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CIRCLE

FALL

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MAGAZINE


FIRST LOOK


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B  elmont’s Class of 2017, along with new graduate and transfer students, volunteered throughout Nashville through the University’s annual SERVE Project on Aug. 19. Students served their new hometown in a variety of ways, including gardening at Hands on Nashville’s Urban Farm.

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From the President With four construction projects currently underway, it’s clear to anyone visiting campus that Belmont is a University on the move. Our enrollment growth has necessitated additional investment in academic, dining and residential space, not to mention the students’ favorite: parking! And Belmont has stepped up to respond, building state-of-the-art facilities that empower students to acquire the education they need to transform the world with their skills and passion. Now, we’re entering a different type of building project, constructing our vision for the next season of Belmont University. At Opening Convocation in August, I announced the launch of our Vision 2020 initiative, a collaborative effort across campus to hear ideas from students, employees and alumni on the Belmont University they want to see in 2020 and to establish a plan to achieve those goals in the next six years. As part of the Belmont family, I hope you’ll help us in those efforts, continuing the wonderful support you’re already offering as together we continue to make Belmont University the best story in higher education. Best Regards,

Robert C. Fisher, President

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F  rom the roof of Belmont’s newest residence hall, guests can see the Nashville skyline and ongoing construction for the Wedgewood Academic Center and the Academic and Dining Services Complex.

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CIRCLE

Table of Contents

University Administration President Bob Fisher

2 From the President

12 Bridges to Belmont

4 Entrepreneurship Village

14 Being Belmont: It’s Bruin Time

6 Ward-Belmont Centennial

16 Experiential Education

8 Humanities Symposium

18 Campus News

10 Sacred Shoeboxes

Provost Thomas Burns Vice President/Chief of Staff Susan West Vice President of Finance and Operations Steve Lasley Vice President for Administration and University Counsel Jason Rogers Vice President of University Advancement Bethel (Bo) Thomas Jr. Vice President of Spiritual Development Todd Lake Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness Paula Gill

ON THE COVER The 2013 “Christmas at Belmont” concert, hosted by mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves, airs nationally on PBS. Check local listings for times in your area.

Magazine Managing Editor April Hefner (M.A. ´07) Designers Nicole Childress Glenda Dahlhauser Natalie Smith (´08) Sara Spencer University Photographer Andrea Hallgren Contributing Photographers Angela Disrud Ben McKeown Sam Polonsky Contributing Writers Juanita Cousins (M.B.A. ’13) Emily Young Production & Distribution Coordinators Veronica Smith Sara Spencer Circle magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of Belmont University. Editorial content, graphic production, printing and distribution are coordinated by the Offices of Communications and University Marketing & Special Initiatives. Address changes and alumni notes should be directed to the Office of Alumni Relations. Third-class bulk postage is paid at the U.S. Post Office, Nashville, TN. Direct inquiries and comments regarding Circle magazine content to: Belmont University Office of Communications/Circle magazine 1900 Belmont Blvd., Nashville, TN 37212 615.460.6641 or circlemag@belmont.edu Belmont University is a Christian community. The university faculty, administration and staff uphold Jesus as the Christ and as the measure for all things. As a community seeking to uphold Christian standards of morality, ethics and conduct, Belmont University holds high expectations of each person who chooses to join the community. Belmont University does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service or sexual orientation. Inquiries or complaints concerning the application of these policies to students should be directed to the Associate Dean of Students, Beaman Student Life Center Suite 200, 1900 Belmont Blvd., Nashville, TN 37212, deanofstudents@belmont.edu or 615.460.6407.

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VILLAGE CONNECTS ALUMNI AND STUDENT ENTREPRENEURS

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ALUMNA KATHLEEN BOND (’11) KNEW SHE WANTED TO OWN HER own business, so she studied entrepreneurship while in the Honors Program at Belmont University. But it was two years later that the then-Turnip Truck manager would return to campus for insight at the Center for Entrepreneurship. With the guidance of her former professors, she and her parents purchased and remodeled a coffee shop in a local Nashville neighborhood. Today Bond employs 17 people and oversees the 1,200-square-foot Bond Coffee Shop that serves paninis and bagels alongside its coffee. Bond returned to campus in September to share her success story and promote her business during the second annual Entrepreneurship Village. Held in the amphitheater surrounding the Bell Tower, 33 student- and alumni-owned businesses convened to showcase their innovation and creativity. “I think by assembling this critical mass, we are able to share the quality, ability and volume of what’s been happening in the program. It is great for alumni to connect with current students, find interns and make contacts,” said Entrepreneurship Professor Jeff Cornwall. Named a national Top 25 Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Program by the Princeton Review for five consecutive years, Belmont’s Center for Entrepreneurship provides students from all majors insight into owning and running a business. Erin Connors, a sophomore studying accounting and finance, began as a sales associate in a student-run business on campus, BLVD Music Shop, and was promoted to manager. “It’s been interesting to see how the numbers work out in a small business. I’m getting hands on experience that makes me look at my major differently and appreciate the opportunity,” Connors said. Alumnus Clark Buckner (’13), owner of ETPcast, a weekly podcast sharing interviews with entrepreneurs, said, “The Center for Entrepreneurship has had a big impact on my life, and the ETP platform is a way I can give back. It is good for me to build contacts and market myself, and it helps students to learn and provides everyone opportunity.” n

Student entrepreneur and art education major Brooke Griffith displays her jewelry line, Glen & Effie, named for her grandparents.

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WARD-BELMONT Centennial Celebration 1913-2013

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Alumnae of Ward-Belmont Return to Campus to Celebrate School’s Centennial

HOSE, HEELS AND EVEN ONE PAIR OF white gloves were evident at the annual Ward-Belmont Alumnae Reunion as alumnae gathered on Nov. 2 in the Belmont Mansion to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the founding of the school. Primarily a boarding school for young women seeking a two-year college degree, over the years Ward-Belmont also included a boarding and day school for high school girls, a grammar school and a music conservatory. In the spring of 1951, after several years of financial problems, the board of trustees decided to sell Ward-Belmont to the Tennessee Baptist Convention, and that fall the new Belmont College had its first coeducational freshman class. Vicky Tarleton, Belmont’s director of major gifts & planned giving, plays a huge role each year in organizing the Ward-Belmont reunion and welcoming alums back to campus for visits. She said, “Ward-Belmont had a national reputation for strong academics. Even in the early years athletics and the arts—particularly music — were important components of the curriculum. Some of America’s most prominent women attended Ward-Belmont, including Sarah ‘Ophie’ Cannon (better known as Minnie Pearl), actress and singer Mary Martin, Clare Booth Luce (founder of Vogue magazine) and Lila Acheson Wallace who, with her husband, founded Reader’s Digest.” A record number of Ward-Belmont alumnae came to campus for the centennial. The luncheon ended with the singing of the Ward-Belmont alma mater followed by a bus tour of the campus, including a stop at the new Alumni House, the last remaining Ward-Belmont club house which is being renovated this fall in time for a grand opening celebration during Homecoming 2014. n

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Girl Before a Mirror, a painting by Picasso, aptly depicted the Symposium theme of “Encountering Otherness.”


Humanities Symposium Focuses on Theme of

‘ENCOUNTERING OTHERNESS’ THE 12TH ANNUAL HUMANITIES SYMPOSIUM

featured renowned authors, poets, researchers, philosophers and professors from across the country as well as a talented artist from within Belmont’s own staff ranks. With the central topic “Encountering Otherness” paralleling the campus-wide theme, the week-long Humanities Symposium was designed to increase interactions with different cultures, religions, political views and historical understandings. Among the notable events were a 90-minute poetry reading, lectures on race and on using empathy to understand others, a talk about Native American history and spirituality, and a discussion on illegal immigration. This year the Humanities Symposium also included six community service projects across Nashville for approximately 120 Belmont students, faculty and staff. Volunteers built fences for outdoor dogs through Music City Hounds Unbound, created crafts and played board games with senior citizens at Morningside of Belmont Assisted Living, and gardened with homeless women at the Nashville Rescue Mission. But perhaps the highlight of the week came from Vietnamese political refugee and current Belmont staff member Tam Mai,

Symposium panel

who found inspiration and acceptance among the community inside the Wheeler Humanities Building, where he works as a custodian.

“[My father] always dreamed to have paintings, but he didn’t have the opportunity. But after living here for a while, he got the inspiration from professors,” said Mai’s son Vinh Mai, a 2011 Belmont alumnus. “He felt the love of Belmont touched his heart, so he takes from his heart and spreads the love with his paint brush.” During his free time, Mai would look at the College of Arts & Sciences webpages and sketch portraits from faculty’s professional photographs. Soon, many of the faculty and staff around the college were hanging Mai’s drawings in their offices. His work grew in volume and composition to the extent that Mai was invited to share his paintings in a Symposium exhibition. Associate Professor of English Cynthia Cox, who chaired the Symposium, noted, “Essentially we want people to think about what kind of learning takes place when people of different backgrounds come together. [With this show] we see Tam’s view of Belmont and his view of his homeland through his paintings.” n

Tam Mai

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DAN HASELTINE

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THE McCRARY SISTERS

GUY GILCHRIST


Sacred Shoeboxes BELMONT OFFERS COUNTLESS OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS’ SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT.

AS A “CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY OF learning and service,” Belmont University seeks to provide students with a variety of opportunities through which to explore faith. From Spiritual Life Assistants who provide resources in every residence hall to mission trips to Atlanta over Fall Break, students don’t need to look far for inspiration. For example, this fall found Belmont’s chapel hours loaded with nationally renowned guests speaking on a wide range of topics, including author Donald Miller, gospel singers the McCrary Sisters, “Nancy” cartoonist Guy Gilchrist and Blood: Water Mission founder and Jars of Clay lead singer Dan Haseltine, among others. Perhaps one of the most inspiring moments, though, came when Oksana Nelson spoke to campus in early October. Orphaned at the age of 7, Nelson shared her story of living in an orphanage where she shared everything with two dozen other children. When she was 9, though, missionaries gave her a shoe box packed full of Dominos, socks and candy. But what she cherished most of all was her own toothbrush and toothpaste. That shoe box was brought to her by Operation Christmas Child, a project of international nonprofit organization Samaritan’s Purse. Nelson, now a spokesperson for Operation Christmas Child, said, “It is an incredible opportunity and an incredible project that saves lives, transforms lives and ultimately brings salvation to children all over the world.” Her chapel presentation kicked off a Universitywide service project uniting students, faculty and staff in an effort to bring joy to children across the world through the small green and red boxes.

DONALD MILLER

OKSANA NELSON

“That is the Belmont way: to identify needs and then work with other Christian organizations to meet them,” said Vice President for Spiritual Development Todd Lake. “Operation Christmas Child gives all of us a chance to pack a box that will be perhaps the first tangible bit of Good News a child receives.” Together, the University collected more than 500 boxes for Operation Christmas Child. n

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Transforming L ives

‘BRIDGES TO BELMONT’ PROGRAM ADDS 30 MORE NASHVILLE STUDENTS FOR 2014-15.

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WITH INCREDIBLE EXCITEMENT, BELMONT administrators announced in December that the recently piloted Bridges to Belmont scholarship program is expanding from 26 Nashville high school students in the 2013-14 charter class to 30 students for the 2014-15 academic year. With the selection of the next 30 Bridges scholars, the program will provide the Davidson County students­— many of whom are first generation college students—unprecedented opportunities for higher education and future careers. Belmont University President Dr. Bob Fisher said, “At the heart of Belmont’s mission is our desire to provide a transformative education to our students in the hopes that they can then take their skills, passions and talents and make a difference in the world around them. I honestly can’t think of a better example of us living out that mission than what we’re trying to do with the Bridges program. I’m thrilled to have these local students as part of the Belmont community.” Launched in March 2013, Bridges to Belmont is a program designed to enroll high potential students from Metro Nashville Public Schools who may not have previously been able to consider Belmont as an option. As a participant in the “Bridges to Belmont” program, all of the students’ expenses— tuition, room, board, required fees and books—that are not covered by state or federal grant resources are provided via scholarships from Belmont for four consecutive academic years, translating to a potential investment by Belmont that could exceed $10 million in the first four years of the program. Fisher added, “I have been thrilled by the response of donors who have become enthusiastic givers to support these kids.” “The Bridges to Belmont program is a life-changing opportunity for our students,” said Metro Schools’ Director Dr. Jesse Register. “They know with hard work, they can achieve their dream of a college education. It is an investment in their future and the community, and we appreciate everyone at Belmont who has worked to develop and expand this program.” n

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BEING

© 2013 Ben McKeown

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It’s Bruin Time! Belmont Defeats UNC 83-80 Belmont University’s men’s basketball team added the latest chapter to its proud tradition, defeating six-time national champion and No. 12 ranked North Carolina, 83-80, Nov. 17. Scoring 28 points and hitting the game-winning three-point shot in the final 13 seconds of the game, senior J.J. Mann earned National Player of the Week honors from both CBSSports.com and NBCSports.com. To purchase basketball tickets, call 615.460.BALL (2255).

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DESPITE THE CATCHY, SING-ALONG HOOK OF THE OLD TV theme song, a horse is not just a horse, of course. Rather, in the case of Dr. Judy Skeen’s First Year Seminar (FYS) on the topic “Cross Species Communications: Through the Eyes of Other Creatures,” horses are a gift to the education process, allowing Belmont freshmen a different way to interact with the campuswide theme, Through the Eyes of Others. Subtitled “Learning about being human by encountering horses,” the two sections of Skeen’s class allowed students the opportunity to visit the professor’s Franklin, Tenn. ranch where they interacted with four of her horses. As with all FYS courses, the primary goal is to increase students’ “recognition, appreciation and use of multiple ways of knowing.” Skeen said, “With so much information out there, we seem drawn to what we already think or know. Students in this class are encouraged to think about what they know, what they don’t know and what they think they know that might not be true.” A discussion-based class, students were required to read four books over the course of the semester as well as view two films and attend convocations and theatre events centered on the campus theme. For Skeen, all of the assignments, including the hands-on experiences with the horses, were designed to open students to seeing the world through a different lens. “It’s always good to take a step back and check out what we think we know — often we learn about ourselves, others and how to be more whole human beings in the world.” Christine Sisson noted that time with the horses allowed her and her fellow students “to see it from the horse’s perspective instead of just our own. The horses are so big that you don’t think about the fact that they’re scared of us.” Student Audrey Arroyo may have summed it up best: “[This class] helped us get a bit better idea about how to understand everyone else. We get so bogged down in our own environment. In different parts of the world, things are done differently and that’s their normal. This experience helps broaden our views.” n

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EXPERIENTIAL

EDUCATION

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR BRINGS STUDENTS FACE-TO-FACE WITH EQUINE ‘OTHERS.’

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CAMPUS NEWS

Enrollment Tops 6,900 When classes began in August, Belmont University reached its largest enrollment to date, this time with a total of 6,918 students. The incoming freshman Class of 2017 represents 45 states and eight foreign countries, with 75 percent of the class originating from outside of Tennessee. This semester Belmont was also named one of the fastest growing campuses in the nation, according to a report released by The Chronicle of Higher Education. n

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Get On Your Horse Belmont’s new Equestrian Club won two first place ribbons in the Maryville College Horse Show.

New Dean of Students Former Vice President for Student Affairs at Alabama A&M Dr. Jeffery Burgin was recently named Belmont’s new associate provost and dean of students.

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Billboard Wisdom Billboard Editorial Director Bill Werde shared his insights on “ruthless self accountability� with students in the Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business.

Honors House Renovation Belmont parents generously donated funds this summer to renovate the Honors House, creating an inviting, community-minded space to better serve the program.

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‘Wash and Roll’ During Wash and Roll, dozens of wheelchair users had their power chairs cleaned and serviced free-of-charge by students and faculty from Belmont’s Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy programs.

Harpeth River Clean Up Eighteen Belmont students offered unique community service, canoeing down the Harpeth River, picking up trash and debris along the way.

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Ian Clark Signs NBA Deal with Utah Jazz Former Belmont University men’s basketball AllAmerican guard Ian Clark (Memphis, Tenn.) signed a two-year contract with the Utah Jazz. Clark blazes uncharted territory for Belmont Basketball, becoming the first player in program history to make an NBA roster. “I’m ecstatic,” Clark said. “I really can’t put this into words. It shows that hard work can lead to good things.” The Memphis, Tenn. native graduated in May with a degree in business administration, completing a remarkable four years at Belmont. The 6 foot 3 inch guard became Belmont’s NCAA era career leader in points (1,920) and three-point field goals (340) in leading the Bruins to a third consecutive NCAA Tournament appearance and the program’s highest NCAA Tournament seed (No. 11 vs. Arizona). His signing came on the heels of Clark being named Vegas NBA Summer League Championship Game Most Valuable Player, scoring 33 points in leading the Golden State Warriors past the Phoenix Suns. Clark’s fellow graduates and men’s basketball standouts Kerron Johnson and Trevor Noack signed professional contracts with the New Zealand Breakers (Australia) and BV Chemnitz 99 (Germany) respectively. n

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Be Bold, Brave & Bald The residents of Kennedy Hall raised more than $2,500 for Camp No Worries, through a “Be Bold, Be Brave, Be Bald” initiative.

Top 10 Again! Belmont remained at No. 7 on U.S. News & World Report’s annual rankings of America’s Best Colleges and was also lauded for the sixth year in a row as a top “Up-and-Comer.”

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Carnival at the Caf Students enjoyed a carnival atmosphere one day this fall in the cafeteria.

Fortune Editor Offers Advice Fortune magazine Senior Editor Geoffrey Colvin spoke to a number of student and business gatherings on campus in October.

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College of Law Achieves Accreditation Success For the first time in nearly 50 years, a Tennessee law program has received accreditation from the American Bar Association (ABA). The ABA informed Belmont University College of Law it had been granted provisional accreditation at a meeting in June. The milestone was achieved in the earliest possible timeline allowed by accreditation guidelines. Quick on the heels of that success, the College confirmed that Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito would be the speaker at the school’s first graduation next year. The inaugural commencement is scheduled for May 10, 2014, and the College currently anticipates approximately 120 graduates from the three-year program. This fall the College hosted its inaugural Belmont Law Review Symposium focused on the topic of Tennessee Legal Reform. The symposium included a judicial roundtable session with Tennessee Supreme Court Justice Cornelia Clark, Sixth Circuit Judge Martha Craig Daughtrey and Tennessee Supreme Court Justice William Koch (pictured). n

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New ER Phone Towers New emergency phone towers were added around campus to increase student safety.

An Encore for Travis Cottrell Alumnus Travis Cottrell received the 2013 Encore Award from the School of Music.

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Digital Citizenship Class Experiments with Google Glass When Google selected Belmont media studies professor Dr. Sybril Bennett as one of its 8,000 Google Glass Explorers in June, the company likely didn’t expect that this single, beta sample of its new wearable computer would jump start the digital creativity of nearly 60 college students. But thanks to Bennett’s desire for her students to embrace and respect innovation, she set aside concerns for the risks (her glasses cost $1,500) and introduced both sections of her “Digital Citizenship & Society” class to the futuristic technology.

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Students were split into groups and asked to propose a new software application, or app, for the product. The innovative course assignment even attracted the attention of NewsChannel5 reporter Vicki Yates, who attended a class presentation and interviewed Bennett and students. “I’m not promoting Google Glass, but I am experimenting with it,” Bennett said. “I’m not going to let my students graduate into a digital world without digital skills.” n

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New Food for Fall Dining Services opened two new restaurants on campus this fall, McAlister’s Deli and Papa John’s pizza.

Campus-wide Health Kick More than 40 table presentations and health screenings were available at no cost to the campus community during this fall’s Health Fair.

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MBA 25th Reunion Members of the charter class of the Massey School celebrated their 25th reunion in October.

Parents Explore Ocean Way The Parents Leadership Council recently met at Belmont-owned Ocean Way Studios Nashville.

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Inclusion Revolution Occupational Therapy hosted Miss Wheelchair America 2014, Jennifer Adams, who spoke on the “Inclusion Revolution.�

PT Baby Day Physical therapy students performed developmental assessments on 26 infants and young children from the community.

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Belmont to Open New Buildings and Add College in 2014 With the last beam in place and interior work beginning, Belmont celebrated the official “topping out” this fall of two construction projects: a 139,000-square-foot residence hall intended to house 422 upperclassmen students and the 188,000-square-foot Wedgewood Academic Center. Both buildings, which also feature new or expanded parking garages, will be open for the Fall 2014 semester. The Wedgewood Academic Center was designed to house most departments from the College of Arts and Sciences as well as the School of Religion. When the new building is completed next summer, it will also mark a significant change in the University’s overall structure as the College of Arts & Sciences will be divided into two new colleges: the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (CLASS) and the College of Sciences and Mathematics (CSM). Provost Thomas Burns said, “Currently, the College of Arts & Sciences (CAS) is Belmont’s largest college in terms of faculty members (130 full-time faculty) representing 15 academic departments within four schools. This particular college structure has served the University well for many years, and, under the leadership of Dr. Bryce Sullivan, the College has grown substantially over the past five years. We believe the new structure will provide increased opportunities for all of the units in what is currently the CAS, positioning both of these new colleges for increased prominence and growth in majors and programs.” n

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Honors Program Honors Lewis The Honors Program hosted a C. S. Lewis discussion series this fall on the Chronicles of Narnia, finishing on the day before the 50th anniversary of Lewis’ death.

Creative Connection New internship program Creative Connection placed students with four different music industry companies in one semester.

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Encore! From ‘Peter Pan’ to ‘Anne Frank,’ students show their acting chops. The Department of Theatre and Dance enjoyed an incredibly successful fall semester with several sold-out performances and strong reviews. The drama and excitement began in September with nine performances of “Peter Pan,” many of which were sold out making the show one of the hottest tickets in town. Complete with several characters flying through the air, “Peter Pan” told the story of how Peter becomes involved with Wendy Darling and her younger brothers, all of whom accompany Peter to Never-Never Land. Showing their dramatic range, student performers turned from the child-like wonder of Peter Pan to the much darker and more intense subject matter in “The Diary of Anne Frank,” a collaboration with Nashville’s Actors Bridge Ensemble. The play, like the book, recounts two years in the life of a Jewish girl who lives in hiding with her family in Nazi-occupied Netherlands. Despite the difficult material, the cast’s immense talents shone brightly. According to the Tennessean review, “the evening belongs to [Belmont student] Madeline Marconi, who fully embodies the role of Anne by tempering moments of levity and wit with an unmistakable sense of dread. She —along with the rest of the cast—draws us into the story so completely that several members of the audience at Saturday’s matinee responded to the inevitable arrival of the Nazis with audible gasps.” Other department performances this fall included Opera Theatre’s “The Marriage of Figaro,” Moving Stories: A Dance Composition Showcase and Musical Theatre’s “Into the Woods.” n

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Home School ‘Mechanics’ Physics professor Dr. Krista McBride led a Home School Science Discoveries session on “Mechanics” Nov. 18.

Overseas Aspirations Students were challenged to think globally at the Study Abroad Fair.

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Music City Roots Belmont was proud to serve as a lead sponsor of 13-episode “Music City Roots: Live from the Loveless Cafe,� distributed by American Public Television.

Global Insights The Center for International Business hosted global futurist Dr. Parag Khanna, who spoke to students about re-mapping the global economy.

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www.BELMONT.edu

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MI ECO

HOMECOMING!

February 3–8, 2014

Alumni House Grand Opening

NG 2014

Sat., Feb. 8 at 2:30 p.m. FEB 3-8

Support the Alumni House renovation! To donate, visit www.BELMONT.edu/give.

COM-13370

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There’s No Place Like


Circle Magazine Fall 2013