months. In April, state regulators sent nearly 1,000 cease-and-desist letters to cannabis businesses they suspected were operating illegally. An analysis by the trade publication Marijuana Business Daily found about 64 percent of the businesses were in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. Last month, the Los Angeles city attorney’s office charged 142 people as part of a crackdown on illegal dispensaries. It also sent out cease-and-desist letters but declined to say how many. Los Angeles County boasts the nation’s largest sheriff’s department, but even it has nowhere near the manpower to take down all the illegal pot shops. A task force overseen by Lt. Frank Montez raids an average of one dispensary a week. However, the voter-approved ballot measure legalizing cannabis in California included a provision that made possessing more than 28.5 grams only a misdemeanor. That means officers can seize businesses’ cash and marijuana, but employees and owners rarely face jail, and illegal operations often quickly reopen. “It’s a money-lucrative business so there are people willing to take the risk,” said Capt. Holly Francisco, who commands the sheriff’s department’s narcotics unit. Montez sees his work as more than code enforcement. Marijuana sold illegally may be tainted with illegal pesticides and

other harmful substances. And licensed marijuana shop owners who pay their taxes should have a fair playing field, he said. “When you have an illegitimate, illegal dispensary operating, that not only hurts the industry as a whole but that really hurts the community,” Montez said. At the Compton store, a sign above a security window says customers must be at least 18 and have a physician’s recommendation to buy medical marijuana and be 21 and have a valid photo ID for anything else. Like many others, the shop operated in plain sight and advertised online, including on WeedMaps, a go-to website for people looking to buy cannabis. Inside, whiteboards on dirt-smudged walls advertised the prices for different types of cannabis and concentrates. Cartridges for vapor pens and “Shatter,” a honey-like oil containing cannabis extract, cost between $15 and $30. Large display cases held jars of branded marijuana strains _ 28 grams of “Purple Dragon” sold for $160. “People out here on the street are thinking it is a legitimate operation and are smoking this cannabis with all these dangerous pesticides, and they are really killing themselves,” Montez said. Some illegal pot shops look so legitimate that customers may not even realize they are illegal unless they figure out they aren’t being charged tax. But like any shopper looking for the best deal, plenty know these places are illegal and go because it’s cheaper. While some illegal LA County pot shops grow their own plants, many are supplied by illegal grows in the hills of Northern California, long a major source of all U.S. pot. Lake County, about 125 miles (201 kilometers) north of San Francisco, is home to many such grows because of its topography, which allows pot farmers to easily hide large operations. It has an abundance of federal and state forests and land where cartels set up operations. Like the LA County Sheriff’s Department, Lake County lacks the manpower to put much of a dent in illegal operations. Deputies patrol on the ground and in helicopters, and last year they destroyed about 250,000 plants and arrested 46 people for illegal grows, Sheriff Brian Martin said. He has no estimate for the number of illegal grows in the county but is confident the hundreds of thousands of plants deputies chop down each year are “just the tip of the iceberg.” Martin said his short-staffed department has assigned a single a detective full-time to marijuana eradication. He counts on help from state and federal agencies, but they too have their priorities. “It’s all about manpower,” he said. “No one has enough of it.”

Prosecutor Under Investigation for Offensive Comments By Manny Otiko California Black Media The San Bernardino County District Attorney’s Office has become embroiled in a scandal that is symptomatic of the political problems facing this country. Over the weekend it was revealed that Michael Selyem, a gang prosecutor, made hateful comments about former first lady Michelle Obama and Rep. Maxine Waters. “Being a loud-mouthed c#nt in the ghetto you would think someone would have shot this bitch by now …” said Selyem, in a post referring to Waters. He also posted a picture of Michelle Obama holding an altered sign that read “Trump touched my penis.” Waters has engaged in a verbal battle with President Donald Trump. She said she is determined to see him impeached. Trump has responded by referring to Waters as “a low-IQ individual.” Waters has also come under fire from her own party for saying that Trump administration officials should be confronted in public for working with a president she sees as a criminal. But Waters was backed by the Congressional Black Caucus and a Twitter hashtag #standwithmaxine, created by the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation (NCBCP)/ Black Women’s Roundtable (BWR.) However, pushback against Trump administration officials is already happening. White House staffers Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and Senior Advisor Stephen Miller have both been confronted in public. Sanders was asked to leave the Red Hen restaurant in Virginia. Miller was cursed at by a Washington,

D.C. bartender while picking up an order of sushi.) However, Selyem’s comments about Michelle Obama are curious. The Obama family has been out of the White House for two years. But when President Barack Obama was head of the government, there was a lot of hate directed at him and his wife from right-wing sources. One of the slurs claimed Michelle Obama was born a man and transitioned to a woman. (Selyem is a Trump supporter.) But there’s another problem with Selyem’s comments. Apart from being unprofessional, they may also call into question his objectivity in the courtroom. Selyem is a gang prosecutor and he mainly went after Latino gangs. But his social media posts show him making racist comments. One of his posts read “Mexican word of the day: Hide.” Selyem’s comments have been criticized by AfricanAmerican political activist Najee Ali, a Los Angeles-based community activist. Ali held a press conference in San Bernardino on Monday. “Selyem’s public comments are hateful and could be interpreted as a call to violence against Congressmember Waters. Law enforcement personnel and officers of the court system should not incite violence,” said Ali. “How can a public prosecutor, who publicly espouses such views be trusted to impartially administer justice.” Terrence Stone, a gang intervention expert who works in San Bernardino, said that these kinds of comments make it difficult

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Michael Selyem, a gang prosecutor, made hateful comments about former first lady Michelle Obama and Rep. Maxine Waters. According to a spokesperson for the San Bernardino County DA’s office, Selyem’s comments have been under investigation since late June. And he has been placed on leave until the investigation is finished.

for young people to trust the legal system. “I’m appalled and it’s disgusting,” he said. “These are people who are in charge of giving us a fair trial.” According to a spokesperson for the San Bernardino County DA’s office, Selyem’s comments have been under investigation since late June. And he has been placed on leave until the investigation is finished. Los Angeles Urban Policy Roundtable President Earl Ofari

Hutchinson takes the matter even more seriously. He called for Selyem to be charged with a federal crime. “In this volatile climate such a threat poses a grave danger to Waters. The shooting of an Arizona congresswoman and the recent physical confrontations with government officials in public places underscore that grave threat,” said Hutchinson. “The law is clear on public threats to federal officials, it is a crime. The U.S. attorney must take action against Selyem for his violation of federal law in calling for the attack on Waters.”

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Graham Volume 33 Number 18 Billyl Rights Civi

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Los Angeles Rams Host Cheerleader 2018 Auditions

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March Rams are hosting attherams.com/2018 The Los Angeles season starting Sunday, perform the 2018 rs not only at auditions for Rams Cheerleade Coliseum and 11. Los Angeles at the LA Memorial also participate service at home games in Mexico City, but community Estadio Azteca internas, events and nationally and in public appearance Angeles region, t the year. or oldacross the Los must be 18 tionally throughou online by looking to audition Candidates March 1, and must register is not availer by Thursday, 8. Walk-up registration y auditions Thursday, Marchfrom last year’s preliminar /videos. able. Coverageat therams.com/cheerRams Cheerleaders can be viewed to auditions the Los Angeles In addition,voluntary workshops prior t the LA region. four are hosting Fitness locations throughou led by Chon hour of dance one at 24 Hour presentatio a includes by ng DiEach workshop PETERS, followed per the Rams Cheerleadi reographer JOHN cost $40.00 last segment with Workshops and a Q & A FIMBRES. Footage from candiavailability. rector KEELY have limited viewed here.  Interested person and can be at therams.com/cheer year’s workshops up for workshops dates may sign leaders/workshops.

(KEEP INSPIRING STRONG SISTAHS) Female First Black to Nominated Fame of State Hall

Women’s Retreat Held in Burbank

Tina Knowles-Lawson, wife, entrepreneur, and mother to singers Beyoncé & Solonge Knowles. (Carrington Prichett/Los Angeles News Observer Photo)

By Darlene L. Williams Los Angeles Contributing Beat Writer BURBANK, CA- The K.I.S.S. (Keep Inspiring

Exotic Dance Coach, Makeda Smith leading the audience in a dance practice. (Carrington Prichett/Los Angeles News Observer Photo)

pe of HoWomen’s Strong retreat was held Saturday, FebgeSistahs) Messa ruary, 24th at the Ramada- Burbank Airport Hotel from The CSU’s

Tina Knowles-Lawson further empowered the energetic group with an open question and answer session in relation to operating successful businesses. 1 p.m. to 9.m. The one-day event geared towards inspir“The best businesses are services people need. You ing and empowering women to love themselves, featured want to have a product that people need,” explained dia Me Keynote Speaker,rni andaMulti-Award Camp-an Knowles-Lawson. Black Winner, Tina Texas Womin Pan ts of Ca the lifo famed sister duo, Mary Mary and Q es and t to “Find a couple of people you can trust, she said. anbell Defaecat gs PG&E’s Gr A session with entrepreneur, designer, philanthropist, to Hide Dru Knowles-Lawson along with husband, Actor Richmotivational speaker, and mother of iconic daughters ard Lawson successfully operates and owns WACO Beyonce’ and Solange; Tina Knowles-Lawson. (Where Art Can Occur) Theater Group in Los Angeles, The event also included a One-Woman Stage play, where they mentor inner-city youths. an All Male Panel Discussion (What Men REALLY “I’ve always dreamed of mentoring young girls”, she Want?) hosted by Fox 11 News Reporter, Leah Uko; and said. Flying Over 50 Exotic Dance Coach, Makeda Smith. Event founder, producer, life-coach, and celebriCampbell, spoke to a group of about 70 women ty hairstylist, Stephanie Singleton told The Bakersfield about the importance of faith, forgiveness, and healing. News Observer; that the overall message intended “I’m a person of faith, Campbell said. Jesus is for women is that they embrace their “outer and what I do”. inner beauty”. Campbell, spoke about her marriage to Robert Coats and Brandon Ellis both husband, Teddy Campbell. “I dealt with his inflew out from Akron, Ohio to support Singlefidelity very publicly and it almost destroyed ton and the K.I.S.S. retreat. “I’m here my marriage. I’ve overcome the opinions of to support the movem e n t people,” she said. and brand. It’s power“God has your life fully orchestrated, Campful for bell told the attentive group, as she began to the womsoftly sing her hit song, “Destiny” an culture. This “I’ve got a destination in my view/ is a great time to push the road may be bumpy getting there/ for the woman, it’s so importBut I’m pressing through/ I will enjoy ant,” Coats said. this journey/ No matter come what “It’s a nice atmosphere; it’s nice what may/ I’ll become better and she’s (Singleton) doing for the women. stronger/ and wiser every It’s important to make women feel powerday.” ful, Ellis said. We are kings and queens.” “ W h y Additionally, Veteran Entertainlook good er and Flying Over 50 Exotic Dance when you can be Coach, Makeda Smith encouraged the good,” Campbell women in attendance to move their said. hips and to “awaken the sleeping goddess within.” “When was the last time Exotic Dance Coach, Makeda Smith leading you shook your hips? Smith asked. the audience in a dance practice. (Carrington Soon the energetic and funny Prichett/Los Angeles News Observer Photo)

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News Observer K.I.S.S. By Darlene L. Williams Los Angeles Contributing Beat Writer BURBANK, CA- The K.I.S.S. (Keep Inspiring Strong Sistahs) Women’s retreat was held Saturday, February, 24th at the Ramada- Burbank Airport Hotel from 1 p.m. to 9.m. The one-day event geared towards inspiring and empowering women to love themselves, featured Keynote Speaker, and Multi-Award Winner, Tina Campbell of the famed sister duo, Mary Mary and a Q and A session with entrepreneur, designer, philanthropist, motivational speaker, and mother of iconic daughters Beyonce’ and Solange; Tina Knowles-Lawson. The event also included a One-Woman Stage play, an All Male Panel Discussion (What Men REALLY Want?) hosted by Fox 11 News Reporter, Leah Uko; and Flying Over 50 Exotic Dance Coach, Makeda Smith. Campbell, spoke to a group of about 70 women about the importance of faith, forgiveness, and healing. “I’m a person of faith, Campbell said. Jesus is what I do”. Campbell, spoke about her marriage to husband, Teddy Campbell. “I dealt with his infidelity very publicly and it almost destroyed my marriage. I’ve overcome the opinions of people,” she said. “God has your life fully orchestrated, Campbell told the attentive group, as she began to softly sing her hit song, “Destiny” “I’ve got a destination in my view/ the road may be bumpy getting there/ But I’m pressing through/ I will enjoy this journey/ No matter come what may/ I’ll become better and stronger/ and wiser every day.” “ W h y look good when you can be good,” Campbell said.

Mayors California Billion Seek $1.5 eless to Help Hom

Continued

Candidates May Register through March 8th at attherams.com/2018cheerauditions The Los Angeles Rams are hosting cheerleader Bill Cosby’s auditions for the 2018 season starting Sunday, March Daughter Ensa Dies at 44 11. Los Angeles Rams Cheerleaders not only perform at home games at the LA Memorial Coliseum and The at Valley’s Estadio Azteca in Mexico City, but also participate in public appearances, events and community service across the Los Angeles region, nationally and internationally throughout the year. Candidates looking to audition must be 18 or older by Thursday, March 1, and must register online by Thursday, March 8. Walk-up registration is not available. Coverage from last year’s preliminary auditions (KEEP INSPIRING STRONG SISTAHS) can be viewed at therams.com/cheer/videos. Women’s Retreat In addition, the Los Angeles Rams Cheerleaders Held in Burbank are hosting four voluntary workshops prior to auditions at 24 Hour Fitness locations throughout the LA region. Each workshop includes one hour of dance led by Choreographer JOHN PETERS, followed by a presentation and a Q & A segment with the Rams Cheerleading Director KEELY FIMBRES. Workshops cost $40.00 per person and have limited availability. Footage from last year’s workshops can be viewed here.  Interested candidates may sign up for workshops at therams.com/cheerleaders/workshops. Volume 33 Number 18

the enerempowered awson further and answer session in L. Williams Tina Knowles-L question By Darlene g Beat Writer (Keep Inspiring getic group with an open You female Febsuccessful businesses. Los Angeles Contributin people need. CA- The K.I.S.S. _ The first black to operating was held Saturday, BURBANK, Conn. (AP) is being nominated to from relation best businesses are services need,” explained Women’s retreat people Airport HotelinspirHARTFORD, “The General Assembly Fame. Strong Sistahs)the Ramada- Burbank a product that towards at member of the t Women’s Hall of was first elected to said. want to have event geared ruary, 24th can trust, she The one-day to love themselves, featured Knowles-Lawson. E. Morton the Connecticu She served four of people you husband, Actor RichCamp1 p.m. to 9.m. g women The late Margaret tives in 1972. a Dem“Find a couple rd Winner, Tinaa Q and along with Representa owns WACO ing and empowerin . She later wonand then and Multi-Awa Mary and the House of Knowles-Lawson operates and in Los Angeles, g Bridgeport senator pist, Keynote Speaker, sister duo, Mary successfully court terms, representin famed Theater Group designer, philanthro ard Lawson against an incumbent after a lengthy bell of the entrepreneur, iconic daughters (Where Art Can Occur) ocratic primary the general election mother of inner-city youths. young girls”, she A session with Democrats. went on to win awson. speaker, and they mentor mentoring eventually beremotivational Solange; Tina Knowles-L the Senate, Stage play, where“I’ve always dreamed of an battle with Bridgeport six terms in tempore in 1990. She and celebriBeyonce’ and also included a One-WomMen REALLY She served president pro (What said. The event producer, life-coach, coming deputyand died in 2012. told The Bakersfield nominated Leah Uko; and Panel Discussion Event founder, an All Male by Fox 11 News Reporter, women legislators Smith. message intended determiStephanie Singleton tired in 1992 black overall “quiet Makeda and the her hairstylist, current hosted that Coach, “outer citing Four Want?) 70 women ty embrace their News Observer; 50 Exotic Dance the hall of fame, racism. on group of about is that they Flying Over Morton to , and healing. are accepted spoke to a prejudice and for women Tina Campbell. Ellis both Campbell, scholars Phonation” to fight ns for the hall of fame e of faith, forgiveness inner beauty”. Coats and Brandon Gospel Artist, said. Jesus is by a consulting SingleWinning Angeles News Observer Nominatio Campbell my support reviewed about the importanc Robert to faith, os of basis and Akron, Ohio n Prichett/L “I’m here Multi-Gram “I’m a person an ongoing to (Carringto flew out from m e n t her marriage K.I.S.S. retreat. committee. to) what I do”. ton and the the movespoke about dealt with his inpowerCampbell, rGetsOld, had to support as #SexyNeve Campbell. “I almost destroyed is for It’s Teddy ful it and brand. husband, whose motto and moving. It appeared of publicly and as the feet 57 year-old, the womfidelity very I’ve overcome the opinions up on their been awakened,a sultry This the women goddesses had to side to my marriage.said. an culture. d, Campif all the sleepingtheir hips from side the inspirational to push people,” she for to life fully orchestrate is a great time women swayed tune Smith used as she began “God has your it’s so importblues attentive group, and soulful for the woman, and event bell told the hit song, “Destiny” from CalAspiring Actress and view/ moment. (AP) _ Mayorsasked state Coats said. e; it’s nice what softly sing her a destination in my LaRe’, Author,was looking for self-love ant,” Calif. Bridgett NTO, atmospher “I there/ God.” “I’ve got on Wednesday “It’s a nice doing for the women. getting SACRAME what the BNO, knew it was be bumpy will enjoy largest cities billion to help with attendee, toldme about the retreat; I said another event feel powerthe road may $1.5 ifornia’s eleven she’s (Singleton) through/ I what to provide to make women a friend told a flyer at church, I’m trying to lawmakers growing homeless crisis. would require the But I’m pressing It’s important We are kings and queens.” “I was handedTowner of Los Angeles, No matter comeand billion they say is a backing legislation that this journey/ ful, Ellis said. Veteran Entertaincreating a $3 tempomovebecome better attendee, LaToya Dance They are Additionally, place; it’s a may/ I’ll matching funds, wiser every Over 50 Exotic that the find myself.” stems from a personal affordable housing, cities to provide stronger/ and er and Flying Smith encouraged women to know outreach. leaders to be spent on you “K.I.S.S. pot of money supportive services and said. I’m helping robbed us if to move their day.” Coach, Makeda to legislative attendance ment, Singleton with love and someone rary shelters, in an earlier letter “ W h y the state’s $6.1 women in “awaken the sleeping godborn They said should use a quarter of good we were all love yourself.” hips and to “When was the last time look be can’t say you that lawmakerssurplus to help the homeless.called it “the asked. dess within.” when you can hips? Smith billion budget Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer today.’’ you shook your energetic and funny good,” Campbell San Diego California cities that the Soon the issue facing said. federal estimate most pressing Smith leading cited a 2017more than 134,000 homen (Carringto Coach, Makeda The mayors Photo) state now has Exotic Dance in a dance practice. Observer populous Demomost News the audience day that two billion os Angeles Prichett/L less people. came the same seek $2 Their request announced they will to the mayors’ in response cratic state senators housing, also Los y. She wanted for affordable mayors from and opportunit to excel in Fresno, requests. group includes system to access son continued becoming The bipartisan San Jose, San Francisco, , Anaof the CSU Bakersfield Diego, that if her great-grand his dream of he should M. Coley reassurance Angeles, San Sacramento, Oakland, one day achieve courses By Dr. SorayaPoly Pomona Gov. e of CSU’s Super school, he might also wanted advice on her husband were Long Beach, Ana. six months after President, Cal reflecting on the importanc I had meetShe and astronaut. She to set heim and Santa come less than law. They im-a Photo) were trying As I was was an experience who intro- an to prepare him for college. The proposals 15 housing bills into resources but mother take came to mind M. Coley (Courtesy fee and placed signed Dr. Soraya Sunday, what American great-grand son that she and her in their 70s and had few Brown transaction Jerry $75 real estate November ballot. great-grand message about the ing an African posed a new bond on the her 8-year-old my A2 duced me to raising. She had heard and the commitment Continued on page $4 billion housing degree husband were of a college increasing value

a By Tony Khing Media PG&E presentedefCalifornia Black NTO -- On Feb. 22, to help their SACRAME California Black Media outlets to erican news t was $53,000 grant major African-Am The endowmen California forts in supporting service area. company’s event at The eight Afwithin the a multicultural media CBM with given during co-hosted by PG&E and organizations.  t the AfriEndowmen print and broadcast to support sperican-American we work hard but February is a “At PG&E, all year, of many community acknowledgement can-American it’s a formal made significant cial month because erican heroes who’ve erican press is a African-Am We’re unsung African-Am community. We in history. The work. contributions in the African- American their to support vital resource with them work with them in 2018 to initiapleased to partner to continuing energy policy Jimi look forward PG&E updates and Manager ty Relations on important PG&E Communi Post tives,”  said such as  The other and Harris. from outlets Representatives andSacramento Observer rate plan Time of Use Reporter  usage. News,  Sun ned about PG&E’s their energy media outlets lear can better manage received informa and how customers session, they also one-hour During the

Observer Group Newspapers of Southern California

Tina Knowles-Lawson further empowered the energetic group with an open question and answer session in relation to operating successful businesses. “The best businesses are services people need. You want to have a product that people need,” explained Knowles-Lawson. “Find a couple of people you can trust, she said. Knowles-Lawson along with husband, Actor Richard Lawson successfully operates and owns WACO (Where Art Can Occur) Theater Group in Los Angeles, where they mentor inner-city youths. “I’ve always dreamed of mentoring young girls”, she said. Event founder, producer, life-coach, and celebrity hairstylist, Stephanie Singleton told The Bakersfield News Observer; that the overall message intended for women is that they embrace their “outer and inner beauty”. Robert Coats and Brandon Ellis both flew out from Akron, Ohio to support Singleton and the K.I.S.S. retreat. “I’m here to support the movem e n t and brand. It’s p owe r ful for the woman culture. This is a great time to push for the woman, it’s so important,” Coats said. “It’s a nice atmosphere; it’s nice what she’s (Singleton) doing for the women. It’s important to make women feel powerful, Ellis said. We are kings and queens.” Additionally, Veteran Entertainer and Flying Over 50 Exotic Dance Coach, Makeda Smith encouraged the women in attendance to move their hips and to “awaken the sleeping goddess within.” “When was the last time you shook your hips? Smith asked. Soon the energetic and funny

First Black Female Nominated to State Hall of Fame By Dr. Soraya M. Coley President, Cal Poly Pomona As I was reflecting on the importance of CSU’s Super Sunday, what came to mind was an experience I had meeting an African American great-grandmother who introduced me to her 8-year-old great-grandson that she and her husband were raising. She had heard my message about the increasing value of a college degree and the commitment

Los Angeles Rams Host Cheerleader 2018 Auditions

Tina Knowles-Lawson, wife, entrepreneur, and mother to singers Beyoncé & Solonge Knowles. (Carrington Prichett/Los Angeles News Observer Photo)

Multi-Grammy Winning Gospel Artist, Tina Campbell. (Carrington Prichett/Los Angeles News Observer Photo)

57 year-old, whose motto is #SexyNeverGetsOld, had the women up on their feet and moving. It appeared as if all the sleeping goddesses had been awakened, as the women swayed their hips from side to side to a sultry and soulful blues tune Smith used for the inspirational moment. Bridgett LaRe’, Author, Aspiring Actress and event attendee, told the BNO, “I was looking for self-love and a friend told me about the retreat; I knew it was God.” “I was handed a flyer at church, said another event attendee, LaToya Towner of Los Angeles, I’m trying to find myself.” “K.I.S.S. stems from a personal place; it’s a movement, Singleton said. I’m helping women to know that we were all born with love and someone robbed us if you can’t say you love yourself.”

of the CSU system to access and opportunity. She wanted reassurance that if her great-grandson continued to excel in school, he might one day achieve his dream of becoming an astronaut. She also wanted advice on courses he should take to prepare him for college. She and her husband were in their 70s and had few resources but were trying to set Continued on page A2

Dr. Soraya M. Coley (Courtesy Photo)

PG&E’s Grant to California Black Media

By Tony Khing California Black Media SACRAMENTO -- On Feb. 22, PG&E presented a $53,000 grant to California Black Media to help their efforts in supporting major African-American news outlets within the company’s service area. The endowment was given during a multicultural media event at The California Endowment co-hosted by PG&E and CBM with eight African-American print and broadcast organizations.  “At PG&E, we work hard to support the African-American community all year, but February is a special month because it’s a formal acknowledgement of many unsung African-American heroes who’ve made significant contributions in history. The African-American press is a vital resource in the African- American community. We’re pleased to partner with them to support their work. We look forward to continuing to work with them in 2018 on important PG&E updates and energy policy initiatives,”  said PG&E Community Relations Manager Jimi Harris. Representatives from outlets such as  The Post News,  Sun Reporter  andSacramento Observer and other media outlets learned about PG&E’s Time of Use rate plan and how customers can better manage their energy usage. During the one-hour session, they also received informa

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) _ The first black female member of the General Assembly is being nominated to the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame. The late Margaret E. Morton was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1972. She served four terms, representing Bridgeport. She later won a Democratic primary against an incumbent senator and then went on to win the general election after a lengthy court battle with Bridgeport Democrats. She served six terms in the Senate, eventually becoming deputy president pro tempore in 1990. She retired in 1992 and died in 2012. Four current black women legislators nominated Morton to the hall of fame, citing her “quiet determination” to fight prejudice and racism. Nominations for the hall of fame are accepted on an ongoing basis and reviewed by a consulting scholars committee. Continued on page A2

Robertson Communit Amelia ral Communic Multicultu Media Group, Pleshette of Black Employees Integrated One New Fiona Chan Publisher,One New Media Group. Dudley Najieb, Lennice Najieb, G&E and

on page A2

Multi-Grammy Winning Gospel Artist, Tina Campbell. (Carrington Prichett/Los Angeles News Observer Photo)

57 year-old, whose motto is #SexyNeverGetsOld, had the women up on their feet and moving. It appeared as if all the sleeping goddesses had been awakened, as the women swayed their hips from side to side to a sultry and soulful blues tune Smith used for the inspirational moment. Bridgett LaRe’, Author, Aspiring Actress and event attendee, told the BNO, “I was looking for self-love and a friend told me about the retreat; I knew it was God.” “I was handed a flyer at church, said another event attendee, LaToya Towner of Los Angeles, I’m trying to find myself.” “K.I.S.S. stems from a personal place; it’s a movement, Singleton said. I’m helping women to know that we were all born with love and someone robbed us if you can’t say you love yourself.”

The CSU’s Message of Hope

L to R Justin Real, Sr. Program Manager, PG&E, Allen Fernandez Smith, Manager Customer Energy Efficiency, PG&E, Amelia Ashley-Ward, Publisher, Sun Reporter, Felicia Roberts, Publisher, Central Valley Voice, Dionne Adams, President of Black Employees Community Support, Regina Wilson, Executive Director, CBM, Valerie Bell, V.P. Operations, PG&E, Fiona Chan Integrated Multicultural Communications, PG&E, Jerilyn Gleaves, Manager, Supplier Diversity, PG&E, Julia Dudley Najieb, Publisher, One New Media Group, Pleshette Robertson, Publisher, Sac Cultural Hub, Libby O’Connell,PG&E  and Lennice Najieb, One New Media Group.

Candidates May Register through March 8th at attherams.com/2018cheerauditions The Los Angeles Rams are hosting cheerleader auditions for the 2018 season starting Sunday, March 11. Los Angeles Rams Cheerleaders not only perform at home games at the LA Memorial Coliseum and at Estadio Azteca in Mexico City, but also participate in public appearances, events and community service across the Los Angeles region, nationally and internationally throughout the year. Candidates looking to audition must be 18 or older by Thursday, March 1, and must register online by Thursday, March 8. Walk-up registration is not available. Coverage from last year’s preliminary auditions can be viewed at therams.com/cheer/videos. In addition, the Los Angeles Rams Cheerleaders are hosting four voluntary workshops prior to auditions at 24 Hour Fitness locations throughout the LA region. Each workshop includes one hour of dance led by Choreographer JOHN PETERS, followed by a presentation and a Q & A segment with the Rams Cheerleading Director KEELY FIMBRES. Workshops cost $40.00 per person and have limited availability. Footage from last year’s workshops can be viewed here.  Interested candidates may sign up for workshops at therams.com/cheerleaders/workshops.

First Black Female Nominated to State Hall of Fame HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) _ The first black female

member of the General Assembly is being nominated to the Connecticut Women’s Hall of Fame. The late Margaret E. Morton was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1972. She served four terms, representing Bridgeport. She later won a Democratic primary against an incumbent senator and then went on to win the general election after a lengthy court battle with Bridgeport Democrats. She served six terms in the Senate, eventually becoming deputy president pro tempore in 1990. She retired in 1992 and died in 2012. Four current black women legislators nominated Morton to the hall of fame, citing her “quiet determination” to fight prejudice and racism. Nominations for the hall of fame are accepted on an ongoing basis and reviewed by a consulting scholars committee.

California Mayors Seek $1.5 Billion to Help Homeless

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) _ Mayors from California’s eleven largest cities on Wednesday asked state lawmakers to provide $1.5 billion to help with what they say is a growing homeless crisis. They are backing legislation that would require the cities to provide matching funds, creating a $3 billion pot of money to be spent on affordable housing, temporary shelters, supportive services and outreach. They said in an earlier letter to legislative leaders that lawmakers should use a quarter of the state’s $6.1 billion budget surplus to help the homeless. San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer called it “the most pressing issue facing California cities today.’’ The mayors cited a 2017 federal estimate that the most populous state now has more than 134,000 homeless people. Their request came the same day that two Democratic state senators announced they will seek $2 billion for affordable housing, also in response to the mayors’ requests. The bipartisan group includes mayors from Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, Fresno, Long Beach, Sacramento, Oakland, Bakersfield, Anaheim and Santa Ana. The proposals come less than six months after Gov. Jerry Brown signed 15 housing bills into law. They imposed a new $75 real estate transaction fee and placed a $4 billion housing bond on the November ballot.

Texas Woman Defecates in Pants to Hide Drugs CORSICANA, Texas (AP) _ Police say a Texas woman attempted to hide evidence during an arrest by defecating in her pants and using the feces to conceal drugs. Officers in Corsicana, about 55 miles (88 kilometers ) south of Dallas, were investigating a report of a theft at a grocery store on Wednesday when they attempted to subdue a female suspect and take her into custody. Police say they placed Shannen Martin in the back of a police cruiser where they say she intentionally defecated in her pants then hid a crack pipe, 2.3 grams of crack cocaine and a Valentine’s Day card in her excrement. Officers had to sift through the woman’s feces to retrieve the evidence after Martin was booked on charges of tampering with evidence and possession of a controlled substance.

California Mayors Seek $1.5 Billion to Help Homeless

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) _ Mayors from California’s eleven largest cities on Wednesday asked state lawmakers to provide $1.5 billion to help with what they say is a growing homeless crisis. They are backing legislation that would require the cities to provide matching funds, creating a $3 billion pot of money to be spent on affordable housing, temporary shelters, supportive services and outreach. They said in an earlier letter to legislative leaders that lawmakers should use a quarter of the state’s $6.1 billion budget surplus to help the homeless. San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer called it “the most pressing issue facing California cities today.’’ The mayors cited a 2017 federal estimate that the most populous state now has more than 134,000 homeless people. Their request came the same day that two Democratic state senators announced they will seek $2 billion for affordable housing, also in response to the mayors’ requests. The bipartisan group includes mayors from Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, Fresno, Long Beach, Sacramento, Oakland, Bakersfield, Anaheim and Santa Ana. The proposals come less than six months after Gov. Jerry Brown signed 15 housing bills into law. They imposed a new $75 real estate transaction fee and placed a $4 billion housing bond on the November ballot.

valleynewsobserver.com of the CSU system to access and opportunity. She wanted reassurance that if her great-grandson continued to excel in school, he might one day achieve his dream of becoming an astronaut. She also wanted advice on courses he should take to prepare him for college. She and her husband were in their 70s and had few resources but were trying to set Continued on page A2

Dr. Soraya M. Coley (Courtesy Photo)

PG&E’s Grant to California Black Media

By Tony Khing California Black Media SACRAMENTO -- On Feb. 22, PG&E presented a $53,000 grant to California Black Media to help their efforts in supporting major African-American news outlets within the company’s service area. The endowment was given during a multicultural media event at The California Endowment co-hosted by PG&E and CBM with eight African-American print and broadcast organizations.  “At PG&E, we work hard to support the African-American community all year, but February is a special month because it’s a formal acknowledgement of many unsung African-American heroes who’ve made significant contributions in history. The African-American press is a vital resource in the African- American community. We’re

Texas Woman Defecates in Pants to Hide Drugs

CORSICANA, Texas (AP) _ Police say a Texas woman attempted to hide evidence during an arrest by defecating in her pants and using the feces to conceal drugs. Officers in Corsicana, about 55 miles (88 kilometers ) south of Dallas, were investigating a report of a

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The CSU’s Message of Hope

a Texas _ Police say arrest by Texas (AP) an CORSICANA,to hide evidence during to conceal using the feces woman attempted her pants and defecating in (88 kilomea about 55 miles drugs. g a report of investigatin when they atOfficers in Corsicana, of Dallas, were ters ) south take her into store on Wednesday suspect and Martin in the theft at a grocery subdue a female Shannen ly tempted to say they placed say she intentional custody. Police cruiser where they 2.3 grams a crack pipe, in her exhid back of a police then her pants Day card defecated in and a Valentine’s feces of crack cocaine the woman’s on crement. to sift through was booked a Officers had of after Martin PG&E, the evidence evidence and possession to retrieve with Energy Efficiency, Customer Dionne Adams, President charges of tampering , PG&E, Voice, Smith, Manager substance. Julia V.P. Operations Fernandez Central Valley Bell, controlled PG&E, Allen Diversity,O’Connell,PPG&E, CBM, Valerie Roberts, Publisher, Manager, Director, Manager, Supplier Program Sun Reporter, Felicia Hub, Libby Real, Sr. Wilson, Executive Sac Cultural Jerilyn Gleaves, rd, Publisher,y Support, Regina L to R Justin , Publisher, ations, PG&E, Ashley-Wa

By Dr. Soraya M. Coley President, Cal Poly Pomona As I was reflecting on the importance of CSU’s Super Sunday, what came to mind was an experience I had meeting an African American great-grandmother who introduced me to her 8-year-old great-grandson that she and her husband were raising. She had heard my message about the increasing value of a college degree and the commitment

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