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CIRCLE

FALL

MAGAZINE

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FALL 2014

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FIRST LOOK


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B  elmont’s musical theatre students delighted audiences this fall with four performances of Oklahoma!, the 1943 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical featuring classic songs like “Oh What a Beautiful Mornin’” and “The Surrey with the Fringe on Top.”

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From the President When asked for my “30-second elevator speech” about Belmont, I know exactly how to begin: “At Belmont, we believe that every person was created by God for a purpose. Our desire is to help students discover their purpose and then assist them in developing their skills and passions to fulfill that purpose so that they can meet the world’s needs.” It’s a simple but profound idea, one that continues to attract the best and brightest students to this campus. These are students who understand that they already possess what they need to succeed but also recognize that—in the words of Malcolm Gladwell—it’s going to take more than 10,000 hours of hard work to see that success come to fruition. Belmont provides both the supportive Christian environment and the dedicated faculty and staff to guide them on that journey. The news, progress and accomplishments in the pages that follow represent parts of that story, and I believe this issue of Circle will give you more insights on our mission than what I can accomplish in a 30-second overview. I hope you’ll enjoy reading more about how together—with your support—we’re empowering the next generation of leaders and change agents in a variety of disciplines. Best Regards,

Robert C. Fisher, president

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A  beautiful new addition to campus, the fountain in front of McWhorter Hall is the focal point of a redesigned Lawn where students can gather to socialize, play games and study.

CIRCLE MAGAZINE


Table of Contents

CIRCLE University Administration

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From the President

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A New Campus Cornerstone

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Compassionate Care

Provost Thomas Burns

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Vision Unveiled

Vice President/Chief of Staff Susan West

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Major Milestones

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Being Belmont: Christmas Traditions

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Extreme Makeover

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Campus News

President Bob Fisher

Vice President of Finance and Operations Steve Lasley Vice President for Administration and University Counsel Jason Rogers Vice President of University Advancement Perry Moulds Vice President of Spiritual Development Todd Lake

ON THE COVER The Wedgewood Academic Center provides an impressive new perspective on Belmont’s campus and lights up the heavily trafficked corner of Wedgewood and 15th Avenues. Photo by Michael Peck.

Vice President for Institutional Effectiveness Paula Gill

Magazine Managing Editor April Hefner (M.A. ’07) Designers Nicole Childress, Glenda Dahlhauser Natalie Smith (B.F.A ’08) University Photographer Andrea Hallgren Contributing Photographers Angela Disrud, Sam Polonsky, Scott Schrecker, Ben McKeown, Michael Peck Contributing Writers Hope Buckner (B.S. ’12), Juanita Traughber (M.B.A. ’13), Emily Young (B.S. ’14) Circle magazine is published biannually for alumni and friends of Belmont University. Editorial content, graphic production, printing and distribution are coordinated by the Offices of Communications and University Marketing & Public Relations. Address changes and alumni notes should be directed to the Office of Alumni Relations. Third-class bulk postage is paid at the U.S. Post Office, Nashville, TN. Direct inquiries and comments regarding Circle magazine content to: Belmont University Office of Communications/Circle magazine 1900 Belmont Blvd., Nashville, TN 37212 615.460.6641 or circlemag@belmont.edu Belmont University is a Christian community. The university faculty, administration and staff uphold Jesus as the Christ and as the measure for all things. As a community seeking to uphold Christian standards of morality, ethics and conduct, Belmont University holds high expectations of each person who chooses to join the community. Belmont University does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, color, national or ethnic origin, age, disability, military service or sexual orientation. Inquiries or complaints concerning the application of these policies to students should be directed to the Dean of Students, Beaman Student Life Center Suite 200, 1900 Belmont Blvd., Nashville, TN 37212, deanofstudents@belmont.edu or 615.460.6407.

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A New Campus Cornerstone BELMONT CELEBRATES the OPENING of its LARGEST BUILDING and FIRST CHAPEL

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AFTER 27 MONTHS OF CONSTRUCTION, Belmont officially cut the ribbon this August to signify the grand opening of the Wedgewood Academic Center, a 186,000 square foot structure located on the corner of Wedgewood and 15th Avenues. From the five-level underground garage fit to hold 430 vehicles to the University’s first intentionally designed chapel, the building stands as a cornerstone for the University that seeks to serve both its growing student body and its dynamic hometown. President Dr. Bob Fisher said, “This building is designed for daily interdisciplinary collaborations and provides classrooms and laboratories that not only represent the latest thinking in academic spaces but also greatly enhances hands-on learning… A guiding principle in Belmont’s strategic Vision 2020 is to embed strong Christian character in everything we do. By housing Belmont’s Chapel in the University’s largest building—a structure where every undergraduate student will have classes—we are both living out our mission and providing a much-needed gathering space for corporate worship opportunities.” The largest campus building to date, the Center houses three colleges—the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, College of Sciences and Mathematics and College of Theology and Christian Ministry—consisting of more than 50 undergraduate programs. The new facility more than doubles the physical space these colleges occupied previously. The Chapel, a gorgeous 300-seat hall, hosts services three times a week, as well as special services of worship throughout the year. In addition to participating in student-led worship music, attendees can listen to nationally acclaimed scholars address topics through the lens of faith. The space is also equipped with audio visual capabilities, so the Chapel can be a multi-functional venue for spiritual life. Vice President for Spiritual Development Dr. Todd Lake noted, “Belmont is making a bold statement about the mutually supporting nature of faith and learning by placing its new Chapel in the Wedgewood Academic Center. It is an architectural embodiment of the fact that Belmont is a Christian community of learning and service.”

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The Wedgewood Academic Center also houses 30 classrooms that vary from 24 –72 seats in capacity, allowing flexibility of use, while smaller group study rooms enable focused discussions among students and faculty. In addition, the building supports 20 science labs outfitted with more than $2 million in equipment. A student-centered service area on the first floor allows for personal assistance via a Writing Center, Math Lab, Computer Science Lab, Language Learning Lab and a centrally located Service Learning and International Education office. Also on the first floor, the campus community can enjoy a dining option featuring Sandella’s Flatbread sandwiches and a We Proudly Brew Starbucks outlet. Belmont Provost Dr. Thomas Burns added, “Starting in August 2011 with an invitation from our president to ‘dream big’ about what we most needed and wanted in a new academic building, the development of the Wedgewood Academic Center has been a collaborative endeavor involving substantial input from students, faculty and staff. The result of these conversations has led to a truly outstanding academic space which embodies our University’s student-centered commitments while reflecting the insight and creativity of the Belmont community.” As part of Belmont’s ongoing commitment to environmental sustainability, the University is seeking LEED Certification for the Wedgewood Academic Center. The new facility is incorporating a number of green features including multiple green roofs, LED lighting and motion-sensors, a variable flow refrigerant HVAC system and a chilled beam mechanical system in conjunction with a VAV system. n

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FALL 2014

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Compassionate

CARE Belmont nursing students tackle challenging end of life simulation.

WITH AN EMPHASIS ON EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, Belmont’s School of Nursing provides students opportunities to practice more than just clinical skills through participation in human simulation labs. For Nursing Instructor Sara Camp’s Adult Health II students, this meant taking part in an End of Life lab that simulated the death of a patient, with a campus volunteer portraying the role of grieving family member. When students arrived, they were aware of their patient, Lisa’s, prognosis. Equipped with her report, they were tasked with guiding Lisa and her family member through her final stages of life. Similar to what would occur in a hospital, the student nurses were responsible for providing care and comfort for the patient, while also assisting the family during a challenging time. Camp is committed to equipping students with the skills needed to care for the family system, not just the patient. Often, nurses are expected to be experts on end of life care, regardless of their training or comfort level. Camp said many bedside nurses aren’t confident in the end of life training they have received and because of that, are not adequate resources for new nurses to turn to. “Given that the end of life is such an important event in the life of our patients and their families, it seems irresponsible to leave this to on-thejob training,” she said. In a debrief following the simulation, senior nursing major Mark Wolter discussed the challenge of moving from a proactive treatment mentality to one that comforts the family and patient through the final stages of life. “At this point in a patient’s care, you are treating everyone close to the patient, and you realize the impact that you can have as a nurse in keeping the situation as peaceful as possible,” he said. Through this and other simulations in Belmont’s program, students are given the opportunity to practice their skills through firsthand experiences. Wolter said he is grateful for the emphasis Belmont puts on experiential learning and knows the program continues to advocate for more and more opportunities. n

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VISION UNVEILED AFTER NEARLY 500 DAYS OF WORK TO BRAINSTORM, discuss and create a strategic plan for the future, Belmont University unveiled the latest step in its Vision 2020 process at a campus-wide and internet broadcast Town Hall Meeting on Nov. 10. The Vision, comprised of seven strategic priorities that will guide Belmont through the next five years, integrates the University’s values of integrity, inquiry, collaboration, service and humility to build what Vision 2020 calls, “Nashville’s University.”

and industry partnerships. Vision 2020 puts a priority on connecting to students and that’s an approach to higher education I want to be a part of in the future.” Fisher ended the presentation with a story describing his experience climbing Mt. Rainier, a Seattle mountain with the greatest rise in elevation of all ranges within the continental U.S. During his climb, Fisher developed altitude sickness and was forced to descend at the mountain’s “High Break,” the final break before the Summit. Although he wasn’t able to accomplish what he set out to do, Fisher said the experience taught him many lessons. “If you aspire to do something really hard and really tough, it does get harder and harder as you approach the goal,” he said.

With Vision 2015 coming to a conclusion, the University is looking toward the future with a strong emphasis on studentcenteredness, Christian character and a people-first culture, among other things. Video interviews from Belmont community members were included in the presentation to highlight each Vision 2020 strategy, illustrating the ambitious action that is “We’re at the High Break point, but if we’re going to the top, it’s going to take the best efforts of everybody. I hear called for by Vision 2020. there’s nothing like the view from the top. I haven’t been Associate Professor and Chair of Public Relations Dr. Bonnie there, but I want to go… Let’s get there together and become Riechert said, “If you ask us why we’re here at Belmont, we one of America’s great universities. Let’s go to the top,” will tell you it’s because of the students. That’s reflected in Fisher concluded. the first strategy point of Vision 2020. We’re committed not only to excellence in teaching but also to forging connections To watch the Town Hall meeting or download a brochure of the with students beyond the classroom—that means advising, seven strategic priorities (along with a few example tactics for student organization involvement, collaborative research each one), visit belmontvision2020.com/town-hall. n

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MAJOR MILESTONES

With more than 7,300 students and a TOP 5 RANKING, Belmont marks a record-setting fall semester.

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DON’T CALL US A “SMALL, LIBERAL ARTS COLLEGE” Associate Provost and Dean of Enrollment David Mee added, anymore! Fall 2014 brought major milestone celebrations for “The entire University is involved in helping Belmont maintain Belmont including an enrollment of 7,301 students (more than the kind of momentum that has resulted in growing national double enrollment from fall 2000) and a Top 5 ranking in U.S. recognition, enhanced experiences for our students and News and World Report’s listing of America’s Best Colleges in phenomenal growth during a period of stagnant enrollment across much of higher education nationally. Belmont is a unique the South region. story—one highlighted by a daily commitment to living out our The University’s Vision 2015 goal-setting list included a number mission and values.” of lofty goals including moving into the Top 5 in U.S. News and World Report’s annual rankings, as well as reaching a target In the U.S. News Best Regional Universities-South, Belmont is enrollment of 7,000. With both goals met in fall 2014, Belmont again the highest-ranked university of the 15 ranked Tennessee is actively looking towards Vision 2020 and paving the way for institutions in its category, a feat the University has claimed for more than a decade. U.S. News bases its ranking on a number higher education. of measures, and Belmont saw improvement in nearly every In addition to incoming freshmen, Belmont also welcomed column over last year’s data. Belmont’s peer assessment score, 508 new transfer students to campus this fall, marking a total graduation rate and retention rate all made gains over previous number of nearly 2,000 new undergraduates. reports. Meanwhile, the University’s much lauded enrollment “It’s both humbling and gratifying to see the number of students growth was balanced by its commitment to small class sizes who want to come to Belmont to learn and discover their life and personal attention with a student/faculty ratio that remains purpose,” said President Bob Fisher. “These are individuals 13-to-1. n from all walks of life and many corners of the globe who aren’t thinking only of future careers but are embracing this University’s mission to engage and transform the world with their passions, skills and talents.”


BEING

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Students,  faculty and staff enjoyed a Christmas Tree Lighting ceremony complete with music, hot chocolate, cookies and self-decorated ornaments to ring in the holiday season.

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EXTREME

MAKEOVER

Thanks to a major gift, the Massey Business Center will receive a significant renovation next year. THE JACK C. MASSEY FOUNDATION, WHICH HONORS THE LEGACY OF ONE of the country’s greatest entrepreneurs and businessmen, announced a generous gift of $6.75 million to Belmont this fall. With this donation, the Foundation provides the lead gift in a planned $10 million renovation of Belmont’s Massey Business Center, as well as secures a new name for Belmont’s former College of Business Administration, now known as the Jack C. Massey College of Business. The late Jack Massey and his family have been among Belmont’s biggest benefactors, helping Belmont establish its business programs and building both the Massey Business Center and the Massey Performing Arts Center. In addition, Massey’s gifts endowed Belmont’s Chair in Entrepreneurship, as well as the Massey Center for Financial Information. Belmont President Dr. Bob Fisher said, “Belmont is blessed to have a number of strong supporters within the community and around the region, but without Jack C. Massey, this institution may not have survived its financial struggles in the 1970s. We cannot say thank you enough for the generous and continued support of Barbara Massey Rogers, as well as the entire Massey family and Foundation, for all of their efforts which have made such a tremendous difference in the lives of thousands of students.” Barbara Massey Rogers, daughter of Jack C. Massey and a long-time supporter of Belmont, added, “The Massey family, along with the Massey Foundation, is pleased to be a part of this celebration. It is exciting to know that the Jack C. Massey name will now be on all diplomas given to both the undergraduate and graduate students of the Jack C. Massey College of Business, which will bring greater recognition and accolades to the widening fame of Belmont and the Massey College.” Massey’s influence and high standards have inspired a top-tier business school that garners clear and concrete results, as seen in its numerous national accolades and strong First Destination Rate of 96 percent, an indication of the program’s graduates who have secured full-time employment, started graduate school or joined the military. Planned renovations include technology upgrades, classroom and office space modernization and the addition of a beautiful glass-enclosed atrium. Scheduled to begin in May 2015, construction is anticipated to be complete by fall 2016. n

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Frist, Gates, Hamilton Speak at Belmont Former U.S. Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, M.D., founder of Hope Through Healing Hands, and Melinda Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, led a community conversation this summer in Belmont’s Maddox Grand Atrium on “The Mother & Child Project.” Moderated by Olympic skater Scott Hamilton, this was the first public event held by the Faith-Based Coalition for Healthy Mothers and Children Worldwide. 18

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Alumnus Josh Turner Speaks at Chapel About Faith, Family, Belmont Josh Turner, Belmont alumnus and double-platinum selling country music artist, returned to campus in November to speak to a packed auditorium of students, faculty and staff. With a new book, Man Stuff, released in April and a new album coming out in spring 2015, Turner spent his time discussing his hit “Long Black Train,” his family, his faith and his love for Belmont. Throughout his career, Turner said the song has changed lives and pulled people out of very bleak places. It is these stories that continue to remind him of his calling to write and sing country music. He said he feels “obligated to go out there and use the talent God has given me to change people’s lives for the better… The Lord gave me this song, he’s been using it and I think he’s going to continue to use it.” “If I had it to do over again, I would come back to Belmont in a heartbeat… You get to learn about who you are, and you get to learn about life,” he said. “This song has kind of come back home to Belmont.” n

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CNN Producer Teaches Media Ethics “Anderson Cooper 360” Producer Jennifer Duck spoke to students in Thom Storey’s Media Ethics class about ethical reporting in September.

Nashville D.A. Joins Law Faculty Retired Davidson County District Attorney General Torry Johnson will join Belmont Law as an esteemed Visiting Professor in January 2015.

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New Belmont Students Continue Tradition of Service Following a send-off from Mayor Karl Dean, Belmont’s newest students volunteered throughout Nashville through the University’s annual SERVE Project on Aug. 18. A “Welcome Week” tradition for more than a decade, SERVE provides a perfect tie-in to Belmont’s ongoing commitment to engage students in their community and encourage the values of service. In West Nashville, 20 students sorted and bundled school supplies for LP PENCIL Box, a nonprofit organization that allows Metro school teachers to pick out $600 worth of pencils, rulers, backpacks, highlighters and other supplies every year. Meanwhile over at Tennessee Voices for Children in South Nashville, students removed old wallpaper and glue from walls, preparing the nonprofit organization for new wallpaper. At other sites across the city, the new students packed food, toiletries and cleaning supplies, cleaned facilities, removed graffiti and painted walls, among other community service projects. n

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Gillibrand Promotes ‘Off the Sidelines’ Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (NY) was interviewed by her college roommate, “Nashville” actress Connie Britton, on campus this fall about her new book, Off the Sidelines: Raise Your Voice, Change the World.

Humanities and ‘Time’ Converge Belmont held its 13th annual Humanities Symposium in September focusing on the theme “Worlds Enough and Time.”

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PRSSA Scores National Acclaim Belmont PRSSA and faculty advisor Dr. Bonnie Riechert won national awards at the PR organization’s national conference in October.

Champion for Justice The College of Law presented the 2014 Champions for Justice Award to Bryan A. Stevenson, the founder of the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative which seeks prison and sentencing reform.

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Two Oaks Opens This August, 418 upperclassmen moved into the new 139,000-square-foot Two Oaks, Belmont’s largest residence complex to date.

A Time to Dance It’s a packed house for the weekly Zumba class, one of the many group exercise options offered by Belmont Fitness and Recreation.

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Dining, Academic Complex Tops Out Belmont topped out its new $80 million Dining and Academic Complex in October by following in the long-held Scandinavian tradition of placing a tree on the roof of the building to celebrate the completed framing of the structure. The building is expected to open in summer 2015 and will be the home of the Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business as well as programs in media studies and a new major that launched last fall, motion pictures. In addition, the second floor offers a 1,000-seat dining hall that triples the capacity of the current campus cafeteria. Classrooms and faculty/staff offices will comprise approximately 70 percent of the building. Academic program-centered features of the building include 30 student edit bays, a motion capture facility, a Foley/ADR sound studio, a color correction studio, a video/broadcast studio, two video production control rooms, a 2,500 square foot sound stage and a scene shop. In addition, two state-of-the art screening theaters (seating 260 and 80) will also boast audio mixing technology. n

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Riders Up! The Belmont Equestrian Club continues to do well, winning six ribbons at the season’s first competition which was hosted by Maryville College.

Campus Connects with Community Hundreds of students participated in the annual Community Connections Fair, learning about ways to plug into Nashville’s nonprofit community.

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New Dual PharmD/MBA Equips Graduates for Rapid Success Starting in fall 2015, prospective pharmacists can pursue the only dual PharmD/MBA degree available in Middle Tennessee at Belmont University in Nashville, the nation’s healthcare capital. Unlike similar programs around the country that require a minimum of five years’ study or offer MBA courses primarily online, Belmont PharmD/MBA students can complete all the requirements for both degrees within four years and will enjoy Belmont’s signature personal interaction from experienced, highly regarded faculty. Moreover, students can complete the degree at a reduced tuition from doing the programs separately. “The modern practice of pharmacy is constantly evolving, and now—more than ever before—it’s imperative that new PharmD

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graduates also enter the workforce with a strong business acumen,” said Dr. Phil Johnston, dean of Belmont’s College of Pharmacy. “Regardless of whether a graduate works in a retail, institutional or research site, they must possess robust entrepreneurial skills.” Dr. Joe Alexander, associate dean of Belmont’s Massey Graduate School of Business, added, “This is a logical extension of our mission to provide business education and thoughtful leadership to the working professionals of Nashville and the Middle Tennessee region. Belmont PharmD/MBA graduates will be uniquely prepared for rapid career development.” n

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An Animated Chapel The co-creator of “VeggieTales” and voice of Larry the Cucumber, Mike Nawrocki spoke during a Belmont chapel service this semester.

‘The Voice’ Top 12 Sophomore Jessie Pitts made a huge impression this season on Team Blake on “The Voice,” landing in the Top 12.

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Happy Halloween This fall, the Bridges to Belmont Scholars Council partnered with community groups to host the fourth annual Halloween Bash in Rose Park for neighborhood children.

Ward-Belmont Reunion Belmont Ambassadors helped welcome WardBelmont alumnae home to campus for their annual reunion in November.

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Alumni Offer ‘Back to School’ Show The 3rd Annual Back to School Alumni Concert showcased the talents of nearly a dozen alumni from Belmont’s commercial music program.

#BelmontAbroad Art Show Lane Sasser, who spent a semester at King’s College in London, won the grand prize in the second annual Belmont Abroad Photo Contest.

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Men’s, Women’s Basketball Teams Kick Off New Season Packed with compelling storylines and unrivaled competition, the 2014–15 season promises to be another exciting chapter in the history of Belmont Basketball. Annually playing one of the nation’s most demanding schedules, Belmont’s men’s team is one of only six NCAA Division I programs to win 26 or more games each of the last four seasons. This year’s slate features 11 contests against teams that won 20 or more games a year ago as well as the always exciting Battle of the Boulevard series against non-conference rival Lipscomb. This year both “Battles” took place in November with Belmont scoring wins by 25 points and 5 points respectively. Coming up in 2015, the Bruins will face off against fellow OVC foes Murray State, Austin Peay and Eastern Kentucky, among others.

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Meanwhile, the second year of the Cameron Newbauer coaching era kicked off Nov. 14 when the Belmont women’s basketball team took on neighborhood rival Vanderbilt. A hard-fought battle, the Bruins kept the game close but ultimately lost 58–65. The Bruins return all five of their starters from one year ago, led by 2014–15 OVC Preseason Player of the Year Jordyn Luffman-Hartsfield, who averaged 14.3 points per outing. Coach Cam has secured a challenging non-conference schedule with match-ups at Kentucky, Louisville and Georgia, before diving into OVC play in January. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit the newly redesigned belmontbruins.com. n

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New Dining Options Welcomed Students rejoiced this August when their return to campus saw the opening of two new dining options, Chick-Fil-A Express in the Curb Café and a We Proudly Brew Starbucks outlet in the Wedgewood Academic Center.

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‘Christmas at Belmont’ Airs on PBS The holiday season wouldn’t be complete in Nashville without the annual “Christmas at Belmont” concert, featuring nearly 700 student musicians along with School of Music faculty and the Nashville Children’s Choir. This year three performances of the concert were held on campus in the Massey Concert Hall, providing viewing opportunities for more than 2,800 students, parents and special guests to enjoy the seasonal offerings.

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Last year’s “Christmas at Belmont”—hosted by opera singer Denyce Graves and featuring traditional carols, classical masterworks, world music and light-hearted seasonal favorites—will be broadcast nationally in late December on PBS. Produced by Nashville Public Television (NPT), this is the 12th consecutive year “Christmas at Belmont” has been seen by a national audience on PBS. Check local listings for air times. n

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Time to See the World The Study Abroad Fair in September drew hundreds of students who were interested in learning about global education opportunities.

Lights, Camera, Action Members of ABC’s “Nashville” cast used a Curb College studio on campus to film a scene for an upcoming episode.

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‘Christmas at Belmont’ Airs on PBS The holiday season wouldn’t be complete in Nashville without the annual “Christmas at Belmont” concert, featuring nearly 700 student musicians along with School of Music faculty and the Nashville Children’s Choir. This year three performances of the concert were held on campus in the Massey Concert Hall, providing viewing opportunities for more than 2,800 students, parents and special guests to enjoy the seasonal offerings.

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Last year’s “Christmas at Belmont”—hosted by opera singer Denyce Graves and featuring traditional carols, classical masterworks, world music and light-hearted seasonal favorites—will be broadcast nationally in late December on PBS. Produced by Nashville Public Television (NPT), this is the 12th consecutive year “Christmas at Belmont” has been seen by a national audience on PBS. Check local listings for air times. n

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Master Class with The Band Perry Massey Concert Hall was treated to a visit from The Band Perry, who taught a School of Music Master Class.

Ethics in Business Financial services executive Brad Katsuyama, the subject of Flash Boys, appeared on campus to speak about high frequency trading and business ethics.

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www.BELMONT.edu

Belmont Homecoming is set for Saturday, February 28, with activities being held February 26–28. alumni.belmont.edu

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Circle Magazine Fall 2014