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OC Today

LIFESTYLE

CHRISTMAS PARADE IN OC Thirty-third annual event this Saturday on Coastal Highway, from 100th to 120th streets – Page 49

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Countdown begins for county dispensaries Commissioners to adopt strategy for winding down government liquor business

By Brian Gilliland Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Last year, the Worcester County Commissioners decided to give the Department of Liquor Control one year and one last

chance to “rightsize” after the 2014 decision to end the county’s monopoly on liquor sales. While store closures, staff reductions and the assurances of director Bobby Cowger went a long way in securing the grace period, that time has ended, with the commissioners voting Tuesday to implement the first stage of an exit strategy developed by county staff.

The first stage of the plan requires a change in state law to allow for appropriate liquor licenses for private package stores. With the new legislative session in Annapolis set to begin on Jan. 13, the county voted to send a letter to the state-level officials requesting the rule change. Sen. Jim Mathias and Del. Mary Beth Carozza were both receptive to the idea.

“If that’s their intention, I’m happy to work with them, Mathias said. “ But the devil’s in the details. I’d like to see the private sector consulted, but we’ve been good partners working together.” Carozza said she was looking forward to hearing more about the proposal. Departing County Attorney Sonny Bloxom spoke for the internally develSee STORE on PAGE 5

City manager search goes into semifinals Interviews of best prospects to start end of next week

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) After more than four months with its top managerial post vacant, Ocean City government is approaching the end stage of the hiring process for a new city manager. “It looks like interviews will begin the latter part of next week,” Mayor and interim City Manager Rick Meehan said this week.

Meehan and the City Council will be interviewing roughly a half-dozen candidates, pulled from a much larger pool of applicants assembled by Slavin Management Consultants, the search firm hired by the city to solicit for the position. The council previously met with Slavin representatives to parse through the applicants and select those they wanted to meet in person. “We’ve left open the option for additional interviews if needed after this first round,” Meehan said. “The See CANDIDATES on PAGE 5

Zombie mail: Addressee gone for winter, but dead letters live on to plague post office

NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH

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By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) With nearly all of the resort now settled into the holiday lull, you’d think there wouldn’t be that many people in Ocean City with a major logistical problem. You’d be right, if it wasn’t for the resort’s un-

sung heroes in the U.S. Post Office. “We’re definitely in a unique situation in this town,” said Dan Woods, postmaster for the 71st Street branch office. “If there’s one thing I could tell people, it’s to put a hold on your mail, get forSee POSTAL on PAGE 3

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Postal options available for part-time residents Continued from Page 5 warding or packet service – just tell us something.” Every fall, the bulk of Ocean City’s population leaves – part-time residents go to spend their six months in Florida, seasonal employees depart for wherever and many of the resort’s younger workers shuffle into cheaper winter rentals. It’s a nightmare for the post office, since, as Newman pointed out in his inaugural Seinfeld appearance, even postal employees are powerless to make the mail stop. This is why, as year-round residents know, you may still be getting traffic court notices, medical bills and Taco Bell coupons for someone who lived at your address for a few weeks 10 summers ago. Or, if you have one box for the whole building, your mail is buried beneath Sears catalogs for everyone who has ever lived there since the Reagan administration. If the senders don’t update the address, either ‘It’s more because the redifficult here cipient never told them, or than anywhere through institu- else. Particularly tional inertia, with younger the mail will just people. They keep coming. tend to just “The best forget about thing to do is put a note in the box their mail. The that these names pay all their aren’t at this resbills and get all idence,” Woods their said. “It won’t stop it from information coming, but it online.’ will let us know Dan Woods, to send it back, postmaster for or recycle it. We send out a ton of the 71st Street recycling, proba- branch office bly more than any other office I know.” By law, the USPS has to hold mail for 10 days, but Woods said they hold it for 30 as a courtesy. “If the carrier notices that the box is filling up, we pull it all out and put a notice on it that no more is to go in,”

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Woods said. “Then we put a notice on it for change of address, and at the end of 30 days, we send it back to the sender. If we get a change of address, we’ll forward it.” However, to help with efficiency, the post office only forwards some types of mail, and only for a certain time, once you change your address. Bulk mail is always recycled and magazines are only forwarded for a month. Some agencies, such as the Motor Vehicle Administration, request that their mail always be returned to them and never forwarded. If you’re going to be out of town for a while, but don’t want to change your address with every possible sender of mail, the best option is packet service, Woods said. For a fee, the post office will bundle up your mail and ship it to you periodically. “It’s more difficult here than any-

where else,” Woods said. “Particularly with younger people. They tend to just forget about their mail. The pay all their bills and get all their information online.” In some large buildings, carriers have taken to putting notice cards in boxes every fall, telling customers to remove the card if they’re still there and want to receive mail. “Some routes, out of 5,000 addresses, we might only have 500 that ever get mail in the winter,” Woods said. Adding to the piles of mail that are recycled or returned to the sender, there is also the issue of sorting through communal mailboxes. Many small condominiums or multi-family homes have one large box for everyone. That, actually, is forbidden under postal code, but still continues in older buildings, Woods said.

“The condo is technically responsible to give every unit a mailbox, whether they receive mail or not,” Woods said. “But a lot of people have gotten away in the past with throwing up a single box for a whole building, even if only a few people actually take out their mail.” Even if the winter is a logistical pain, the volume is fairly static, Woods said. The Christmas rush, given Ocean City’s low year-round population, is negligible. What the Ocean City office considers its Christmas rush actually happens in August and September. “The end of August and beginning of September is when the foreign students have tons of packages,” Woods said. “They’re filling up suitcases with all the stuff they can’t get back home and shipping them overseas. That can be a huge push-up.”

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 5

Store leases, employees complicate strategy Continued from Page 1 oped plan, which included a sunset clause, or automatically imposed countdown, to aid the transition from public to private operations. The plan also offered recommendations to help the county divest itself of its four retail stores. The commissioners also voted to extend the lease at the Gold Coast Mall liquor store for one year, since it’s profitable according to county figures, and the overall retail operations aren’t expected to end until 2017, if Bloxom’s proposal is adopted as written. Commissioner Joe Mitrecic warned against being too specific at this early stage, and called for the commissioners to review the strategy before officially sanctioning it. The board members present supported his suggestion. Commissioners Bud Church and Ted Elder were absent from the proceedings. The Department of Liquor Control manages four retail stores spread throughout the county as well as a warehouse in Snow Hill. Of those facilities, the county owns one building outright, which, according to Bloxom, has less than $40,000 left on the mortgage, and leases three. Of these, Bloxom said, the store at

16th Street in Ocean City is the “most $2.3 million, while the best case is less problematic” as it has eight years left than $1 million. on a 10-year lease with a remaining The budgeted cost to run the debalance in rent of about $677,000 as partment last year was about $10.5 of June 30, 2017. The northern million. Worcester store, at the Gold Coast The Department of Liquor Control Mall, will have a balance of about is expected to lose $492,000 this year, $122,400 as of June exhausting the re30, 2017. The wareserve fund of house has about ‘I think it’s very important that $400,000 and leav$465,000 left on its we send the letter. I do feel the ing a loss of mortgage, inventory $92,000, according and equipment, he rest of the strategy should be to county figures. tweaked by this commission.’ said. Bloxom outlined The DLC em- Commissioner Joe Mitrecic the plan for closure ploys 19 full-time in three stages. The and two part-time first, already made, employees. During the summer, these is to request the code change from the numbers are augmented with tempo- state delegation. Next, halt wholesale rary workers. The county is examining operations after next summer, but by different severance scenarios for de- Sept. 30, except to stock the county parting employees, as well as a bonus stores and to liquidate remaining instructure for those who remain at the ventory. Finally, wrap up retail and department until the doors are closed for good. The commissioners declined to discuss those plans in detail, owing to Mitrecic’s suggestion. The current best guess provided by county staff is those expenses will run nearly $1 millocal lion in severance and unemployment expenses. Bloxom said the worst-case scenario of the exit strategy is a cost of

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wholesale operations by June 30, 2017. To aid in the transition from public to private retail operations, the plan called for a caveat within the state law change disallowing any new stores from opening within 10 miles of an existing county store. The idea, Bloxom said, is to entice prospective business owners to consider entering into a lease or purchase agreement with the county for an existing store. However, if an entrepreneur in the area were set on opening a package store, her or she would still be able to do so. As the county’s stores are expected to fade away, the provision would no longer apply. “I think it’s very important that we send the letter. I do feel the rest of the strategy should be tweaked by this commission,” Commissioner Joe Mitrecic said.

David Recor, resigned his post in July following a minor collision in his city-owned vehicle, sparking an outpouring criticism from council members and fellow city staff. While the traffic accident itself was minor, the incident proved to be the last straw in Recor’s allegedly disconnected management style and ongoing reluctance to engage with day-to-day policy.

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A pod of whales are one of more than 400 displays, from fairytale characters to the 12 Days of Christmas, visitors will see at the Winterfest of Lights at Northside Park on 125th Street, now until Jan. 3.

Winterfest of Lights breaks holiday attendance records Warm weather credited for 22,423 guests visiting OC display at Northside Park By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) The long Thanksgiving weekend was a good one for Ocean City’s Winterfest of Lights, which posted a new attendance record for that period. Altogether, 22,423 people checked in and checked out the more than 400 illuminated displays from Wednesday, Nov. 25 through Sunday, Nov. 29 at Northside Park on 125th Street. Jessica Waters, communications manager for the Town of Ocean City, attributed some of the crowd size to the unseasonably warm weather.

Spring-like temperatures brought 1,274 more people out to Winterfest of Lights than in 2011, which broke the record for Thanksgiving weekend attendance. In 2011, 21,149 people toured the illuminating setup during the holiday weekend and weather was comparable. For the same time last year, when it was 15 degrees colder, Winterfest drew 19,918 people. “The holiday weekend is historically a great weekend but when we have a forecast that was as fabulous as last week, it truly changes the attendance of a typical weekend,” Waters said. Waters also saluted the work of the staff, including the electricians who had to fix a major issue on Saturday morning by installing new electrical lines underground.

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County improvement plan to spend $74M in five years Public hearing scheduled for Jan. 5 on projects like Showell, jail, paving, SDMS By Brian Gilliland Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) More than $73.67 million in county government capital projects could be undertaken in the next five years, providing that the fiscal 2017-2021 capital improvement plan presented to the Worcester County Commissioners Tuesday passes muster intact. First up in that approval process will be a public hearing on the plan and its proposed projects on Jan. 5 and then the commissioners will determine what works fiscally and what, if anything, doesn’t. According to Budget Accountant Kim Watts, 15.5 percent, or about $12 million, of the total price tag will

come from the General Fund. The county will finance 50.1 percent or about $38.2 million from bond funds. “The remaining portion would come from user fees, grant funds, state match funds, designated funds, enterprise fund bonds or a private donation,” a memo by Watts said. The capital improvement plan includes only those projects that would cost more than $500,000. Public school projects, namely the Showell Elementary replacement school and an addition to Stephen Decatur Middle School, were included in the county’s plan. Showell Elementary had been allocated $455,000 previously, and it will take about $4.4 million more to complete the Stephen Decatur addition. According to the report, these projects will cost $47.9 million. See DRAFT Page 8

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DECEMBER 4, 2015

Coastal bays report card misses honor roll, remains steady

Draft CIP public hearing scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 5

Overall grade of C+, but no gains or losses to scores

Continued from Page 7 A $2.6 million academic building added to Wor-Wic Community College is also requested, and the Berlin Library replacement branch is projected to cost in excess of $5.2 million. Public Works projects total about $17.3 million spread over three divisions: general public works, water and wastewater and solid waste. Most of that department’s request of $11 million is for road paving. A new county storage building in Snow Hill is the next most expensive at about $3.6 million. Two $1 million projects follow: the Newark spray irrigation site for wastewater disposal and a renovation plus addition to the landfill administration building. Finally, a Riddle Farm Commercial water line is expected to cost $660,000. Recreation and Parks requests about $2.3 million to acquire and develop land for Showell Park. The Worcester County Jail is seeking $10 million to replace its 30 year-old HVAC system to save on oil and increase efficiency in the system. The project includes the replacement of 18 air handlers, ductwork, piping, pumps and controls.

By Brian Gilliland Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) For the second straight year, the Maryland Coastal Bays have earned a C+ grade in the Coastal Bays Health Index that measures total nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll (specifically chlorophyll a), seagrass levels and hard clam populations. The Maryland Coastal Bays Program, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and the Department of Natural Resources all contributed to the report. “It’s our attempt to summarize all the monitoring activities we do and come up with a single number,” Roman Jesien, acting director of the Coastal Bays Program, said. Assawoman Bay received a grade of C, which is the same grade earned in 2013 and 2012, but was, according to the report, experiencing a decline from last year’s results. Increases in the concentration of dissolved oxygen is seen as a positive, and decreases in the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus and chlorophyll are considered improvements. See LOCAL Page 9

STEWART DOBSON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

SURF FISHING A surf angler finds the mild late fall weather conducive to trying his luck on Ocean City’s beach, but the major fish of fall, most notably keeper-size rockfish, have yet to appear in these waters beyond a couple here and there.

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Local waterways maintain grades from last year Continued from Page 8 Conversely, an improvement in nitrogen, phosphorus and chlorophyll represents a decrease in concentration. “While chlorophyll a improved, nitrogen, phosphorus and seagrass all became more degraded,” the report states. Hard clams and seagrasses were rated “poor” to “very poor” in the northernmost bay in Worcester County. To the west of the Assawoman Bay is the St. Martin River, which also maintained its D+ score from last year. The bright spot for the St. Martin River, according to the report, is the chlorophyll levels, which are rated good. Most of the other indicators scored poor or very poor, according to the report. South of the Assawoman Bay is the Isle of Wight Bay, which also maintained its C grade. “A large improvement in dissolved oxygen was offset by declines in nitrogen, phosphorus, hard clams and seagrass scores,” the report reads. Jesien said that rejuvenation processes aren’t marking the same calendar as those who are doing the measuring. “What we’re seeing year to year isn’t as important as taking a step back to notice the trends. Things aren’t getting worse,” Jesien said. “I think the practically implemented solutions in the watershed are working — the bays are holding their own.” Agricultural improvements, removing septic systems in favor of centralized services and zoning were examples of changes Jesien saw as positive. “Groundwater nutrients take a while to work through. I think we’re experiencing a hiatus in improvement,” he said. South of the Isle of Wight is Sinepuxent Bay, which again gained top marks with a B grade. Phosphorus levels and hard clams both improved from “moderate” to “good” in the Sinepuxent, but dissolved oxygen and seagrasses remained moderate. To the west of the Sinepuxent is Newport Bay, which improved from D+ to C- this year as dissolved oxygen, nitrogen and chlorophyll all improved, according to the study. Seagrasses and hard clams both scored very poor in this bay. Finally, the Chincoteague Bay earned a B- this year, again the same as last year. Seagrasses reportedly improved significantly while hard clams scored very poor. “It’s about the same as last year,” Jesien said. “One of the few differences is the water quality in the upper bays is better, but seagrasses are declining. In the Chincoteague Bay the grasses increase, but the clams haven’t.” Hard clam levels are the same as they were before the moratorium on dredging, Jesien said.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 10

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Climate report details erosion, rising sea levels on Delmarva By Brian Gilliland Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Whether it’s Assateague Island or Ocean City on the eastern side or Smith Island to its west, the Delmarva Peninsula is taking on water and while beach replenishment — among other climate change countermeasures — are having an effect, recent studies cited a new federal report say it’s time to do more. “Changing climate has its consequences for parks, for people and for the planet,” Liz Davis, interpretation and education chief at the National Seashore, said. “The parks are responding. The choices we make now can avoid catastrophe in the future.” Released last week in conjunction with the 21-nation climate change conference taking place in Paris were the results of 24 case studies of several different parks, including Assateague and Yellowstone. Assateague Island contributed two cases studies to the report (the full text can be found at www.nps.gov/ subjects/climatechange/coastaladaptationstrategies.htm). “The whole idea of coming up with the report is to help managers down the road as climate changes across the globe,” Davis said. “It’s establishing a baseline.” Bill Hulslander, the park’s chief of resource management, agrees. “Various parks are making changes, but along Assateague, changes have been made since the beginning,” he said. “We’ve seen a little of this since Hurricane Sandy.” Hulslander said the park has been asking itself questions about infrastructure ever since the hurricane struck the shore. “Things like, do we need this piece? Does it have to be on the island? If not here, where?” These questions form the basis of As-

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sateague’s first case study: “Incorporating climate change response into a general management plan.” In broad strokes, it details some of the strategies used by the National Seashore in order to facilitate responses to events. For example, incorporating GPS and Lidar, which is essentially radar that uses lasers instead of electromagnetic waves, data allows trends to be identified and more accurate models to be developed. This case study also suggests managing infrastructure in a way that is resilient or resistant to the effects of climate change, and managing the “retreat” of facilities not built to those standards. This topic forms the basis of the second study, “Relocating Visitor Facilities Threatened by Erosion.” “After Sandy we began asking ourselves if we should move the parking lot away from the active shoreline to preserve access and help promote longerterm use in the absence of future impacts. This work is being done as we speak,” Davis said Monday. The lot is expected to be moved by the end of February. On the bayside, Davis said, the lot is being repaved using a clay base and topped with crushed shells, replacing asphalt park officials said they were still pulling out of the bay from erosion caused by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. The repaving work is proceeding along the same timeline, Davis said. “These are examples within the park service that can be modified by other parks, or wherever really, that can be used to adapt to coastal climate change,” Hulslander said. “By protecting infrastructure we’re maximizing our investment. No one wants to make a bad investment.”

POLICE/COURTS

Out-of-state handgun Travis Corl, 22, of Howard, Pa., was arrested for allegedly carrying a concealed handgun without a Maryland permit. OCPD Pfc. Michael Dzurnak pulled Corl over for a broken headlight at 8:20 a.m. on Nov. 30 around 40th Street, according to charging documents. Dzurnak wrote that he asked Corl if he had a concealed carry permit in Pennsylvania, which Corl apparently freely shared that he did. Dzurnak then searched the car, finding a Springfield XDS 9mm handgun in the driver’s side map pocket.

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Ocean City police charged three people in relation to a Jeep being driven up Baltimore Avenue with an “overwhelming” amount of marijuana smoke, as well as other illicit substances. Driver Nicholas Gigliotti, 25, of Harrisburg, Pa., was hit with traffic violations, while Jessica Kroll, 29, of Ocean City, and Corey Johnston, 26, of Chestertown, were charged with drug offenses.

OCPD Sgt. Charles Kelley wrote that he observed Gigliotti run a stop sign at Wicomico Street before turning north up Baltimore Avenue. Kelley then ran the license plate on the Jeep, which came back as belonging to someone with an outstanding drug warrant in Florida. As he followed the vehicle, Kelley wrote that he saw it continually braking and accelerating in a bizarre manner. The Jeep then turned into a parking lot on Eighth Street and Philadelphia, where a passenger, later identified as Kroll, got out and walked to a bar across the street. When he asked Gigliotti to roll down his window, Kelley wrote, the marijuana smoke inside was overpowering. A subsequent search of the Jeep by another officer revealed needles and a spoon with heroin residue in a backpack, later identified as Johnston’s, according to charging documents. Kroll, located across the street, consented to a search, Kelley wrote. Xanax and Zoloft tablets were found in her pockets, without a pharmacy bottle. Although Kroll stated at first that she had prescriptions for them, she later admitted that Continued on Page 11


Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 11

Suspects stashed stolen beer after WOC break-in (Dec. 4, 2015) Two Ocean City residents have been charged with breaking into the Captain’s Galley restaurant in West Ocean City last Thursday and making off with an undisclosed amount of cash and multiple cases of beer. The beer, however, appeared to the main target, as the accused, Tony Leonard Childs and Kenneth James Webb Jr., are alleged to have taken 22 cases of it. The Worcester County Sheriff’s Office reported that its deputies went to the restaurant at 6:43 a.m. after an alarm sounded when someone broke a lock on an outside cooler. On their arrival, the deputies found that a quantity of beer had been removed and that two windows had been damaged so the perpetrators could access the second-floor deck. Deputies said that once the beer burglars

were on the deck, they gained entrance to the restaurant by smashing a window. Investigators said Childs and Webb had been seen making multiple trips to and from the restaurant carrying cases of beer. The pair allegedly took the beer to a residence on Swordfish Drive and left the area. Deputies contacted the occupants of the residence who allowed them to enter the home, where the beer was discovered. A short time later, Webb and Childs reportedly returned to the home and were arrested, the sheriff’s office said. In addition to the beer, the pair is accused of going through two cash registers and taking a bank bag containing an undisclosed amount of money. There were being held on $25,000 bond as of mid-week.

Sprinklers saved vehicles, city says (Dec. 4, 2015): An afternoon fire at a city facility was quickly extinguished because of fire sprinklers, according to Jessica Waters, OC spokeswoman. Just before 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 22, the Ocean City Fire Department was dispatched to an automatic fire alarm at the Town of Ocean City’s Service Center Warehouse located at 65th Street, Waters said.  Firefighters arrived and reportedly found the 12,000 square foot garage area filled with smoke. The call was upgraded to a building fire, bringing in additional fire and EMS resources.  Firefighters found that two fire sprinkler heads activated and extinguished a

fire prior to the fire department being dispatched. “By these two fire sprinklers activating, city ambulances, police cars, busses, street sweepers and other essential equipment was saved,” Fire Marshal David Hartley said. “This example shows the huge impact sprinklers have not just in a home, but also in reducing the average loss of property during a fire in a commercial structure.”     The on-scene investigation by the Ocean City Fire Marshal’s Office revealed that the fire started as the result of a machine malfunction, Waters said. The building was reportedly unoccupied at the time of the fire.  

Collision Giuseppe Belfiore, 33, is accused by the Maryland State Police of being involved in a multi-car collision while under the influence of some type of drug.

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POLICE/COURTS Continued from Page 10 she purchased the Zoloft “on the street,” Kelley wrote.

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The MSP stated in a release that they were called to a three-car crash on eastbound Route 50 at Keyser Point Road on Nov. 27 at 1:42 p.m. Troopers allegedly saw Belfiore drop syringes on the ground as he walked away from his vehicle. Belfiore failed field sobriety tests, but a breathalyzer showed no alcohol in his system, troopers wrote. Belfiore then refused a drug recognition exam.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 12

DECEMBER 4, 2015

Going green saves Ocean City plenty of green New three-year contract with renewable focus will save resort $150K annually By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) In what seems to be a good omen toward the long-term viability of green energy, city government this week discovered that electricity prices actually came back cheaper with a higher level of renewable sources. “The ‘green’ component wound up slightly cheaper than the standard bid,” said City Engineer Terry McGean. “It actually was a savings. We were surprised.” As a large consumer of electricity, the Town of Ocean City typically procures its energy independently, rather than taking the retail rates offered by Delmarva Power. On Tuesday morning, the city conducted a reverse auction for its energy supply, with bidders competing to go the lowest on what were actually six separate offerings, McGean said. Bids were taken for 12-, 24-, and 36month supplies with unrestricted energy sources, as well as the same terms with the stipulation that 20 percent of the supply be from renewable resources, such as wind and solar. The lowest bid turned out to be the

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24-month renewable supply, at a rate of 6.275 cents per kilowatt-hour, versus the city’s current rate of 7.267 cents. Going with a 36-month supply would increase the rate about three percent, McGean said, not because the cost of the supply itself will change, but because the pass-through rates charged by Delmarva Power and PJM Interconnection for use of the grid infrastructure are scheduled to go up after two years. “It’s a three percent premium to lock in for three years, because the passthrough costs in the third year go up substantially,” McGean said. “However, if we don’t do the 36-month now, that third year we’re going to pay that amount ... if we rebid after two years, you’re going to pay that surcharge anyway all in the third year. Based on that, my recommendation is to go ahead and do the 36-month.” Savings will still amount to over $150,000 per year versus the current rates. The winning bidder for the threeyear contract is Constellation Energy, a company owned by utility giant Exelon. Exelon is also currently attempting to merge with Pepco, Delmarva Power’s parent company, in a $6.8 billion dollar deal. While the merger has been approved in Maryland and other states which the companies serve, the

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Even if the merger is approved, Exelon has said that its energy-production elements and power infrastructure ownership will remain as separate operations, likely not affecting arrangements such as Ocean City’s.

Worcester inks 20-year solar power deal with WGL Energy Laborious process ends with guaranteed production accord for county facilities

By Brian Gilliland Staff Writer (Dec. 4. 2015) Worcester County government is going solar, to a degree, as the county commissioners this week agreed to a deal with Cleveland-based WGL Energy to provide two of the eight megawatts the county uses annually for public facilities, locking in a rate of 6.43 cents per kilowatt hour for the next 20 years. Additionally, there is a guarantee of 85 percent production on the WGL solar facility. If the company fails to meet its requirement, the county can walk away from the deal. County Attorney Sonny Bloxom said this deal does not preclude other deals with other providers that may wish to do future business with the county. The production site for the solar power is located in Church Hill, in Queen Anne’s county. Worcester included a stipulation that all production equipment be produced in North America and WGL agreed. The county currently pays 8.1 cents per kilowatt hour for electricity, with a projected bi-annual escalation of 2 percent, according to

County Engineer Bill Bradshaw. Using those figures, the county is set to save about $162,000 in the first year alone, and could save more than $3.7 million over the life of the deal. On the downside, the initial outlay for this power purchase agreement is among the highest of the options, with a cap of $300,000. This is used to cover interconnection costs between the solar array and Delmarva Power, Bradshaw said. Seaford-based Solar City made a similar offer, which might have saved the county a few thousand dollars more, with its array in Pittsville. It also offered a lower cost cap but generated fewer kilowatt hours and had a weaker guarantee and therefore did not make the cut. The initial offers were presented to the commissioners in July in a joint bid by Standard Solar and Solar City. The commissioners, initially resistant to staff advice on listening to information sessions and hiring solar consultant firm CQI at a cost capped at $6,000 to evaluate any proposals, put out a request for proposals, which was answered by three bids on Sept. 8. On Sept. 16, county staff put requests out to WGL and Solar City for “best and final offers,” Bradshaw said. No reason was given for See PACT Page 13

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 13

COUNTY BRIEFS (Dec. 4, 2015) The Worcester County Commissioners discussed the following issues during their meeting Tuesday.

Landfill development The commissioners empowered Public Works Director John Tustin to negotiate with Dorchester Energy LLC to explore the opportunity to commercialize the central landfill. Opportunities may exist in collecting landfill gas and other ventures, such as solar collectors. The sticking point was the term of

Pact signed Continued from Page 12 SunEdison’s disqualification. “WGL provided the best proposal based on cost, site selection, permit ability, financial strength and responsiveness to the RFP process,” Bradshaw wrote in a memo to the commissioners. Therefore, Bradshaw said, the county selected WGL for its power purchase agreement. The county is beholden to the deal inasmuch as the commissioners agree to buy power at the approved rate over the life of the contract.

exclusivity while Dorchester evaluated the site — the company requested 36 months but a company representative said it was open to negotiation. The county had a previous arrangement to collect methane from the landfill years ago.

New signs The commissioners agreed to participate in a state program to reduce the overall number of signs on state and county roads previously only available on state roads and freeways. The State Highway Administration

decided to open the program to county roads as well, since not every county has appropriate roads to participate in the program.

Groundwater monitoring Public Works Director John Tustin delivered requests for proposals to the commissioners for groundwater monitoring in each of the closed landfills in Berlin, Pocomoke City and Berlin. Historically, monitoring had been conducted by EA Engineering, but the commissioners decided to bid the process out. The next round of sam-

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 14

DECEMBER 4, 2015

City facing replacement of core radio system in FY17 Public safety system likely to change over to digital standard, 700MHz band

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) After several years of having the purchase looming in the so-called “right-hand column” of unfunded initiatives, city government is about to commit to replace its aging radio infrastructure. It’s more complicated than just picking up some walkie-talkies at Wal-Mart. Replacing the city’s core radio network is arguably the most important infrastructure purchase one could make, Emergency Services Director Joe Theobald argued, given that the system handles nearly every vital function in the municipality. The current system was purchased in 1992 from Ericsson (then a GE company) and installed in 1993-1994. Through a series of mergers and acquisitions, the technology is now owned by the Harris Corporation. “The system is now 23 years old,” Theobald said. “The name has changed seven times. What we then bought from GE is now a Harris product. But come July 1, 2017, Harris will no longer be providing parts or tech-

nical support. They’re simply not making these anymore.” Most jurisdictions in Maryland and the rest of the Mid-Atlantic have already, or soon will, move on to better technology. Since the early ’90s, Theobald said, there has been an effort to come up with a standardized digital radio coding protocol that will allow interoperability between public safety agencies in different jurisdictions. That system now appears to be the P25 standard, which is already used by state agencies. Worcester County committed earlier this year to replacing its current system with a P25-spec network, as have most other counties in Maryland. Further, the city’s current radio system, which uses the EDACS protocol on the 800 MHz spectrum, experiences considerable interference from a radio wave phenomenon known as “tropospheric ducting,” which occurs primarily in coastal areas. This “ducting” in the troposphere involves temperature inversions that create a tropospheric channel of sorts that allows radio waves to travel much greater distances and, thus, interfere with local radio signals. Newer radio systems have ways to minimize that. See CITY Page 15

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Ocean City’s Emergency Services Administrative Office Associate, Carol Boyles, has retired after contributing 30 years of dedicated service. Pictured with Boyles is her son, Andy, left, and Mayor Rick Meehan.

Carol Boyles retires after 30 years of public service (Dec. 4, 2015) The Town of Ocean City’s Emergency Services Administrative Office Associate, Carol Boyles, has retired after contributing 30 years of dedicated service to the town. Her employment began in 1986, when she was hired in the Water Department’s billing office. After two years in the department, Boyles moved to finance administration for the Town of Ocean City from 1988 until 1999. In November of 1999, Boyles began working for the Emergency Services Department where her responsibilities included various tasks for the department’s separate divisions. “Carol has always displayed a high level of professionalism and

is a true team player,” Emergency Services Director Joseph Theobald said. “A loyal employee, Carol was committed to the Town of Ocean City and everyone whom she worked with, within our organization and community.” Upon retirement, Boyles said she intends to spend more time reading, gardening and enjoying the company of her family and friends. She will remain an active member of CERT and the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company’s Ladies Auxiliary. “I have always cared about my coworkers and the employees of the town, who are the resources that keep our community going” Boyles said. “Thanks to everyone who played a part in my career over the last 30 years.”

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 15

City would prefer stand-alone system for emergency needs Continued from Page 14 Frequencies in the 700 MHz range are now available, and preferable. “In the past, the 700 MHz systems were for broadcast TV, but the FCC moved that range to public safety radio,” Theobald said. “There were only seven frequencies left after Maryland licensed the available frequencies for their systems, and we went ahead and licensed six of those frequencies for Ocean City.” The system would also need to support a protocol known as SCADA, which broadcasts in the 900 MHz range. This is a data overlay used to transmit commands for public works, namely controls on water and wastewater systems. Based on those needs, Theobald recommended negotiating with Harris to upgrade the existing infrastructure with a 700 MHz, P25 system that will also support an “OpenSky” 900 MHz SCADA system. Options are also open to piggyback off the state’s P25 system (known as Maryland FiRST), which would save some money while still guaranteeing interoperability. However, this deal would need to be made with Motorola, the state’s vendor, or Harris technology would have to be modified to suit. Further, in such a scenario, the city

would not have stand-alone transmission power, thinning the layers of redundancy important for emergency operations if one system were to go down, Theobald said. “It’s pretty apparent that having our own system is what we need for the town,” said Councilman Wayne Hartman. The council voted unanimously Tuesday to allow Theobald to begin negotiations with Harris. While the final price is yet to be seen, the estimated cost on the last city capital improvement plan was $9 million. Harris would likely offer a 10year lease purchase on the equipment. Once the deal is finalized, Theobald said, work would move in several stages concurrent with the upgrade of the city’s 911 dispatch consoles to the next-generation interface, which the state is sponsoring. 911 replacements would begin this spring, and finish in the fall of 2016. Installation of new radio hardware in police, fire, and public works vehicles would begin that fall, and finish by the spring of 2017. Refitting of the core radio system at the 65th Street Public Safety Building would start in the fall of 2017 and be ready for a switch-over prior to the 2018 summer season.

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DECEMBER 4, 2015

Paddack takes 171-mile trip to return tags lost on beach

PHOTO COURTESY MARK PADDACK

Sgt. Mark Paddack, right, with Skylar Knight after Paddack returned Knight’s lost jewelry, one of several such journeys Paddack has taken during his career with the OCPD.

(Dec. 4, 2015) Ocean City Police Sgt. Mark Paddack often hits the beach looking for whatever he might find. Most recently, he found something he couldn’t keep: a pair of ID tags with a unique cut coin attached to the chain. He discovered them while in Ocean City’s on Sept. 11 and concluded that, given the nature of the reworked coin, the owner would probably appreciate having it back. A search for the owner through colleagues and social media led to a picture of the tags hanging from the neck of Skylar Knight. Paddack was able to speak with him through his mother. The tags were apparently lost on Sept. 1, and travelled approximately

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10 blocks before being discovered by Paddack. The chain slipped over Knight’s head while he was helping his sister learn how to surf and the cut quarter attached to the chain was a gift from his girlfriend. Knight is attending community college, is a volunteer firefighter and has aspirations to serve in the United States Army. Two months after the discovery, Paddack traveled 171 miles to return the tags to Knight in his hometown. Paddack writes jewelry return stories in his ‘Life in the Lane’ column on www.TheTreasureDepot.com and in the Surf and Sand forum under the heading of ‘The Depot Honor Roll.’

County schools’ budget requests for FY17 heard

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) During a public budget meeting on Tuesday night, all 14 schools in Worcester County had a member of their School Improvement Advisory Committee present each of their school’s priorities for the 2017 fiscal year budget. “Each school makes a presentation based on what they hope to be the big picture of the budget process,” said Worcester County Board of Education President Bob Rothermel. All school representatives thought providing competitive salaries and benefits for teachers and staff, in addition to funding for instructional technology, should be highlights of school budget priority lists. More than half of the schools desired funding for equipment costs such as replacing tiles, walkways and other miscellaneous infrastructure upgrades. Six schools require funding to add more positions and money for additional textbooks and supplies. A preview of the schools’ FY17 budget considerations includes $1.1 million for a step increase on employee pay scales, as well as $600,000 for a one percent cost-of-living adjustment. A 10 percent increase in health insurance coverage comes in at just less than $1.4 million. Public Relations Spokesperson Carrie Sterrs presented survey results from parents and households on their thoughts regarding various aspects of the school system. “We are the only county in the state that surveys parents and households,” Rothermel said. “Results came out very favorable.” Worcester County funds its school system to the tune of $90 million in the current fiscal year, an expenditure that comprises almost half of the county’s total $182 million budget.


Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

SHA looking for ambitious spring paving schedule

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Dec 4, 2015) Rome wasn’t built in a day, but half of Ocean City will apparently be paved in about three months. During their semi-annual meeting with the city council this week, State Highway Administration officials detailed their timeline for this off-season’s repaving of Coastal Highway from Route 90 to the Delaware Line. “We have already advertised the contract, the first bid opening will be this Thursday with notice to proceed given in February,� said SHA District 1 Chief Engineer Donnie Drewer. “Hopefully, paving will start the first day of March. When the weather breaks we’ll be here. The contract has a dropdead date to be finished by May 26.� At the same time, planning for renovations south of Route 90 continues, with repaving next year to tie into the first phase of major median improvements designed to enhance pedestrian safety. The work will also involve replacing the last few non-wheelchair-friendly curbs along Coastal Highway. “We’ll have two contractors coming in to town in the next few days to start,� Drewer said. “They will make Route 90 to Delaware completely ADA-compatible. They’ll need to be finished if not before we start paving, then at least on one side.� Work in the spring has become particularly hectic in recent years, with a combination of wet winters delaying construction and an ever-increasing volume of car-centric springtime events in the resort. “I do want to caution you to the fact that in order to pull this off, it’s a lot of work,� Drewer said. “We might, in some cases, be working seven days a week, 24 hours per day, but we have the ability, if there’s a weekend [the contractor] shouldn’t work, we can make provisions. “We already have written in certain weekends and certain days they cannot work, per the police department and the public works department.� Drewer also noted that Dennis German, head of the SHA’s design office, will be meeting with the council’s TransSee ADA Page 18

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Ocean City Today

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DECEMBER 4, 2015

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Tax cap issue will not be heard in federal court; state case still pending

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Despite the volume of paperwork it produced, the push by local tax activists to have their dispute with the city heard in federal court will not be going forward. U.S. District Court Judge Richard Bennett issued his final opinion last week with regard to a case filed by the organization known as Ocean City Taxpayers for Social Justice, which spearheaded a

petition drive to create a referendum on the next municipal ballot potentially limiting the city’s property tax rate. The city has challenged OCTSJ’s petition in Maryland Circuit Court for Worcester County, questioning the ability of voters to dictate a specific tax rate via charter amendment, and citing a previous decision in the case of Anne Arundel County vs. Smallwood. Subsequently, OCTSJ frontman Tony Christ filed for relief in federal court, claiming, in short, that the city’s attempt to prevent the petition from hitting the ballot, by citing the Smallwood precedent, See PETITION Page 19

ADA work starting soon Continued from Page 17 portation Committee on Dec. 15 to go over designs for the median improvements, which will likely involve additional landscaping, fencing, and lighting. There is also the open question of whether the city wants to change the configuration of Coastal Highway’s lanes in the improved area, although this would likely mean cutting out a lane of

traffic in a so-called “road diet.” The city has leaned away from this option in recent discussions. The first phase of pedestrian safety improvements along the median will run from the convention center to Route 90. Studies to detail further work, to cover the entire stretch of the median from Ninth Street to the Delaware border, will be sought, Drewer said.

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Ocean City Today

Petition remanded to circuit court Continued from Page 18 denied the public’s First Amendment right to petition its government. While this may be a valid argument, Bennett wrote, the simple fact that state law appears to be against OCTSJ does not justify removal of the case to federal jurisdiction. “Put simply, plaintiffs’ efforts to circumvent unfavorable state law precedent are insufficient to afford this Court jurisdiction over their inadequately pled federal causes of action,” Bennett wrote late last week. However, he noted, “this court acknowledges that plaintiffs remain free to ask the state court to overrule Smallwood, or to find it inapplicable to their petition.” Bennett has granted the city’s request to have the case remanded back to Worcester County Circuit Court, where — barring any other developments — it will likely be judged in the coming weeks. OCTSJ’s petition had proposed to amend the city’s charter to include a provision stating, “the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City shall not tax property at a rate greater than thirty-eight cents ($0.38) per one hundred dollars of assessed valuation.”

This level, 38 cents per hundred dollars of assessment, was the tax levy in the 2008-2009 fiscal year, the last budget struck prior to the 2008 financial collapse. Since then, the city’s tax rate — in response to declining property values — has risen to 47.8 cents for the coming fiscal year. If approved, the measure would thus cut taxes by nearly 10 cents, forcing the city to cuts its operating budget by at least $8 mil-

‘Put simply, plaintiffs’ efforts to circumvent unfavorable state law precedent are insufficient to afford this Court jurisdiction.’ Judge Richard Bennett lion. The petition garnered enough signatures to meet the margin of 20 percent of registered voters, as required by Maryland law, to initiate a referendum at the next election. However, the city’s circuit court case questions the legality of the petition, a position stemming from a 1992 brief from the Maryland Court of Appeals, regarding a case between Anne Arundel County and anti-tax advocate Rayburn Smallwood, as well as another parallel case between an activist group and

Baltimore County. In both cases, the court found that ballot provisions which would de-facto set the tax rate were in violation of section 6-302 of the Maryland Code, which dictates that the county council was to set the tax rate. Having the tax rate dictated by charter amendment thus violates this basic organization. The legal stipulation, City Solicitor Guy Ayres has argued, is the same for municipalities, as the same language used in 6-302 is used in section 6-303, which assigns municipal tax powers. The court’s reasoning goes back to the basic idea of representative democracy. Elected bodies are elected to look out for the interests of all constituents, and are thus endowed with legislative powers, as opposed to simply legislating by popular majority. Thus, the court found that “the exercise of the legislative initiative power [by petitioners] ... completely circumvents the legislative body, thereby totally undermining its status as the primary legislative organ.” However, certain elements of the Anne Arundel and Baltimore petitions were found to be correct in that they did not set a hard level of See BENNETT Page 20

PAGE 19


Ocean City Today

PAGE 20

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Bennett does not find cause for federal court intervention Continued from Page 19 growth of government — and the taxation, but rather provided guide- uneven application of the “constant lines for the legislative body, such yield” tax revenue methodology as requirements that tax increases during the boom years — has crebe pegged to the Consumer Price ated an excessive burden postIndex. Only those elements of the 2009, as the city has only dropped referendum that mandated a tax its taxes about 15 percent in the past rollback regardless of action from six years, whereas it hiked them the county councils were deemed il- about 80 percent during the six years before that. legal. But while Christ may very well In his federal filings, Christ argued that OCTSJ’s petition meets have a valid criticism of the city’s this test, and that the city’s request tax policy, the fact that his chosen for review can thus be relieved fed- method of addressing the issue may erally, since, in OCTSJ’s view, the not turn out to be legal does not, in petition has been unjustly detained. itself, make a case for federal inter“The petition did not attempt to vention. If the petition is stricken control assessments, nor did it at- based on Smallwood, there is still no case for a tempt to fix the Constitutional viamount of revenue olation, Bennett to a prior period such as earlier peti- ‘Plaintiffs’ anticipation of not wrote. “By their own tions in Baltimore, obtaining their desired redress Talbot and Anne in state court however, does admission, plainArundel with which not transform their claim into tiffs did petition the state court found their Governa federal cause of action.’ ment,” Bennett fault,” Christ wrote Judge Richard Bennett noted. “Plaintiffs in his federal filing. circulated their “In 2009, the last petition and subtime the tax rate was 38 cents, the Town of Ocean City re- mitted it to the Ocean City Council ceived record revenues. Since the after obtaining the requisite number petition does not fix revenues to a of signatures. They have not alleged that a government actor sought to prior period, it is not a rollback.” To this point, Christ argues that limit their petition signing campaign the city’s over-taxation problem was or prevented them from submitting created prior to 2009. In 2004, the petition. Nor have plaintiffs pled Christ notes, the city collected only a denial of access to the courts. “Plaintiffs believe Smallwood about $26 million in tax revenue. In the ensuing years, as total property would result in an unfavorable values rose rapidly, the city did not judgment in state court. Plaintiffs’ reduce the tax rate to fully compen- anticipation of not obtaining their sate, driving up the municipal desired redress in state court howbudget. In 2009, the total tax bur- ever, does not transform their claim into a federal cause of action based den stood at nearly $48 million. Thus, Christ argues, the rapid on denial of access to the courts.”

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Ocean City Today

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Expected rate hikes prompt real estate buyers to settle Resort’s second-home and investment purchases speed up ahead of mortgage bump

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Widespread belief by economists in national media that borrowing costs — including mortgage rates — will be rising soon may be behind a recent rush to get real estate deals finalized in the resort area. “We have seen a lot of buyers who are trying to come to town sooner rather than later to get their contract locked in,” said Kari Story of First Home Mortgage. “I don’t think it has necessarily motivated buyers who weren’t already committed. But we have seen secondhome buyers moving their trips to Ocean City up in order to get the rate.” Suspicions have been rife for well over a year that the Federal Reserve will begin scaling back its buyout of bad assets that has continued since the 2008-2009 recession. And if the central bank looks to demand more from its investments, the rest of the lending market will too. Over the past several weeks, according to national reports, rates on the traditional 30-year fixed mortgage have increased one-quarter percent in anticipation — although averages are still almost exactly where they were this time last year, at just over four percent. More importantly for real estate agents, however, is the number of mortgage applications submitted this fall was up over 20 percent from the same period last year. “I don’t know that this is bringing in people who weren’t already thinking about buying, but it will push through the people who were on the fence,” said Pat Terrill of Hileman Realty. “It will raise the cost of homeownership. But sometimes these things have a good side.” Rising rates don’t necessarily mean that home sales will stall — they may continue to rise. “Historically, we have sold the most real estate when rates were between 8.25 and 8.5 percent,” said Joy Snyder with the Mark Fritschle Group. “The first property I sold in this town with a mortgage was at 24 percent, at that was a good rate at the time.” Local market prices have been up three percent per year for the past several years, Snyder noted, but sales volume continues to be stronger than ever and the excess inventory from 2008 continues to drop. Data from the Coastal Association of Realtors shows this briskness stops at around the $400,000 mark. “The controlling factor here is

what we call the affordability index, and it has consistently capped at around $350,000,” Snyder said. “That’s where the average consumer appears to be the most comfortable financially. Then we have this huge gap between $350,000 and $650,000, and then beyond

‘Historically, we have sold the most real estate when rates were between 8.25 and 8.5 percent.’ Joy Snyder that we have a select pool of buyers for whom price is not really an issue.” Story estimated that most of her mortgages average between $225,000 and $275,000. The majority are second home or investment buyers — a group that is often less sensitive to mortgage rates because they have a considerable amount of cash that can earn them more money in other investments, rather than being tied down to avoid borrowing costs. “With second-home buyers, you See MARKET Page 22

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Market still strong Continued from Page 21 will see them put 20 percent down to avoid needing mortgage insurance, but not necessarily more,” Story said. “They typically have a lot of money saved up, but that doesn’t mean they want to part with it.” Snyder also noted that she has seen more interest recently in adjustable-rate mortgages (ARM), given the market uncertainty and the fact that many investment property buyers in Ocean City are preparing for retirement. Adjustable-rate arrangements typically guarantee a base rate of interest for a period of time, usually five or seven years, after which

the rate is indexed to any number of market performance numbers. This allows banks to avoid longterm asset-liability mismatches by over-investment in fixed-rate mortgages, and thus lending institutions may present a better deal to adjustable-rate buyers. “We’re seeing a lot of shorterterm mortgages at an adjustable rate,” Snyder said. “A lot of consumers are planning ahead for retirement. If they’re going to retire in 10 years, they take a seven-year ARM ... where they might initiate at four percent and after seven years it could drop down to two percent, depending on the index, or go up to six.”

DECEMBER 4, 2015

Shore groups win awards at Md. tourism & travel summit Downtown development, craft beer, county visitors’ guide efforts take honors

(Dec. 4, 2015) Worcester County Tourism (WCT), along with area partners working together to promote Maryland’s Eastern Shore as a tourism destination, took home five awards during the 35th annual Maryland Tourism & Travel Summit in late October. The Best Media & Public Relations Campaign Award went to Tourism, Art and Downtown Development (TADD) for Eat, Drink, Buy Art on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. An alliance of Eastern Shore businesses, Main Street groups, arts or-

ganizations, tourism and economic development offices formed TADD to create an “art drive” campaign that promotes the ease and accessibility of visiting eateries, artists and galleries in the historic towns of Berlin, Cambridge, Chestertown, Easton, Elkton, Denton, Ocean City, Princess Anne, Salisbury and Snow Hill. Learn more about the campaign at www.eatdrinkbuyart.com. The Best Destination Guide Award went to WCT for producing the Beach & Beyond Visitor’s Guide. This highquality guide includes sections about eateries, lodging and activities that set each town apart, arts and entertainment, museums, destination weddings, parks and camping, golf, See SPORTS Page 23

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 23

Sports partnership with counties, OC wins Continued from Page 22 miles of white sand beaches in Ocean City, the ponies of Assateague Island, area breweries and touts national awards bestowed on the towns and beaches. “The most innovative feature is that we don’t call it a Worcester County Visitor’s Guide,� Tourism Director Lisa Challenger said. “Since most people don’t travel knowing what county they are traveling to, we branded it as Maryland’s Beach and Beyond.� The guide is available in print and is downloadable at www.visitworcester.org.� The Cooperative Partnership Award was presented to Eastern Shore Destination Marketing Organizations (DMO) that created the Eastern Shore Visitor’s Guide and website www.visitmarylandseasternshore.co

m. The guide promotes Maryland’s Eastern Shore as a travel destination. DMO partners include Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne’s, Talbot, Caroline, Dorchester, Wicomico, Somerset and Worcester counties, and Ocean City.

rounding region as a craft beer destination and serve to enhance tourism, particularly in the shoulder and offseasons. The Maryland Office of Tourism Partnership Award went to the Town

‘Since most people don’t travel knowing what county they are traveling to, we branded it as Maryland’s Beach and Beyond.’ Lisa Challenger

The Visionary Impact Award went to Ann Hillyer, OceanCity.com, Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association, and WCT www.ShoreCraftBeer.com. This collaborative effort promotes the shore’s expanding craft beer industry. The effort launched successful marketing, overnight hotel packages and events that promote the county and the sur-

of Ocean City and Wicomico and Worcester counties for their sports marketing partnership, the Mid-Atlantic Amateur Sports Alliance (MAASA). “These are exciting times,� Worcester County Recreation and Parks Director Paige Hurley said. “This sports alliance partnership will allow us to bring in larger events to

this area. We are looking forward to offering these ‘Play-cations,’ where teams and families can come and play here, and then extend their time into a vacation.� “MAASA delivers world-class sporting events designed to spur Maryland’s economy,� said Kristen Goller, director of Marketing and Public Relations for Wicomico County Recreation, Parks and Tourism. “The formal sports-marketing partnership is the first of its kind in the nation. Since its inception, the region has successfully hosted two national girls’ softball tournaments and the ISSA Eastern Shore senior softball championship. These three MAASA events combined for a total of more than 25,000 hotel room nights booked and $40 million in estimated economic impact.�

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PAGE 24

Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

WORLD WAR II: TRIAL OF GENERAL TOMOYUKI YAMASHITA

Dubious trial of ‘Tiger of Malaysia,’ this week By Peter Ayers Wimbrow III Contributing Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) This week, 70 years ago, the trial of Japanese Gen. Tomoyuki Yamashita was in its fourth week in the High Commissioner’s Residence in Manila. Gen. Yamashita may have been the best general in the Imperial Japanese Army during WWII. It was he who led a small (less than 40,000) force through the jungles of Malaya to capture the British fortress of Singapore (“The Gibraltar of the East”) with its 120,000-man garrison, thereby earning him the sobriquet, “The Tiger of Malaysia.” It was the largest surrender in British history. However, he crossed the régime of Prime Minister Gen. Hideki Tōjō, and was banished to

Manchuria. By 1944, Tōjō was out and it was obvious that the empire was losing the war. The “Tiger” was recalled and sent to the Philippines and given command of the 14th Area Army and ordered to repel the approaching American assault. He arrived at his new command on Oct. 10, 1944, a mere 10 days before Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s dramatically staged “return” to the Philippine island of Leyte. In those 10 days Gen. Yamashita had to acquaint himself with his staff, the condition and location of his troops, the civilian situation and the geography, while planning a defense within the strictures of the Southern Expeditionary Army Group, of which it was a part. The Southern Expeditionary Army Group was commanded

by Field Marshal Count Hisaichi Terauchi, who maintained his headquarters in Manila. As the soldiers of Gen. Walter Kreuger’s Sixth Army came ashore on Leyte Island, the guerrilla war that had been waged by the Filipinos against the Japanese intensified, with a corresponding increase in the ferocity of the Japanese response. With the occupation of Leyte Island almost complete, landings were begun on Mindoro on December 15, 1944, followed by landings on Luzon, on January 9, 1945. With that, Gen. Yamashita ordered the troops on Luzon to withdraw to the Sierra Madre mountains in the north of the island, and relocated his headquarters to Baguio, which today has a population of 320,000, and declared

Manila an “open city.” However, he didn’t count on Rear Adm. Sanji Iwabuchi. In the meantime, Field Marshal Terauchi left Manila for Saigon. Adm. Iwabuchi had been captain of the battleship Kirishima, when it was sunk on the evening of November 14/15, 1942, by the battleship USS Washington, during the Second Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. Although promoted, Iwabuchi had never recovered from the humiliation of losing his ship, and surviving! Faced with the opportunity to restore a bit of his pride, he took it, disobeying Gen. Yamashita’s direct order, and prepared to defend the Philippine capital with 15,000 undisciplined marines and 4,000 army stragglers. During the battle for Manila, 100,000 civilians were killed. The number attributable to Japanese reprisal killings, as opposed to American bombings and shellfire, is unknown. The admiral got his wish and committed suicide at his post, as the Americans closed in. When Gen. Yamashita learned of his country’s surrender, he surrendered, and on Sept. 3, 1945 replicated the surrender to Gen. Jonathan M. Wainwright IV in the presence of British Gen. Sir Arthur Percival, who had surrendered Singapore to Gen. Yamashita. Three weeks later Gen. Yamashita was served with an indictment, charging him with numerous war crimes committed by Japanese soldiers and sailors. On Oct. 8, the general was arraigned and pled “not guilty.” Three weeks later the prosecution served the defense with a bill of particulars, “...specifying 64 items setting forth a vast number of atrocities and crimes allegedly committed by troops under his command.” [Application of Yamashita, 327 U.S. 1, 57 (1946)]. Trial began on Oct. 29, at which time the prosecution, led by Major Robert M. Kerr, filed a supplemental bill of particulars, “...containing 59 more specifications of the same general character....” [Application of Yamashita, 327 U.S. 1, 58 (1946)]. The general’s request for a postponement in order to adequately prepare a defense against the 59 new charges was denied. Unbeknownst to the defense, Gen. MacArthur had conveyed his opinion to the commission that he, “... doubted [the] need of [the] defense for more time.” In addition to Maj. Kerr, the prosecution team included Capts. M. D. Webster, William M. Calyer, D.C. Hill and Jack M. Pace. None of the charges alleged that Gen. Yamashita committed the acts or that he even ordered them. Rather, he was charged because soldiers under his command – no matter how tenuous or theoretical his authority – committed the acts. In some cases, the acts alleged occurred on another Continued on Page 26


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

PAGE 25


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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

WORLD WAR II: TRIAL OF GENERAL TOMOYUKI YAMASHITA

Japanese commander Tomoyuki Yamashita surrenders to U.S. troops in the Philippines at the end of World War II.

The Yamashita standard is based upon the precedent set by the United States Supreme Court in the case of Japanese General Tomoyuki Yamashita.

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Continued from Page 24 island, during the American invasion. In other instances, the acts were committed by naval personnel outside of his command. In fact, Adm. Soemu Toyoda was acquitted of these same crimes in 1949, even though he conceded that Adm. Iwabuchi and his men were a part of his command. Adm. Toyoda testified at his trial that he had ordered that Manila, “... be defended to the very end.” Unfortunately, because of the limited time within which Gen. Yamashita’s team had to prepare his defense, they were unable to discover that order. After six weeks of trial, the general was, of course, convicted, by the five American generals, Brig. Gens. William G. Walker and Egbert F. Bullene, and Maj. Gens. Clarence L. Sturdevant, Russell B. Reynolds and James A. Lester – who were all appointed by Gen. MacArthur to do just that – of having, “...failed to provide effective control over his troops.” None of the five generals were lawyers or had combat experience. The conviction came in spite of the herculean efforts by his appointed defense team, led by Col. Harry E. Clarke Sr. and including Lt. Cols. Walter C. Hendrix and J. Gordon Feldhaus, Maj. George F. Guy and Capts. A. Frank Reel and Milton Sandhurst. Except for Col. Clarke, a lawyer from Altoona, Pa., none of the other members of the defense team had any trial experience, while the prosecutors were all prosecutors in civilian life. Although 286 witnesses had testified, not one had connected the accused with any war crimes. As expected, the sentence was death, by hanging. An appeal had already been taken to the Supreme Court of the Philippines and argued on November 23, 1945. When that court refused, on Nov. 27, 1945 to entertain the appeal, a petition for Writ of Certiorari was filed in the Supreme Court of the United States and was granted on Dec. 20, 1945. Gen. Continued on Page 28


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 28

DECEMBER 4, 2015

WORLD WAR II: TRIAL OF GENERAL TOMOYUKI YAMASHITA Continued from Page 26 MacArthur refused to stay the execution, so a stay was requested from the high court, which was granted. Oral arguments were presented to the court on Jan. 7 and 8, 1946. The court released its opinion on Feb. 4, 1946. Mr. Chief Justice Stone wrote the majority opinion. Mr. Justice Jackson, being on leave to head the U.S. prosecution team at Nuremberg, did not participate. The six-man majority affirmed the conviction and sentence, recognizing, for the first time, the criminality of a commander’s failure to control his troops. Of course, many of the crimes were committed by naval personnel who were not even under the general’s command, and whose commander, Adm. Iwabuchi, had disobeyed the order of his superior, Admiral Toyoda, to not defend Manila. Dissenting Opinions were written

by Justices Frank Murphy and Wiley Rutledge decrying: (1) the unfairness of the proceedings; and (2) the fact that the crime of which the general had been convicted had never, in history, been recognized as a crime. As Mr. Justice Murphy said, in his dissent, “Nothing in all history or in international law, at least as far as I am aware, justifies such a charge against a fallen commander of a defeated force. To use the very inefficiency and disorganization created by the victorious forces as the primary basis for condemning officers of the defeated armies bears no resemblance to justice or to military reality.” But the “Yamashita Doctrine” has now been engrafted into the American version of the Law of War – except in situations involving American forces. An appeal was made to Gen.

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The gallows.

MacArthur to commute the death sentence, with predictable results. He is reputed to have said, when he ordered Gen. Yamashita tried before his tribunal, “We’re going to give this man a fair trial, and then we’re going to hang him.” In the early morning of Feb. 23, 1946, the general was led into the courtyard of the former Japanese POW camp at Los Baños, by a fiveman detail, accompanied by a Buddhist priest. By the order of Gen. MacArthur, he was not allowed to wear any medals or decorations. He and the priest climbed the 13 steps to the gallows. There, he was met by the hangman, Lt. Charles

Raroad. After the lieutenant had prepared the condemned, adjusted the noose, and allowed him his last words, the trap was sprung. “The Tiger of Malaysia” was pronounced dead at 3:02 A.M. on Feb. 23, 1946. NEXT WEEK: THE TRIAL OF GENERAL HOMMA

Mr. Wimbrow writes from Ocean City, Maryland, where he practices law representing those persons accused of criminal and traffic offenses, and those persons who have suffered a personal injury through no fault of their own. Mr. Wimbrow can be contacted at wimbrowlaw@gmail.com.


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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PAGE 32

OBITUARIES ROBERT GUY KURTZ Snow Hill Retired Episcopal Clergyman Robert Guy Kurtz, age 95, died on Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in Fort Collins, Colo., he was the son of the late Brig. General Guy Orth Kurtz and Agnes Cox Kurtz. Robert Kurtz He was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 53 years, Martha Barnum “Tish” Kurtz. He is survived by children, Pamela Gordy and her husband, William, of Snow Hill, and Martha Gilbert and her husband, Geoffrey, of Geneva, N.Y.

Ocean City Today There are five grandchildren, Christina Miller and her husband, Kevin, Jennifer Donoway and her husband, Keith, Bobby Gordy, Emily Gilbert and Anna Gilbert-Cic and her husband, David, and eight greatgrandchildren. Also surviving is a sister, Harriette Grigsby of Longmont, Colo. Rev. Kurtz was raised an “army brat,” living in many states, the territory of Hawaii and Washington, D.C. After graduation from West Point in January 1943, he served as a fighter pilot with the 355th Fighter Group of the Eighth Air Force stationed in England during World War II. His P 51 Mustang was shot down on his 63rd combat mission over the Black Forest in Germany in September 1944. He spent nine months as a POW, retiring as a major at the end of the war. His decorations included the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air

Medal, Presidential Unit Citation and Purple Heart. Following a lengthy career in private industry, including positions at the Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Denver Research Institute and Sperry Rand Corp., Rev. Kurtz attended Virginia Theological Seminary and the Episcopal Theological Seminary in Kentucky and was ordained in 1967. He served as rector of three historic Episcopal churches on the Eastern Shore: All Hallows Church in Snow Hill, Emmanuel Church in Chestertown and St. Andrew’s Church in Princess Anne, and also as chaplain to his West Point class and to the 355th Fighter Group. He retired in 1992. A funeral service was held on Monday, Nov. 30, 2015 at All Hallows Episcopal Church in Snow Hill. Bishop Henry Parsley officiated. A donation in his memory may be made to: All Hallows Episcopal

DECEMBER 4, 2015 Church, 109 W. Market St. Snow Hill, Md. 21863, or Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21804. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. DOROTHY CURRAN VILLANI Ocean City Dorothy Curran Villani, age 89, died Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. Born in Washington, D.C., she was the daughter of the late Bartholomew Curran, Sr. and Anna Virginia Mueller Curran.  She was preceded in death Dorothy Villiani by her husband of 55 years, Anthony J. Villani, Sr.  She is survived by her daughter, Constance Villani LeCompte, and her husband, Michael LeCompte, of South Point and her loving grand dogs; a son Anthony J. Villani, Jr. and his wife, Suzanne Woodfin Villani and grandchildren, Anthony J. Villani III, Wright W.  Villani and Virginia C. Villani all of Richmond, Va.  Also surviving is a brother, Joseph Curran, of Berlin and numerous nieces and nephews. Her brother Bartholomew Curran preceded her in death. Mrs. Villani was a graduate of Holy Cross School and St. Patrick’s Academy in Washington, D.C. She had  worked as a secretary for the C&P Telephone Company in Washington, D.C. and sang in its Glee Club. She also  had worked in the U.S. House of Representatives.  She joined the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Co. Ladies Auxiliary in 1950, and was a member of the American Legion Post #166 Ladies Auxiliary, The Ocean City Women’s Club and charter member of the Ocean City Lioness Club.  Trained in piano and voice, she sang for over 60 years lending her voice to entertain at Walter Reed Hospital and the U.S.O. during WW II in Washington, D.C., as well as the Berlin  Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, receiving an award for over 20 years of service. She also sang at St. Mary’s Star-of-the Sea and St. Paul’s by-the Sea choirs.  She was an inspiration to her family and friends saying often that “an education was key to a successful life and any time you get an opportunity to learn and travel then take it.”  She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Ocean City. A funeral service was held on Monday, Nov. 30, 2015 at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.  Continued on Page 34


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 34

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 32 Donations may be made in her memory to: Ocean City Volunteer Fire Co., P.O. Box 27, Ocean City, Md. 21843 or to the Delmarva Discovery Center, 2 Market St., Pocomoke City, Md. 21851. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.BurbageFuneralHome.com. BERTHA ANN GINNAVAN Ocean City Bertha Ann Ginnavan, age 90, passed on Wednesday, Nov. 25, 2015 at the University of Maryland Hospital in Baltimore. Born in Brooklyn, Md. on Dec. 30, 1924, she was the daughter of the late Thomas McCall and Bertha Mae Pitts McCall. Bertha Ginnavan She was preceded in death by her husband, Calvin Gordon Ginnavan, Sr., in 2010. She is survived by her son, Calvin Gordon Ginnavan, Jr., and his wife, Carol, and a daughter, Gail Fowler, and her husband, Tommy, all of Ocean City. There are three grandchildren, Erin Sieber and her husband, TD, Bryan Ginnavan and his wife, Amy,

and Kevin Ginnavan and his fiancée, Allison Thomas. There are three great grandchildren, Logan Ginnavan, Chase Ginnavan and Flynn Sieber. Formerly of Randallstown, Md., Mrs. Ginnavan had been an assistant librarian. She had worked for many years in the hospitality industry. She was the owner and operator of the Cabana Motel, Stonehaven Apartments, Colonel Arms Apartments and Ocean Wave apartments. She was devoted to her family and her church. She was a bright smiling face in Ocean City since 1964 and truly enjoyed eating at her favorite local restaurants. She was a true matriarch who lived and breathed for her family. She was honest, sincere and very hard working; a role model to so many that knew her. Her generosity has impacted many lives. To say she will be missed is an understatement. A funeral service was held on Tuesday, Dec. 1, 2015 at the Burbage Funeral Home, Berlin. A private graveside service for family was held on Wednesday, Dec. 2, at Lake view Cemetery in Eldersburg, Md. Donations may be made to: Coastal Hospice, P. O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21804; Worcester County Humane Society, P. O. Box 48, Berlin, Md. 21811 or Worcester GOLD, P.O. Box 39 Snow Hill, Md. 21863.

DECEMBER 4, 2015

Letters of condolence may be made to: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. GLENN HERBERT NAGY Berlin Glenn Herbert Nagy, “Pop-Pop,” age 59, died Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of the late John Nagy. He is survived by his mother, Thelma Nagy of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; former Glenn Nagy wife, Tammie Nagy. mother of his children; and children, Brandon Nagy and his wife, Alyssa, of Redwood, Ca. and Lauren Nagy of West Ocean City; and two step-children, Brant Cassell and his wife, Tabbetha of Naperville, Il, and Justin Cassell and his wife, Tiffany, of Ocean Pines. There are six grandchildren, Natalie Butner, Alexis Cassell, Kaitlyn

Cassell, Logan Cassell, Zachary Cassell and Garrett Cassell. Also surviving is a brother, David Nagy, and his wife, Jerry, of Myrtle Beach, S.C. and a host of friends. He also leaves behind his beloved companion and best friend of 24 years, Nancy Cassell. Mr. Nagy had owned and operated Glenn’s Technical Service, which specialized in HVAC-refrigeration and gas piping. He had been an official with Bayside Football for 25 years, and was a member of the Berlin Lions Club. Glenn was a diehard Redskins fan, and famous for his favorite quote: “Never Give Up!” Cremation followed his death. A celebration of life will be held on Sunday, Dec. 13, 2015 at Whisker’s Bar and Grill in Ocean Pines from 14 p.m. Donations may be made to Nancy Cassell c/o Glenn H. Nagy Memorial Fund, PNC Bank, 11045 Racetrack Rd., Berlin, Md. 21811. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

OBITUARY NOTICES Obituary Notices are published free each week in the Ocean City Today and Bayside Gazette. E-mail: editor@oceancitytoday.net Mail: Ocean City Today, P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Fax: 410-723-6511 Obituary Notices are published as space allows. Every effort is made to publish all that are received.

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 35

OC Marshal’s tips to help prevent holiday fires Live trees not permitted in hotels, bars, restaurants; keep decor away from heat (Dec. 4, 2015) While the holiday season represents a time for festivities and good cheer, few consider it is a time when there is also an increased risk of fire. “As everyone gets busier during the holidays, we often become rushed, distracted or tired,” Ocean City Fire Marshal David Hartley said. “That’s when fires are more likely to occur.” With added awareness and some minor adjustments to holiday decorating, the season can remain festive safe, he said. “By taking some preventive steps and following simple rules of thumb, most fires can be prevented.” The Ocean City Fire Department offers the following advice for holiday decorating: Live trees are not permitted within hotels or assembly occupancies (bars/restaurants/nightclubs). Be sure that artificial trees, including garland, is labeled, certified or identified by the manufacturer as fire-retardant. Place trees at least three feet away from any heat source, like fireplaces, space heaters, radiators, heat vents or lights. Use lights that are labeled with a recognized UL testing laboratory. Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords, or loose bulb connections. Read manufacturer’s instructions for number of light strands to connect. Never use lit candles to decorate. Always turn off Christmas tree lights before leaving the property. Bring outdoor electrical lights inside after the holidays to prevent hazards and make them last longer. Make sure Christmas trees are not blocking exits. All exits must be marked by illuminated exit signs. All marked exits, including access to and from the exit, must be completely free and clear of any and all

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that all of fire protection systems including fire alarms, sprinklers, kitchen extinguishing systems, fire extinguishers and generators are up to date. Emergency lighting should be checked monthly and after any period of extended power loss. “The Ocean City Fire Departments looks forward to a safe and successful holiday season for all business and

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Sports & Recreation

Dec. 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

Page 37

www.oceancitytoday.net

STEPHEN DECATUR WINTER SPORTS PREVIEW

Coates new head coach of SD girls’ basketball squad

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Dec. 4, 2015) The Stephen Decatur girls’ basketball team had a successful 2014-15 season, finishing 24-2 and capturing its first Bayside Conference championship title since 1977. The Lady Seahawks’ season came to an end with a 67-43 loss to Westlake in the 3A South Regional chamKate Coates pionship game. They were on a 23-game win streak before that loss. The girls hope to pick up where they left off, now under the direction of a new head coach. Kate Coates has taken over for Amy Fenzel-Mergott (2014-15 Bayside South Coach of the Year), who led the Seahawks for five seasons. “I’m definitely excited,” she said. “I think it will be fun because the girls are excited too.” Coates is not new to the program. She played for Decatur from 20032007, then for McDaniel College for four years following high school. After graduating from college in December 2011, she came back to Berlin to work with the Decatur girls’ varsity basketball team and was an assistant coach the last two seasons. “Working under Amy, I know I have big shoes to fill,” Coates said. “Amy was a great mentor. I learned a lot from her.” Since Coates has been a part of the team for the past three seasons, she said the transition from assistant to head coach was easy for both her and the players. Some of the drills the team ran last year have been incorporated into practices this season and a few of the plays are also the same. Coates has added some new drills and plays as well. “I think we’re going to have a great year,” she said. “We want to be able to dictate the pace of the game. The fundamentals of the game and our mental toughness will be important for us to win games.” The Seahawks are also ready for the season to begin and have enjoyed working with their new coach. “It’s going really well. It definitely helps [that Coates has been with the program] and the transition has been pretty smooth,” said junior Lexie VanKirk, a three-year team member. VanKirk is one of four varsity veterans that make up Coates’ nine-player squad. She is joined by fellow returning players, senior guard Dayona Godwin

STEPHEN DECATUR HIGH SCHOOL WINTER SPORTS SCHEDULES

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur junior captain Lexie VanKirk makes a layup during Monday's practice at the Berlin school. "We definitely want to win a Bayside championship again this year,” VanKirk said.

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

“Everyone’s coming to practice every day and working hard and giving it all they have,” said senior captain Dayona Godwin, pictured guarding freshman teammate Grace Beres during practice.

(2014-15 Bayside South First Team) and sophomores Amya Mumford, a forward, and guard Chloe Sass. With four veterans and five newcomers, Godwin has the most varsity experience, competing for the team since her freshman year. “There’s a little pressure, but Lexie has done a good job helping me out and I appreciate that,” she said. Godwin and VanKirk have been

named team captains. “We lost a lot of seniors, so we definitely need some leadership this year,” VanKirk said. “Dayona’s the only one who’s been on varsity four years and she’s been stepping up. I feel like I need to follow in her footsteps.” Godwin said she has been encouraging her teammates and helping them get ready for the season. See GODWIN Page 38

BOYS’ BASKETBALL Dec. 4: Arcadia 7 p.m. (A) Dec. 8: Wicomico, 5:30 p.m. (H) Dec. 10: Colonel Richardson, 5:30 pm. (A) Dec. 15: Crisfield, 5:30 p.m. (H) Dec. 17: Washington, 5:30 p.m. (H) Dec. 21: Pocomoke, 5:30 p.m. (A) Dec. 29-30: Governors Challenge Jan. 5:Snow Hill, 5:30 p.m. (A) Jan. 7:James M. Bennett, 5:30 p.m. (H) Jan. 12: Mardela, 4 p.m. (A) Jan. 14: Parkside, 5:30 p.m. (H) Jan. 19:Wicomico, 5:30 p.m. (A) Jan. 22: Cambridge, 6:30 p.m. (A) Jan. 26: Pocomoke, 5:30 p.m. (H) Jan. 28: Crisfield, 6:30 p.m. (A) Feb. 2:Washington, 6:30 p.m. (A) Feb. 4:Snow Hill, 5:30 p.m. (H) Feb. 9:James M. Bennett, 5:30 p.m. (A) Feb. 11:Mardela, 5:30 p.m. (H) Feb. 16: Kent County, 5:30 p.m. (H) Feb. 18: Parkside, 5:30 p.m. (A) Feb. 24: Bayside Championship TBA GIRLS’ BASKETBALL Dec. 4: Cambridge, 5:30 p.m. (H) Dec. 8: Wicomico, 5:30 p.m. (A) Dec. 10: Colonel Richardson, 5:30 p.m. (H) Dec. 15: Crisfield, 5:30 p.m. (A) Dec. 17: Washington, 4 p.m. (A) Dec. 21: Pocomoke, 5:30 p.m. (H) Dec. 26-28: Governors Challenge (A) Jan. 5: Snow Hill, 5:30 p.m. (H) Jan. 7:James M. Bennett, 5:30 p.m. (A) Jan. 12: Mardela, 5:30 p.m. (A) Jan. 14: Parkside, 5:30 p.m. (A) Jan. 19:Wicomico, 5:30 p.m. (H) Jan. 22: Indian River, 5:30 p.m. (H) Jan. 26: Pocomoke, 5:30 p.m. (A) Jan. 28: Crisfield, 4 p.m. (H) Feb. 2:Washington, 4 p.m. (H) Feb. 4:Snow Hill, 5:30 p.m. (A) Feb. 9:James M. Bennett, 5:30 p.m. (H) Feb. 11:Mardela, 4 p.m. (H) Feb. 16:Kent County, 5:30 p.m. (A) Feb. 18: Parkside, 5:30 p.m. (H) Feb. 24: Bayside Championship TBA Continued on Page 38


PAGE 38

Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

STEPHEN DECATUR WINTER SPORTS PREVIEW

Seahawks have good size, are athletic, Johnson says

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Dec. 4, 2015) At the end of the 201415 season, Stephen Decatur boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball Coach BJ Johnson said it was important for the Seahawks to play during the offseason in order to improve. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ball handling, passing and shooting are what the kids need to work on and deBJ Johnson velop,â&#x20AC;? he said in March after Decaturâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season ended with a 65-54 loss to Huntingtown in the first round of Section I of the 3A South Regional tournament. Four sophomores and a junior started that game. Decatur finished 2014-15 with an 815 record. Eight of the Seahawks on Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 12-player roster this year competed last season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Energy-wise, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing hard. We need to make sure we play smart basketball,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a core group back, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still pretty young. The future is bright.â&#x20AC;? Many of the Seahawks played together in a summer league and were

pretty successful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s any indication [how the season will go], Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take it,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re jelling pretty well because weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been playing together since summertime,â&#x20AC;? added senior forward DeQuan Andrews (2014-15 Bayside South Conference Honorable Mention), a three-year member of the team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re coming along pretty well. I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get better each game and start winning more and more.â&#x20AC;? Johnson, now in his third season as head coach, said as a whole, the team is athletic and has good size, from the guards to the forwards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Any time you have good size and a lot of athletic ability you can do some things,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We also have a deep roster, which we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had in a while.â&#x20AC;? Also returning to the court are juniors, guard Jaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Quan Johnson and 6-foot 8-inch forward/center Keve Aluma, a team captain. Both received Bayside South Honorable Mention accolades for their performance last season. Aluma said he will use his height to score and secure rebounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing hard. I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be really good,â&#x20AC;? said Aluma, a three-year team member. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We look way

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur junior captain Keve Aluma (44) and teammate Ryan Beach, a senior, fight off two Sussex Tech players for the rebound during Monday's scrimmage in Berlin.

better [from the beginning of preseason]. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve definitely improved a lot. I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait for the season.â&#x20AC;? Kevon Voyles, a sophomore, and his brother, Kevin, a junior forward, transferred to Decatur from Northampton, Va. Kevon has been named a team captain and will play point guard. Senior Demond Mills also joins the team and Johnson will count on him to contribute as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keve and Kevon have done a great

Godwin 99 points from SD record Continued from Page 37 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming to practice every day and working hard and giving it all they have,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because we lost so many people [to graduation] weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to work together and work harder.â&#x20AC;? Godwin has been a leader since her freshman year. In three seasons, she has scored a total of 1,395 points. She is only 99 points away from breaking Elise Mercerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (2001-2005) school record of 1,494 points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been thinking about it, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not my top goal. I just want to win and play for my team and show everyone that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re top contenders,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about the team. Your personal

goals come in later.â&#x20AC;? This is her last season as a Seahawk and Godwin said she wants to cherish it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want it to end,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to enjoy every moment of it and go into every game thinking itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my last and play my heart out.â&#x20AC;? With five new players, Coates said the young and athletic group is working on team chemistry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I see so many positives. Each day weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting better,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The upperclassmen have shown so much leadership and are encouraging the younger girls. Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pushing each other.â&#x20AC;? Joining the team are freshmen Sofia

Gordy and Grace Beres, senior Ajee Finney and juniors Madison Jones and Rachel Florek. Florek made the varsity team her freshman year, but did not compete last season. Although the team graduated five key contributors, the Seahawks hope to repeat as Bayside champions this year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our goal. We definitely want to win a Bayside championship again this year,â&#x20AC;? VanKirk said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We lost a lot of strong players and people might think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll fall down this year, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to happen. The younger girls have definitely been stepping up. We motivate each other at practice to get better.â&#x20AC;?

job so far,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keve will lead the team on the defensive end; heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be our defense enforcer and Kevon will run the offense.â&#x20AC;? Johnson said the goals this year are the same as they are every season: to win Bayside Conference and regional championships. The ultimately goal is to take home a state title. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We set our sights pretty high. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to take hard work and team chemistry [to be successful],â&#x20AC;? Andrews added.

STEPHEN DECATUR HIGH SCHOOL WINTER SPORTS SCHEDULES Continued from Page 37 INDOOR TRACK All meets at the Worcester County Recreation Center at 2 p.m. Dec. 4, 9 and 16 and Jan. 6, 13 and 27 Jan. 20: Bayside Championship, 2 p.m. SWIMMING Dec. 8: Saints Peter & Paul, 3:30 p.m. (H) Dec. 10: Pocomoke, 3:30 p.m. (H) Continued on Page 44

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 39

Lady Mallards earn 26-16 win over Vikings Worcester Prep basketball team outscores Broadwater Acad. 12-4 in final quarter

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Dec. 4, 2015) After trailing during the first half of Monday’s game, the Worcester Prep girls’ basketball team turned up the pressure in the fourth quarter and pulled out a 2616 victory over Broadwater Academy in Berlin. “It was pretty intense,” said Prep

Scot Dailey

Coach Scot Dailey. “We scored 12 points in fourth quarter, we got some steals and played good defensively.” Broadwater led 54 at the end of the first quarter and 9-8

at halftime. During the break, Dailey told the Lady Mallards they were playing hard and their defense was great, but the girls weren’t executing offensive plays.

Dailey said his players began to settle down and after three quarters Worcester led 14-12. The Mallards outscored the Vikings 12-4 in the fourth quarter. “They were nervous to start out. We haven’t played in a while and we looked out of sync. We haven’t had a full team since Nov. 18,” Dailey said. “By the fourth quarter, they settled in a little bit and looked more at ease on offense.” Junior Melissa Laws led Worcester with eight points and five rebounds. Karlie Southcomb, a junior,

chipped in with six points, four rebounds and four steals. Juniors Leigh and Regan Lingo added eight and seven steals, respectively. The girls’ and boys’ teams will compete in the Indian River Tip-Off tournament today and Saturday in Delaware. The boys’ squad is slated to play Laurel today at 6 p.m. and Indian River tomorrow at 4:30 p.m. The Lady Mallards are scheduled to take on Delmar today at 7:30 p.m. and Indian River Saturday at 6:30 p.m.


PAGE 40

Samuel Todd to play for Under-16 U.S. National Team

(Dec. 4, 2015) Stephen Decatur High School offensive lineman, Samuel Todd of Bishopville, has been named to the U.S. Under-16 National Team and will compete against Canada in the 2016 International Bowl at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Tex., home of the Dallas Cowboys, on Feb. 5. Todd, Decatur’s junior varsity team MVP this season, is one of 60 of the nation’s best high school freshmen and sophomore football players selected for this honor to represent Team USA in the annual international competition. Four high school-aged U.S. national teams will compete against national teams from Canada in the seventh annual International Bowl series. U.S. select teams at the high school and junior high level also will compete as part of the series. The U.S. Under-16 head coach is Tom Bainter, who has been a high school football coach in the Seattle area for 18 years, including the last 15 years at Bothell High School, where he led the 2014 Cougars to the school’s first state championship. His teams also have twice finished state runners-up. A health and physical education teacher, Bainter served as the head coach for the 2015 Under-15 U.S. national team and the running backs coach for the 2009 U.S. Under-19 National Team, which won a gold medal at the IFAF Under-19 World Championship in Canton, Ohio. U.S. rosters and coaching staffs will be announced throughout November and December and available on www.internationalbowl.com. Canadian rosters will be announced in early 2016. The games are a collaboration of the sport’s national governing bodies in each country – USA Football and Football Canada – featuring top student-athletes in high school football’s greatest annual international competition. The event will feature a week of practices and activities for each team, culminating in internationally sanctioned competitions. Single-day general admission tickets are $10. Single-game sideline passes, which include access to the field club, are $50. Games also will be broadcast throughout the United States. “This is an exciting opportunity for these young men to represent their country on the football field and learn from top coaches while working alongside the best athletes in their grade levels,” USA Football CEO Scott Hallenbeck said. “To play on the same field as the Dallas Cowboys will make this a memorable experience for our coaches, athletes and their families.” “I’m looking forward to this extraordinary opportunity to lead some of the finest young athletes in our nation and represent our country on the football field,” Bainter said. “It’s rare to get play for your country in a sport you love. To be able to do it in football, America’s most popular sport, is truly special.”

Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

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DECEMBER 4, 2015

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PAGE 41

STEPHEN DECATUR WINTER SPORTS PREVIEW

Malone joins SD swim program to coach girls’ team

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Dec. 4, 2015) Mary Malone has joined the Stephen Decatur swim program this season, coaching alongside Steve Deakyne. “I’ve always been interested in coaching. When the position became available I was excited to apply for it. I’m very happy I got the job,” said Steve Deakyne Malone, who swam competitively for 14 years, competing for the Ocean Pines swimming club and at the YMCA in Salisbury. “It’s been really nice to have chlorine back in my life again.” Mary Malone She teaches social studies, world history, psychology and government at Stephen Decatur High School. “We have a really great group of kids this year. They’re adjusting to my style really well and I’m adjusting to them,” she said. “My style of coaching might be a little different than what they’re used to. I want to focus more on technique.” Malone said she likes to get in the pool with the swimmers and show them proper techniques. “I’m impressed with their speed and by their abilities so far. I’m excited to see what the season’s going to bring,” she said. “My most important thing is that they have fun. I want them to have a good time here. My swim friends were my best friends and I want to build that family relationship here.” Although the squads train together, Malone is head coach of the Lady Seahawks, while Deakyne leads the boys’ team. Last year was his first with the Decatur swim program, when he was head coach of the girls’ team. Deakyne takes over the boys’ squad this season from Damien Sanzotti, who was at the helm for three years. Both teams were successful last season. The Lady Seahawks finished with a 10-2 record, while the boys went 9-3. They each placed second in the 3A/2A/1A East Regional competition. The girls were just seven points out of first place. The Lady Seahawks took fifth at states; the boys finished 13th. Nineteen girls and 20 boys are participating this season. Ten of the girls and 14 boys competed last year. Some of the veterans Deakyne will rely on to lead the boys’ team include senior Andrew Gottfried (100-yard butterfly, 500 freestyle and 200 IM), See MALONE Page 42


Ocean City Today

PAGE 42

DECEMBER 4, 2015

STEPHEN DECATUR WINTER SPORTS PREVIEW

Malone: We have a really great group of kids this year

k c i w n e SD indoor track F

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur senior Marley Rakow works on her stroke during Tuesday’s practice in Ocean Pines. “A lot of the girls have experience. I think we’re going to have a great year,” Rakow said.

n i 4 5 . Rt

Continued from Page 41 junior Dustin Berkey (100 freestyle, 100 backstroke) and sophomore Kevin Williams (100 breaststroke, 200 IM). “I’ve just got to show leadership, help them out and give them tips, and also take criticism. I feel like my experience helps,” said Gottfried, a twoyear Decatur swimmer. “We’re coming along. We’re all bonding. We definitely have a lot of learning to do, but I feel like we’ll be strong.” Gottfried earned a spot on the podium last season for finishing fourth in the 100-yard butterfly and eighth in the 200 IM during the state championship. Gottfried and senior Reed Watson have been named captains. “The boys’ team seems pretty balanced between the different strokes, distance and sprints,” Deakyne said. Leading the girls’ squad will be

seniors Hailey Williams (500 and 200 freestyle, 200 IM), Marley Rakow (100 freestyle, 100 backstroke) and Zainab Mirza (500 and 200 freestyle). “A lot of the girls have experience. I think we’re going to have a great year,” said Rakow, a member of the team since her freshman year. “We have a lot of new freshmen and they have swimming experience. Us older kids try to help as much as we can. There’s a lot of encouragement ” Rakow and Williams are the girls’ team’s captains. “The girls’ team has a lot of talented swimmers,” Deakyne said. Deakyne said the newcomers who have experience will contribute right away, while the others work to perfect their form. “We have so many new people. We have a big freshman class and some strong new swimmers,” he said.

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By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Dec. 4, 2015) About 80 athletes will be representing Stephen Decatur during the 2015-16 indoor track season. About two-thirds of the Seahawks have experience, participating in indoor track, outdoor track and/or cross country. A number of new athletes have joined the proJody Stigler gram as well, and fourth-year Coach Jody Stigler will count on some of them as well as several veterans to score points for Decatur. “Like the last few years, we’ll score a majority of our points in the field and in distance and mid-distance events,” he said. “The boys are a little more well-rounded, but it’s still early. We’ll get a better idea after the first meet.” The teams are strong in mid-distance (500-800 meters) and distance (1-2 mile) races. Stigler also thinks the boys and girls will do well in the pole vault. Both teams have solid high jumpers, but the girls have a bit more experience. The boys’ team should also score some points in the shot put event, he said. “It’s been pretty good so far. We’ll see Friday [first meet] how we’re coming along,” Stigler said. “We have to figure out the best events, where everyone fits. It’s a work in progress.” Stigler will rely on veterans, seniors Alison Alvarado (800, 1-2 mile), Katie Hofman (pole vault), Rachel Savage (800) and Emily Cook (55-meter hur-

FILE PHOTO/OCEAN CITY TODAY

“I think we’re doing pretty well. The group that we have is really solid,” said senior Emily Cook. She earned a Bayside Conference title in the 55-meter hurdles during indoor track last season.

dles) and juniors Bethany Williams (jumps) and Jillian Mitrecic (pole vault) to lead the girls’ squad. “I think we’re doing pretty well. The group that we have is really solid. Everyone that’s here wants to be here,” said Cook, a member of the team for four years. “I just love helping out everyone. With the hurdles I’ll train the newcomers, I’ll help out with relays and how to hand off, just be a general leader and motivate the team.” Savage is the 800-meter Bayside Conference champion and Cook holds

the title in the 55-meter hurdles. Mitrecic also won a conference title last season, taking top honors in the pole vault. Williams and junior Christina Romano competed in the high jump at the state championship. Romano tied for seventh and Williams tied for 11th. Mitrecic participated in the pole vault event at states, but did not place. Stigler said the boys return a good, core group, which includes veterans Cameron James and Javier Hernandez, both juniors, and sophomore Jack See INDOOR Page 43


Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 43

STEPHEN DECATUR WINTER SPORTS PREVIEW

Decatur wrestlers ‘very good technicians,’ Martinek says

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Dec. 4, 2015) A number of underclassmen scored spots in the Stephen Decatur wrestling team’s starting lineup last season and were successful. They have returned this year more experienced and ready to compete. About a dozen of the Seahawks on Coach Todd Martinek’s 22wrestler roster are veterTodd Martinek ans. He said the varsity returners are “bigger, stronger and really good kids. [They’re] very mature [and get] good grades.” Seahawks back to compete include sophomore Jeremy Danner (120/126 weight classes), juniors Robert Kaminski (106), Josh Lawson (113), Andy McKahan (138), Adam McInerney, (145), Gavin Payne (195), Jian Joobeen (220) and Ean Spencer (heavyweight) and seniors Brett Kim (152/160), Tyler VanSice (160/170) and Dryden Brous (195/220). “I’m just trying to help motivate everyone and keep everyone doing what they’re supposed to be doing and push forward,” said Kaminski, a three-year team member. “We’re doing pretty well. We still need some work and [have] some gaps to fill.”

McKahan is a two-time Bayside Conference and regional champion. He finished fourth in the 126-pound division at the 4A/3A state competition last season. A member of the team for three seasons, McKahan, who is chasing a state title this year, said he will help lead the Seahawks through his experience. “I know how I was when I was a freshman and sophomore. If you have a good environment it’s easier to learn,” he said. “[There’s a] few holes here and there, but we look pretty good.” Kim also qualified for the state tournament last year, where he won one match and lost two. “I’m looking to help others improve how I improved over the years and help the new kids get through their first matches and the experienced kids get focused on wrestling,” said Kim, a fouryear grappler. He is hoping to return to the state tournament and secure a spot on the podium this season. Martinek will also look to some newcomers to contribute, including freshman Lukas Layton (160/170) and sophomores David Garcia (heavyweight) and Zachary Pilarski (132/138). Since preseason began in mid-November, Martinek, now in his fifth season leading the team, said the wrestlers See TEAM Page 44

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur junior Andy McKahan, left, and senior Tyler VanSice work on their moves during Monday’s practice at the Berlin school.

Indoor track season opens Fri. Continued from Page 42 Reimer. The trio wrapped up their cross country season a few weeks ago. They will run in the mid-distance and distance races for indoor track. Junior Avonte Purnell competed in outdoor track last spring and will contribute indoors as a sprinter. “The boys team is coming along very well,” James said. This is his second indoor track season. “A lot of the younger boys are really stepping up and taking the place of the boys that graduated. I think there’s a lot of potential for the

team because we’re constantly improving.” Stigler thinks more athletes will score points for the squads this season. In past years, a handful of participants scored a majority of the teams’ points. “I think it will be more spread out and we’ll have more people contributing,” he said. “We have a lot of different people who can score points.” The squads are shooting for Bayside championships this season. The girls’ team placed second last year and the boys’ squad took third.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 44

DECEMBER 4, 2015

STEPHEN DECATUR WINTER SPORTS PREVIEW

Team has some ‘studs’ in lineup, Martinek says Continued from Page 43 have improved and are in better shape. They are also very technical. “[We] may only start two to three seniors so we have room for growth… [We’re] not as physical as year’s past, but [we’re] very good technicians,” he said. “[We’re] a little inexperienced at spots so we will see how they mature in close individual and dual meet situations. We still have three to four kids out from football injuries, but they are getting healthy quickly.” Decatur finished the 2014-15 season with an 11-3 record. In a tight battle, the Seahawks placed fourth overall in the Bayside Conference championship meet. Martinek said the goals this year are to win the conference and regional tournaments and have four to five wrestlers place at states. “We have some studs and they are spread out throughout the lineup. Those big guns will most likely win over 35 matches each for us,” he said. “I’m really curious how we shape up from 195 up. We have about seven guys, but it’s wide open, so I want to see them compete in the [wrestling] room and who takes the varsity spots. Wrestle-offs will begin by the end of the week and continue until next week.”

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

[We’re] not as physical as year’s past, but [we’re] very good technicians,” said Stephen Decatur wrestling Coach Todd Martinek. “[We’re] a little inexperienced at spots so we will see how they mature in close individual and dual meet situations.”

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Continued from Page 38 Dec. 15: Pocomoke, 3:30 p.m. (H) Dec. 17: Cape Henlopen, 3:30 p.m. (H) Jan. 7: Kent County, 3 p.m. (A) Jan. 12: Indian River, 4 p.m. (A) Jan. 14: Easton, 3 p.m. (A) Jan. 21: Delmarva Christian, 3:30 p.m. (H) Jan. 26: Cambridge S. Dorchester, 3 p.m. (A) Jan. 28: Pocomoke, 3:30 p.m. (H) Feb. 2: Queen Anne’s, 7 p.m. (A) Feb. 4: Pocomoke, 3:30 p.m. (H) WRESTLING Dec. 9: North Caroline, 6 p.m. (H) Dec. 16: Mardela, 5 p.m. (A) Dec. 18: Easton, 5 p.m. (H) Dec. 22: Saint Michaels, 4 p.m. (H) Dec. 29-30: South River Duals (A) Jan. 6: Wicomico, 5 p.m. (A) Jan. 8-9: Iron Horse Duals (A) Jan. 13: Snow Hill 4 p.m. (A) Jan. 15-16: War on the Shore (H) Jan. 22: Polytech, 6 p.m. (A) Jan. 27: Queen Anne’s 5 p.m. (A) Jan. 29: Kent County, 5 p.m. (A) Feb. 3:Kent Island, 6 p.m. (H) Feb. 5: James M. Bennett, 6 p.m. (H)


Dec. 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

Business

Page 45 REAL ESTATE REPORT

Holiday shopping includes looking for new homes

SUBMITTED PHOTO/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Dough Roller owner Bill Gibbs recently presented a $15,000 donation to the Worcester County Education Foundation. Pictured, from left, are WCEF Chairman Todd Ferrante, Worcester County Public Schools Superintendent Dr. Jerry Wilson, Gibbs, WCEF Vice Chair Greg Shockley and Worcester County Public Schools Assistant Superintendent Lou Taylor.

County financial reporting lauded for exactitude

By Brian Gilliland Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) In the realm of financial auditing, the best opinion is no opinion at all, and Worcester County’s auditors, TGM Group of Salisbury, didn’t have much to say about the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report produced by the treasurer’s office and released Tuesday. “This is the holy grail of all things finance in Worcester County,” Phil Thompson, the county’s chief financial officer, said. “Since the crisis, there is an increased emphasis on forecasting. This is a good tool to evaluate county processes.” TGM auditor Chris Hall emphasized that the “unmodified opinion,” delivered by his agency was perhaps the most important achievement of the entire 163page document, available online through the county’s website: www.co.worcester.md.us. Hall gave the example of the total real and personal property revenue variance, where the county estimated in the fiscal 2015 budget to bring in $117,933,052 but actually brought in $117,963,356 according to the report — a difference of See WORCESTER Page 47

Dough Roller’s Gibbs donates $15K for digital conversion Worcester Co. Education Foundation seeks private funding for school tech

(Dec. 4, 2015) Dough Roller owner Bill Gibbs said he knows the value of excellent schools and great education and has always been a strong supporter of education. Gibbs explained that each year he watches young employees who shine, work hard and enjoy their job while others Bill Gibbs struggle. “More often than not, the kids who struggle have not had the benefit of a really good education,” he said. Recently, Gibbs presented a $15,000 donation to the Worcester County Education Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)(3) established in August 2014. The WCEF was established to provide a perpetual funding resource to ensure every Worcester County student could have equal access to a world class education, enable them to function in today’s digital college environment and to

compete in a new, emerging job market. Gibbs mentioned the hundreds of high school and college students he has employed over the years and how easy it is to identify the confidence, self-motivation and other attributes in kids who have experienced a good education. “Every child and every community deserves the benefits that come from having great schools,” he said. “It’s one of the best investments any of us can make in our community.” “The first focus of the WCEF is to assist our county schools with digital conversion by accelerating the purchase and distribution of digital learning devices, so that every child K-12 has equal access to a world class education,” WCEF Board Member Lisa Challenger said. Gibbs said he was proud to support such a worthy cause. “One thing I’ve noticed is that the most prosperous communities tend to be those that invest in their education system,” he said. “I’d like to see our kids given the best education possible because it all comes back to us.” Visit www.wced.foundation to learn more or to donate.

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Realtor.com recently issued an article with the headline wondering “When is Housing’s Black Friday?” in an effort to determine how the holidays affect the housing market. The findings show that the slowdown in online house-hunting activity is short-lived, lasting only during the week leading up to Thanksgiving, but returning to normal after Black Friday. It compared realtor.com traffic data on Thanksgiving Day 2014 with an average day in 2014’s fourth quarter, and identified states where house-hunting activity appeared to be the most or the least. Virginia was one of the states “least impacted,” Maryland was in the list of “neutral” states, but Delaware was in the list of states “most impacted” by a dip in house-hunting activity by the Thanksgiving holiday. Realtor.com looked beyond Thanksgiving and found that based on 2014 figures, the true “Black Friday” for the housing business is Dec. 28, and Dec. 24 was the slowest. This finding usually holds true year to year, as we see an increase in activity during the week after the Christmas holiday through the new year, when people have time to search for their dream home and are possibly looking to make a change. Additionally, a busy time of year for online house-hunting is July 6 – another holiday break when people have time to search for property. The report shows that overall, the spring market offers, “the best combination of inventory and value – more homes go onto the market, but prices have not yet thawed.” The next-highest online traffic pointed to the fall, after Sept. 1. Besides the major holidays noted above, there is one more holiday that showed a slow-down in home-searching activity – Valentine’s Day. Lauren Bunting is a licensed Realtor/Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 46

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PRMC opens new pharmacy Gillis entrepreneurship to accompany OP facilities award goes to Eccleston

(Dec. 4, 2015) Peninsula Regional Medical Center has officially opened the new PRMC Home Scripts community pharmacy at the Delmarva Health Pavilion off Route 589 near the North Gate of Ocean Pines. The pharmacy is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and offers prescription medications as well as over-the-counter products. The pharmacy can be reached at 410-543-4769. The new PRMC Home Scripts Ocean

Pines, along with a Millsboro location, brings PRMC Home Scripts’ attention to prompt prescription fills and exceptional service closer to customers. The opening means that people who visit Peninsula Regional Family Medicine Ocean Pines will have a convenient location to fill prescriptions given to them by their family doctor. Joining Home Scripts at the pavilion are PRMC FamilyLab, Cardiac and Pulmonary Rehabilitation and the Junior Board’s Pines Café.

(Dec. 4, 2015) Maryland Capital Enterprises announces that Chris Eccleston, president of Delmarva Veteran Builders, is the recipient of the 2015 Palmer Gillis Entrepreneur of the Year award. “This year’s nominees were a diverse group of entrepreneurs who are all doing an amazing job in their respective careers,” said George Koste, executive director

of MCE. Eccleston started Delmarva Veteran Builders just three years ago, with explosie growth. A former Navy sailor, Eccleston said the concept for his business was “to create a company with a workforce of some of the best trained people in America – our veterans.” This is the fourth year for the award.

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Ocean City Today

Worcester releases annual comprehensive finance report Continued from Page 45 just $30,304. Hall said the typical tolerance for these figures is between 2 and 3 percent, and a one percent difference amounts to about $1.2 million. According to the report, the county is maintaining a fund balance of $42 million, which is about 25 percent of the budgeted $164 million in General Fund expenditures. County policy, according to county spokesperson Kim Moses, is 10 percent of budgeted expenses. During last year’s budget sessions, it was revealed the county would have to dip into its budget stabilization fund to cover at least some expenses — how much would actually be used was something of a mystery at the time, and facing a shortfall of about $22 million overall, the county could exhaust the fund yet still need to identify new sources of revenue or make cuts. The decision to use about $6 million of the estimated $18 million in stabilization funds had been made by a previous board of commissioners. Four new members joined the board following the November elections. Closing the gap left by the previous board actually cost the county $6.9 million in savings, according to the report. This year, the commissioners opted to forgo using any additional stabiliza-

tion funds and raised income and property taxes, as well as zeroing out raises for employees. This had been met with protest by Worcester County teachers, who through negotiation between the collective bargaining unit and the board of education were able to restore teacher raises at the cost of 32 support jobs. Finally, the funding percentage error in post-employment benefits discovered by Ocean City Today in previous financial reports has been corrected. County employees have met almost 83 percent of the accrued liability, while the Board of Education has met almost 18 percent of its obligation. Since the reporting met all the standards set out by the Government Finance Officers Association, which ensures easy comparability between municipalities through financial reporting, the county was awarded another certificate of achievement. This is the seventh time in a row the county has won the award. “Receiving the GFOA award for the last seven years is truly an honor and reflects the strong work ethic and standards of the finance office staff and management team,” Thompson said. “It requires a truly dedicated and knowledgeable team to accomplish this task, and I am fortunate to work with such a team.”

Ribbon cutting to be held marking shop’s anniversary (Dec. 4, 2015) Dazzle and The Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce are hosting a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Friday, Dec. 4 from 4-6 p.m., celebrating the store’s oneyear anniversary. Dazzle Gift Shop opened one year ago to serve the needs of the Ocean City, Ocean Pines, Berlin and surrounding communities with a gift shop dedicated to providing customer service and care and affordable and useful gifts and holiday décor. Dazzle Gift Shop has accessories, jewelry, gourmet foods and dips, baby items and much more. It also features unique and personalized gift baskets with complimentary gift wrapping. As a thank you to loyal customers and the community, those who visit the store the weekend of Dec. 4-6, may register for free presents under its decorated trees. Refreshments will be served during the ribbon-cutting event. For more information, call Dazzle at 410-208-4438. Dazzle is located inside the South Gate of Ocean Pines in the Manklin Station Shopping Center.

PAGE 47

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This well maintained 3BR/2BA home is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City. The home is situated on a corner lot and features a porch, cathedral ceilings, a gas fireplace and cen. air. Recent upgrades include new floor coverings, new light fixtures, new refrigerator and a freshly painted interior. HOA fees are only $190 a year. Listed at $237,000.

515 SANDY HILL DRIVE

This 3BR/1.5BA home is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City. The home features an eat-in kitchen, a family room, insulated windows and cen. air. Outside there are 2 covered patios, a utlity shed and a 2-car parking pad. The community features pools, tennis, shuffleboard, min. golf and a bayfront boardwalk. The HOA dues are just $190/yr. Offered at $169,000 furnished.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

ON THE POND - 2005 CUSTOM-BUILT HOME

$261,500

Charming single family with one of a kind location! GLORIOUS direct water views of community 9 acre lake! Extra large (20'X10') waterside 3-season room, generous living/dining, complete kitchen w/ breakfast bar, full appliances. XL utility/hobby room, master bed/bath w/ seated shower opens to sunroom. Waterside patio w/retractable awning storage shed, floored attic. Den/2nd bedroom, bath - almost 1,200 sq.ft., immaculately maintained by original owner and priced at $261,500! Montego Bay Community has 2 pools, tennis, min. golf, boardwalk, $190 annual HOA.

JUDY FROMAN Realtor/GRI

410-726-8560

,

11001 Manklin Meadows Lane, Ocean Pines, MD 21811 Licensed in MD, DE

Judy@judyfroman.com •  www.oceanpines-oceancity.com

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

13216 NANTUCKET ROAD

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Lifestyle

Dec. 4, 2015

Ocean City Today Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertaiment, Events, Features, Music

Page 49

cate meighan inside going out hile the weather has been pretty warm here in OC (I’m used to biting NYC temperatures, remember? So it IS warm to me!) there’s no denying that the holiday season is off to a flying start. December is, technically, only a few days old and just like you, I’ve already ticked several things off my festive todo list. Winterfest of Lights ... loved it. The Berlin Christmas Tree Lighting & Holiday Arts Night from last weekend ... loved that too. I mean, does Berlin ever really get anything wrong? They throw a party and everyone in the surrounding area always shows up. I also ventured in to the Holiday Shopper’s Fair at the convention center on 40th Street last weekend and was pretty impressed, not only by the number of vendors, but also by the turnout. The place was packed and not just with browsers either, lots of money was changing hands. I was easily suckered into buying a little, tabletop plug in Christmas tree that reminds me of one that my mother had when I was little. I remember her plugging it in for the first time on a table near our television while I was watching “Dance Fever” (so that’s how old I am) and just loving it enough to stop watching Denny Terrio and Motion (remember them?) for at least a minute or two. So now I have my own tree courtesy of Dot’s Ceramics. Luckily, the fun has just started this season and the month of December is just jammed with holiday-themed events, like the Berlin Christmas parade, which was scheduled to take place on Thursday. Then on Saturday, Berlin will also be hosting the 8th annual 5K Reindeer Run to benefit Worcester Youth & Family. The event begins at 9 a.m. at the Atlantic Hotel on Main Street. You can register for this race via www.raceroster.com. Ocean City is celebrating the holiday season with Winterfest of Lights, which features hundreds of animated, lighted displays at Northside Park on 125th Street, bayside. After taking a ride through the lights, you can grab hot cocoa inside the heated pavilion, browse Yukon Cornelius’ gift shop and have a keepsake photo taken with Santa. Winterfest of Lights is open daily at Continued on Page 50

W

Mrs. Claus joins the Harrison Group in wishing Ocean City Christmas parade spectators a happy holidays during last year’s event. The 2015 parade will take place Saturday, beginning at 11 a.m. on Coastal Highway from 100th to 120th streets.

Ocean City’s 33rd annual Christmas parade, Saturday

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) It is that special time of year again when the Ocean City Christmas parade marches down Coastal Highway on Saturday, Dec. 5, beginning at 11 a.m. The 33rd annual holiday parade will start on Old Landing Road near 100th Street and continue north in the southbound lanes to 120th Street where participants will be greeted by the judges. As of Monday afternoon, 60 units had signed up to participate in the parade, including high school bands, horses, mascots, antique cars, local businesses and holiday floats. For the first time, the Town of Ocean City is coordinating the 2015 Ocean City Christmas parade. “We are excited to continue the Ocean City holiday tradition,” said Frank Miller, special events superintendent for the Town of Ocean City. “Its longevity has proven it is something people come to enjoy and the beach atmosphere makes it special.” Three professional judges from the National Judges Association will be critiquing the units in eight categories: school marching bands, commercial floats, noncommercial floats, antique vehicles, fire companies, costume/mascot units, marching units and motorized vehicles.

Santa waves to spectators watching the 32nd annual Ocean City Christmas parade last year along Coastal Highway.

Trophies will be awarded at the Carousel Hotel on 118th Street following the parade for first, second and third place in each category. In addition, two special trophies will be awarded to the best overall parade entry and best Ocean City vacationthemed entry. “These awards are totally different than the others and named for two of our

sponsors: Coca-Cola and the Carousel Group,” Miller said. New this year, WBOC television anchors Maxine Bentzel and Chris Weimer will be the masters of ceremony and provide a play-by-play of the parade. The event will last approximately two hours and seating will be located in the Food Lion parking lot for spectators. See ACTIVITIES Page 50


Ocean City Today

PAGE 50

DECEMBER 4, 2015

cate meighan Continued from Page 49 5:30 p.m., but make sure you get there early. I arrived before 6 p.m. and the lines were already huge. Take a look at www.oceancitymd.gov for all of the fun details. Christmas at the North Pole will take place today (Friday) at Seacrets Bar & Grill on 49th Street. This event, which benefits Believe In Tomorrow Children’s Foundation will run from 610 p.m. and tickets are $30 for adults or $15 for children under 14. Come dressed as your favorite holiday character and compete in the costume contest. Those dressed up will also receive a free drink ticket for wine, beer or soda. To purchase tickets for this fun night out for a great cause, call 410-723-2842. Ronnie Milsap will be taking the stage on Friday night at the OC Performing Arts Center on 40th Street and Coastal Highway. Tickets for the 8 p.m. show are still available through Ticketmaster by calling 1-800-551SEAT. The very next day, on Saturday, the Performing Arts Center on 40th Street will feature two performances of The Nutcracker. This show has long been a holiday tradition for many families and this year there are tickets still available for both the 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. shows. Stop by the visitors center on 40th Street or else you can also purchase tickets via Ticketmaster at 1800-551-SEAT. Horse and Carriage Rides with Santa are running every Saturday and Sunday now through the end of December. The ride originates on the Boardwalk and it’s $10 for adults and children under 3 can ride for free. Contact Randy Davis at 443-783-1409 for more information. Also, don’t forget that the OC Christmas parade will take place on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The parade route is on Coastal Highway from Old Landing Road to 120th

Street. How many of you are fans of the Trans-Siberian Orchestra? I’m betting a lot of you are and, unfortunately, the official holiday rock orchestra all but ignores the Eastern Shore when it comes to live performances. This year, fans of TSO will be happy to know that a really great tribute band will be playing close enough to make seeing its show a realistic possibility. Ornament is the brainchild of producer/guitarist Chris Nunes, a music teacher from Massachusetts who has watched his small-scale idea for a holiday show turn into a production that tours up and down the East Coast. Many of you are actually already familiar with those playing in Ornament because 11 months out of the year they perform together as Scarab, the Journey Tribute band that played at the OC Convention Center last summer. Its TSO tribute will be playing two shows (6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m.) at Harrington Raceway and Casino in Harrington, Del. on Saturday. As for the show itself, Nunes tells me that, “People can expect a roller coaster ride of a show when they see Ornament. We want the audience to have as much fun watching and listening to the show as we have performing it for them. We play all the big TSO hits and some of the songs they haven’t played live in a while. You will see a big light show, some special effects, and a group of musicians who really love performing this music. “Our goal is to make the show as close to a TSO show as possible, yet keep the setting nice and intimate. We love talking with the audience after the show, so feel free to come up and say hi.” Check out www.ornamentband/tour-dates for ticket info and more details on Ornament. On Sunday, Dec. 6, Ocean City Parrothead Club’s 18th annual “Hots for Tots” Chili Cookoff will take place at

the Greene Turtle in West Ocean City from 1-4 p.m. The Cookoff raises funds for Worcester G.O.L.D. (Giving Other Lives Dignity), a nonprofit helping children, adults and families in need during the holiday season. In addition, toys are collected for the Ocean City Police Department and the Santa House in Snow Hill. The cost of admission is $10 or a new, unwrapped children’s toy. Touch of Italy on 66th Street has something a little different coming up in December. You can take an “Italian Experience” class with Cheese & Wine of Northern Italy coming up on Wednesday, Dec. 9, from 4-5:30 p.m. Those registered will spend an afternoon with cheese monger Bill Wilson in an intimate class discovering wine and savoring cheese from the northern region of Italy. To register for this class, visit www.touchofitaly.com. On Friday, Dec. 11 The Greene Turtle on 116th Street and Coastal Highway is having a special dinner from 5-8 p.m. that will benefit Mike Ciorrocco’s Prom King fundraiser. Twenty percent of all proceeds during this three-hour window will be donated to the Believe In Tomorrow Children’s Foundation. Here’s a bit of money-saving added incentive: those in attendance will receive a free Winterfest of Lights ticket with every entree purchased. Applebee’s in Ocean City, located at 12849 Ocean Gateway, will be hosting a breakfast with Santa on Saturday, Dec. 12 from 8-10 a.m. Kelsey’s Pancake Breakfast for Believe in Tomorrow’s Prom Queen will include unlimited pancakes, sausage, drinks and, of course, a photo with Santa himself. Every child in attendance will have an opportunity to win a bike and there will be crafts, 50/50 raffle and more. Tickets for this breakfast are $8 and you can contact Kelsey Hickey for more info at 301-751-1066.

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A Breakfast Buffet with Santa will also be held on Saturday, Dec. 12 from 8-11 a.m. at The Restaurant at Lighthouse Sound, located at 12723 St. Martin’s Neck Road near Bishopville. The menu includes scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon, donuts, coffee, juice and more. Children ages 6-12 can eat for $5 while anyone 12 and up is $10. Contact Linda at 410-208-0431 for more details on this holiday event. The fifth annual SantaCon will be arriving in OC on Saturday, Dec. 12 at the 28th St. Pit & Pub. Beginning at 3 p.m., you can bring goodies for the cats and dogs of Worcester County Humane Society and 50/50 money to benefit Assateague Coastal Trust. For more info on this fun event, check out www.santacon.info/Ocean_City-MD/ On Friday, Dec. 18 from 5-10 p.m. Ocean 98 will host its Listener Appreciation Christmas Party at Seacrets. You can enjoy drink specials, complimentary appetizers, a Chinese auction and door prizes. Also on tap, live performances by Stone Senate, Lower Case Blues, Amy Fairchild and many more! Admission for this yearly event is free to the public. Mione’s Pizza on 67th Street and Coastal Highway, TownCenter, has Continued on Page 51

Activities planned following parade at Carousel Hotel Continued from Page 49 About 1,000 people participate in the parade annually and 3,000 spectators are expected to be at the event this year, lining Coastal Highway to watch the procession. Santa, one of his elves and Mrs. Claus will be at the end of the parade in a horse drawn carriage, Miller said. After the parade, festivities continue at the Carousel Hotel across Coastal Highway with half-price ice skating, complementary winter refreshments, a deejay playing holiday music and free photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus. “Traffic will be stopped to get everyone safely to the Carousel for festivities when the parade ends,” Miller said. “I hope everyone joins in and stays in town to check out the Winterfest of Lights later in the evening.” The parade will feature three local high school bands—Snow Hill, Pocomoke and Stephen Decatur. TriRunning Sports, the Coast Guard and an antique fire engine will all be a part of the parade lineup this year as well. They will join Trimper’s Rides and Harrison Group’s commercial floats who have participated since the parade’s inception. Traffic pattern changes will begin around 8 a.m. on Saturday and southbound lanes will shut down an hour later. There is no fee to participate in the parade. To register for the parade, call Miller at 410-250-0125.


Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 51

cate meighan Continued from Page 50 some sweet deals going on daily. Its dinner specials vary from day to day but Thursday’s feature is chicken Parmesan with pasta for $9.99 and on Friday night the dinner special is linguine with shrimp for $10.99. Mione’s also has a Sunday football special that includes one large 18-inch cheese pizza and 10 wings for just $19.99. Crab Bag on 130th Street, bayside is open seven days a week, year ‘round and it has some really great deals, such as a 3-pound bucket of ribs, half-pint of baked beans and a half-pint of cole slaw for just $22.95. Its charcoal pit sandwich special is always a hit with one meat for $7.50 and two priced at $9.50. Crab Bag also has an all day super happy hour with $2 rail drinks and wine by the glass for just $3.50. Duffy’s Tavern on 130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center is now open from Wednesday through Monday and closed on Tuesday. It has a great happy hour that runs from 12-6 p.m. Duffy’s is also featuring food and drink specials on Sunday to coincide with football.Personal cheese pizzas are just $5, calamari is $9 and a seafood steamer basket will run you $19.99. Head on over to www.duffysoc.com to check out the daily “second season” specials too! Jules on 120th Street and Coastal Highway offers an every day early bird special between 5-6 p.m. The prix fixe dinner includes three course served with a complimentary glass of wine for just $30. Half-price appetizers are the hot ticket on Monday and don’t forget that Wednesday is Ladies Night at Jules with half-price entrees being the big seller. Check out the full menu at www.ocjules.com. Whiskers Pub on 120th Street is now open from Tuesday through Sunday and has some great happy hour specials from 4-7 p.m. You can grab wings and fries for $7.95, garlic butter

clams are just $8.95 and Whiskers crab dip is $8.95. As far as the happy hour drinks go, you can grab Natty Boh cans for $2.25, domestic bottles are $2.50 and $2 will get you Miller Lite, Coors Light or Yuengling drafts. BJ’s on the Water on 75th Street, bayside is featuring winter half-price specials on particular entrees that are sure to please. On Sunday, you can enjoy the fried seafood platter. Monday’s spotlight is on the crab imperial dinner and Tuesday’s feature is the twin crab cake dinner. Wednesday is stuffed flounder and Thursday you can grab the flash fried shrimp dinner for half price. All entrees are served with two sides. BJ’s also features prix fixe seven days a week. You can enjoy a threecourse lunch (11 a.m. to 5 p.m.) for $20 or a 4-course dinner (5 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.) for $30. Happy hour here runs from Monday through Friday from 4-7 p.m. and there also is a late-night happy hour that runs Sunday through Thursday from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. BJ’s official Xmas party will take place on Wednesday, Dec. 9 beginning at 6 p.m. Make a donation for the Worcester County Humane Society, either cash or pet products and then get ready to celebrate with a great Christmas buffet and entertainment provided by Teenage Rust & the Fabulous Rustettes. Seacrets: Jamaica USA on 49th Street, bayside, is open Thursday through Sunday for the winter season. It’s your football headquarters, with various food and drink specials to help usher in every NFL game shown on the 15 HDTVs. Happy hour runs from 4-7 p.m. with various drink specials and you’ll want to check out the new football-themed menu at www.seacrets.com. Harborside Bar & Grill on South Harbor Road in West OC has some cool lunch specials for $5.99 running from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., Monday

ise rom We Pperior a Su y Pizz lit Qua

Happy Hour Sunday - Friday 3 – 6 pm

Entertainment Every Friday & Saturday • 9- 1 am Friday December 4: Slappy Hour • 9pm Saturday December 5: Randy Lee Ashcraft & Saltwater Cowboys • 9pm EVERY Wednesday 6-9pm: Randy Lee Ashcraft & Saltwater Cowboys

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Join Us WEDNESDAY DEC 9TH @ 6 PM CHRISTMAS PARTY LIVE MUSIC BY RANDY LEE ASHCRAFT FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS

through Thursday. Harborside’s dinner specials begin at 5 p.m., with Monday being half-price entree night. Tuesday’s you can fill up on tacos, Thursday is allyou-can-eat ribs and steamed shrimp and then on Friday the special is on fried oyster and soft shells. Don’t forget that Harborside also has live entertainment every Thursday-Sunday. That’s it for this week. Next time around we’ll start to talk about New Year’s Eve parties and where you can go to ring in 2016 in style. If you have a special event coming up this holiday season or know of something that deserves a mention, please email me at cate@oceancitytoday.net.

Ronnie Milsap to take Performing Arts Center stage

(Dec. 4, 2015) Enjoy the holidays at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center on 40th Street when Ronnie Milsap takes the stage on Friday, Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. Milsap, with 40 No. 1 hits, six Grammy Awards and a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame, is coming to Ocean City, performing hits including “Smoky Mountain Rain,” “Lost in the Fifties Tonight,” “I Wouldn’t Have Missed it for the World,” “Any Day Now” and “Stranger in My House.” In addition, he will sing some holiday favorites to celebrate the season. Be part of country music history as the legendary musician celebrates his Farewell Tour in the resort. Tickets cost $45-$55. For tickets to the shows, call or visit the Ocean City Convention Center box office, 40th Street and Coastal Highway, 1-800-OC-OCEAN or call Ticketmaster 1-800-551-SEAT. Visit www.oceancityconcerts.com for more show information.

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TOYS FOR TOTS Customer Appreciation/ Holiday/Closing Party

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Bryan Russo 5 – 8 PM Happy Hour All Day Reopening Dec 26th

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BEV’S HOME COOKIN Dec. 10th MEATLOAF MASHED POTATOES & GRAVY $8.99

THURSDAY

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SINGLE CRAB CAKE DINNER W/ 2 SIDES $12.99 L IV E EN T E RT A IN ME NT W/ B O B HU G H E S 5 – 8 P M RIB NIGHT 1/2 RACK W/ 2 SIDES $12.99

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130TH ST. IN THE MONTEGO BAY SHOPPING CENTER


Ocean City Today

PAGE 52

‘Hots for Tots’ Chili Cookoff, Dec. 6 Event benefits Worcester G.O.L.D. as well as OCPD and Santa House toy drives

. w ww

O

- OC-GO

HOROSCOPE ARIES - Mar 21/Apr 20

Aries, you can be quite generous when you choose to be, but sometimes you can overlook the needs of others. Pay as much attention to others’ needs as possible this week.

TAURUS - APR 21/MAY 21

Little things influence how others look at you, Taurus, so make sure you get all of your ducks in a row — especially at work. Focus on some finer details.

GEMINI - May 22/Jun 21

You may not be in a practical mood this week, Gemini. Fortunately for you, there isn’t much of importance that needs to be done, so you are free to let loose a little bit.

CANCER - Jun 22/Jul 22

This isn’t a week to take a walk down Memory Lane, Cancer. Focus on the future rather than getting lost in nostalgia. However, let your past guide your actions a bit.

LEO - Jul 23/Aug 23

Leo, your calendar is filling up quickly, but you cannot add any days to the calendar. Divide your responsibilities so you can better handle everything on your slate.

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4 0)

dozens of families during its 12 years of working with Worcester G.O.L.D. This year so far, four families have been adopted, which includes six adults and 16 children, for Thanksgiving and Christmas. The families are all from Pocomoke, said OCPHC member Bob Gilmore. “One of our families has eight children and we also have a single dad with two little girls,” Gilmore said. The families make a list of needs and the children write out their Christmas wish lists for Santa. Club members purchase the items on these lists and the organization delivers the gifts to these families before Christmas. They also provide a food gift card to each family for Christmas dinner as well, Gilmore said. The Greene Turtle in West Ocean City has hosted Hots for Tots for See LOCAL Page 53

LF

(80

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Organizers are challenging area restaurants to showcase their recipes and compete for bragging rights during the Ocean City Parrothead Club’s 18th annual “Hots for Tots” Chili Cookoff at the Greene Turtle in West Ocean City, Sunday, Dec. 6. The Cookoff raises funds for Worcester G.O.L.D. (Giving Other Lives Dignity), a nonprofit helping children, adults and families in need during the holiday season. In addition, toys are collected for the Ocean City Police Department and the Santa House in Snow Hill.

“It is always a good time,” OCPHC President India Bandorick said. “Everyone likes chili, football will be on the numerous televisions and Greene Turtle will have bar specials.” Restaurants will provide samples of their chili, ranging from hot to mild in the audience-judged competition. Attendees will vote for their favorite recipe to determine which restaurant will take home the top prize. “It’s one of the longest-lasting charity events in town for children,” Bandorick said. “I think everyone looks forward to it and there are bragging rights for the entire year.” Last year, more than 300 people attended Hots for Tots, which raised hundreds of dollars for Worcester G.O.L.D. and a paddy wagon was filled to the top with toys, Bandorick said. The Parrothead Club has assisted

DECEMBER 4, 2015

l cea nCityG o

VIRGO - Aug 24/Sept 22

Ambivalence will get you nowhere fast, Virgo. It can be difficult to make decisions, but that’s something you have to do this week. Once you do, you can forge ahead.

LIBRA - Sept 23/Oct 23

Libra, you are capable of making intelligent, objective decisions. Expect to find yourself with a growing list of new friends who want your advice.

SCORPIO - Oct 24/Nov 22

Now is not the time to begin a new project, Scorpio. Rather, keep a low profile and finish up any tasks that you did not get to finish last week.

SAGITTARIUS - Nov 23/Dec 21

Sagittarius, it’s difficult to get a good read on any associates or friends, which could impact your plans moving forward. You may need to make a few assumptions and back track later.

CAPRICORN - Dec 22/Jan 20

Course OCGC - Newport Bay OCGC - Seaside Nutters Crossing Rum Pointe Lighthouse Sound Eagle’s Landing Glen Riddle - Man O’ War Bay Club Bear Trap Dunes Bayside Ocean Pines Baywood Greens Heritage Shores

$55 $49 $50

Green Card

Gre een Card

Green Card

Green n Card

Green Card

$25 $25 $20 $25 $45 $30 $25 $25 $30 $50 $25 $25 $25

$4 45 $4 45 $2 25 $6 60 $7 70 $5 50 $5 50 $3 35 $6 65 $7 75 $4 44 $6 65 $5 50

$45 $45 $25 $60 $70 $50 $50 $35 $75 $95 $44 $65 $50

$45 $45 $25 $60 $70 $50 $50 $35 $65 $75 $44 $65 $50

$25 $25 $20 $25 $45 $30 $25 $25 $30 $50 $25 $25 $25

$65 $99 $69

$65 $89 $79

$65 $99 $69

$45 $49 $50

Capricorn, right now all you can think about is your career and your financial future. That’s okay because you’ve been meaning to give more thought to your finances and how to proceed.

AQUARIUS - Jan 21/Feb 18

Aquarius, you may feel yourself pulled in two different directions this week. There’s a part of you that is focused on home, and another that knows work beckons. Find a balance.

PISCES - Feb 19/Mar 20

It may seem like getting others to open up is a struggle this week. Find a way to communicate as best you can, Pisces.


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

PAGE 53

Local restaurants vie for ‘best’ chili awards this Sun. Continued from Page 52 more than a decade. “What makes this all worthwhile is when the truck is all filled up for the kids at the end and that’s not even counting the people who gave money,” said Greene Turtle General Manager Chad Rogers. For the fourth year, Mother’s Cantina on 28th Street took top honors with its “Mother’s Chili Con Café” in 2014. In addition, the restaurant won the “Best of Show” award, which goes to the crowd’s favorite decorated serving station. OC Brewing Co. placed second with “Joshua’s Red Hot Chili” and Greene Turtle West took third with its “GT Chili” at last year’s event. The top prize is up for grabs this year since the owners of Mother’s Cantina, Neely and Ryan James, will be in Miami for a catering event and will not be participating. “We think the mission of the Hots for Tots chili competition is awesome and of course we love participating in the fundraising effort,” Neely James said. “We are leaving the contest open for newcomers and new recipes. We hope the fact that we are not participating will encourage more restaurants to jump in the challenge for the trophy and support the Parrothead Club.” James said her restaurant plans to donate a percentage of profits from their award-winning “Mother’s Chili Con Café” during the week of the competition to the Parrothead Club’s fundraising efforts. Touch of Italy, West Ocean City Greene Turtle, Original Greene Turtle, Ocean City Brewing Co., Sellos, Pit and Pub, the Greenhouse, Culture and Yellowfins will all be competing, with more entries expected to sign up later in the week, Bandorick said Tuesday. The cost of admission is $10 or a new, unwrapped children’s toy. Money will be given to Worcester G.O.L.D and toys will go to the police department or donated to the Santa House. “The money raised at the Chili Cookoff supports our OCPHC charities effort,” Gilmore said. “Our help is always well received by the adopted families and its been wonderfully supported to make this time of year special for many children and families less fortunate then ourselves.” The Hots for Tots event will take place from 1-4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6, at the West Ocean City Greene Turtle on Route 611. Restaurant representatives can sign up to participate in the Chili Cookoff by going to www.ocphc.com and filling out an entry form. For more information, visit www.ocphc.com and click on the Chili Cookoff link, call the Greene Turtle at 410-213-1500 or email ocphc@comcast.net.

Participating in the 2014 Ocean City Parrothead Club’s “Hots for Tots Chili” Cookoff representing The Greenhouse (left) are Nancy, left, and Brandi Bolt and (right) McKena Cooke of the Greene Turtle West. The 2015 event will take place Sunday from 1-4 p.m. at the Greene Turtle off Route 611 in West Ocean City.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 54

DECEMBER 4, 2015

OUT & ABOUT

Sean Robinson

Harleigh Wojcik, left, and Patty Buchta

SHOPPER’S FAIR The 33rd annual Holiday Shopper’s Fair took place last Friday through Sunday at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street. More than 120 vendors featured an assortment of gifts for all family members including Christmas décor and ornaments, sports memorabilia, toys, ceramics, pet items, jewelry, scarves, arts and crafts, hand-painted furniture, stained glass, photography, quilted handbags, candles, nautical items and florals. CATE MEIGHAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Debbie Jones

Leslie Moore

Michelle Ruark

Sharon Bradford, left, and Melanie Collins


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

PAGE 55

Fun City provides winter activities for BIT families

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Critically ill children and their families visiting Believe in Tomorrow House by the Sea on 66th Street have spent almost 10 years of quality time together at Fun City arcade on the Boardwalk at Caroline Street during their wintertime getaways to Ocean City. “Most places are closed in the wintertime and its hard to find activities for the kids to do,” said Wayne Littleton, coordinator for the Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Respite Housing Program. “All children love playing video games and winning prizes. [Fun City] always go out of their way to make our families happy and they look forward to the activity.” The children are given at least $10 in quarters to play games for a couple hours before redeeming their tickets for stuffed animals and other treasures. Also, employees of Fun City send the youngsters home with an additional bag filled with toys. “They are very nice people and it is nice to know in October and November I can give them a call,” Littleton said. Alexa and Jeff Monte stayed at the Believe in Tomorrow house in Ocean City for the fourth time last weekend with their three children and Fun City is always a highlight of their trip.

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Monte family, from left, Sophia, Alexa, Nate, Jeff and AJ, pose for a picture after playing games at Fun City on the Boardwalk at Caroline Street. Critically ill children and their families visiting Believe in Tomorrow House by the Sea on 66th Street in Ocean City often spend time at the arcade.

“We hit the double jackpot twice in a row the last time we were here,” said Jeff Monte, who has been active in the Army for 24 years and completed three tours in Afghanistan. “Tickets were going for 15 minutes and they ran out. Our 13year-old who does not show public emotion was cheering.”

The Monte’s used words such as “friendly,” “kind,” “warm,” “inviting,” “accommodating” and “generous” to describe Fun City employees. “Whether it is winter or summer we always enjoy Fun City,” Alexa Monte said. “My kids love this and I remember coming as a kid to the beach wanting to

play Skee ball. The kids don’t even need to win tickets because they always give away a huge bag of goodies each time we come.” Both of her boys love arcade games and it is nice for the family to have “some old school fun” together. See FUN Page 56


PAGE 56

Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

Fun City staff make visits extra special for ill children

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

AJ Monte, 6, plays a Ninja video game at Fun City on the Boardwalk last Friday. Monte, who is battling Leukemia, will soon receive a bone marrow transplant.

Continued from Page 55 Last weekend was a special trip for the Monte family. It was their last opportunity to get away as a family before 6year-old AJ receives a bone marrow transplant to help fight his Leukemia. “We are not sure when we will be able to get away again,” Alexa Monte said. “It relieves stress and is such a freeing feeling. We would not have been able to get away otherwise and are so thankful.” In August, doctors determined a bone marrow transplant was the only option to aggressively fight his tumors after AJ suffered a relapse. The process is risky and it is a hard recovery, Monte said. “This organization gives us the one chance to get away in the midst of turmoil and stress at home and in the hospital,” she said. The Monte family lives in Washing-

ton D.C. and traveling with a sick child is a constant worry. The close proximity to Ocean City relives stress. “It is a great organization and helpful financially,” Alexa Monte said. “We would not be able to afford going on vacation having a critically ill child without Believe in Tomorrow.” Jerry Greenspan, owner of Fun City, is honored that the arcade provides an environment where sick children and their families can go to forget about their problems for a little while. The positive reactions from his employees was enough to realize it is a wonderful way to give back. “My crew said it was amazing to see the smiles on these kids’ faces,” Greenspan said. “Families playing Skee ball together and laughing is all I needed to hear. They [employees] all felt they were giving back in a small way.” Fun City has been entertaining families since 1958 and creating memories for visitors to Ocean City for decades. “We are a part of the downtown fabric of Ocean City,” Greenspan said. “It is wonderful to see fathers, mothers, kids and grandparents all playing Skee ball together. We thank the Believe in Tomorrow kids for coming to our place and making our day special.” “The first time we did not know what to expect [staying at Believe in Tomorrow on 66th Street],” Monte said. “We knew it was a free place to stay, but it was so much more than that. Here at the beach, there is a community of people and businesses who contribute to families, from local restaurants to places like Fun City. They are so generous and over-the-top.”

Event fundraiser for Shirley Grace Pregnancy Center

(Dec. 4, 2015) The second annual “A Night to Remember in December” will take place on Saturday, Dec. 5 at Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic School in Ocean Pines to benefit the Shirley Grace Pregnancy Center.  Doors open at  5:30 p.m. A donation of $35 includes a holiday buffet prepared by area chefs, desserts, a night of dancing, a $1,000 cash raffle ticket, 50/50, Chinese and live auction items featuring hotels stays, restaurant gift cards, golf, jewelry and gift items. Nonalcoholic beverages are included. There will be a cash bar. Shirley Grace Pregnancy Center’s mission is: “We seek to be a safe haven that advocates life affirming alternatives while equipping, educating and empowering parents in order to strengthen families in our community.” Its vision is to build a world that supports all life. All proceeds go to helping the cause of making a positive difference in the lives of women, babies and families. Call Patti Bulvin at 443-513-4124 for information or tickets.


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

PAGE 57

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Berlin Pop Warner cheerleaders proudly pose with their second-place trophy from the Eastern Regional competition last month during practice at the Ocean Pines Recreation Center on Tuesday night. The girls will compete at nationals in Disney World on Monday morning.

Cheerleaders headed to nationals

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) The Berlin Pop Warner cheerleaders will compete at nationals in Disney World on Mon-

day after coming in second place at the Eastern Regional competition Nov. 14 in New Jersey. “The first two teams advanced to Pop Warner’s national champi-

onship in Disney,” Head Coach Jessie Parsons said. “It was amazing to see these little girls. Their faces were priceless.” See BERLIN Page 58

Art show, auction Dec. 10 in Berlin Eastern Shore Mountain Biking Association hosts ‘Saddle Up’ fundraiser (Dec. 4, 2015) The Eastern Shore Mountain Biking Association will host “Saddle Up,” an art show and silent auction fundraiser featuring more than 40 custom decorated bicycle saddles, at The Globe in Berlin from 6-9 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 10.

Live music will be provided by bands Full Circle and Concussion. Enjoy an evening of music while browsing and bidding on art and supporting the ESIMBA’s mission of creating, enhancing and preserving Eastern Shore bicycle trails. “We are raising money to become certified by IMBA and The League Of American Bicyclists. These certifications will enable us to continue to promote and educate about cycling

professionally,” said Tres Denk, ride leader and club president. Art will hang in the gallery until Jan. 3, 2016, and patrons are encouraged to not only bid, but to vote for their favorite artist. The artist with the most votes will win a show to be held at The Globe, located at 12 Broad Street in Berlin, in 2016. For more information, contact Denk at tres@esimba.org or 410430-4992.

‘Light up the Pines’ holiday contest Residents encouraged to decorate homes for annual outdoor display competition (Dec. 4, 2015) Ocean Pines residents once again have the chance to show off their holiday decorating skills with the community’s annual “Light up the Pines” outdoor display contest. This year’s event is sponsored by the Ocean Pines Association and Choptank Electric Cooperative, which will give two free LED lightbulbs to each registered participant as well as prizes to the winners. Participants will be judged in four categories: “Top-Notch All-Around,”

“Most Creative,” “Most Lights” and “People’s Choice.” The winner in each category will receive a $50 gift certificate to The Cove and a $25 Choptank electric bill credit. The deadline for applicants is Friday, Dec. 11. Participants will be notified when judging is to take place. The ballot for the “People’s Choice” award will be emailed and will be available online at OceanPines.org. A map showing the locations of the entries will be on the website as well. Residences are eligible to win “TopNotch,” “Most Creative” or “Most Lights” once every three years; there is no restriction for the “People’s Choice” category. Previous winners may still

submit their names and addresses to be included in the map of light displays entered in the contest. They will also receive two free LED lightbulbs. Volunteer judges are being sought to help with the contest. Anyone interested in serving as a judge should submit a name and phone number to info@oceanpines.org or 410-641-7717 ext. 3014. Residents interested in entering the contest may do so by submitting a name, address and phone number by email to info@oceanpines.org, fax to 410-641-5581, phone to 410-641-7717 ext. 3014 or to the Ocean Pines Association in person or mail at 239 Ocean Pkwy., Ocean Pines, Md., 21811.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 58

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Berlin cheerleaders excited to perform at national event Continued from Page 57 It is the first time in history a Berlin Seahawks Pop Warner squad has advanced this far. If they raise $10,000, it will cover a three-night stay at the Caribbean Beach Resort on Disney property for all 16 girls. “That [$10,000] is our bare minimum and wouldn’t cover food or airfare,” Parsons said Tuesday. “It is looking like we will reach our minimum goal and be able to cover the package costs.” Debbie Donahue, who is in charge of the cheerleading program in Berlin, created a GoFundMe web page to raise money for the trip to Florida and there has been $1,800 in donations pledged as of Tuesday night. The 16 junior peewee cheerleaders range in age from 8-12 years old and most of the girls have been cheering together for a number of years. “Being tight, our facial expressions and working together as a team” are the reasons the Berlin Seahawks have made it to nationals, according to Maddie Reed, 10, a four-year veteran on the cheer squad. Three brothers and both of her parents will accompany Reed on her first trip to Disney. She is excited for the competition and to visit the Magic Kingdom. “It is exciting because our goal at the beginning of the year was to get to nationals,” said Brooke Berquist, 9, who has been cheering for the Pop Warner Berlin Seahawks for three years. Berquist visited Disney when she was 2 years old while her brother competed in a baseball tournament and she remembers eating breakfast with princesses. The Tower of Tower and the competition will be highlights of her trip, she said. “We have cool stunts with facial expressions,” Berquist said. “We make duck faces and blow kisses.” The girls began training for the competitions in August when they practiced four nights a week. Once school started, practices were scheduled three days a week. In addition, the cheerleaders perform every Saturday for the Pop Warner football games. “It’s a lot of dedication from the little girls and parents,” Parsons said. “It’s been a lot of fun to see them grow and some have never done this before. What a great group of girls.” The cheerleaders will use their winning routine consisting of cheer, dance, tumbling and stunts with a couple tweaks for the national competition at Walt Disney World’s Wide World of Sports on Monday, Dec. 7 at 8:30 a.m. They will be competing against seven additional regions and 16 potential Pop Warner teams in the junior pee wee medium level three

division. In addition, the girls will represent Berlin in Disney World as “The coolest little cheer squad from the coolest small town” in a parade with themed hats they create. Pop Warner cheerleaders are required to maintain acceptable grade point averages to participate in the nonprofit organization’s programs. At Disney World, the cheerleaders are required to have a study hall and the program has reached out to their schools, Parsons said. “Many of our girls were national scholars for Pop Warner last year,” she said. “Five girls made first team for Pop Warner cheerleading and that’s amazing to be in the top 35 with 450,000 participants in the country.” The cheerleaders who received recognition maintained a 96 average and participated in a number of volunteer activities including girl scouts and Relay for Life, she said. “It was a neat group of wellrounded girls and an amazing year for them scholastically,” Parsons said. “We missed going to nationals last year by half a point and these girls are very determined [this year].” More than 200 children in Berlin participate in Pop Warner programs including six football teams and three cheer squads. Donahue has spent endless hours for the past 16 years dedicated to the program. “She has done a fabulous job and is our rock,” Parsons said. All adult volunteers go through certification programs and participants rely on donations to attend national championships. Tony Morris is president of the association in Berlin and coaches football, Parsons said. “We have a lot of good volunteers and keep 200 kids active.” The cheerleaders collected donations during the Holiday Shopper’s Fair at the convention center on Thanksgiving weekend. “They did very good and people were generous,” Parsons said. “They cheered for donations and came in shifts.” Berlin Pop Warner is accepting monetary donations for its football and cheer program. Donations are tax deductible and can be mailed to: Worcester County Youth Football P.O. Box 205 Berlin, Md. 21811. “They are out of the house practicing football and cheerleading,” Parsons said. “We have to raise money for everything we do and rely on the kindness of the community.” For information on the Worcester County Youth Football and Cheerleading Berlin Seahawks, call 443-783-8628 or visit www.BerlinSeahawks.com. To donate money to the cheerleaders GoFundMe page, visit www.gofundme.com/qpag7sk4.


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

PAGE 59

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Roasted cauliflower mash served Dish calls for few russet potatoes; acts as binder for smoother consistency By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Change is undeniably the hardest concept that graces the table of chance. Whether it’s aromas linger in the kitchen of cookery or the shadows of progression, adjustment and modification have a tendency to remain on the burner of abstinence. Thanksgiving has passed and my expanded waistline is an indication of indulgence and satisfaction. If I am going to survive the holiday season without an extended stay at Canyon Ranch, the menu must be trimmed for the sake of my prodigious vanity and susceptible sanity. Dieting is a misconception that needs clarification. Unless one is in the prime of their youth or family genes produce the likes of a supermodel, cutting out the fats and carbs are unfortunately a fact of life. But on the other hand, that doesn’t mean one has to reduce themselves to a meal of carrot and celery sticks. Losing weight is a lifetime commitment but must incorporate some room for extravagance. Roasted vegetables are delicious and have much more depth than steamed vegetables. The roasted flavor adds a unique twist and is so simple to prepare. But how much do we know about the science behind these blessings to be. Following is a brief synopsis on the chemistry of roasted vegetables. Chefs have known for centuries that browning food makes it taste better. The problem is that vegetables are very high in water, and when browned in a hot oven, there is a significant loss of moisture. This concentrates flavor which is a good thing, but can leave one with an unappealing batch of wrinkled veggies. The solution is the use of two cooking methods. Steaming the vegetables first promotes tenderness and at the same time does not expel any liquid. This precooking stage is especially important in vegetables like potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, Brussels sprouts, asparagus and cauliflower. The gentle start of steaming allows the enzyme pectin methyl esterase (PME) to help keep the vegetables firmer and less prone to water loss. According to education.com., scientists believe PME is found in the cell wall of all plants. When the vegetables are heated to 120 degrees, the enzyme becomes activated. The texture of the cell wall becomes stiff and remains stiff even when subject to boiling for long periods of time. After this initial steaming phase is completed, the heat is turned up and the vegetables are roasted uncovered until a modest char has developed. The end result are luscious vegetables with a moist interior and a gorgeous roasted exterior. While we are on the subject of browning, there is an important distinction that needs to made. Many cooks assume

“caramelizing” and “browning” can be used interchangeably. But if one looks at the science behind these techniques, they are related but actually quite different. Caramelization describes the chemical reactions that takes place when sugar is heated to the point that its molecules begin to break apart and generate new flavors, colors and aroma compounds. As for browning, this process involves the interaction of not just sugar molecules and heat but also proteins and their breakdown products called amino acids. This is a subtle difference, but specification is necessary for proper education. Roasted cauliflower mash is quite delectable and has much more taste than traditional mashed potatoes. The recipe calls for a few russet potatoes which acts as a binder for a smother consistency. Roasted cauliflower mash can easily be paired with chicken, pork, lamb, beef and fish. It can also stand on its own and enhance vegetarian menus. Roasted cauliflower mash is a must for the chilly months of winter. Enjoy! *Note: The recipe calls for one to cover the cauliflower with tin foil. Many people believe the shiny side must be facing the exterior while the dull side is touching the food. The shiny and dull

sides of aluminum foil work the same. Aluminum foil is made by passing two layers of foil through a rolling mill at the same time. The side in contact with the rolling mill comes out shiny, while the other side remains dull.

Roasted Cauliflower Mash Ingredients 4 russet potatoes 1 head of cauliflower (trim outer leaves, remove stem and cut head into 8 equal wedges) 1 small head of garlic, unpeeled extra virgin olive oil kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 2/3 cup good quality Parmesan cheese, freshly grated 4 tablespoons unsalted butter ¼ cup whole milk kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste 1. Prepare 4 russet mashed potatoes according to your favorite recipe. Set aside. 2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Place the cauliflower and whole head of unpeeled garlic in a shallow roasting pan. Toss with enough olive oil to coat the pan and vegetables. Cover tightly with tin foil and bake for 25 minutes. 3. Turn the oven up to 400 degrees, remove the tin foil and turn the florets of cauliflower and garlic. Cook for another See ROASTED Page 61

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 60

DECEMBER 4, 2015

NOW PLAYING

SIMPLE TRUTH Harborside Bar & Grill: Saturday, Dec. 5, 2-6 p.m. Bourbon Street On The Beach: Thursday, Dec. 10, 5-9 p.m.

BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com Dec. 4: Full Circle, 9 p.m. Dec. 5: Over Time, 9 p.m. Dec. 9: Christmas Party w/Teenage Rust & the Fabulous Rustettes, 5 p.m. BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium Ocean City , 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com Dec. 4: Dave Sherman, 7-10 p.m. Dec. 5: Baltimore Boyz, 7-10 p.m. Dec. 10: Simple Truth, 5-9 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue CASINO AT OCEAN DOWNS 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-641-0600 www.oceandowns.com Dec. 4: Aaron Howell Duo, 5:30-9:30 p.m. Dec. 5: Aaron Howell Duo,

4:30-8:30 p.m.; Monkee Paw, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. THE COVE AT OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford’s Landing Road Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 www.oceanpines.org Dec. 5: Kevin Poole, 6-10 p.m. DUFFY’S TAVERN 130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com Dec. 4: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m. FAGER’S ISLAND 60th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-5500 www.fagers.com Dec. 4: “unwind” DJ RobCee, 6 p.m.; DJ Hook, 9 p.m. Dec. 5: DJ Groove, 9:30 p.m. Dec. 6: Everett Spells, brunch GUIDOS BURRITOS 33rd Street and Coastal Highway Ocean City 410-524-3663 www.guidosburritos.com Every Thursday: DJ Wax, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.

POWER PLAY Ocean Club Nightclub: Friday and Saturday, Dec. 4-5, 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m.

HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com Dec. 4: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. Dec. 5: Simple Truth, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. Dec. 6: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 7 p.m. Dec. 10: Opposite Directions, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. HARPOON HANNA’S Route 54 and the bay Fenwick Island, Del. 800-227-0525 302-539-3095 www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com Dec. 4: Dave Hawkins, 5-10 p.m. Dec. 5: Dave Sherman, 6-10 p.m. Dec. 10: Melissa Alesi, 5-9 p.m. HOOTERS Rt. 50 & Keyser Point Road West Ocean City 410-213-1841 www.hootersofoc.com Dec. 5: TBA, 8 p.m. JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB 56th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-524-7499

www.johnnyspizzapub.com Dec. 4: Slappy Hour, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Dec. 5: Randy Lee Ashcraft and the Saltwater Cowboys, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Dec. 9: Christmas Party w/Randy Lee Ashcraft and the Saltwater Cowboys, 6 p.m. KY WEST RESTAURANT & BAR 54th Street Ocean City 443-664-2836 www.kywestoceancity.com Every Saturday: DJ Rhoadie OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Dec. 4-5: Power Play, 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com Dec. 4: Element K, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Dec. 5: John McNutt Band, 5-9 p.m.; Kristen & The Noise, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Dec. 10: Opposite Directions, 5-9 p.m. SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-6762 www.skyebaroc.com Dec. 5: James Darley, 4-8 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL

OVER TIME BJ’s On The Water: Saturday, Dec. 5, 9 p.m.

11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 443-365-2576 Dec. 4: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Roasted cauliflower mash pairs well with meat and fish Continued from Page 59 20 minutes uncovered. You may have to add a little extra olive oil. Again turn the cauliflower and garlic and cook for another 20 minutes. Total cooking time is 1 hour and 5 minutes. 4. Remove the soft garlic from the skin. Using a food processor, puree the roasted cauliflower and soft garlic. 5. In a large pan, combine mashed

potatoes, roasted cauliflower mixture, cheese, butter, milk, salt, pepper and mix well with a hand mixer. *Measurements may vary slightly according to size of the potatoes and cauliflower. Secret Ingredient - Gentleness. “Nothing is so strong as gentleness, nothing so gentle as real strength.” — St. Francis de Sales

Santa to make appearances at Pines events this month (Dec. 4, 2015) Despite the area’s beach location and relatively mild temperatures, Santa Claus and his crew will make appearances at several Ocean Pines events. Santa will begin his visit to Ocean Pines with “Breakfast with Santa Claus & Friends” on Saturday, Dec. 5 from 8-11 a.m. at the Ocean Pines Community Center, located at 235 Ocean Parkway. The entire family can enjoy breakfast and take a picture with Santa and Mrs. Claus. The cost is free for children ages 3 and under, $4 for children ages 4-10 and $6 for ages 11 and up. Attendees are encouraged to bring an unwrapped, new gift or nonperishable food item for local families in need. The Reindeer Lane Gift Shop, also held on Dec. 5 from 8-11 a.m. at the community center, is a holiday “store” where children ages 12 and under will be able to purchase gifts for family and friends. Items for children and adults, all nominally priced, will be available. Donations for the shop are also being accepted. Following these events, Santa will be visiting with children weekly in White

Horse Park, located across from the community center. He will be available for lap-sitting, pictures and wish lists every Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. starting Sunday, Dec. 6 until Sunday, Dec. 20. There is no charge for this Santa experience. Santa will wrap up his stay by donning swim trunks and flip-flops at the eighth annual “Swim with Santa” on Saturday, Dec. 12 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Sports Core Pool, located at 11143 Cathell Road. The fee is $6 for swimmers and $3 for non-swimmers. Donations of food and unwrapped toys will also be accepted on behalf of the Worcester County Sheriff Department’s “Christmas for the Needy” program. All of these events are open to the public. For more information, call the Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department at 410-641-7052. Information regarding additional recreational programs, including an online version of the Ocean Pines Activity Guide, is available at www.OceanPines.org.

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Annual Santa’s Open Charity Golf Tournament, Saturday

(Dec. 4, 2015) Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Chesapeake will host the 23rd annual Santa’s Open Charity Golf Tournament, sponsored by RAMS, LLC., on Saturday, Dec. 5 at the Ocean Pines Golf & Country Club. Since 1992, Santa’s Open has provided funds to benefit low-income children and families on Maryland’s Eastern Shore who are in need of mentoring support and encouragement. There are still options available for sponsorships, including Toy Shoppe Tees, Santa’s Cheer Cart and Mrs. Claus’ Breakfast. Delmarva Power is the 2015 Rudolph’s Reception Sponsor. Registration the day of the tournament is $85 per player. Each golfer is asked to bring an unwrapped gift for an underprivileged child age 7-17. The format is four-person teams. Registration includes golfing fees, break-

fast, cart, reception, Santa’s Cheer and the chance to win contests and gifts. Sign up to golf or become a sponsor at www.biglittle.org/santa15. For more information on the agency, visit www.biglittle.org or call 410-543-2447 ext.225. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Chesapeake is a nonprofit, youth development organization that is committed to helping children reach their fullest potential through professionally supported, one-to-one mentoring relationships and a full range of youth mentoring programs with measurable impact. Programs are tailored to the needs of the children and include educational and social activities that they would otherwise never experience. Research proves that through Big Brothers Big Sisters, children facing overwhelming odds can thrive and achieve long-term success with the support of positive adult role models.

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

SDHS PRESIDENTIAL SERVICE HONOREES Sixty-four Stephen Decatur High School students received the Presidential Service Award for community service, including 19 gold recipients for volunteering more than 250 hours. SDHS students logged more than 12,000 volunteer hours this past school year. Pictured are 19 Stephen Decatur High School students receiving the Presidential Service Gold Award for community service, an honor reserved only for those volunteering more than 250 hours. In back, are Katelyn Norman, Ian Waggoner, Hailey Williams, Darrien Ross, Cole Norman, Ben Short, Ashley de Sampaio Ferraz, Andrew Hoffman and Allison Shumate, and in front, Victoria Kerkovich, Rachel Prengaman, Patrick Miller, Paige Hastings, Malia Nichols, Lucia Vicidomini, Logan Sackadorf, Logan Figgs, Lindsay Jones and Kevin Williams.

GUEST SPEAKER SING-ALONG Delmarva Chorus members performed at The Park harvest dinner on Nov. 18. The chorus will host a holiday music sing-along on Monday, Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. at the Ocean Pines Community Center. Homemade holiday desserts will be served.

PHOTO COURTESY TED PAGE

EASTERN SHORE ‘JEWELS’ The Worcester County Commission for Women and the Friends of the Commission, hosted “The Gems Tea” at the Dunes Manor Hotel on 28th Street in Ocean City on Nov. 1. This event honors and celebrates the lives of “jewels” of the Eastern Shore. Pictured, from left, are Lou Etta McClaflin, president of the Friends of the Commission; the four honorees, Ruth Kemp, Jo Fran Falcon, Mary Makinen and Barbara Tull; L. Eloise Henry-Gordy, chair of the Worcester County Commission for Women and Carol Rose, chair of the Gems Tea event.

Ocean City/Berlin Rotary Club President Arlan Kinney welcomes special speaker, Caroline Massey from NASA at Wallops Island. The Ocean City/Berlin Rotary Club meetings are held Wednesdays at 6 p.m. in the Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott on 15th Street and the Boardwalk.

NURSES VISIT OCES Nurses from Atlantic General Hospital recently visited Ocean City Elementary School to help the kindergarten students learn about the hospital and the people who work there. The nurses brought hospital equipment, a slideshow and gear for the students to view. Pictured are students Samantha Chavarria-Aguilar and Trevor Lehman from Christine Lieb’s class, with nurse Denise Esham.


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

PAGE 63

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

OCES HEAVENLY HATS DAY Since 2001, the Heavenly Hats Foundation has donated 2 million new hats to cancer patients of all ages. Ocean City Elementary School held its third annual Heavenly Hats Day on Oct. 15. For a $1 donation, students, faculty and staff had the privilege of wearing their favorite hats to school, while positively impacting the lives of those facing the biggest challenge of their lives. Ocean City Elementary School made a donation of $635.40 to the Heavenly Hats Foundation. Julie Justice’s fourth grade class was the top contributor, raising $68.40. All of the money donated will help to provide hats to cancer patients nationwide. (Right) Some of Justices’ students, in front, Chris Stedding, Brian Quach, Tobias Walas and Taylor Davis, and in back, Jawad Labwam, Marlee Roberts, Sophia Law and Rylee Houck. (Left) Kindergarten students, Israel David, Colby Fowle and Makayla Price.

‘WOUNDED WARRIORS’ DONATION The Gibbs family, owners of the Dough Roller restaurants in Ocean City, donated $5,000 to the Ocean City Lions “Wounded Warriors” Fund and the 10th annual “Wounded Warriors” Golf Tournament, held Oct. 14, at the Ocean City Golf Club. The Gibbs family is a “Medal of Honor” sponsor and has financially supported the fundraiser and golf tournament since its inception. The tournament benefits wounded troops from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. To date, the Ocean City Lions have donated more than 20,000 items of new clothing and more than $250,000 worth of gift cards to the U.S. Army Medical Center/ Pastoral Services in Landstuhl, Germany, where wounded troops are sent for treatment before heading home. Pictured, from left, are Lion Norm Cathell, Jeff and Bill Gibbs and Lion Ben Dawson.

‘SELF-CONTROL’ AWARD Seaside Christian Academy’s theme for the school year is the “Fruit of the Spirit,” which are: Love, Joy, Peace, Patience, Kindness, Goodness, Faithfulness, Gentleness and Self-Control. Each month, the students will focus on one of the fruit and the winners will be chosen by their teachers. These students won the “Self-Control” award for the month of September. Pictured, in front, are Simon Fetters and Joel Foreman, and in back, Adalynn Render, Hannah Stirn and Alicia Walker.

WPS CHRISTMAS BAZAAR Worcester Preparatory School Christmas Bazaar Volunteer Chairpersons kick off their planning meeting on Oct. 9 at the Berlin school. Pictured in front, from left, are Susan Beauchamp, Ingrid Poffenberger, Lisa Browne and Jen Humes; second row, Suzanne Arrington and Ann Bateman; third row, Tami Oltman, Sophia Christian, JL Cropper and Doreen Dennis, and in back, Tonya Rayne, Mary Beth Hebert, WPS Development Coordinator Amy Tingle, WPS Director of Human Resources Heather Parsons and WPS Director of Development Betsy Hornung. The 44th annual Christmas Bazaar will take place on Sunday, Dec. 6, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free and the event is open to the public.


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Ocean City Today

Local organizations collect donations for those in need

Sussex Ballet’s ‘The Nutcracker’ performed in OC

(Dec. 4, 2015) Sussex Dance Academy of Rehoboth Beach, Del. has been a training ground in classical ballet and other dance forms since 2002. Sussex Ballet is a pre-professional ballet company comprised of students from Sussex Dance Academy, under the artistic direction of Kate Downes Walker. Although in its 13th season, this will be the company’s premier performance in Ocean City. “The Nutcracker” will be performed by Sussex Ballet on Saturday, Dec. 5 at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on 40th Street. There will be two performances with curtain at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at Ticketmaster.com or at the box office.This show is appropriate for all ages. Audience members will have the opportunity to meet lead characters after the performances. In its 12th annual production of this

DECEMBER 4, 2015

“The Nutcracker” will be performed by Sussex Ballet on Saturday, Dec. 5 at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on 40th Street. Pictured is Cameron James.

seasonal favorite, the Sussex Ballet, which is comprised of dancers ranging in ages from 7 to 18, has a holiday treat for every member of the family. For more information, contact Sussex Dance Academy at 302-645-7855 or visit www.sussexdance.com.

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) The Ocean City Police Department, Santa House, Worcester G.O.L.D. and Toys for Tots will be assisting local families in need this holiday season by collecting toys, food, clothing and monetary donations throughout the area. •Ocean City Police Department/ Santa House: The Ocean City Police Department will be working with Santa House for the third year to provide food and toys to local families. Donations will help struggling families across Worcester County

have a happy holiday season. “The collaboration with Santa House makes it easier for both groups,” said OCPD Public Affairs Specialist Lindsay Richard. “Officers can deliver toys from events and it adds another dropoff location for the charity.” The Santa House is collecting new, unwrapped toys until Friday, Dec. 11. The toys can be dropped off at the Public Safety Building, located on 65th Street, or at any Calvin B. Taylor Bank location throughout Worcester County. Monetary donations can be mailed to Santa House, Inc. any time of the year at See DONATIONS Page 71

CROSSWORD

Winterfest of Lights Jingle Bell 5K run at OC park, Sun.

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Dec. 4, 2015) Do not miss the chance to run through the Winterfest of Lights on Sunday evening during the fifth annual Jingle Bell 5K run at Northside Park on 125th Street from 5-6:30 p.m. “It is all about the spirit of the season,” said Chris Klebe, event organizer. “We have a lot of families and kids who come out. I love seeing people slow down to enjoy the scenery. It is fun and a unique run.” Participants will run through the Christmas lights twice during the race course and will receive a T-shirt. In addition, hot chocolate and cookies will be waiting at the finish line and all runners will receive a free ride on the Winterfest Express.

First-place finishers for top male and female in seven age categories will be awarded after the race. The cost to participate is $28 for adults and $23 for runners 12 and under. Registration will be held outside Abbey Burger on 126th Street from 3:30-4:40 p.m. on Dec. 6. Organizers encourage participants to donate a toy for Toys for Tots and the Santa House. “They support us and I like to do whatever we can,” Klebe said. “I am looking forward to it and the event brings many friends and family together. A lot of grandparents watch the kids run through.” For more information, visit www.octrirunning.org.

Furnace Town’s 19th century Christmas celebration, Sat. (Dec. 4, 2015) Furnace Town Living Heritage Village presents a 19th century Christmas on Saturday, Dec. 5, from noon to 5 p.m., with activities including live holiday music by Bob Sellers all day and a book signing by Gracie Ayers, author of “The Weaver’s Daughter,” from 1-3 p.m. Baked goods and craft vendors, Furnace Town artisans and complimentary holiday refreshments will be on hand throughout the celebration, which concludes with a 19th century church service officiated by Rev. Sherwood McGrath in the historic Old Nazareth Church at 7 p.m. Church doors open at 6:30 p.m. While regular admission applies to ex-

ploring Furnace Town’s artisan village from noon to 5 p.m., all other holiday events are free and open to the public, including walking the Paul Liefer Nature Trail through the Nassawango Cypress forest. Furnace Town is located at 3816 Old Furnace Road, just southwest of Route 12, on the northwest side of Snow Hill. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for age 60 and older and AAA members and $4 for children ages 4-18. Children 3 and under get in free. The Nature Conservancy and Furnace Town members and their guests with passes are free. For more information, contact Furnace Town at 410-632-2032.

Answers on page 67


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.oceancityhilton.com/dining / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717 / www.ocitalianfood.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room with fireplace. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ BARN 34, 3400 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-289-5376 / www.barn34oc.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Barn 34 is a unique and rustic setting with two distinctly different levels. Award winning breakfast at 7 a.m., great lunches from 1-5 p.m. and dinner at 5 p.m. Featuring fresh fish, hand cut steaks, crab cakes and awesome fish tacos. Daily specials. Happy hour is 4-7 p.m. Closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays. ■ BILLY’S SUB SHOP, 120th Street, Food Lion Shopping Center, 410-723-2500; 140th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-1778; Route 54, Fenwick Shoals, Fenwick Island, Del., 302-436-5661 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Dine in, carry out. Fast delivery. Open 7 days 11 a.m. – 3 a.m. Ocean City’s most famous sub and pizza shop since 1959. An OC tradition where a sandwich is a meal, serving fresh dough pizza, subs, burgers, cones, shakes and sundaes with beach delivery available. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater. com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-5243983 / www.bluefishoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH, 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896 / www.bourbonstreetonthebeach. com / $$-$$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations recommended for large parties / Children’s menu/ Full bar / Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, Steaks & Pasta dishes—Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. Like us on Facebook. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COACHES CORNER, 74th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-723-2468 / $ / V-MCDIS/ No reservations required / Children’s menu / Open 7 days a week, 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Happy hour, 67 a.m. Serving breakfast all day and lunch. Our restaurant offers casual dining atmosphere for families. Family owned and operated, everything home made from our white egg omelets to fresh squeezed OJ. ■ COINS, 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100 / www.coinspub.com / $-$$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar/ Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. Our restaurant offers a casual dining atmosphere for families. Best crab cakes in town, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m., 6 days a week and early bird 4-6 p.m., daily specials. Closed Mondays. ■ DOUGH ROLLER, South Division Street & Boardwalk, 410-289-3501; 3rd Street & Boardwalk, 410289-2599; 41st Street & Coastal Hwy, 410-524-9254; 70th Street & Coastal Hwy, 410524-7981 / www.DoughRollerRestaurants.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Ocean City’s Favorite Family Restaurant for 35 years! Great kid’s menu. Dayton’s Boardwalk Famous Fried Chicken now available at 41st and 70th

St locations. Off-season special pricing and online ordering now available at both Coastal Highway locations. Visit our website for more information. ■ DUFFYS, 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449 / www.duffysoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Something for everyone. Our menu features appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second Season & Daily Dinner Specials. Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m., serving breakfast, lunch and dinner; Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Dine In, Carry Out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410-524-5500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar / Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside. ■ GROTTO PIZZA, 14th Street on the boardwalk, Ocean City 443-664-2617 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full Bar / OC’s newest spot to watch people on the boardwalk, indoor dining and deck dining. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. 125th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-1234 / Serving lunch and dinner. Open 7 days. Grotto Pizza is a family casual dining restaurant that specializes in award winning pizza and hospitality. The full menu includes pizza, pasta, sandwiches, subs, appetizers, salads, beer, wine, cocktails and Grotto Gelato. Takeout available. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1846 / www.ocharborside.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment everyday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and all-you-can-eat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdhotels.com/hemingways / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Sea-food, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE, 31st Street, Ocean City, 410-289-2581 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / We have proudly served Ocean City, Maryland for over 40 years. Known for All You Can Eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HOOTERS, Route 50 & Keyser Point Rd., West Ocean City 410-213-1841 and 5th Street, Ocean City / www.hootersofoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Full bar / Open daily at 11 a.m. Brand new menu. Delicious juicy burgers, garden fresh salads, 12 delicious wing sauces and signature seafood entrees. Tropical frozen drinks and signature Hooters cocktails. Large parties are welcome. Call for private party information. Carry out available. The year round Route 50 location features happy hour daily, live entertainment every weekend and Bike Night every Wednesday. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Horizons Oceanfront Restaurant is proud to serve delicious, beach-inspired dishes in both our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. New all-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., features many favorites, as well as exciting new creations with a local flare. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB, 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600 / www.johnnyspizzapub.com / $ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Ocean City’s official pizzeria and pub featuring homemade pizzas, serving 18 different gourmet pizzas including local favorites. Huge variety of calzones, subs, burgers and sandwiches to choose from. Ocean City’s place for jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Voted best sound system for

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Add a QR Code to your Dining Guide listing and give your patrons a direct link to your Web site, Facebook page, App, etc. Cost is $15 for current advertisers ~ $25 for new listings Contact a Sales Representative at 410-723-6397

live music. Carry out or delivery til 2 a.m. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood yearround, fresh local produce. ■ KY WEST BAR & RESTAURANT, 5401 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 443-664-2836 / www.kywestoceancity.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Ky West is becoming the local's fine dining and casual fare destination. Ocean City's best veal chop, the freshest seafood and great pasta dishes. Our experienced chefs deliver the finest in cuisine nightly. Ky West has a fine dining side, as well as a beautiful bar best described as New York funky chic. Whether you chill out on our sofas, hang in the bar, or grab a table, Ky West will provide excellent food & drink for a great dining adventure. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ, 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443 664 5639 / www.longboardcafe.net / $$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / We are the locals favorite serving lunch and dinner. Longboard Cafés menu offers unparalleled flare from the lite fare to dinner entrees — offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads … even a popular "veggies" menu featuring their famous wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with the finest ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MIONE’S PIZZA & ITAILIAN RESTURANT, Route 50 (Tanger Outlets), West Ocean City 410-2132231 / www.mionesoc.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Beer, wine / Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. 67th Street (Town Center), Ocean City 443-664-6635 / Beer, wine / Open Tuesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. Come and enjoy family New York style pizza, subs and pasta. Daily lunch and dinner specials. Eat in or carry out. ■ OC WASABI, 33rd Street Plaza, Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-7337 / www.ocwasabi.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full bar / OC’s freshest, steamed sushi and sashimi and Japanese cuisine. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 411 p.m. ■ PHILLIPS SEAFOOD, Crab House, 21st Street, Ocean City 410-289-7747 and Seafood House, 141st Street, Ocean City 410-250-1689 / PhillipsSeafood.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full bar / Traditional Dining Buffet - Carry Out. Early Bird Menu when seated before 5pm - All-You-Can-Eat Buffet - Voted OC’s Best Buffet. Featuring over 75 items including Snow Crab Legs, Carving Station, Made to Order Pasta, Handmade Crab Cakes & so much more. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, yearround. Every Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ ROPEWALK, 82nd Street on the bay, Ocean City 410-524-1109 / www.ropewalkoc.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full Bar / OC’s newest spot to watch the sunsets. Indoor dining and bar, deck dining and tiki bar. Serving lunch and dinner in relaxed casual atmosphere. Happy hour specials all day and all night every day available at tables and bar. ■ ROPEWALK - A FENWICK ISLAND OYSTER HOUSE, 700 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-581-0153 / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted except 6-9 p.m. / Children’s menu / Full Bar / Family friendly dining with a rotating oyster list and seafood creations paired with our fresh fruit crushes and extensive craft beer menu. Takeout available except between 6-9 p.m. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410-5244900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SEASONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-524-1000 / www.carouselhotel.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., featuring a wide variety of entrees, seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ SHRIMP BOAT, 9924 Stephen Decatur Highway, West Ocean City 410-213-0448 /

shrimpboatoc.com / $- $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Beer, wine / Steamed crabs and shrimp. Full menu featuring homemade soups, salads, seafood appetizers, fish and shrimp tacos, crab cakes, sandwiches, seafood dinner entrees, burgers and wings. Fresh seafood market with daily shrimp specials. ■ SICULI RUSTIC ITALIAN KITCHEN, 104 N. Main St., Berlin 410-629-0550 / FB-Siculi Italian Kitchen / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full Bar / Family friendly. Open for lunch and dinner, 11 a.m.; Sunday brunch, 10:30 a.m. Locally sourced, freshly prepared. Award-winning brick oven pizza, steaks, seafood, chicken and veal selections. Daily lunch, happy hour and dinner specials. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / www.skyebaroc.com / $$$$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Enjoy lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare in the Skye, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Amazing views of Ocean City, the ocean and bay with spectacular sunsets overlooking Sunset Island. Celebrate happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with great food and drink specials. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE COVE AT OCEAN PINES, 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 / www.oceanpines.org/ $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS/No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual Waterfront - The Cove at Ocean Pines Yacht Club in an all new gorgeous bayfront setting, specializing in coastal cuisine. Serving lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. Inside and outside dining areas. Open-air bar and live entertainment. Check Web site for special events. Open everyday. ■ THE CRAB BAG, 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-250-3337 / www.thecrabbag.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Full bar / Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Huge menu; something for everyone. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carry-out and dinner specials. The best happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ TOKYO SEAFOOD BUFFET, 131st Street (formerly JR’S North), Ocean City 410-390-5939 / $$ / V-MCAE/ No reservations required / Full bar/ OC’s largest seafood, all-you-can-eat buffet featuring soups, raw sushi and sashimi, steamed and baked seafood along with classic Chinese entrees and many classic desserts and fruits. Friday through Sunday buffet features hot steamed snow crab legs. ■ TONY LUKES, 33rd Street, Ocean City 410-524 0500 / www.tonylukes.com / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Breakfast, lunch and dinner. Our restaurant offers authentic cheesesteaks, roast pork and chicken cutlet sandwiches, burgers, salads and desserts at family friendly prices. Eat in and carry out. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT, Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-289-1100 / www.dunesmanor.com / $$ - $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations not required but recommended / Full Bar / Children’s menu / Open year round. An elegant oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily 7:30am to 9:00pm (Fri & Sat to 10pm). Also featuring Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 47p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season. ■ VINNY’S PIZZA & ITALIAN GRILL, 25th Street and Philadelphia Avenue, Ocean City 410-390-3713 / www.vinnyspizzaanditlaiangrille.com / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Beer, wine / Serving lunch and dinner. Our restaurant offers authentic Italian food featuring subs and fabulous authentic Italian entrees. Hand tossed, made from scratch pizzas. Family friendly, eat in and carry out. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Old World saloon-type feel, Whisker’s is famous for its Certified Angus®burgers and delicious casual fare, as well as its entertaining atmosphere and photo lined walls of famous and infamous “whiskers.” Enjoy flat screen TVs to watch your favorite sports. Call for hours.


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DECEMBER 4, 2015

Calendar FRI. Dec. 4 RONNIE MILSAP CONCERT — Ocean City

Performing Arts Center, Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 8 p.m. Tickets cost $45 and $55. For tickets, call or visit the Ocean City Convention Center box office, 40th Street and Coastal Highway, 800-OC-OCEAN or Ticketmaster, 800-551SEAT. Info: www.oceancityconcerts.com or 410-289-2800. — Starting at 7 p.m., the parade begins at Town Hall and ends at the PNC Bank parking lot at the corner of Church and Main streets. Marching bands, fire trucks, antique cars, floats and Santa Claus. Visit Santa’s House from 5:30-7 p.m. Cookies and cocoa sales support the Delaware Read Aloud Program. Info: Lauren Weaver, 302-539-2100, Ext. 118.

55TH ANNUAL SELBYVILLE CHRISTMAS PARADE

GIFT SHOPPE — The Refuge Clubhouse,

37533 Leisure Drive, 6-8 p.m. Holiday, new and nearly new items, soup makings and basket of cheer. Benefiting the American Cancer Society, Relay for Life, Team Refuge.

STORY TIME ‘TRANSPORTATION’ — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. Info: www.worcesterlibrary.org.

CHRISTMAS AT THE NORTHPOLE — Seacrets,

49th Street and the Bay, 6-10 p.m. Christmas costume contest for adults and children. Participants receive a drink ticket for wine, beer or soda. Cost is $30 for adults and $15 for children 13 and younger. Food, desserts, silent auction, raffles, music provided by DJ BK and a visit from Santa. Support David Neith and Shelley Leach in their bid for prom king and queen. Tickets: 410-723-2842. — Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th Street, 5-7 p.m. Featuring “The Best of 2015” and the annual all-media juried show. Meet the artists and enjoy hors d’oeuvres. Free and open to the public. The Artisan Fair begins during the First Friday reception and continues on Saturday. Purchase unique handmade artwork, meet the artisans and enjoy live music and refreshments. Patrick Henry will be on hand for book signings. Info: www.artleagueofoceancity.org or 410-524-9433. All shows will be on display until Dec. 26.

OPENING ART RECEPTION AND ARTISAN FAIR

SAT. Dec. 5

CHEER AND DANCE EXTREME — Ocean City

convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway. OC Christmas Open Championship - Cheer and Dance Extreme Competition. Spectators admission fees are $15 for adults, $10 for ages 6-11 years and free to children 5 and younger. Info: www.cheeranddanceextreme.com.

‘THE NUTCRACKER’ PERFORMANCE — Ocean City Performing Arts Center, Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Performed by Sussex Ballet. This show is appropriate for all ages. Meet

lead characters after the performance. Purchase tickets at Ticketmaster.com or at the Convention Center Box Office. Cost is $15 for adults and $12 for children 17 and younger and seniors 60 and older. Info: Sussex Dance Academy, 302-645-7855, www.sussexdance.com or 410-289-2800.

OCEAN CITY CHRISTMAS PARADE — The parade starts at 11 a.m. on Old Landing Road and marches northbound in the southbound lanes of Coastal Highway to the judges’ stand at 120th Street. Featuring more than 50 units, including high school bands, horses, antique cars, holiday floats and more. Awards presentation and reception following at the Carousel Resort Hotel and Condominiums, 118th Street and oceanfront in Ocean City. Halfpriced ice skating, holiday music, complimentary winter refreshments and free photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus. Info: Brenda Moore, 410-250-0125 or bmoore@oceancitymd.gov.

SANTA PHOTOS AND MRS. CLAUS STORYTIME — Visitor’s Center, 14 S. Main St., Berlin, noon to 4 p.m. Santa photos with the ‘Santa of the President.” Ed France has been the White House Santa Claus since the 1970s. Story time with Mrs. Claus, free hot chocolate and Christmas characters walking around town. Info: www.BerlinMainStreet.com or 410-973-2051. FREE HORSE AND CARRIAGE RIDES — In front

of the Visitor’s Center, 14 S. Main St., Berlin, Saturdays and Sundays, noon to 3 p.m. Info: www.BerlinMainStreet.com or 410-973-2051.

CHRISTMAS COOKIE WALK — Bethany United Methodist Church, 8648 Stephen Decatur Highway, Berlin, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Homemade cookies sold by the pound. Packaging with ribbons and bows. Info: 410-213-8238.

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BAZAAR — Stevenson United Methodist Church, 123 N. Main St., Berlin, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Retail and hand craft vendors and silent auction items. Pulled pork sandwich, cole slaw and a beverage for $5. Eat in or carry out. Info: 410-641-1137.

GIFT SHOPPE — The Refuge Clubhouse, 37533 Leisure Drive, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Holiday, new and nearly new items, soup makings and basket of cheer. Benefiting the American Cancer Society, Relay for Life, Team Refuge. INDOOR YARD SALE — Bishopville Volunteer

Fire Department, 10709 Bishopville Road, 7 a.m. to noon. Tables rental costs $15 each or two for $25. Breakfast sandwiches available. Reserve tables: 443-235-2926.

BREAKFAST WITH SANTA — Applebee’s,

12849 Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City, 810 a.m. All-you-can-eat pancake breakfast with sausage, coffee, juice and fountain sodas for $7. Benefits Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation.

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET WITH SANTA — Buckingham Presbyterian Church,

20 S. Main St., Berlin, 8:30-10:30 a.m. Cost is $8 for adults, $4 for children ages 3-10 years and free to those 2 and younger. Take cameras and camcorders. Tickets available at the door. Reservations recommended for

large groups: 410-641-0234.

CHRISTMAS CONCERT — St. Andrews Center, 14401 Sinepuxent Ave., Ocean City. Featuring “Irishman Chorale” of Baltimore and Most Blessed Sacrament Childrens Choir. Donations are $10 in advance or $12 at the door. Children 12 and younger admitted free. Sponsored by Ladies Ancient Order of Hibernians; all proceeds go to charity. Info: 410-208-3847 or 302-988-1498.

19TH CENTURY CHRISTMAS — Furnace Town

Living Heritage Village, 3816 Old Furnace Road, Snow Hill, noon to 5 p.m. Baked goods and craft vendors, Furnace Town artisans and complimentary holiday refreshments. Music by Bob Sellers all day and a book signing by Gracie Ayers, author of “The Weaver’s Daughter,” from 1-3 p.m. A 19th century church service held in the historic Old Nazareth Church at 7 p.m. Regular admission applies to exploring Furnace Town’s artisan village from noon to 5 p.m.; all other holiday events are free. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for seniors age 60 and older and AAA members, $4 for children ages 4-18 and free for children 3 and younger. Info: 410-632-2032.

2ND ANNUAL ‘A NIGHT TO REMEMBER IN DECEMBER’ — Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic

School, 11242 Race Track Road, Ocean Pines. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. A $35 donation includes a holiday buffet prepared by local chefs, desserts, dancing, a $1,000 raffle ticket, 50/50, Chinese and live auction items and non-alcoholic beverages. Cash bar. Proceeds benefit the Shirley Grace Pregnancy Center. Tickets: Patti Bulvin, 443-513-4124.

HOLIDAY TRAIN DISPLAY — Georgetown Public Library, 123 West Pine St., Georgetown, Del., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Featuring a large O gauge layout with 24 operating push button displays and a Thomas the Train layout. Sponsored by Delaware Seaside Railroad Club. Info: Bill Ziegler, wjziegler1@verizon.net or 302-537-0964.

MORNING MATINEE & CRAFT — Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 10:30 a.m. Family friendly movies and themed crafts. Info: 410-957-0878. Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., 10 a.m. Novice and established writers gather to share their works. Info: 410-641-0650.

WRITE IT! CREATIVE WRITING FORUM —

OCEAN CITY SURF CLUB HOLIDAY SURFER SOCIAL — Bull on The Beach, 17 94th St., Ocean City, 6:30 p.m. Holiday gifts 2016 member stuff. Raffles, music and more.

40TH ANNUAL ‘CHRISTMAS IN BRIDGEVILLE’ CRAFT SHOW — Woodbridge Middle School,

307 Laws St., Bridgeville, Del., 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Featuring more than 70 vendors and a raffle for a high definition television. Admission is free and all proceeds benefit the Bridgeville Historical Society, Inc. Info: Charles or Sharon Hawk, 302-337-8675.

MODEL TRAIN DISPLAYS — Delaware Seaside Railroad Club, Clayton Crossing, 32422 Royal Blvd., Dagsboro, Del., Saturdays, 10

a.m. to 3 p.m., year round. See five layouts. Info: Bill Ziegler, wjziegler1@verizon.net or 302-537-0964.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST — VFW, Post 8296, 104 66th St., bayside in Ocean City, 8-11 a.m. A $5 donation for all-you-can-eat pancakes or 2-2-2, two eggs, two pancakes and two bacon slices. Info: 410-524-8196. FARMERS MARKET — White Horse Park, 239

Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Locally grown vegetables and fruits, eggs, honey, kettle korn, flowers, artisan breads, seafood, meats and more. New vendors welcome. Info: 410-641-7717, Ext. 3006. Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 8-11 a.m. Enjoy breakfast and take a picture with Santa and Mrs. Claus. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children ages 4-10 and free to those 3 and younger. Attendees are encouraged to bring an unwrapped, new gift or nonperishable food item for local families in need. Open to the public. The Reindeer Lane Gift Shop will also be open from 8-11 a.m. Info: 410-641-7052.

BREAKFAST WITH SANTA CLAUS & FRIENDS —

REINDEER LANE GIFT SHOP — Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 811 a.m. A holiday “store” where children ages 12 and younger are able to purchase gifts for all ages at nominal prices. Donations for the shop are also being accepted. Open to the public. Info: 410-641-7052. ARTISAN FAIR — Ocean City Center for the

Arts, 502 94th Street, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Purchase unique handmade artwork, meet the artisans and enjoy live music and refreshments. Bunk Mann and Paul Treadway will be on hand for book signings from 1-3 p.m. Info: www.artleagueofoceancity.org or 410524-9433. All shows will be on display until Dec. 26.

SUN. Dec. 6 — Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, 5 p.m., rain or shine. Run or walk under the Winterfest of Lights. Participants are encouraged to dress in the holiday spirit. Cost is $28 for adults and $23 for children 11 and younger. Registration held at Abbey Burger Bistro, 126th Street, 3:304:30 p.m. Info: Charlie McClure, csc.mcc@gmail.com or octrirunning.com.

WINTERFEST OF LIGHTS JINGLE BELL 5K RUN

FREE HORSE AND CARRIAGE RIDES — In front

of the Visitor’s Center, 14 S. Main St., Berlin, Saturdays and Sundays, noon to 3 p.m. Info: www.BerlinMainStreet.com or 410-973-2051.

44TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BAZAAR — Worces-

ter Preparatory School, Athletic Performing Arts Center, 508 S. Main St., Berlin, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Musical entertainment, a variety of booths with one-of-a-kind greens and decorations, homemade desserts, handmade gifts, vendor booths, silent auction, Apple Watch raffle, WPS Spirit Booth, the Kris Kringle Café, Starbucks Coffee Bar, Kids’ area and pictures with Santa in his sleigh from noon to 2 p.m.


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CALENDAR Admission is free. Open to the public. The Mallard General Shop for Kids offers children a chance to purchase gifts under $10. Info: www.worcesterprep.org or 410-641-3575.

PARTY FOR PRESERVATION — Captain’s Galley, 12817 Harbor Road, West Ocean City, 5-9:30 p.m. Carving table and heavy hors d’oeuvres, beer, wine, entertainment by Lauren Glick & The Moodswingers and silent auction. Cost is $40. Purchase tickets online by Dec. 1: www.lowershorelandtrust.org. Info: 410-6414467 or vbauer@lowershorelandtrust.org. 18TH ANNUAL HOTS FOR TOTS CHILI COOKOFF — Greene Turtle West, 9616 Stephen

Decatur Highway, West Ocean City, 1-4 p.m. Judging done by patron participation. The Cookoff is a toy drive for the Ocean City Police Department and the Santa House and a fund drive for the Worcester GOLD families. Register: www.ocphc.com. Info: 410-2131500 or opphc@comcast.net. Sponsored by the Ocean City Parrothead Club.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS — Atlantic Gen-

eral Hospital, Conference Room 2, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, noon to 1 p.m. Group shares experience, strength and hope to help others. Open to the community and to AGH patients. Info: Rob, 443-783-3529.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS #169 — Atlantic

General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Group is a 12-step program for anyone struggling with a compulsive eating problem. No initial meeting charge. Meeting contribution is $1 weekly. Info: Bett, 410-202-9078.

SUNDAY NIGHT SERENITY AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP MEETING — Woodlands in Ocean

Pines, Independent Living Apartment Building, 1135 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, 7:30 p.m.

PICTURES WITH SANTA — White Horse Park,

239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Santa will be available for lap-sitting, pictures and wish lists. Free and open to the public. Info: 410-641-7052.

MON. Dec. 7

WW TUNES HOLIDAY MUSIC — Snow Hill li-

brary, 307 N. Washington St., 2 p.m. Enjoy classic holiday music with the WWtunes. Info: 410-632-3495.

GREAT BOOKS DISCUSSION — Ocean Pines

library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:30-4 p.m. The group meets twice a month to discuss both classic and modern reading selections. Info: Dana Rosenfield, 410-652-8639.

HYPERTENSION CLINICS — Sponsored by At-

lantic General Hospital and takes place the first Monday of every month at Apple Discount Drugs, 314 Franklin Ave., in Berlin, 10 a.m. to noon and at Walgreens, 11310 Manklin Creek Rd., in Ocean Pines, 1-3 p.m. Free blood pressure screening and health information. Info: Dawn Denton, 410-641-9268.

Berlin group No. 169, Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, 5-6:30 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING —

weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: Edna Berkey, 410-251-2083.

DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP — St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 405 Flower St., Berlin, first Monday of each month, 6-7 p.m. All welcome. Info: AGH Diabetes Outpatient Education program, 410-641-9703.

CPAP MASK FITTING — Atlantic General Hospital Sleep Disorders Diagnostic Center, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin. Free, monthly mask fitting clinic for patients who are having trouble adjusting to their CPAP equipment. By appointment only: Robin Rohlfing, 410-641-9726. SOCIAL 1 1/2 — Bethany United Methodist

Church, 8648 Stephen Decatur Highway, Berlin, Mondays, 6:30-8 p.m. Christian social club for those 50 and older are welcome to enjoy games, activities, bike rides, prayer and friendship. Info: 410-641-2136 or Bethany21811@gmail.com.

DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS MEETS WEEKLY — The Delmarva Chorus, Sweet

Adeline’s, meets each Monday from 7-9 p.m., at the Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway. Women interested in learning the craft of a cappella singing welcome. Info: 410-641-6876.

TUES. Dec. 8

PLAY TIME — Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., 10:30-11:30 a.m. For infant to 5 year old children. Info: www.worcesterlibrary.org. STORY TIME — Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. Info: www.worcesterlibrary.org.

ON YOUR OWN, BUT NOT ALONE - WOC Fitness, 12319 Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City, 5 p.m. Weight loss support group with discussions about nutrition, exercise, health and weight loss. Cost is $5 per meeting. Info: dillon128@aol.com. FALL BUS TRIP — Tour NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility on Dec. 8. Cost is $35. Open to the public. Buses depart from the Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway. Reservations required: 410-641-7052. Info: www.OceanPines.org.

WED. Dec. 9 — Party will begin at 5 p.m. Officers for 2016 will be installed Cost is $15. Reservations required: Sally Smith, 410-208-0564 or mstngsal42@verizon.net.

RETIRED NURSES HOLIDAY COCKTAIL PARTY

STORY TIME — Ocean City library, 10003

Coastal Highway, 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. Info: www.worcesterlibrary.org.

OCEAN CITY BOOK OF THE MONTH — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 2 p.m. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot. Monthly book club. Info: 410-524-1818. BINGO — Every Wednesday at Ocean City

Elks Lodge 2645, 138th Street and Sinepuxent Avenue, rear of the Fenwick Inn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start 6:30 p.m. Food is available. Open to the public. No one allowed in the hall under 18 years of age during bingo. Info: 410-250-2645.

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB — Meets every

10003 Coastal Highway, 2 p.m. Learn the art of making these cookies with a live demonstration using spelt and sprouted spelt. Info: 410-524-1818.

Wednesday at Peaky’s Rooftop Restaurant & Bar, located in the Fenwick Inn, 13801 Coastal Highway, Ocean City. Beginner and intermediate lessons, 5:30-6:30 p.m., followed by dancing 6:30-9 p.m. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ’50s, ’60s and Carolina beach music. All are welcome. Info: 302-200-DANCE (3262).

HEALTHY LIVING WITH DIABETES WORKSHOP — Snow Hill Senior Center, 4767 Snow Hill

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OCEAN PINES/OCEAN CITY — Meets every Wednes-

PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP — Ocean Pines

BAYSIDE BEGINNINGS AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP MEETING — Ocean Pines Commu-

WILLIAMSBURG RALEIGH TAVERN GINGERBREAD COOKIES — Ocean City library,

Road, 9:30 a.m. to noon. Free, six-week workshop designed to help those affected by diabetes better manage their disease. Preregistration required: Dawn, 410-641-9268. library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Helping individuals with Parkinson’s disease and their families. No reservation, no fee. Info: www.DelmarvaParkinsonsAlliance.org or Ron and Mary Leidner, 410-208-0525.

NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP — Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 2, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, 6:30-8 p.m. Offers shared wisdom and problem solving for family members of persons with mental illness. The group is free. Info: Carole Spurrier, 410208-4003, carolespurrier@msn.com or Gail S. Mansell, 410-641-9725, gmansell@atlanticgeneral.org. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING - Berlin

group 331, Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin, 5:30-7 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: jeanduck47@gmail.com.

day at the Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. Info: 410-641-7330. nity Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 7:30 p.m. Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St, Ocean City, 6 p.m. Info: 410-641-1700 or kbates@taylorbank.com.

OCEAN CITY/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING —

ON YOUR OWN, BUT NOT ALONE - WOC Fitness, 12319 Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City, noon. Weight loss support group with discussions about nutrition, exercise, health and weight loss. Cost is $5 per meeting. Info: dillon128@aol.com.

THURS. Dec. 10

YOUNG & RESTLESS ‘REINDEER GAMES’ — Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 a.m. Science, art, music and games for 3 to 7 year old children. Dress to get messy. Info: www.worcesterlibrary.org.

STORY TIME ‘WINTER STORIES’ — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. Info: www.worcesterlibrary.org.

WRITING WITH RUTH — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 1-3 p.m. Monthly gathering of local writers who share their independent works. Info: 410-524-1818. WILLIAMSBURG RALEIGH TAVERN GINGERBREAD COOKIES — Pocomoke library, 301

Market St., 1 p.m. Learn the art of making these cookies with a live demonstration using spelt and sprouted spelt. Info: 410-957-0878.

CELIAC SUPPORT GROUP — Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, second Thursday of each month, 7-8 p.m. Support and information for those affected by celiac disease. Info: Betty Bellarin, 410-603-0210.

ART SHOW AND SILENT AUCTION — The Globe, 12 Broad St., Berlin, 6-9 p.m. Saddle Up! Bicycle Seat Art Show and Silent Auction will feature more than 40 custom decorated bicycle seats from regional artists. The evening will include the silent auction; music by Full Circle and a student band called Concussion; and voting for Local’s Choice favorite. Proceeds benefit the Eastern Shore IMBA. Info: info@esimba.org or www.esimba.org.

FARMERS’ MARKET — 10019 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, 3-6 p.m. Featuring local in season produce, gluten free and gluten full baked products, eggs, honey, kettle korn, natural pet treats, soaps and more. Info: 410-713-8803. BEACH SINGLES — Every Thursday, Beach

Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour at Harpoon Hanna’s, 39064 Harpoon Road, Fenwick Island, Del., 4 p.m. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577; Kate, 410-524-0649; or Dianne, 302-541-4642.

BINGO — American Legion Post 166, 2308

Philadelphia Ave., in Ocean City, every Thursday, year round. Doors open at 5 p.m., games start at 6:30 p.m. Food available. Open to the public. Info: 410-289-3166.

CHAIR AEROBICS — St. Peter’s Lutheran

Church Community Life Center, 10301 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, 1-2 p.m. Free will offering appreciated. Sponsored by St. Peter’s Senior Adult Ministry. Info: 410524-7474.

COASTAL HOSPICE GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11 a.m. Free and open to anyone who has lost a loved one, not just Coastal Hospice families. Info: 410-251-8163.

Crossword answers from page 64


DECEMBER 4, 2015

68

Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

Customer Service Position Must have experience in customer service, punch out and trim. Valid driver’s license and transportation are required. Apply in person Beachwood Inc., 11632 Worcester Hwy., Showell, MD 21862

HELP WANTED

Retiree PT Carpenter

needed with own tools, flexible hours 3-4 days per week. Good references needed. Contact Gene Brewis with Harbour Island at 14th Street on the bay. Nice place to work.

410-251-1423

MODEL CASTING

for South Moon Under

Female applicants must be 5'8" or taller and fit a size 2 dress and size 25 jean. Male applicants must be 6' or taller and fit a size 32"-34" pant. All applicants must be of legal working age. Work permits required for anyone under the age of 18. Email your name, contact info, age, height and sizes with a head shot and full length shot to: models@southmoonunder.com. We will contact you if you fit the criteria.

Thank you for your interest.

The Princess Royale Hotel & Conference Center Located at 91st St. Oceanfront, Ocean City, MD

Year Round • Housekeepers • Hskp. Floor Supervisor • General Maintenance • YR Bellman

Apply online at www.princessroyale.com or fax to 410-524-7787 or email to employment@princessroyale.com

---Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities:

Year Round, Full/Part Time: Food Runner (PT), Server, Housekeeping House Staff, Bartender, Room Attendants (van will pick up in Salisbury)

Free Employee Meals and Great Benefits.

HELP WANTED

PipeLine

Contracting, LLC

Home Improvement Contractor Seeking Full-Time Temp Help This position will provide a variety of general labor. Requires previous experience, knowledge & skill in painting, demolition, carpentry, drywall repair, minor plumbing & electrical work. Must be RELIABLE, have a valid driver’s license and own insured vehicle. Only candidates who are meticulous about their work need apply. PipeLine Contracting LLC is a drug-free company. You MUST pass a background & drug test prior to being offered a position. Send resumes to info@pipelinecontracting.net or call M-F 9:00 am - 3:00 pm, 410-982-8368 to arrange an interview. www.pipelinecontracting.net

Make 2015 the year of “Beauty” for you and others!

Work F/T or P/T, set your own hours, and make up to 50% commission. To become a Representative or to order product email snowhillavon@ comcast.net Like me on Facebook & for more beauty tips go to christinesbeautyshop

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

SELL REAL ESTATE AT THE BEACH Interested in a career in Real Estate?

Coldwell Banker School of Real Estate is offering Licensing Classes Now SPACE IS LIMITED

Contact Kelley Bjorkland at 443-424-8329 or kelley.bjorkland@cbmove.com or visit www.CBRBSchool.com Nothing in this document is intended to create an employment relationship. Any affiliation by you with the Company is intended to be that of an independent contractor agent. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC

CLASSIFIEDS CALL 410-723-6397

WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE

Immediate Opening! Our busy Thrift Shop in Berlin has an opening for a Warehouse Associate at our new Donations Center. This is a physically demanding job requiring repetitive lifting up to 50 pounds and standing up to 4 hours at a time. Assist with receiving donations, rotating inventory in the warehouse, and moving stored items around the store. This is a year-round, paid position. Please submit your resume or letter of interest by visiting our website; www.coastalhospice.org. EOE

HELP WANTED

Clerical FT/PT YR Good pay. Small firm looking for right person. Rental/Bookkeeping. Experience a plus. Excel/ Word/QBooks. Resume to: Fred@ParadiseOC.com. ***PLUMBER WANTED*** *******TOP PAY******* *FOR THE RIGHT PERSON* Reputable HVAC company is looking for a Professional Plumber to serve the Delmarva area. 401K, Health Benefits, Bonuses and Plenty of Overtime if you want it. Clean Criminal Record & Drivers License are required. Drug Free Environment. SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY Call 443-497-1953

General Manager in Ocean City, MD Full Time Salary + benefits Prefer supervision, sales & customer service experience. E-mail resume to: Attn: Fred Davis dinosaurcanyon@gmail.com or fax resume to: 417-332-0883

RENTALS RENTALS

YR Rental. 2BR/1BA. Ocean Block. Partially furnished. No pets. $950/month. 443-3738987 WINTER WEEKLY RENTALS Pool Front Rooms $170. Efficiencies $190. 2BR Apartments $275. Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave. 410-289-8581

APARTMENTS FOR RENT *2BR, WOC, YR $1000/mo. *1BR, YR, Berlin $1000/mo. *1BR YR, Berlin $800/mo. *3BR House, YR, Bay Street $800/mo. *2BR, WR, Downtown OC $600-800/mo. For more information 443-614-4007

RENTALS

2BR/2BA Fully Remodeled, Bright Furnished House in WOC. Near Harbor. Potential studio in loft. Vaulted ceilings, fireplace & deck. Optional Y/R $1230/month includes water. 240-620-3040

2BR/1.5BA Mobile in Bishopville. Unfurnished. No pets/ no smoking. Includes heat and air. $1,000. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-3525555. WOC Spacious 3BR/2BA House on quiet Salisbury Road. Available December. $1200/mo., plus utilities. $1,200 sec deposit required. Text or call 443-783-4535.

Deal Island. $1,100/mo. 3BR/2BA. New carpeting and floors, porch, large back yard. 443-523-4110 or 410-7842626 WR - 2BR/2BA - Fully furn. $925/mo. Utils. & cable included. W/D, DW. No smoking/pets. Dec 1st-May 1st. Call 717-816-1790.

YR, 2BR Condo, 142nd St. Available now! $995/mo. + utils. Winter Rental - 3BR Townhouse on 28th Street. Available Nov. 1st. $700/mo. + utils. Call John 410-7268948. WEST OCEAN CITY 10216 Golf Course Road Three Bedroom, Three Bath House. Winter Rental Only. $1,000 per month plus utilities. 410-726-1988 YR - MIDTOWN OCEANBLOCK First Floor 3BR, 1.5BA Beautifully renovated New appl.’s & hardwood floors. No pets. Ref’s & Sec. Dep. Req. $1095 per mo. Victor 410-422-5164

Winter Rental - OC Maryland. 2BR/2BA Bayfront 39th St. $650/mo. + util. & sec. dep. Top floor available now. No smoking/pets. 703-9698485 YR, Oceanside, Mid-Town, 4BR/1BA Apt. - Ocean view, plenty of parking. Great location! $1250/mo. + utils. 1 mo. sec. deposit req’d. 443-8802486

3BR/2BA Remodeled Mobile. Waterfront. $1,000/mo. Not including utilities. Call Howard Martin Realty, 410352-5555. OC Winter Rental - 1 Bedroom Efficiency Apt., 47th St., fully furnished. $750/mo. Utilities and cable included. 443506-2738

Winter Rental - 2BR Apt. $215/wk. Sec. deposit req’d. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED. No pets. 410-289-5831 YR, NOC, 145th St., Bayside. 4BR/1BA - Ground level, plenty of parking. $1250/mo. + utils. 1 mo sec. deposit req’d. 443-8802486

YR, Large 5BR/4BA Apt. Off 104th St., $1600/mo. + utils. 1 mo. sec. deposit req’d. Sleeps 12. Walking distance to stores and mall. 443-8802486 Winter Rental $600 for Dec. Blue Turtle Apt. on 57th 2BR Furn. & Utilities Included 410-422-4780

WEEKLY • SEASONAL

R E N TA L S

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626 VA C AT I O N S

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com

Apartments Starting at $675 Single Family Homes Starting at $1,100 Condos Starting at $1,000 CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

RENTALS

Open 7 Days A Week for property viewing in: * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

Now you can order your classifieds online

RAMBLER MOTEL 9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $175 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

ROOMMATES ROOMMATES

Female Roommate Wanted to share a 2BR Blue Turtle Apt. on 57th St. $300/month includes All Utilities 410-422-4780

Classifieds 410-723-6397

www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.net


DECEMBER 4, 2015

REAL ESTATE

Salisbury 3BR/1.5BA. Fully Remodeled 2-story w/basement. $129,900. New HVAC, fully hardwood flooring, W/D, deck, FP, cedar closet, garage. Request photos - A Must See! 240-6203040

Direct Bayfront - For Sale By Owner. Fish from your dock, deep-water boatlift spectacular sunsets. Bayshore Drive townhouse: 1,400 sq. ft., two-stories, two bdrms., two baths, gas fireplace, den and many other upgrades. No HOA or condo fees. $399,900. By appointment only. Call Buddy Dykes (licensed Realtor) 443-6954324.

Waterfront End Unit Townhouse

3BR (1st Floor Master) 2.5BA, 3-season room and deck. 1 car garage. Ocean Pines. $375,000.

Ocean City Condo for Sale by Owner Top floor/end unit, 1BR/1BA - Great canal view on 28th Street, furn., W/D. $119,000. Call 724-2904528.

Classifieds 410-723-6397 By Monday, 5 p.m.

Office/Retail in WOC. 926 sq. feet on Rt. 50. Next to the UPS store. $850/mo. rent, plus utilities. Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

Office Spaces For Rent in Prime West Ocean City Location, Units 7 & 8 in Herring Creek Professional Center. Call 410-213-1200. 2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443497-4200. 1196 & 1743 sq. ft. Commercial Spaces For Rent Starting Immediately! @ Trader Lee’s Village, WOC. Corner of Rt. 50 and 611. Call Bob Jester 410-430-4480.

OFFICE SPACE / ARTIST STUDIO FOR LEASE

410-973-1475

FOR SALE FOR SALE BY OWNER BY OWNER

COMMERCIAL

Historic Berlin, Md. Two adjoining rooms 700 total square feet $425/month Available immediately

443-513-0392 For more details

Ocean City Today

PAGE 69

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

SERVICES

Bishopville Movers Inc. Fast, reliable service. 410-352-5555

DONATIONS DONATIONS

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 410-726-1051.

ESTATE SALE

Lennox Gold-Rim Holiday Dishes (10-place setting) $400; Cross-Country Ladies Skis $60; Dk Wood Corner Cabinet lighted w/beveled glass $60; Seven-foot Christmas tree $20. Call Jack 410-913-8845. Classified Deadline is Monday @ 5pm

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

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www.baysideoc.com ~ www.oceancitytoday.net

CHARITI R A E T S S

AUCTIONS

Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

AUCTION: BID ON-SITE & ONLINE! CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT &TRUCKS ExcaMARYLAND STATEWIDE vators, Dozers, Dumps CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING &More! 12/8 @ 10AM, RichNETWORK mond, VA Accepting Consignments Thru 12/4 We BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Sell/Fund Assets Fast! Drive traffic to your business www.motleys.com/industrial and reach 4.1 million readers ~ 804-232-3300x4 VAAL#16 with just one phone call & one AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS bill. See your business ad in 91 newspapers in Maryland, DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, Delaware and the District of RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION Columbia for just $495.00 per SOCIETY. Your donation ad placement. The value of helps local families with food, newspapers advertising HAS clothing, shelter, counseling. NEVER BEEN STRONGER … Tax deductible. MVA License call 1-855-721-6332 x 6 today to place your ad before 4.1 #W1044. 410-636-0123 or million readers. Email Wanda www.LutheranMissionSociety.org Smith @ wsmith@mddcBUSINESS SERVICES press.com or visit our website Place your ad on Facebook; at www.mddcpress.com. Twitter; LinkedIN and Google EDUCATION Ads Words through MDDC’s MEDICAL BILLING TRAIN- Social Media Ad Network; Call ING! Online Training gets you today to find out maximize ready to become a Medical your presence on Social Office Assistant! NO EXPERI- Media; 410-212-0616; or ENCE NEEDED! Call CTI for email Wanda Smith @ details! HS Diploma/GED & wsmith@mddcpress.com Computer/Internet needed. 1888-528-5549 HELP WANTED: SALES EDUCATION TRAINING

AVIATION Grads work with JetBlue, Boeing, Delta and others- start here with hands on training for FAA certification. Financial aid if qualified. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-823-6729

LOTS & ACREAGE

GREAT MTN. LAND SALE 5.3AC. WAS $64,900 NOW $49,900 CLOSE TO TOWN/ NEAR LAKE CABIN SHELL $26,000. Rare chance to own private one of a kind Land with Mtn. views perfect for camp, build ATV, retire, recreation abounds on this mix of Open and wooded rolling land. New perc, elec, Survey. No time to build. Excellent financing. CONTACT OWNER 800-888-1262 SERVICES-MISCELLANEOUS

Want a larger footprint in the marketplace consider advertising in the MDDC Small Display 2x2 or 2x4 Advertising Network. Reach 3.6 million readers every week by placing your ad in 71 newspapers in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia. With just one phone call, your business and/or product will be seen by 3.6 million readers HURRY … space is limited, CALL TODAY!! Call 1-855-721-6332 x 6 or 410-212-0616 email wsmith@mddcpress.com or visit our website at www.mdWANTED: LIFE AGENTS dcpress.com • Earn $500 a Day • Great Agent Benefits • Commissions Paid Daily • Liberal Underwriting • Leads, Leads, Leads • LIFE INSURANCE, LICENSE REQUIRED. Call 1-888-713-6020

Advertise in MDDC 410-723-6397

Reach Millions of Readers 106 papers with a circulation of 2.3 million and readership of 4.9 million! Call 410-723-6397 for more information

ALL VOLUNTEERS Please join us for our

Annual Beef & Beer Fundraiser Friday, January 8, 2016 Ocean Pines Community Center 5:00-9:00 p.m. To Benefit Wounded Soldiers of MD

All-You-Can-Eat Beef Dinner by MONTY JONES OF THE LAZY RIVER SALOON

SHARON SORRENTINO • IRV BRUMBLEY • DJ DAWN DOOR PRIZES • LIVE AUCTION • GUEST SPEAKER OP YOUTH THEATER “BEAUTY AND THE BEAST” SPECIAL PERFORMANCE BY TOMMY EDWARD, ROD STEWART IMPERSONATOR

TICKETS $30.00

Contact Anna Foultz 410-641-7667

A special thank you to Marlene Ott, Associate Shamrock Realty Group for donating the tickets and program. We thank you from our hearts.

Cannot be combined with any other offer. Exp. 12/25/15 Cannot be combined with any other offer. Exp. 12/25/15


Ocean City Today

PAGE 70

DECEMBER 4, 2015

A/C & HEAT PUMPS

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LANDSCAPING

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PAINTING

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PAGE 71

Donations sought for people in need this holiday season Continued from Page 64 P.O. Box 14, Snow Hill, Md. 21863 to help families. The Ocean City Parrothead Club will host its annual “Hots for Tots” Chili Cookoff on Sunday from 1-4 p.m. at the Greene Turtle in West Ocean City where toys for Santa House and the Ocean City Police Department will be collected. In addition, Burley Oak in Berlin will collect toys and monetary donations on Monday starting at 6 p.m. Fager’s Island on 60th Street will accept toys and donations for the organizations during its annual holiday party on Thursday, Dec. 10 beginning at 5 p.m. In 2014, the Santa House provided food, toys and clothes for more than 500 families, including 50 from Ocean City. Ocean City families who have signed up can pick up their items on Thursday, Dec.17 at the Public Safety Building from 9 a.m. to noon. As of Nov. 24, 265 families across Worcester County will receive toys and food through Santa House and the Ocean City Police Department. Contact the Santa House at 443-9442011 with donation questions. •Worcester G.O.L.D.: Worcester County G.O.L.D. (Giving Other Lives Dignity) is seeking sponsors for its 19th annual “Helping Hands for the Holidays.” The program served more than 900 needy people in Worcester County last holiday season. This year there are an abundance of children and elderly who need food, clothing, household items and gifts or toys. Community sponsors are matched up with families or individuals in need and it is a great opportunity for businesses, service clubs, churches, families and youth groups to help neighbors living in poverty. “These are low income folks who need the help,” said Worcester G.O.L.D.

Members of the Ocean City Parrothead Club and Greene Turtle West General Manager Chad Rogers, third from right, display toys donated by guests attending the organization’s annual “Hots for Tots” Chili Cookoff last year at the West Ocean City restaurant. The Cookoff raises funds for Worcester G.O.L.D. (Giving Other Lives Dignity), a nonprofit helping children, adults and families in need during the holiday season as well as collects toys for the Ocean City Police Department and the Santa House in Snow Hill.

Executive Director Claire Otterbein. “Many work multiple jobs with no benefits to pay the bills and Christmas presents do not fit into their budget.” The needy families are referred to Worcester County G.O.L.D. by a local agency before filling out a form, which will provide gift ideas and clothing sizes for their sponsor to buy. Monetary or gift card donations are needed to provide for people not matched directly with a supporter. Donations can be made through PayPal at worcestergold.org or sent directly to Worcester County G.O.L.D., P.O. Box 39, Snow Hill, Md. 21863. Anyone interested in sponsoring a child or senior can call G.O.L.D. at 410677-6830 or sign up using the electronic form on worcestergold.org. “It is a way to personally connect with needy people in the community,” Otterbein said. “Some are surprised at the level of need here and the holidays put a lot of stress on these struggling families.

REAL ESTATE RENTALS 13% Weekly Rental Special Commission for New Rental Listings Unit Inspected Prior to Tenant Going In & When They Leave! On Internet Since 1995

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We could not have hundreds of kids opening gifts on Christmas morning without participation from the generous community.” Worcester G.O.L.D. is a nonprofit that has provided financial aid to families in crisis, vulnerable adults and children in foster care since 1996. •Toys for Tots: Last year, Toys for Tots distributed 18 million toys to seven million less fortunate children. Locally, 7,108 toys were delivered to 3,196 children. Toys are distributed to children in Ocean City, Berlin, Ocean Pines, Frankford and Selbyville. “The children who receive the toys are underprivileged and their families are usually on state benefits,” said local Toys for Tots Coordinator Jack Carey. “Around 14 million kids live in poverty in this country, which means we are only getting toys to half of the underprivileged.” There will be a fundraiser and buffet

ROOFING

on Tuesday, Dec. 8 at Mio Fratello in Selbyville on Route 54 starting at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $20 to attend and can be purchased at the restaurant. No toys will be accepted. In addition, toys will be collected during the Winterfest of Lights Jingle Bell Run on Sunday at Northside Park on 125th Street. Registration will be held outside Abbey Burger on 126th Street from 3:30-4:40 p.m. on Dec. 6. The race begins at 5 p.m. The first Toys for Tots campaign was conducted in Los Angeles in 1947 and this year it has 759 campaigns throughout the United States. “I’ve been involved for the last 13 years and a coordinator for eight. It is a great thing we do,” Carey said. “It is a large undertaking, but a lot of fun. These are children that need to get a toy.” There is a Friday, Dec. 18 deadline to donate toys. For a list of dropoff locations visit www.toysfortots.org or call Carey at 302-537-7272.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 72

DECEMBER 4, 2015

PUBLIC NOTICES Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10900 COASTAL HWY., UNIT #1907 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Susan Elaine Geiselman a/k/a Susan Geiselman and Michael K. Ward, dated March 31, 2008 and recorded in Liber 5106, folio 5 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on DECEMBER 18, 2015 AT 1:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Unit No. 1907 “Golden Sands Club Condominium”, Tax ID #10-120918 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $51,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.   Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to

convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit.  The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property.  In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale. Trustees’ file number 41848. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-12/3/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 9400 COASTAL HWY., UNIT #1101 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated September 5, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4799, Folio 297 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $288,000.00 and an original interest rate of 5.00% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on DECEMBER 15, 2015 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Unit number 1101 of the “9400 Ocean Highway Condominium” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as

is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $34,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M.

Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-11/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Boulevard, Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 110 UPSHUR LA. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 17, 2012 and recorded in Liber 5881, Folio 42 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $288,500.00 and an original interest rate of 4.25000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on DECEMBER 15, 2015 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $30,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other


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PUBLIC NOTICES taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-1126/3t _________________________________ Alba Law Group, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 1814 DUN SWAMP ROAD POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 CASE NUMBER 23-C-15-000244 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Crystal L. Woods, John Woods, recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 5354, folio 113, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Mark S. Devan, Thomas P. Dore, Christine Drexel, Brian McNair, and Angela Nasuta as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, 1 West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863 on Tuesday, December 8, 2015 at 11:00 AM:

All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 5354, folio 113, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 5163, folio 321. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. The purchaser assumes all risks of loss for the property as of the date of sale. Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE:   A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $23,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale.  Any amount tendered at sale in excess of the required deposit will be refunded and not applied to the purchase price. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within ten (10) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  Time is of the essence.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 5.00000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement.  Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited.  The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages.  Defaulting purchaser also agrees to pay the Substituted Trustees’ attorney a fee of $250.00 in connection with the filing of a motion to resell. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. The Substituted Trustees shall have

the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor. Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Mark S. Devan, Thomas P. Dore, Christine Drexel, Brian McNair, and Angela Nasuta, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-11/19/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10220 RUFFIAN LA. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Wendy Marie Reeling and Russel Scott Reeling, dated February 25, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4522, folio 108 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on DECEMBER 14, 2015 AT 1:06 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $50,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 5.375% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser.

There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2012-29716) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-11/26/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 Diane S. Rosenberg Mark D. Meyer John A. Ansell, III Kenneth Savitz Caroline Fields Jennifer Rochino 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff(s) v. Maureen T. Terry 10105 War Admiral Lane Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C15000228

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 16th day of November, 2015, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of 10105 War Admiral Lane, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 21st day of December, 2015, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 14th day of December, 2015. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be


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PUBLIC NOTICES $374,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-11/19/3t _________________________________ Law Offices of Jeffrey Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, Maryland 20705 240-473-5000 Jeffrey Nadel Scott Nadel Daniel Menchel John-Paul Douglas 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, MD 20705 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff v. Blanche Bell Hudson 9818 Elm Street Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C15000901

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 17th day of November, 2015, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 21st day of December, 2015, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 14th day of December, 2015. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $120,000.00. The property sold herein is known as 9818 Elm Street, Ocean City, MD 21842. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-11/26/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 16300 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MARSHA A. STANTON Notice is given that Jacqueline S. Donohue, 10354 Keyser Point Rd., Ocean City, MD 21842, was on November 12, 2015 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Marsha A. Stanton who died on October 16, 2015, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 12th day of May,

2016. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Jacqueline S. Donohue Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: November 19, 2015 OCD-11/19/3t _________________________________ WILLIAM T. SMITH III ESQ ONE PLAZA EAST STE. 102 EAST MAIN STREET SALISBURY, MD 21801

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 16309 Notice is given that the Superior Court of New Castle County, DE appointed Linda M. Mele, 908 Benge Road, P.O. Box 1150, Hockessin, DE 19707 as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Daniel M. Mele who died on April 09, 2014 domiciled in PA, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is William T. Smith III Esq. whose address is One Plaza East, Ste. 102, Salisbury, MD 21801. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two

months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Linda M. Mele Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: November 19, 2015 OCD-11/19/3t _________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8TH STREET OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND 21842 THE WAVES COUNCIL OF OWNERS, INC. Plaintiff v. WARREN J. BUTLER CAROL V. BUTLER et al. Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. 23-C-15-1255

NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland this 18th day of November, 2015, that the foreclosure sale of the properties mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by James E. Clubb, Jr. , Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 21st day of December, 2015, provided a copy of this order be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in Worcester County, Maryland once in each of three successive weeks, before the 14th day of December, 2015. The Report of Sale filed in the above case states the amount of the sales to be as indicated below for the referenced time-share intervals: Price Timeshare Wk 22, #306 $600.00 Wk 21 , #206 $50.00 Wk 38, #302 $50.00 Wk 25, #302 $600.00 Wk 46, #201 $50.00 Wk 6, #204 $50.00 Wk 37, #401 $50.00 Wk 36, #302 $50.00 Susan Braniecki Clerk True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-11/26/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING WORCESTER COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS AGENDA

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2015 Pursuant to the provisions of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held before the

Board of Zoning Appeals for Worcester County, in the Board Room (Room 1102) on the first floor of the Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland. 6:30 p.m. Case No. 15-52, on the application of Ashley Roberts-Lamb, on behalf of, and on the lands of Red Eye LLC, requesting a special exception to establish a family burial ground within the A-1 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(c)(3), ZS 1-201(c)(20) & ZS 1305(b), located at 8416 Burbage Road, approximately 0.59 miles south of the intersection of Assateague Road and Burbage Road, Tax Map 33, Parcel 185, in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. 6:35 p.m. Case No. 15-50, on the application of Mark S. Cropper, Esquire, on behalf of and on the lands of the Johnson Family Trust requesting a special exception (transient use) for use of land to hold celebration functions and parties, in the A-1 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(c)(3), ZS 1105(c)(5) & ZS 1-337(a), located at 7530 Cedartown Road, approximately 970 feet east of Double Bridges Road, Tax Map 56, Parcel 100, Lot 1, in the Second Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS OCD-11/26/2t _________________________________ REGAN J. R. SMITH ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY, P.O. BOX 739 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 16291 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF GARY EDWARD MEYER Notice is given that Angelique Marie Waldron, 8524 Fountain Valley Drive, Montgomery Village, MD 20886, was on November 17, 2015 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Gary Edward Meyer who died on October 16, 2015, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 17th day of May, 2016. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or


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PUBLIC NOTICES (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Angelique Marie Waldron Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: November 26, 2015 OCD-11/26/3t _________________________________ Stanford G. Gann, Sr., Esquire 502 Washington Ave., #800 Towson, MD 21204

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 16313 Notice is given that the Circuit court of Monroe County, Florida appointed Michael D. Tannenbaum, Esquire, 2161 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 304, West Palm Beach, FL 33409 as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Rene Neuberger who died on August 7, 2015 domiciled in Florida, America. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Stanford G. Gann, Sr., Esquire whose address is Levin & Gann, P.A., 502 Washington Ave., #800, Towson, MD 21204. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Michael D. Tannenbaum, Esquire Foreign Personal Representative Register of Wills Worcester County 1 West Market Street, Room 102 Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest

Date of first publication: 11/26/2015 OCD-11/26/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 301-490-3361 Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. Kimberly Decker a/k/a Kimberly Smith and Kevin Decker Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C14000553

NOTICE ORDERED, this 24th day of November, 2015 by the Circuit Court of WORCESTER COUNTY, Maryland, that the sale of the property at 10989 Griffin Road, Berlin, Maryland 21811 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et. al, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th day of December, 2015 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 21st day of December, 2015, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $1,034,138.22. Susan R. Braniecki CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-12/3/3t _________________________________ Law Offices of Jeffrey Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, Maryland 20705 240-473-5000 Jeffrey Nadel Scott Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, MD 20705 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff v. Carolyn B. Kniceley 712 Hurricane Road North Ocean City, MD 21840 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C15000938

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 24th day of November, 2015, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th day of December, 2015, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the

21st day of December, 2015. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $171,000.00. The property sold herein is known as 712 Hurricane Road, North Ocean City, MD 21842. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/3/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110 of the Code of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Zoning Ordinance for Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted by the Board of Zoning Appeals for Ocean City, Maryland in the Council Chambers of City Hall located on Baltimore Avenue and Third Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: THURSDAY, December 10, 2015 at 6:00 p.m. APPLICANT: PACESETTER CONDO ASSOCIATION – (BZA 2443 #15-9400012) Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(3)(a) requesting a special yard exception to the minimum yard requirements of the front yard to allow the oceanfront decks to extend to the property line, in lieu of the 4 feet required by Code. The site of the appeal is described as Lot 8, Block 7, of the Fenwick Plat, Revised 1965; further described as located on the west side of Wight Street between 127th Street and 128th Street at the oceanfront and locally known as Pacesetter Condo Association, 12709 Wight Street in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: NEWQUIST FAMILY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP – (BZA 2444, 15-9400013) Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(3)(a) requesting a special yard exception to allow a new structure to follow existing pre-established setbacks on the side yard and front yard for a 4story home. The site of the appeal is described as Lot 5A and 5B, Block 17, of the Fenwick Plat, Revised 1965; further described as located on the southeast corner of Wight Street and 138th Street locally known as Newquist Family Limited Partnership, 13706 Wight Street in the Town

of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: HUGH CROPPER IV, ATTY FOR COMMANDER HOTEL LLC – (BZA 2442 #15-09500007) – Postponed / Re-Hearing Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(3), Powers, of the Code, an appeal will be reheard pursuant to the provisions of Section 11095(1)(a) requesting a variance to the front yard setback on Atlantic Avenue to allow a 21’2” encroachment to build a new commercial element to the lot line, instead of a 32’ as required by Code. The site of the appeal is described as Lots 2-3, Block 55N, Sinepuxent Beach Company Plat, 1891; further described as located on the east side of Baltimore Avenue, the north side of 14th Street, and the west side of Atlantic Avenue, and locally known as The Commander Hotel, 1401 Atlantic Avenue, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. Further information concerning the public hearings may be examined in the office of the Department of Planning and Community Development in City Hall. Alfred Harrison, Chairman Heather Stansbury, Attorney OCD-11/26/2t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. STEPHEN BOUVIER LEANAH E. BOUVIER 204 33rd Street, Unit #204-B IRTA 204 33rd Street, Unit 020402 Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C14001346

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 24th day of November, 2015, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 204 33rd Street, Unit #204-B, IRTA 204 33rd Street, Unit 020402, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 28th day of December, 2015, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 21st day of December, 2015. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $89,700.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/3/3t _________________________________


Ocean City Today

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DECEMBER 4, 2015

PUBLIC NOTICES

Town of Ocean City

BID SOLICITATION

read aloud at the Council Work Session held on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 at 1:00 p.m. Bids are to be submitted to the Town of Ocean City, Attn: City Manager’s Office, Room 230, Ocean City, MD 21842. Late Bid Document will not be accepted. Minority vendors are encouraged to compete for award of the solicitation. OCD-12/3/1t _________________________________

Northside Park Gym Floor Installation The Town of Ocean City is seeking bids from qualified and experienced vendors to install a Gym Floor at Northside Park in conformity with the specifications detailed in the Bid Documents. Bid Documents for the Northside Park Gym Floor Installation may be obtained from the Town of Ocean City’s Procurement Department by either e-mailing the Procurement Manager, Catrice Parsons, at cparsons@oceancitymd.gov or by calling 410-723-6647 during normal business hours, or via the Bid tab on the Town’s website. Vendors are responsible for checking this website for addenda prior to submitting their bids. The Town of Ocean City is not responsible for the content of any Bid Document received through any third party bid service. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their Completed Bid Documents. Sealed Bid Documents are due no later than 4:30 p.m. on Monday, January 11, 2016 and will be opened and

Town of Ocean City

BID SOLICITATION Northside Park Gym Floor Remediation The Town of Ocean City is seeking bids from qualified and experienced vendors to provide Gym Floor Remediation at Northside Park in conformity with the specifications detailed in the Bid Documents. Bid Documents for the Northside Park Gym Floor Remediation may be obtained from the Town of Ocean City’s Procurement Department by either e-mailing the Procurement Manager, Catrice Parsons, at cparsons@oceancitymd.gov or by calling 410-723-6647 during normal business hours, or via the Bid tab on the Town’s website. Vendors are responsible for checking this website for addenda prior to submitting their bids.

The Town of Ocean City is not responsible for the content of any Bid Document received through any third party bid service. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their Completed Bid Documents. Sealed Bid Documents are due no later than 4:30 p.m. on Monday, January 11, 2016 and will be opened and read aloud at the Council Work Session held on Tuesday, January 12, 2016 at 1:00 p.m. Bids are to be submitted to the Town of Ocean City, Attn: City Manager’s Office, Room 230, Ocean City, MD 21842. Late Bid Document will not be accepted. Minority vendors are encouraged to compete for award of the solicitation. OCD-12/3/1t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS BOARD OF PORT WARDENS Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 106, “Waterways,” Article II – “Shoreline Development” of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Port Wardens Ordinance of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that

Print • Web

public hearings will be conducted in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD Thursday December 10, 2015 At 2:00 PM A request has been submitted to remove existing dock, install 60ft +/vinyl bulkhead with returns (small amount of stones at return). Construct 6’x22’ perpendicular pier, 6’x24’ parallel. Install boatlift with poles, install 4 pole jetski lift inside parallel, 2 mooring poles left side of perpendicular. Channelward 50ft. Located at 739 Laurel Ave Parcel # 0072B in the Town of Ocean City, MD. Applicant: Ocean City Boatlifts & Marine Construction Inc. Owner: David Campbell PW15-199 A request has been submitted to install 2 poles at end of pier to extend no further than 20’. Install boatlift onto poles. Located at 734 Mooring Rd Unit 2 Parcel # 9481 in the Town of Ocean City, MD. Applicant: Blake’s Boatlifts Owner: Tracey Shipman PW15-200 A request has been submitted to install boatlift onto existing poles within existing slip. Located at 778 94TH St Pintail Point Boat Slip 28 Parcel # 9647 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Blake’s Boatlifts Owner: Charles Daffin PW15-201 OCD-11/26/2t _________________________________

oceancitytoday.net • baysideoc.com


Commentary

USPS as good as we allow it to be

No wonder the U.S. Postal Service loses money: it must, by law, deliver the mail to people who may not even continue to exist. That sort of thing does happen, too, as a staff member here can attest after receiving a series of overdue bills for the long-deceased former owner of the property. It is not, however, the Postal Service’s fault, since the regulations that govern it require it to do one important thing: accept the word of the sender that the addressee is where the sender says he or she is. And do that over and over until it becomes apparent to the postal carriers and administrators that something is not quite right. Although elected federal officials and policy wonks routinely insist that the Postal Service find a way to make money, theirs is a ridiculous demand considering that few if any federal or quasifederal services are required to do the same. Further, even with the Postal Service’s inefficiencies – and what enterprise, public or private, doesn’t have them? – it is bound by law to accommodate an even more inefficient public. Because the public is more prone to gripe about mail service than it is to respect its dependability, many people, businesses and even government agencies don’t think to keep the service updated on changes of address or to help by keeping their own mailing lists current. Either people just don’t care enough to bother or they assume that eventually the mail mix-up will sort itself out on its own. It doesn’t work that way. According to the U.S. Postal Service Office of the Inspector General, the service spent $1.5 billion in fiscal year 2014 processing, delivering, returning and eventually destroying 6.6 billion pieces of mail that had the wrong address. About 20 percent of that was, by its own account, the Postal Service’s fault because of faulty sorting or delivery problems. That’s inefficiency for sure, but most of the blame for falls on the public one way or the other. The supposed ease of digital messaging notwithstanding, it remains that the post office provides one of the more secure methods of communications. You don’t, for instance, hear stories about someone compromising the contents of 10 million letters. Still, the quality, efficiency and expense of its service are, in many respects, only as good as its customers will allow.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR/PUBLISHER.......................... Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli STAFF WRITERS .................. Zack Hoopes, Josh Davis, .................................... Brian Gilliland, Kara Hallissey ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Donna L. Moran SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS................ Kelly Brown, Kaitlin Sowa .............................................................. Debbie Haas COMPTROLLER.................................. Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net.

Dec. 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

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Letters to the editor Giving a little can mean a lot

Editor, Life presents us with many unexpected journeys, some sweet and heartwarming, some that we would prefer to forget. Regardless of our age, or the age we live in, one of those unexpected journeys is when we discover the absolute joy that comes from giving. There are all kinds of giving and certainly among the most gratifying are the gifts we give to those we love and care about during the holiday season. In your nonprofit community this time of year has become known as the “Giving Season.” The motivation for giving to those in need in our community shares a common thread with gifts we share with family and friends, the human instinct to help others in a meaningful way. And among the many reasons that makes the giving season so special is that it is not so much about the amount of a gift of

charity, but the meaning behind it. Money, in and of itself, has little value. It is what you do with it that gives it value. Depending on how you spend and share your money, the same amount can do a little good, or a lot of good. Don’t ever feel that you can’t make a difference. With so many needs in our community, how do you go about deciding where your charitable gift should go? May I suggest you start by thinking about the causes that matter to you? Think about your life and those around you … what impact has been made by a charitable organization? Do you have an aging family member who needed some assistance getting through the day, or know a family that was in distress and in need of food? Have you met a child so full of promise, but with real limitations in meeting their educational potential? Do you know a forgotten veteran seeking someone to talk to or who urgently requires emergency assistance? Have you provided a

home to a rescued animal and want to help others have the same opportunity? Nonprofit organizations throughout the region meet these needs and more, each and every day. The potential needs that you care about are both incredibly diverse and timeless. And while it may seem overwhelming to meet them all, we can all gain some perspective through the words of world-renowned anthropologist Jane Goodall, “You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” Each year the Giving Season gives each and every one of us a wonderful opportunity and responsibility. Don’t let this time pass without experiencing the special joy we can all share – through charitable giving. Erica Joseph President Community Foundation

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR E-mail: editor@oceancitytoday.net Mail: Ocean City Today, P.O. Box 3500 Ocean City, Md. 21843 Fax: 410-723-6511 All letters are subject to editing for clarity and potentially libelous material


PAGE 78

Ocean City Today

PUBLIC EYE

BRIAN GILLILAND/OCEAN CITY TODAY

TOWER OF POWER The city has begun construction on its new water tower downtown by drilling holes that will one day support the structure in now what is a parking lot off St. Louis Ave.

Just plain crazy

DECEMBER 4, 2015

By Stewart Dobson Editor/Publisher Just because you fear the world may be going crazy doesn’t mean it isn’t. Or something like that. We apparently have reached the point in the evolution of society, or absence of it, where just about anything might qualify as normal. Here are three examples. After a brief legal battle, Lindsay Miller of somewhere in Massachusetts won the right to have her driver’s license photo show her wearing a colander on her head. State law there stipulates that no headgear of any type can be worn in driver’s license photos unless said headgear is donned for religious or medical reasons. Aided by her legal team, Miller successfully contended that wearing a colander is part of her religion as a “Pastafarian” and as a member of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster. No kidding. No mention was made of who her attorney was, but it was reported that she was seen walking into court with a cheese grater carrying a briefcase. *** Canadian college student Kai Xu, 27, of Windsor, Ontario has pleaded guilty in this country to attempting to cross back into Canada with 51 live turtles in his pants.

He was spotted, apparently, when border security personnel took note of his particularly lumpy pants and that he was walking funny, a sure giveaway that something was up his sleeve or wherever. Authorities said he had turtles taped on the outside of and between his legs, indicating that either he had good depth perception or that this was no snap decision. Anyway, Xu had been working the illegal turtle trade between North America and China, where they eat them, because … well, they’ll eat your dog too, if you let them. *** Bilgin Ciftci, a doctor in Turkey, lost his job and faces up to two years in prison for posting photos comparing President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Gollum from the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy. It’s illegal in Turkey to insult the head of state, and now the fight is over whether Gollum is a good guy or a bad guy, an issue that will be decided by a court-appointed panel of “Lord of the Rings” experts, as opposed to actual hobbits, who would really know what was what in Middle Earth. All I know is if insulting the head of state was illegal in this country, half the population would be in jail no matter who was in charge.

New Winter Arrivals


DECEMBER 4, 2015

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

DECEMBER 4, 2015

12/4/15 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

12/4/15 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...