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FINAL 2018

Community Risk Assessment / Standards of Cover ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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ORLAND FIRE DISTRICT – AT A GLANCE…………

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Fire Chief Michael Schofield I am humbled and honored to serve as the Fire Chief/Administrator of the Orland Fire Protection District. I have a unique insight in the District having been a member since 1977, when I started my career as a cadet firefighter in 1977 and working my way through the ranks to where I am today. This has afforded me the opportunity of working under every Fire Chief in the history of the District (with myself being the 10th). Prior to the formation of the Fire District, there was a Village of Orland Park Fire Department dating back to the 1890’s and we were able to find the names of the Fire Chiefs going back to 1930’s. Since 1969, when the District was formed, we hit the ground running, designing and building a state-of-the-art fire station and moving into it in 1974, becoming one of the first Fire Districts to have Paramedics, then one of the first in the District’s area to have full-time Firefighter/Paramedics. The District’s Firsts continued: the regions first Training Center, the areas first Water Rescue team, the first Tactical Rescue Team, the first Hazardous Materials team and so on. We will continue this tradition of always looking ahead, leading the way, providing the best Emergency Fire, Rescue and EMS Services possible and always improving. The Orland Fire District’s leadership, starting with the Board of Trustees, have made it clear that we serve the changing needs of the District and do it by being proactively-prepared, not reactive. We have gone from a farming/rural community with a population around 6,000 people to a major commercial/medical destination with a District population of close to 70,000 swelling to 150,000 during business hours. Through preparation and training, we maintain the District’s level of service. If you are having a medical emergency, a fire, become trapped or injured because of a natural event such as a tornado or a flood, pinned in a car from an accident, involved in a construction accident 100 feet in the air or 100 feet below grade, we are trained and prepared. Orland Fire, just like every other Fire Department, like to think they are providing the service they claim, and they are doing it well. We have members in key positions developing curriculum at the state level regarding firefighter and fire officer training and certification. The same is true with specialty team training and certifications. The question is how this is translated to the rank and file of the District and what effect does it have on what we claim and what we truly do. Through the Community Risk Assessment-Standards of Cover, the Strategic Plan, and the Fire and Emergency Services Self-Assessment Manual, we will reset where needed, we will build on the District’s strengths, we will learn from the District’s weaknesses, and set plans and policies to meet those shortcomings. We will embrace opportunities and meet threats with planning and preparation. In 2016, I was appointed Fire Chief. We were short Administrative and Operations Chiefs on days, but before filling these positions we needed to define the roles, needs, and direction of the Fire District. This process and the incredible work presented by the Accreditation Team has provided the groundwork necessary to move forward. The Conclusions and Recommendations presented in this report will now become the groundwork of the District’s new Command Team to investigate, create timelines and benchmarks and implement as soon as possible. While some of the Conclusion and Recommendations are not new, they are now fact and analysis based with input from all. If not addressed, they can stop the Fire District’s forward progress and force us to become a reactive organization instead of being proactively-prepared for the needs of the residents, which is not the direction giving to us by the District’s Board of Trustees.

Michael Schofield

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Table of Contents SECTION 1 – AREA CHARACTERISTICS.......................................................................................................... 9 District History

11

Leadership / Divisions

17

Timeline

18

Milestones

20

Legal / Financial

27

Geography

30

Topography

30

Climate

31

Population

32

Demographics

33

Schools

36

Transportation

39

Water Distribution

42

Area Development

43

SECTION 2 – PROGRAMS and SERVICES .................................................................................................... 47 Service Delivery Programs

47

Administrative Support

48

Community Risk Reduction

51

Dispatch / Communications

57

Fleet and Facilities

58

EMS – Emergency Medical Services

62

Fire Suppression

65

M.A.B.A.S. Mutual Aid Box Alarm System

66

Hazardous Materials

71

Rescue – Special Operations

72

Training

74

Response Area

78

Planning Zones

80

SECTION 3 – COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT .......................................................................................... 81 All Hazard Community Risk

89

Risk Identification and Clarification

91

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Fire Risk

102

EMS – Emergency Medical Service Risk

113

Hazardous Materials Risk

117

Rescue Risk

120

Disaster Risk

122

Service Risk

128

Categorizations and Conclusions

130

SECTION 4 – DEPLOYMENT and PERFORMANCE ..................................................................................... 131 Incident Response Measures

133

Service Demand

135

Current Deployment and Performance

185

Performance Goals and Objectives

189

Service Area Performance

190

Historic Performance Charts

208

Current Deployment Response Plan

213

Current Deployment Strategies

211

Resiliency

216

Additional Resources Available

217

Planned Special Events

221

Large-Scale or Unplanned Emergencies

221

Consideration of Time as a Factor / Conclusions

221

SECTION 5 – PLAN FOR MAINTAINING and IMPROVING PERFORMANCE ............................................. 221 Maintaining and Improving Performance

223

Compliance Methodology

224

Monitor

220

Evaluate

221

Identify and Modify

222

Approve and Share

222

SECTION 6 – CONCLUSIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS .......................................................................... 229 Conclusions / Recommendations

229

APPENDIX – .............................................................................................................................................. 230

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INTRODUCTION The Orland Fire Protection District has conducted a Community Risk Assessment and Standards of Cover (CRA-SOC) for the District we serve. The primary purpose of these documents is two-fold: 1) Identify and assess risks specific to the District’s citizens, visitors, and businesses that the District protects. 2) Allocate an efficient, effective deployment distribution and concentration of resources to appropriately respond to meet the District’s mission of “protecting life and property”. The basis of a Standard of Coverage document is to prove: 

A tool o o o o o o o

To assess community hazard risks: both fire and non-fire. That defines baseline emergency response performance standards. For determining apparatus and staffing patterns. For planning for future station locations. For evaluating workload and ideal unit utilization. For measuring service delivery performance. That supports strategic planning and policy development relative to resources and allocation of funds.

This analysis is part of the District’s continuous driven improvement process and is divided into 4 parts:

AREA CHARACTERISTICS

PROGRAMS and SERVICES

COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT

DEPLOYMENT and PERFORMANCE

Once the CRA analysis was complete, the District established a Standards of Cover (SOC) which includes Performance Objectives and Measures identified in these two parts:

PLAN FOR MAINTAINING and IMPROVING PERFORMANCE

CONCLUSIONS and RECOMMMENDATIONS

In addition to developing a Fire and Emergency Service Self-Assessment Manual (FESSAM), containing 10 categories with up to 252 performance indicators, the CRA-SOC and the STRATEGIC PLAN are the three documents required to achieve Accreditation status from the CPSE – Center for Public Safety Excellence of which the District is striving to achieve in the fall of 2018.

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SECTION 1 – AREA CHARACTERISTICS

 DISTRICT HISTORY  LEADERSHIP and DIVISIONS  TIMELINE  MILESTONES  LEGAL and FINANCIAL  GEOGRAPHY  TOPOGRAPHY  CLIMATE  POPULATION  DEMOGRAPHICS  SCHOOLS  TRANSPORTATION  WATER DISTRIBUTION  AREA DEVELOPMENT

AREA CHARACTERISTICS

An overview of the history, formation, oversight, and synopsis of the District’s jurisdictional profile

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DISTRICT HISTORY While the exact date of organized fire protection in the Orland area (incorporated in 1892) is uncertain, the earliest indications of a fire department include a volunteer fire department flag with the year 1894 sewn on, as well as a photo of uniformed members standing in front of a two-story building on Beacon Avenue with State Senator John Humphrey. Although some measure of fire protection must have existed before that, perhaps as bucket brigades, no records exist.

1894

This early Volunteer Department consisted of a four-man, hand-pulled pumping engine, a hose cart with 500 feet of hose and 14 members. They used the wood-frame building on Beacon Avenue, which doubled as a Village Hall and Firehouse, to store their equipment. The six-block farming community was guaranteed a good water supply thanks to a wooden water system and elevated water tower erected in 1892. Established

The Orland area’s first major fires occurred in November 1912 when a small settlement known as Alpine, located near 167th Street and 108th Avenue, called for help. The volunteers hauled their equipment over nearly two miles of wagon-rutted roads only to arrive too late. Two saloons and the only general store burned to the ground, thus dooming the future of that town since the buildings were never rebuilt. In 1914, Peter J. Pitts was named Fire Marshal. His duties, besides overseeing the volunteers, included cleaning the village water tank for a fee of $5. The Fire Department’s budget for the year was $100. The 25-member fire department survived on a small stipend from the village and various fundraisers. In 1923, the Village of Orland Park enacted a Foreign Fire Tax to capture revenues from insurance companies (which would help fund the growing Fire Department), purchased another hose cart and fire hose and approved 23 fire hydrants for the town. The first motorized vehicle would not be purchased for another six years. Under the direction of Chief Carl Quigley, the Department purchased a 1929 Chevrolet chemical engine from the Prospect Fire Company for $3,500. Donations from area farmers helped finance the deal. Those farmers who refused to donate were billed for later service should they need it. The new engine, which served both the town and rural areas, came equipped with a front-mount pump, two forty-gallon water tanks, a tank of bicarbonate of soda and small bottles of sulfuric acid. In town, the engine would hook up to fire hydrants (bypassing the pump) and in rural areas, the soda and acid were combined to create gas that would propel water through the booster line. The village appointed the fire marshals up until 1930 when

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the volunteers could elect the next Fire Chief. John Helenhouse, the town barber, police constable, and volunteer Firefighter, served as Chief for the next eleven years. One of the rare calls for mutual aid from the City of Chicago came from the famous stockyards fire in 1931. While there, the Orland Park Firefighters teamed up with a Blue Island fire company to fight an apartment building fire. Arthur Granat Sr., the seminal figure who would later serve 29 years as Fire Chief and the longest tenure of any Orland Fire Chief, joined the volunteer ranks in 1946. Elected Fire Chief in 1957, Granat, Sr. led the department as it transitioned from a predominantly rural service to a more suburban-oriented one. In 1969, he was instrumental in forming the Orland Fire Protection District after voters approved a referendum the previous year. Chief Granat became the first full-time employee of the District in 1973 and was later honored with the dedication of the Orland Fire Protection District Training Facility in his name. Robert M. Buhs, appointed Fire Chief/Administrator in 1988, oversaw the transition of a small organization to a modern professional Fire/Rescue operation growing the District from two stations to five, thanks largely to an overwhelming voter approved $8 million referendum passed in late 1987. That year, the total number of full-time Firefighters stood at 26 and the District appropriated budget $8.7 million responding to 3,568 calls annually. In 1989, the first group of 21 candidates from the outside were tested and hired. The District originally covered roughly 30 square miles, including the Villages of Orland Park, Westhaven (now Orland Hills) and unincorporated Orland Township. Another three-square mile was added in 1990 when the subdivisions of Brook Hills, Eagle Ridge and Mallard Landing annexed into the District and a sixth Fire Station was constructed.

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INCIDENTS 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

1971 1976 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001 2006 2011 2016 2021

Today, the Orland Fire Protection District continues to provide innovative and cutting-edge service to the residents and visitors to the area. In 2017, the District is a multifunction fire protection and life-safety organization with over 119 suppression personnel backed up by 36 support staff and covers approximately 30 square miles. The District serves a population more than 70,000 operating from six stations, a regional training campus, a maintenance facility, and an administration headquarters/regional dispatch center responding to nearly 10,000 incidents per year with an operating budget of $34.1 million.

A line of duty death for the Orland Fire Protection District occurred in 1998. Battalion Chief William Bonnar, Sr. joined the District in 1972 as a volunteer and went on to become an EMT, then enrolled in the first Paramedic program at Ingalls Hospital, in Harvey, IL. Chief Bonnar, Sr. joined the Chicago Fire Department in 1974 as a Paramedic. In 1977, Chief Bonnar left Chicago to become one of the first full-time Firefighter/Paramedics for the District. In 1980, before becoming a Chief, he helped organize the Firefighters to create the IAFF Local 2754 union and served as the first union president. Over the next decade Chief Bonnar was promoted several times from Lieutenant to Shift Commander and finally to Battalion Chief in 1990. On February 2, 1998, Chief Bonnar, Sr. was found unresponsive in his vehicle after participating in an annual air consumption drill. Fellow Orland Firefighter/Paramedics attempted resuscitation and the Chief was transported to the hospital where he passed away at the age of 62 after serving 26 years in the fire service. In 1999 the Technical Rescue Team responded to the Bourbonnais Amtrak train crash. On March 15, a semi- truck loaded with steel went around the warning gates and collided with the City of New Orleans passenger train. The collision caused both locomotives and 11 out of the 14 cars to derail. Many of the passengers were trapped in the cars and had to be extricated from the debris field. The crash killed 11 people and caused 122 injuries. Thanks again to the support of the community in 2002, Orland Fire was able to pass a referendum to add a Rescue Tax (.05%) With this growth over the few years, staff was added, the Engineer rank was established, facilities and equipment were upgraded, and Orland Fire became a center for training, especially in Technical Rescue and HazMat, for the south Chicagoland area and beyond.

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In 2005, Hurricane Katrina descended on Louisiana and the surrounding states. Local providers were quickly overwhelmed and immediately called for help. This was the largest national call for and deployment of mutual aid in the history of the fire service at that time. Orland Fire sent equipment and three Firefighters along with 950 other First Responders from Illinois. These responders spent six weeks in Louisiana assisting local departments with water rescues, building collapse operations, rebuilding of firehouses and other duties. 2010 saw the opening of the Blue Card Training Center at the new Command Training Center or CTC. This CTC was the first in the State of Illinois and one of a dozen or so across the country as a new facility that allowed for formalization and expanded training opportunities. The Blue Card program is an Incident Command certification training program that teaches officers how to standardize local company operations at incidents across their organization (and other mutual aid partners) to create a safer, more efficient Hazard Zone Management. Blue Card was developed by the late Chief Alan Brunacini of the Phoenix Fire Department and then adopted by Orland Fire in 2009. The Blue Card program is now a cornerstone of the training provided by the Training Department, and so far, has trained and certified over 1,000 Incident Commanders from around the State and Country. Another Line of Duty Death (LODD) occurred in 2009. Raymond C. Marquardt started as a volunteer and worked as a boat mechanic until being hired as a full-time Firefighter in 1977. He was promoted to lieutenant in 1981 and remained a dedicated Firefighter until his retirement in 1999. Lt Marquardt succumbed to a duty-related illness.

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The most recent major response for aid by Orland Fire was in 2015, after an EF3 tornado struck Coal City, IL. The tornado caused damage to almost 900 buildings, including their fire station. Orland Fire along with thirty other communities, sent technical rescuer team members to help search and rescue/recover victims trapped in collapsed buildings.

In 2017, the District answered nearly 10,000 calls (9,847) which is an increase of over 46% since 2000 and 23.8% since 2010. The District protects the Village of Orland Park, the Village of Orland Hills and unincorporated Orland Township. The resident population is approximately 70,000+, which can swell to well over 150,000 during the day.

INCIDENTS

12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000

2019

2015

2011

2007

2003

1999

1995

1991

1987

1983

1979

1975

1971

0

Today, Orland Fire is predominantly residential with a large retail base. Residential occupancies range from small ranches to some that are more than twenty thousand square ft.! The District still has rural/agricultural pockets within the area along with forest preserves, manufacturing complexes, office buildings and major transportation corridors. I-80 defines the southern border and major state highways run through the District. The District achieved ISO Class 1 in 2017 and is working towards Fire Service Accreditation. The District answers calls for EMS, structure and other type fires, auto accidents/extrication, hazardous materials, water rescue, high angle rescue, trench rescue and structural collapse and has maintained an average median response time of 3 min. and 48 sec. and responds to 90% of emergency incidents in less than 6 min. and 20 sec. The District protects the largest shopping mall in the Chicago southland (Orland Square Mall and Orland Park Place draw shoppers from the entire southwest Chicago region and beyond), in addition to national manufacturing companies, hotels and the hub for commercial activity and development driving growth in COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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the area. The LaGrange Rd corridor is the main traffic thoroughfare moving 70,000+ vehicles per day. These roads carry a growing population to 2 specialty hospitals, 28 schools, 1 University, 1 College, 57 big box and large retailers, many government offices (IRS, FBI, Social Security and 2 USPS facilities). Along with telecommunications switching stations, internet and cyber facilities, there are numerous hightension power lines, switching stations and many underground pipelines in the District. As one of the largest Districts in Illinois and the best-trained department in the southwest suburbs, the District provides the expertise, personnel, and training to specialized mutual aid teams. This, in addition to training in firefighting and emergency medical services. This has standardized the training for local MABAS division to ensure consistency of operation throughout the response area. As a major participant in local and state technician-trained specialty teams, the District is relied on by many communities to provide personnel and equipment to the affected areas. The District covers other communities in nearby MABAS Divisions that have less resources or under-trained personnel to mitigate situations in all disciplines, especially Special Operations. Many communities rely on the District’s mutual aid to provide the resources for rescue type incidents experienced during natural disasters or domestic terrorism.

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LEADERSHIP and DIVISIONS

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TIMELINE FIRE CHIEFS: (1914-30)

Peter Pitts (Fire Marshall – first recorded Fire Official)

(1930-42)

John Helenhouse

(1942-49)

George Steinhagen

(1949-51)

Melvin Doogan

(1951-53)

Bill Young

(1953-57)

Paul Voss

(1957-88)

Art Granat, Sr* (First full-time ’74)

(1988-97)

Bob Buhs

(1997-99)

John “Mac” McCastland

(1999-2003)

Bob Buhs

(2003-04)

Dan Wysocki (Acting)

(2004-07)

Donald Bettenhausen

(2007-11)

Bryant Krizik

(2011-12)

Ray Kay (Acting)

(2012-15)

Ken Brucki

(2015-Present)

Michael Schofield

STATION OPENINGS:  1974 – Station 1 (New replacement from Beacon)  1980 – Station 2  1986 – Training Tower  1989 – Station 3/Maintenance Facility  1989 – Station 4  1989 – Station 5  1992 – Station 6  2010 – Training Center/CTC MAJOR REFERENDUMS: 1987 – $8,000,000 bond approved via referendum (73% margin) 2002 – Rescue tax – referendum approved (.05) 2006 - $8,000,000 bond [voted to fund previous bond again] 2012 - $26,715,000 Pension bond funded 100% to fund pension obligations

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SWORN PERSONNEL HIRED/DEPARTED THROUGH THE YEARS

TOTAL YEAR HIRED DEPARTED SWORN CHIEFS CALLS 1974 1 1 598 1

1976 1

2

1977 7

9

1978

9

1979 1

10

1980 7

17

2

1981 4

21

2

1982

21

2

1983

21

2

1984

21

2

1985

21

2

1986 4

-1

24

2

1987 3

-1

26

2

1988 5

31

2

1989 21

52

5

1990 3

55

5

1991 3

58

5

1992 12

70

5

1993 10

80

6

1994 5

-2

83

6

1995 9

-1

91

6

1996 17

-2

106

5

1997 14

-1

119

5

1998 2

-4

117

7

1999

-1

116

6

2000

116

7

2001

116

6

2002

-3

113

6

2003

-1

112

6

2004 1

-4

109

7

2005

-1

108

7

2006 10

-3

115

7

2007 10

-5

120

5

120

8

2008 2009

-2

118

6

2010

-1

117

7

2011

-5

112

5

2012 12

-4

120

6

2013

-1

119

6

2014 10

-18

111

6

119

5

2015 8 2016

-3

116

5

2017 6

-3

119

4

2018 9

-7

121

3

615 915 1,073 1,213 1,317 1,386 1,443 1,527 1,667 1,994 2,100 2,450 2,955 3,568 3,585 3,458 3,751 4,272 4,959 5,141 5,308 5,880 5,928 6,154 6,704 6,799 6,895 7,168 7,615 7,739 8,046 8,311 8,388 8,282 7,967 8,036 8,115 8,393 8,499 9,116 9,263 9,960 9,847 10,000

SWORN: HIRES/DEPARTURES/TOTALS 140

25 HIRED

21 1997, 119

120

DEPARTED

120

121

120

20

17

118

TOTAL SWORN

115

100

116

112

14

108

106

12 10

15

111

12 10 10

10

9

10

9 8

7

7 6

80

5 4

SWORN TOTAL

1975

5

5

4 3

3 3 2

1

1

1

60

0

70 -1 -1

55 52

58

-1 -2

-1

-1

-1

-1

-1

-2

-1

-2

-3 -4

-3

-3 -3

-4

-4 -5

-5

-5

40

-7

-10 31 24

20

26

21

-15

17 9 10

1

0

2

-18

-20

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MILESTONES  1894 Earliest record of Orland Fire Department  1897 Sanborn Fire Insurance Map shows 14 volunteer firemen had a hand pump engine, hose cart, and 500’ of hose and operated out of the Village Hall/Firehouse on Beacon St.  1912 First known major fire – flames destroy 2 saloons and general store in Alpine, a settlement at 167th St. and 108th Ave.  1914 First known Fire Official - Fire Marshall Peter Pitts  1915 First record showing Fire Department receiving appropriation from Village - $100  1919 Village purchases 30’ Extension Ladder for Fire Department  1923 Village passes ordinance to begin conversion of wooden water mains to cast iron and installation of 23 fire hydrants  1930 First Engine Purchased  1934 Village begins charging Palos Park $150 for “stand by” coverage  1937 Volunteers begin to receive $1.00 per call  1940 Village appropriates $3500.00 for purchase of first modern pumper, a 1940 Ford  1941 Chief John Helenhouse informs Village Board that Fire Department is no longer a Village Department; thus, begins the infamous “Fire Truck Squabble” which received coverage from Chicago Newspapers. Helenhouse claimed the pumper was owned by the volunteers and not the village  1941-1945 During WWII, volunteers organized air raid and blackout drills

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 1943 Village enacts ordinance to create a “Volunteer Fire Department of Orland Park”  1947 Formation of Fire Department Women’s Auxiliary  1957 Volunteers elect Art Granat, Sr. as Fire Chief, beginning a 29-year tenure (longest served)  1960 New Station constructed at 14415 Beacon Ave by Volunteers  1966 First Ambulance purchased (donated $16,000 by saved child’s father)  1969 Orland Fire Protection District formation by referendum  1970 Became a member of the Illinois Association of Fire Protection Districts Purchase of American LaFrance 1500 Gallon Truck  1972 Melrose Fireworks factory explosion (10/06)  1973 Arthur Granat Sr appointed First Full-Time FIRE CHIEF Membership in the Illinois Fire Chief’s Association approved Purchase of American LaFrance 750 Gallon Engine  1974 New Station built/relocated from old – Station #1 [9790 W. 151st Street]

 1976 FIRST Full-Time Firefighters hired (3) New Aerial American LaFrance (100’) “High Pride”  1980 IAFF Local 2754 Orland Professional Firefighters started Deputy Chief and 7 Lieutenants promoted to first Full-Time Positions  1981 Westhaven annexation by referendum. Later became Orland Hills  1983 Fire/Arson Team Agreement w/Village of Orland Park  1984 ISO Rating improved to Class 5 (7 rural)

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 1985 $250,000 plus one-half of land cost donated by Andrew Corporation for construction of Regional Fire Training Facility  1986 Regional Fire Training Facility Construction ($400,000 grant)  1987 $8 Million referendum passed (build 3 additional Stations and Maintenance Facility) FIRST COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AGREEMENT – IAFF LOCAL 2754 FIRST Board of Fire Commissioners appointed  1988 FIRE CHIEF Bob Buhs appointed Opticom traffic system in operation throughout District Maintenance (Shops), Training Facilities opened 3 Lieutenants appointed to Shift Commander South West Hazardous Materials Team (SWHMT) in operation Intergovernmental Agreement with the Village of Orland Hills  1989 Vote passed for election of Trustees vs. Appointed Trustees (Yes-2957; No-590)  1990 P.O.C. (Paid on Call) Roster raised to 40 ISO Rating improved to Class 4 Fire District Grows to 30 Square Miles – Brook Hills/Eagle Ridge areas annexation  1991 FIRST 5 Elected Trustees take office Administration/Communication Building Opened behind Station #1 DISPATCH Center opened Remodeled Station #1 State of Illinois – Best Fire Prevention Program Award  1992 Fire Dispatch Operations begin, 4 Full-Time Dispatchers Hired Received IFSA Award for best Fire Prevention Program in the State Fire Station 6 opened  1993 ISO Rating Improved to Class 2 Deputy Administrator hired 5% TAX CAP proposed to take effect July 1st

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 1994 The District celebrates 100 years of Fire Protection in Orland area and 25th Anniversary of Formation End of POC program 1st Place IFSA Fire Prevention Award for Class 2 Departments MABAS 19 formed  1995 Strategic Plan complete Safety Trailer purchased with Grant EMS Coordinator assigned to days CART donated Tractor/Trailer Unit (6095) in service  1996 Require New Firefighter Personnel to hold EMT-P Certification Fire Prevention authorized to hire 1 Full-Time Employee for the Bureau EMS Director Appointed Station #2 remodeled 2 CAIRNS IRIS purchased (First generation of Thermal Imagers) Great Flood of July takes place Winner GOFA (Government Officers Finance Award) Winner NFPA Learn Not to Burn Program  1997 94 Full-Time Firefighters now hired since 1989  1998 LODD Battalion Chief Bonnar, Sr. (2/2/98)  1999 The District Responds to Amtrak Train Derailment in Bourbonnais – 3/19/99 All Front-Line Fire Apparatus become ALS equipped  2000 Rank of Engineer Established – 30 Promoted Restructured Organization – 2 Battalion Chiefs moved to days Dive Team purchases new boat, trailer, and motor  2002 Trustee Margaret Schofield passed away District received 2001 Life Safety Award Rescue Tax Approved at General Election – Not to exceed .05% of value of taxable property  2003 Federal Grant – Standardize MABAS RIT training (1,000 persons trained across 3 MABAS Divisions) and repairs @ Training Facility Pension Fund Settlement/Agreement – District funds additional $2,010,000 MVCC Institutional Agreement of Affiliation for FOI and FOII certification at the District – allows two students at no cost to District Administration Building named after Joseph Barbaro (22 years of service as Trustee)

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 2004 Intergovernmental Agreement with Cook County 911 $50,000 Grant from 2004 Assistance to Firefighters Grant - Apparatus – Funding is 70% of the entire $500,000 grant  2005 Twins delivered in parking lot Donated District vehicles to Bogalusa Mississippi FD $25,000 received from Illinois First Grant – used at Training Facility Major flooding incident occurred inside Orland Square Mall due to water main break– mitigated by the District - very high $ loss Hurricane Katrina Deployment Assist Chicago – EMS - train derailment Minimum manning raised from 21 to 26 AFG/DHS Grant for Quint Truck Purchase - $310,000  2006 Humanitarian Medals awarded to BC Krizik, Lt. Madden, and Eng. Schloegel – Katrina deployment Participation in Western Illinois Internship Program Purchased Computer-Aided Dispatch (CAD) and Record Management Systems (RMS) $500,000 IBEW Local 134 Tele-Communicators Labor Agreement Purchase six Zoll monitors w/12 lead cardio monitors IPRF Grant Money for safety equipment - $45,000 Referendum approved in November for $8,000,000 – re-issue fire protection bonds by the voters (Apparatus – 3 Engines, 1 Tower Ladder, 2 Ambulances, Training Building/future station, HQ addition, facilities, communication upgrades, and potential land acquisition IMPLEMENTATION OF 10 DEDICATED ALS COMPANIES (4 Engines, 2 Trucks, 4 Ambulances) from previous JUMP COMPANY responses.  2007 VEBA established District’s 30th EMS Anniversary Fatal (1) car vs school bus accident – 2-11 EMS Box Assist Chicago – EMS – Marathon heat emergencies  2008 First Citizen Fire Academy and Fire Station neighborhood BBQ programs started Radio alert fire alarms started – notable call reduction identified Cadet program started  2009 Training Center opened - built from referendum funds (10728 W. 163rd Pl) Blue Card Command Program started IPRF Grant - $ 67,700 for building of the Command Training Center (CTC) Motorola Grant – 15 Portable and Mobile Radios for CTC (~$50,000)

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 

 

Surface supplied Air System purchased/in-service for Dive Team 5th Ambulance put in service Minimum manning increased to 28 “Service 1” Company staffed peak period (manning increased soft 30 minimum– 1-year trial LODD – Lt. Ray Marquardt 2010 IPRF Grant - $ 84,250 for building of the Command Training Center (CTC) Illinois Department of Commerce Grant – Training Facility $56,250 Opening of Command Training Center (CTC) – 1st in the State of Illinois (< dozen in country) Approval of Target Safety online training platform for Fire/EMS records management system Construction started on New Headquarters – combining/remodeling of Station #1 & Admin 2011 Approval of proclamations to the District Firefighters Local 2754 and Orland Central Dispatch Local 134 for their extraordinary work during blizzard Illinois Public Risk Fund Grants $65,100 for Opticom Purchases $12,486 for Blue Card Training $150,000 in simulators funding and opening of EMS Sim-Lab at Training Center Assistance to Firefighter Grant (AFG) of $302,400 for the Officer-in-Training for Excellence Program training 450 officers from 45 surrounding departments in Blue Card Incident Command New Headquarters opened (Admin/Station #1) major remodel project 1 Battalion Chief, and 1 Deputy Chief Positions eliminated Suspension of hiring for 11 proposed Firefighters, numerous personnel changes 2013 $20,000 Grant Awarded by Firehouse Subs 2014 Silver Award presented by the American Heart Association for save rate of STEMI patients 2 new Engines in service Station #5 major remodel Lt. Peter Vassios receives the Award of Valor for rescue of citizen from house fire Firefighter Wes Peak passes away while reporting for shift 2015 Orland CART Team responds to Coal City EF3 Tornado 2016 Retired Firefighter Donnie Piscitello passes away Command Vehicle donated to Robbins Fire Department The District has a 47% VF save rate and a 4-year VF save rate of 39.8%

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 2017 The District receives ISO Class 1 Rating The District has a 65% VF save rate Agreement with Cook County DHS and University of Illinois Training Funding (~ $1 million+ renewing) to host/teach for Rescue Task Force(RTF), Blue Card Command, Advanced Airway, Leadership Development and Decision Making (LDDM), IFSI Operations and Technician Level classes, more FEMA Motorola Radio Grant – 45 new portable radios for $ 278,182 Bleeding Control Kits (B-Con) Grant for all 19 schools Accreditation process started

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LEGAL and FINANCIAL BASIS

Orland Fire was established as a fire department in 1894 and passed via election and voter referendum to form a Fire Protection District in 1969. The District’s authority as a Fire Protection District is defined in 70 ILCS 705. The Orland Fire District’s main operating funds are the General, Ambulance, Tort, and Rescue Funds with an overall Budgeted Revenue for 2018 of $34,075,000 – 80.9% from property tax ($28,314,000). The Board of Trustees is the Orland Fire Protection District’s policy-making body that is responsible for providing financial oversight and strategic policy direction. It consists of five locally-elected officials, each of whom serves a six-year term. The Orland Fire Protection District’s Board of Fire Commissioners is a policy-making body appointed by the Board of Trustees. The Board of Fire Commissioners is responsible for regulating examinations for original appointments, examinations for promotions, and hearings on charges brought against members of the District. Each Commissioner serves a three-year term. The Orland Fire Protection District’s Finance Bureau consists of a Finance Director, an Assistant Finance Director, and an Accounting Assistant. The Bureau develops, disperses, and accounts for the budget of the Fire District. As a special taxing District, the revenue side of the budget is mainly received from property taxes. State Statutes (include 50/ILCS 330/3) define how revenue and disbursements are handled. The Board of Trustees adopts a budget ordinance after it has been publicly displayed and a public hearing has taken place. After the budget ordinance, the Board adopts a levy ordinance which provides Cook County information to utilize for the property tax cycle. The Finance Bureau has received the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) every year since 2008. The Budget Process is a collaborative process developing a financial plan for the following year. Annual budgets are adopted on a basis consistent with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, except that encumbrances are recorded as the equivalent of expenditures for budgetary basic purposes. It is also a reflection of the Strategic Plan.

PROPERTY TAXES Property tax helps to fund operations of all units of local government. Property tax is a major source of funding for police, utilities, fire departments and road maintenance. Federal and state law mandates some of the services provided by the local government. For instance, funding is set aside to finance special education, regulate against waste disposal and meet requirements for public safety standards. Property taxes represent 80.9% of the 2018 budgeted revenue. The District levies property taxes for the purposes of the following funds – Corporate, Tort, Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund, Pension, Ambulance, Audit, Rescue, and Social Security. The property tax levies are filed with the Cook County Clerk.

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The District has a diverse economic base; of the District’s Equalized Assessed Valuation (EAV): 68.4% is related to residential development, 30.6% is related to commercial development, and 1.0% is related to industrial development.

OTHER TAXES Other taxes include individual property replacement taxes and Foreign Fire Insurance. Replacement taxes are paid by businesses to replace revenue that was lost by local governments when they lost their power to impose individual property taxes on businesses in the 1970’s. Foreign Fire Insurance payments are made by every out-of-state insurance corporation for insurance premiums paid within the District. The Foreign Fire Insurance fund is managed by an independent Board of Trustees but is included in the District’s overall budget. Both individual property replacement taxes and Foreign Fire Insurance were estimated for the 2018 budget using trend analysis.

AMBULANCE and RESCUE FEES Ambulance and Rescue fees represent 8.9% of the 2018 budgeted revenue. The District bills non-residents and the insurance companies of residents for ambulance and rescue services. Charges for ambulance transport range from $1,250 to $1,450 for residents and from $1,350 to $1,500 for non-residents. The District accepts Medicare and Medicaid allowances. Charges for rescue services are based on statutory rates for non-residents. Fees were projected based on trend analysis for the 2018 budget. Fees are not assumed to increase in 2018 and payer mix (Private pay, Medicare, Medicaid, etc.) is assumed to remain stable.

DISPATCH and COMMUNICATION SERVICES REVENUE Dispatch and Communication services revenue includes revenue from dispatch services, tower space leases and alarm service and represents approximately 2.7% of the 2018 budgeted revenue. Currently, the District provides dispatching services for Blue Island, Calumet City, Country Club Hills, Lemont, and Oak Forest. The contracts for dispatching calls for other fire departments are structured so each department pays their fair share of dispatch costs. Dispatch service fees are budgeted based on estimated costs per call to the other fire departments. The District also provides alarm services for Tyco and leases tower space to several cell phone companies. Tower lease revenue is budgeted based on existing contracts. For the purposes of the 2018 budget, it is assumed the District will not receive any fees from Tyco in 2018.

FIRE PREVENTION FEES Fire Prevention fees include inspection, re-inspection and false alarm fees. Fees are projected based on trend analysis for the 2018 budget.

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GRANT REVENUE In August 2017, the District entered into a Sub-Grant Agreement in the amount of $695,680 with Cook County, Illinois to offer training programs that address high priority preparedness gaps across all core capabilities where a nexus to terrorism exists. Cook County receives the grant funding through Illinois Emergency Management Agency (IEMA) which originated from the United States Department of Homeland Security/Office of Domestic Preparedness (DHS). It is anticipated that this grant will receive another sub-grant in 2018 in the amount of $931,000. (District/Department comparable information is included in the Appendix.)

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GEOGRAPHY The District covers thirty square miles encompassing the bulk of the Village of Orland Park, the Village of Orland Hills, and some unincorporated areas of Orland Township. The District is in Northeastern Illinois and in Southwest Cook County and is approximately 25 miles southwest of Chicago. It is bordered by Palos Park to the north, Palos Heights and Oak Forest to the east, Tinley Park and Mokena to the south, and Homer Glen to the west. The area lies on a natural continental divide that separates the Mississippi river watershed and the Atlantic Ocean watershed. The area was formed by a glacier and is made up of rolling hills, grasslands, the wetlands, and many waterbodies. The water bodies include four large lakes, Lake Sedgewick and McGinnis Slough in Orland Park and Lake Ashburn and Lake Lorin in Orland Hills. There are also six tributary creek headwaters within the boundaries, Long Run Creek, Marley Creek, Midlothian Creek, Mill Creek, Spring Creek and Tinley Creek. Orland Park has over 600 acres of park space including sixty parks, one hundred and forty athletic fields and courts, thirty miles of trails, and three hundred acres of open space. The largest area of park space is Centennial Park. At 192 acres, Centennial Park has multiple athletic fields, an aquatic center, a boat launch for Lake Sedgewick, and a dog park. Orland Hills has 60 acres of park space. Adjacent to the District is also over fifteen thousand acres of Cook County Forest Preserve land and large lakes.

TOPOGRAPHY Mostly flat with a few rolling hills, Orlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elevation is listed as 686-706 ft. above sea level. In the Village of Orland Park, water represents .28 sq. miles (1.31%) and there are over 300 bodies of water in Orland.

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CLIMATE The Orland Area is classified as Humid Continental with hot summers and year-round precipitation on the Koppen climate classification system. Largely, it is a temperate climate that experiences all four seasons, including cold snowy winters, wet mild springs, hot humid summers, and mild falls. The area can see a wide range of temperatures and weather events. The overall average temperature is 59 degrees with an average high of 84 degrees in July and an average low of 16 degrees in January. The Highest recorded temperature was 107 degrees set in 1934, with the lowest recorded temperature of -25 degrees set in 1985. In July of 1995 the Orland and the surrounding Chicagoland area experienced the deadliest heat wave in history. Over a four-day span, the area had record setting temperatures of 106 degrees and high humidity, which combined to cause over 700 deaths in Chicagoland. Precipitation can also vary widely depending on the season. Overall the average total precipitation for the year is 39 inches. May and June, see the most rain, with both months averaging about 4 inches of rain. May is also the beginning of storm season. The bulk of the area’s thunderstorms occur in the warm season between May and October. June has the highest average of thunderstorms, with seven, followed by July and August with six each. June is also the month that most likely will experience a tornado or major wind disturbance. Though two thirds of tornadoes occur between the months of March and June, they can occur at any time with one of the earliest to occur in January of 2008 and the latest in November 2015. Flooding is the single most damaging weather threat for the area. Illinois has spent an average of 257 million annually on flood damage since 1983, which is the third highest in the country. In 1996, a record rainfall of 16.9 inches in Northern Illinois over a two-day period led to the flooding of a substantial portion of the Orland area and necessitated in the evacuation of 128 homes including 26 rescues.

Average

Degree F

TEMPERATURE

59

Overall

HIGH

84

July

LOW

16

January

RAIN

39”

MarDec

SNOW

31”

DecMar

RAIN DAYS

39

SUNNY DAYS

188

PRECIPITATION

Record

Degree F

TEMPERATURE HIGH

107

1934

LOW

-25

1985

RAIN

16.9

1996

SNOW

23”

1967

PRECIPITATION

In the winter, the Orland area can see up to 31 inches of snow. January has the highest average of snow fall of 12.6 inches. Blizzards, while not yearly are not uncommon either. The worst on record was the blizzard of 1967. Over a two-day span in January the area saw 23 inches of snow fall at a rate of almost two inches an hour. The latest blizzard which also combined with extreme low temperatures and high winds in 2011, dumped 19 inches of snow onto Orland. This combination led to power outages and school and business closures for three days after the blizzard. Along with snowfall, winters can also bring sleet, hail, and ice storms. These weather conditions can lead to any number of emergencies including, traffic accidents, street closures, power outages, and a marked increase in medical calls.

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POPULATION Orland Township encompasses 36.9 miles and covers areas in Orland Park, Orland Hills, Tinley Park and various parcels of unincorporated areas throughout the township boundaries. The Orland Fire Protection District covers 30sq. miles of the township and protects approximately 75% of the population. The remaining areas and population are protected by the Tinley Park Fire Department. According to estimated Census data, Orland Park has a population in 2017 of 57,913, and ranks #21 in Illinois. Orland Hills has a population of 7,268 and ranks #284 in the state for population but ranks #21 in the state for population density. Orland Township has 5,300 residents who are unincorporated, and Orland Fire protects the majority of those residents, approximately 5,100. Therefore, the combined total is 70,281 residents. POPULATION DENSITY: ORLAND HILLS 6,274.24/sq. mi ORLAND PARK 2,677.49/sq. mi

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ORLAND PARK* DEMOGRAPHICS

47%

53%

45.6

Male

Female

Median age

$81,453

58%

Median Household Income

Married

Orland Park Demograhics

$271,800 Median Housing Value

ASIAN 5%

OTHER 3%

HISPANIC 6%

BLACK 1% WHITE 90%

40.8% 93.9%

Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree or Higher

High School Graduate or Higher

77% 13.5%

Speak English Only

Foreign Born

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DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES 2010-2016

2016

34

Age Group ALL Population

TOTAL POPULATION CHANGE from 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2016

Age Group <5 Population

AGE GROUP < 5 POPULATION CHANGE from 2010 - 2016

Age Group > 65 Population

AGE GROUP > 65 POPULATION CHANGE from 2010 - 2016 These graphics show the changing and shifting demographics in the Fire District. When we lay the incident history over these maps it confirms the increased call volumes in the elderly and other at-risk populations.

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To project calls for service within the District, it is necessary to define the relationship of population to calls for service that are generated. A correlation can be established. This means that more people will mean more calls for service. Population has a direct correlation to risk. The District has a correlation rate of .1426 calls for service in relationship to population served. This means that 85.74 % of the variation in calls for service may be explained by the changes in the population. High density population areas increase the risk associated with that service area. The more people in a service area, the more incidents are generated. Density is increasing in Orland, as recent developments include clusters of multi-family units in 5-6 story arrangements or “attached dwelling” row house/townhouse complexes appear to be the Village of Orland Park’s plan for future development in the remaining 15%+ open space. The overall population is a good indication of the number of calls for service that can be expected from the Fire District. The number of calls per capita (calls per year per resident) continues to increase. In 2000, the rate was .11752 per person or just under 12 calls per 100 residents. By 2017, this rate .15080 or 15 calls per 100 residents; an increase of 25% without the population increase. The overall calls for service increased by 46.29% in the same period. This combination of increased population and increased service demand per capita increases workload within the District dramatically.

YEAR

CALLS

1990 2000 2010 2016 2017

3,458 6,799 8,036 9,960 9,946

CALL INCREASE 73.42% 96.62% 18.19% 23.94%

POP. 41,230 57,856 63,916 66,046 70,000

POP INCREASE 59.63% 40.33% 10.47% 3.33%

CALLS/POP. 0.08387 0.11752 0.12573 0.15080 0.14209

CALLS/100 RESIDENTS 8.39 11.75 12.57 15.08

NOTE THE INCREASE IN CALLS PER RESIDENT:

8.3 CALLS PER RESIDENT IN 1990 15.08 CALLS PER RESIDENT IN 2016 NOTE: Population Increased 70% Call Volume Increased 288%!

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SCHOOLS The Orland Fire Protection District provides service and care to a total of 19 schools scattered throughout the District. With schools ranging from preschools to collegiate facilities, it is the goal of the District to provide a safe learning environment that encompasses fire and life safety to students and faculty. Activities such as Fire Drills, Adopt-A-Firefighter, and Public Education Events are vital to ensuring that the children of the community learn the concepts of Fire Safety while also establishing trust and rapport with the District’s Firefighters. Inspections of the schools are also a valuable tool the District uses to make sure the District’s schools remain as safe as can be. Pre-plans done by on-shift companies allow the District’s crews to have a better understanding of the layout, exits, and hazards, so that they are better prepared if an emergency does ensue. Inspections done by the District’s Fire Prevention Bureau help to oversee that fire codes are met and kept up to date with both existing structures and any new construction or remodeling. Sprinkler systems, fire extinguishers, exit paths/doors are all examples of safety features that the bureau makes sure to be in good working condition. Schools within the Orland Fire District are 100% sprinkled now (after retrofitting). The Orland area is serviced by three elementary Grade School Districts. o o o

SD 135 SD 146 SD 140

The largest of the three is the Orland School District 135.SD 135 has ten schools and serves 4,958 students ranging from Pre-K through eighth grade. Community Consolidated School District 146 and Kirby School District 140 also serve the Orland area, and each have only one school within the boundaries. The Kruse Education Center is part of SD 146, has 310 students in grades ranging from Kindergarten through fifth grade. Fernway Middle School is a part of SD 140, has 416 students in grades ranging from Kindergarten through fifth grade. High school education is provided by Consolidated District 230. SD 230 is made up of three high schools none of which are in the borders of Orland Fire. Orland Fire, however, does respond as auto/mutual aid for emergencies to two of the schools, Carl Sandburg High School and Andrew High School. Over five thousand Orland township residents attend these two schools. Both High Schools are just over the District’s borders. Private education is also an important aspect of the education system. There are three religious grade schools, St. Michael’s School in Orland Park, and Christian Hills and Cardinal Joseph Bernadine School in

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Orland Hills. Each school offers Pre-K through eighth grade. There are many other private schools in the boundaries. Most of the private schools of pre-K and Kindergarten education only and have anywhere from 40-175 students each. Orland Park has two University sites, Robert Morris University and St. Xavier University. Both sites are smaller secondary campuses. However only Robert Morris University is within the Orland Fire boundaries. St. Xavier is protected by the Mokena Fire Protection District with Orland Fire providing mutual aid response. The Orland Park campus of Robert Morris University houses the admissions office

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School District

Grades

Student Population

Centennial

135

K-3rd

464

Century Junior High

135

6 -8th

th

701

Fernway

140

K-5th

446

High Point

135

3rd-5th

513

Jerling Junior High

135

6th-8th

592

Kruse

146

K-5th

310

Liberty

135

3 -5th

rd

513

Meadow Ridge

135

3rd-5th

581

Orland Center

135

K-2nd

279

Orland Junior High

135

6 -8th

542

Orland Park Elementary

135

K-2nd

372

Prairie

135

K-3rd

461

Cardinal Bernadine

Pri va te

Pre-K -8th

621

Christian Hills

Pri va te

Pre-K -8th

198

KinderCare (John Humphrey)

Pri va te

Pre-K- K

86

KinderCare (Pinewood)

Pri va te

Pre-K –K

80

Mary Sears

Pri va te

Pre-K – K

125

Mi Sol Montessori

Pri va te

K-5th

36

Parkview Christian

Pri va te

Pre-K

24

Sandbox (1)

Pri va te

Pre-K- K

90

Sandbox (2)

Pri va te

Pre-K –K

39

St. Michael's

Pri va te

K-8th

670

School

th

for the entire university. The campus is also the main learning site for the University’s Culinary Arts program and many of its graduate programs. There is no on campus housing at this site. According to the Village of Orland Park, schools within the community present reading and math scores that are over 20% higher than the state average. There are also over a dozen religious assemblies throughout the District, many with preschool or other type classes during the week.

There are 3 Elementary Grade School Districts with 19 schools throughout the District. Two High Schools sit just on the North and South border.

7743

Students per School 0

100

200

300

400

500

600

700

800

Centennial High Point Liberty Orland Junior High Cardinal Bernadin KinderCare (Pinewood) Parkview Christian St. Micheal's

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TRANSPORTATION Two of the most significant infrastructure issues for the District are water and roads. Access to the scene of an emergency and water supply to fight fires are essential to providing service. In the developing areas, the District (through the Fire Prevention Bureau) expend a great deal of effort to insure the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s voices are heard to the Village Planning Departments (the AHJ) and that both are provided during construction and after occupancy. The street network is the backbone of an emergency response system. Orland Fire has more than 362 miles of surface streets. The network must be both efficient and effective to maximize emergency response. The best-case scenario is a network with direct routes and multiple points of entry. The District has a mix of good and bad areas with respect to overall traffic circulation, but the street network generally works well. Lack of efficient circulation within a community can have serious degradation of the ability of the District to provide an effective rapid response. An area of concern is the future build out of the undeveloped areas. Missing streets or one-way in configurations as well as smaller, restricted non-straight streets already adversely affect response. One area example is the Crystal Tree Golf Course subdivision that only has 1 way in off 143rd Street. This places the entire subdivision outside of the 4-minute travel area for both Station #3 and Station #1. Additionally, the brand-new reconstruction of LaGrange Rd (Rt. 45) has planted medians for the entire 6 miles stretch through the District, and now new construction on 159th St from LaGrange Rd to I-355 will be the same. Some traffic improvement options may reduce response times while others slow the negative impacts. Increased traffic decreases response performance and increases the potential for accidents. In some traffic situations, like roads with raised/planted center medians, units must wait for traffic to clear â&#x20AC;&#x201C; although the use of Emergency Vehicle Preemptive devices (Opticom) throughout the District has greatly improved this problem. Nearly 100% of signaled intersections in the District are controlled by Opticom systems.

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Increases in traffic can become a significant negative factor and the District sees a dramatic increase in November and December as Orland Park is a large retail destination with one of the remaining indoor shopping malls â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Orland Square.

The transportation network within the District is composed of roads, railways (Metra), and bus routes (Pace). Being located just 25 miles southwest of Chicago, Orland Park is close to several interstate highways. I-80 being the southern border of the town, is a busy interstate as it serves as the east-the west coast connector for the country. Other major highways that are close to the District and frequently used by its commuters are I-57 to the east and I-355 to the west. Traffic counts from 2013 show a daily volume of 38,000+ vehicles on LaGrange Rd (Major North/South throughway) and 34,000+ on 159th St (Major East/West throughway) for a combined total of 72,000+ vehicle crossing that intersection per day with an estimated increase by 2040 to nearly 100,000 vehicles per day. The Stevenson Expressway (I-55) is a quick 15 minutes north via LaGrange Road (U.S. Route 45), which is the

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main thoroughfare through the heart of Orland Park. The Veterans Memorial Tollway/I-355, completed in 2007, is accessible just west of Orland Park connecting to the western suburbs. This thoroughfare has opened new potential for the Village as a residential option for the many people employed in the suburbs along this corridor and as a travel destination for those looking for entertainment and activity options. Interstate 80 borders the southern end of Orland Park and provides connections to numerous roads and interstates. Orland Park has three stops on Metra's Southwest Service, which provides the weekday and weekend rail service between Manhattan, Illinois, and Chicago Union Station from: 143rd Street, 153rd Street, and 179th Street. As of January 29, 2017, the last time Metra revised the timetable, the Southwest Service has fifteen round-trips per day on weekdays and three on Saturday. There is no Sunday service. All Saturday trains run through to Manhattan. Of the weekday trains, one terminates at Orland Park 153rd Street, three at Manhattan, and the remainder at Orland Park 179th Street. There are 30 METRA passenger trains with 226 cars total traveling daily in/out of Chicago stopping at these 3 stops with an average of 220,000 riders per month. Freight train traffic has been reduced lately on this line due to new routing; however, there are still a number that travel through the District daily and that number is variable with no confirmation yet from the railway. Commuters looking for an alternative to driving board Metra Southwest Service trains at three stations in the area for a convenient trip to Chicago’s Loop. The Main Street Triangle District, a planned downtown development at 143rd Street along Southwest Highway and LaGrange Road, includes a new $3 million commuter train station and ample parking. Additional trains on the Rock Island Line are available at stops in nearby Tinley Park and Mokena. The improved Pace Suburban Bus Service operates three routes in Orland Park, one of which ends at the Midway Airport Station, where it connects with CTA Southwest Orange Line “L” trains to downtown Chicago. In addition, Pace works with the Village to offer Dial-a-Ride service for residents in Orland Park and Orland Hills. This service is especially useful for disabled riders and senior citizens. Commercial air transportation is readily available for travelers, as Orland Park is situated just 25 minutes from Chicago’s Midway International Airport and 40 minutes from O’Hare International Airport.

This Photo by

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WATER DISTRIBUTION A Fire District relies extensively on a reliable water supply to minimize the damage caused by fire. The outstanding water systems in the Orland Fire District are maintained and serviced from the Village of Orland Park and American Water for the Orland Hills and unincorporated Orland areas. There are 2 small pockets of no-hydrant areas. In 2017, ISO reviewed many categories within the Orland Fire Protection District, with water supply being one of them. ISO reports that forty percent of a community’s overall score is based on the adequacy of the water supply system. While scoring the District’s water supply systems, the ISO field representative evaluated: 

The capability of the water distribution system to meet the needed fire flows at selected locations up to 3500 gpm

Size, type, and installation of fire hydrants

Inspection and flow testing of fire hydrants

After ISO’s review, the District received an earned credit score of 37.78 out of 40. The break-down of the total is as follows: 

Credit for supply system –

29.97 out of 30

Credit for hydrants –

3 out of 3

Credit for inspection and flow testing – 5.51 out of 7 

37.78 out of 40

Total

There are over 5,386 fire hydrants within the District with water being supplied from Lake Michigan through the City of Chicago via Oak Lawn and then branching out to Orland Park. Water line pipes (miles):

Valves:

Meters:

ORLAND PARK:

355.3

4,242

24,008

AMERICAN WATER:

37

1,004

514

Production (mil gal/yr.): 2,002,106 MG/yr. 200 MG/yr. +

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AREA DEVELOPMENT Orland Park continues to be a growing Village in which people choose to live and work. The assessed valuation (EAV) for property within the District is $2.24

billion.

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Per the Village of Orland Park, it is estimated that currently the build out rate is near 85% with 15% of the land mass still vacant and able to be developed. Building permit history has increased exponentially since 2012. According to the Village of Orland Park website, Orland Park has over 11 million square feet of commercial development and boasts an effective trade area population of 848,000. A sample of Orland Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest Employers is listed on chart below. New Construction permits (2006-16) - $1.2 billion value EMPLOYER

TOTAL

ELITE AMBULANCE

714

CARSON PIRIE SCOTT

381

MACY'S & CO.

312

MARIANO'S

308

JC PENNY

272

PANDUIT CORP.

209

LIFE TIME FITNESS

200

SILVER LAKE COUNTRY CLUB

179

TARGET CORP.

178

ALDEN - OP REHAB & HEALTH CARE

170

Outside of Chicago, the Village of Orland Park ranks 5th in Illinois Retail Sales and receives approximately $30 million a year in sales tax dollars according to the 2014 Melaniphy Chicagoland Retails Sales Report. The District's land use patterns generally contribute to the development of an efficient fire resource deployment configuration which is currently in place with the current location of six strategically placed Fire Stations. Additionally, the District has a 7th facility that is currently part of the Training Campus on 163rd Pl that can quickly be turned into a manned Fire Station as the need develops.

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BUSINESSES Number Percent 0.20% 5 Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting 0.10% 2 Utilities 9.10% 227 Construction 2.50% 61 Manufacturing 3.80% 95 Wholesale Trade 19.50% 484 Retail Trade 1.30% 32 Motor Vehicle and Parts Dealers 1.80% 46 Furniture and Home Furnishings Stores 1.20% 29 Electronics and Appliance Stores 1.60% 41 Building Material and Garden Equipment and Supplies Dealers 1.30% 33 Food and Beverage Stores 1.70% 43 Health and Personal Care Stores 0.20% 6 Gasoline Stations 5.00% 125 Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores 1.40% 34 Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, and Music Stores 0.60% 14 General Merchandise Stores 3.20% 79 Miscellaneous Store Retailers 0.00% 1 Nonstore Retailers 2.30% 56 Transportation and Warehousing 1.60% 41 Information 7.90% 197 Finance and Insurance 3.00% 75 Insurance Carriers and Related Activities 4.10% 101 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 10.10% 252 Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services 0.10% 2 Management of Companies and Enterprises 4.00% 100 Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services 2.20% 55 Educational Services 10.20% 253 Health Care and Social Assistance 1.20% 31 Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 7.40% 183 Accommodation and Food Services 11.10% 276 Other Services (except Public Administration) 1.30% 32 Public Administration 1.40% 34 Unclassified Establishments 100.00% Totals 2,487 Orland Fire Protection District â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Total Businesses Distribution by Type

Orland Fire Protection District Business Distribution by Type It is evident from the business data provided above that the District protects a significant percentage of commercial and industrial businesses that support the local, state, and global economy. To explore a community's future risk, an assessment has been developed based on potential land use within its anticipated future boundaries. These potential uses are found in each Village's development plans and zoning designations. The zoning map translates land use (potential scale and type of development within geographic sub-areas) to categories of relative fire and life risk.

Other Growth Opportunities

MERGER and CONSOLIDATIONS The Orland Fire District has a few growth opportunities especially regarding consolidation and merger potential with some neighboring fire protection districts. This will entail much discussion and detailed cost/benefit ratio analysis. However, these type or arrangements, either functional or full consolidation merit a thorough review and deliberations as a cost-effective force multiplier reducing redundant expenses.

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SECTION 2 PROGRAMS and SERVICES

     

      

SERVICE DELIVERY PROGRAMS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION DISPATCH / COMMUNICAITONS FLEET and FACILITIES EMS – EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES FIRE SUPPRESION MABAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS RESCUE – SPECIAL OPERATIONS TRAINNG RESPONSE AREA PLANNING ZONES

PROGRAMS and SERVICES

An overview of the programs and services of the District to provide exemplary Emergency Response Services

2

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SERVICE DELIVERY PROGRAMS As part of the District mission – “protecting life and property while valuing full accountability to each other and the people the District serve”; the District is committed to providing preventative services aimed to stop or minimize dangers to the people served before they occur. Services other than Emergency “Operations” Response include Fire Prevention/Public Education (Community Risk Reduction), Dispatch/Communications, Fleet and Facilities Maintenance, Training, EMS, and Administrative Support are all critical and essential components of Emergency Service delivery program.

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ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT The District provides its own support and administrative services. Administration is responsible for the day to day management and support of the District as a whole. Headed by the Fire Chief, the Administration section provides policy direction, leadership and vision to the members, finance (including budgeting, accounts payable, and payroll) and plays a key role in securing the resources necessary to carry out the District’s Mission, Information Technology (I.T.), Human Resources (HR), labor relations and special projects are carried out in this division. Together, Admin oversees an annual operating budget of nearly $34 million and grants total.

FINANCE The Finance Division is responsible for all financial activities and financial functions of the District, including preparing the annual budget and property tax levy, paying employees, paying vendors, collecting revenue, investing funds, recording receipts, expenditures, and other financial transactions, and preparing financial reports.

Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting In 2017, the District received the Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting from the Government Finance Officers Association for the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report. This is the 8th consecutive year the District has received this prestigious award.

HUMAN RESOURCES Mission Statement “The Division of Human Resources is committed to cultivating and embracing the District’s superior serviceoriented culture by providing innovative and efficient talent solutions in the recruitment, development, and retention of exceptional and diverse talent for public service.”

The Division of Human Resources is committed to cultivating and embracing the District’s superior serviceoriented culture by providing innovative and efficient talent solutions in the recruitment, development, and retention of exceptional and diverse talent for public service. The Division of Human Resources (HR) provides services and support to the employees of the District in ways that embrace the district’s mission of devotion to duty and tradition of excellence. The Division of Human Resources is dedicated to support the District’s workforce of over 150+ employees by striving to provide best HR practices and objectives in leadership, legal compliance, labor negotiations, risk management, services and support as well as superior benefits that promote health, wellness, and a

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sound work/life balance to the employees of the Orland Fire Protection District. Human Resources provides programs and services designed to support the District and its employees in the achievement of the organizations mission and objectives. The Human Resources Division successfully launched multiple initiatives to promote an effective, efficient and equitable organization including expanding the District’s professional development curriculum to include increased eLearning opportunities, webcasts and online job aids to increase employee engagement in professional development. To help employees maximize health, Human Resources continues to offer annual health screenings, assessments and coaching to all Firefighters to provide early detection, a reduction of health issues, and to motivate employees toward living healthier lifestyles. In all areas of work, the Division of Human Resources firmly upholds the tenets of confidentiality, accountability, and trust. The HR Division remains dedicated to the District’s responsive and progressive organization and strives to maintain a culture of service excellence through effective training, technology and adapting to the changing needs of the community we serve.

COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION FIRE PREVENTION BUREAU Mission Statement It is the mission of the Fire Prevention Bureau (FPB) to educate the community about the benefits of proper safety practices and to identify and eliminate hazardous conditions which pose a threat to life, property and the environment. The Fire Prevention Bureau protects people by eliminating potential emergency situations before they occur. The District use the term “pro-active firefighting” to describe how the District analyzes new building plans to anticipate potential life-safety issues. The District also use this term to describe how the District look for potential life-safety hazards while doing the District’s annual inspections and bring them to the property owner’s attention. The District’s public education programs are designed to address current lifesafety issues that the District sees occurring within the Fire District. Ultimately, the goal of the Fire Prevention Bureau is to keep emergencies from occurring; thus, keeping people out of harm’s way. The purpose of the FPB is to prevent injuries, deaths, business interruption and property damage resulting from fire and other threats to life. The District believe that Fire Prevention plays a crucial role in making the District’s community safer. Inspection, enforcement and public education work together to not only identify and correct safety issues, but also to help change people’s attitude toward safety. Through the diligence and challenging work of the members of the Orland Fire District’s Fire Prevention Bureau, the District have been able to achieve the District’s annual goals. The future will bring greater challenges as the District sets loftier goals to ensure the safety of the public and the District’s Firefighters.

For the period 2012-2017, the FPB has logged 26,397 life safety inspections and other events.

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PUBLIC EDUCATION DIVISION The Public Education Division provides education on several fire and life safety issues. The job of the Fire and Life Safety Educator is to coordinate and implement the Department’s Community Public Safety Mission. The Fire and Life Safety Educator delivers and manages public events for the District throughout the year. The educator is responsible for the effective supervision and education of the different programs that are implemented. The educator develops, coordinates, presents and oversees the fire and life safety programs in the schools. All public education activities presented in and for the department are coordinated by the Public Educator. Everyone needs to be made aware of making smart choices to reduce the risk of injury, harm or death. Some of the programs in which the District offer are Fire and Life Safety programs, First Aid/CPR, station tours, car seat installations, fire extinguisher training, fire drills, senior citizen home safety, apartment/condo safety, business evacuation planning and emergency preparedness. The District also offer a Kid’s Camp each summer implementing strategies to teach fire and life safety topics to children between the ages of 8-11. The District’s safety trailer has created awareness to all, preparing everyone that visits, evacuation and weather preparedness. The trailer has turned out to be an essential tool to the District’s organization. The District’s Senior Advisory Council has assisted us during the District’s Safety Luncheons and have proven to be essential to the District’s Senior Programs.

For the period 2012-2017, Public Education has logged 1,989 events with over 65,000 contacts.

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COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION LIFE SAFETY INSPECTIONS

PUBLIC EDUCATION EVENTS

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

1,153

1,211

1,045

967

978

Greater 5000 sq. ft. comm

280

311

323

301

309

Restaurant

187 630

219 495

222 240

236 508

281 615

1,537

1,406

1,339

1,423

1,125

Final occupancy

322

389

510

215

284

Complaint Investigations

101

87

47

31

111

Less than 5000 sq. ft. comm

Multi-family Re-inspections

Schools

31

31

31

33

34

Rough

241

265

299

132

227

Carnival

1

2

2

3

2

Haunted House

1

1

1

1

1

Fireworks

3

3

2

3

5

Kiosk (Mall)

14

20

18

27

25

Group Home

11

10

11

12

13

Tent

4

8

5

8

15

Total

4,516

4,458

4,095

3,900

4,025

Problem fire alarm checks

710

956

913

910

Hydrostatic test of sprinklers

88

103

142

63

51

Fire alarm acceptance tests

91

106

158

78

77

107

31

14

20

21

3,489 447 510 35 173 31 525 0 193

1,351

1,241

1,287

1,131

393

5,403

5,867

5,699

5,382

5,031

4,418

26,397

Fire pump tests

6

7

5

8

9

Hood fire suppression system

29

34

49

44

17

Underground flushes

5

4

6

8

8

Knox Box issues

315

210

Plan review Misc. events Total: LIFE SAFETY ACTIVITY TOTAL

TOTAL 5,354 1,524 1,145 2,488 6,830 1,720 377 160 1,164 10 5 16 104 57 40 20,994

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

Car Seat Checks

15 120

16 127

19 101

12 130

11 86

CPR Classes

18

18

18

18

20

Fire Drills

9

19

19

23

20

Fire Extinguisher Classes

4

3

5

5

5

Parade

6

5

5

5

4

Public Display

24

36

35

35

40

Block Party

Safety Trailer

6

7

5

4

Safety Lecture

22

24

20

42

Station Tour

24

20

25

18

18

Senior Events

4

12

5

5

13

Stand By

11

4

3

2

2

Other

14

11

2

2

Career Days

3

Family Walks/Runs

2

3 4

Apparatus Show & Tell

34

37

Adopt A Firefighter

21

130

170

Learn Not To Burn

15

130

59

600

512

Public Education Meetings Total: Attendees

20 277 5,133

338

262 7,000

TOTAL 73 564 92 90 22 25 170 22 108 105 39 22 29 6 6 71 321 204 20 1,989

8,000 40-50k

COMMUNITY RISK REDUCTION (CRR) PROGRAMS COMMUNITY C.A.R.E. PROGRAM The Orland Fire Protection District Community CARE program is dedicated to the proposition that when it comes down to those precious minutes following sudden cardiac arrest, planning saves lives. There is a 90% survival rate for victims of sudden cardiac arrest with effective CPR and ready access to an automated external defibrillator (AED). CARE’s primary mission is two-fold: (1) to increase the number of people trained in CPR and the use of an AED and (2) to increase the availability of Public Access to Defibrillators (PADs). Furthermore, the program aims to create a monitoring/maintenance program ensuring CPR skills remain current and defibrillator batteries and pads remain operational. Community CARE is modeled from a successful Seattle, Washington, program boasting a near 50% survival rate in reducing fatalities from cardiac arrest. The Orland Fire Protection District provides FREE CPR training courses every other month or so and monthly classes accredited for healthcare providers. Information on both courses is detailed on the District’s website.

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SENIOR ADVISORY COUNCIL The Orland Fire Protection District Senior Advisory Council (SAC) serves as a bridge between the District’s officials and the large senior population in the District in communicating health and safety concerns. SAC both communicates to seniors and brings information from seniors to the leadership of the District. The goal is to preserve life and property for seniors within the District. The Orland Fire Protection District established the Senior Advisory Board (SAC) in 2009. SAC’s main purpose is to “identify and address specific needs of the senior residents of the District’s District” with respect to health and safety. In general, advisory boards may perform the following tasks:  Studying of issues  Performing independent research  Participate in District activities  Educate seniors about health and safety issues recommended by staff and District  Analyzing the impact of policies on the senior population within the District  Make recommendations to the Board of Trustees based on thoughtful and unbiased discussions From a senior perspective

CADET PROGRAM The District’s Cadet Program helps individuals between the ages of 16-21 who have an interest in a Fire Service or Emergency Medical Services career. Cadets will be taught firefighting skills and knowledge based on the current Illinois OSFM standards for Basic Operations Firefighter through both online course work and hands-on practical training on Saturday mornings according to the program schedule. Program Goals:    

Experiencing a taste of the day-to-day life of a Firefighter / Paramedic Exploring fire service as a career Providing opportunity for individuals 16-21 years old to get involved in the fire service and the community Providing training that will assist individuals in obtaining a position as a career Firefighter / Paramedic

Program Activities:     

FF II basic training – Regular program of 280 hours in 28 subject areas Instruction in First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Ride time on ambulance for EMT / Paramedic Sponsorship for EMT / Paramedic school Supervised “ride-a-long” as observer

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RESIDENTIAL KNOX BOX PROGRAM The Residential Knox Box Program helps the Orland Fire Protection District loan out boxes to the elderly with medical call buttons and who have medical conditions that limit their mobility. The District also loans these boxes out to people who have debilitating medical conditions (such as multiple sclerosis, etc.) regardless of age. People who want a box are required to fill out an application, a medical history form and must provide a key for their residence. (This key is locked in the Knox Box.) Currently, the District notes any hazards in the residence, such as oxygen tanks and places this information in the dispatch system as a “caution note.” Family members usually install the Knox Box on the residence door, Fire Prevention Bureau personnel will install them, if requested. This program has been very successful and is a great service that the District provides to residents. The District is planning to increase the size of the program with the purchase of 20 more boxes and an increased advertising effort via the website and this community outreach program utilizing several senior citizen and community organizations.

CAR SEAT CHECKS The Orland Fire Protection District installs and checks car seat installations for District residents by appointment. The District has three certified personnel to assist with the installation of car seats. Personnel are also available to do car seat inspections if the seat is already installed.

C.E.R.T (Community Emergency Response Team) The Orland Fire District is hosting a new CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) class tentatively starting Monday, September 11th, 2017. The classes will be held 8 consecutive Monday evenings from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. each evening. The classes are held at the Orland Fire District Administration building located at 9790 W. 15st Street. The class is limited to residents of the Orland Fire District and the minimum age to participate is 18 years of age. The CERT graduate classes currently have 42 active community members. The District are looking to add additional volunteers to assist the Orland Fire District during emergencies such as disasters and weather-related emergencies. This is a way that the District’s residents can give back to the community. Experience is not necessary, and the District will provide you with the training needed to become an Orland CERT team member. Some of the training provided includes: The ability to safely extinguish fires in the event of an emergency, First Aid, CPR, bleeding control, assist your family and neighbors in the event of an emergency, organize and operate search and rescue duties in your neighborhood, coordinate and work with other First Responders during community emergencies.

SENIOR CITIZEN SMOKE DETECTOR REPLACEMENT PROGRAM In conjunction with Local 2754, the members annually replace smoke detector and/or batteries, to any resident in need.

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CPR CLASSES The District offers two types of CPR courses. The first type is the Friends and Family CPR Course, which follows the guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and foreign body airway obstruction maneuvers outlined by the American Heart Association. This course will consist of a lecture and a practical. The lecture will include background information about heart disease, risk factors, and prudent heart living and heart and lung anatomy. One-rescuer and foreign body airway obstruction maneuvers will be demonstrated in the practical portion. Both Trained over lecture and practical will cover Adults and Pediatrics resuscitation. This course is FREE to those attending! The second CPR course offered is geared towards the professional that needs CPR as a term of employment. This course also follows the guidelines set forth by the American Heart Association and reviews Adult and Pediatric resuscitation. At the end of this course, a certification is granted when all requirements of the course are met.

3,600 In CPR!

From 2015 to date, the District has trained over 3,600 people in life saving CPR!

KIDS FIRE and LIFE SAFETY CAMP The Kids Fire and Life Safety Camp is dedicated to exposing school-aged children to fire and life safety lessons dealing with potential hazards around their homes and schools, along with several life lessons that are also important. The camp is designed to be fun, entertaining and educational, while providing the campers with knowledge to keep themselves out of harmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way. The participants have lectures and lessons each day, follow by hands-on opportunities to actively participate in exercises designed to reinforce what they have been taught.

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DISPATCH / COMMUNICATIONS The Orland Fire Protection District operates a fire service only communications/dispatch center providing emergency medical, fire, and rescue dispatching service to the community it serves. These services are also being provided as a contracted service to the cities/Districts of Blue Island, Calumet City, Country Club Hills, Lemont, and Oak Forest. This allows the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s center to dispatch the closest vehicle to an emergency improving response times for the residents. In 2013-2017, emergency communications dispatchers for Orland processed 118,754 alarm incidents for the center. Orland Central Dispatch was the primary dispatch center for three Mutual Aid Box Alarm System (MABAS) Divisions (19, 22, and 24) covering much of the South and Southwest suburban area. At the time these Southland communities request assistance for incidents beyond their resource capabilities, communications are passed on to Orland Central and the alerts and requests for mutual aid to that agency along with incident communications are through Orland Central. In the period 2013-2017, Orland Central handled 663 box alarm requests through the MABAS system for these three divisions. Orland Central is the back-up to the primary statewide MABAS Communication System operated out of RED Center in Northbrook. Activation for assets and specialty equipment/teams is done through these two centers in the event of a large incident or disaster in the State or those surrounding Illinois. Orland Central is also the back-up dispatch center for the Chicago Fire Department Englewood (South) Fire Alarm Office. Orland Fire employs a Communications Director, 11 full-time and 4 part-time dispatchers that operate the dispatch center with three staffed positions 24 hours a day. Orland Central conducts monthly training and continuing education for all dispatchers. Dispatchers participate in department drills as well as drills with RED center on deploying resources during natural disasters. Dispatchers are also encouraged to attend classes given by APCO and MABAS.

ORLAND CENTRAL DISPATCH - 911 Dispatch for the agencies: Blue Island FD

Lemont FPD Orland FPD

Oak Forest FD Calumet City FD

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FLEET and FACILITIES Support Service provides behind the scenes support required to maintain optimal and efficient front line operational service to the District’s residents. Support Service encompasses the maintenance and repair of the District: Facilities, Fleet Vehicles, SCBA (Self Contained Breathing Apparatus), Tools, Equipment and Hose, as well as the procurement and distribution of various supplies.

FLEET MAINTENANCE The Orland Fire Protection District’s Support Service Bureau consists of six specialized areas committed to aggressively maintaining the Fire District’s buildings, vehicles and equipment. Safety, reliability and readiness are priorities as well as running a cost-effective and efficient maintenance operation. Support Service encompasses the maintenance and repair of the District: Facilities, Fleet Vehicles, SCBA (Self Contained Breathing Apparatus), Tools, Equipment and Hose, as well as the procurement and distribution of various supplies. The District takes no shortcuts when working on any the District emergency vehicles, buildings or equipment. Emergency equipment is unique, extremely complex and quite challenging to maintain and repair. Given the nature of the fire service, this equipment is subject to extreme and less than ideal operating conditions which not only result in significant wear and tear, however demand a very high and specialized level of technical skill. Orland Fire Protection District technicians possess a keen knowledge and understanding of auto and truck, mechanical, emission control and fuel injection systems, in addition to welding, fabrication, building maintenance, HVAC systems, multi-phase commercial electrical systems and communication systems. What sets the District’s people apart is their level of expertise with the technical intricacies specific to fire, EMS, emergency equipment and building systems and maintenance. All equipment is serviced regularly and thoroughly maintained as part of the Orland Fire Protection District’s preventive-maintenance program. About the program: · Reduces costly breakdowns and increases reliability. · Staffed with trained, certified, highly-skilled and very valued technicians. · Fleet of 60 pieces of fire apparatus, ambulances, specialty equipment and support vehicles. · Six fire stations, Headquarters building, Fleet Maintenance building and three training buildings. · Utilizes a cost-conscious, cost-effective, common sense approach. · Ongoing initiative to exceed operational demands and increase efficiency. · Pride and professionalism are the expectation. · Safe work practices and safe equipment are a must.

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The Support Service Bureau provides behind the scenes services that are essential to effective Fire, EMS, and Rescue Operations. Serving the community is the privilege of every Orland Fire Protection District employee, not only those responding to fires, EMS calls or other emergencies, but also those people behind the scenes repairing the District’s facilities and fire apparatus, in addition to performing other essential functions. In the end, every Orland Fire Protection District employee fulfills a vital role that allows the District’s organization to help others in times of need. Helping others is truly the District’s privilege. Fleet Repair and Maintenance – The District employs two ASE certified technicians and maintains approximately 60 pieces of equipment. All the District fire apparatus, ambulances, and support vehicles are serviced at regular intervals in addition to required repairs. The District vehicles are extremely well maintained which is imperative given the need for 100% reliability and the severe duty associated with emergency response.

FACILITIES/GENERAL REPAIRS The District employs 1 full-time and 2 part-time building maintenance technicians with extensive backgrounds in HVAC, plumbing, electrical and building maintenance systems. Most repairs are handled in house which allows us to address issues in a prompt, efficient manner which keeps costs down and minimizes any impact to operations.

SCBA/SMALL TOOLS/SUPPLIES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) – are worn by Firefighters to protect them from inhaling toxic and super-heated gases found in fires and hazardous environments. Compressed air is stored at a pressure of 4500 psi in cylinders worn on each Firefighter’s back like a backpack. Due to the extreme pressure and exposure to hostile environments this equipment must be thoroughly tested and maintained. The District practices a regimented routine of daily, weekly and annual testing, maintenance and repair of each SCBA. The District utilizes thousands of various pieces of equipment used for anything from vehicle extrication to thermal imaging cameras used to find victims in smoke filled, zero visibility environments. This equipment must also be extremely well maintained and kept in a constant state of readiness so that it can be reliably deployed in any emergency. Each the District fire engine carries nearly 3000 feet of various diameter fire hose. These hoses are designed to operate at pressures ranging from 80 psi to as high as 250 psi. Each length of hose is tested annually to NFPA standards and repaired in house by trained the District personnel. The District Support Service maintains an inventory of basic cleaning supplies and paper goods which are distributed to all facilities on a per order basis.

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Headquarters/Dispatch 9790 West 151st Street Orland Park, Illinois 60462 (708) 349-0074

Phone

(708) 349-0354 Fax

Station 1 9790 West 151st Street

Station 2 15100 West 80th Avenue

Station 3 15101 West Wolf Road

Station 4 16515 South 94th Avenue

Station 5 8851 West 143rd Street

Station 6 17640 South Wolf Road

FACILITIES

www.orlandfire.org

Training & Fleet Maintenance Facilities 10728 West 163rd Place

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EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES (EMS) Orland Fire District has over 115 Paramedics (100% crossed trained as Firefighter/Paramedics) that maintain certifications in various medical disciplines that exceed the Illinois Department of Public Health requirements. This Division is overseen by a Day Lieutenant with a support staff of “7G” part time staff and adjunct instructors. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) is also a function monitored through committee and a crucial tool for delivering the highest level of EMS care and service. Orland Fire belongs to REGION VII EMS. Silver Cross EMS System serves as the District’s Medical Resource and Project Medical Director. Some of the additional certifications and descriptions maintained by ALL PARAMEDICS are: 

 

Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) training focuses on the treatment of cardiac arrest, stroke and other life-threatening medical emergencies, as well as the skills to deploy advanced interventions. Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) is recognized globally as the leading educational program for prehospital emergency trauma care. Pediatric Education for Pre-Hospital Professionals (PEPP) provides comprehensive instruction for the emergency care of infants and children.

EMS training is conducted utilizing the District’s state-of-the-art $ 200,000 Simulation Lab. Every type of stressful and difficult medical or traumatic situation can be recreated through simulation. Skills and abilities are built, and knowledge gained through this hands-on teaching and learning environment. Orland’s highly-trained medical personnel respond in advanced life support (ALS) ambulances and ALS fire apparatus. When you call for help, the closest available ambulance and fire apparatus are dispatched simultaneously, which ensures help is arriving as soon as possible. At least 5 Paramedic/Firefighters are dispatched to EVERY EMS INCIDENT!

Cardiac Arrest SAVE RATE VF Save %

65% 43%

46%

44.5% 25%

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

National Average - Cardiac Arrest Save Rate - 11%

The national average for Cardiac Arrest resuscitation from Ventricular Fibrillation (VF) is only 11%. The Cardiac Arrest Save rate in Orland (VF) is averaging at 45% for the last 5 years [111/248]. Remarkably, in 2017 that statistic improved to 65% [34/53]. That is SIX TIMES THE NATIONAL AVERAGE! Advanced technologies are brought to every emergency. Among those

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technologies are cardiac monitors that can transmit your 12 Lead ECG to the hospital, so the appropriate care may be assembled prior to your arrival there. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP), commonly used to treat sleep apnea, is utilized pre-hospital for the treatment of acute respiratory failure and may preclude the need for the patient to be intubated and placed on a ventilator. Other advanced technologies include video laryngoscopes and Intra-osseous drills that save time when seconds count and life is in the balance. Power-assisted cots and ergonomically-designed stair chairs make patient movement and transition of care less stressful for the patient, while providing a measure of safety for the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personnel.

Chain of Survival What the District know for certain is that successful treatment of cardiac arrest and particularly VF is associated with quick delivery of care. The chain of survival with its 5 links of early 9-1-1 access, early CPR, early defibrillation, early advanced care and early post resuscitative care illustrates the most critical elements of addressing sudden cardiac arrest.

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EMS Incident Type Breakdown 8%

7%

EMS Treatment

Medical

Refusal

21.22%

BLS

21.83%

Trauma

8%

Cardiac

77%

Respiratory

Health Care, Detention & Educational Correction Storage 1% 2% Assembly 9%

ALS

56.95%

INCIDENT BY PROPERTY TYPE 2015-17

8% Outside or Special Property 10%

Residential 57%

Mercantile, Business 13%

2.5% 3.5% 5.1% 6.2% 7.4% 10.3%

6-15 21-27 38-50 66-79 90

6.9% 0.0%

17.1% 20.0% 20.9%

5.0% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0%

25.0%

EMS PATIENTS by AGE GROUP

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FIRE SUPPRESSION The District responds to diverse types of fires and other service requests, including EMS and RESCUE/SPECIAL OPERATIONS (HazMat, Technical Rescue, and Dive Rescue). The fires include, but are not limited to: single family structures, multi-family structures, commercial buildings, strip malls, high-rise occupancies, industrial facilities, vehicle fires, brush fires and dumpster fires. Within these categories, the District strives to provide a standard of coverage that is unique to the structure, depending on criteria such as construction type, risk factors, response times, occupancy type, known hazards, and many others. To adequately provide coverage for the many types of fires and scenarios that can arise, the Orland Fire Protection District provides a minimum of 29 on-duty Firefighters each shift. These on-duty personnel are on duty for 24 hours at a time and are stationed among the District’s 6 strategically-placed Fire Stations. Within these 6 stations, and in addition to the frontline rigs, reserve apparatus is also placed throughout the District to supplement the line as they go out-of-service due to maintenance and/or repairs or call back situations. Additionally, there are specialty Ambulances (Hazmat S3, Dive S5, TRT2, and Brush1/Gator2 for brush fires) that are crossstaffed, if needed. All frontline dedicated companies are Advanced Life Support – Paramedic equipped.

6 STATIONS 29 PERSONNEL (minimum 24/7) ALS &

DEDICATED COMPANIES:

4 ENGINES 2 TRUCKS/QUINTS 5 AMBULANCES 1 BATTALION CHIEF

Expanding on the District’s frontline apparatus, each engine in the District is equipped with the necessary equipment used to carry out an assortment of tasks. Each Type 1 engine has a tank that holds 750 gallons of water with a 1500 GMP pump capacity. The engines carry a variety of hose used for both supply and attack lines, as well as a basic compliment of other tools and equipment. Two ladder trucks, one being a tower ladder and the other being a straight stick, are utilized within the District. The primary task of these trucks is for rescue and removal of civilians, roof and window access, forcible entry, search and rescue, and heavy extrication. Both trucks have a 105’ aerial l adder that can be used to access windows or roofs which the District’s ground ladders cannot reach. Along with the rigs main ladders, these trucks carry a compliment of ground ladders, hand tools, power tools, saws and extrication equipment. All front-line ambulances, which are discussed further in the EMS section, are also equipped with two SCBA air packs and hand tools so that the District’s Firefighters assigned to ambulances can also assist in fire related incidents.

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MABAS MABAS stands for Mutual Aid Box Alarm System. The Orland Fire Protection District provides mutual aid to and receives mutual aid from other fire departments. Mutual aid received is noted in other areas of this report. Along with handling incidents within Orland jurisdiction, the Orland Fire Protection District is regularly requested to assist surrounding agencies with their incidents. The request may be to cover a fire station for subsequent incidents or to assist with personnel and equipment on the scene. A single incident can be taxing to the resources of any fire department which has resulted in mutual aid agreements prearranging the assistance prior to an incident and specifying who responds with what personnel, apparatus and equipment. The Orland Fire Protection District is a member of MABAS Division 19 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one of twelve fire agencies. Frankfort, Homer Township, Lemont, Lockport Township, Manhattan, Mokena, New Lenox, East Joliet, Palos, Palos Heights, and Peotone Fire Districts comprise the remainder of MABAS 19.

LEMONT

PALOS

PALOS HEIGHTS

T NW HOMER HOMER

LOCKPORT

OAK FOREST ORLAND MOKENA

EAST JOLIET

TINLEY PARK

NEW LENOX

FRANKFORT MANHATTAN

PEOTONE

MABAS 19 and SURROUNDING TOWNS

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By annually preapproving “Mutual Aid” and/or Automatic Aid Agreements, the District sets predetermined levels of response depending on type of incident as well as location in town. In the below example, Box 6019 NE covers an area in Orland that is North of 151st St and East of LaGrange road for Fire Incidents.

Each alarm per Box level (2nd, 3rd, etc.) will bring a minimum of 22 additional Firefighters per level in 3 Engines, 2 Trucks, 2 Ambulances, and 2 Chiefs plus important Change of Quarters companies to cover the District’s other Incidents that may occur simultaneously to the initial fire incident. Those 22 additional personnel and equipment would be additional to the initial Still and Full Still assignments of 30 Firefighters on 4 Engines, 3 Trucks, 3 Ambulances, and 3 Chiefs thereby totaling a minimum of 52 Firefighters on scene at a Box Alarm and 22 additional per each level thereafter.

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MABAS BOX ALARM CARD – 6019 NE DEPARTMENT

BOX ALARM TYPE:

REVISED DATE:

MABAS DIVISION:

4/1/17

19

ORLAND

FIRE - HYDRANTED

BOX ALARM #

LOCATION OF AREA:

AUTHORIZED SIGNATURE

6019 NE

NORTH of 151st - EAST of Lagrange Rd

Chief Schofield

LOCAL DISPATCH AREA: ALARM LEVEL

ENGINES

TRUCKS

STILL

Orland Orland

Orland Orland

FULL STILL

MAYDAY RESPONSE RESOURCES:

Orland Orland

Palos or Tinley Park (if not on still)

Tinley Park Palos

EMS

COMMAND

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

Orland Amb

Orland Chf

Orland Amb Orland Amb

Orland Chf Tinley Park Chf IMT Mokena Chf Palos Chf Frankfort Chf

Orland General Alarm

COMMAND

SPECIAL EQUIPMENT

Oak Forest

Crestwood Amb

Alpha Page Chief Tone

STA #

CHANGE OF QUARTERS

Lemont Crestwood Orland Oak Forest Matteson Northwest Homer Homer Tinley Park Palos Heights New Lenox

Chf Trk Amb Eng Amb Eng Amb Eng Eng Trk

1 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 5 6

MABAS BOX ALARM: ALARM LEVEL

ENGINES

TRUCKS

EMS

BOX

Oak Forest Tinley Park Lemont

Crestwood North Palos

Orland Amb Matteson Amb

2nd

Northwest Homer Palos Heights Posen

New Lenox Roberts Park

Orland Amb Homer Amb

3rd

Country Club Hills Frankfort Hometown

Lockport Alsip

Elwood Amb Argonne Amb

4th

Chicago Ridge Oak Lawn South Holland

East Joliet Peotone

Lansing Amb Wilmington Amb

INTERDIVISIONAL REQUEST

INFORMATION:

New Lenox Chf Homer Chf Manhattan Chf MABAS 19 IMT Orland CommVan

Frankfort Rehab

East Joliet Chf Lockport Chf Oak Forest Chf

Crestwood Chf Peotone Chf Country Club Hills Chf Mokena CommVan Oak Lawn Chf North Palos Chf Hometown Chf

Lockport Orland Country Club Hills Argonne Frankfort Elwood Chicago Ridge Wilmington Oak Lawn East Joliet Bedford Park Lansing Homewood Thorton Manhattan Flossmoor Harvey Romeoville Hazel Crest University Park

1st CHOICE

2nd CHOICE

3rd CHOICE

MABAS 10

MABAS 7

MABAS 15

*BOLD UNITS - Last line ENG/TRK/all CHF *CQ CHF covers District- no move up to scene from own station (others from previous CQ)

FIRE - HYDRANTED

STA #

CHANGE OF QUARTERS

Trk Amb Eng Amb Eng Amb Eng Amb Eng Trk Trk Amb Eng Amb Eng Amb Eng Amb Eng Trk

1 1 2 2 4 1 3 3 5 6 1 1 2 2 4 1 3 3 5 6

BOX #

6019 NE

This is a sample of a MABAS Box Alarm card. Box 6019 NE is a FIRE BOX in Orland Fire for areas north of 151st St and East of Lagrange Rd. After the initial 15-person Effective Response Force (ERF) Still Alarm of the closest: 2 Engines, 2 Trucks, 1 Ambulance, and 1 Battalion Chief – an upgrade would bring 2 more Engines, 1 Truck, 2 Ambulances, and 3 Chiefs (15 additional personnel) as well as all Stations back filled with Change of Quarters companies. Box Alarm and higher brings another 22 personnel to the scene per level in a very short time frame – thanks to the MABAS commitments by the Districts surrounding towns.

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MABAS-IL MABAS Mission Statement MABAS-Illinois serves local fire agencies, MABAS Divisions, State of Illinois departments, and Cook County UASI-DHSEM by providing a systems-based resource allocation and distribution network of robust traditional and nontraditional fire-EMS-rescue and special operations teams for emergency and sustained response within and outside of the State of Illinois. Accomplishment of the services requires cooperation, standardization, reliability, partnering, brokering and ongoing communication and compliance with customer specification and expectations. Customer trust and reliance on the MABAS system is built upon personal relationships, credibility, and ongoing customer support. MABAS Purpose Statement The Mutual Aid Box Alarm System (MABAS) provides emergency rapid response and sustained operations when a jurisdiction or region is stricken by an overwhelming event generated by manmade, technological, or environmental threats. In response, MABAS will mobilize and, deploy a sustained fire, emergency medical services (EMS), hazardous materials, technical rescue, water rescue, urban search and rescue, and incident management assistance team resources to prevent loss of life, human suffering and further damage to property. MABAS is a statewide mutual aid system, which has been in existence since the late 1960s. Pre September 11th, MABAS was heavily rooted throughout northern Illinois. Since September 11th, MABAS has rapidly grown throughout the State of Illinois as well as Wisconsin, Indiana and Michigan and parts of Iowa and Missouri. Day-to-day MABAS extra alarms are systematically designed to provide speed of response of emergency resources to the stricken community during an ongoing emergency. Declarations of Disaster provide a MABAS sustained system of response on top of daily mutual aid activations. Today MABAS includes approximately 1,175 of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1,246 fire departments organized within 69 divisions. MABAS divisions geographically span an area from Lake Michigan to Iowa's border and south almost into Kentucky. Wisconsin divisions also share MABAS with their Illinois counterparts. The cities of Chicago, St. Louis, and Milwaukee are also MABAS member agencies. MABAS has expanded into all 102 Illinois counties. MABAS includes approximately 38,000 of Illinoisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 40,000 Firefighters who staff emergency response units including more than 1,600 fire stations, 2,735 engine companies, 500 ladder trucks, 1,300 ambulances (many Paramedic capable), 250 heavy rescue squads, and 1,000 water tenders. Fire/EMS reserve (back-up) units account for more than 1,000 additional emergency vehicles. MABAS also offers specialized operations teams for hazardous materials (40 teams), underwater rescue/recovery (15 teams), technical rescue (39 teams) and a state sponsored urban search and rescue team. An additional element of resource are the certified fire investigators, Incident Management Team COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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members and fleet support mechanics which can be "packaged" as mobile support teams aid with larger scale incidents requiring complicated and time-consuming efforts beyond capabilities of most agencies. MABAS is a unique organization in that every MABAS participant agency has signed the same contract with their 1,100 plus counterpart MABAS agencies. As a MABAS agency, you agree to: standards of operation, incident command, minimal equipment staffing, fire ground safety and on-scene terminology. MABAS agencies, regardless of their geopolitical origin, work together seamlessly on any emergency scene. All MABAS agencies operate on a common radio frequency (IFERN) and are activated for response through pre-designed "run" cards each participating agency designs and tailors to meet their local risk need. MABAS also provides mutual aid station coverage to a stricken community when their fire/EMS resources are committed to an incident for an extended period. MABAS extra alarms are commanded by the stricken community and dispatch control is handled through the stricken communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s MABAS division dispatch center. Over 800 MABAS locally controlled extra alarm incidents occur annually throughout the 69 divisions of Illinois MABAS. Existing Illinois statute regarding a Declaration of Disaster allows the Governor to mobilize state assets under the direction of IEMA. Through a memorandum of understanding between IEMA and MABAS, fire, EMS and special operations resources can be activated as a State of Illinois asset when a Declaration of Disaster is initiated. Activation of the Statewide Plan through IEMA is designed to provide quantity of response for sustaining incident operations. MABAS also provides various specialty equipment and apparatus staged strategically throughout the State available to any MABAS Department upon request.

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HAZARDOUS MATERIALS The Orland Fire Protection District’s Hazardous Materials Team (HazMat) consists of 21 trained Firefighters who are responsible for investigations involving hazardous materials calls. All Fire District Firefighters are trained to respond to these calls at the HazMat Op’s level, however; members of the HazMat Team are trained to a technician level as set by state and federal standard. This team works in conjunction with federal, state, and local agencies including USEPA, Illinois EPA, Illinois Emergency Management Agency, Metropolitan Water Reclamation District, Cook County Sheriffs Police Bomb Ambulance, and local Public Works to properly handle the special needs of this type of call. The District conducts training with local rail road and pipeline companies to ensure that all members have hands on experience. This training uses props to ensure a proper response to leaks, spills, and fires of hazardous materials. Many members have also participated in federal training programs offered locally and around the country. The Orland Fire Protection District is a part of MABAS 19 and is supplied with more skilled equipment and technicians in case of complicated hazardous materials calls. Nine of the Fire District’s Hazardous Material Team members are also members of the South West Hazardous Materials Response Team, MABAS 22. The Hazardous Materials Division prepares responders on equipment, best practices and new hazards. From Carbon Monoxide calls to leaking tankers, the HazMat Division prepares the members of the department to identify and initiate the correct response. The District continue to improve the equipment and provide 12 hours of continuing education to all responders. Hazardous Material Operations level responses that occur frequently and are usually handled by the first in Fire Company which do not need a full team response include: elevated Carbon Monoxide levels, natural gas leaks, fuel and chemical spills, odor investigations, etc.

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RESCUE (SPECIAL OPERATIONS) TECHNICAL RESCUE TEAM (TRT) The Orland Fire Protect District’s Technical Rescue Team (TRT) specializes in confined space, trench, high angle, and structural collapse rescue. The Fire District’s team has been identified as the confined space rescue team for the Village of Orland Park while their Public Works department perform maintenance on their equipment. The team and its members have responded to numerous technical rescue incident since its inception in 1993. Some of the more notable incidents the team has responded to are the Spirit of New Orleans train crash, Microburst in Frankfort IL, and the tornado in Utica IL. These members of the team train approximately 55 hours annually. This is in addition to their annual firefighting and EMS training. Each member of the team is tested cognitively and practically each year and participates in a deployment exercise every three to four years. During this exercise the team deploys to Champaign IL and works in concert with other rescue teams from around the state. This exercise is a natural disaster scenario. During the exercise rescue operations are conducted around the clock for forty-eight hours. Since this is a simulated natural disaster the conditions are austere. Each team must be self-sufficient and live in tents and eat military rations. The Orland Fire Protection District is a member of the Combined Agency Response Team (CART). CART responds to rescue incidents with a cache of member owned and CART supplemented equipment to support the efforts of the local technical rescuers. CART serves 8 northeastern counties in Illinois, including Cook, Will, Grundy, Kendall, Kankakee, DuPage, Kane, and DeKalb totaling a response area of over 1000 square miles. The District also has seven members who are part of Illinois’ urban search and rescue team. These members have received in depth training through FEMA in emergency medicine, technical search, crane operations, and asset management. The function of Illinois Task Force One (ILTF-1) is to respond to a natural disaster anywhere in the state and be completely self-sufficient. ILTF-1 when deployed, operates twenty-four hours per day and will be in the field for approximately ten days before rotating fresh rescuers to the scene.

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DIVE/WATER RESCUE The 30 miles in which is the Orland Fire Protection District has over 300 bodies of water with a depth of more than six feet. The potential for a water related incident is a very real possibility. If someone were to fall through the ice or get caught in a swift water creek due to flooding, the Dive Ambulance has all the training and equipment available to affectively rescue those in distress. This team deploys about six times a year. In case of a more complicated rescue call, The Orland Fire Protection Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dive Ambulance is a part of MABAS 19 and receives more skilled equipment and technicians to help safely handle these special situations.

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TRAINING MISSION The Orland Fire Protection District Division of Training is organized to provide the highest quality training and education to all the District’s members. The District will provide realistic, relevant and referenced training to ensure skill proficiency in all facets of the District’s profession. The Training Division is overseen by a Day Lieutenant and supported by numerous 7g/adjunct instructors. The Orland Fire Protection District Training Division has worked diligently to develop a training program to ensure that the District provide an all-hazards training curriculum. The District’s program encompasses initial training and continuing education for the District’s members in many different areas covering any type of incident the District may encounter. Orland Fire Protection District has adopted the certification program offered through the Illinois State Fire Marshal Office (OSFM). The OSFM certification program outlines a standard curriculum to be delivered for each discipline or class. The classes taught and utilized for training at the District are: · Basic Operations Firefighter·

· Technical Rescue Awareness

· Advanced Technical Firefighter

· Structural Collapse Operations

· Arson

· Structural Collapse Technician

· Company Fire Officer

· Trench Operations

· Advanced Fire Officer

· Trench Technician

· Chief Fire Officer

· Rope Operations

· Instructor I, II and III

· Rope Technician

· Fire Service Vehicle Operator

· Vehicle Machinery Operations

· Fire Apparatus Engineer

· Vehicle Machinery Technician

· Hazardous Materials Operations·

· Water Operations / Technician

· Hazardous Material Technician

· EMS (Numerous Classes)

The initial courses are varying in length from twenty hours to one-hundred twenty hours. Once a member has passed the course and OSFM state exam, they will receive a certificate for that discipline or course. The certified member will use the District training program to maintain their skills and proficiency for each certification or discipline area. The Orland Fire Protection District training program had a very productive year in training. The District’s Firefighters logged over twenty-six thousand hours of training averaging over two-hundred and fifty hours COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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per Firefighter. The District’s training is guided by the Illinois State Fire Marshal, Secretary of State, Occupational Health and Safety Association, National Fire Protection Agency and local and federal statutes. The District training program is designed to meet both the mission of the District, as well as the training division. The District assure each Firefighter receives training in the following areas. · Firefighter Training · Driver Training · Hazardous Material Training

· Special Rescue Training · Live Fire Training · Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus · General Compliance Training · Officer Training

The ability to provide the highest quality training to the District’s members is the cornerstone of the District’s training program, so Orland Firefighter / Paramedic professionals maintain the highest level of skill proficiency and provide the very best possible service to the District’s customers.

IFSI TRAINING The District has partnered with Illinois Fire Service Institute (IFSI), the state fire academy to provide training to the area. The partnership with IFSI provides an avenue to deliver high quality training to the local area. The courses delivered at Orland Regional Training Facility allow Orland Firefighter/Paramedics to attend certification courses and provide an opportunity for other local departments to train at the District’s state-ofthe-art Training Facility.

SPECIAL RESCUE TRAINING Orland Fire Protection District is an all hazards fire department. When an emergency happens within the District and someone calls 911, the District responds with highly-trained professional Firefighter Paramedics. The District’s training on all types of emergencies is vital to the District’s ability to serve the customers of the Orland Fire Protection District. The District’s special rescue training includes, Trench, rope, collapse, confined space and other special types of emergencies.

(RTF – RESCUE TASK FORCE) Active Threat Training It is important for us to conduct training based on best practice models for worst case scenarios utilizing simulation. The District don’t want to think that tragic terror events will happen here, but the District must be prepared. The District continue to train with Orland Park Police if lives must be saved while they provide protection to the District’s Paramedics.

RESIDENT PHYSICIAN TRAINING for Advocate Christ Medical Center In October, Orland Fire hosts nearly 50 resident physicians from Advocate Christ Medical Center. This event has taken place every 3 years over approximately 15 years. After introductions, the groups are sent to different stations to experience the patient care perspective from the Paramedic responders’ view. They extricated a patient that was pinned under a vehicle, performed confined space rescue, provided an advanced airway to patients trapped in a vehicle, assessed and treated a trauma patient

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while being hindered by low light, smoke and noise and extricated a patient’s hand from a meat grinder and machines.

INCIDENT COMMAND TRAINING Since the District’s Command Training Center (CTC) opened in 2009, the District has trained over one thousand incident commanders from around the country. The CTC uses high-fidelity simulations to train incident commanders in how to manage an incident safely and efficiently. The District continue to develop more simulations, train more incident commanders and provide quality continuing education for current incident commanders.

BLUE CARD INCIDENT COMMAND Trained over 1,000+

TRAINING FACILITIES The goal for the Orland Fire Protection District Regional Training Campus is to provide the District’s people with the most realistic training environment while maintaining a high degree of safety. The District strives to provide the District’s companies with the opportunity to train on all the hazards that might be encountered each day the District respond to emergency incidents. The Orland Fire Protection District utilizes the Illinois State Fire Marshal Certification Program as a guide to develop and deliver the District’s training program. The District’s Training Facility provides a means to maintain the highest level of proficiency in the District’s “All Hazards Response” of service delivery. The Orland Regional Training Facility is continually looking to provide quality training in fire, rescue, emergency medical services, fire prevention and education and specialized rescue. The prop allows us the ability to train on confined space, rope and high angle rescue, hazardous materials and many other scenarios.

HEAVY EXTRICATION CLASS The District is continuously looking for ways to provide high-quality training to all its members and other local emergency responders. A heavy extrication class sponsored by Genesis Rescue Systems was an opportunity for area emergency responders to learn and train on various rescue emergencies. The District and surrounding departments train together in the event there is an event that requires more than one

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agency to respond. Orland Regional Training Facility was utilized for one of these training events.

MABAS 19 Light-n-Fight Incident Command Training Quarterly, each of the departments within the District’s Mutual Aid Box Alarm Division 19 (MABAS 19) send one company to the training event. A scenario is developed, and the company respond and work together to mitigate the incident. The ability to bring departments together enhances the District’s interoperability and cohesiveness in the event a real emergency incident happens.

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RESPONSE AREA Each of the 6 fire stations in the District are strategically located throughout the 30-mile area to respond to any incident as quickly as possible. The benchmark standard goal by the District is “to respond to requests for ANY emergency assistance 90% of the time in less than 6:20 from initial receipt of call at the District’s Dispatch center to arrival of the first due companies.” This coincides with NFPA 1710 response standard and is discussed in detail in Section 4 – Deployment and Performance. Fire Stations have “Still Districts” of approximately 4-6 square miles each. However, due to ability to now dispatch the closest available unit via GPS, AVL (Automatic Vehicle Location) and CAD (Computer Aided Dispatch) each station now has a more “dynamic” area of responsibility - or A.O.R. Therefore – each station’s AOR is indicated in the above map and area of coverage per station is listed below. This DISTRIBUTION is also known as equalization. Stations with less than 70% 4 min drive cover are being evaluated and analyzed for possible improvement solutions. This information and data will be further discussed in Deployment (Section 4).

FIRST DUE (DISTRIBUTION) COVERAGE - TRAVEL TIME

Station Sq Miles 1 2.9 2 3.7 3 7.1 4 4.7 5 5.8 6 5.3 DISTRICT 29.5 TOTAL Sq Miles

Call % of total Road Miles % of Total Population Volume % of Call sq miles Covered Road Miles in AoR % of Pop 2015-2017 Volume 9.8% 42.6 11.8% 7,124 11.0% 6,134 22.5% 12.5% 51.4 14.2% 10,503 16.2% 5,047 18.5% 24.1% 74.8 20.7% 10,786 16.7% 2,798 10.3% 15.9% 53.2 14.7% 11,692 18.1% 5,567 20.4% 19.7% 70.5 19.5% 11,900 18.4% 3,905 14.3% 18.0% 69.5 19.2% 12,727 19.7% 3,790 13.9% 362 64,732 27,241 ROAD MILES DISTRICT TRA Cover @ 4/8 MIN

TRA = TOTAL RESPONSE AREA (DISTRICT WIDE) AOR = AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY (STILL DISTRICT)

STILL STILL STILL DRIVE STILL COVER COVER linear DRIVE sq mile % mile 4 % 4 min 4 min min 4 min 2.7 93% 42.2 99% 3.5 95% 50.4 98% 4.5 63% 50.2 67% 3.8 81% 50.1 94% 3.7 64% 55.0 78% 3.4 65% 48.1 69% 21.6 296.0 SQ MILES

DISTRICT DISTRICT

COVER COVER District District sq mile % COVER COVER 4 min 4 min 8 min 8 min 5.1 17% 21.7 74% 5.0 17% 14.4 49% 5.0 17% 19.3 65% 4.5 15% 17.2 58% 4.9 17% 17.9 61% 3.6 12% 11.8 40% 21.9 29.4 29.5 74% 362 100% DRIVE MILES SQ MILES SQ MILES

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ï&#x20AC;

*Square Miles

*Linear Miles

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PLANNING ZONES AND CORRELATING RISKS The District is broken down into 32 separate planning zones. Each of these planning zones are correlated with the closest Fire Station and it’s Area of Responsibilty (AOR) or Still District. Hazards within each Planning Zone (PZ) are identifed and assessed. Those hazards are discussed in greater detail in the next section 3 – Community Risk Assesment.

These planning zones allow the District to identify, analyze, categorize, and classify the methodology to determine and document the distinct categories and classes of risks within each planning zone.

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SECTION 3 COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT

3

An overview of the current and potential risks and all hazard zone assessments within the District ALL HAZARD COMMUNITY RISKS RISK IDENTIFICAITON and CLASSIFICATION FIRE RISK EMS RISK HAZARDOUS MATERIAL RISKS RESCUE RISK DISASTER RISK SERVICE RISK COMMUNITY RISK EVALUATION

RISK ASSESSMENT

        

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RISK ASSESSMENT & RESPONSE CYCLE

RISK

RESPONSE

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RISK ASSESSMENT & RESPONSE

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THREAT - ANALYSIS

Analyzing the THREAT in all categories can be accomplished a few ways. Two of the focus and starting points include the PROBABILITY of an incident occurring and the CONSEQUENCE/IMPACT that may result if this threat were to occur. Location and Occupancies are assessed and classified. Probability can be determined by analyzing the POTENTIAL of an incident, with HISTORIC DEMAND as a key indicator. Consequence and Impact can be determined also by potential and historic demand as well as results of prior incidents. Using a scoring system, such as the two below, allow other measurements to help determine a Risk Score and determination of a TYPE LEVEL – CATEGORY/CLASSIFICATION of Low, Medium, and High. ***Scoring the entire District’s top 4 Occupancies as below for all risk categories places the category determination TYPE class as LOW – MODERATE for the majority of the District.*** HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TOOL NATURALLY OCCURRING EVENTS

STRUCTURE RISK ASSESSMENT

Residential

SIZE

IMPACT / CONSEQUENCES PROBABILITY HUMAN

EVENT Likelihood this will occur

Possib ility of death or injury

PROPERTY Physical losses and damages

AVERAGE SCORE

BUSINESS Interuption of services

SCORE

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

TOTAL IMPACT

PROBABILITY + IMPACT

Average Impact 0 = N/A = Lo w M o derate = High Extreme

1 2= 3 4=

PRECONNECT REACH

Small

Medium

Large

Mega

1

2

3

4

HEIGHT

Overa l l Ri sk Fa ctor

Severe Thunders torm

4

2

2

0

4

1.33

5.33

Extrem e Winter/Ice Storm

4

2

2

0

4

1.33

5.33

Tornado

3

3

4

0

7

2.33

5.33

Tem perature Extrem es

3

3

1

0

4

1.33

4.33

Flood

3

2

3

0

5

1.67

4.67

Earthquake

1

3

4

0

7

2.33

3.33

Drought

2

2

1

0

3

1.00

3.00

Epidem ic

1

2

1

0

3

1.00

2.00

AVERAGE SCORE

2.63

2.38

2.25

0.00

4.625

1.54

4.17

HP / LI

HP / HI

STORIES

One

Two

Three

Four+

1

2

3

4

OCCUPANCY TYPE

Residential Multifamily Commercial 1

2

Target

3

4

SPEC OP 3

SERVICE 0

PROBLEM

PROBABILITY HIGH

Risk Assessment 1-2 Low Threat

NATURE

3-4 Moderate Threat 5-6 High Threat LP / LI

LP / HI

LOW

HIGH

LOW= < 3

IMPACT

Height 2 3 1 4

Occupancy 1 2 3 4

FIRE 2

RISK SCORE

7-8 Extreme Threat

LOW

TYPE CLASS SCORING - OCCUPANCY SHOPS Size RESIDENTIAL 2 MULTIFAMILY 3 COMMERCIAL 3 TARGET 4

EMS 1

Problem 1 1 2 2

SCORE 6 9 9 14

MODERATE = 4-9

TYPE - PROBABILITY/CONSEQUENCE FIRE EMS RESCUE M L-M L M L-M M M M-H M H H H

HAZMAT L-M L-M M H

HIGH = > 10

TOTAL 4-7 6-8 8-9 12 L = 1, M = 2, H, = 3

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TYPE - CATEGORY & CLASSIFICATION

EMS - RISK Once the hazard assessment is complete, a type risk level can be classified by category for all hazard response. Most LOW type risk level incidents are primarily first due/distribution company classifications.

LOW

Injured/Illness

MODERATE Severe Life Threat Cardiac Arrest/Trauma/Extrication

HIGH

These assignments then have corresponding critical TASKS that must be assigned and accomplished. MODERATE type risk level incidents usually involve multiple units/distribution assignments. HIGH type risk level incidents tend to involve the activation of a large number of resources or Special Operations Teams â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Tactical Rescue, Hazmat, Water/Ice, etc.

RISK RESPONSE

Single Patient

Multi/Mass Casualty 5 or more Pts

FIRE - RISK LOW

Outside fires Vehicles, Brush, Refuse

MODERATE Structures SMALL - MEDIUM: Residential, Multifamily, Commercial

HIGH

Target Hazards LARGE - MEGA: Residential, Multifamily, Commercial

LOW

or Schools, Hotels, Malls,

Nursing,Assisted Living

MODERATE

HAZMAT - RISK HIGH LOW

Investigations - Outside Incident CO Detector (no illnesss), Fuel spill, Odor

MODERATE Static Inside Gas leak, CO Detector w/ illness

HIGH

Dynamic/Active release Level A - Technical Team may be needed

RESCUE - RISK LOW

Elevator entrapment Occupied, Lock Out,Wires Down

MODERATE MVA w/ extrication Vehicle into Building

HIGH

Spec Operations Technicians (TRT) Confined Space, Trench, Structure Collapse, Water/Ice

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TASKS - CRITICAL ASSIGNMENTS

RESCUE - Critical Task / ERF

Once a TYPE level has been identified/classified, then Critical TASK Assignments are determined to effectively and efficiently mitigate the situation. Additionally, an ERF (Effective Response Force) of the number of personnel necessary to accomplish these tasks is allocated to each of the risk type levels, i.e. “Task Math.” These TASKS are categorized by LOW, MODERATE, HIGH for All Hazard responses – EMS, FIRE, RESCUE, HAZMAT as well as LOW risk SERVICE/INVESTIGATIONS. High Level Tasks involve Special Ops Teams.

EMS CRITICAL TASKS

FIRE CRITICAL TASKS

HAZMAT / RESCUE TASKS

FIRE - TASKS / ERF

EMS - TASKS / ERF

HAZMAT - Critical Task / ERF

LOW

LOW Command/Safety/Family Liason Patient Assessment/Treatment Paramedic in Charge/ Documentation Patient Movement/Transport TOTAL ERF

1 1 1 2 5

MODERATE Command/Safety/Family Liason Patient Assessment/Treatment Paramedic in Charge/ Documentation Patient Movement/Transport

1 2 1 2

Resusitation/Stabilization/Extrication TOTAL ERF

3 9

TOTAL ERF

1 1 1 3

MODERATE Command/Safety

1

Fire Attack - 1st Fire Attack - Backup Search/Rescue OnDeck - Rapid Intervention Water Supply

2 2 2 2 1

Pump Operations Ventilation Utilities

1 3 1 15

TOTAL ERF

HIGH

HIGH Command

2

Scene Safety Medical Triage Treatment Transportation Staging

1 1 3 6 12 1 26

TOTAL ERF

Command/Safety Fire Attack Pump Operations

Command/Safety Fire Attack - 1st & 2nd Fire Attack - Backup Search/Rescue & EMS OnDeck - Rapid Intervention Crew

1 4 2 8 2

Water Supply Pump Operations/Aerial Ventilation Utilities

1 2 6 1 27

TOTAL ERF

CRITICAL TASK LOW Command/Safety 1 Extrication 2 TOTAL ERF 3 CRITICAL TASK MODERATE Command/Safety 1 Rescue Sector Officer 1 Stabilization 2 Extrication 2 Medical 1 TOTAL ERF 7 CRITICAL TASK TECH RESCUE TEAM NEEDED HIGH

CRITICAL TASK LOW Command/Safety 1 Investigation 2 TOTAL ERF 3 CRITICAL TASK MODERATE Command/Safety 1 Hazmat Sector Officer 1 Investigation/Entry 2 Backup 2 Science/Research 1 EMS/Treatment 2 TOTAL ERF 9 CRITICAL TASK HIGH Command 1 Safety 1 Hazmat Sector Officer 1 Entry 2 Backup 2 Science/Research 2 Decon 3 EMS/Treatment 2 TOTAL ERF 14

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TEAMS - TOOL / TRUCKS [DEPLOYMENT PLAN]

After the critical TASKS are determined and an ERF (Effective Response Force) is established indicating the number of personnel needed to accomplish these tasks, then a Deployment Response Plan is programmed into Dispatch CAD to bring those closest personnel and apparatus/equipment needed using GPS & AVL (Automatic Vehicle Locator). If an alarm were to elevate levels, from a LOW to MODERATE or MODERATE to HIGH, then these plans would escalate automatically or on request.

EMS

ENG TRK AMB CHF

Nature

RESPONSE

# FF

LOW

Medi cal

1 - closest

1

MODERATE

Cardi ac / Traumati c Arrest

2 - closest

1

1

9

Pi n-In/Extri cati on (RESCUE)

2 - closest

3

1

13

HIGH

Mul ti /Mass Casual ty BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL

FIRE RESPONSE

OUTSIDE Grass/Refuse

MODERATE

3

2

5

1

26

2

1

4

3

46

1 - closest

15:00

# FF

FIRST DUE

3

6:20

1

1

1

9

STRUCTURES

2

2

1

1

15

6:20

4

3

2

2

30

6:20

3

2

2

3

52

10:20

TARGET HAZARDS

15:00 TOTAL

ENG TRK AMB CHF

Nature OUTSIDE / Investi gati on

ERF

10:20

Large - Mega (R,M,C)

HAZMAT RESPONSE

HIGH

10:20 6:20

1*

* M ultiFamily A larm +1Eng

MODERATE

6:20

ALARM*/INVESTIGATION/VEHICLE

BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL +

LOW

6:20

Smal l - Medi um (R,M,C)

HIGH

ERF

10:20

ENG TRK AMB CHF

Nature

LOW

5

FIRST DUE

1 - closest

# FF

FIRST DUE

3

6:20

CO (no i l l ness), Fuel Spi l l INSIDE / Stati c Rel ease

10:20 1

1

1

1

9

6:20

2

1

2

1

14

6:20

CO (wi th i l l ness), i nsi de Gas l eak DYNAMIC / Acti ve Rel ease

ERF

10:20

*Level A Team Response needed

15:00

BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL SOUTHWEST + HAZMAT TEAM

RESCUE RESPONSE LOW MODERATE HIGH

Nature El evator entrapment

ENG TRK AMB CHF 1 - closest

# FF

FIRST DUE

3

6:20

Lock Out, Wi res down MVA w/ Extrication Vehi cl e i nto bui l di ng SPECIAL OPERATIONS - TRT

10:20 1

1

1

1

9

2

2

2

2

18

Con Space, Col l apse, Rope, Water BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL +

ERF

6:20 10:20 6:20 15:00

MABAS TEAMS

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TRACK & TRAIN [PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS] • BASELINE & BENCHMARK MEASURES

TIMES

•First Due (Distribution) & Balance of Alarm (Concentration) Goals/Actual Times

Establish current baseline times and benchmark goals using this SOC and National Standards (ie NFPA 1710) for 1st Due and balance of alarms for 90% of all incidents.

As part of the ongoing Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) program, we must measure the District’s responses and performance to these incidents with Threats and Risks to ensure efficient and effective delivery of services rendered that meet or exceed the District’s benchmarks.

Additionally, Training on performance and proficiency of the Critical Task Assignments needs to be conducted to ensure rapid completion once the units and personnel arrive on the scene. Establish Job Performance Requirements (JPR’s ) baseline and benchmark times with CQI as ultimate goal.

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ALL HAZARD COMMUNITY RISKS One definition of “HAZARD” can be defined as any dangerous condition with the potential to cause harm to people and loss to property. This harm or loss can be a result of fire, medical emergencies, hazardous material release, entrapment or other natural/man made hazards. Orland Fire is the Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) and as such is responsible and responds to all those hazard zone emergencies and manages the risks associated with them. “RISK” can also be defined as an “estimate of the probability” of a hazard related incident occurring and the severity of harm or damage that may result. Risk Assessment is the process of evaluating and identification of potential risks within a community, and the process of assessing and classifying those risks. It is the critical initial step in emergency preparedness, which enables organizations to eventually mitigate (if possible), plan, prepare and deploy appropriate resources to attain a desired outcome. This CRA is a critical step in the process of developing a Standard of Cover (SOC). This process includes examining the events that may occur within a jurisdiction and projecting the potential impacts of those events on the community. It is the goal of the SOC process to match the deployment of resources with the identified risk in the most effective manner possible. The steps involved include:    

An examination of the nature of the hazard(s) that may exist Identification of the values and property at risk Evaluation of the impact and consequence of an event Consideration of the potential frequency of an event

The District responds to a variety of risks and each type of risk may have different resource needs. In the SOC process, deployment is analyzed from the basis of all-hazard risk. Some risks require a greater deployment of resources than others to achieve an acceptable outcome. Deployment strategies are based on the goal of providing the needed resources to handle the risk. It is quantified by considering how many people must arrive within a specific time frame and resources to mitigate the situation (i.e. “TASK MATH”). The methodology includes 4 primary steps: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Identify the risks Assessing the risks Categorizing the risks Classifying the risks

The relationship between probability and consequences are one of the principles used in risk analysis. This concept is critical to the eventual establishment of risk levels for each area served. As either factor

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increases, it will impact the overall risk. The probability and consequence establish the overall risk factor for any given situation. To adequately process and plan for various risk in the District, a systemic review of the community is needed. Two primary categories were examined: community risk and service demand. As with all other communities, the Orland Fire District has potential risks. Such risks can be humancaused (e.g., preventable injuries, fires) or naturally occurring (e.g., from frequently occurring severe the weather to tornados; etc.) Examples of uncommon risks in this area might include earthquakes, domestic terrorism and major hazardous material release. The District has identified and prioritized potential and likely risks, and subsequently prioritized them to include strategies to mitigate these risks. According to the CPSE, these terms are significant in a Community Risk Assessment: HAZARD – the causes of danger and peril usually caused by: o Human, Material, Mechanical, or Natural events THREAT - the likelihood or probability of injury or harm CONSEQUENCE – the disparate outcome of loss or injury measured by: o Emotional, Economic, or Historic IMPACT - the events drain on resources, deployment, and coverage RISK – the classification type and category degree of danger or peril of injury/loss by: o Classification by program (Fire, EMS, Rescue, Hazmat) o Categorization by degree (Low, Moderate, High)

RISK EXPECTATIONS Each community must identify an accepted level of service. Accepted risk is a relative term that is

determined by considering expected and desired outcomes, availability of resources and cost. The process of establishing what is “right” for the District is a policy decision. It is important to capture the expectations of the community at the start of the process to build the appropriate criteria. Stakeholder interviews identified the following for economic and cultural risk: Schools and retail bases such as Orland Square Mall. Interruption to the main traffic thoroughfares is also a major concern. The next step in this examination of risk is to look at the mission and goals established by the organization. The second is to establish performance objectives for each service that is provided. The decisive step is to develop specific performance measures for each service provided in each risk category. MISSION: “The Orland Fire Protection District is dedicated to protecting life and property while valuing full accountability to each other and those the District serve”

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RISK IDENTIFICATION and CLASSIFICATION RISK ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY and CATERGORIZATION Risk assessment includes determining and defining the distinct threats in the community, based on occupancy such as single-family, multi-family, commercial, and other special type structures. Each scenario presents unique problems and requires an appropriate Fire, Rescue or EMS response. After analysis of these and all other factors, the District had chosen to use these structures size, height, occupancy type, and problem as the basis to classify the potential risks associated. This also ties in perfectly with the “SHOPS” Size-Up portion of Blue Card Incident Command Certification (which all members in Orland are instructed as well as what the District has taught to over 1,000 other Incident Commanders via the District’s Command Training Center throughout the State).

“SHOPS” is a Blue Card Command acronym for a defining a structure’s:

Size, Height, Occupancy, Problem, Strategy. This also is identified as a risk assessment decision tree in the CPSE Quality Improvement through Accreditation (QITA) manual. Points are scored on a structure's assessment. The structure assessment utilizes a Size, Height, Occupancy, and Problem. This assessment reflects the number of personnel that will be needed to mitigate an incident based from a critical task analysis “Task Math” and impact to the District and Community. The larger, taller, buildings require more personnel to mitigate incidents in these structures. The different occupancies have different community impact and risk considerations. Utilizing this model, the Orland Fire District is primarily comprised of moderate risk buildings.

STRUCTURE RISK ASSESSMENT SIZE PRECONNECT REACH

Small

Medium

Large

Mega

1

2

3

4

HEIGHT STORIES

One

Two

Three

Four

1

2

3

4

OCCUPANCY TYPE

Residential

Multifamily

Commercial

Target

1

2

3

4

SPEC OP 3

SERVICE 0

PROBLEM EMS 1

NATURE

FIRE 2

RISK SCORE LOW= < 3 TYPE CLASS SCORING - OCCUPANCY SHOPS Size RESIDENTIAL 2 MULTIFAMILY 3 COMMERCIAL 3 TARGET 4

MODERATE =

Height 2 3 1 4

Occupancy 1 2 3 4

Problem 1 1 2 2

SCORE 6 9 9 14

4-9

HIGH = > 10

TYPE - PROBABILITY/CONSEQUENCE FIRE EMS RESCUE M L-M L M L-M M M M-H M H H H

HAZMAT L-M L-M M H

TOTAL 4-7 6-8 8-9 12 L = 1, M = 2, H, = 3

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The “moderate” risk was also identified in the 2006 Master Plan and the 2011 Staffing studies: “the District contains mostly low to moderate risk properties”. The predominance of higher risk is in Orland’s core, along the Route 45 corridor in the center of the District. The remaining parcels reflect mid-rise, mixed-use, institutional, multi-family, and single-family occupancies. These classifications have been calculated, quantified and verified in site assessment of the District in those past studies as well currently at the www.FIRECARES.org site with results listed below. As all hazard – first response agency, the District must assess and plan for more than just fires. For example, EMS is the top response request and rescue and special operations must also be analyzed individually. This CRA/SOC considers these independently. The size or area of a building is a key factor in assessing risk for fires. Larger more complex structures carry a higher risk due to the time it takes to complete suppression activities within them. They tend to require longer hose lays, more ladders and may require equipment staging areas within the building for working crews. The height of buildings is also a factor in assessing risk for fires. There is a direct relationship between height and the equipment needed to protect the building. For example, the roof of most three-story buildings cannot be accessed with a 24-foot ladder, the standard on many the District engine companies. A 24-foot ladder can be placed with only one person, while a 35-foot ladder requires two personnel. Buildings three or more stories require an aerial ladder to access the upper floors and roof area. Processes being performed within a structure can increase the risk factors significantly. If a standard commercial concrete tilt-up building is used as an office or warehouse, the risk is not significant, but if the same building is used as a woodworking shop or printing shop, an explosion potential exists. The same building using copious quantities of flammable liquids or gases would change the risk factors again. Finally, changing the use by adding many people such as in a church or restaurant changes the life hazard and the risk factors of the structure. What is happening in the structure is every bit as important to the overall risk assessment as the size, location and construction of the building. Built-in fire protection (fire sprinklers, standpipes, etc.) is a major issue with larger structures. Built-in fire protection negates many of the concerns regarding large structures or hazardous processes. In many communities, developers and builders are given “credit” for built-in protection by allowing narrower street, longer cul-de-sacs, larger buildings and/or smaller water mains. This results in the lower risk and cost. While built-in fire protection should significantly reduce the spread of fire, it may not extinguish the fire. Firefighters still need to complete the extinguishment and perform ventilation, overhaul and salvage operations. A large majority of the commercial building in Orland are fully sprinklered.

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TARGET HAZARDS/CRITICAL FACILITIES FEMA defines these as: “facilities in either the public or private sector that provide essential products and services to the public, are otherwise necessary to preserve the welfare and quality of life in the community, or fulfill important public safety, emergency response, and/or disaster recovery functions.” Critical Infrastructure described by DHS/FEMA is discussed later in this chapter. To conduct an effective target hazard assessment, some key definitions must be understood: Hazards: Known physical features that can ignite and sustain combustion, or existing features (natural or manmade) that have the potential to cause negative impacts to life, property and/or natural resources. Values: Community assets, including life, property and natural resources Other major target hazards have been identified. These include nursing homes, mid-rise and other buildings (consisting of three floors or greater), all public schools, and locations of hazardous materials sites. This information assisted in determining where best to locate fire suppression and other specialty resources for each planning zone. A comprehensive review of the service area was completed. Data was gathered from ISO, fire prevention inspection records, GIS list of high rise occupancies, target hazards in CAD, economic revenues from Census, and interviews with the Village and District stakeholders. The information was then reviewed with the Fire Prevention Bureau and information was collected on type of risk found: Need Fire Flow (NFF), Hazardous Material occupancy, Life Safety risk, High Rise, economic risk and other (historical/cultural). An interesting fact was found concerning needed fire flow and reports given to the District by ISO. Much of the data in these “batch reports” were found to be incorrect – especially regarding the large commercial structures showing “non-sprinklered” by ISO when in fact they are (for example – Home Depot and Walmart!). This finding, and soon to be field correction by ISO, dramatically changes the NFF for the District and potentially could have adversely affected the ISO rating if this was not discovered and challenged. After a detailed analysis, the District has identified the following as “target hazards/critical facilities”: Schools, Nursing/Assisted Living, Hotels, Malls as well as non-sprinklered structures 4 stories or more are considered high or target hazards. Police and Fire Stations, Communication Systems, Water Treatment facilities are considered “critical” facilities. Fortunately, all these facilities are fully sprinklered and alarmed within the District. The number of Target Hazards per Station Area of Responsibility (AOR) are listed to the right.

Station AOR Target Hazards 1

23

2

13

3

10

4

13

5

4

6

4 67

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There are 16 critical infrastructure sectors whose assets, systems, and networks, whether physical or virtual, are considered so vital to the United States that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety, or any combination thereof. Presidential Policy Directive 21 (PPD-21): Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience advances a national policy to strengthen and maintain secure, functioning, and resilient critical infrastructure. This directive supersedes Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7 This entire section below was taken verbatim from the DHS website to better define the 10 of the 16 Critical Infrastructure identified in the Orland Fire District.

Commercial Facilities Sector The Commercial Facilities Sector includes a diverse range of sites that draw large crowds of people for shopping, business, entertainment, or lodging. Facilities within the sector operate on the principle of open public access, meaning that the public can move freely without the deterrent of highly visible security barriers. Most of these facilities are privately owned and operated, with minimal interaction with the federal government and other regulatory entities. The Commercial Facilities Sector consists of eight subsectors: 

Entertainment and Media (e.g., motion picture studios, broadcast media).

Gaming (e.g., casinos).

Lodging (e.g., hotels, motels, conference centers).

Outdoor Events (e.g., theme and amusement parks, fairs, campgrounds, parades).

Public Assembly (e.g., arenas, stadiums, aquariums, zoos, museums, convention centers).

Real Estate (e.g., office and apartment buildings, condominiums, mixed use facilities, selfstorage).

Retail (e.g., retail centers and districts, shopping malls).

Sports Leagues (e.g., professional sports leagues and federations).

Communications Sector The Communications Sector is an integral component of the U.S. economy, underlying the operations of all businesses, public safety organizations, and government. Presidential Policy Directive 21 identifies the Communications Sector as critical because it provides an “enabling function” across all critical infrastructure sectors. Over the last 25 years, the sector has evolved from predominantly a provider of voice services into a diverse, competitive, and interconnected industry using terrestrial, satellite, and wireless transmission systems. The transmission of these services has become interconnected; satellite, wireless, and wireline providers depend on each other to carry and terminate their traffic and companies routinely share facilities and technology to ensure interoperability.

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Emergency Services Sector The Emergency Services Sector (ESS) is a community of millions of highlyskilled, trained personnel, along with the physical and cyber resources that provide a wide range of prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery services during both day-to-day operations and incident response. The ESS includes geographically distributed facilities and equipment in both paid and volunteer capacities organized primarily at the federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial levels of government, such as city police departments and fire stations, county sheriff’s offices, Department of Defense police and fire departments, and town public works departments. The ESS also includes private sector resources, such as industrial fire departments, private security organizations, and private emergency medical services providers.

Energy Sector The U.S. energy infrastructure fuels the economy of the 21st century. Without a stable energy supply, health and welfare are threatened, and the U.S. economy cannot function. Presidential Policy Directive 21 identifies the Energy Sector as uniquely critical because it provides an “enabling function” across all critical infrastructure sectors. More than 80 percent of the country's energy infrastructure is owned by the private sector, supplying fuels to the transportation industry, electricity to households and businesses, and other sources of energy that are integral to growth and production across the nation. The energy infrastructure is divided into three interrelated segments: electricity, oil, and natural gas. The reliance of virtually all industries on electric power and fuels means that all sectors have some dependence on the Energy Sector. The Energy Sector is aware of its vulnerabilities and is leading a significant voluntary effort to increase its planning and preparedness. Cooperation through industry groups has resulted in substantial information sharing of best practices across the sector. Many sector owners and operators have extensive experience abroad with infrastructure protection and have more recently focused their attention on cybersecurity.

Financial Services Sector The Financial Services Sector represents a vital component of the District’s nation's critical infrastructure. Large-scale power outages, recent natural disasters, and an increase in the number and sophistication of cyberattacks demonstrate the wide range of potential risks facing the sector. The Financial Services Sector includes thousands of depository institutions, providers of investment products, insurance companies, other credit and financing organizations, and the providers of the critical financial utilities and services that

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support these functions. Financial institutions vary widely in size and presence, ranging from some of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest global companies with thousands of employees and many billions of dollars in assets, to community banks and credit unions with a small number of employees serving individual communities. Whether an individual savings account, financial derivatives, credit extended to a large organization, or investments made to a foreign country, these products allow customers to: 1. Deposit funds and make payments to other parties 2. Provide credit and liquidity to customers 3. Invest funds for both long and short periods 4. Transfer financial risks between customers

Government Facilities Sector The Government Facilities Sector includes a wide variety of buildings, located in the United States and overseas, that are owned or leased by federal, state, local, and tribal governments. Many government facilities are open to the public for business activities, commercial transactions, or recreational activities while others that are not open to the public contain highly sensitive information, materials, processes, and equipment. These facilities include general-use office buildings and specialuse military installations, embassies, courthouses, national laboratories, and structures that may house critical equipment, systems, networks, and functions. In addition to physical structures, the sector includes cyber elements that contribute to the protection of sector assets (e.g., access control systems and closed-circuit television systems) as well as individuals who perform essential functions or possess tactical, operational, or strategic knowledge. The Education Facilities Subsector covers pre-kindergarten through 12th grade schools, institutions of higher education, and business and trade schools. The subsector includes facilities that are owned by both government and private sector entities. The National Monuments and Icons Subsector encompasses a diverse array of assets, networks, systems, and functions located throughout the United States. Many National Monuments and Icons assets are listed in either the National Register of Historic Places or the List of National Historic Landmarks. The Election Infrastructure Subsector covers a wide range of physical and electronic assets such as storage facilities, polling places, and centralized vote tabulations locations used to support the election process, and information and communications technology to include voter registration databases, voting machines, and other systems to manage the election process and report and display results on behalf of state and local governments.

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Healthcare and Public Health Sector The Healthcare and Public Health Sector protects all sectors of the economy from hazards such as terrorism, infectious disease outbreaks, and natural disasters. Because many the sector's assets are privately owned and operated, collaboration and information sharing between the public and private sectors is essential to increasing resilience of the nation's Healthcare and Public Health critical infrastructure. Operating in all U.S. states, territories, and tribal areas, the sector plays a significant role in response and recovery across all other sectors in the event of a natural or manmade disaster. While healthcare tends to be delivered and managed locally, the public health component of the sector, focused primarily on population health, is managed across all levels of government: national, state, regional, local, tribal, and territorial. The Healthcare and Public Health Sector is highly dependent on fellow sectors for continuity of operations and service delivery, including Communications, Emergency Services, Energy, Food and Agriculture, Information Technology, Transportation Systems, and Water and Wastewater Systems.

Information Technology Sector The Information Technology Sector is central to the nation's security, economy, and public health and safety as businesses, governments, academia, and private citizens are increasingly dependent upon Information Technology Sector functions. These virtual and distributed functions produce and provide hardware, software, and information technology systems and services, and—in collaboration with the Communications Sector—the Internet. The sector's complex and dynamic environment makes identifying threats and assessing vulnerabilities difficult and requires that these tasks be addressed in a collaborative and creative fashion. Information Technology Sector functions are operated by a combination of entities—often owners and operators and their respective associations—that maintain and reconstitute the network, including the Internet. Although information technology infrastructure has a certain level of inherent resilience, its interdependent and interconnected structure presents challenges as well as opportunities for coordinating public and private sector preparedness and protection activities.

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Transportation Systems Sector The Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Transportation are designated as the Co-Sector-Specific Agencies for the Transportation Systems Sector. The nation's transportation system quickly, safely, and securely moves people and goods through the country and overseas. The Transportation Systems Sector consists of seven key subsectors or modes: 

Aviation includes aircraft, air traffic control systems, and about 19,700 airports, heliports, and landing strips. Approximately 500 provide commercial aviation services at civil and joint-use military airports, heliports, and sea plane bases. In addition, the aviation mode includes commercial and recreational aircraft (manned and unmanned) and a wide-variety of support services (such as aircraft repair stations, fueling facilities, navigation aids, and flight schools). Highway and Motor Carrier encompasses more than 4 million miles of roadway, more than 600,000 bridges, and more than 350 tunnels. Vehicles include trucks (including those carrying hazardous materials) other commercial vehicles (including commercial motor coaches and school buses), vehicle and driver licensing systems, traffic management systems, and cyber systems used for operational management. Maritime Transportation System consists of about 95,000 miles of coastline, 361 ports, more than 25,000 miles of waterways, and intermodal landside connections that allow the various modes of transportation to move people and goods to, from, and on the water. Mass Transit and Passenger Rail includes terminals, operational systems, and supporting infrastructure for passenger services by transit buses, trolleybuses, monorail, heavy rail (also known as subways or metros), light rail, passenger rail, and vanpool/rideshare. Public transportation and passenger rail operations provided an estimated 10.8 billion passenger trips in 2014. Pipeline Systems consist of more than 2.5 million miles of pipelines spanning the country and carrying nearly all the nation's natural gas and about 65 percent of hazardous liquids, as well as various chemicals. Above-ground assets, such as compressor stations and pumping stations, are also included. Freight Rail consists of seven major carriers, hundreds of smaller railroads, over 138,000 miles of active railroad, over 1.33 million freight cars, and approximately 20,000 locomotives. An estimated 12,000 trains operate daily. The Department of Defense has designated 30,000 miles of track and structure as critical to mobilization and resupply of U.S. forces. Postal and Shipping moves about 720 million letters and packages each day and includes large integrated carriers, regional and local courier services, mail services, mail management firms, and chartered and delivery services.

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Water and Wastewater Systems Sector Safe drinking water is a prerequisite for protecting public health and all human activity. Properly treated wastewater is vital for preventing disease and protecting the environment. Thus, ensuring the supply of drinking water and wastewater treatment and service is essential to modern life and the Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. The Water and Wastewater Systems Sector is vulnerable to a variety of attacks, including contamination with deadly agents and physical attacks (such as the release of toxic gaseous chemicals), and cyberattacks. The result of any variety of attack could be large numbers of illnesses or casualties and/or a denial of service that would also impact public health and economic vitality. The sector is also vulnerable to natural disasters. Critical services, such as firefighting and healthcare (hospitals), and other dependent and interdependent sectors, such as Energy, Food and Agriculture, and Transportation Systems, would suffer negative impacts from a denial of service in the Water and Wastewater Systems Sector.

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STRUCTURE INVENTORY/ BUILDING STOCK Structure fire risk assessment is performed on the community's building stock or inventory. According to analysis by District records, there are 18,676 structures within the District. The types are listed below, with the majority being Residential, and are broken down by Planning Zone. Most of the large commercial structures are protected with fire sprinklers systems. A few residential dwellings (mostly multifamily) in some areas are protected with residential sprinkler systems; however, most are not. Alarmed, sprinklered commercial buildings have low rated NFF so many are classified Moderate Risk.

Health Care, Outside or Industrial, Utility, Planning Detention & Other Critical Mercantile, Special Defense, Manufacturing, TOTAL per Zone Residential Multifamily Assembly Correction Educational Infrastructure Business Unknown Property Storage Agriculture, Mining Processing Zone 1 859 58 1 1 2 921 2 246 1 10 257 3 1 2 1 1 1 6 4 980 89 2 31 27 1129 5 1276 39 1 2 1318 6 287 287 7 574 3 3 8 588 8 289 56 2 4 351 9 806 52 19 1 8 2 66 3 11 968 10 667 150 10 1 4 1 74 1 1 909 11 638 1 1 1 9 650 12 93 93 13 405 1 1 3 410 14 344 37 4 4 8 1 2 1 401 15 201 114 6 3 1 42 3 38 3 411 16 766 92 1 8 4 75 2 948 17 1207 125 2 17 6 23 1380 18 1047 180 6 11 2 1 39 1 42 1329 19 1 1 42 44 20 61 9 70 21 320 42 5 2 3 75 5 452 22 32 33 3 2 1 14 1 9 95 23 1094 72 7 2 3 31 13 2 1224 24 142 24 1 4 3 174 25 1007 6 7 1020 26 127 127 27 569 62 3 634 28 804 49 1 4 858 30 611 116 7 3 1 738 31 640 214 2 1 1 9 14 881 32 1 1 1 3

16,094

1,611

RES 16,094

MULTI 1,611

76

28

37

TARGET 141

12

581

CRITICAL 12

COMM 818

36

12

175

13

1

18,676

*Obtained from Orland Fire District records (CAD, Inspections, RMS)

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FIRE RISKS NATIONWIDE: According to the United States Fire Administration (USFA), the trend in fires and fire deaths nationwide in this last decade continues to move downward; however, the hazard and threat to life is still very real. In the decade period from 2006 – 2015, overall nationwide data for USFA shows:

Fires

1,345,500 in 2015

-19.1% from 2006

Deaths

3,280 in 2015

-3.0% from 2006

Injuries

15,700 in 2015

-8.0% from 2006

$ Loss

$14.3 billion in 2015

-20.4% * from 2006

While this is a positive trend, the statistics are still quite grim: Nationwide 2016:  1,342,000 fires reported.  3,390 civilian deaths.  14,650 civilian injuries.  $10.6 billion in damage. In 2016 the USFA shows Fire Departments responded to a fire every 24 sec. and one structure fire every 66 sec.     

One home structure fire was reported every 90 sec. One civilian fire injury was reported every 34 min. One civilian fire death occurred every 2 hours and 35 min. One outside and other fire was reported every 48 sec. One highway vehicle fire was reported every 3 min. and 2 sec.

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IN ORLAND: No part of the District is immune from fire danger. Structural and automobile fires represent the most common types of fire in this area and can be caused by a variety of human, mechanical, and natural factors. Fires have the potential to spread to other structures or areas, particularly if not extinguished promptly. Proactive efforts, such as fire sprinkler systems, fire alarms, and fire-resistant construction methods, can collectively lessen the likelihood and reduce the severity of urban fires. Below is a summary of the four main classified fire types according to NFIRS. These include structures (or fires inside a structure), vehicle, brush/vegetation (wildland), and other fires classified by NFIRS Types. Also, below is the historical data for fire ground injuries and death to both civilian and firefighter as well as dollar loss/save rates for the period 2015-2017. 2015

2016

2017

TOTAL

YEARLY AVG.

Structure (fires in)

96

60

74

230

77

Vehicles

21

13

15

49

16

Brush/Vegetation

21

22

40

83

28

Other/Outside

24

24

50

98

33

TOTAL

162

119

179

460

153

FIRE DEATHS & INJURY

2015

2016

2017

TOTAL

YEARLY AVG.

CIVILIAN Fire Death

0

0

1

1

0

Fire Injuries

3

4

3

10

3

Fire Death

0

0

0

0

0

Fire Injuries

6

2

6

14

5

TOTAL

9

6

10

25

8

2015

2016

2017

TOTAL

YEARLY AVG.

FIRE RESPONSES

FIREFIGHTER

FIRE LOSS # STRUCTURE FIRES FIRE LOSS PROPERTY SAVE CONTAINED TO RM OF ORIGIN TOTAL

10 10 $2,344,750 $1,637,000 $1,771,000 $5,752,750 $2,876,375 $25,559,750 $26,130,000 $11,795,500 $63,485,250 $31,742,625 58%

46%

52%

$27,904,500 $27,767,001 $13,566,500 $69,238,000 $23,079,333

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TOP 5 FIRES BY PROPERTY TYPE USA 2 0 1 6 30.4% RESIDENTIAL 8.4% NONRESIDENTIAL 14.5% VEHICLE 41% OUTSIDE 5.8% OTHER

Top 5 Fires by Type in Orland FPD 0

50 100 150 200 250

Fires in Buildings

Natural vegetation fire, other

Passenger vehicle fire

Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire

Fire stations, staffing and apparatus need to be distributed within the community to provide an initial response force capable of dealing with each unique problem. Firefighters encounter a wide variety of fire conditions related to each risk category. When determining the location of a fire station, apparatus placement and staffing levels, a point in a fire’s growth that marks a significant shift in its threat to life and property is designated. This shift, or “flashover point,” makes conditions non-survivable. The Standard of Cover is intended to put enough Firefighters on the scene in time to prevent flashover to protect both the occupants and the Firefighters.

Reflex Chart for Response Time. Time Segments Relating to Flashover and EMS Intervention

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MODERN FIRE BEHAVIOR Thanks to the recent work by NIST (National Institute of Scientific Technology) and UL (Underwriters Laboratory), the fire service is learning more now than ever about the effects of fire on modern construction. The below graphs represent the time temperature curve of a past, or “legacy” style home, compared to the dramatically explosive “modern” fire environment in a ventilation limited fire scenario. These conditions can occur in less than 5 minutes. Common fire and life safety factors, such as fire flow and code compliance for life safety, are used to determine risk classification. Risk classifications range from Low, Moderate, High and finally to Special/Maximum. Single family dwellings, considered typical or moderate risk, comprise the majority of most communities.

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FIRE RISK TYPE ASSESSMENT A definition of â&#x20AC;&#x153;fire risk analysisâ&#x20AC;? considers fire potential (probability), life hazards and economic impact (consequences), occupancy use, construction features, fire protection systems, fire flow requirements, and community risk factors.

FIRE - RISK LOW

Vehicles, Brush, Refuse

MODERATE Structures SMALL - MEDIUM: Residential, Multifamily, Commercial

HIGH

By evaluating and using event probability, consequence, and location (as part of this analysis of existing and potential community risk), the following TYPE classification of fire risk hazard levels have been established:

Outside fires

Target Hazards LARGE - MEGA: Residential, Multifamily, Commercial or Schools, Hotels, Malls,

Nursing,Assisted Living

Low Risk type are incidents typically requiring a single Fire Company. Examples are small brush and dumpster type fires. Vehicle fires are also classified Low Risk; however, Orland Fire dispatches, additional Truck Company, and Battalion Chief are used for traffic control and manpower. Moderate Risk type are the Structure Fire incidents that make up most all the District. They involve Small to Medium Residential-Multifamily-Commercial occupancies. Typically, they are single family residential, small six unit or less multifamily apartment buildings, small to medium commercial, or strip mall buildings. Note that most commercial occupancies in the District are fully sprinklered. High Risk type are Large to Mega Size Residential-Multifamily-Commercial and include Target Hazards which have the risk of large loss of life, loss of economic value to the community, or high property loss. These include sites such as schools, hotels, skilled nursing facilities, and malls (such as Orland Square Mall). LOW RISK MODERATE RISK HIGH RISK

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CRITICAL TASK ANALYSIS

FIRE RISK “TASK MATH” – CRITICAL TASKS

Firefighting capability is determined by staffing levels, training, equipment, and teamwork. There are specific critical TASKS necessary to control and extinguish ALL RISK TYPE levels fires efficiently and safely. The definitions of an Effective Response Force (ERF) is the number of staff necessary to complete all the identified tasks within a prescribed timeframe. The chart to the right displays the critical tasks and minimum personnel necessary to control and extinguish each class of fire risk.

RESPONSE PLAN Response plans are the deployment of resources to bring the needed number of minimum personnel and equipment necessary to complete the CRITICAL TASKS, or “Task Math”, required to safely and efficiently mitigate the incident. This is the allocation of TEAMS/TOOLS/TRUCKS to be sent to the scene to complete the TASKS needed per incident level TYPE per THREAT (Risk). For example, if the ERF (Effective Response Force) for a medium 2 story residential structure fire (MODERATE RISK TYPE) is 15, the District will deploy the RESPONSE PLAN (TEAMS) as per the chart below:

FIRE - Critical Task / ERF CRITICAL TASK LOW Command/Safety 1 Fire Attack 1 Pump Operations 1 TOTAL ERF 3 CRITICAL TASK MODERATE Command/Safety 1 Fire Attack - 1st 2 Fire Attack - Backup 2 Search/Rescue 2 OnDeck - Rapid Intervention 2 Water Supply 1 Pump Operations 1 Ventilation 3 Utilities 1 TOTAL ERF 15 CRITICAL TASK HIGH Command/Safety 1 Fire Attack - 1st & 2nd 4 Fire Attack - Backup 2 Search/Rescue & EMS 8 OnDeck - Rapid Intervention Crew 2 Water Supply 1 Pump Operations/Aerial 2 Ventilation 6 Utilities 1 TOTAL ERF 27

2 ENGINES, 2 TRUCKS, 1 AMBULANCE, + 1 BATTALION CHIEF (15 personnel minimum).

FIRE RESPONSE LOW MODERATE HIGH

ENG TRK AMB CHF # FF FIRST

Nature OUTSIDE Grass/Refuse

DUE

1 - closest

3

ALARM*/INVESTIGATION/VEHICLE

1*

1

1

1

9

STRUCTURES

2

2

1

1

15

6:20 10:20 6:20

Small - Medium (R,M,C) Large - Mega (R,M,C)

10:20 4

3

2

2

30

TARGET HAZARDS BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL + * M ultiFamily A larm +1Eng

ERF

6:20 15:00

3

2

2

3

52 TOTAL

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NFIRS Group 100 – ALL FIRES INCIDENT LOCATION - HEATMAP (2015-17) This map indicates the location heat map frequency of incidents coded NFIRS Group 100 – ALL FIRES from 20152017.

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STRUCTURE FIRE FIRES IN STRUCTURES Structure fires are TYPE classified as MODERATE - HIGH RISK.

FIRE - Critical Task / ERF

The frequency of structure fires is LOW. The risk TYPES are MODERATE on single family homes with the minimum critical TASK assignments to the right. The TEAMS (TOOLS/TRUCKS) Deployment Plan is listed below. Over the previous three years, the average number of incidents is at 77 per year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 230 total 2015-2017. The number includes 134 cooking fires, confined to container.

TOTAL

FIRE LOSS

YEARLY AVG.

# STRUCTURE FIRES 22 FIRE LOSS $5,752,750 $2,876,375 PROPERTY SAVE $63,485,250 $31,742,625 CONTAINED TO RM 53% OF ORIGIN TOTAL

$69,238,000 $23,079,334

CONTAINED TO STRUCTURE

FIRE RESPONSE LOW MODERATE HIGH

50%

ENG TRK AMB CHF # FF FIRST

Nature OUTSIDE Grass/Refuse

CRITICAL TASK LOW 1 Command/Safety 1 Fire Attack 1 Pump Operations 3 TOTAL ERF MODERATE CRITICAL TASK 1 Command/Safety 2 Fire Attack - 1st 2 Fire Attack - Backup 2 Search/Rescue 2 OnDeck - Rapid Intervention 1 Water Supply 1 Pump Operations 3 Ventilation 1 Utilities 15 TOTAL ERF CRITICAL TASK HIGH 1 Command/Safety 4 Fire Attack - 1st & 2nd 2 Fire Attack - Backup 8 Search/Rescue & EMS 2 OnDeck - Rapid Intervention Crew 1 Water Supply 2 Pump Operations/Aerial 6 Ventilation 1 Utilities 27 TOTAL ERF

DUE

1 - closest

3

ALARM*/INVESTIGATION/VEHICLE

1*

1

1

1

9

STRUCTURES

2

2

1

1

15

4

3

2

2

30

6:20 10:20 6:20

Small - Medium (R,M,C) Large - Mega (R,M,C)

10:20

TARGET HAZARDS BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL +

ERF

6:20 15:00

3

NFIRS 2015 * M ultiFamily A larm +1Eng 111 Building fire 26 112 Fires in structure other than in a building 1 113 Cooking fire, confined to container 66 114 Chimney or flue fire 1 116 Fuel burner/boiler malfunction, 1 117 Commercial Compactor fire 118 Trash or rubbish fire, contained 1

2

2

2016 32 21 2 1 4

3

52

2017TOTAL Grand Total 18 76 2 3 47 134 1 4 1 2 1 5 10 230

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MOBILE PROPERTY Vehicle fires are TYPE classified as LOW RISK. However, due to the possible roadway locations Orland Fire dispatches an additional Truck Company and Battalion Chief for traffic blocking and scene control if necessary.

FIRE - Critical Task / ERF LOW

CRITICAL TASK Command/Safety Fire Attack Pump Operations

TOTAL ERF The frequency of passenger vehicle fires (NFIRS 131) over the previous three years average number of incidents at 16 per year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 49 total 2015-2017. This is a decline from a high of 21 in 2015 to 13 and 15 in 2016 and 2017 respectively.7.

FIRE RESPONSE LOW

Nature OUTSIDE Grass/Refuse ALARM*/INVESTIGATION/VEHICLE

NFIRS 130 Mobile property (vehicle) fire, other 131 Passenger vehicle fire 132 Road freight or transport vehicle fire 134 Water vehicle fire

FIRST

ENG TRK AMB CHF # FF DUE 1 - closest 1*

1

3

1

1

9

1 1 1 3

ERF

6:20 10:20

2015 2016 2017 Grand Total 2 2 19 12 13 44 2 2 1 1 49

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OUTSIDE FIRES Outside fires are TYPE classified LOW RISK. Orland Fires does not have vegetation fires that meet the classification of “wildland”. However, there are a few brush/grass fires. The frequency of brush fire (NFIRS 142) over the previous three years average number of incidents at 23 per year – 68 total 2015-2017.

FIRE - Critical Task / ERF CRITICAL TASK Command/Safety Fire Attack Pump Operations TOTAL ERF

LOW 1 1 1 3

This number of brush fires includes fires categorized as wildland-types (grass fires; forest, woods, or wildland fires; grass fires; natural vegetation fires).

NFIRS 2015 2016 2017 Grand Total 140 Natural vegetation fire, other 4 6 15 25 BRUSH/VEGETATION 141 Forest, woods or wildland fire 2 2 4 142 Brush or brush-and-grass mixture fire 11 7 7 25 Brush fires average 23 per year 143 Grass fire 2 5 7 14 and 2017 showed 50% increase 68

over the previous year’s 20.

NFIRS 2015 2016 2017 Grand Total 150 Outside rubbish fire, other 2 2 11 15 151 Outside rubbish, trash or waste fire 10 10 11 31 153 Construction or demolition landfill fire 1 2 3 154 Dumpster or other outside trash receptacle 7 fire 5 6 18 160 Special outside fire, other 2 2 15 19 162 Outside equipment fire 1 4 4 9 163 Outside gas or vapor combustion explosion 1 1 96

REFUSE/RUBBISH Refuse fires average at 32 per year. 2017 did show a 100% increase over the previous years from 23 to a high of 49.

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CONCLUSIONS and CATEGORIZATIONS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FIRE RISK The fire risk in the District is considered moderate and in line with national averages and most at risk populations. Community Risk Priorities based on the assessment of incident and demographic data, the top three priorities for community risk have been identified. These are potential risks that can ultimately be mitigated through various strategies, which will be addressed through a comprehensive community risk reduction plan. They include a focus of reduction of cooking fires, other small fires in the home, and brush/vegetation fires.

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EMS RISK EMS is TYPE classified LOW-MEDIUM RISK.

EMS - RISK

The District has responded to 17,862 EMS incidents from

LOW

2015-2017. These incidents are 65% of the requests for

Single Patient Injured/Illness

service.

MODERATE Severe Life Threat Cardiac Arrest/Trauma/Extrication

A review of incident history, types of incidents, and nature of call is listed below. The location property type of these incidents is mostly residential as identified in the adjacent exhibit.

EMS Incidents by Type Medical 8% 8% 8%

Trauma 76%

Cardiac Respiratory

HIGH

Retail / Commercial 7%

5 or more Pts

The District has identified both statistically and through strategic planning that emergency medical services are critical to the community. Statistical data substantiates that this is the highest level of service demand in all response zones. Although the consequence of an individual incident may not be high (typically limited to one fire company and one ambulance company), the probability of multiples of these incidents

Business Office Other recreation area 1% 1% PD Lock-up Restaurant 2% Nursing home 2%

4% Health care provider 6%

Multi/Mass Casualty

Public administrative 1% Church/Religious 1%

Single-Family Residential 46%

Roadway 14% Multiple Family Residentialâ&#x20AC;Ś

EMS Incidents Property Type

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occurring is very high. Thus, emergency medical incidents are high importance and have a very high impact on the Districts resources. EMS Incidents can be broken into three major risk TYPE group categories (with response) – Low, Moderate, and High. The chart to the right are the corresponding Critical TASKS associated with each Risk Group.

EMS - Critical Task / ERF CRITICAL TASK LOW Command/Safety/Family Liason 1 Patient Assessment/Treatment 1 Paramedic in Charge/ Documentation 1 Patient Movement/Transport 2 TOTAL ERF 5 CRITICAL TASK MODERATE Command/Safety/Family Liason 1 Patient Assessment/Treatment 2 Paramedic in Charge/ Documentation 1 Patient Movement/Transport 2 Patient Resusitation/Stabilization 3 TOTAL ERF 9 CRITICAL TASK HIGH Command 2 Scene Safety 1 Medical 1 Triage 3 Treatment 6 Transportation 12 Staging 1 TOTAL ERF 26

EXAMPLE OF TYPICAL “TEAM” DEPLOYMENT BY NATURE:

EMS RESPONSE

Nature

LOW

Medical

1 - closest

1

Cardiac / Traumatic Arrest

2 - closest

1

1

9

Pin-In/Extrication (RESCUE)

2 - closest

3

1

13

MODERATE HIGH

ENG TRK AMB CHF # FF FIRST

ERF

DUE

Multi/Mass Casualty BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL

NFIRS 311 Medical assist, assist EMS crew 320 Emergency medical service incident, other 321 EMS call, excluding vehicle accident with injury 322 Motor vehicle accident with injuries 323 Motor vehicle/pedestrian accident (MV Ped) 324 Motor vehicle accident with no injuries.

2015 3 5 5115 263 11 227

5

10:20

3

2

5

1

26

2

1

4

3

46

2016 2 11 5551 336 8 176

6:20 6:20 10:20 6:20 15:00

2017 Grand Total 4 9 7 23 5593 16259 285 884 7 26 169 572 17,773

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A review of EMS incidents from 2015-2017 indicate the Top 10 medical natures. This is an abbreviated period due to RMS software changes and incompatibility. The impressions are listed below. The top impression was “Other” so no conclusions can be drawn on those, as well as “No Apparent Illness/Injury.” These are likely refusals of treatment/transport. : Traumatic injury” was consistently the top with the Top 10 injury causes, listed on the next page. “Respiratory Distress and Weakness” rounded out the top three as well as corresponding treatments.

Provider Impression (2015-17) OTHER TRAUMATIC INJURY

EMS Treatment

NO APPARENT ILLNESS/INJURY RESPIRATORY DISTRESS WEAKNESS

Refusal

21.22%

BLS

21.83%

CHEST PAIN / DISCOMFORT PSYCHOLOGICAL EMERGENCIES SYNCOPE/FAINTING

ALS

ABDOMINAL PAIN/PROBLEMS ALTERED MENTAL STATUS

56.95 %

This data set is limited to the last 8 months due to the RMS change/incompatibility; however, as Traumatic Injury is the top EMS incident nature, it is pertinent to note that other than the second highest cause (Car occupant injury in MVA). The remaining clear majority are falls.

EMS RISK CONCLUSIONS and CATEGORIZATIONS Additional research and data analysis is needed to identify the most frequent primary impression involved such as: traumatic injuries, chest pain, altered level of consciousness, abdominal symptoms, etc. The current data available shows that traumatic injuries, because of falls, are the highest frequency nature. Non-traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest cases represented a relatively small number of EMS incidents. Most occurred at home and most presented with an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation (V-Fib). In 2017, the save rate for cardiac arrest patients in V-Fib reached 65% (national average is 11%).

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Emergency Medical environment continues to evolve with a changing society. Events such as terrorism, active shooter, and other man made hostile events are reshaping EMS roles and responsibilities which will require continued planning and training to meet those risks. EMS incident data showed that most of ground-level falls occurred among 65 years and older, typically female. The types of injuries were usually hip and lower-extremity fractures. While such injuries can be significant in younger persons, they are often much more devastating in the elderly. They frequently result in long-term functional impairment, nursing home admission, and increased mortality. Ground-level falls are preventable in many cases by making homes safer by reducing tripping hazards, improving lighting, and adding grab rails in bathrooms. In addition, regular exercise to improve strength and balance, annual eye exams, taking calcium and Vitamin D supplements, and ensuring that any medicines they are taking does not have side effects, such as dizziness or drowsiness, can all help to reduce the potential for falls.

NFIRS

300 RESCUE/EMS INCIDENT LOCATION

Top 10 Causes of Injury - 2017-18 "Accidental hit, strike, kick, twist, bite or… "Fall from or off toilet" "Contact with blunt object, undetermined intent" "Assault by bodily force" "Fall from bed" "Fall from chair" "Other slipping, tripping and stumbling and falls" "Fall (on) (from) unspecified stairs and steps" "Car occupant (driver) (passenger) injured in… "Fall on same level from slipping, tripping and… 2018

2017

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HAZARDOUS MATERIAL RISK HAZMAT is TYPE classified LOW-MODERATE RISK.

HAZMAT - Critical Task / ERF

A hazardous material is any substance or material capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health, safety, and property. Multiple factors determine if a material is considered hazardous, including quantity, concentration, and physical or chemical characteristics. A hazardous material becomes a hazardous waste when it can no longer be used for the purpose it was originally intended. Hazardous materials are present throughout the District. Chemicals are used in process, in transit, in storage, and, in some cases, disposed of illegally. These hazardous materials come in all sizes and risks from household hazardous waste to acutely hazardous materials. Businesses use, transport, or sell thousands of diverse types of hazardous materials. Many processors mix materials, changing the chemical properties and increasing the potential risk. The District recognizes that all facilities have the potential to carry and utilize minimal amounts of hazardous materials. A number of these businesses have reportable levels (quantities of material that require disclosure of the location, amount, and nature of the risk) of hazardous materials. Additionally, all types and quantities of hazardous materials travel through the District by rail, air, and truck. The hazardous materials risk may be significant enough to require the District to have a hazardous materials response team capable of Level A entry (HazMat).

HAZMAT RESPONSE LOW MODERATE HIGH

Nature OUTSIDE / Investigation CO (no illness), Fuel Spill INSIDE / Static Release CO (with illness), inside Gas leak DYNAMIC / Active Release *Level A Team Response needed

CRITICAL TASK LOW Command/Safety 1 Investigation 2 TOTAL ERF 3 CRITICAL TASK MODERATE Command/Safety 1 Hazmat Sector Officer 1 Investigation/Entry 2 Backup 2 Science/Research 1 EMS/Treatment 2 TOTAL ERF 9 CRITICAL TASK HIGH Command 1 Safety 1 Hazmat Sector Officer 1 Entry 2 Backup 2 Science/Research 2 Decon 3 EMS/Treatment 2 TOTAL ERF 14

ENG TRK AMB CHF # FF FIRST DUE

3

1 - closest

ERF

6:20 10:20

1

1

1

1

9

2

1

2

1

14

6:20 10:20 6:20 15:00

BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL + SOUTHWEST HAZMAT TEAM

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The top three hazardous conditions in the District from 2015-2017 are: -

Natural Gas leaks (241). Carbon Monoxide leak (147). Electrical Lines down/arc (116).

It is noted that natural gas leaks have dropped from an average of 80 per year to 68 in 2017. This may be due to reduced road construction work on LaGrange Rd.

NFIRS 400 – Hazardous Hazardous Condition ATTEMPTED BURNING,… BUILDING OR STRUCTURE… BIOLOGICAL HAZARD,… ARCING, SHORTED… POWER LINE DOWN BREAKDOWN OF LIGHT… OVERHEATED MOTOR HEAT FROM SHORT CIRCUIT… ELECTRICAL… CARBON MONOXIDE INCIDENT CHEMICAL SPILL OR LEAK CHEMICAL HAZARD (NO SPILL… TOXIC CONDITION, OTHER OIL OR OTHER COMBUSTIBLE… GAS LEAK (NATURAL GAS OR… GASOLINE OR OTHER… COMBUSTIBLE/FLAMMABLE… HAZARDOUS CONDITION,… 0

Condition Incident Frequency Heatmap

1 1 1 68 48 3 26 9 46 147 7 5 2 3 241 20 4 18 50 100 150 200 250 300

NFIRS 2015 2016 400 Hazardous condition, other 2 9 410 Combustible/flammable gas/liquid condition, other 411 Gasoline or other flammable liquid spill 5 9 412 Gas leak (natural gas or LPG) 89 84 413 Oil or other combustible liquid spill 1 420 Toxic condition, other 1 421 Chemical hazard (no spill or leak) 1 2 422 Chemical spill or leak 3 1 424 Carbon monoxide incident 55 45 440 Electrical wiring/equipment problem, other13 16 441 Heat from short circuit (wiring), defective/worn 2 3 442 Overheated motor 17 5 443 Breakdown of light ballast 2 444 Power line down 24 9 445 Arcing, shorted electrical equipment 26 27 451 Biological hazard, confirmed/suspected 461 Buildings/structure weakened/collapsed 1 480 Attempted burning, illegal action, other 1

2017 Grand Total 7 18 4 4 6 20 68 241 2 3 1 2 2 5 3 7 47 147 17 46 4 9 4 26 1 3 15 48 15 68 1 1 1 1 650

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5 MAJOR PIPELINES RUN THROUGH the District and TANK FARM ON SOUTHWEST BORDER

Tank Farm -MFPD CONCLUSIONS and CATEGORIZATIONS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; HAZMAT The HAZMAT risk TYPE in the District is considered LOW to MODERATE. 77% of the incidents from 2015-2017 are type classified as low-risk such as outside Natural Gas leaks, Carbon Monoxide incidents, and electrical lines down/arching incidents. Most of the potential exposure for HIGH risk TYPE incidents in the District includes transportation, roadway, rail, electrical, and pipelines.

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RESCUE RISK RESCUE is TYPE classified as LOW to MODERATE

RESCUE - Critical Task / ERF Rescue risks within CRITICAL TASK the District is LOW 1 primarily EMS/motor Command/Safety LOW Elevator entrapment Extrication 2 Occupied, Lock Out,Wires Down vehicle accidents. TOTAL ERF 3 MODERATE MVA w/ extrication From 2015-2017, 62% Vehicle into Building CRITICAL TASK MODERATE of all incidents is HIGH Spec Operations Technicians (TRT) Command/Safety 1 NFPA Incident 300 Confined Space, Trench, Rescue Sector Officer 1 were in this category. Structure Collapse, Water/Ice Stabilization 2 Low/High Angle Rope Rescues Excluding the 16,259 Extrication 2 EMS incidents and Medical 1 1,482 Motor Vehicle Accidents, the remaining next two highest TOTAL ERF 7 requests were Elevator Rescue (63) and lock-in (9). Lock-in incidents can usually be forcible entry into a dwelling or automobile if someone (i.e. a child) are locked in. They could have been coded incorrectly as a lock in instead of service call lock out (code 511), which has a much higher number of incidents at 162. These Rescue incidents, once EMS and MVA with no extrication are removed, reduce to 81 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 63 of which are occupied elevator rescues that average 20 per year. RESCUE - RISK

LOW risk TYPE RESCUE Elevator entrapment, residential or vehicle lockout, and wires down are classified LOW risk TYPE.

RESCUE RESPONSE LOW MODERATE HIGH

Nature

ENG TRK AMB CHF # FF FIRST

ERF

DUE

Elevator entrapment

1 - closest

3

6:20

Lock Out, Wires down MVA w/ Extrication Vehicle into building SPECIAL OPERATIONS - TRT

10:20 1

1

1

1

9

2

2

2

2

18

Con Space, Collapse, Rope, Water BOX ALARM - ADDITIONAL +

NFIRS 331 Lock-in (if lock out , use 511 ) 342 Search for person in water 350 Extrication, rescue, other 351 Extrication of victim(s) from building/structure 352 Extrication of victim(s) from vehicle 353 Removal of victim(s) from stalled elevator 356 High-angle rescue 360 Water & ice-related rescue, other 381 Rescue or EMS standby

6:20 10:20 6:20 15:00

MABAS TEAMS 2015 2016 2017 Grand Total 4 2 3 9 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 20 20 23 63 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 81

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MODERATE risk TYPE RESCUE Vehicle Extrication is classified as a MODERATE risk TYPE. As a Pin-In response, the District deploys one ENGINE, one TRUCK (both extrication tools equipped), and two AMBULANCES with one CHIEF.

HIGH risk TYPE RESCUE Technical Rescue covers a wide range of incidents, which include vehicle extrication, confined space rescue, trench collapse, low/high angle rescue, swift water rescue, and structural collapse. The hazard levels have been established for technical rescue risk per each discipline of Special Operations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rope, Confined Space, Trench, and Water/Ice Rescue. These are the corresponding Critical TASKS associated with HIGH risk TYPE Group. These are strictly Technician Level team deployments.

RESCUE RISK CONCLUSIONS & CATEGORIZATIONS MODERATE risk TYPE classification for Rescue District wide, with most of it coming from motor vehicle accidents. HIGH risk TYPE incidents requiring Special Operations team deployment within the District accounted for two high angle/confined space incidents and two water rescues from 2015-2017.

RESCUE - Critical Task / ERF CRITICAL TASK TECHNICAL RESCUE - Rope Incident Command Rescue Officer Safety Rescue Team and Back-up Rigging / Haul Team Treatment TOTAL ERF TECH. RESCUE - Confined Space Incident Command Rescue Officer Safety Attendant Rescue Team and Back-up Ventilation Monitoring Air supply Rigging / Haul Team Treatment TOTAL ERF TECH. RESCUE - Trench Incident Command Rescue Officer Safety Rescue Team and Back-up Shoring Team Air Supply Treatment TOTAL ERF TECH. RESCUE - Water Incident Command Rescue Officer Safety Rescue Team and Back-up Rope Tenders Treatment TOTAL ERF TECH. RESCUE - Collapse Incident Command Rescue Officer Safety Rescue Squad Officers Rescue Specialists Treatment Cut Station Equipment Log TOTAL ERF

HIGH 1 1 1 4 5 2 14 HIGH 1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 5 2 18 HIGH 1 1 1 4 8 2 2 19 HIGH 1 1 1 4 4 2 13 HIGH 1 1 1 2 8 2 2 1 18

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DISASTER RISK DISASTERS are TYPE classified as HIGH RISK. The following tables were established using data from 2013 Illinois natural hazard mitigation plan. It was used to determine the probability of a natural disaster occurring to the area of the Orland Fire Protection District. After the probability was established for the District’s area, it was broken down by occupancy and individualized the impact for each building type. The following disaster types were established as possibilities for the District: 

Severe Thunderstorm

Extreme Winter Storm/Ice

Tornado

Extreme Temperatures

Flood

Earthquake

Drought

Disease Epidemic

The impact of each disaster was broken down by the impact of three distinct areas: human impact, property impact, and business impact. Human impact is the risk towards health and life of the occupants of these buildings. Property impact is the structure itself and the need for rebuilding or repairs. Business impact is the ability to remain open to perform business operations. These individual impacts are combined, averaged, and combined with the probability of each disaster occurring. This raw value will indicate the risk assessment for each given occupancy.

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Using this method for developing risk assessment, several conclusions were found. It was established that severe thunderstorms and extreme winter storms had the greatest probability of occurring. This was followed by tornado, extreme temperatures, and flood. The total impact/consequences were highest for tornado and earthquake due to the nature of the event. The property and business impact will be high if a disaster of that magnitude occurred. This leads to the overall risk assessment to be established as the highest for extreme winter storm, tornado, and extreme winter storms for most of occupancies. The hazards that were identified to have the longest duration were flood, disease epidemic, and drought. A longer duration, but a lower acute risk, makes these events have a lower impact but still affects the community. The following map shows the tornado activity for the United States. The District’s area shows an average of six to ten tornados per 1000 sq. mi. per year. This map shows the hazard of seismic activity in the District’s area. With southern Illinois having a much greater risk than the District’s area, the District still has risk of earthquake activity. In the event of this happening, it would have tremendous impact on the District’s area.

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HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TOOL – NATURALLY OCCURING EVENTS HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TOOL NATURALLY OCCURRING EVENTS

Residential IMPACT / CONSEQUENCES PROBABILITY HUMAN

PROPERTY

BUSINESS

Likelihood this will occur

Possibility of death or injury

Physical losses and damages

Interuption of services

SCORE

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

EVENT

AVERAGE SCORE

TOTAL IMPACT

PROBABILITY + IMPACT

Average Impact 0 = N/A = Lo w M o derate = High Extreme

1 2= 3 4=

Overall Risk Factor

Severe Thunderstorm

4

2

2

0

4

1.33

5.33

Extreme Winter/Ice Storm

4

2

2

0

4

1.33

5.33

Tornado

3

3

4

0

7

2.33

5.33

Temperature Extremes

3

3

1

0

4

1.33

4.33

Flood

3

2

3

0

5

1.67

4.67

Earthquake

1

3

4

0

7

2.33

3.33

Drought

2

2

1

0

3

1.00

3.00

Epidemic

1

2

1

0

3

1.00

2.00

AVERAGE SCORE

2.63

2.38

2.25

0.00

4.625

1.54

4.17

HP / LI

HP / HI

PROBABILITY HIGH

Risk Assessment 1-2 Low Threat 3-4 Moderate Threat 5-6 High Threat LP / LI

LP / HI

LOW

HIGH

7-8 Extreme Threat

LOW

IMPACT

For natural occurring hazard events, the chart above was used to analyze the risks and vulnerability’s while determining potential consequences for the 4 building types (Residential, Multifamily, Commercial, and Target Hazard) as part of the Orland Fire Districts Risk Assessment model.

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HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TOOL NATURALLY OCCURRING EVENTS

Multi-Family IMPACT / CONSEQUENCES PROBABILITY HUMAN

PROPERTY

BUSINESS

Likelihood this will occur

Possibility of death or injury

Physical losses and damages

Interuption of services

SCORE

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

EVENT

AVERAGE SCORE

TOTAL IMPACT

PROBABILITY + IMPACT

Average Impact 0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

Overall Risk Factor

Severe Thunderstorm

4

2

2

0

4

1.33

5.33

Extreme Winter/Ice Storm

4

2

2

0

4

1.33

5.33

Tornado

3

3

4

0

7

2.33

5.33

Temperature Extremes

3

3

1

0

4

1.33

4.33

Flood

3

2

3

0

5

1.67

4.67

Earthquake

1

3

4

0

7

2.33

3.33

Drought

2

2

1

0

3

1.00

3.00

Epidemic

1

2

1

0

3

1.00

2.00

AVERAGE SCORE

2.63

2.38

2.25

0.00

4.625

1.54

4.17

HP / LI

HP / HI

PROBABILITY HIGH

Risk Assessment 1-2 Low Threat 3-4 Moderate Threat 5-6 High Threat LP / LI

LP / HI

LOW

HIGH

7-8 Extreme Threat

LOW

IMPACT

For natural occurring hazard events, the chart above was used to analyze the risks and vulnerabilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s while determining potential consequences for the 4 building types (Residential, Multifamily, Commercial, and Target Hazard) as part of the Orland Fire Districts Risk Assessment model.

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HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TOOL NATURALLY OCCURRING EVENTS

Commercial IMPACT / CONSEQUENCES PROBABILITY HUMAN

PROPERTY

BUSINESS

Likelihood this will occur

Possibility of death or injury

Physical losses and damages

Interuption of services

SCORE

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

Severe Thunderstorm

4

2

2

3

Extreme Winter/Ice Storm

4

2

2

Tornado

3

3

4

Temperature Extremes

3

3

Flood

3

Earthquake Drought

EVENT

AVERAGE SCORE TOTAL Average Impact IMPACT 0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

PROBABILITY + IMPACT

Overall Risk Factor

7

2.33

6.33

3

7

2.33

6.33

4

11

3.67

6.67

1

1

5

1.67

4.67

2

3

3

8

2.67

5.67

1

3

4

4

11

3.67

4.67

2

2

1

1

4

1.33

3.33

Epidemic

1

2

1

3

6

2.00

3.00

AVERAGE SCORE

2.63

2.38

2.25

2.75

7.375

2.46

5.08

HP / LI

HP / HI

PROBABILITY HIGH

Risk Assessment 1-2 Low Threat 3-4 Moderate Threat 5-6 High Threat LP / LI

LP / HI

LOW

HIGH

7-8 Extreme Threat

LOW

IMPACT

For natural occurring hazard events, the chart above analyzes the risks and vulnerabilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s while determining potential consequences for the 4 building types (Residential, Multifamily, Commercial, and Target Hazard) as part of the Orland Fire Districts Risk Assessment model.

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Health Care Facilities IMPACT / CONSEQUENCES PROBABILITY HUMAN

PROPERTY

BUSINESS

Likelihood this will occur

Possib ility of death or injury

Physical losses and damages

Interuption of services

SCORE

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

EVENT

AVERAGE SCORE

TOTAL IMPACT

PROBABILITY + IMPACT

Average Impact 0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

Overa l l Ri sk Fa ctor

Severe Thunders torm

4

2

2

3

7

2.33

6.33

Extrem e Winter/Ice Storm

4

2

2

3

7

2.33

6.33

Tornado

3

3

4

4

11

3.67

6.67

Tem perature Extrem es

3

3

1

1

5

1.67

4.67

Flood

3

2

3

3

8

2.67

5.67

Earthquake

1

3

3

3

9

3.00

4.00

Drought

2

2

1

1

4

1.33

3.33

Epidem ic

1

2

1

4

7

2.33

3.33

AVERAGE SCORE

2.63

2.38

2.13

2.75

7.25

2.42

5.04

HP / LI

HP / HI

PROBABILITY HIGH

Risk Assessment 1-2 Low Threat 3-4 Moderate Threat 5-6 High Threat LP / LI

LP / HI

LOW

HIGH

7-8 Extreme Threat

LOW

IMPACT HAZARD AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT TOOL NATURALLY OCCURRING EVENTS

Orland Mall IMPACT / CONSEQUENCES PROBABILITY HUMAN

PROPERTY

BUSINESS

Likelihood this will occur

Possib ility of death or injury

Physical losses and damages

Interuption of services

SCORE

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

EVENT

AVERAGE SCORE

TOTAL IMPACT

PROBABILITY + IMPACT

Average Impact 0 = N/A 1= Lo w 2 = M o derate 3 = High 4 = Extreme

Overa l l Ri sk Fa ctor

Severe Thunders torm

4

2

2

3

7

2.33

6.33

Extrem e Winter/Ice Storm

4

2

2

3

7

2.33

6.33

Tornado

3

3

4

3

10

3.33

6.33

Tem perature Extrem es

3

3

1

1

5

1.67

4.67

Flood

3

2

3

2

7

2.33

5.33

Earthquake

1

3

4

3

10

3.33

4.33

Drought

2

2

1

1

4

1.33

3.33

Epidem ic

1

3

1

3

7

2.33

3.33

AVERAGE SCORE

2.63

2.50

2.25

2.38

7.125

2.38

5.00

HP / LI

HP / HI

PROBABILITY HIGH

Risk Assessment 1-2 Low Threat 3-4 Moderate Threat 5-6 High Threat LP / LI

LP / HI

LOW

HIGH

7-8 Extreme Threat

LOW

IMPACT

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SERVICE RISK SERVICES are TYPE classified as LOW RISK. However, these incidents account for a large use of resources. Incidents after excluding FIRES (NFIRS 100), EMS/RESCUE (NFIRS 300), and HAZARDS (NFIRS 400), include the remaining types and were placed in the “Other Incidents” category.

False Call

Service Incidents

CARBON MONOXIDE… ALARM SYSTEM ACTIVATION,… DETECTOR ACTIVATION, NO… SMOKE DETECTOR… EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM… SPRINKLER ACTIVATION, NO… UNINTENTIONAL… CO DETECTOR ACTIVATION… ALARM SYSTEM SOUNDED… HEAT DETECTOR ACTIVATION… SMOKE DETECTOR… EXTINGUISHING SYSTEM… SPRINKLER ACTIVATION DUE… SYSTEM MALFUNCTION, OTHER LOCAL ALARM SYSTEM,… CENTRAL STATION,… TELEPHONE, MALICIOUS… DIRECT TIE TO FD, MALICIOUS… MUNICIPAL ALARM SYSTEM,… MALICIOUS, MISCHIEVOUS… FALSE ALARM OR FALSE CALL,…

COVER ASSIGNMENT,… 2 UNAUTHORIZED BURNING

9

DEFECTIVE ELEVATOR,… 239 ASSIST INVALID

2164

PUBLIC SERVICE

71

POLICE MATTER

18

ASSIST POLICE OR OTHER… 53 PUBLIC SERVICE… 51 ANIMAL RESCUE

8

ANIMAL PROBLEM

1

ANIMAL PROBLEM, OTHER

1

SMOKE OR ODOR… 150 WATER OR STEAM LEAK WATER EVACUATION WATER PROBLEM, OTHER

46 5 28

RING OR JEWELRY… 6 LOCK-OUT

162

PERSON IN DISTRESS,… 38 SERVICE CALL, OTHER

160

85 1010 117 265 1 19 165 135 260 10 180 2 13 1849 2 1 1 24 8 20 126

Good Intent/Other 243 155

149 7

10

3

9

79

20

2

9

38

2

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The clear majority of the Service Incidents are Invalid Assists at 2,164, which represents nearly 5.7% of the incidents from 2015-2017. Defective elevators (usually alarms with no occupants) and lockouts rounded out the top three.

NFIRS 600 – GOOD INTENT/OTHER

NFIRS 700 – FALSE CALLS

Service Calls, False Calls, and Good Intent Calls all fall into the low-risk category. The service demand is increasing for these incidents and, while they require a small response, they are a deployment demand that affects the District’s ability to respond to other incidents. The NFIRS 600 and 700 calls will continue to be analyzed for effects on response benchmarks.

SERVICE CALL / INVESTIGATION LOW

CRITICAL TASK Command/Safety Investigation TOTAL ERF

1 2 3

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COMMUNITY RISK LEVEL CATEGORIZATION & CONCLUSIONS The evaluation of all District risk reveals that Orland Fire Protection District has taken the primary steps to identify, assess, categorize, and classify area hazards and threats. The District staffs and deploys to mitigate any risk category to established benchmarks.

EMS - RISK LOW

Single Patient Injured/Illness

In almost all Risk Categories (Fire, EMS, HazMat, Rescue, Other), the MODERATE Severe Life Threat Orland Fire District responds primarily to LOW to MODERATE risk Cardiac Arrest/Trauma/Extrication TYPE classified incidents. HIGH Multi/Mass Casualty 5 or more Pts

FIRE - RISK EMS

P R O B A B I L I T Y

LOW

Service Calls Good Intent

Outside fires Vehicles, Brush, Refuse

Fire Alarms

MODERATE Structures SMALL - MEDIUM:

Outside Investigation

LOW RISK Elevator

Residential, Multifamily, Commercial

Inside Leak

HIGH

MODERATE RISK

Brush Fire Vehicle Fire

Rescue-Entrapment EMS - Cardiac Arrest Residential/Multi-family Active Leak STRUCTURE FIRE HIGH RISK

Residential, Multifamily, Commercial or Schools, Hotels, Malls,

Nursing,Assisted Living

FIRE - TARGET HAZARD RESCUE - Special Op EMS - Mass Casualty

HAZMAT - RISK

CONSEQUENCE

LOW FIRES Structure Residential s-m Multi-Family s-m Commercial s-m Target (+La rge R/M/C) L-XL Non-Structure Oustide Vehicle

PROBABILITY CONSEQUENCE

Investigations - Outside Incident CO Detector (no illnesss), Fuel spill, Odor

RISK

MODERATE Static Low Low Low Low

Moderate Moderate Moderate High

Moderate Moderate Moderate High

Moderate Moderate

Low Low

Low Low

High Low Low

Low High High

Low Moderate High

RESCUE Elevator/Lock-out Entrapment Special Ops

Moderate Low Low

Low Moderate High

Low Moderate High

HAZMAT Outside Invest Inside Leak Active Leak

Low Moderate Low

Low Moderate High

Low Moderate High

EMS Medical Cardiac Arrest Mass Casualty

Target Hazards LARGE - MEGA:

Inside Gas leak, CO Detector w/ illness

HIGH

Dynamic/Active release Level A - Technical Team may be needed

RESCUE - RISK LOW

Elevator entrapment Occupied, Lock Out,Wires Down

MODERATE MVA w/ extrication Vehicle into Building

HIGH

Spec Operations Technicians (TRT) Confined Space, Trench, Structure Collapse, Water/Ice Low/High Angle Rope Rescues

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SECTION 4 DEPLOYMENT and PERFORMANCE

            

INCIDENT RESPONSE MEASURES SERVICE DEMAND CURRENT DEPLOYMENT and PERFORMANCE PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES SERVICE AREA PERFORMANCE HISTORIC PERFORMANCE CHARTS CURRENT DEPLOYMENT RESPONSE PLAN CURRENT DEPLOYMENT STARTEGIES RESILIENCY ADDITIONAL RESOUSCES AVAILABLE PLANNED SPECIAL EVENTS LARGE-SCALE OR UNPLANNED EMERGENCIES CONSIDERATION OF TIME AS A FACTOR

DEPLOYMENT & PERFORMANCE

An overview of the deployment of resources and assessment of performance measures

4

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INCIDENT RESPONSE MEASURES/ SERVICE DEMAND To properly review SYSTEM incident deployment and response performance, several factors are usually analyzed and measured which is referred to as “Service Demand.” It starts with these questions:  WHAT: What type of Incident is it? Fire, EMS, rescue, hazard, service, and other are the main types. Nature of call or NFIRS (National Fire Incident Reporting System) Coding a consistent formula for typing.  WHEN: When did the request occur? These time measures start MACRO and end MICRO – Year, month, day of week, and hour of day.  WHERE: Where was the incident location and occupancy? Actual GIS plotting and occupancy type trends should be reviewed.  WHO: Who responded the incident? What shift, what station, and/or what unit(s) responded?  HOW: How well did they perform? Did the system perform as expected and planned? Did they respond within benchmark times or better?

If not, then why not? By exploration of the above metrics and others later in this section, the emergency response plans for the future can be predicted and planned.

Where? When?

What?

Who? INCIDENT RESPONSE MEASURES

How?

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WHAT

Where? When?

What?

Let’s start with the “WHAT”. Below is a listing of the types and number of requests for incidents the District has responded to from 2015-2017.

Who?

INCIDENT RESPONSE MEASURES

During the period January 1, 2015, through December 31, 2017, the District was dispatched to 27,238 incidents, or an average of 9,079 annually.

How?

Incident types are based on the National Fire Incident Reporting System (NFIRS) standard definitions as developed through the U.S. Fire Administration and National Fire Data Center. Incident type is defined as the situation found upon arrival by emergency providers. It covers the large varieties of calls the modern District responds to daily and are divided into nine series. Within each series are additional codes that define the incident more specifically. The primary incident types are listed below with the total volume for each from 2015-2017.

NFIRS Incident Type Series Code/Title 100 – Fires 200 - Overpressure Rupture, 300 – Rescue & Emergency 400 – Hazardous Condition 500 – Service Call 600 – Good Intent Call 700 – False Alarm and False Call 800 – Severe Weather and 900 – Special Incident Type

Total OFPD Average Year Incidents 208 160 210 193 578 5 10 8 8 23 5,739 6,186 6,169 6031 18,094 244 255 207 235 706 1,055 1,255 1,222 1177 3,532 579 548 628 585 1,755 1438 1554 1388 1460 4,380 4 11 3 6 18 5 6 1 4 12 2015

2016

2017

Total per Year 9,277 9,985 9,836

29,098

% of Incidents 2.0% 0.1% 62.2% 2.4% 12.1% 6.0% 15.1% 0.1% 0.0%

9,699

Incident by Type: 2015-17 700 - FALSE ALARM, 15% 600 - CANCELED/GOOD INTENT, 6%

100 - FIRE, 2%

100 - FIRE 200 - OVERHEAT, OVERPRESSURE 300 - RESCUE & EMS 400 - HAZARDOUS CONDITION

500 - SERVICE CALL, 12%

500 - SERVICE CALL 300 - RESCUE & EMS, 62%

400 - HAZARDOUS CONDITION, 3%

600 - CANCELED/GOOD INTENT 700 - FALSE ALARM 800 - SEVERE WEATHER

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SERVICE DEMAND – INCIDENT FREQUENCY

Where?

When?

Call volume affects the amount of time a company is available to respond to emergencies within its respective first due area. Under optimal conditions, INCIDENT when stations are properly located, the call volume RESPONSE What? How? distribution should be evenly divided. The impacts of MEASURES call queuing and commit times are discussed later in this section under the Reliability heading. This discussion on concentration focuses on basic workload issues. Incident locations are spread relatively even throughout the developed area of the District’s jurisdiction. Who?

This section will break this volume of incidents down from macro to micro specifics: o o o o

YEARLY MONTHLY DAY OF WEEK HOUR OF DAY

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INCIDENTS PER YEAR A review of the incidents per year show a steady increase since the District was formed. 2017 has a small drop 1.2% of 117 incidents (from 9,960 in 2016 to 9,843 in 2017). A number of these incident decreases may have been due to the passing of a few “regular” patients that needed frequent citizen assists. However, incidents year to date in 2018 are up by 5.8% in January and 10.3% in February. Therefore, an upward trend growth is projected.

INCIDENTS PER YEAR

10,000 9,000 8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0

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INCIDENTS PER MONTH

Total Incidents per Month 2015-'17

2,541 2,189 2,328 2,319 2,443 2,471 2,486 2,396 2,355 2,447 2,380 2,724

1200 1000

A review per month of incidents indicate December as the busiest month, with 9.4% of the average total incidents. When looking at incidents per month, per year, the trend is similar. However, in 2017 it appears to be an increase in calls from March to April.

Incidents per Month per Year 2015-'17

800 600 400 200 0

2015

2016

2017

Incidents by Month by Type - EMS/FIRE

EMS

FIRE

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INCIDENTS PER DAY OF WEEK

Incidents per Day of Week: 2015-17 SUNDAY

3,802

MONDAY

4,330

TUESDAY

4,127

THURSDAY

4,232

FRIDAY

4,390

SATURDAY

1,800

When averaged out, the days balance out closer ranging from 13.1% of the incidents on Sunday, peaking at 15.1% on Friday.

4,102

WEDNESDAY

It appears that incidents per day of week, when compared to the last three years individually, are highest inbetween Thursday and Friday.

4,096

Incidents per Day of Week per Year

1,600

2015

2016

A review shows Monday and Friday as the busiest days, with Sundays having the least amount of activity.

2017

1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600 400 200 0

Incidents by Day of Week by Type EMS/FIRE

EMS Fire

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

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INCIDENTS PER HOUR OF DAY When call volume is examined by the time of day, it shows call volume increases rapidly in the morning and remain high until the late evening with slight variation.

Total Incidents per Hour of Day: 2015-17

2,000 1,800 1,600 1,400 1,200 1,000 800 600

The incidents per day per year appear balanced.

400 200 0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

0 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10 2015

11

12

13

2016

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

2017

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WHO?

Where? When?

What?

Who? INCIDENT RESPONSE MEASURES

How?

UNIT WORKLOAD A most important workload indicator is the number of responses per unit and the time spent on those responses. The amount of time a unit is unavailable is a key factor in analyzing concentration and reliability.

One workload issue is the number of calls that a unit services within its own first due area versus the number it responds to outside of its first due area. There are three reasons for responses outside of the first due area are: 1.) Concurrent calls outside a units Area of Responsibility, 2.) Calls requiring multiple units, and 3.) Specialty unit capabilities that take the unit out of its primary first due to provide services to the larger area. It should be noted that fire, rescue, and EMS calls routinely require adjacent units. This will be discussed further in this section under Reliability.

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INCIDENTS BY STATION STILL / AOR Incident per Area of Responsibility (AOR) / Station still show Station #1 and Station #4 as the busiest. Station #3 has the lowest volume of incidents.

Total Incidents per Station Area of Responsibility (AOR) per Year 6,134 5,567 5,047 3,905

3,790

5

6

The view of AOR by year comparison shows, while most stations were roughly the same, Station #4 has incresased every year since 2015.

2,798

1

2

3

4

Incidents per Station AOR per Year

(2015-'17)

2,500

2,000

1,500

1,000

500

0

1

2

3 2015

4 2016

5

6

2017

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INCIDENTS BY STATION INCLUDES INCIDENTS BY TYPE

STATION #1 INCIDENT TYPE:

STATION #4 INCIDENT TYPE:

2015-17

2015-17

#1

FIRE 3%

#4

FIRE 2%

OTHER 28%

OTHER 41% EMS 56% EMS 70% FIRE

EMS

OTHER

FIRE

STATION #2 INCIDENT TYPE:

OTHER

STATION #5 INCIDENT TYPE: 2015-17

2015-17

#2

EMS

#5

FIRE 1%

FIRE 2% OTHER 35%

OTHER 37%

EMS 64%

EMS 61%

FIRE

EMS

FIRE

OTHER

EMS

OTHER

STATION #3 INCIDENT TYPE:

STATION #6 INCIDENT TYPE:

2015-17

2015-17

#3 OTHER 31%

#6

FIRE 2%

FIRE 1% OTHER 41%

EMS 57%

EMS 68% FIRE

EMS

OTHER

FIRE

EMS

OTHER

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INCIDENTS BY SHIFT

Incidents per Shift 2015-'17 1st - BLACK 33%

3rd - GOLD 34%

INCIDENTS PER SHIFT PER YEAR

2nd - RED 33%

Incidents per Shift per Year 2015-'17 3,359

3,342

3,325 3,279

3,270 3,227

3,114 3,085

2015

3,085

2016 It appears the call volume on average is distributed equally among three shifts. However, when reviewing the incident numbers, it appears the least number of incidents are handled by first shift.

2017 0147 5201 4

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INCIDENTS BY UNIT

UNIT RESPONSES: 2015-17

Incidents per unit are an initial indicator of reliability.

7,000 6,000

The amount of time committed on the incidents can be further analyzed by Unit Hour Utilization (UHU) later in the performance section.

5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000

AMBULANCES A1 A2 A3 A4 A5 A6 ENGINES E1 E2 E3 E4 E5 E6 TRUCKS T1 T2 T4 T6 T7 T8 BATTALION CHIEFS B1 B2 B3 CHIEF

0

Incidents per Unit per Year

2015-'17

3000 2500 2000 1500 1000 500

2015

2016

T8

T7

T6

T4

T2

T1

E6

E5

E4

E3

E2

E1

A6

A5

A4

A3

A2

A1

0 2017

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WHERE – BY TYPE?

Where? When?

Who?

Where the incidents occur include several factors that can reviewed. First, specifically where the actual physical location is at can be geo coded, plotted, and scrutinized in INCIDENT depth by GIS (Geographical Information System) divisions RESPONSE What? How? and mapping. Those maps and extensive measures provide MEASURES a great deal of easily recognized and understood tools to determine performance – both positive and negative. By quickly identifying gaps in ACTUAL performance and potential FUTURE response, challenges can be investigated. Placement of station locations and assignment of personnel/apparatus are decisions that can be made easier through these tools and one that is critical to a truly “useful” Standard of Coverage plan. Furthermore, it aids in the continuous monitoring process to maintain expected performance. A second measure is to identify the PROPERTY USE TYPE where that the location is. From residential to multifamily, commercial, assisted living/nursing, and open areas (roadways, fields, etc.), all are examples of occupancy data that show trends in incidents. Most departments have their highest percentage of incidents in residential occupancies. In Orland, these incidents account for 57%, followed by business at 13%, and outside or special property at 10%. Those top three combined account for 80% of the incidents property use from 2015-2017.

Educational 1%

Assembly 8% Outside or Special Property

Health Care, Detention & Correction 9%

INCIDENT BY PROPERTY TYPE 2015-17 Storage 2%

10%

Mercantile, Business

Residential 57%

13%

TOTAL INCIDENTS 2015-2017: 28,236

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INCIDENTS BY PROPERTY TYPE NIFRS PROPERTY TYPE 100 RESIDENTAIL

Incidents by Property Type 400 RESIDENTIAL 2015-'17

16,218 Incidents (57% of Total Incidents)

26% MultiFamily

75% Single Family

74% - Single Family

25% Multifamily

NFIRS PROPERTY TYPE 500 MERCHANTILE/BUSINESS

Incidents by Property Type 500

BUSINESS 2015-'17 Textile, wearing apparel sales

3%

Service station, gas station

2%

(13% of Total Incidents)

Bank

4%

Household goods, sales, repairs

3%

General retail, other

3,568 Incidents

41% Other 8% Specialty shop 8%

Food and beverage sales, grocery store

7%

Department or discount store

7%

Motor vehicle or boat sales, services,â&#x20AC;¦ Specialty shop Business office Other

8% General Retail 7% Department Store 7% Business Office

4%

7% Food/Beverage Store

8% 7% 41%

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INCIDENTS BY PROPERTY TYPE NFIRS PROPERTY TYPE 900 OUTSIDE/SPECIAL PROPERTY

Incident by Property Type 900 OUTSIDE/SPECIAL 2015-'17

2,934 Incidents 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

(10% of Total Incidents)

39% Street 18% Vehicle parking 12% Commercial Street 10% Highway 7% Open land/other

NFIRS PROPERTY TYPE 300 HEALTH CARE, DETENTION

Incident by Property Type 300 Health Care, Detention 2015-'17 JAIL, PRISON (NOT JUVENILE)

2,622 Incidents

1%

(9% of Total Incidents)

MENTAL 1% RETARDATION/DEVELOPMEâ&#x20AC;¦ DOCTOR, DENTIST OR ORAL SURGEON OFFICE

12%

36% Nursing Home

HEMODIALYSIS UNIT

1%

32% Clinics, Dialysis, MD Office

CLINIC, CLINIC-TYPE INFIRMARY

4%

12% Police Station

CLINICS, DOCTORS OFFICES, HEMODIALYSIS CNTR, OTHER

20%

24-HOUR CARE NURSING HOMES

36%

HOSPITAL - MEDICAL OR PSYCHIATRIC

12%

POLICE STATION

12%

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INCIDENTS BY PROPERTY TYPE NFIRS PROPERTY TYPE 100

Incident by Property Type 100 ASSEMBLY 2015-'17 0% Eating, drinking places, other Restaurant or cafeteria Public or government, other Fixed-use recreation places, other Swimming facility: indoor or outdoor Movie theater Church, mosque, synagogue, temple,… Playground Bar or nightclub Bowling establishment Rapid transit station Variable-use amusement, recreation… Athletic/health club Ballroom, gymnasium Ice rink: indoor, outdoor

10%

20%

30%

ASSEMBLY

40%

50%

4% 43%

2,229 Incidents (8% of Total Incidents)

10% 5% 1% 3%

43% Restaurants 8%

10% Public or Government

1% 3% 1% 0% 2%

8% Health Club 8% Church or Mosque 4% Eating, Drinking

8% 1% 3%

Incidents by Property Type 200 EDUCATIONAL 2015-'17 Day care, in commercial property Schools, non6% adult, other 6%

NFIRS PROPERTY TYPE 200 EDUCATIONAL

228 Incidents (1% of Total Incidents) High school/junior high school/middle school 25%

Adult education center, college classroom 9%

37% Elementary 25% Junior High 12% Preschool

Elementary school, including kindergarten 37%

Educational, other 5% Preschool 12%

9% College 6% Day Care

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WHERE – IN JURISDICTION OR OUT (Automatic/Mutual Aid)

Jurisdiction 6% Inside of TRA

94%

Outside of TRA

94% of the Incidents from 2015-2017 were inside the jurisdiction boundaries of the Orland Fire Protection District. 6% were to the outside to assist the neighboring jurisdictions – either Mutual Aid (change of quarters or direct to the scene) or Automatic Aid (sent on still alarm response).

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WHERE – ON MAP? The NFIRS Group Codes below will be used to illustrate in the following maps the TYPES of incident as well as the physical geo-located site.

All Incidents NFIRS Group 100 - FIRE NFIRS Group 200 - OVERHEAT/OVERPRESSURE NFIRS Group 300 - RESCUE/EMS NFIRS Group 400 – HAZARDOUS CONDITION NFIRS Group 500 – SERVICE CALL NFIRS Group 600 – CANCELED/GOOD INTENT NFIRS Group 700 – SERVICE CALL NFIRS Group 800 – SEVERE WEATHER NFIRS Group 900 – SPECIAL/CITIZEN COMPLAINT

DEFINITIONS All Incidents: All incidents regardless of NFIRS group codes. AoR: Area of Responsibility. AW: Area workload is the percentage of a given time frame in which there is a demand for service within a station’s AoR. Catchment: A geographical area based on travel time. Drive Time: The time measured from fire company enroute to fire company on scene. EMS Incidents: Incidents in the NFIRS group codes 300’s. Fire Incidents: Incidents in the NFIRS group codes 100’s. Historical: Incidents that have happened in the past. Data that has been collected in the past. Hotspot: A representation of an area with a statistical higher density than its surrounding area. Other Incidents: Incidents in the NFIRS group codes 200’s, and 400’s through 900’s. Projected: The results that may happen in the future based on analysis. Response Time: The time measured from fire company notification to fire company on scene. Service Area: A geographical area where service is provided or demanded.

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TRA = Total Responses Area (Fire District Jurisdiction) AOR = Area of Responsibility (Station Still District) Catchment = geographic area based on time

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WHERE – ON MAP – THE INCIDENTS? The NFIRS Group Codes below will be used to illustrate in the following maps the TYPES of incident as well as the physical geo-located site.

All Incidents NFIRS Group 100 - FIRE NFIRS Group 200 - OVERHEAT/OVERPRESSURE NFIRS Group 300 - RESCUE/EMS NFIRS Group 400 – HAZARDOUS CONDITION NFIRS Group 500 – SERVICE CALL NFIRS Group 600 – CANCELED/GOOD INTENT NFIRS Group 700 – SERVICE CALL NFIRS Group 800 – SEVERE WEATHER NFIRS Group 900 – SPECIAL/CITIZEN COMPLAINT

TRA = Total Responses Area (Fire District Jurisdiction) AOR = Area of Responsibility (Station Still District)

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All Incident Total: 27,234

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HOW?

Where? When?

What?

Who?

INCIDENT RESPONSE MEASURES

How?

CURRENT DEPLOYMENT and PERFORMANCE DEPLOYMENT PERFORMANCE Deployment performance can be measured using three concepts: distribution (what and where), concentration (how much), and reliability (how well). These concepts will be used in the creation of performance objectives, performance measures for response times, and the determination of the District’s ability to provide an effective response force for each risk category for each service provided.

DISTRIBUTION (FIRST DUE) Distribution is defined as the systematic locating of geographically-distributed first due resources (stations, apparatus, and personnel) for all-risk initial intervention. Distribution locations, also known as “points of service delivery,” are established to ensure the rapid deployment of resources to intervene in routine emergencies and bring them to a successful conclusion. For the most part, this is time and distance analysis. The distribution system is set up to provide the appropriate emergency response to the variety of risks identified in the previous section. The District uses an “all-risk” concept in that each first due station is equipped and staffed to provide an effective base line response. The effectiveness of a distribution system is normally measured by the percentage of the jurisdiction covered by the first due units within adopted public policy response times. Specific performance objectives have been established for each service provided. (See next chapter.) A distribution network is considered successful when it can provide a resource to the scene of an emergency with the correct apparatus, equipment, and staffing to complete the following: 1. Assessment of the situation and take command. 2. Establishment of a plan of action capable of mitigating the emergency. 3. Request for appropriate resources, if necessary. 4. Intervention to stop/impede the escalation of the emergency.

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The current distribution of resources for the District can be traced to several events throughout its history. The location and spacing of stations has been dependent on funding, land availability, infrastructure, and expected growth. Distribution implies that there are certain risks that will require resources beyond that available on initial attack. The depth of coverage includes an analysis of whether sufficient resources are available within acceptable time frames to amass staffing, equipment, and apparatus to deal with identified risk levels. Distribution performance measurement emergencies are those incidents that have a direct impact on the placement of fire stations and the resources in the stations. EMS, rescue incidents, and structure fires are the key measured emergencies, or Priority 1 calls. Other types of incidents are not modeled, as they do not overly affect deployment, but are a sub-set of the total workload. Incidents outside the District areas are not used for analysis. Measurement of incidents are from the Records Management Systems (RMS), GIS, and StatsFD data base and are reviewed based on incident type codes with outliers are removed. Measuring the distribution system is normally accomplished using Travel Time or Total Response Time of first due company resources. Travel Time is the interval of time from the point the emergency unit begins responding to its arrival at the scene of the emergency. Total Response Time begins when the request for emergency services is received at the dispatch center and extends to the arrival of the first emergency unit at the scene of the emergency, including turnout from unit notification to response. Response Times (Baselines): The rapid deployment of resources to emergencies is another distribution factor to consider. The District uses the nationally-recognized incident count to better inform management and determine resource allocation and deployment decisions. The use of "incident count" has been the basic reference numbers used by the District for deployment issues and for collecting data on response volumes. This was an integral part of the 2006 Master Plan and the current budgetary process. Incident count data is typically used and reported to describe service demand changes over time because the number and type of resources (i.e., Engines, Trucks, Ambulances, etc.) assigned or committed to each event is subject to operational policy. Thus, data that reflect the number of times a resource is "dispatched" to an event are not suitable for performing trend/historical or comparative analysis of incidents. Response times are one of the most frequently-used methods of measuring system performance as it relates to the overall response time. In review of the CAD and RMS data, the District tracks four elements of response from turnout-time through enroute time, on-scene time, and when companies are available. Additionally, call handling time is also measured (the time Orland Dispatch picks up the 911 call to the time units are notified or â&#x20AC;&#x153;dispatchedâ&#x20AC;?). The District uses NFPA 1710 as the benchmark goal for all these measures: 90% of Incidents: Call Processing < 60 sec., Turnout < 80 sec. Fires (< 60 sec. EMS), Travel < 240 sec. (Distribution/First Due), Travel < 480 sec. (Concentration/Balance of alarm)

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9 1 1 C A L L

NFPA 1710 STANDARD RESPONSE TIMES CALL PROCESSING < 1:00 TURNOUT < 1:00 - 1:20 TRAVEL TIME < 4:00 - 8:00 1st DUE TRAVEL (Distribution) < 4:00 BALANCE OF ALARM/ EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (Concentration) < 8:00

>?

1

2

TOTAL <

2:00

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

MINUTES

6:00

1st DUE - ENGINE/AMBULANCE ERF - EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE

10:00 COMPANY PERFORMANCE MEASURES (JPR's)…….?

4 PERSONNEL INITIAL 15 PERSONNEL TOTAL - Fires (Moderate Risk Type)

The current distribution is shown to the below with six stations. It is important in the measurement of response time that recognition is given to the passage of time within each element. The degree of life and property loss depends on reducing the overall time by improving each segment incrementally. The District currently uses Image Trend Elite, interfaced to TriTech Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) Software, as a records management system to document and record emergency calls. A key component of this software enables the District to produce statistical reports to assist in the assessment of the level of service being provided. Additionally, the District uses StatsFD to interface the two existing platforms as well as two other previous RMS for historical data. Dispatch records on emergency incidents are essential to providing an accurate report of the District’s activities.

TRAVEL TIME ANALYSIS For the period of 2015-2017, 90% of the calls in protection areas were covered within a four minute or less travel time by the first unit to arrive. The average travel time to all fire emergencies was 3 min. 48 sec. and 90% of all fire emergencies have a unit arriving in 6 min. 4 sec. for travel time.

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DISTRIBUTION: AOR SERVED BY DRIVE TIME (PER EACH MINUTE

GRADIENT)

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PERFORMANCE GOALS/OBJECTIVES BENCHMARKS and BASELINES The District has developed objectives for each of the major services provided: fire suppression, emergency medical services (EMS), rescue, and special operations. These performance objectives further define the quality and quantity of services. The benchmark performance goals are per risk type.

FIRE For 90% of all Fire incidents, the District shall arrive “first due/distribution” in less than 6 min. and 20 sec. with at least four personnel sufficient resources to stop the escalation of the fire and keep the fire to an area of involvement upon arrival limiting the heat and smoke damage. Initial response resources shall be capable of assuming command, containing the fire, rescuing at-risk victims, protecting exposures and performing salvage operations while providing for the safety of the responders and general public. Apparatus shall have a minimum pump capacity of 1500 GPM and 750-gallon water tank for Engines, 400 gallons for Quints. A positive water supply shall be established and hose line deployed, attacking the fire within 5 min. of arrival or less. Additionally, the “balance of alarm/concentration” or Effective Response Force (ERF) shall arrive in less than 10 min. and 20 sec. with a minimum of 15 personnel for moderate risk type classified incidents. High risk type classified incidents shall have a “full still” deployment of a total minimum 28 personnel within 10 min. and 20 sec. The ERF shall be capable of transferring and maintaining Command, providing an uninterrupted water supply, advancing attack and backup lines for fire control, complying with OSHA requirements of two-in-two-out and on-deck companies, completing forcible entry, search and rescue, ventilation, and utility control with ability to utilize aerial devices if necessary and support sprinkler systems if available. These actions shall be done in accordance with District Standard Operating Procedures with Safety/Sectoring, Command/Control, and Rehab of all companies as needed.

EMS For 90% of all Emergency Medical Service incidents, the District shall arrive “first due/distribution” in less than 6 min. with at least five personnel trained and equipped to assume Command/Safety, provide medical services that will stabilize the situation, provide care, support to the victim, and reduce, reverse, or eliminate the conditions that have caused the emergency while providing for the safety of the responders and transportation of patient(s), if necessary, to appropriate medical facilities in an effective and efficient manner. For all moderate risk type incidents where resuscitation of victims is required, the District shall arrive in less than 10 min. with at least nine personnel and resources to treat, stabilize, move, and transport patient. ERF Concentration per high risk type level shall arrive in less than 10 min. and 20 sec with at least 26 personnel capable of assuming sector roles including at least Medical, Triage, Treatment, Transportation, Staging, and Fire/Rescue as needed.

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RESCUE/SPECIAL OPERATIONS For all Low Risk Type Special Operations such as Hazardous Materials, Rescue: Vehicular/Machinery, Technical, or Water Rescue; the District shall arrive â&#x20AC;&#x153;first due/distributionâ&#x20AC;? in less than 6 min. and 20 sec. with at least four personnel trained at the Operations level with sufficient resources to establish Command/Safety, stabilize the situation, stop the escalation of the incident, contain the hazard where applicable, and establish an action plan to stabilize the situation or treat/extricate the victim(s) from the emergency or location without causing further harm to the victim, responders, public, and environment. ERF Concentration per Moderate Risk Type level shall arrive in less than 10 min. and 20 sec. capable of assuming sector assignments as needed including stabilization, medical, and extrication. If Technician/Team High Risk Type level response is necessary for ERF Concentration, they shall arrive in less than 15 min. once dispatched with at least 13 personnel for Water Rescue incidents, 14 personnel for Hazardous Material incidents, and 18 personnel for Technical Rescue incidents HazMat ERF, In addition to above, shall be capable of isolating, identifying, and mitigating the hazard with entry/decon teams, monitoring resources, and providing a research team to test, sample, contain, extinguish and/or abate the hazard in accordance within the District standard operating procedures. Technical & Water Rescue ERF, in addition to above, shall be capable of providing entry and backup teams to stabilize, medically treat, and extricate the victim(s) in accordance within the District standard operating procedures.

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RELIABILITY FIRST DUE This Distribution measure identifies compliance when an “first due” unit can respond “first” to an incident inside their assigned AOR (Area of Responsibility). The higher the percentage, the better the compliance. On this map, the dots indicate actual historic incidents in which a SECOND station was first in. In this case, it shows the location of the 21% non-compliant incidents for the first due. This is DISTRICT WIDE and for ALL INCIDENTS – both EMERGENCY and nonemergent calls. Times indicated are from unit Dispatched to Arrival.

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RESPONSE RELIABILITY Response reliability deals with the delivery system’s ability to meet stated or desired performance objectives, response time goals, and performance measures. Historical performance and system reliability are the two key components of this measurement. A key indicator in the analysis of performance is the ability of first due companies to service their own first due area. There were 21% of the incidents from 2015-2017 where a unit other than the first due company(s) arrived first. That is over 6,000 times the “first due” was not “first”. This chart indicates the percent of the calls in each first due area that a unit other than a first unit arrived first.

UNIT RELIABILTY: 2015-17 59.8% 59.6% 52.9% 52.1% 48.0%

85.8% 84.9% 79.8% 71.4% 59.0% 55.6%

4.3%

Unit Reliability per Year: 2015-17 100.0% 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0%

2015

2016

2017

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CONCURRENT/SIMULTANEOUS INCIDENTS Incidents do not occur on a one-at-a-time basis. As such, emergency response system must be prepared and situated to handle multiple incidents that occur concurrently along with incidents that require more units on at one incident. These scenarios can stress many response systems and impact performance benchmarks. In the Orland Fire Protection District from 2015-2017, the frequency of two or more other incidents occurring concurrently/simultaneously is: 72% - 11,450 incidents 1 simultaneous alarm (2 total)

Concurrent Incidents

22% - 3,502 incidents

4+ 1%

3+ 5%

2 simultaneous alarms (3 total) 2+ 22%

4.6% - 735 incidents

1+ Simultaneous 72%

3 simultaneous alarms (4 total) 1% - 11,450 incidents

How many time concurrentcy occured

4 simultaneous alarms (5 total)

1+

2+

3+

4+

STILL LOCATION and FREQUENCY OF CONCURRENT/SIMULTANEOUS INCIDENTS 2015-'17 817 Station 1

666

Station 2

489

Station 3 Station 4

330 307 221

110 72 20 64 21 24

14 2

1 10 1

Station 5 Station 6

2+

3+

4+

Additional Incidents occuring IN ADDTION to first (Add 1+)

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Simultaneous Incidents per Station 2015-'17 0

50

100

150

200

250

300

350

1 2 3 4 5 6 1 additional

2 additional

3 additional

Simultaneous Incidents per Station per Year 2015-'17 (w it h T o t a l) 1000 800 600 400 200 0

1

2

3

How many time concurrentcy occured

2015

4

2016

2017

5

6

2015-17

Station AOR Frequency of SIMULTANEOUS INCIDENTS 2015-'17 348 299

1

297

286

254 200

216

200

147 73 2015

89 94

2

105 2016

3

134 124 65 2017

130 113

4 5 6

STATION STILL (AOR) in which the concurrent call occured

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CONCENTRATION Concentration is defined as the number and spacing of resources needed to achieve an â&#x20AC;&#x153;effective response forceâ&#x20AC;? that can be assembled at the scene of an emergency within a defined time frame for each given risk and level of service. An effective response force is the accumulation of resources necessary to stop the escalation of the emergency and bring it to conclusion. In other words, concentration is the ability to place enough resources on a specific call to keep the event from becoming a major emergency. Concentration considers risk versus cost. Both factors are variables; thus, increased risk equals increased concentration. Concentration can be measured in several ways. The most common approach is to measure the percentage of the community covered by an effective response force within adopted time frames. A first-alarm assignment is considered an effective response force for fire incidents. In arriving at a concentration level for the District, the challenge is to strike a balance on how much overlap there should be between station response areas. Some overlap is necessary to maintain response times and to provide back-up for distribution when first-due units are committed. A successful concentration network means that the system can provide the correct equipment, apparatus, and staffing to the scene of an emergency to complete the following: 1. Stop the emergency from continuing to escalate. 2. Provide for the safety and security of citizens and emergency workers. 3. Complete all critical tasks in a timely manner. 4. Provide for incident management and Command. Most of the areas now served started with limited development and very little risk. As time passed and development continued, both the population base and risk increased. The location and spacing of resources has been dependent on funding, land availability, and infrastructure. Measuring the current concentration is accomplished using calls for service and the system performance of the company resources. There were 30 structure fires in which a full Effective Response Force (ERF) arrived on scene since 2015.

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HISTORIC PERFORMANCE CHARTS (LOW RISK) Rescue - 90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

20152017

2017

2016

2015

Alarm Handling

Pick-up to Dispatch

Urban

:43

:41

:44

:43

Turnout Time

Turnout Time 1st Unit

Urban

1:52

1:51

1:56

1:48

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Urban

4:12

4:13

4:11

4:10

Travel Time Travel Time ERF Concentration DISTRIBUTION = CONCENTRATION (LOW RISK ERF)

Total Response Time

Total Response Time 1st Unit on Scene Distribution

Urban

5:50

5:48

5:54

5:47

1,595

503

557

535

Total Response Urban Time ERF Concentration DISTRIBUTION = CONCENTRATION (LOW RISK ERF)

*THERE WERE LESS THAN 10: MODERATE OR HIGH RISK “RESCUE” LEVEL RESPONSES NFIRS Types: 300,311,320,322,323,324,331,353,381 [Moderate – 350,352, High – 342,351,356,360)

RESCUE – LOW RISK TYPE Level (< 10 Moderate or High Type) COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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(LOW RISK) HazMat - 90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

20152017

2017

2016

2015

Alarm Handling

Pick-up to Dispatch

Urban

1:00

:58

:57

1:06

Turnout Time

Turnout Time 1st Unit

Urban

2:21

2:09

2:25

2:09

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Urban

5:18

5:04

5:39

5:04

Travel Time Travel Time ERF Concentration DISTRIBUTION = CONCENTRATION (LOW RISK ERF)

Total Response Time

Total Response Time 1st Unit on Scene Distribution

Urban

7:22

7:00

8:06

7:22

398

124

125

149

Total Response Urban Time ERF Concentration DISTRIBUTION = CONCENTRATION (LOW RISK ERF)

NFIRS Types: 400,410,411,413,421,424,440,441,442,443,444,445,480 [High – 420,451,461]

HAZMAT – LOW RISK TYPE Level (< 10 Moderate or High Type) COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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(MODERATE RISK) HazMat - 90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

20152017

2017

2016

2015

Alarm Handling

Pick-up to Dispatch

Urban

:51

:49

:44

:51

Turnout Time

Turnout Time 1st Unit

Urban

1:59

1:55

1:54

2:03

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Urban

5:04

4:28

5:14

6:23

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Urban

8:52

7:53

8:04

8:58

6:56

6:10

7:07

6:07

248

71

85

92

8:10

9:08

8:19

7:53

90

31

23

36

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Total Response Time 1st Unit on Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Urban

*THERE WERE LESS THAN 10: HIGH RISK “HAZMAT” LEVEL RESPONSES

NFIRS Types: 412,422 [High = 420,451,461]

HAZMAT – MODERATE RISK TYPE Level (< 10 High Type) COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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(LOW RISK) Fire - 90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

2015-2017

2017

2016

2015

Alarm Handling

Pick-up to Dispatch

Urban

1:26

1:30

1:33

1:14

Turnout Time

Turnout Time 1st Unit

Urban

2:03

1:57

2:18

1:57

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Urban

3:56

3:47

4:11

3:56

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Travel Time

DISTRIBUTION = CONCENTRATION (LOW RISK ERF)

Total Response Time

Total Response Time 1st Unit on Scene Distribution

Urban

6:20

6:21

6:23

6:09

364

146

84

134

Total Response Urban Time ERF Concentration DISTRIBUTION = CONCENTRATION (LOW RISK ERF)

NFIRS Types: All except 111

FIRE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LOW RISK TYPE Level COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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(MODERATE RISK) Fire - 90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

20152017

2017

2016

2015

Alarm Handling

Pick-up to Dispatch

Urban

1:48

1:43

1:14

1:45

Turnout Time

Turnout Time 1st Unit

Urban

1:59

1:57

2:03

1:48

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Urban

3:54

3:56

3:53

3:34

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Urban

5:26

4:27

5:29

6:19

6:04

6:15

5:27

5:38

107

20

34

29

12:25

12:51

11:35

12:49

35

8

10

17

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Total Response Time 1st Unit on Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Urban

THERE WERE LESS THAN 10: HIGH RISK “FIRE” LEVEL RESPONSES

NFIRS Types: 111

FIRE – MODERATE RISK TYPE Level (< 10 High Type) COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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(LOW RISK) EMS - 90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

20152017

2017

2016

2015

Alarm Handling

Pick-up to Dispatch

Urban

:56

:56

:58

:54

Turnout Time

Turnout Time 1st Unit

Urban

2:00

2:03

2:05

1:57

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Urban

3:56

3:55

3:56

3:56

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Urban

5:44

5:43

5:40

5:45

5:54

5:54

5:59

5:53

23,482

6,080

6,094

5,645

7:33

7:32

7:33

7:36

22,805

5,943

5,943

5,445

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Total Response Time 1st Unit on Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Urban

NFIRS Types: 321

EMS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; LOW RISK TYPE Level

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(MODERATE RISK) EMS - 90th Percentile Times - Baseline Performance

20152017

2017

2016

2015

Alarm Handling

Pick-up to Dispatch

Urban

:44

:47

:36

:46

Turnout Time

Turnout Time 1st Unit

Urban

1:54

1:59

1:54

1:46

Travel Time 1st Unit Distribution

Urban

3:50

3:52

4:07

3:34

Travel Time ERF Concentration

Urban

8:52

7:53

8:04

8:58

5:26

5:20

5:53

5:16

267

99

98

70

13:35

12:17

10:38

13:44

206

72

80

52

Travel Time

Total Response Time

Total Response Time 1st Unit on Scene Distribution

Total Response Time ERF Concentration

Urban

Urban

THERE WERE LESS THAN 10: HIGH RISK “EMS” LEVEL RESPONSES

NFIRS Type

EMS – MODERATE RISK TYPE Level (< 10 High Type) COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT


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HISTORICAL RESPONSE EFFECTIVENESS – Total Response Time CALL PROCESSING The initial 911 call is picked up and processed the Orland Park Police Department 9-1-1 Primary PSAP Center. Once the call is determined to be a Fire or Ambulance incident, it is then transferred to the District’s Orland Central Dispatch. This handoff time is supposed to occur less than 30 sec. per NFPA 1710. In attempting to analyze theses times, the District has worked with the Orland Park Police and discovered that this time is not readily available. Further work is underway to streamline the process. After reviewing a one-month sample data from 2017 (that must be manually matched police to fire), it appears that the 90% baseline time is 50 sec. for handoff. The District is working with PSAP to reduce that time to reach the benchmark goal time of 30 sec., 90% of the time. NFPA 1710 2016 edition calls for call processing to be at 60 sec. or less, 90% of the time, and 90 sec. for EMD processing dispatch. Call Transfer times (police to fire) may need to improve after further analysis.

TURNOUT TIME Turnout time is higher than national standards. To resolve some extended turnout issues, the department has implemented daily prior shift data reviews and negative reporting on weekly basis in which the Battalion Chiefs review with each station the delays. This process was implemented in the beginning of 2018. NFPA 1710 2016 edition calls for turnout time to be 80 sec. or less, 90% of the time, for fires and special operations and 60 sec. or less, 90% of the time, for EMS. Turnout time needs to improve. This is the only category not meeting the District’s initial benchmark goal (NFPA 1710). Currently, the 90% baseline measure is at 2 min. and current SOG time. This is being reviewed.

TRAVEL TIME Travel time is at 3 min. and 57 sec. for the first due unit to all emergency fire and EMS calls, 90% of the time, which meets the benchmark goal of 4 min. (given the variance 1 second from 4 min. and 1 second on 89.9% of the calls) for the period 2015-2017. Traffic and recent extensive roadwork improvement to the main artery in Orland Park (LaGrange Rd) has possibly extended these times. The new development and workload have increased the time to incidents. The District’s goal is to maintain a consistent 4-minute travel time for 90% compliance. In addition, the District supports implementing fire prevention and education solutions to aid in fire suppression and medical alternatives. Supporting infrastructure improvements, reviewing new development, and aiding interagency community services are also goals for improved services. NFPA 1710 2016 edition calls for travel time to be at 4 minutes or less, 90% of the time, and ERF travel time to be 8 minutes or less, and 90% of the time. This concept is an NFPA standard that is not routinely

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met; however, the District does meet this goal. The District was built based on city growth, funding, and street network. Decisions made in the past improved service. For the most part, the community and community leaders believe the current service is acceptable. However, this may be taxed in the future as the Village has recently informed the District of several new nursing homes and large senior living complexes that will be coming soon. These alone are known to generate many more additional calls. Maintaining current service and improving service in areas that are less served than others are the current goals.

TOTAL RESPONSE TIME – 911 Call to Arrival of Units (First Due and ERF)

EMERGENCY CALL PROCESSING

• < 1:00

TURNOUT

• < 1:00 EMS • < 1:20 FIRE

TRAVEL

• < 4:00

ARRIVAL

• < 6:00 EMS • < 6:20 FIRE ARRIVAL BALANCE OF ALARM

• <10:20 ERF

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CURRENT/BASELINE DEPLOYMENT RESPONSE PLAN The District, in assessing all the factors, has determined that the following levels and response plans should be established to identify the fire risk in each geographic area:

ORLAND FIRE RESPONSE PLAN 2018

ENG

TRK AMB CHF SQD

OTHER

CQ # FF

TOTAL PER UPGRADE

FIRE RESPONSE - MULTI Company INVESTIGATION FIRE ALARMS CFA - COMMERCIAL RFA - RESIDENTIAL MFA - MULTIFAMILY STILL/WORKING FIRE FULL STILL + BOX ALARM (Each level) + NON-HYDRANTED TARGET HAZARD VEHICLE FIRE

1

1

1

1

9

1 1 2 2

1 1 1 2

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

9

2 3

1* 2

2 2

1+3* 3

2 2 1

2 2 1

1 1 1

1 1 1

9 12 15 * = AutoAid C/Q 17 C/Q 22 Tankers on FS

32 54

15 15 9

FIRE RESPONSE - SINGLE Company ( + STILL AMB @ discretion of Station Officer)

BRUSH/GRASS DUMPSTER/REFUSE OUTSIDE WIRES DOWN TROUBLE ALARM

Brush/Gator

6 3

1 - closest

3 3

1 - closest (*if TC n/a)

Trouble Car

3

RESCUE RESPONSE CITIZEN ASSIST ELEVATOR MVA MVA - PIN IN (Upgrade) + HAZMAT INVESTIGATION CO - no illness FUEL/GAS LEAK - outside ODOR investigation HAZMAT CO - illness GAS LEAK - inside TRQ WATER

3

1 - closest 1 - closest 1 - closest

3

1 1

1

6 6

11

3 1 - closest

3 3

1

1

1 - closest

1 1 1

1 1 1

2 1 1 2 2

1 1 1 1 1

1

TEAM on FS

14 6 9

1 1

TEAM on FS

14

TEAM on BOX

14

EMS RESPONSE MEDICAL/TRAUMA FULL ARREST (Upgrade) +

1 - closest 1 - closest

1

5

+1

4

9

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These response plans are based on the “task math” for each different type of response. NFPA 1710 FIRE RESPONSE BENCHMARKS Response Component Call Handling – 911 call to Dispatch units Turnout Time Arrival of First Fire Company [Distribution] Arrival of Full Alarm Assignment [Concentration]

Time < 1 minute < 1 minute 20 sec. < 4 min. < 8 min.

TASKS FOR MODERATE RISK OCCUPANCY Attack Line Search and Rescue Ventilation Back-Up-Line RIT Team (On Deck) Pump Operator Water Supply Utilities/Support Command Officer Safety Officer Total Personnel

Firefighters Required 2 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 15

Company typically assigned 1 Fire Company (Engine/Quint) Truck/Ladder Truck/Ladder Engine Engine or Ladder or Ambulance Engine Engine Ambulance, Truck, Engine Chief Officer Sector Officer st

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TASKS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; minimum CRITICAL TASK ASSIGNMENTS PER INCIDENT TYPE PERSONNEL

UNITS

EMS: Medical Emerrgencies Patient Care TOTAL

2 2

1 - Ambulance

EMS: Cardiac Arrest Command T reatment Patient Movement TOTAL

1 5 3 9

1 - Command Car 1 - Ambulance 2 - Suppresion

EMS : MVA (Non-trappped) Command Patiet assessment Patient/Scene Safety T OT AL

1 2 3 6

1 - Command Car 1 - Ambulance 1 - Suppresion

EMS: MVA (Trapped) Command Patient Management Extrication Scene Safety T OT AL

1 2 3 3 9

1 - Command Car 1 - Suppresion 1 - Heavy Rescue

GRASS FIRE Command Pump Operations Fire Attack T OT AL

1 1 2 4

1 - Command Car 1 - Suppresion

SINGLE ODOR: (Check Odor) Command Pump Operations Investigation T OT AL

1 1 2 4

1 - Command Car 1 - Suppression

GAS LEAK: Command Pump Operations Investigation Back-up T eam T reatment T OT AL

1 1 2 3 2 9

1 - Command Car 1 - Suppression 1 - Aerial Apparatus 1 - Ambulance

Single Family Dwelling Initial Full Alarm Assignment Incident Command 1 Pump Operator 1 Attack Line 2 Search and Rescue / Ventilation 2 Aerial Operator 1 IRIC 2 T OT AL 9 HIGH HAZARD Initial Full Alarm Assignment Inident Command / Safety 1 Pump Operator 1 Attack and Back-up Lines 4 Support members for lines 2 Search and Rescue 2 Ventilation 2 Aerial Operator 1 IRIC 2 T OT AL 15

1 - Command Car 1 - Suppression 1 - Aerial Apparatus 1 - Ambulance

SP ECIA L OP ERA TIONS HAZ MAT Incident Command 1 1 - Command Car Haz Mat Branch Officer 1 1 - Suppresion Safety 1 1 - Aerial Apparatus Entry T eam / Back-up 4 1 - Squad 3 Research / Support 2 T reatment 2 T OT AL 11 TECHNICAL RESCUE - Rope Incident Command Rescue Officer Safety Rescue T eam and Back-up Rigging / Haul T em T reatment T OT AL

1 1 1 4 5 2 14

1 - Command Car 1 - Suppresion 1 - Cart T railer

TECHINCAL RESCUE - Confined Space Incident Command Rescue Officer Safety Attendant Rescue T eam and Back-up Ventilation Monitoring Air supply Rigging / Haul T eam T reatment T OT AL

1 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 5 2 18

1 - Command Car 1 - Suppresion 1 - Cart T railer

TECHINCAL RESCUE - Trench Incident Command Rescue Officer Safety Rescue T eam and Back-up Shoring T eam Air Supply T reatment T OT AL

1 1 1 4 8 2 2 19

1 - Command Car 1 - Suppresion 1 - Cart T railer

TECHNICAL RESCUE - Water Incident Command

1

1 - Command Car

1 1 4 4 2 13

1 - Suppresion 1 - Squad 5 and Boat

Rescue Officer Safety Rescue T eam and Back-up Rope T enders T reatment T OT AL

1 - Command Car 2 - Suppression 2 - Aerial Apparatus 1 - Ambulance

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CURRENT DEPLOYMENT STRATEGIES

Staffing: Minimum Staffing Level of 28 Personnel Per SHIFT

Station #1

Station #2

Station #3

Station #4

Station #5

Station #6

Relief spots per shift

Battalion Chief

1

Lieutenants

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

Engineers

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

Firefighter/Paramedics

1

3

3

3

3

3

4

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MINIMUM/MAXIMUM STAFFING LEVELS PER CURRENT LABOR AGREEMENT 2017 Personnel Station

Minimum Staffing

Maximum Staffing

Levels

Levels

3

6

Station 1

Apparatus

Tower (Quint) /Amb

Response Type

Fire/ALS

Squad/Brush Truck/2 Boats Station 2

5

6

Eng/Amb/TRT Trailer

Fire/ALS

Station 3

5

6

Eng/Amb/HazMat Squad

Fire/ALS

Station 4

5

6

Truck (Quint)/Amb

Fire/ALS

Station 5

5

6

Eng/ Amb/Dive Squad

Fire/ALS

Station 6

5

6

Trk/Amb

Fire/ALS

Total

28

36

CURRENT DAY STAFFING INCLUDES: 1 FIRE CHIEF, 4 DAY LIEUTENANTS FUTURE OPTIONS: * OPTIONAL FUTURE STATION 7 – ALREADY BUILT and BEING USED FOR TRAINING * PEAK PERIOD AMBULANCE 1 – 0700-1700 (currently only occasionally staffed if manning level are over minimum 28) * FIRE PREVENTION TROUBLE ALARM CAR “TAC” UNIT to run line trouble alarms 0-1700 Mon. thru Fri. *PROMOTE TWO BATTALION CHIEFS TO FILL DAY POSITIONS (OPERATIONS/ADMIISTRATION)

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RESILIENCY The dictionary definition of resilience is, “The capacity to recover quickly from difficulties”. In the fire service, that translates to how well departments bounce back from adversity, regardless of the cause. This could be wide scale and far reaching events such as severe weather extremes, massive prolonged power outages, floods, and mass casualty events or simply multiple concurrent incidents that require a response and resilient. Even Firefighters, individually, learn to respond, handle the emotionally challenging scene, and then return to some normalcy. The District’s response system is built on reliability, consistency, redundancy, and performance (including speed). There may be times that the system is pushed and stressed. Severe weather incidents such as thunderstorms (or worse – tornados and other conditions) spread resources thin. These situations alter levels of response that are instituted. “Storm Mode” response procedures dispatch the closest fire company to investigation and initiate alarm activations (without tone alerts – just radio notification). The ability to recover to “normalcy” can include multiple considerations, such as:   

Capability – Developed early through trained KSA (knowledge, skills, and abilities). Capacity – Resources ready state (mechanically sound and properly equipped). Reliability – Amount of times a unit can respond to incidents in own still area as first due. Availability – Use of resources and ability to add units to response or coverage.

Located at 10728 W. 163rd Pl at the District’s Training Campus is the Training Center. This was originally constructed in 2008 as a shell of a fire station; however, it is currently used extensively for the Command Training Center, EMS Simulation Lab, and numerous other classes. It was designed to be brought up as a 7th station very quickly in the case that the need and demand presents itself. As Station 7, the map below illustrates the potential impact area as a 4-minute travel

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(AOR) and 8-minute travel times as displayed. The improvement in coverage area and response time reductions are obvious. When viewed with the current deployment maps and incidents, this station fills in the performance gaps in first due response and also has great backup (2nd due) potential to four other stations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; #6, #3, #4, #1. Additionally, it opens the possibility of relocating Station 3 to improve response coverage in that AOR. Included in that AOR for Station #7 are target hazards of 3 schools (2 of which are elementary and junior high schools) and 2nd due to one existing nursing home (with and additional facility being proposed for 159th St and 108th Ave), an Ice Arena, and a number of religious assembly locations. An additional beneficial factor, outside of dramatically improved response area, would be the benefit of having personnel assigned full-time to the Regional Training Campus to assist/oversight as needed. Further research and analysis should occur on this option.

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COMPANY AVAILABILITY (UNITS/STATIONS OUT OF SERVICE) As defined by the CPSE Manual, response reliability is defined as the probability that the required amount of staff and apparatus will be available when a fire or emergency call is received. If every piece of fire department apparatus that were available in its desired location every time a fire/EMS call was received, then the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response reliability would be 100%. If however, a call is received for a company but that company is busy at another call, a substitute company must be assigned from another station. If the substitute station is too far away, that company cannot respond in the maximum prescribed travel time. A fire company unavailable for response provides no service to the community. Basically, if a company is not available 80% of the time, it is not reasonable to expect the unit to perform at the 80th percentile. Availability refers to the number of hours the company can respond to an incident over the number of hours it is in service. In a 24-hour period, if a unit is committed or unavailable for other reasons for six hours, it has only 75% availability remaining.

UNIT WORKLOAD Unit workload looks at, not only how many incidents a unit responded to, but also how much time those units spent on those incidents; therefore, being unavailable for additional calls which creates a decrease in reliability performance.

The busiest units or companies include trucks, especially T1 as it is in the center of town. At least one truck is deployed on most fire incidents (alarms, vehicle, reported fires, etc.). It is also the first responder to the Orland Park PD (a high frequency EMS incident request location). As EMS accounts for 63%, the five main ambulances are busy. (A1 is currently only brought up if manpower exceeds minimum level.)

Hours per Unit 2017

3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500

T8

T7

T6

T4

T2

T1

TRUCKS

E6

E5

E4

E3

E2

E1

ENGINES

A6

A5

A4

A3

A2

A1

AMBULANCES

0

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ADDITIONAL RESOURCE AVAILABILITY As described in detail previously, MABAS Agreements and Automatic Aid Agreements greatly assist the District in reinforcement on scenes and backfilling at stations to provide consistent coverage for simultaneous incidents which helps the District perform at benchmark response levels. Additionally, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call Backâ&#x20AC;? for general alarms (usually Full Still Level or higher) will notify off-duty members to respond back to their assigned stations.

PLANNED SPECIAL EVENTS Large scheduled or unusual type incidents are pre-planned with Incident Action Plans (IAP), developed and distributed to the line personnel as well as Public Safety partners (Police and Villages). These forms follow NIMS 200 formats. Additional units, either Ambulances or Utility Vehicles, are deployed where deemed practical and beneficial.

LARGE-SCALE OR UNPLANNED EMERGENCIES Thanks to extensive training with surrounding towns and MABAS Division departments, as well as cooperative training with Public Safety Partners (the Orland Park Police), the District is ready to responds efficiently, safely, and proficiently to All Hazard Zone incidents.

CONSIDERATION OF TIME AS A FACTOR Time is an important measure when evaluating deployment as time has a significant impact on the outcome of emergency incidents. From modern fire behavior and time temperature curve to cardiac arrest survivability and hemorrhage control, time is a very real factor that can truly mean the difference between life and death.

CONCLUSION Analysis of total response time and effective response force must continue to identify gaps and potential areas of improvement.

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SECTION 5 PLAN FOR MAINTAINING and IMPROVING PERFORMANCE

     

MAINTAINING and IMPROVING PERFOMANCE COMPIANCE METHODOLOGY MONITOR EVALUATE IDENTIFY and MODIFY APPROVE and SHARE

MAINTIANING and IMPROVING

An overview of the plan to measure, evaluate, and improve the deployment of resources and assessment of performance measures in the future

5

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SECTION 5 - PLAN FOR MAINTAINING and IMPROVING PERFORMANCE MAINTAINING and IMPROVING PERFORMANCE Maintaining and improving performance is paramount to any progressive and successful emergency services program. The District is committed to not only maintaining the current performance levels, but also improving. Compliance Model To develop and a plan to maintain and improve response capabilities, the District began with a proven model of Plan-DO-Check-Act. Using this model as a foundation, the District has adopted the following compliance model that also parallels the compliance model in the CFAI Community Risk Assessment/Standard of Cover.

Establish and Review Performance Objectives

Make Adjustments

Evaluate Performance

Validate Compliance

Develop Compliance/ Improvement Strategies

Communicate Expectations

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COMPLIANCE / REVIEW METHODOLOGY Implementing a plan to guide improving and maintaining SOC response capabilities and performance has been a weak link in the history of the Orland Fire Protection District. To strengthen this weakness, the District is committed to the SOC team and the process being developed to continually analyze the data and use the analytics for continual improvement. With facilitation by the Operations Chief, Accreditation, SOC team, and Command Staff, the SOC team will be assigned the responsibility of the managing the compliance outlined in the following steps. Step 1 – Establish and review performance objectives (CRA-SOC Section 2-4). 1. 2. 3. 4.

Identify services provided. Defined level of service. Identify and cauterized levels of risk. Developed performance distribution/concentration measures and associated objectives.

While much of this process may remain the same with each CRA-SOC process, it is important to review the underlying organizational assumptions to ensure they are still accurate and relevant. This can be done in the form of environmental scanning with an emphasis on community expectations, while updating and establishing any new performance measures when the following occur: There is a change in the type(s) services delivered by District. New mandated laws or regulations require a change in the method of service delivery by the District. Significant changes within District boundaries. The Board of Trustees or Fire Chief feel there is a need to adjust performance service delivery and associated performance objectives. Step 2 – Evaluate performance objectives (CRA-SOC Section 5) at several levels. Performance at a District-wide level o DAILY STATION/UNIT LEVEL (including CQI on EMS) o MONTHLY SHIFT/ BATTALION LEVEL (each/all 3 shifts) o QUARTERLY OPERATIONS/ADMIN LEVEL – REVIEW ALL SHIFTS o YEARLY OPS/ADMIN/BATTALIONS – SOC/DEPLOYMENTS Performance at the geographical planning zone level. Effective response force level.

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Step 3 – Develop compliance strategies (CRA-SOC Section 7) that will include, but are not limited to: Ensure maximization of existing resources. Evaluation of partnering opportunities. Consideration of alternate means of service delivery. Possible recommendations for allocating additional financial resources to improve service delivery. Individual or group actions that can improve service delivery. Recommend response performance reporting systems. Step 4 – Communicate expectations. This edition of the CRA-SOC clearly outlines service level response performance objectives. These performance objectives need to be communicated to the operations personnel responsible for service delivery as well as Support personnel. The methods for communicating performance objective expectations may include, but are not limited to: Direct communication with crews by the Battalion Chiefs. Training via video conferencing or direct delivery. Posting of the CRA-SOC on the District’s website and Intranet. Real-time live delivery of response expectations on monitor video boards. Using these and potentially other methods of communication, the District will develop a plan to communicate expectations by the end of 2018. The plan will also include an element by which members can give feedback regarding expectations. Step 5 – Validate compliance. The Command Staff, more specifically the Operations Division, will be responsible for validating compliance using the following mechanisms: Battalion Chiefs will monitor real-time response performance data each shift for gross deviance from performance standards. Monthly performance reports that include performance data by unit, station, and shift will be developed, standardized, and distributed to all personnel through the chain of command. Quarterly performance reports will be developed and delivered at the quarterly meetings. A comprehensive annual Performance Report will be developed. The annual report will include all aspects of performance compliance for the previous calendar year, any significant trends that were identified because of analyzing performance, any new external influences or altered conditions, new growth and development trends, and new or changing risks. The annual report shall be submitted to the Chief and Board of Trustees for their review and comments.

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Step 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Make necessary adjustments. By reviewing the information developed for the validation of compliance, any performance gaps can be identified and a plan formulated for improvement developed by the Command Staff, specifically the Operations Division, in partnership with the SOC team. Annual Review of the CRA-SOC Document In addition to developing an annual performance report as outlined in Step 5, the SOC team will review on an annual basis the entire CRA-SOC to make any necessary adjustments. Following the SOC team annual review, the CRA-SOC will be reviewed and adopted by the Board of Trustees annually.

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SECTION 6 CONCLUSIONS and RECOMMENDATIONS

 CONCLUSION  RECOMMENDATIONS

MAINTIANING and IMPROVING

Overview of this current Community Risk Analysis/Standard of Cover measures and evaluations for improvements

6

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SECTION 6 - CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Development of this Standards of Cover has allowed the District to examine extensively who we are (as a Fire Rescue Service) as well as how we got here, what we do, and how well we do it. Lastly, it’s about how we can do what we do better. These conclusions and recommendations will make the District the absolute best that the District can be. After all, that is what District stakeholders (patients, victims, guests, business owners, community partners, and dedicated staff) demand and hold the District accountable to. It is the District’s mission: “Dedicated to PRESERVING LIFE and PROPERTY while valuing full ACCOUNTABILITY to each other and people WE SERVE.”

CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS  The District’s baseline times currently meet the National Standard benchmarks (including the very important Call to Arrival time of 90% < 6:00) with the exception of turnout time. This needs to be reduced and baselines adjusted for continuous improvement.  Handoff times from the OPPD Primary PSAP and the District’s PSAP itself need to be evaluated and monitored for compliance to NFPA standard benchmark of < 30 sec.  GIS modeling is exceptional but must be maintained for timely decisions.  Multiple technology platforms need to be consolidated, coordinated, and improved.  Data input needs to be improved for consistency (GI-GO) and analysis made a priority.  JPR times (Job Performance Requirement) scene goal times need to be established (NFPA 1401 drills) for Critical Tasks Assignments.  Conflicting data issues need to be eliminated.  Expansion of Administrative oversight and structure into programs and services will improve the District’s span of control, minimizing and eliminating redundancies, inefficiencies, and inconsistencies.  Ambulance 1 needs to be brought up to peak period, starting as soon as possible.  Station 7 staffing and deployment costs/benefit needs to be evaluated further.  Station 3’s current location is not ideal; therefore, exploration into alternate sites and deployment needs to be conducted to improve service to NW quadrant (Planning Zone #1+).  The District needs to strive to staff four person fire companies to meet NFPA 1710 compliance standard to improve efficiency and safety on emergency scenes.  The District should continue discussions and consolidation evaluations.  The District needs to expand the Training Campus as planned for increased parking, classrooms, driving pads, three house structures, taxpayer strip mall, burn town additions, swift water prop, and dive pond.  The District should consider to move the Maintenance Facility to a larger location nearby in order to offer services to outside Fire agencies and allowing expansion of additional classrooms, an auditorium, and other training functions in current Maintenance Shop.

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APPENDICES and REFERENCES COMPARABLES & SURROUNDING TOWNS UNITS INSERVICE FIRE COMPARABLES DISTRICT ISO or DEPT

Orland

EAV

Budget Population

Calls

Size mile

Sq miles Daily Non Cost # Sworn Citizen per per Fire Staff Sworn per Sta Staff Firefighter Sta Min Staff Capita

E N G

T R K

A M B

B C

District

1 $2.24b

$34.1

70,284

9,948

32

6

5.3

29

119

35

591

$485

4

2

5

1

Arlington Hts

Dept

1 $2.90b

$22.7

75,525

10,045

16.6

4

4.2

25

105

2

719

$301

3

1

4

1

Downers Grove

Dept

1

$2.31b

$17.5

49,473

6,352

14.7

4

3.7

19

77

6.5

643

$354

3

1

3

1

District

1

$2.19b

$25.3

70,000

7,376

25

5

5.0

22

87

1

805

$361

4

1

3

1

Lisle Lockport

District

4

Naperville

Dept

Schaumburg

$1.6b

S Q D

J U M P

D I S P

Y

2 N N *A to

$20.0

77,366

9,123

39

6

6.5

22

89

10

869

$259

5

1 4* 1

2

$36.5

147,122

14,631

52

10

5.2

42

192

10

766

$248

6

3 5-8 2

Dept

2 $3.36b

$25.2

74,446

9,100

19.3

5

3.9

28

123

9.5

605

$339

5

2

Homer

District

3 $550m

$7.5

30,000

2,135

22

3

7.3

10

34

2

882

$250

3* or 3* 1

Y

N

Lemont

District

4 $550m

$14.2

35,000

3,791

40

4

10.0

13

51

13

686

$406

4* or 4* 1

Y

N

Mokena

District

1 $614m

$6.3

17,500

2,581

12.5

3

4.2

9

34

1

515

$360

3* or 3* 1

Y

N

NW Homer

District

5 $550m

$3.0

15,500

1,810

10

2

5.0

8

11

1

1409

$194

2* or 2*

Y

N

Oak Forest

District

3 $408m

$4.9

27,792

3,138

6

2

3.0

8

26

2

1069

$176

2* 2* 2

Y

N

Palos

District

5 $530m

$6.1

24,500

3,188

13.8

2

6.9

10

30

1

817

$249

2

2

1

Y

N

Tinley

Dept

1.373b

$8.3

56,831

8,100

16

4

4.0

24

75*

2

758

$146

4

1 4.5 1

N

Y

4

N

1

1

N

NEIGHBORING

1

Orland Fire/EMS Protection annually â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ($35m/70,284) $485 per resident = $1.33 DAY*

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HISTORICAL RESPONSE TIMES BY TYPE ALL INCIDENTS – EMERGENCY and NON-EMERGENCY

ALL TYPES - EMERGENCY & NON-EMERGENCY

GOAL

90th % Times - Baseline Performance CALL PROCESSING TURNOUT TIME

TRAVEL TIME

TOTAL RESPONSE TIME

BASELINE PERFORMANCE

2015-17 2015

2016

2017

Pick-up to Dispatch

< 1:00 min

1:00

:58

1:00

1:01

Dispatch to Enroute

< 1:20 min

2:06

2:03

2:11

2:09

Enroute to On Scene 1st UNIT (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 4:00 min

4:31

4:34

4:28

4:29

EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE

< 8:00 min

5:40

5:40

5:37

5:39

(CONCENTRATION / BALANCE) Call to Arrival(CTA) 1st Unit (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 6:20 sec

6:36

6:39

6:37

6:34

Incidents

35,496

8,579

9,273

9,148

< 10:20 sec

7:32

7:32

7:33

7:30

Incidents

27,827

5,499

7,39

7,356

Enroute to On Scene

Call to Arrival (CTA) EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (CONCENTRATION / BALANCE)

FIRE AND EMS – EMERGENCY INCIDENTS

FIRE & EMS (Ri sk Level ) -

GOAL

90th % Times - Baseline Performance CALL PROCESSING TURNOUT TIME

TRAVEL TIME

TOTAL RESPONSE TIME

BASELINE PERFORMANCE

2015-17 2015

2016

2017

Pick-up to Dispatch

< 1:00 min

:57

:54

:59

:56

Dispatch to Enroute

< 1:20 min

2:00

1:57

2:05

2:03

Enroute to On Scene 1st UNIT (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 4:00 min

3:57

3:56

3:56

3:55

EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE

< 8:00 min

5:43

5:44

5:39

5:42

(CONCENTRATION / BALANCE) Call to Arrival(CTA) 1st Unit (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 6:20 sec

5:55

5:54

6:00

5:55

Incidents

24,123

5,808

6,213

6,250

< 10:20 sec

7:32

7:35

7:32

7:32

Incidents

23,278

5,577

6034

6,066

Enroute to On Scene

Call to Arrival (CTA) EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (CONCENTRATION / BALANCE)

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EMS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; EMERGENCY INCIDENTS

EMS (Risk Level)

GOAL

90th % Times - Baseline Performance CALL PROCESSING TURNOUT TIME

TRAVEL TIME

TOTAL RESPONSE TIME

BASELINE PERFORMANCE

2015-17 2015

2016

2017

Pick-up to Dispatch

< 1:00 min

:56

:54

:58

:56

Dispatch to Enroute

< 1:00 min

2:00

1:57

2:05

2:03

Enroute to On Scene 1st UNIT (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 4:00 min

3:57

3:56

3:56

3:55

Enroute to On Scece < 8:00 min EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (CONCENTRATION / BALANCE)

5:44

5:45

5:40

5:43

5:54

5:53

5:59

5:54

Call to Arrival (CTA) 1st Unit (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 6:20 sec

23,482

Call to Arrival (CTA) EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE < 10:20 sec (CONCENTRATION - BALANCE)

7:33 22,805

5,645 6,094 6,080 7:36

7:33

7:32

5,445 5,943 5,956

BUIL DING FIRE INCIDENTS

BUILDING FIRE (Risk Level) -

GOAL

90th % Times - Baseline Performance CALL PROCESSING TURNOUT TIME

TRAVEL TIME

TOTAL RESPONSE TIME

BASELINE PERFORMANCE

2015-17 2015

2016

2017

Pick-up to Dispatch

< 1:00 min

1:48

1:45

1:14

1:43

Dispatch to Enroute

< 1:00 min

1:59

1:48

2:03

1:57

Enroute to On Scene 1st UNIT (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 4:00 min

3:54

3:56

3:53

3:34

Enroute to On Scece EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (CONCENTRATION / BALANCE)

< 8:00 min

5:26

4:27

5:29

6:19

Call to Arrival (CTA) 1st Unit (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 6:20 sec

6:04

5:38

5:27

6:15

107

29

34

20

Call to Arrival (CTA) EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (CONCENTRATION - BALANCE)

< 10:20 sec

12:25 35

12:49 11:35 12:51 17

10

8

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HAZARDOUS MATERIAL INCIDENTS

HAZMAT (Risk Level) -

GOAL

90th % Times - Baseline Performance CALL PROCESSING TURNOUT TIME

TRAVEL TIME

TOTAL RESPONSE TIME

BASELINE PERFORMANCE

2015-17 2015

2016

2017

Pick-up to Dispatch

< 1:00 min

1:24

1:23

1:27

1:21

Dispatch to Enroute

< 1:20 min

2:15

2:13

2:20

2:17

Enroute to On Scene 1st UNIT (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE)

< 4:00 min

4:55

4:41

5:31

5:05

Enroute to On Scece < 8:00 min EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (CONCENTRATION / BALANCE)

5:13

4:53

5:30

4:54

7:19

6:58

8:05

7:19

951

237

211

196

7:30

7:21

7:57

7:09

452

118

96

90

Call to Arrival (CTA) < 6:20 sec 1st Unit (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE) Call to Arrival (CTA) EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE < 10:20 sec (CONCENTRATION - BALANCE)

TECHNICAL RESCUE

TECH RESCUE (Risk Level) -

GOAL

90th % Times - Baseline Performance CALL PROCESSING TURNOUT TIME

TRAVEL TIME

TOTAL RESPONSE TIME

BASELINE PERFORMANCE

2015-17 2015

2016

2017

Pick-up to Dispatch

< 1:00 min

1:17

:53

1:26

:51

Dispatch to Enroute

< 1:20 min

1:42

1:46

1:42

1:29

5:19

4:34

4:42

5:19

5:56

3:47

2:31

10:40

7:53

7:01

8:53

7:04

95

24

21

23

Enroute to On Scene < 4:00 min 1st UNIT (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE) Enroute to On Scece EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE < 8:00 min (CONCENTRATION / BALANCE) Call to Arrival (CTA) < 6:20 sec 1st Unit (DISTRIBUTION / FIRST DUE) Call to Arrival (CTA) EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE < 10:20 sec (CONCENTRATION - BALANCE)

12:22 10

5:23 12:22 12:22 1

2

2

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RESPONSE TIME ANALYSIS ALL INCIDENTS: EMERGENCY and NON-EMERGENCY All Incidents - Department-Wide 90% Baseline Performance Call Processing Turnout Travel-Distribution / First Due Travel-2nd Arrival Dispatch to Arrival Call to Arrival-Distribution / First Due Call to Arrival-2nd Arrival Scene Duration Total Duration

BENCHMARK < 1:00 < 1:20 < 4:00 < 5:20 < 6:20

ALL INCIDENTS Overall 01:00 (35,200) 02:06 (34,846) 04:31 (35,311) 05:40 (27,777) 05:57 (35,534) 06:36 (35,496) 07:32 (27,827) 50:24 (35,557) 54:56 (35,570)

2014 01:03 (8,044) 02:00 (8,223) 04:34 (8,458) 05:45 (6,520) 05:56 (8,494) 06:36 (8,496) 07:31 (6,536) 31:03 (8,507) 35:27 (8,511)

2015 00:58 (8,674) 02:03 (8,516) 04:34 (8,550) 05:40 (6,482) 05:59 (8,592) 06:39 (8,579) 07:32 (6,499) 50:12 (8,588) 54:49 (8,592)

2016 01:00 (9,309) 02:11 (9,125) 04:28 (9,218) 05:37 (7,422) 05:59 (9,283) 06:37 (9,273) 07:33 (7,436) 54:24 (9,289) 58:52 (9,292)

2017 01:01 (9,173) 02:09 (8,982) 04:29 (9,085) 05:39 (7,353) 05:55 (9,165) 06:34 (9,148) 07:30 (7,356) 55:32 (9,173) 60:02 (9,175)

FIRE/EMS Overall 00:57 (23,701) 02:00 (23,630) 03:57 (23,930) 05:43 (23,235) 05:17 (24,118) 05:55 (24,123) 07:32 (23,278)

2014 01:00 (5,501) 01:54 (5,645) 03:59 (5,817) 05:49 (5,588) 05:15 (5,845) 05:52 (5,852) 07:31 (5,601)

2015 00:54 (5,800) 01:57 (5,763) 03:56 (5,776) 05:44 (5,562) 05:15 (5,813) 05:54 (5,808) 07:35 (5,577)

2016 00:59 (6,184) 02:05 (6,097) 03:56 (6,156) 05:39 (6,021) 05:21 (6,211) 06:00 (6,213) 07:32 (6,034)

2017 00:56 (6,216) 02:03 (6,125) 03:55 (6,181) 05:42 (6,064) 05:18 (6,249) 05:55 (6,250) 07:32 (6,066)

55:12 (24,130) 59:38 (24,133)

32:10 (5,851) 36:36 (5,853)

55:33 (5,812) 59:46 (5,812)

58:39 (6,215) 62:48 (6,215)

59:51 (6,252) 64:16 (6,253)

EMS Overall 00:57 (23,077) 02:00 (23,001) 03:57 (23,290) 05:44 (22,762) 05:17 (23,477) 05:54 (23,482) 07:33 (22,805) 55:15 (23,489) 59:41 (23,492)

2014 00:59 (5,326) 01:53 (5,461) 03:59 (5,628) 05:50 (5,448) 05:14 (5,656) 05:51 (5,663) 07:32 (5,461) 32:07 (5,662) 36:31 (5,664)

2015 00:54 (5,637) 01:57 (5,602) 03:56 (5,614) 05:45 (5,430) 05:15 (5,650) 05:53 (5,645) 07:36 (5,445) 55:35 (5,649) 59:53 (5,649)

2016 00:58 (6,065) 02:05 (5,982) 03:56 (6,037) 05:40 (5,930) 05:21 (6,092) 05:59 (6,094) 07:33 (5,943) 58:37 (6,096) 62:47 (6,096)

2017 00:56 (6,049) 02:03 (5,956) 03:55 (6,011) 05:43 (5,954) 05:18 (6,079) 05:54 (6,080) 07:32 (5,956) 59:57 (6,082) 64:22 (6,083)

BUILDING FIRES Overall 01:48 (107) 01:59 (105) 04:00 (106) 05:26 (104) 05:11 (107) 06:04 (107) 07:14 (104)

2014 02:10 (23) 02:10 (22) 04:06 (24) 05:26 (23) 05:45 (24) 06:07 (24) 07:33 (23)

2015 01:45 (29) 01:48 (29) 03:56 (28) 04:27 (28) 05:07 (29) 05:38 (29) 06:47 (28)

2016 01:14 (34) 02:03 (34) 03:53 (34) 05:29 (34) 04:52 (34) 05:27 (34) 07:12 (34)

2017 01:43 (21) 01:57 (20) 03:34 (20) 06:13 (19) 05:15 (20) 06:15 (20) 08:09 (19)

136:00 (107) 139:39 (107)

162:55 (24) 167:54 (24)

159:56 (29) 164:22 (29)

92:24 (34) 96:36 (34)

95:09 (20) 107:53 (20)

FIRE and EMS INCIDENTS: COMBINED Fire & EMS - Department-Wide 90% Baseline Performance Call Processing Turnout Travel-Distribution / First Due Travel-2nd Arrival Dispatch to Arrival Call to Arrival-Distribution / First Due Call to Arrival-2nd Arrival ERF - EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (Concentration) Scene Duration Total Duration

BENCHMARK < 1:00 < 1:20 < 4:00 < 5:20 < 6:20 < 9:20

EMS INCIDENTS ONLY EMS - Department-Wide 90% Baseline Performance Call Processing Turnout Travel-Distribution / First Due Travel-2nd Arrival Dispatch to Arrival Call to Arrival-Distribution / First Due Call to Arrival-2nd Arrival Scene Duration Total Duration

BENCHMARK < 1:00 < 1:00 < 4:00 < 5:00 < 6:00

BUILDING FIRES: ONLY Building Fires - Department-Wide 90% Baseline Performance Call Processing Turnout Travel-Distribution / First Due Travel-2nd Arrival Dispatch to Arrival Call to Arrival-Distribution / First Due Call to Arrival-2nd Arrival ERF - EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (Concentration) Scene Duration Total Duration

BENCHMARK < 1:00 < 1:20 < 4:00 < 5:20 < 6:20 < 9:20

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ALL FIRES: ONLY

TECHNICAL RESCUE Technical Rescue - Department-Wide 90% Baseline Performance Call Processing Turnout Travel-Distribution / First Due Travel-2nd Arrival Dispatch to Arrival Call to Arrival-Distribution / First Due Call to Arrival-2nd Arrival ERF - EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (Concentration) Scene Duration Total Duration

BENCHMARK < 1:00 < 1:20 < 4:00 < 5:20 < 6:20

TECH RESCUE 01:17 (96) 01:42 (94) 05:19 (94) 05:56 (10) 06:41 (95) 07:53 (95) 12:22 (10)

2014 01:20 (27) 01:37 (26) 05:27 (27) 05:56 (5) 06:39 (27) 07:15 (27) 09:13 (5)

2015 00:53 (24) 01:46 (24) 04:34 (23) 03:47 (1) 06:24 (24) 07:01 (24) 05:23 (1)

2016 01:26 (21) 01:42 (21) 04:42 (21) 02:31 (2) 06:41 (21) 08:34 (21) 12:22 (2)

2017 00:51 (24) 01:29 (23) 05:19 (23) 10:40 (2) 06:33 (23) 07:04 (23) 12:22 (2)

35:49 (95) 43:55 (95)

31:34 (27) 35:58 (27)

40:57 (24) 44:42 (24)

35:49 (21) 45:38 (21)

26:53 (23) 27:43 (23)

HAZMAT 01:24 (935) 02:15 (927) 04:55 (949) 05:13 (450) 06:30 (951) 07:19 (951) 07:30 (452)

2014 01:24 (291) 02:04 (294) 04:51 (305) 05:15 (147) 06:02 (306) 07:09 (306) 07:03 (148)

2015 01:23 (239) 02:13 (235) 04:41 (238) 04:53 (117) 06:21 (238) 06:58 (238) 07:21 (118)

2016 01:27 (210) 02:20 (207) 05:31 (210) 05:30 (96) 06:56 (211) 08:05 (211) 07:57 (96)

2017 01:21 (195) 02:17 (191) 05:05 (196) 04:54 (90) 06:45 (196) 07:19 (196) 07:09 (90)

40:44 (950) 46:46 (951)

35:38 (306) 42:04 (306)

43:06 (237) 50:32 (238)

35:26 (211) 40:21 (211)

46:39 (196) 51:49 (196)

< 9:20

HAZARDOUS MATERIAL (HAZMAT) Haz Mat - Department-Wide 90% Baseline Performance Call Processing Turnout Travel-Distribution / First Due Travel-2nd Arrival Dispatch to Arrival Call to Arrival-Distribution / First Due Call to Arrival-2nd Arrival ERF - EFFECTIVE RESPONSE FORCE (Concentration) Scene Duration Total Duration

BENCHMARK < 1:00 < 1:20 < 4:00 < 5:20 < 6:20 < 9:20

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Orland Fire achieves ISO CLASS 1! On September 5th, 2017, the Orland Fire Protection District was officially awarded the ISO CLASS 1 rating! This is the highest rating possible in the Country! Out of 46,042 Fire Departments nationwide, the District is proud to be one among only 242 in the entire country to achieve this level! In Illinois, there are only 12 Class 1 departments out of the 2,162 total in the entire state! ISO Reviews and Rates: • • • •

EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS FIRE DEPARTMENT WATER SUPPLY COMMUNITY EFFORTS

WHAT IS ISO? Insurance Services Office (ISO) is a leading source of information about property/casualty insurance risk. The organization provides statistical, actuarial, underwriting, and claims data for a broad spectrum commercial and personal lines of insurance.

WHY ARE ISO RATINGS IMPORTANT? About every two years, ISO evaluates municipal fire-protection efforts in communities throughout the United States using the Public Protection Classification (PPC™) program. PPC is used in several ways, to serve as a tool to help: - Insurance companies establish premiums for fire insurance. - Communities measure the effectiveness of their fire-protection services. - Communities plan for, budget, and justify improvements. Most U.S. insurers of home and business properties use ISO’s PPC in calculating premiums. In general, the price of insurance in a community with a good PPC is lower than in a community with a poor PPC.

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WHAT DOES A CLASS 1 COMMUNITY LOOK LIKE? To determine a community's Public Protection Classification (PPCâ&#x201E;˘), ISO conducts a field survey to observe and evaluate features of the fire protection systems. ISO objectively evaluates four major areas:

Analysis of a community's fire suppression capabilities based on fire department's first-alarm response and ability to minimize potential loss. Includes review of: - Engine companies / ladder or service companies - Geographic deployment of fire companies - Equipment / reserve equipment - Automatic Aid Agreements - Pumping capacity - Personnel and training

Evaluation of a community's water supply system to determine the adequacy for fire suppression. - Hydrant size, type, and installation - Frequency and completeness of hydrant inspection and flow-testing programs

Includes: - Facilities for the public to report fires - Staffing, training, and certification of Tele Communicators - Facilities for dispatching Fire Departments

Local efforts to reduce the risk of fire, including: - Fire prevention codes and enforcement - Public fire safety education and Fire Investigation programs Residents and business owners should contact their insurance providers to inquire about how Orlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT Class 1 PPC rating may impact their premiums.


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THANKS TO ALL THE MEMBERS OF THE ACCREDITATION TEAM, DIVISION HEADS, AND STAFF FOR YOUR HARD WORK AND EFFORTS! YOU ARE MAKING THE ORLAND FIRE DISTRICT A BETTER PLACE FOR TODAY AND WELL INTO THE FUTURE.

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COMMUNITY RISK ASSESSMENT / STANDARDS OF COVER | ORLAND FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT

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