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sub.urban Creative Director Madeline Carpentiere Photographer Sarah Silbiger Featuring Sam Morse, Lexie Bowman Styling Dee Dee Ogbogu, Sam Morse & Molly Glass Hair & Makeup Carli Schmidt, Sam Morse

16 self worth Creative Director Deric Hamer Photographer Sarah Silbiger Featuring Samantha Wong, Taiba Zahir & Isaiah Tharan Styling Rachel Angeloff, David Lowe Eden Pritikin Hair & Makeup Carli Schmidt

24 saturation Creative Director Madeline Carpentiere Photographer Nicki Gitter Featuring Vynique Walker, Thalia Duque

& Amberly Moody Styling Natasha Mendoza & David Lowe Hair & Makeup Andriana Todorovic

29 construct Creative Director Carli Schmidt & Vincenzo Calvi Photographer Angela Francis Featuring Varsha Srivastava, Thalia Duque,

Lexie Bowman, Noelle Kichura, & Samantha Wong Body Paint Artists Tami Qiu, Christine Fang, Noelle Kichura & Samantha Wong

41 etched Creative Director Erin McCarthy Photographer Erin McCarthy & Josh Smith Featuring Hanna Yang, Heidi Auvenshire,

Anna Hogan, Lillian Lee, David Lowe, Calvin Chin & Matthew Hartnett Spotlight Artists Tami Qiu, Hanna Yang, Josh Smith, Kathleen Allain, Qian Mei, & Christine Fang

46 wo/man Creative Director Deric Hamer Photographer Angela Wang Featuring Jordan Fessehaie, Brandon Ong-Sy

Samantha Morse, Jean-Luc Lukunku Rhiannon Jeselonis, Andriana Todorovic Styling Dee Dee Ogbogu, Natasha Mendoza, Minji Kim & Sara Boutorabi, Jean-Luc Lukunku, Brandong Ong-Sy

Hair & Makeup


56 bleached Creative Director Madeline Carpentiere Photographer Nicki Gitter, Ellen Clouse Featuring Varsha Srivastava, Gabriella Plotkin, Olivia Simonson, Samantha Wong Stylists Taylor Ann Greenwood, Minji Kim Hair & Makeup Maya Hudlin, Rhiannon Jeselonis

64 ain’t nobody cool Creative Director Deric Hamer Photographer Madeline Carpentiere, Sam Brooks Featuring Hunter Coughlan, Giovanna Spargo,

David lowe, Lexie Bowman Brandon Ong-Sy, Sam Morse, Sara Boutorabi

Styling

74 dirty glam Creative Director Madeline Carpenteiere Photographer Angela WangAngela Wang Featuring Kaitlin Tsai, Noelle Kichura,

Victoria Gruenert, David Lowe Lexie Bowman, Samantha Morse, Sarah Boutorabi, Jean-Luc, & Minji Kim Hair & Makeup Maya Hudlin, Andriana Todorovic

Styling


contributors Editor in Chief Carli Schmidt Creative Directors Madeline Carpentiere & Deric Hamer Art Director Erin McCarthy Managing Editor Samantha Kelley Director of Finance Olivia Simonson

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Director of Marketing Margot Menestrot

PR

Art Directors

Writers

Stylists

Gabriella Plotkin Kelsey Borovinsky Monica San Luis Shravya Rao Steven Frieman

Cristina Estupinan Carly Pickett Alena Adams Raeanne Villicongo Georgina Pagounis Josh Smith Hanna Yang Qian Mei Tammy Qiu Kathleen Allain Victoria Gruenart Pilar O Connor

Arianna Davis Jazmyne Jackson Michelle Santiago Cortes Eden Marcus Susanna Yudkin Courtney Ryder Olayinka Fasehun Isaiah Tharan Deean Yeoh Kaylie Piecuch Ruby King Jacqui Manning Cole Kerrigan DeeDee Ogbogu Tabia Zahir

Eden Pritikin David Lowe Brandon Ong-Sy Rachael Angeloff Taylor-Ann Greenwood Lexie Bowman Minji Kim Natasha Mendoza Sara Boutorabi Sam Morse Jean-Luc Lukunku DeeDee Ogbogu

Events Cole Kerrigan Christy Tan Jillian Furchak

Brand Outreach & Finance Nicole Liew Jina Rifai Amy Yi Kelsey Thomas Lucia Tonelli Bryan Brager Gabriella Forman Jahan Jina Rifai Wilson McDermott Maggie Cheng Samantha Modaro

Copy Editors Regina Raphael Frances Lown Brittany Kinch Jenna Lavin Amanda Wenslow Taylor Robinson Beth Sorel

Video Editors Jamie Ferguson Bailey Garton Helena DuGard Selen Terzi

Photographers Sarah Silbiger Angela Francis Nicki Glitter Angela Wang Lauren Peterson Sam Brooks Madeline Carpentiere Ellen Clouse


letter from the editor Spring is a time for rejuvenation and rebirth: spring cleaning, the return of warm days, the sprouting of leaves and flowers. This spring has been a season of renewal forOff The Cuff as well. With an entirely new Executive Board—six fresh perspectives, personalities, and styles—OTC has experienced a period of transition. E-Board felt it was time for a shift in many aspects of the magazine like launching a new logo, revitalizing the website and improving the print aesthetic. While we are not losing what Off The Cuff stands for, our hope is that the magazine springs forward and blooms even more. Thank you everyone for all the hard work and passion involved with this issue of Off The Cuff! Xox Carli Schmidt

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Madeline Carpentiere Sarah Silbiger Sam Morse & Lexie Bowman Creative Director Photographer Featuring

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sub.urban by Kaylie Piecuch & Samantha Kelley

A shapeless black body suit sits on the the American Apparel hanger tangled among 20 other cotton pieces of the same design. But you purchase it. Maybe because you like the feel of the fabric or even because it’s on sale. Or, maybe because you saw Gigi Hadid in a picture on Instagram, illuminated by white camera light and surrounded by half-a-dozen other models, wearing the exact same thing. It doesn’t matter where you are or what background you come from, fashion inspiration is no longer

restricted to what those around you are wearing. With a click of a button there is a global community of fashion lovers,brands and celebrities who inspire and sell new ideas and styles. To anyone “stuck in the suburbs” who has considered going to Target for a fun night out, it may be more difficult to look to the streets for edgy fashion influence. Instead, you can let pictures from Alessandra Ambrosio’s beach vacation be your swimsuit style inspo, and let Kanye tell you what your exercise footwear should look like.


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9 Special Thanks Monica Canilao Blank Canvas Mural (Converse) Pop Allston

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sub.urban Walk into a high school in a suburb of L.A. and you can see teens in platform sandals, oversized denim and all black frocks that look more suitable for a lunch date at Urth Caffé than for brown bagged lunches in cafeterias. But how did this style jump from streetwear to suburbia? Krista Lichtner is a high school senior in Orange County, California, who works and models for Brandy Melville. She describes her style as “simple, vintage, and sometimes from the ‘90s,” and like most millennials, looks to social media as her own personal fashion catalogue. “I am most inspired from Instagram because it is easy to see various peoples styles, whether it be people I know personally or just know through social media. I also can see new trends and get ideas about outfits that I might be interested in wearing,” she said. Her taste in fashion has earned her nearly 150K followers on Instagram, inspiring the outfits of others all over the world without even venturing into a bustling city. Fashion houses understand that these viral outlets open the market to new and virginal territories and demographics, and they are putting their most exciting and modern foot

forward. Companies like Supreme often do not even feature their pieces in their advertisements, but instead they plaster their logo over a well-known face. This simple concept digs deep into the core of human emotion, a trope that our parents have riddled off since pre K: we always want what others have. Click on the tags featured in your favorite celebrity’s most recent outfit post and now you, too, can get their

“simple, vintage, and sometimes from the ‘90s,” wire rimmed Quay sunglasses or platform Pumas. Now able to capitalize on this basic human psychological thinking, the fashion industry can able to expand their trends far past the runway. Gone are the days when only the first two rows at a show could appreciate the clothing, and fashion is no longer restricted by borders, languages or even class. Social media has brought the appreciation for fashion from the streets of Milan, Italy to the streets of Milan, Ohio.

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self-worth by Isaiah Tharan

It took me a long time to find a personal sense of style. I’m still searching, really, but initiating that search allowed me to become much more confident. Early in high school, I was quiet and made few friends; this changed as soon as I started caring about my appearance, and I gained confidence because I just wanted to look good for myself. My style at

17 Deric Hamer Sarah Silbiger Samantha Wong, Isaiah Tharan, Tabia Zahir

While I enjoy dressing in an unconventional manner, I realize it is not always feasible. I have an internship and a job in professional settings, both of which encourage me to wear standard clothing. Finding a balance between self-styling and allowing others to influence you is an essential part of developing a style you can maintain and be proud of.

Creative Director Photographer Featuring

“Dress well, test well” is a popular mantra, but it only scratches the surface of how our sense of self is reflected in what we wear. How this is displayed differs from person to person; some wear a suit with joy while others find tying their Half-Windsor knot the worst part of the day. Everyone has this nonverbal code that switches: we dress up for interviews, or down if in the tech industry, and we even dress differently when we interact with alternate friend groups. The conflict of dressing for yourself and dressing for others is nearly impossible to balance. I love to wear weird shirts I made from my mom’s dresses, joggers with intertwining velvet flowers and Italian military surplus boots.


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the time was about as late 2000s pseudo-hipster as you can get; a red flannel over a t-shirt and skinny jeans was my way of life. Dressing for others wasn’t an issue at the time since my school had a very lax dress code for boys, even if the standards for girls were quite strict. One example of when I changed what I wore for others was when a few friends and I organized a protest for these strict dress codes and all wore yoga pants to school—admittedly this was mostly just an excuse to wear comfy clothing.The administration shut down the protest immediately and so suspended my experimentation with dressing for someone other than myself. The next time I had to confront this dilemma was during college interviews. Unlike the previous occasion, I was not looking forward to dressing up in my uncle’s oversized suit to impress some mid-thirties interviewer whom I had never met. I had yet to discover how enjoyable dressing up could be compared to dressing down, partly because I was wearing a pinstripe suit older than I was, which would have looked more fitting on Nixon than on my skinny shoulders. Before prom, I miraculously discovered a well fitting blazer and immediately fell in love. I looked

good and felt good; it was comfortable and not some tobacco smelling monstrosity from a different era. From this point, on I chose to dress formally even when the occasion didn’t call for it, and reconciling my love of style with my disdain for suits and ties allowed me to be more comfortable in formal settings.

“I was wearing a pinstripe suit older than I was and which would have looked more fitting on Nixon than on my skinny shoulders.” This conflict of self presentation flared up most when I turned 18 because I wanted to get a tattoo for my birthday. The struggle was not with my family (my mom was the one gifting me the tattoo and has more ink on her than anyone I have ever met), but rather, was with myself. My mom has always been a teacher, a job that is surprisingly accepting of tattoos. At the time, I wanted to go into economics or chemistry, which tend to be more conservative fields. I knew that the tattoo design I wanted, a partial sleeve

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of daisies encircling a hummingbird, would not allow me to ever wear short sleeves at work if I continued with my current ambitions. I chose to get the tattoo and dress permanently for myself above everyone else, a decision I am proud to have made.

Finding peace with expected style and the style you want for yourself takes compromise. I cannot wear my strange boots and weirder shirts to work, and perhaps an Oxford shirt tucked into dress pants would draw a few looks at the concerts I

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attend. Realizing that I sometimes have to sacrifice my personal desires to appease others was a mistake; instead, I learned from the uniform styles and incorporated them into my own, which has made me a much more confident individual.

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Creative Director Photographer Featuring Madeline Carpentiere Nicki Glitter Vynique Walker, Thalia Duque & Amberly Moody

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construct by Yinka Fasehun The fundamental difference is that race is socially imposed and hierarchical. There is an inequality built into the system. Furthermore, you have no control over your race; it's how you're perceived by others. — Dalton Conley

30 Carli Schmidt & Vincenzo Calvi Angela Francis Varsha Srivastava, Thalia Duque, Lexie Bowman Noelle Kichura, Samantha Wong

The division between black, white, Asian, Hispanic and other began early in the history of the United States.

Darkness indicated difference and inferiority during the institution of slavery: a stigma that still continues to poison the United States and even reverberates among those in the black community. Similarly, the immigration of Asians to the United States presented a challenge to the white middle class majority. The introduction and growing tolerance of different races in the U.S., in turn, exposed a deeply rooted fear of inferiority and emasculation among white males. So how do you tackle the great fear that others will take your jobs, women and happiness? You separate them from the rest of society. You make sure there is a clear division between their value and worth in comparison to the majority. You label them according to characteristics they cannot control: color and appearance.

Creative Director Photographer Featuring

Race is not something we can choose. It is created to separate us. By accepting the notions of race, we relinquish controland put our worth in the hands of others. Built into the institution of race comes challenges of poverty, education and class. Saida Grundy, Assistant Professor of Sociology and African American Studies at Boston University, is skeptical of the institution of race: “The effects [of race] are real. The concept is not.”Race can be determined, in most cases, by one glance. According to Conley, “You can identify ethnically as Irish and Polish, but you have to be essentially either white or black.” So why have we let race become so definitive in our society?


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“The U.S. has created classifications of different races to unfairly disadvantage,” says Grundy. “Race is the classification system we chose to justify white supremacy. Our country has never predated racial exploitation and we’ve never known a time without it. We are the way we are because of it.” Throughout history, race and ethnicity have both created and destroyed relations within the melting pot of the United States. Yet, with the introduction and growth of a new ethnicity, backlash is sure to follow from entrenched cultural and racial norms. It can be seen in the institution of slavery, the persecution of Native Americans and the internment of Japanese Americans: new things bring uncertainty, accompanied byfear. The Zoot Suit Riots of the 1940s, the race riots that occurred leading up to and

Throughout history, race and ethnicity have both created and destroyed relations within the melting pot of the United States. throughout the Civil Rights Movement and racial segregation all demonstrate that reactions ensue racial tension. The difference is often a source of division, and creating division is a means of coping with great change. “The relationship between race and inequality is a power dynamic,” says Grundy. “With each generation and change, the racial dynamic shifts. When people feel pressured, racialtensions tend to be higher.” As empowering and fulfilling as it can be to come into one’s own and recognize and accept your identity, race has often been used by the majority to oppress the minority. It has been both a label of shame and pride for many.

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Perhaps that is the most frightening part of race—leaving your identity to be defined by others. Leaving your identity open to interpretation allows others to limit you and to diminish all that you are and all that you can become. In moments of weakness, race is used to quell and suppress great potential and growing power.

means of division. Similarly, while it is important to define yourselves as equal to others there is also something to be said for wearing your flag boldly in mind, body and spirit. And seeing others for what they are, where they come from and what they would like to be makes the world all the more colorful.

And yet the racial minorities and the culturally diverse have persevered. They have been labeled different and have used that to bring about unity, not only in their community, but also within a larger set of minorities. There is a fine line to be danced within the construct of race and ethnicity. As we enter an age where boldly declaring who you are and what you stand for is becoming the norm—Black Lives Matter, He For She, A Day Without Latinos—we must not revert to old ways and use our differences as a

Minorities in the United States have appeared to accomplish what once seemed impossible. They have reclaimed the race associations they have been given and, not only owned them, but used them to fuel a great return to cultural and ethnic roots. People around the world are learning that it is okay to be more than a color—they are unique people with history and tradition assigned to them at birth which flows as steadily as the blood through their veins.

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etched 40 Artists Featured Tammy Qiu, Carly Pickett Hanna Yang, Kathleen Allain Christine Fang, Qian Mei Josh Smith & Erin McCarthy


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Erin McCarthy Josh Smith Hanna Yang, Heidi Auvenshire, Anna Hogan Lillian Lee, David Lowe, Calvin Chin & Matthew Hartnett

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wo/man by Deean Yeoh

Creative Director Photographer Featuring Deric Hamer Angela Wang Jordan Fessehaie, Brandon Ong-Sy Sam Morse, Jean-Luc Lukunku

Women and men have always been subjected to subliminal stereotypes, but traditional segregation of roles and responsibilities with respect to one’s sex is becoming increasingly redundant in society today. So redundant, in fact, that our contemporary workforce is taking matters into their own hands. No doubt the concept of “pigeonholing” is still pertinent when there is a sense of comfort that lies in predictability—a sense of security. But to what extent do these labels benefit and limit us as a society? And how creative are people willing to become in order to dodge society’s stereotypes?

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Special Thanks

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A Huffington Post study cited, “When it comes to women in management, the U.S. ranks 37th of 45 countries.” Examined, this is a surprisingly low ranking for a supposedly progressive country.

Mira Hopkins, a Boston University student majoring in International Relations and Economics, reflected on her experience as an intern at UBS, a global financial services company. “I was surprised at how few

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women were in management roles at such a big corporation,” she said. “There was only one woman in management. She was in the Financial Advisory department.” Hopkins agreed that stereotypes of inferiority and weakness may pertain to the absence of women in management positions, but workforce related stereotypes are not limited to women. Research conducted by Erin Reid, an Assistant Professor at Boston University’s Questrom School of Business, shows that men in the workforce are often subjected to the expectation of being “Superman” or the “ideal worker.” Reid’s article, Why Some Men Pretend to Work 80-Hour Weeks, was featured in the Harvard Business Review and blatantly brings to light workforce stereotypes for both men and women, along with the contrasting ways in which these parties cope with the expectations of their professional jobs. Reid states that while women use formal accommodations to meet the demands of their personal lives and become “marginalized within the firm,” men find “unobtrusive, under-the-radar ways to alter the

structure of their work” and avoid the same marginalization women face. Reid points out that while women are often seen as incapable of meeting demands due to family obligations, men are now expected to fulfil the role of the ideal worker. While our society can often appear consumed by the presence of stereotypes against women, Mira Hopkins believes they can be actively combated: “I think girls need to project their confidence during job interviews.” The abolition of stereotypes for men and women will aid workforces in breaking down socially conceived barriers of prejudice. Acceptance and education can lead the way for a future world where employees are judged purely on their performance, rather than by the subliminal stereotypes pertaining to their denominative categories. This will be the future world where diverse workforces will benefit from multifaceted values. Only then will society become a conglomerate of intellectual capability that integrates the strengths of males and female roles into a society of equality.

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Madeline Carpentiere Nicki Glitter, Ellen Clouse Varsha Srivastava, Gabriella Plotkin Olivia Simonson, Samantha Wong Creative Director Photographer Featuring

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by Ruby King Lipstick, by many people, is considered to be inconvenient, messy, too bright and even a “boner killer.” And the adjectives don’t stop there. That’s pretty controversial for something that comes in such a small tube. Many of us seem to think of lipstick as something unattainable, something that only looks good on old film stars or professional dancers—an agent to a theatrical performance. But as more and more modern women rediscover lipstick, we have to ask ourselves: is it really so inconvenient to re-apply your favorite shade of red, or are we being discouraged to wear it for the sake of conservatism?


Lynne Harlow

Sweetheart of the Rodeo, 2016 BU Annex Gallery

Special Thanks

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This is not to suggest that women aren’t wearing lipstick because others have an influence over their choice. Yet, how many times can we say that a man has avoided kissing us because of lipstick? Or someone has said that our lipstick is too loud, or that it clashes with the rest of our outfit? That it makes us look like a clown? It would seem so easy to opt for a lip gloss instead, but this isn’t a middle school dance, and another’s judgement has no place in

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making decisions about our self-expression.Lipstick used to be the most popular pick-me-up item, something women would wear around the house just for the sake of it. Unlike eyeliner, blush or even eyeshadow, lipstick has a mystifying power to transform anyone’s identity with a careful swipe. Going for consumptionridden glamour à la Nicole Kidman in Moulin Rouge? There’s a red for you. Or perhaps you want to emulate the eternal elegance of Jackie O. with a bright pink? The choice is yours. The truth of the matter is that wearing lipstick remains one of the best confidence boosters around, and history seems to prove it. While it was sometimes linked with prostitution and witchcraft, lipstick was a symbol of status in Ancient Egypt and was also a reigning symbol of female emancipationamong American suffragettes in the early 20th century.

Because, what would drinking a latte be without leaving behind that kiss of confidence on the porcelain cup? Of course lipstick lovers are no strangers to the upkeep it requires. From taking extra caution in eating anything larger than a French fry to slipping white clothing on with care, it is no secret that we do a lot to keep from smudging everything we touch. I’m not even sure if Dita Von Teese has discovered a lipstick that is long lasting, moisturizing and non-bleeding, but we continue to wear it with confidence, grace and a little mystery. Because, what would drinking a latte be without leaving behind that kiss of confidence on the porcelain cup?

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ain’t nobody cool The Duality of Fashion & Ego by Michelle Santiago Cortés

65 Creative Director Photographer Featuring

Black and Latino New York ­boys turned knife fights into dance­offs where bright swatches of colorful tracksuits and gold chains popularized athletic wear. Branding became bolder and logos more visible under the pressures of 1980s consumerism until customized denim jackets were replaced with an entire outfit worth of brand loyalty. The aspirational whims of a 1980s adolescence turned daydreams into wardrobes.

Deric Hamer Madeline Carpentiere Hunter Coughlan, Giovanna Spargo David Lowe, Lexie Bowman

With every new socialite who scrambles to cop the Yeezy Season 3 designs, a streetwear veteran will wonder if those Boost 350’s will ever set foot on actual pavement. Streetwear is the first millennial contribution to fashion history with a fiercely protected lineage of its own. A Ping-Pong game of subcultures between London and New York has kept the rhythm of aspirational youth vibrating across the Atlantic for over 40 years.


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The football hooligans of Manchester wore Adidas, Lacoste and Izod off the field in honor of their favorite athletes. The casuals, as they were called, rang in the cacophony of the punk and goth of Thatcher’s England. Their preppy polos and up­to­date footwear were daring feats of appropriation that outsiders mistook for imitation.

With streetwear readily accessible from almost anywhere except the street, desperation sweatthrough the luxury threads. The hamperedreality of the club scene prompted grime’s corrosive mixture of garage and hip­hop. Colors and patternscircled the drain leaving stripped down uniforms of boiler suits and baseball caps.

Streetwear subcultures longed for authenticity in a time when shameless consumerism pushed the have­nots out of the picture. B­boys and casuals fostered a playful one­upmanship that paved the way for teenage boys to bond over self­ expression and Jordans. The dream gave the label hunting a spiritual dimension.

The Internet highways of the early 2000s were the streets to be owned; grime artists hid behind their LimeWire usernames and bomber jackets.

The last decade of the twentieth century exploded with aspirational peacocking. While New York was drowning in its own label craze, London rude boys dropped acid in rave clubs and reggae began to oscillate with the frenetic excitement of the jungle drum and bass. Tracksuits morphed into minimal shapes of boxy shirts, pants and bucket hats, uniformly emblazoned with cultural icons, baroque patterns and booming colors. Establishment labels like Versace and Moschino were in a position to absorb streetwear trends and offer visual assaults for a dress­to-kill showdown.

Streetwear is not a trend but the current state of fashion itself. Nazir Mazhar has worked to keep pumping the grime in his most recent men’s Ready­to­Wear collection—an all black sonnet of ripples and straps in memoriam of the boiler suit. Mazhar is one of many designers who is suffocating under a blanket of “streetwear” labels. Streetwear is a cloudy current seeping through the greater part of contemporary fashion, whether it is a Balenciaga sneaker, vintage Adidas or a Craig Green waistline. Streetwear is not a trend but the current state of fashion itself.

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Madeline Carpentiere Angela Wang Kaitlin Tsai, Noelle Kichura, Victoria Gurenert, David Lowe Creative Director Photographer Featuring

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dirty glam by DeeDee Ogbogu

One art form is not nearly enough to satiate the hunger for expression. This hunger is very apparent in the microcosm of the entertainment industry where different spheres of artistic influences merge. Nowadays, the focus seems to be on the collaboration of music and design; artists have been creating their own brands and teaming with designers to produce lines where fashion lovers and fans can connect through tangible expressions. The idea of musicians endeavoring in fashion is not a new concept, but it is now becoming more prevalent.


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In some cases, artists become better known as designers than musicians. Victoria Beckham, formerly known as Posh Spice, owns her eponymous brand that won her a Designer of the Year Award at the Annual British Fashion Awards in 2011, Brand of the Year Award at the British Council Fashion Awards in 2014 and other high regards. Her Ready­-to-­Wear line is filled with sleek, classically­cut pieces and meticulous funky patterns which coincide with her tasteful and chic demeanor. Other figures who have contributed to the collision of fashion and music include: Rihanna x Puma, Kanye West’s Yeezy line, Tyler the Creator and his GolfWang line, Gwen Stefani and L.A.M.B. and Drake x OVO. The year of artistic collaboration is here, and the number of musician turned designers shows no sign of slowing down.

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Special Thanks

Among the numerous collaborations that are occurring, there are a few that truly stand out. Rapper A$AP Rocky joined forces with Guess to create “Gue$$.” Rocky’s fashion influences stem from the very same 90’s hip­hop culture that shapes his music. He adds a fresh contemporary American style to his designs, and what emerges are classic urban pieces. Courtney Love, frontwoman of the punk band Hole, has merged with Nasty Gal to create a line inspired by her own 90s look. Grunge and punk themes of black, white, lace, fishnet and satin recur on slip dresses, baby­doll dresses, body­suits, tights, chokers and other barely­there clothing items. Rocky and Love have acted as the frontrunners of the vibrant decade’s re-inception with their aesthetic designs.

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special thanks

Monica Canilao | Lynne Harlow | Lynne Cooney Lauren Recchia & The Verb Hotel Paul Delano |South Street Diner thank you for making this issue possible

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Off The Cuff - Issue 06  

Our #OTCSS16 Issue!

Off The Cuff - Issue 06  

Our #OTCSS16 Issue!

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