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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.COM

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

SERVING NORTHERN WORCESTER COUNTY

VETERAN’S DAY EVENTS Ceremonies planned for this Sunday in Ocean City and Ocean Pines – Page 25

FREE

Paddack wins seat, James leads ticket

Carozza defeats Mathias

Meehan returns as mayor, Martin makes it back, as Nock comes within 4 votes

Republicans sweep state offices with strong support from Worcester County

By Josh Davis Associate Editor By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Worcester County, which was once such a Democratic Party stronghold that it recorded zero votes for Abraham Lincoln, made a different kind of history Tuesday by voting to send an all-GOP delegation to the state legislature for the first time. Delegations in previous years had members of both parties, or were all Democrats. But this year the big switch was made possible by the victory of Del. Mary Beth Carozza over Democratic incumbent State Sen. Jim Mathias in District 38. Carozza won by 2,840 votes, earning 53 percent of the total votes to Mathias’ 46.9 percent, according to the Maryland State Board of Elections. Worcester, the home port for both candidates, was the most decisive factor in the election. Carozza had just a 563-vote lead in the district’s other two counties, Somerset and Wicomico, but Worcester County voters turned a close race into sure thing for Carozza by giving her a 2,287-vote margin over Mathias, 12,330 to 10,043. Altogether, Mathias won just five of the county’s 20 voting precincts, with Ocean Pines and Ocean City clearly favoring Carozza. Carozza declared victory shortly after 10:30 p.m. at her watch party at Mad See WORCESTER Page 6

LIFESTYLE

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Carozza: “We thank God for us being here to be able to serve and, to my heart of hearts, I thank each and every one of you for all you’ve done to make tonight’s victory possible.”

JOSH DAVIS/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Mathias: “I congratulate the senator-elect. I know there’s plenty of work to do and, as we go forward, I’m offering my help to be there as we carry on.”

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Ocean City voters headed to the polls Tuesday and elected newly minted Councilman Mark PadRick Meehan dack, while returning incumbents Lloyd Martin and Matt James to council seats, as well as reinstating Mayor Rick Meehan and approving binding interest arbitration for the Matt James firefighter’s union. Resort residents cast 2,566 votes during Tuesday’s municipal election, including 139 absentee ballots, representing a slight uptick from the 2016 contest Mark Paddack when 2,380 votes were counted, including 105 absentees. In total, 44 percent of the 5,808 active voters registered in the Ocean City precinct participated, with an additional Lloyd Martin 530 names on the inactive rolls. In 2016, voter turnout was roughly 41 percent of the resort’s 5,818 registered voters. Mayor Meehan defeated challenger and former Councilman Joe Hall by a 1,695-to-733 margin to win a seventh two-year term. In 2016, Meehan ran unopposed and pulled See JAMES Page 5


Ocean City Today

PAGE 2

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Unofficial Worcester County Election Totals* Governor/Lt. Governor Larry Hogan and Boyd K. Rutherford, Rep., 16,925 Ben Jealous and Susan Turnbull, Dem., 5,049 Shawn Quinn and Christina Smith, Lb., 136 Ian Schlakman and Annie Chambers, Green, 75 Other Write-Ins, 11 State Senator Legislative District 38 Mary Beth Carozza, Rep., 12,330 Jim Mathias, Dem., 10,043 Other Write-Ins, 19 House of Delegates Legislative District 38A Charles James Otto, Rep., 3,749 Kirkland J. Hall, Sr., Dem., 2,954 Other Write-Ins, 6 Legislative District 38C Wayne A. Hartman, Rep., 11,779 Other Write-Ins, 616 County Commissioners District 1 Merrill W. Lockfaw, Jr., Rep. 1,138 Joshua C. Nordstrom, Dem., 1,321 Other Write-Ins, 1

District 2 Diana Purnell, Dem., 1,930 Other Write-Ins, 75 District 3 Bud Church, Rep., 2,302 Zackery Tyndall, 1,182 Other Write-Ins, 2 District 4 Theodore “Ted” Elder, Rep., 1,586 Virgil L. Shockley, Dem., 1,367 Other Write-Ins, 12 District 5 Chip Bertino, Rep., 2,516 Judy Butler, Dem., 1,451 Other Write-Ins, 5 District 6 Madison “Jim” Bunting, Jr., Rep. 3,137 Other Write-Ins, 70 District 7 Joseph M. Mitrecic, Rep., 2,389 Other Write-Ins, 66 State’s Attorney Kris Heiser, Rep., 17,324 Other Write-Ins, 547 Clerk of the Circuit Court Susan Richardson Braniecki, Rep., 17,549 Other Write-Ins, 377

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Judge of the Orphans Court Mike Diffendal, Rep., 12,982 Linda M. Hess, Rep, 12,153 Cheryl Jacobs, Rep., 11,175 Other Write-Ins, 433 Sheriff Matt Crisafulli, Rep., 17,801 Other Write-Ins, 422 Board of Education District 1 Bill Buchanan, Non-Partisan, 2,015 Other Write-Ins, 21 District 4 Bill Gordy, Non-Partisan, 2,506 Other Write-Ins, 22 District 6 Eric Cropper, Non-Partisan, 3,045 Other Write-Ins, 30 District 7 Todd Ferrante, Non-Partisan, 2,319 Other Write-Ins, 31 *From Maryland Board of Elections

Worcester produces solid turnout Numbers up significantly from last off-year election, but off from 2010 edition

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Ocean City Today

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PAGE 5

James, Paddack, Martin win council contest Continued from Page 1 1,894 votes. In the council race, of the five candidates jockeying for three openings, Councilman Matt James was the top finisher with 1,787 votes. Newcomer Mark Paddack, who recently retired after three decades with Ocean City Police Department, finished second with 1,187 votes, finishing narrowly ahead of Council President Lloyd Martin who had a 1,183 tally. Only four votes off the mark was Emily Nock, whose inaugural campaign garnered 1,179 votes, with Chris Rudolf’s 848 total placing fifth.

Paddack, speaking on Wednesday and still aglow from his election victory, expressed gratitude for the opportunity to continue serving the resort, albeit in a new capacity. “Many of the citizens of this town are my family after 30 years,” he said. Paddack quoted long-time newspaper advice columnist Ann Landers, to illustrate his philosophical outlook. “Ann Landers once wrote, ‘opportunities are usually disguised as hard work so most people don’t recognize them,” he said. “I have lived by that quote since my early 20s.” Looking forward, Paddack appreciates the elected position will pro-

Voter registration info snafu costs OC man turn at polls By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Tuesday started like any other Election Day for 73year-old George Stoll III, who had already cast his ballot in the state and county election during early voting in Berlin. The thing was, he had to use a provisional ballot, which presaged problems he would encounter in the Ocean City municipal contest. The Ocean City resident headed to the convention center to vote as he had in many previous elections, but was rejected. He “was supposed to be voting in Baltimore County,” according to the registration data on file with the county. That’s where his father, George Stoll Jr., lives, and somehow a clerical error mixed up their information. “I had no idea that that was going to be a problem on the local elec-

tions,” he said. “They, unlike the county, they told me that they could not accept my vote today because of that inconsistency with the information, and that I’m really not in Ocean City.” Stoll said he’s lived in the resort for more than 45 years and votes regularly. He said a woman at the polling place is his neighbor, but still nothing could be done. “So, ‘I’m sorry, but you can’t vote,’” he said. “Unbelievable, and even when people know me up there, they can’t make any accommodations for it. Absurd.” Stoll said he was told he’d need to go to Snow Hill to fix the mistake. “It’s not my responsibility to correct their error,” he said. “It would seem to me to be their responsibility to correct their own error.” Stoll then called for someone to See DATA Page 6

vide yet unknown challenges over the next four years. “Life is too short, and two thirds of my life has been lived,” he said. “I want to make the best I can out of that last third.” James, who topped polls with 1,666 votes during his inaugural campaign in 2014, once again led the pack to secure a second term on council. This election James received 70 percent of the vote, nearly identical to his 71 percent total in 2014. Martin, who again ran a subdued campaign light on advertising, was pleased that constituents made a healthy showing at the polls despite the generally gloomy weather. “I was concerned the strong early voter turnout in Gull Creek [Senior Living Community in Berlin] would have an impact,” he said. While exercising fiscal constraint during campaigning, Martin, who was first elected to council in 2002, opted to rely on public approval based on his political track record. “If the people want you there, you want to be there,” he said. “I’m a firm believer if an incumbent is not doing their job, they won’t get reelected.” Voters also approved a ballot referendum from the Ocean City Firefighters Union, IAFF Local 4269, to

amend the city charter and permit binding interest arbitration if collective bargaining negotiations reach a stalemate. IAFF president Ryan Whittington said the referendum campaign, which was approved by a 1,288-to-1,048 margin, was an uphill battle. “We knocked on doors and we sent out mailers,” he said. “We did everything we could to educate the public … why we thought this was not only in the firefighters’ best interest, the mayor and city council’s best interest, but also in the residents we protect and serve.” Under this change, if the city and the union fail to reach agreement on contract terms, the dispute would be decided by a third-party arbitrator. Whittington also said binding interest arbitration is a last resort option. “It’s a tool that has never been used in Ocean City,” he said. “We’re looking at having a much more committed relationship with our mayor and council knowing that we need to work it out together and not rely on someone else.” The council was scheduled to meet Thursday at 7:30 p.m. to swear in the newly elected council members and to choose the council president and secretary for the upcoming term.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Worcester gives Carozza big victory margin Continued from Page 1 Fish Bar & Grill in West Ocean City. “We thank God for us being here to be able to serve and, to my heart of hearts, I thank each and every one of you for all you’ve done to make tonight’s victory possible,” Carozza said. “Thank you, from my heart.” Mathias conceded about 30 minutes later at his election headquarters at Tall Tales Brewing Company in Parsonsburg. Up until Tuesday, the former Ocean City councilman, Ocean City mayor and delegate had never lost an election. “The most important thing is the people have spoken and that’s what our politics are all about,” he told supporters and volunteers. “It’s about the people and it’s about their choice,” he said. “I congratulate the senator-elect. I know there’s plenty of work to do and, as we go forward, I’m offering my help to be there as we carry on.” Elsewhere in Worcester County, most races went about as expected. Incumbent District 38A Del. Charles Otto, a Republican, held his seat, besting Democratic challenger Kirkland Hall by 2,631 votes, or nearly 20 percentage points. Otto won 59.5 percent of the vote compared to Kirkland’s 40.4 percent. In the race for the District 38C del-

egate seat vacated by Carozza, Republican Wayne Hartman coasted to victory, winning 95.4 percent of the vote. According to the Maryland State Board of Elections, “Other Write-Ins” earned the remaining 4.6 percent. As for the county’s complete turn to GOP representation in the General Assembly, Paul Ellington, former executive director of the Maryland Republican Party, confirmed it. “This is the first time it’s been all Republican — 38 [District] as a whole and Worcester,” he said Wednesday. In Worcester County Commissioners races, three Republican incumbents won reelection. Bud Church bested Berlin Town Councilman Zackery Tyndall in the race for District 3 (2,302 votes to 1,182), Ted Elder held off former commissioner Virgil Shockley in District 4 (1,586 votes to 1,367) and Chip Bertino beat Judy Butler in District 5 (2,516 votes to 1,451). One seat, however, was turned over, as Democrat Joshua Nordstrom edged incumbent Republican Merrill Lockfaw, 1,321 votes to 1,138, in the District 1 race. Nordstrom will join County Commissioner President Diana Purnell as the only two Democrats on the seven-member panel. Purnell (District 2), Madison “Jim” Bunting (District 6) and

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RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Senator-elect Mary Beth Carozza addresses attendees of her campaign watch party following her victory in the race for the District 38 Senate seat. Also pictured are District 38C Delegate-elect Wayne Hartman, left, and District 3 Commissioner Bud Church.

Joseph Mitrecic (District 7) each won reelection without opposition. In other contested races, Terri Delaney Westcott, a Republican, easily defeated Democrat Nicole Caudell 13,790 votes to 7,550, in the register of wills contest. Republican Gov. Larry Hogan also coasted to victory, earning a second term. In Worcester, Hogan won 76.3 percent of the vote, with Democrat

Data miscue costs man his vote Continued from Page 5 take responsibility for this mistake. “It’s all wrong, and there should be some accountability for someone putting that information in such huge error,” he said. “I mean it’s ridiculous.” Stoll then expressed his frustrations with “this whole system.” “They’re telling me that nobody has the ability to do it,” he said. “They tell me it’s a done deal, they can’t help me and go away.” Where does that leave Stoll? He said this has put him at a crossroads. “It would be easy for me to go down to Snow Hill and correct it. But

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why should I have to? I mean, hell, it’s not my mistake,” he said. “They want me to correct their mistake, and they wouldn’t let me vote anyway.” Stoll said he was hurt by not being able to vote. “I consider it a right and an honor to be able to vote,” he said. “I’m just very upset that they would take that right away from me.” The reason Ocean City elections officials were unable to change the voter registration information, however, is because that is handled at the county level for the state board of elections. Resort officials have no access to those records.

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Ben Jealous coming in second with 22.7 percent. Hogan received 16,925 votes in Worcester County, while Jealous won 5,049 votes. Statewide, Hogan received 1,194,866 votes, good for 56.2 percent, while Jealous earned 909,024 votes, or 42.7 percent of the total. Comptroller Peter Franchot and Attorney General Brian Frosh were also reelected, as were U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin and Rep. Andy Harris.

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‘Operation Tourist Boom’ invades OC

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Maryland National Guard members, along with a host of other agencies, seized control of the inlet parking lot during “Operation Tourist Boom,” an all-day disaster response exercise last Saturday. Maj. Kurt Rauschenberg, National Guard Bureau public affairs officer, said an array of catastrophic scenarios were explored for emergency management teams to test their readiness for local and state disasters or civil unrest. Joining the Maryland National Guard, in addition to police, fire and EMS personnel from Ocean City, were the Maryland State Police, Worcester County Sheriff’s Department, U.S. Park Police, Maryland Department of Natural Resources Police, U.S. Coast Guard, Wicomico Civil Air Patrol, Worcester County Schools and Atlantic General Hospital. “The National Guard is always the first military responder for domestic response,” Rauschenberg said. “We’re easily called up and at the ready, as far as capabilities, resources, and personnel, to the state governor.” Scheduled during the National Guard’s regular drill weekend, “Operation Tourist Boom,” which was under development since February, featured live demonstrations and exercises at the inlet parking lot, the Boardwalk and beach. Disaster response training events are

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Maryland National Guardsmen, the first military responders for domestic incidents, patrol the inlet parking lot during the disaster response exercise “Operation Tourist Boom,” last Saturday.

done on a predictable basis to help the National Guard synchronize with first responders from federal, state and local governments. “This is everything the Maryland National Guard does with the civil authority here in the state at the local level,” he said. “That includes providing security efforts, augmenting law enforcement, medical assistance and also decontamination if there is a chemical/biological type scenario.” Among the complex scenarios used to test emergency decision-making were simulated dirty bomb explosions, landmine sweeps on the beach, riot containment, as well as active shooter and

attacks by vehicle assailants. In addition to soldiers, airmen were also stationed in the resort, including U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Matt Crabill, 175th Wing Emergency Management superintendent for the Maryland Air National Guard, who oversaw the units from the Mobile Emergency Operations Center trailer. Maryland’s National Guard deploys the MEOC trailer from Warfield Air National Guard Base in Baltimore. The mobile unit features half dozen workstations, conference area, dedicated generator, and also contains satellite, Internet, and television feeds. See DISASTER Page 9

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Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

PAGE 9

Disaster exercise fills inlet lot Continued from Page 8 Crabill, a certified MEOC operator, said the apparatus provides efficient response support for domestic operations but requires about a seven-figure investment. “That’s an initial cost because once you have technology you chase technology,” he said. “To ask a local jurisdiction to cough up a million dollars and then to continue to support this with technology as it advances, it’s a lot to ask.” The fiscal challenges vary by locale, with Crabill noting Worcester County, which owns comparable equipment, is located within Federal Emergency Management Agency region three.

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“That’s a fairly wealthy region because it’s around D.C, and Philadelphia,” he said. “As you start to go south and west not necessarily can they afford this type of technology at a local level.” Crabill said the National Guard has 21 MEOC trailers to assist local emergency management agencies during times of need. Rauschenberg said both Air and Army National Guard branches serve a dual mission at the state level and the federal level. “While we’re protecting the homeland, we’re also fighting America’s wars,” he said. “But while we’re doing both, we’re sustaining enduring partnerships.”

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Members of the Maryland National Guard’s 231st Chemical Company practice decontamination procedures following a simulated dirty bomb explosion during “Operation Tourist Boom,” an allday disaster response exercise, last Saturday.

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PAGE 10

Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

OC expanding pilot program for dune crossover matting By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Ocean City wants to improve sand access for the handicapped and mobility challenged next summer with an expansion of a dune crossover matting pilot program launched last year. Engineering Manager Paul Mauser said the city worked with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources in 2017 to install improved dune crossover surfaces at 130th and 94th streets in accordance with Americans With Disabilities Act guidelines. “It was well received and the feedback we received was tremendous,” he said. “That’s why we completed the trial test period.” Ocean City resident Janet Mazor originally championed the cause after recognizing ocean front access was off limits to many less than able bodied visitors. “It started about two years ago when I realized people who were disabled couldn’t get to the beach, it was impossible,” she said. “So, you’re stuck looking at other people enjoying the beach and you can’t get there.” Moved to action, Mazor spent two weeks walking the beach and collected hundreds of signatures supporting the endeavor. “I got a list of 200 names of people who were in favor of getting … some sort of mat to help people get down to the beach,” she said. Despite hitting some initial dead ends, Mazor worked with local officials and politicians in Annapolis to get a trial project off, or perhaps on, the ground for summer 2017. “The first time I went to the beach and saw it I was blown away,” she said. “There were so many people in wheelchairs that were previously not able to get to the beach that were ecstatic.” With the trial run deemed successful, Mauser said the program will now be expanded. “Installation is planned to be completed by Memorial Day for the summer season,” he said. “We’re targeting existing streets with ADA accessibility crossovers.” Mauser said although Ocean City currently has handicapped beach access points about every ten blocks, with clay added to improve dune crossover surfacing, matting provides a smoother surface to transverse. “The locations are currently being detailed and we’re not sure of the exact number yet,” he said. “The project will be publicly bid in February.” Mauser said funding channels would be identical to the pilot program and coordinated through the state. “It’s actually funded through the town but we’re working in conjunction with the state [which] own the

PHOTO COURTESY JANET MAZOR

Thanks to new dune crossover matting at 130th Street, Ocean City resident Val Gates was able take her grandson, Cody, to the beach for the first time ever this summer.

dunes.” Mazor said the matting would provide a significant safety upgrade over the hard clay previously installed at dune crossovers. “When you have hard clay and then you put sand on top … you have pits in the bottom that you don’t see,” she said. “It’s actually dangerous.” Although a wealth of positive feedback was provided during conversations on the sands this summer, Mazor said the first testimonial shared was particularly poignant. “There was a little boy with dystonia [movement disorder characterized by involuntarily muscle contractions] with his grandmother,” she said. “This was the first time he was able to wheel himself down to the beach.” Numerous people learned of the new crossover mats from social media posts on Facebook, Mazor said. “I spoke to one woman who said she went to other beaches because they had handicapped accessibility, but never in Ocean City,” she said. “When she saw this, she rented for a week with her son.” Additionally, the matting has been of assistance to elderly people using walkers and families with strollers, Mazor said. “We have a friend without a leg who now can get to the beach a little more comfortably without falling,” she said. While acknowledging seashore topography naturally inhibits handicapped access, Mazor said dune crossover mats afford an inroad. “It provides the first step of people getting to the beach … to sit with their friends and be part of the community,” she said. “I don’t want a pat on the back, what I wanted was to see was people happy and getting to the beach.”


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 11

“American oysters differ as much as American people... The Easterners seem more daring.”

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City transit officials report video surveillance cameras installed aboard its 65-vehicle fleet this spring have proven useful in identifying criminal suspects and addressing driver-related complaints.

Bus cameras provide town video evidence for incidents

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Since instituting a fleetwide bus camera surveillance program earlier this year, Ocean City transit officials report video footage helped identify several criminal suspects and address numerous driver related complaints. Transit Administrative Manager Brian Connor said in addition to internal department investigations, the Ocean City Police Department and the city’s Risk Management department also used bus surveillance footage this summer. “Since the spring we’ve had 42 [video footage] requests from one of the three stakeholders,” he said. Connor said the bulk of those were from the OCPD Forensics Department. “We work very closely with them because once we provide the video … that becomes an evidentiary legal packet and there is a chain of custody that must be followed, or it could be thrown out in court,” he said. Transit Manager Mark Rickards said the 65-bus fleet has eight cameras installed on 35- and 40-foot buses, with 10 on 60-foot articulating buses and para-transit buses having a half dozen. All vehicles also have four cameras for exterior views. “We have the whole exterior covered,” he said. “One looking front, one looking down each side and also one looking out the back.” Capturing footage outside transit buses can prove useful on a number of fronts, Rickards said. “When there is an accident or … collision where a car hits a bus, we can go back and look at that and determine liability or fault,” he said. In other cases, exterior footage captures criminal activities, Rickards said. “If there is a crime that supposedly happens, and the bus is going by at that time, the police can request that video,” he said. “The neat thing about these videos is you can pinpoint, slow them down, plus look at various speeds [and] angles.” OCPD Public Affairs Officer Lindsay Richard said, in a similar fashion to private property owners’ surveillance systems, her department requests permission to use footage for investigative purposes.

Connor said bus surveillance footage proved useful in assisting police to identify and capture criminal suspects this summer. “The feedback from the police department was … the clarity and quality of these images is awesome,” he said. The new video system also helps address passenger complaints regarding drivers, Rickards said. “Most times the complaints are found not to be valid,” he said. “The videos are very helpful in determining driver discipline and we couldn’t do that before.” Reviewing incident footage also helps with driver training and retention, Rickards said. “It’s hard to argue your own actions on the film,” he said. Connor said in the most egregious cases, unruly passengers have assaulted drivers. “This makes it incredibly easier for us to identify the perpetrator and under what circumstances this occurred,” he said. The system also captures audio, which Connor said proved useful this spring after a passenger had a heated exchange with a transit driver. “If you didn’t have audio, you would just think this is getting a little heated,” he said. “Once you heard the words … it took it to a completely different level where it was illegal.” Now able to decipher the precise language used, which included threats of bodily harm, Connor said accurate blame was assigned. “It made clear sense we were not at fault and yet this person was complaining we had done something wrong,” he said. “It’s funny how people remember what they remember.” Other camera system perks include recording bus speeds and physical locations, Rickards said. “The driver has a view [screen] up in the visor and they can select a live shot,” he said. “With this you can see what’s going on all the way in the back.” Rickards also noted, unlike the City Watch system on the Boardwalk which are monitored live, bus cameras are intended to enhance public safety in response to reported incidents. “They’re safe because something is watching but we’re not watching in real time,” he said.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 12

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

OC mulls insurance benefit change

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Projected price increases of more than four percent from CareFirst, has led Ocean City government to explore other options for employee health insurance after 2019. Kathleen McAuliffe, senior consultant with Bolton Partners, presented details about employee benefits insurance contract renewals during the City Council work session last Tuesday. “We’ve had several years where either we’ve offset the premium increase or there’s been no premium increase,” she said. “For the 2019 plan year, CareFirst is requesting a six percent increase, which was negotiated to 4.3 percent.” Wayne Evans, Human Resources Director provided historical background on the city’s benefit packages. “We added a high deductible health plan with a health savings account in 2012,” he said. “In 2014, we made a major change by adopting a self-funding arrangement with CareFirst, whereas before we had a fully insured product.” Evans said in 2015 the city made the high deductible health plan the default option for new hires. “It’s the best, most generous plan

the town offers,” he said. Since that time, other changes have included altering the co-share premium for the PPO plan from an 85 / 15 split to an 80 / 20 split, Evans said. Additionally, office visit co-pays were raised this year to $30 for primary care and $40 for specialists, with emergency room co-pays jumping from $100 to $150. “As a result, … we’ve seen a slight decrease in the ER utilization of [about] four percent,” he said. Evans also noted mandating use of generic drugs has resulted in a roughly two percent increase in their use. McAuliffe said the city has managed to offset rate increases in the past, including the 4.9 percent hike proposed in 2016. “In December 2016, the town implemented a premium free pay period which actually offset the 2017 rate increase,” she said. “In 2018, CareFirst requested a 2.8 percent increase and it was negotiated to arrive at no change.” The recent pricing discussions were addressed through improved prescription drug rates, McAuliffe said. “The actual increase to employees in dollars and percentage is pretty minimal,” she said.

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By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) A recommendation for a change in sewer system for a proposed Atlantic General Hospital building was unanimously approved during the Worcester County Planning Commission meeting last Thursday. Commission member Jay Knerr said he recently joined the board of trustees for the hospital, and recused himself before the presentation. The proposal aims to “change in the water and sewer service classifications” for the property and would like to “connect to the sewer connection system by connecting to a gravity

manhole at the south gate of Ocean Pines that discharges to Pump Station ‘T.’” Mitchell added in the proposal environmental preservation is a priority with this project and strives to protect “clean surface and ground water.” The proposed site is located at Racetrack Road, just south of the southern gate to Ocean Pines, according to the project description. It would need 34 equivalent dwelling units to serve the hospital’s outpatient facility. If approved, the proposed property would be 98,964 square feet, and used for “offices and mixed medical specialties,” Mitchell said.

Maintaining rate schedules is likely to become more difficult as CareFirst is changing methodology for rebate calculations, which are paid on brand name drugs and shared back to the plan sponsor to offset costs. “CareFirst in the past would pass back the maximum of the actual rebate or a guaranteed amount per claim,” she said. “They’ve changed for 2019 to just a per claim fee and we don’t think this is going to be a favorable change for the town.” McAuliffe estimated the adjustment would cost the town at least $90,000, and potentially as much as $130,000 per year. “It’s what the manufacturer kicks back on rebates and then that comes back to the plan,” she said. “It’s one to two percent of overall plan cost, so we think it’s worthwhile looking at other options.” With prescription drugs representing a growing portion of costs, McAuliffe said numerous coalitions have formed to reduce consumers’ bottom line. “There are a lot of plans I think we should look at,” she said. McAuliffe also noted CVS Caremark’s recently approved purchase of Aetna will likely result in market fluctuations. “CVS Caremark [is] the prescription provider for CareFirst, who is a competitor of Aetna,” she said. “We’re kind of waiting to see how that all shakes out, but it’s a good time to bid when this is going on in the industry.” To balance out the 2019 rate increase, the town will institute two premium free pay periods, McAuliffe said. “The bottom line is even though the rates are going up some, the dollar amount from the premium holiday will offset that increase,” she said. Looking ahead, McAuliffe recommended the city solicit bids for the medical plan combined with prescription coverage, which may result in lower costs. “The HSA plan continues to be a rich plan,” she said. “Every year since the plan was put in the town has been in a positive settlement position.”

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Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

PAGE 13

Wor. Planning Commission approves Sea Oaks proposal

By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) The Worcester County Planning Commission unanimously agreed last Thursday to send a favorable recommendation to the Worcester County Commissioners for a Sea Oaks Village project. Sea Oaks Village is on the west side of Stephen Decatur Highway, and north of Sinepuxent Road. If approved, the area will consist of 59 townhomes and two commercial buildings using 24,570 square feet of space for “retail, office and

contactor shop uses.” The existing 40-acre parcel has about 21.82 acres of uplands, and 18.18 acres of “non-tidal wetlands” within the R-3 MultiFamily Residential District, according to the project description. However, approximately 4.22 acres is classified within the C-1 Neighborhood Commercial District. Attorney Hugh Cropper said there would be “minimal impacts” on the wetlands. Cropper added a public hearing is set for the Nov. 20 county commissioners meeting to discuss sewage treatment.

BID BRIEFS

By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Several bids were solicited, proposed and approved during a Worcester County Commissioners meeting on Oct. 23.

Rehabbing Berlin homes Rehabilitation projects were proposed for single-family homes on Friendship Road and White Horse Drive in Berlin. Four homes were proposed for renovations, two on Friendship Road and two on White Horse Drive. Interested parties can obtain bid forms from the Office of County Commissioners in room 1103 on 1 West Market St., Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. Anyone with questions can call Program Inspector Dave Walter at 410-213-2021 or Jo Ellen Bynum, housing program administrator, at 410-632-1200, ext. 1171.

Nuisance structure demo County Commissioners unanimously approved demolishing a nuisance structure on 13412 Madison Avenue in Ocean City to sole bidder Delmarva Arborists LLC. The job would cost $25,300, according to the proposal. In the event that asbestos is discovered, there would be an additional cost for removal and disposal. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic made the motion, which was then seconded

Commissioner Jim Bunting.

Dump truck purchases A bid to purchase two dump trucks was approved 6-1 for $265,964 from Baylor Inc., DBA International of Delmarva, Salisbury, according to the proposal. Two bids were made after the process began on Sept. 24. There was $310,860 available in funding from the FY19 budget. Mitrecic made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Merrill Lockfaw. Commissioner Ted Elder expressed concerns about whether the county would be able to get warranty work done following a change in the company’s management.

County vehicles Bids to purchase 35 vehicles for Worcester County were unanimously approved, with the addition of a 4x2 pickup truck designated for solid waste. Director John Tustin said the 29 of the vehicles would come from Hertrich Fleet and six would be purchased from IG Burton, both of Milford, Delaware. The vehicles ranged from pickup trucks, to sedans, to police vehicles, according to the proposal. The pickup truck designated for solid waste was missed during the initial bidding process, but Tustin said he’d like it added to the listed recommendations. Continued on Page 14

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 14

Cricket Ctr. fundraiser nets thousands for child advocacy

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) More than $25,000 was raised on Oct. 24 during an annual fundraiser for the Cricket Center held at the Hobbit in Ocean City. The center, based in Berlin, is the only child advocacy center for sexually and physically abused children in Worcester County. Since opening in 2009, the center helped produce more than 1,000 years of jail time for child sex offenders. In 2016, the center reviewed 92 local cases, logged 472 hours of trauma therapy with victims and identified 31 sex offenders. Cricket Center Executive Director Wendy Myers said the fundraiser went off without a hitch. “It was extraordinary,” she said. “We had such a great crowd and they were so focused on our mission and wanting to hear about the program, and everybody had a great time. The Full Circle Duo was fantastic and the food at The Hobbit, obviously, is amazing. It was just a great event and we raised a lot of money.” Myers said money raised during the event would go directly toward services offered at the center. “If there’s equipment needs or needs that children and families have – any-

thing they might need – we can help provide that,” she said. “We also sometimes use some of that money for staff training.” Myers said the overall number of clients at the Cricket Center are on the rise, with the number of teen victims noticeably higher during the last six months. “I don’t know if that is due to increased reporting or actually increased victimization,” she said. “We just don’t know that because, obviously, if it’s not reported we don’t know about it. But, we certainly have seen a drastic increase in those teen victims.” Prosecutorial statistics are also increasing, she said. “We have enjoyed some very successful prosecutions recently and we are awaiting trial for multiple victims right now,” Myers said. “Certainly, our states attorney’s office is working really hard to make sure they’re prosecuting these cases.” For more information or to donate to the Cricket Center, call 410-641-0097 or visit www.thecricketcenter.com. “They can give us a call and come in for a tour. They can donate directly through our website. They can mail a check to our P.O. box. There are lots of ways to help out,” Myers said. Up next, the center will cohost the annual “Shop with a Cop” event with Maryland State Police on Dec. 15.

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BID BRIEFS Continued from Page 13 The motion was made by Mitrecic and seconded by Elder.

Dump truck purchase The motion to purchase a dump truck for the solid waste division was unanimously approved. Four bids were entered, according to the proposal, but the recommended dump truck was the Alban Tractor CAT 725-C2, Tustin said. The tractor would cost $5,955.66 per month, and $500,275.44 over 84 months. The motion was made by Lockfaw and seconded by Mitrecic.

Sole firm awarded bid The county commissioners approved the bid to Peter Johnston & Associates, LLC. to work on the Atlantic Coastal and Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Ordinance Update. The bid was for $9,750, according to the proposal. Robert J. Mitchell, director

of environmental programs,said he anticipates the work beginning Nov. 1 and finishing in February or March. Mitchell added the developer had experience working on similar projects in other areas. Bunting made the motion, which was seconded by Church.

Natural gas Tustin introduced a proposal “get the ball rolling” on converting the health department’s Berlin office to natural gas. It was unanimously approved. The project would cost $19,749, according to the proposal. The health department is located at 9370 Healthway Drive in Berlin. Tustin called the projects’ current status a “huge liability for [the] county.” The health department is one of four projects, according to Tustin, who said the library, courthouse and jail are also without natural gas. The motion was made by Church and seconded by Mitrecic.

Ocean City saves big with wastewater building project By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Ocean City government saved roughly $112,000 this week on a project budgeted for $170,000 to repair the generator building at the wastewater treatment plant on 64th Street. Public Works Director Hal Adkins told the City Council Monday that a low bid of $57,780 from Harkins Contracting seemed off base initially. Adkins said after opening project bids on Oct. 30, he contacted Harkins to assure the price, roughly $95,000 below the other bid received, was accurate. “A little eye-opening, but we did, in fact, reach out to Harkins to question if … they had missed anything,” he said. Adkins recited an email Harkins sent explaining that the low price was due to an ongoing project Harkins is completing at the Public Works 65th

Street Complex. “We cut out a lot of general conditions since we already were onsite doing your campus project,” Adkins quoted from the correspondence. “Basically, they go on to say they’ve got it covered and they’re comfortable with their numbers.” Following Councilwoman Mary Knight’s unanimously approved motion to accept the bare bones offer, Councilman Tony DeLuca offered a fiscal footnote to Councilman John Gehrig, who have both previously debated the merits of spending constraint. “I would like to comment to Councilman Gehrig that we saved $112,000 at this meeting,” he said. Gehrig asked if DeLuca wanted to begin a competition. “Is that a challenge to keep a running tally, because I guarantee you’ll lose,” he said. “You might not want to dance in the end zone quite yet.”


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

ADDRESSING THE EPIDEMIC: HOW BAD IS IT - PART 1

Heroin, opioids still have hold on Worcester

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) The heroin and opioid epidemic has touched most communities in Worcester County – and in Maryland. By all accounts, the face of addiction is the face of your neighbor. They are sons and daughters, mothers and fathers, veterans and star athletes. They are without a single race or religion or class. After talking with police and politicians, medical specialists and economists, a mother and father who fought the epidemic by starting a movement, and a former addict who has made it his mission to help others, a common theme emerged: there are no easy solutions. Nevertheless, plenty of people and resources are being directed toward efforts to save lives and to prevent the tide of addiction from continuing to rise. This is the first installment of a twopart look at the problem. Maryland Department of Health data on unintentional drug and alcohol-related intoxication deaths from January through June year showed 1,325 fatalities, a 12 percent increase

over the same period last year. Of those, 1,185 were opioid-related, including 1,038 fatal overdoses from the synthetic heroin, fentanyl. Heroin-related deaths decreased 20 percent compared to the same period in 2017 and prescription opioid deaths dropped 7 percent. Overdose fatalities, however, have been going up for the past 10 years. State data for the first six months in 2008 shows 359 unintentional intoxication deaths. Since 2012, those numbers were 385 in 2012, 397 in 2013, 528 in 2014, 601 in 2015, 979 in 2016, and 1,179 in 2017. In 2008, opioid-related overdose deaths were 261, but shot up to 873 in 2016, and up to 1,032 in 2017. Thirteen fentanyl-related deaths were recorded in the first half of 2008 and jumped to 800 last year before reaching the 1,038 fatalities in first six months of this year. Prescription-related deaths haven’t changed as much: 136 during the first two quarters of 2008, 218 during the same period in 2016 and 199 from January to June of this year. Ocean Pines Police Chief David Massey, formerly the police chief in Ocean City, recalled the days when heroin abuse was rare locally, which

IMAGE COURTESY WORCESTER COUNTY WARRIORS AGAINST OPIATE ADDICTION

The potency of fentanyl and carfentanil, both of which are synthetic opioids, has led to increased overdose deaths statewide, according to the Maryland Department of Health.

makes the surge in the drug’s use even more astonishing. “It’s unlike anything I’ve ever seen as far as addiction,” he said. “There’s no community that’s immune from drug abuse … it’s a national problem and various things have been tried.”

That includes decriminalization efforts, which he said now means “when we get a call for a drug overdose, police can’t make an arrest, no matter what they see.” He that approach has both good and bad aspects. See ADDRESSING Page 18


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Ocean City Today

PAGE 18

ADDRESSING THE EPIDEMIC: HOW BAD IS IT - PART 1 Continued from Page 16 “The feeling was that it (decriminalization) would make people more apt to call the police,” Massey said. “The unintended consequences are, when we went to a drug overdose before, and we found drugs, and someone was arrested, they … would get into counseling and drug awareness, or they would go to a facility. If it was serious enough, they would go to prison and be rehabilitated. Now, we’re not seeing that.” Today, when police respond to a reported overdose, any drugs found are seized and the victim may be hospitalized, Massey said. “Or, in many cases, the police [administer] Narcan and just leave,” he said. Narcan or Naloxone is a drug used to treat overdoses. The widespread availability of Narcan may also be skewing overdose statistics, Massey said. His department was the first in the county to carry the drug and to train police officers to administer it. “We don’t have a clue right now as far as how many drug overdoses [are occurring],” he said. “We have the ones that are reported … but we don’t know how big the problem is, because the addicts or the parents of the addicts are keeping Narcan and there’s no requirement to call police [during an overdose].” Massey said 10 fatal heroin-related overdoses occurred in Ocean Pines

during the two-year period of 2015 and “Everyone is looking for a solution – 2016. Those numbers have since de- everyone is looking for a magic bullet clined. in the case of opioid addiction, but I “Narcan apparently is working,” he don’t think there is one,” he said. said, adding, “We had one sad case “We see elderly people who were on where a woman pills. I’ve seen 61overdosed 13 year-olds … and times – and the young people 13th time she died also,” Massey “We have to said. “The first acknowledge that time you take [Narcan] is bringheroin you can ing people back – become addicted the question is, is – it’s a one-shot it a cycle?” poison.” Massey continOcean City ued. “[Does it] Firefighter bring them back Paramedics to the point where Association they can reoffend President Ryan without treatWhittington ment?” said the heroin Massey said epidemic reached opioid-related Ocean City about deaths in the four or five years United States Kim Poole, a behavioral health and addictions ago. And then it now outnumber program worker with the Worcester County got worse. Whittraffic fatalities. Health Department, administers a dose of tington said EMS naloxone, a drug that helps reverse opiate overThe fact is, they doses, during a training session at the Ocean personnel began don’t just out- Pines Library. to see heroin laced number them, with additives they exceed them by far.: statistics from such as fentanyl “that were making it the Centers for Disease Control esti- much more deadly.” mate 72,000 overdose deaths in 2017, “In Ocean City and West Ocean City, while the National Safety Council re- we see our share of overdoses,” he said. ported 40,000 traffic accident deaths “When it comes to an overdose call, for that year. your situational awareness is always

NOVEMBER 9, 2018 something that’s on high alert. “You’re looking to make sure that you’re not poked with a needle, you don’t kneel on a needle, that if it is laced with something, there’s no residue laying around so that you’d don’t inadvertently touch it … you don’t want it to come through your skin,” Whittington continued. “Your level of awareness is up and you know that, when it comes to an overdose call, seconds matter and you have to be ready to administer your drugs, your oxygen, assist with respiratory efforts – there’s so many things that go on.” Whittington said Ocean City firefighter-paramedics use Naloxone on overdose victims, per Maryland Medical Protocols, He credited Gov. Larry Hogan’s Heroin and Opioid Emergency Task Force, the interagency coordinating council begun in 2015, with making Naloxone available to the majority of first responders. “The heroin epidemic is one of the things that I really saw unite all public safety, all communities,” he said. A Former Addict’s Take: Tom Mcgrath Mcgrath is a former resident at Ottey’s recovery house in Wicomico County. He’s 29, originally from Baltimore, and a graduate of Stephen Decatur High School. He and said he was a normal kid See ADDRESSING Page 20


Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

PAGE 19

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Ocean City Today

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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

ADDRESSING THE EPIDEMIC: HOW BAD IS IT - PART 1

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Continued from Page 18 growing up, although he never knew his mother and was instead raised by his father and two brothers. In college, Mcgrath transferred from Wor-Wic to the University of South Carolina, but a loan fell through during his second semester there. He left school and enlisted in the U.S. Navy. He smoked marijuana and drank a little, but didn’t try any hard drugs until he came back from the Navy and found his friends had gotten into Percocet. “Just one day, randomly, I was over at a guy’s house and he was prescribed them,” he said. “I guess I didn’t really open my eyes enough to see how it was grabbing people and catching people, because even my friends at the time were doing it every day.” It also grabbed him. Mcgrath found the pills helped numb everything that had been going on inside him. “I wish I would have focused more on things that were going on inside of me, as far as depression and anxiety and just turmoil constantly,” he said. “My head was constantly just going, going, going. I didn’t know how to fix it, so I did drugs.” He graduated to heroin a few years later when the supply of prescription opioids became scarce. Mcgrath, who sold pot in college, found himself selling heroin to support his new habit. “I was just trying not to pay $500 out of my pocket,” he said. “I could sell some and still get high. It was like an avalanche … it was probably the most powerless and vulnerable I’ve ever been. “Once it gets ahold of you, that’s when the real terror starts to come, because it’s not just about the physical addiction anymore … but now it’s in your head,” Mcgrath continued. “Everything snowballed so fast.” He got busted and charged with distribution, and eventually went to jail. While there, Mcgrath said, the problem only grew worse. “It kind of multiplied the problem, because then you put me around other people who are addicts and have different connections, and you’re surrounded by that 24-7,” he said. “Once I got released on parole, I went right back to using.” Within the space of just a few years, two of his best friends overdosed and died. Before that, his aunt had overdosed and died in 2012 and a cousin suffered a fatal overdose in 2009. “I was still using at that point [around 2016],” Mcgrath said. Finally, he checked himself into rehab, but by doing so violated parole and was again sent to jail. “The day before I got released, my other best friend left to go back to work on a tugboat in Philadelphia. Two weeks later, he overdosed on the boat and he died,” Mcgrath said. “It was a point in my life where I was saying, ‘Am I going to go left or right?’” The drugs, he said, had become a mask for unresolved issues with his family and friends.

“I told myself I was either going to be a 50-year-old junkie, or I’m going to try and take a second chance at life,” Mcgrath said. “And it was the first time in my life I felt like I got outside of myself – it wasn’t all about me anymore. I could see the pain in my father’s eyes and my brothers’ eyes. “I couldn’t do it by myself,” he continued. “And [recovery has] been the greatest thing that’s happened to me in my life, because now, in return, I can help other people that were in that position.” He got into the drug court program, which he’s now nearly finished, and volunteered to help in several other local groups, including the Worcester County Warriors, that address addiction, depression and anxiety. “Anything where I can get some personal time, because that’s what I needed,” Mcgrath said. “I needed somebody to get through to me, to pay attention [and to say] ‘I’ve been through it.’ You can have a piece of paper that says, ‘I can help you,’ but you have no idea what I’m talking about, because it’s hell.” Mcgrath said trying to help someone recover from an addiction is a balancing act. Based on his experience, too much pressure can push someone away, while not enough can make a person feel isolated. “It’s really individual,” he said. “Really, it’s up to you as far as, ‘Am I tired of this life 100 percent?’ And it can’t be 99, because at 99 percent you’re going to use again. It has to be 100 percent and you have to stay committed. “You can’t ever stop working, even if it feels like it’s getting better and you’ve been clean for a while … you still have to work every day to replant the different seeds in your head,” Mcgrath continued. “And it’s impossible to do it on your own.” Economic impact Dr. Memo Diriker, director of the Business Economic and Community Outreach Network of the Franklin P. Perdue School of Business at Salisbury University claims, the negative financial impact of heroin and opioids will exceed the positive impact of the billion-dollar poultry industry. “We did a study on the economic cost of substance abuse in our nine [Eastern Shore] counties,” he said, adding that incarceration, treatments and the prices for Naloxone are on the rise. “Separately, we did a study of the economic value of all resource-based industries in all of Maryland’s counties. From that, we looked at the positive economic impact of poultry within those resource-based industries.” The negative dollar-amounts in dealing with the opioid crisis were alarmingly close to the positive impact of poultry, Diriker concluded. “Given that the impact of opioids continues to grow at a very rapid clip, we believe that within in a few years the negative impact will be a higher number than the positive number for the poultry.


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

O’Brien leads first Worcester recovery house By Josh Davis Associate Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) A year ago Brandon O’Brien was sleeping in his car on back roads and in parking lots near Ocean Pines, thinking about taking his own life after struggling with drug addiction for close to a decade. Today, he’s turned his life around and was recently named the house manager at the newly opened Hope4Recovery center in Berlin, the first recovery house in Worcester County. O’Brien, 32, was born in Baltimore but has lived in the Berlin/Ocean Pines area since he was about five. He graduated from Stephen Decatur High School and briefly attended college at Wor-Wic, but he struggled to find direction. “I’d experimented with drugs and

got hooked on opiates, and I went to rehab in 2011 for painkillers. And then I met a girl in rehab, which is not a good idea,” he said. “We were going to get clean together and then she started using, and she introduced me to heroin.” That went on for about a year, O’Brien said, and he ended up back in rehab in 2012. “It was not even a year later and, this time, it was for shooting heroin,” he said. He got out again and, again, he met a girl. This time it lasted five years, but O’Brien had became “pretty miserable” by the end of the relationship. “She broke it off with me and I moved in with my grandmother, because I didn’t have anywhere else to go,” he said. “I was attempting to get my life on track and to figure out how

to be OK with being on my own, with being single. I was running 15 miles a week, because I was so mad at myself for ruining this relationship that I just wanted to kick my own ass.” He also started using benzodiazepines like Klonopin and Xanax. At first, the lack of a solid connection meant high prices and low supply, “so it kept me from doing them too much,” he said. “Then, I met somebody who had them all the time and wasn’t charging a ridiculous amount, so I bought a lot,” O’Brien said. “And it was such a short amount of time before my family noticed, my grandmother noticed, my work noticed. A week later my grandmother and everybody had an intervention – and I was not in the mood for that.” O’Brien said he became combative

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Brandon O’Brien, house manager of the newly opened Hope4Recovery house in Berlin, will help local people attempt to overcome addiction and reintegrate into society. Seven months ago, O’Brien himself was a client at a similar recovery house in Salisbury.

and “said some really terrible things” to family members. He was kicked out of his grandmother’s house and didn’t have anywhere else to go, so he slept in his car, parking near Manklin Creek in Ocean Pines. One night, sleeping with the car running because of the cold, police were called and asked to do a field sobriety test, but O’Brien refused. “I didn’t have anything on me, but I got in trouble and it really snowballed,” he said. “I was already really depressed over this situation with this girl and I felt like I had nowhere to go … I really just wanted something different and I didn’t know what to do to get that, so the only solution in my mind at that point was, I’m going to kill myself. I don’t want to do this anymore.” He tried to slit his wrist. O’Brien said at the time he was sitting in the car, listening to his favorite song and wearing his favorite outfit. “It was like some stupid, tragic thing in my mind – very cinematic,” he said. He remembers being parked near Whiskers Bar & Grill and bleeding into a collectible popcorn tin from a local movie theater. “My father later said, ‘I knew you weren’t serious, because they told me that you were cutting your wrists over a popcorn bucket because you didn’t See WE’RE Page 24


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Ocean City Today

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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

‘We’re about recovery and ... changing lives’ Continued from Page 22 want to ruin your upholstery.’ I really liked that car,” O’Brien said with an uneasy laugh. Then, without warning, a man handing out religious pamphlets appeared at the driver’s side window. He saw what O’Brien was doing and offered to help. “Nobody is ever in that shopping center. To have somebody handling out pamphlets [there] is kind of strange. I’ve never seen it before or since,” O’Brien said. “I feel like maybe that was God trying to delay me.” O’Brien moved to a different spot but, five minutes later, police arrived. He was taken to Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury and wound up in the psych ward there, and was later forced into detox from benzos and Suboxone.

“It ended up being a great opportunity, because I don’t think I would have ever gotten off of those,” he said. “When I was in the hospital I thought, ‘How did I get here? I am so much smarter than being in this situation.’ It kind of blew my mind: Here I am in a psych ward and I have nowhere to go … what am I doing? What can I do?” O’Brien’s mother helped him get into a recovery house in Salisbury run by Ocean Pines Police Det. Patrice Ottey. He was told it was “not an option” to go back to his grandmother’s house. “I was scared. I didn’t want to do it. But, it was my only option,” he said. “I had a moment in the hospital where I was at my wit’s end with everything and I was just desperate to do anything to change my life. “My mom told me, ‘You can look at

this in a negative light or you can look at it as an opportunity,’” O’Brien continued. “I’ve always had problems trying to see the good in bad situations.” Once he got into the recovery house, O’Brien started attending regular meetings. He got a sponsor and starting working the steps. He said it was actually nice to be around other addicts in recovery. “Looking back, if I would have gone back to my grandmother’s house, I don’t think I would be sober a year later,” he said. Monday, Nov. 5 was the one-year anniversary of his sobriety. About seven months into his treatment, Ottey approached O’Brien about becoming the house manager for her new center in Berlin and helping to shepherd clients through the recovery process there. He was surprised and, initially, somewhat skeptical.

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“I might not be a natural leader, but if I can at least lead by example maybe some other guys will follow,” he said. “That she trusted me enough to even put me in that position – it just went to show people around me … they noticed how different I was and how much things like the steps, my sponsor and getting involved with church started changing me. “It’s crazy for me to think I went from not wanting to do this to, here I am in Berlin with a brand new house – the first of it’s kind in Worcester County – in my hometown. Somebody gave me the opportunity to be here at this point and it’s been amazing,” O’Brien continued. “I can’t describe how overwhelmed I am, but in the most positive way that you can use the word.” In Berlin, O’Brien will help guide a new group of clients through the recovery process. He’ll be there to set rules and boundaries, make sure they’re clean and going to regular meetings and, eventually, help them find work and integrate back into society. It’s a role he now relishes. “To see my mom, she tells me how proud she is, but she doesn’t have to because it shows all over her face and in our interactions now,” he said. “And the same thing with my grandmother, who was trying to help me put the pieces back together after that last relationship. I know she felt like she failed me, because I acted the way that I did. “The change that they’ve all seen in me since then – it’s amazing. It’s exciting, really. I’m excited for life,” O’Brien continued. “I never was excited for what’s around the corner, because I didn’t know. Now, because there’s hope for the future, anytime that I’m feeling down I now know these feelings are temporary and will pass. It’s all in how I chose to respond to them.” O’Brien said he wants to be an uplifting presence for others. Knowing how low he was just a year ago, he hopes to be able to relate to people who are in similar situations. “I feel like my responsibility to somebody who’s coming in here is to show them that this program and this recovery house environment, it can work and it can be a positive change in your life – if you’re willing to do the work,” he said. “When it comes down to it, the ones that really want it – they’ll take it. And the ones that don’t will always fall off. It’s the sad truth. “I just want to be a part of something where it’s just recovery – we’re about recovery and we’re about changing our lives,” O’Brien continued. “If you’re not here to change your life, then you’re taking up space for somebody who maybe is ready for that. And I don’t know where I would be today if there hadn’t been a bed open for me.” To contact Ottey about space in the home, email hope4recovery2017@ gmail.com or call 443-523-4459.


Lifestyle

Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertaiment, Events, Features, Music

Veteran’s Day ceremonies planned By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) This year marks the 100th anniversary of Veteran’s Day. American military veterans and families will be honored during this day filled with activities and ceremonies, Sunday, Nov. 11, throughout Worcester County.

Ocean City:

•American Legion Synepuxent Post 166: The American Legion Synepuxent Post 166 will have its centennial Veteran’s Day celebration this Sunday, beginning at 1 p.m. on 24th Street in Ocean City. To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, the names of 38 Worcester County men who made the supreme sacrifice during WWI will be read off in recognition and respect of their final sacrifice. Light refreshments will be served after the ceremony. The Boy Scouts, Eagle Scouts,

Sons of the American Legion, Junior and Senior Auxiliary and American Legion Riders will be in attendance, wreaths will be placed and the Color Guard will perform a gun-firing salute. For more information, call Adjutant Robert Smith at 443-614-2503 or email at rls.terp22@gmail.com.

Ocean Pines:

•Worcester County Veterans Memorial: The Worcester County Veterans Memorial Foundation will present its annual Veteran’s Day ceremony on Sunday at 11 a.m. The Worcester County Veterans Memorial is located between Cathell and Manklin Creek roads off Route 589 in Ocean Pines. Capt. Jeff Lock, USN, will be the keynote speaker during this year’s event. Capt. Lock is currently serving as the commander of the Surface Command Center at Wallops Island. Attendees are asked to bring a chair, though some will be provided on a first-come basis. There will be golf carts for those needing assistance from their cars to the memorial. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will move to the Ocean

Page 25 See Marine Corps vet use chainsaw to carve sculpture

Local Scouts and others salute during a Veteran’s Day ceremony at the Worcester County Veterans Memorial in Ocean Pines last year.

Events to take place at memorial in Ocean Pines and at OC American Legion

Nov. 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

Pines Community Center. Faded or worn American flags are being collected before and immediately after the ceremony for disposal during a Flag Retirement Ceremony, which will be held at the Veterans Memorial on Saturday, Nov. 17 at 10 a.m. •American Legion Synepuxent Post 166, Boy Scout Troop 261 and Cub Scout Pack 261 will host an annual Flag Disposal Ceremony at the Worcester County Veterans Memorial in Ocean Pines on Nov. 17 at 10 a.m. All worn, torn and unusable United States flags can be dropped off prior to 9 a.m. at Disharoon Post 123, at 10111 Old Ocean City Blvd, Berlin, and Duncan-Showell Post 231, on 104 Showell Street, Berlin. Flags can also be dropped off at these two posts prior to Nov. 17, in addition to, the Ocean Pines Community Center, Ocean City Elks Lodge on Sinepuxent Ave. and the American Legion Post 166 on 24th Street in Ocean City. For more information, call 443735-1942. •Wreaths Across America: The Worcester County Veterans MemoSee WREATH Page 26

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Watch Marine Corps veteran Anthony Marquez of XVII Carvings use a chainsaw to carve a sculpture honoring veterans at K-Coast Surf Shop on 36th Street in Ocean City today, Nov. 9, at 9 a.m. Marquez’s last deployment was to Sangin, Afghanistan, in 2011. His Battalion lost 17 members during that tour. In 2016, Marquez made it his mission to provide chainsaw carvings for each family member who lost their son during that 2011 deployment. Since then, Marquez, who lives in Oklahoma, has been making customized carvings for individuals and performing live carvings demonstrations all over the country. “He’s going to carve the boots, rifle and helmet, which we call a battlefield cross in the military,” Event Organizer Alex Mitchell said. Mitchell is also a Marine veteran and an Ocean Pines resident. He asked Marquez to display his talent to help raise awareness of mental health and addiction. “That’s a guy who’s standing up there seven hours with a chainsaw working,” Mitchell said. “I’m [hosting this event] because I want to be able to let people know what type of help is out there for mental health and addiction.” Mitchell has been struggling with mental illness his entire life and said he understands first-hand the challenges veterans face on a daily basis. “I’m always trying to do things in the community and I’m excited to be someone who can bring people together for a good cause,” Mitchell stated in a press release. Marquez’s carving to be completed on Friday has been purchased by the Worcester County Veterans Memorial Foundation. The 55-inch sculpture will be the latest addition to the memorial, located on Racetrack Road in Ocean Pines. Veteran artists will also be onsight selling their work. Each artist will donate one piece to the cause. The pieces will be raffled off to raise money for Joe Merritt’s organization, Community Building Arts Work. Tables with information about resources available to those suffering from mental health or addiction will also be at the event. All proceeds will benefit the ComSee RAFFLE Page 26


Ocean City Today

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American Legion Post #166 Junior Auxiliary member Delaney McDaniel and Cub Scout Sean McCrystal participate in the placement of the wreaths during the Veteran’s Day ceremony at the American Legion on 24th Street in Ocean City last year.

Wreath sponsorship $15 for Wreaths Across America Continued from Page 25 rial Foundation is participating in Wreaths Across America again this year and community members are asked to sponsor a wreath for $15. The project originated with wreaths being placed at Arlington National Cemetery, but it has grown to include veterans’ cemeteries nationwide and overseas. Wreaths will be placed at the Eastern Shore Veterans Cemetery in Hurlock on Saturday, Dec. 15 at 10 a.m. It will follow a short ceremony in the

cemetery chapel. In 2017, Wreaths Across America volunteers laid more than 1.2 million memorial wreaths at more than 1,400 locations in the United States and beyond. To sponsor a wreath, complete the form found at www.opvets.com and mail it with a check addressed to: “Wreaths Across America,” P.O. Box 1576, Ocean Pines, Maryland 21811. The deadline is Monday, Nov. 26. For more information on Wreaths Across America, visit www.wreathsacrossamerica.org.

Raffle featuring donated artwork to benefit CBAW Continued from Page 25 munity Building Arts Work, a charitable organization that builds healthy and connected communities where veterans and civilians share creative expression, mutual understanding, and support. For more information on CBAW visit communitybuildingartworks.org. For more information on Marquez’s sculptures, visit www.xviicarvings.com. Marine Corps veteran Anthony Marquez carves intricate battlefield crosses, consisting of a rifle, boots and helmet, out of wood to raise money for veterans. Marquez will perform a live carving demonstration at K-Coast Surf Shop on 36th Street in Ocean City, today, Nov. 9. PHOTO COURTESY ANTHONY MARQUEZ


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Military history buff Dennis Theoharis landscaped the Morris Cemetery near Selbyville earlier this year, which was nearly obscured by overgrowth, and was amazed to discover impressive grave monuments for WWI veteran L.D. Morris and his parents in the tiny family farm gravesite.

Theoharis locates gravesite of WWI vet near Selbyville

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) While investigating Morris Cemetery in Selbyville earlier this year, military history buff Dennis Theoharis was astonished to stumble upon the gravesite of WWI veteran L.D. Morris, who was killed on the French front lines 100 years ago this October. Theoharis, who resides in Selbyville, said the tiny family gravesite is located just above the Maryland line on Hudson Road, which becomes Bishopville Road south of Route 54. “I came across grave stones but there were three of them that [looked] like tombs,” he said. “It looked like a little coffin upside down.” If the unusual grave architecture was not eye catching enough, Theoharis said a trio of roughly three-foottall monument-like headstone markers were virtually impossible to ignore. “I read the mom and dad’s (gravestones) and got to the third one and started reading about L.D. Morris,” he said. Pfc. Levin David Morris, who was born on May 26, 1888, was killed in combat on Oct. 14, 1918 while engaging in trench warfare in the Argonne Forest near Champ Mahaut. Morris, who fought with the 328 Infantry Regiment, was among 137 casualties the company suffered during October 1918, according to a summary of WWI operations issued by the American Battle Monuments Commission. “It said an artillery and machine gun barrage got him,” he said. “The shame of it was the Armistice Day, which is now Veterans Day, Nov. 11, was less than a month away.” Levin David Morris was the son of Levin J. and Sallie M. Morris, who passed in October 1922 and Decem-

PAGE 27

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The gravestone for WWI veteran Pfc. Levin David Morris, who was killed on the front lines in France 100 years ago this October, is located in the Morris Cemetery on Hudson Road near the Maryland state line.

ber 1888, respectively. “On Oct. 14, I got two little American Flags and put a flag at the headstone marking and at the front of the grave and then I saluted him for his service to his country,” he said. “Here’s a guy a hundred years ago who gave his life for his country.” The percentage of WWI veterans killed in action and buried in private plots is only a fraction of those who made the ultimate sacrifice, with Theoharis noting the War Department, which became the Department of Defense in 1949, offered family members the option of having their loved ones permanently buried in Europe or shipped home. “Obviously, the family wanted him shipped home and he was buried on, I guess, the family farm,” he said. “He was one of more than 50,000 Americans killed in combat during the war.” According to the National Archives, approximately 4.7 million American men and women served See GRAVE Page 28

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Ocean City Today

Greenspan helps redevelop Holocaust Memorial in Pa.

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) In 1964, the first public memorial to the Holocaust in the United States was unveiled in Philadelphia, located along Benjamin Franklin Parkway. More than 50 years later, the area surrounding the memorial expanded and adopted technological advancements for education and further remembrance. Ocean City resident Jerry Greenspan spent his childhood in Philadelphia, where the memorial was constructed. His father, Harold, was one of the Holocaust survivors who helped to design and dedicate the first Holocaust memorial in North America. The bronze-on-black granite sculpture called “Six Million Jewish Martyrs” was the work of artist Nathan Rapoport, who fled his native Poland when the Nazis invaded Warsaw. “This is a memorial to remember the past and the fathers, mothers, brothers and sisters that never made it here,” Greenspan said. “Their voices will continue to be heard and their stories will never be forgotten.” Greenspan’s father passed away in January 1999, but not before imparting a special request to his son and daughter regarding the memorial. “Before he passed away, he asked me and my sister to look into developing this plaza,” Greenspan said. “His request was to take this gift that he left for the Philadelphia monument and to develop the rest of the plaza. It was just a grass plot with a little wall around it, but nothing was there beside trees.” Greenspan, his sister, Claire Akselrad, and members of the Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation began expanding the memorial in 2002, completing the project this year, on Oct. 22. The project took 16 years and cost approximately $13 million to complete.

In addition to the original sculpture, four focal points were also added to the memorial. The new surroundings include three sections of train track from the Treblinka railroad in Nazi-occupied Poland, which are four to six feet long and have been embedded in the pavement. Six pillars were constructed to represent the six million martyrs of the Holocaust. Another focal point is the now grown sapling of the original Theresienstadt tree raised by students in German occupied Czechoslovakia. “A teacher and her young children took a portion of their water and nurtured this tree,” Greenspan said. “It grew from a sapling to a large tree and we were given a sapling which is over 20 feet tall now.” Finally, new trees were planted to represent the resistance and growth, as well as show that life could go on after the Holocaust. “A survivor who spoke that day said, ‘You can cut the tree down, but the roots survive this horrific event, and we were able to be reborn in a sense,’” Greenspan said. “Our roots of our existence are never exterminated. We have continued to grow and be a part of society today.” Another addition to the memorial comes from the partnership between the Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation and the USC Shoah Foundation to bring educational content and technology to the renovated plaza. An app specifically developed for the plaza allows visitors to use their phones, iPads and other mobile devices to connect to video testimonials of Holocaust survivors and witnesses. The videos draw from the USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive, which has over 54,000 eyewitness accounts of the Holocaust, along with photos, documents, maps and other educational materials. Greenspan hopes the modern technology will help to educate

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Grave of WWI vet, L.D. Morris, found in local cemetery Continued from Page 27 during WWI, with more than 116,000 killed in combat or by disease, and about 200,000 military members wounded. “Most people don’t realize that was as many as Vietnam and in Korea,” he said. “That was the last entrenched war where they got in trenches and they just kept shooting … and trying to blow each other up.” While estimates vary slightly, about 58,000 American service members were killed during the Vietnam conflict with roughly 33,000 killed in the Korean War. Theoharis said L.D. Morris’ gravestone inscription illuminates the interminable loss experienced by families of service members who depart for battle but fail to return. “Farewell to you, a precious one from us has gone,” the words chiseled in stone read. “A voice we loved is stilled. A place is vacant in our home which never can be filled.” younger generations about the Holocaust. “What we’re going to do is continually have kids from elementary school to high school go on trips to the memorial provided by the Holocaust museum,” Greenspan said. “Hopefully in the future there will be more stability around the world and that this provides some place of remembrance not only for Jewish people but all religions and a place we can find some compassion and understanding for other people.”

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20

Aries, this is a great week to give that special someone in your life some extra love and attention. Your workloads have lightened across the board, so go the extra mile.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21

Taurus, all eyes are on you and all attention is focused in your direction. Stay grounded as much as possible as you become the center of attention.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21

Keep a watchful eye on your domestic responsibilities, Gemini. It’s easy for the scales to tip in other directions, but nothing is more important than life at home.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22

Distant shores are beckoning, Cancer. Now could be the time to start planning a getaway you have always dreamed of. Enjoy this exciting trip.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23

Romance may not be in the stars this week for you, Leo, as you are too distracted by work. Make some time to come up for air and then focus on relationships.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22

Virgo, someone special to you may shower you with intense love and affection this week if you just find the time to connect. Clear your schedule for the rest of the week.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23

Libra, if you play your cards right, you will look back on this week with nothing but smiles. Things will soon get sorted out, and this week will mark a turning point.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22

Scorpio, things may not have been easy for you over the last couple of weeks, but your courage and stamina know no bounds. Keep forging ahead.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21

Sagittarius, your career is in a perfect place right now, so you can devote some of your attention to personal matters — even your love life. Start focusing on your feelings.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20

You notice a definite boost in your energy level and drive this week, Capricorn. It’s almost as if you’ve rediscovered a passion you tucked away for a while.

This pillar, depicting a quote from George Washington about the importance of human freedom, is one of six which were added during the rededication of the Philadelphia Holocaust Memorial Plaza.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18

Cosmic dust will settle mid-week and you will feel as if you have your power back, Aquarius. If you’ve been holding off on projects, now is the time to charge ahead.

PHOTO COURTESY JERRY GREENSPAN PHOTO COURTESY JERRY GREENSPAN

Ocean City resident Jerry Greenspan and his mother, Jean, stand before the completed Philadelphia Holocaust Memorial Plaza on Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Greenspan helped redevelop the memorial.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20

Pisces, make a list of your priorities so you can focus your energy efficiently. You don’t want to waver when trying to get things done.


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

Wild & Scenic Film Festival, Thurs.

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) The Assateague Coastal Trust will hold its eighth annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival at Seacrets on 49th Street, Thursday, Nov. 15, from 6-9 p.m. “Films featured at Wild & Scenic give people a sense of place,” Kathy Phillips, Assateague COASTKEEPER, stated in a press release. “When we realize that the change we need in this world begins with us, we start making a difference. Spend this evening with your friends and get inspired.” Fourteen films will be presented, each specifically selected by Assateague Coastal Trust for a customized Wild & Scenic Film Festival tour. Topics range from the frozen Arctic, to the Appalachian Mountains and under the waters of Long Island Sound. Film lengths range from 3 to 20 minutes. “The films we selected this year fit with a theme that we’ve chosen for our autumn newsletter, which is ‘Be the Change’, which is a film to inspire people to make a difference in today’s world and today’s society to really be the change to give back to the community and make a difference,” Billy Weiland, Assateague Coastal Trust’s communication director, said. “The way we select the films, we’ll

get 50-60 films from the Wild & Scenic Film Festival,” he continued. “We actually have the privilege to pick out the films for our venues. The films that we picked this year … some of them have a message that is pertinent to not just our organization but our local area and our watershed.” Assateague Coastal Trust will feature a short film documenting its latest project during the event, known as “Trash Free Assateague.” Oceana

“Films featured at Wild & Scenic give people a sense of place.” Kathy Phillips will also present its latest film in efforts to end the shark fin trade. “The other films we picked, usually the longer ones, those will be the ones that are a little bit more picturesque and inspire people to get outside and experience the environment around them,” Weiland said. “Getting people stoked on the environment is the first step to getting them to care about the environment and do something for it.” Live music, food and drink specials, door prizes, and a silent auction featuring items from local artists and businesses will complement the evening in Seacret’s Morley Hall.

“This is an excellent way for likeminded people and those concerned with the environment to come out,” Weiland said. “It just inspires people and makes people feel good. People want to come out and see good changes for the community and for the environment.” New for 2018, the Assateague Coastal Trust will host a second venue for the Wild & Scenic Film Festival at the Cinema Art Theater in Lewes, Delaware, Tuesday, Nov. 27. Fourteen films will be presented at this venue. Tickets for the Ocean City festival cost $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Ticket package discounts are also available. Additional event details and tickets can be purchased online at www.actforbays.org/act-events or by calling 410-629-1538. This year’s Wild & Scenic Film Festival is supported by Dogfish Head Brewery, OC Wasabi, and SantaCon OCMD, with additional support from Maryland Coastal Dispatch, Deepwater Wind, Oceana, Comcast Spotlight, Deeley Insurance Group, Delmarva Birding Weekends, Ocean 98, Shotti’s Point - Ocean City, Seaside Plumbing, Sons of the American Legion, Atlantic Dental Cosmetic and Family Dentistry, and Bank of Ocean City.

PAGE 29

Annual Winterfest of Lights in OC to kick off Thursday

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Colorful lights, hot chocolate, a festive market and Santa Claus return to Northside Park on 125th Street for the 26th annual Winterfest of Lights, which kicks off next Thursday, Nov. 15. “We wanted to create an event that people could come to, and they can have that holiday cheer, that wonderful feeling of warmth and giving that goes along with the holiday,” Ocean City Special Events Director Frank Miller said. “We want people to come here and feel the holiday season.” The opening ceremony will begin at 5:30 p.m. on Nov. 15 and includes Ocean City Elementary School’s “OC Stars” performing holiday songs and dance in addition to an appearance from Santa Claus. Mayor Rick Meehan will “flip the switch” to illuminate the 50-foot Christmas tree and light displays and officially open the Winterfest of Lights. In addition, there will be free rides on the Winterfest Express after the celebration. New to the festival this year are moving light displays, Miller said. “This year [the 50-foot tree] has animated garland wrapped around it See WINTERFEST Page 31


PAGE 30

Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City residents Richie and Breezy Kammermeier are dead set on having a fun Halloween this year during BJ’s on the Water’s Halloween party at the 75th Street establishment, Wednesday, Oct. 31.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Bethany Beach residents Mark and Kim Tate stop by BJ’s on the Water’s Halloween party at the 75th Street establishment, Wednesday, Oct. 31.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City residents Tesa Terlizzi, David Ruhl, center, and Dusty Carver enjoy the Halloween party at BJ’s on the Water, Wednesday, Oct. 31.

BJ’s on the Water employees Amber Doby, left, Bradley Bjorkand and Brittney Muller serve up spooky drinks and meals during the Halloween party at the 75th Street establishment, Wednesday, Oct. 31.

Ocean City resident Karen Gilberath is pretty as a peacock during BJ’s on the Water’s Halloween party at the 75th Street establishment, Wednesday, Oct. 31. MORGAN PILZ/ OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Selbyville resident Chuck Guerra, left, poses with Dave Moxley, of Ocean City at BJ’s on the Water.


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 31

Winterfest of Lights runs Nov. 15 to Dec. 31 Continued from Page 29 and we added a small sound system into the tree and [it] now dances to music,” Miller said. “There are three songs we created and the lights will dance to the music. We’ve tried to cover the gambit. We’ve got oldies, modern [and] somewhat semi-classic rock. You have to come and listen to all three songs to get the feeling for them.” The 12-minute tram ride provides guests with an unforgettable experience, Miller said, through 58 acres of more than 400 displays from fairytale characters to the 12 Days of Christmas accompanied with holiday music. From Nov. 15 through Dec. 31, visitors will have the opportunity to see more than one million lights during their one-mile ride through the park. Visitors can wait for their ride inside a heated pavilion, which includes the Winterfest Village and features returning favorites such as an open Winterfest Marlin Marketplace where ornaments, stocking stuffers, souvenirs and holiday gifts can be purchased. Long lines should not discourage fans of the ride, as six trams will be set up during the weekends, meaning 65-70 passengers board a tram every four minutes. Jolly Roger Amusements will have a display for visitors to take photos near, in what Miller calls the “Instagram Hotspots.” There will be five designated hotspots this year compared to last year’s three. “Inside the village we have what are called Instagram Hotspots. These are photo opportunities for families and patrons and those displays we try to change up every single year,” he said. IG Burton is slated to have a Jeep on display, there will be an Assateague Island National Seashore photo opportunity, a sweet display courtesy of Candy Kitchen and four poinsettia trees including the large 12-foot favorite will decorate the pavilion in a courtyard setting. Also new this year is a display from Ripley’s Believe It or Not. “We always try to give new opportunities for photographs, and those are in addition to our hotspots like the Christmas tree and the Winterfest archway,” Miller said. “We always try to give something new to experience in the Winterfest pavilion.” Santa resides in Kris Kringle’s Corner, surrounded by Christmas trees. The jolly old elf’s section has been decorated every year by Candy Kitchen. Santa will greet visitors and listen to Christmas wish lists through Dec. 23. Children also have the option to write a letter to Santa and put it in his mailbox. Mrs. Claus will join Santa in spreading holiday cheer, with her

focus on staying healthy and helping through the park. others. The Jingle Bell Run and New Winterfest of Lights has become a Year’s Eve fireworks show will also be yearly tradition for local residents returning this holiday season. The and families visiting during the holi- run will take place on Sunday, Dec. 2, day season. The city’s crew begin and is sponsored by the Ocean City setup in early OcRecreation and Parks tober to transform Department and OC the park into a “We want people to come here Tri Running. The winter wonder- and feel the holiday season.” race will take runners land with a differthrough the light disFrank Miller ent layout each plays at Northside year to keep exPark. cursions fresh for returning visitors. The New Year’s Eve celebration Last year, 109,210 passengers took will include a midnight fireworks disa ride through illuminated Northside play, live entertainment, hot chocoPark during the 46-night holiday late and a ride through the Winterfest spectacular, according to Miller. He of Lights. hopes good weather will bring in For almost a decade, organizers larger crowds. The largest recorded have been focused on refurbishing attendance took place in 2015, with a the more than 400 existing displays, total of 126,924 patrons riding which are stripped down, rewired

and the bulbs and sockets replaced. This year, something completely new will be added to the displays. “We are going to have a new display in the park this year,” Miller said. “It’s going to stand out unlike anything else we’ve had historically. It’s always been 2-D displays at Northside Park. This year we have a three-dimensional element, which you’ll have to come and see for yourself.” The nighttime holiday favorite festival runs nightly through Dec. 31 at Northside Park. Hours of operation are 5:30-9:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, and 5:30-10:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. The cost to ride the train is $5 for adults. Children 11 and younger ride for free. For more information, call Ocean City’s Recreation and Parks Department at 410-250-0125.


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Ocean City Today

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NOW PLAYING BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com Nov. 9: Full Circle, 9 p.m. Nov. 10: The Girlfriend, 9 pm Nov. 14: Identity Crisis, 6 p.m. BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

HALLOWEEN Ocean City residents Curt and Patty Smith are ready to fiesta during Bourbon Street on the Beach’s Halloween party at the 116th Street establishment, Wednesday, Oct. 31.

116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium Ocean City 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com Nov. 9: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 4-7 p.m.; 33 RPM, 8-11 p.m. Nov. 10: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 7-11 p.m. Nov. 11: Bob Hughes, 6 p.m. Nov. 13: Tony Sciuto, 6-10 p.m. Nov. 14: Reform School, 6 p.m.; Open Mic, 9 p.m. Nov. 15: Chris Button, 7 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. DUFFY’S TAVERN 130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com Nov. 9: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m. Nov. 10: Karaoke w/DJ Chuck D, 8 p.m. to midnight HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City residents Steve and Jacquie Tennant are on the hunt for some treats during Bourbon Street on the Beach’s Halloween party at the 116th Street establishment Wednesday, Oct. 31.

12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com Nov. 9: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Nov. 10: Side Project/Chris Button, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. Nov. 11: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Nov. 15: Opposite Directions, 6 p.m. HOOTERS 12513 Ocean Gateway West Ocean City 410-213-1841 www.hootersofoc.com Nov. 9: DJ BK, 4-8 p.m. Nov. 10: Classic Vibe, 4-8 p.m. OCEAN 13

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Patricia Smith, left, and Peggy Stinemire, both of Ocean City, listen to music performed by Reform School during Bourbon Street on the Beach’s Halloween party at the 116th Street, restaurant, Wednesday, Oct. 31.

13th Street on the boardwalk Ocean City www.Ocean13ocmd.com Nov. 11: Karaoke w/DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant

RANDY LEE ASHCRAFT Bourbon Street on the Beach: Friday, Nov. 9, 4-7 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 10, 7-11 p.m.

In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Nov. 9-10: First Class PICKLES 706 Philadelphia Ave. Ocean City 410-289-4891 www.picklesoc.com Nov. 9: Beats By Jeremy, 10 p.m. Nov. 10: Sean Loomis, 10 p.m. Nov. 12: Karaoke w/Jeremy, 9 p.m. Nov. 15: Beats by Wax, 9 p.m. SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com Nov. 9: Nowhere Slow, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Nov. 10: Jon Maurer, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 6 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; DJ Cruz, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Fish Out of Water, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. Nov. 15: Opposite Directions, 5-9 p.m.; Wild & Scenic Film Festival, 6-10 p.m. SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-6762 www.skyebaroc.com Nov. 9: Test Kitchen, 4-8 p.m. Nov. 10: Monkee Paw, 4-8 p.m. TRADER LEE’S LIVE 9935 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 443-614-4119 Nov. 14: Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 www.whiskersbar.com Nov. 9: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

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The Taylorville United Methodist Church, located on 11252 Adkins Road in Berlin, has reopened now that foundation construction is completed.

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By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) After several months, the Taylorville United Methodist Church, located on Adkins Road in Berlin, has reopened for prayer. The 170-year-old church was in dire need of a new foundation, and all Sunday prayers had been relocated to the communal hall right next to the church while it underwent construction. “Today we have come together as a church family, brought God into our lives, and raised this church up to a new foundation,” Chairperson Bruce Clark said during Sunday’s service. “I want to thank my foundation committee for the job that they’ve done and their support. I also want to thank everyone for donating and supporting.” The project took roughly five months to complete after two years of planning, and cost $130,000, which was raised very quickly by members of the church, local businesses and other churches in the area. “I’d like to thank the individuals, the businesses and even other churches that helped make this a reality,” Pastor Walt Crocker said during Sunday’s service. The church also received a 167year-old surprise while building the new foundation, the discovery of a time capsule unearthed for the first time since 1851. The box contained a New Testament, a small hymnal, a registry of the members at the time and an old book from that era. “We knew there was a corner stone, which we replaced,” Contractor Russel Snader said. “As we were pulling it out, we saw the top of it had been hollowed out and there was a small four-inch by seven-inch by three-inch-tall box. Most of the stuff

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Taylorville United Methodist Church in Berlin has reopened. The first Sunday service held at the 170-year-old church following renovations and foundation construction took place Nov. 4.

inside was in pretty good shape.” Church members quickly preserved the artifact the best way they could and displayed photos of the original documents and objects during the service. Before completing the foundation work, a new time capsule as well as the original were placed back into the earth for the next generation to discover. “They helped us to understand what it was to be a people of faith not only as they reached out to their generation but also to us as the future generation,” Crocker said. “We in turn put together a new time capsule with records from this day and a thumb drive. Imagine 150 years from now somebody will open this box and say, ‘What is this?’” In addition to the thumb drive, within the new time capsule members placed a bible signed by the congregation, a brick from the original foundation, a 150 anniversary plate, photo albums from 2004, 2012 and 2018, a new hymnal, photos of the original time capsule items and even a cornbread recipe. “One thing has never changed in 150 years, they came together as a church family and built this church, See NEW Page 34

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Ocean City Today

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k c i w en

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Members of the Taylorville United Methodist Church in Berlin celebrate its official reopening on Sunday, Nov. 4. Pictured, from left, are Berlin resident Bruce Clark, Larry and Donna Curry of Ocean Pines and Pastor Walt Crocker, from Selbyville.

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A time capsule containing an updated bible, hymnal, photos from the original time capsule from 1851, current photos and even a cornbread recipe was buried alongside the older time capsule during construction of the church’s new foundation.

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A photo collage of the original documents of a time capsule buried in 1851 is on display during the reopening Sunday service at the Taylorville United Methodist Church in Berlin, Sunday, Nov. 4. It was discovered during recent foundation work.

New time capsule buried alongside church’s old one Continued from Page 33 and kept this church going bringing God into their lives,” Clark said. Crocker expressed gratitude for the experience that was shared with his church as a result of this discovery and the work that went into creating the new capsule. “We’re not trying to reach out not just to our community but to those future generations as well,” Crocker said. “We erected this church onto a new foundation. I trust it will last longer than the old one did. God has been good to us. “The reality is both in 1851 and here in 2018 we have the same foundation; the lord Jesus Christ,” he continued. That’s why we’ve survived this long, that’s why we’ve been called to this place.”

www.oceancitytoday.com updated every friday


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Homemade Thanksgiving decoration options By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Hosting a special event takes precise planning and detailed preparation. But no matter how organized one is, you must be able to manage the unexpected, and it is how one handles these situations that determines your level of success. The Howard County – Iron Bridge Hounds Foxhunting Club celebrates the sport of foxhunting on the first Saturday in November at my parent’s estate (Harwood). Months of planning are in order for an event of 300 people that includes riders, spectators and invited guests. History is an ingredient that enriches and enlightens any occasion. The Howard County – Iron Bridge pack of hounds are a perfect example. According to an article, Mountain and Muse: A Bicentennial, written by Norman Fine, the Port of Baltimore earned a place in American history during the War of 1812. The British, after attacking Washington, D.C. turned their attention to Baltimore. Francis Scott Key, a witness to the devastating naval bombardment of

Fort McHenry, jotted down the infamous words to what has become our national anthem, “The Star Spangled Banner.” In addition, Fine states that The Port of Baltimore also earned its place in American foxhunting history. In September 1814, after the British fleet withdrew from Baltimore to head to New Orleans, a merchant ship entered the Port of Baltimore and disembarked two magnificent foxhounds from Ireland, Mountain and Muse. Mountain and Muse began hunting in what is now known as Howard County; and because of their undeniable prowess, have become the foundation of today’s American foxhounds. The Howard County – Iron Bridge pack of hounds are a direct descendant of Mountain and Muse and not only continue their legacy but also the elite sport of foxhunting. There is an irrefutable relationship between the Master of the hunt, the riders and the hounds. Just like there is an unquestionable sense of gratitude to all the volunteers who make opening day a glorious festivity for all. This particular year we were tested beyond our wildest dreams. Allow me to start from the beginning. I arrived Tuesday evening, and was

greeted by mother. I could tell something was wrong but did not push for particulars. She opened up a bottle of Chateau St. Jean chardonnay and said we need to talk. I could not imagine what she was about to tell me. Mom informed me that her dishwasher was no longer working. I thought this was not a big deal, my dishwasher has been broken for eight years. Besides, we use paper plates and many of the serving dishes have to be washed by hand. All of this gloom for such a minor inconvenience seemed unwarranted. As I went for another sip of chardonnay, mother said there is something else I have to tell you. All of a sudden, my sip became a gulp. A few seconds seemed an eternity. Mother said the oven does not work but the top burners are still working at this point. She ordered a new stove but it will not be delivered until after the foxhunt. I instantly started going over the entire menu and figured out what dishes would be affected by this latest development. The slices of baguettes need to be toasted for the Mediterranean bruschetta and the biscuits for the sugarcured ham need to be cooked in an oven. I assured mom that we could get

a neighbor to help us out and this would not be a problem. The next two days were filled with shopping and cooking non-stop. I arrived with two huge coolers of frozen dishes that had been prepared in advance which helped tremendously. The only cooking left was appetizers that could not be frozen or had to be made at the last minute. Gonzalez, one of our workers, told me that a bad storm was supposed to hit our area on Friday night. The day was so gorgeous and the farm looked so beautiful, I thought maybe he was exaggerating. But I trust his judgement and we decided to hold off on setting up outside. To make a long story short, a tornado landed in a town about 10 minutes from us, the entire area was without power. In addition, our generator that is a back up for the house, barn and automatic waterers for the horses broke down. Mom put an emergency call for the generator and a serviceman arrived at 3 a.m., four hours before the volunteers were supposed to arrive. She told him the situation, and he assured her he would do everything he could to get us up and running with electricity. See AFFORDABLE Page 37


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Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

CLIMB TO REMEMBER (Left) Sixty-five firefighters and volunteers climb 110 flights of stairs despite poor weather conditions during the annual 9/11 Stair Climb at the Pyramid Condominium on 95th Street, Saturday, Oct. 27. The participants climbed the stairs in honor of the police and firefighters who lost their lives during the terrorist attack in New York on Sept. 11, 2001.

(Center) Suffolk, Virginia, firefighter Bill Price carries an American Flag with a blue-red stripe in the middle to pay homage to the police and firefighters who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001. (Above) Easton firefighters Matt Jensen and Becky Caldwell lead Firehouse 60 up several flights of stairs during the Oct. 27 event in Ocean City.

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

CHURCH BAZAAR Atlantic United Methodist Church’s 40th annual holiday bazaar and luncheon will take place two days this year, Friday, Nov. 9, from 3-7 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 10, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Fourth Street and Baltimore Avenue. The bazaar will include a silent auction, Christmas Home Place, White Elephant Treasures & Finds, “Take & Make” Christmas decor and craft supplies, fashion accessories and gifts, and baked goods. An Italian dinner will be available from 4:30-6:30 p.m. on Friday and includes baked ziti with meat sauce, Italian bread, salad, a drink and dessert for $10. On Saturday, lunch will be offered from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Get chicken salad or egg salad sandwich platters for $6.50 each. Both served with chips, cole slaw and a pickle. Homemade vegetable beef soup costs $3 and desserts $2. Carryout is also available. All proceeds from the event, sponsored by Martha Circle, benefit AUMC missions.

BACKPACK COLLECTION In August, Worcester Prep seniors Chloe Ruddo, left, and Clare Demallie, along with teacher Linda Bragg, collected dozens of backpacks and school supplies from their soccer teammates, students and Quiet Storm to donate to those in need at Buckingham Elementary School and Berlin Intermediate School.

MEET AND MINGLE The General Levin Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution held a “Meet and Mingle” at the Ocean Pines Library to celebrate Constitution Week. Chapter Regent Gail Weldin read the proclamation for Constitution Week issued by the Worcester County Commissioners. Pictured, from left, are Mary Pat Carozza, Del. Mary Beth Carozza, Weldin, Barbara May and Liz Sharpless.


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Affordable decoration ideas Continued from Page 35 We sat in a completely dark kitchen and wondered what are we were going to do. Sometimes in an emergency situation, you will be surprised at how you can improvise. Once word got out about our dilemma, people started showing up and offering to help us in any way. We finally got power around 8:30 a.m. and it was a mad rush to make the day go according to plans. Our kitchen looked like an old black and white movie that had been sped up to fast motion. My case in point, no matter how much you plan for a special occasion, things out of the ordinary will happen. It is up to you to remain calm and not to panic. Thanksgiving is around the corner

and homemade decorations are very affordable and easy to do. For example, a glass trifle bowl filled with pecans, walnuts and hazelnuts and a pumpkin scented candle is a lovely display for your table. You can take this theme for Christmas and fill the trifle bowl with dried cranberries and a cinnamon candle for the same effect. Homemade decorations are fun, affordable, and make a memorable impression on your guests. A trifle bowl filled with nuts and a candle is as simple as it gets. Enjoy! Secret Ingredient – Perseverance. “A failure is not always a mistake. It may simply be the best one can do under the circumstances. The real mistake is to stop trying.” – B.F. Skinner

Annual Rock for Recovery at Trader Lee’s this Sunday

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) Live music, door prizes and auctions will be part of the third annual Rock for Recovery event this Sunday at Trader Lee’s in West Ocean City, starting at 1 p.m. The Taylor Knox project and DJ Wax will perform, and Chinese and silent auctions are planned in the effort to raise funds for the Worcester County Warriors Against Opiate Addiction. Local people and businesses donated auction items, which include golf foursomes, a pool party at an Ocean Pines Aquatics facility, several Kindle Fires, artwork, and gift certificates to area stores and restaurants. Proceeds will help local people get into addictions recovery programs. A portion of funds will benefit Hope4Recovery, the first Berlin recovery home. Organizers Heidi and Jamie McNeeley said the idea for the event originally came from Mike Chester, frontman for rock/reggae group The Rogue Citizens. “It was our first fundraiser, mainly just to bring awareness to us and try to raise money so we could help people get into rehab,” Jamie said. “It was actually thrown at us and I had two-orthree weeks to get all the stuff for it but it worked out.” He said close to $3,000 was raised at the initial event and totals have gone up each year. During a recent fundraiser at the Green Turtle, the group raised nearly $5,000, Jamie said. “We’d love to raise thousands and thousands of dollars, but even if the only thing we’re doing is bringing awareness and getting the word out there about our organization, [it would

be a success],” Heidi said. During the first event, she said, a local man showed up and asked for help on the spot. Because of that, he was able to get into The Amethyst Recovery Center in Ohio. “This person had just kind of wandered in to see what we were all about,” Heidi said. “And this man approached us and said, ‘I really need to get into recovery – I think I’m ready to find help.’ So, we were able to give him resources.” Jamie said the Warriors received some pushback from people about the wisdom of holding fundraisers for addiction recovery in bars and nightclubs, but largely shrugged that off. “You know what? Those are the places that reach out to us,” he said. “And if [Rock for Recovery] was at the library, that person seeking treatment probably wouldn’t have come.” Heidi agreed. “My feeling, having been there as someone who loves someone who was addicted, is you already feel they’re marginalized,” she said. “To see an event advertised: ‘wholesome family fun at the church’ – I’m going to think I don’t fit in. Everyone’s going to look at me and say, ‘that’s the mother of someone who is addicted.’ “It’s more comfortable at Trader Lee’s. It’s more comfortable at The Green Turtle, because that’s where everyone is on common ground,” she added. Tickets, $10 and available at the door, include food and door prizes during the event. For more information, call 443880-5943, or visit www.wocowarriors.org or www.facebook.com/WorcesterCountyWarriors.

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Ocean City Today

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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Artwork, supplies available during yard sale (Nov. 9, 2018) The public is invited to a yard sale put on by artists who are cleaning out their studios on Sunday, Nov. 11 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street. The sale will be held indoors, rain

or shine. Included in the sale from the participating artists are original paintings, photographs, pottery, prints, fiber art, glass, plus framing and art supplies, and excess art. In addition, the Art League of Ocean City will be

Woodell chosen as Pine’eer Craft Club’s Nov. crafter

(Nov. 9, 2018) The Pine’eer Craft Club announces its Crafter of the Month for November is Beth Woodell. Woodell has lived in Berlin since 2009 and is fluent in many types of crafts. She has been creating pure, natural, cold-process soap and other toiletries since 2011. All her soaps are made from scratch using common ingredients such coconut oil, coca butter, shea butter and essential oils. Woodell said it is not only gratifying, but also fun to create soap. Currently, her bathroom is a soap lab with over a dozen different creations

selling donated art, books and excess pottery. “This is a great opportunity to get a great deal on original art and art supplies, as artists make room in their studios for new work,” Rina Thaler, executive director of the Art League of Ocean City, said. “The prices are amazing, and so are the treasures you’ll find.” While some artists will accept credit cards, others will accept cash

only. Admission is always free to the Ocean City Center for the Arts at 502 94th Street, home of the Art League of Ocean City, a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing the visual arts to the community through education, exhibits, scholarship, programs and community art projects. More information is available at 410-524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org.

CROSSWORD

Beth Woodell

in it. Find Woodell’s natural soaps and other creations she has made in the Pine’eer Artisans and Gift Shop under the brand name Savon de Pines (Soap of the Pines.) Many other artisans and crafters also have their items available for sale in the shop at White Horse Park in Ocean Pines every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Your Online Community: www.oceancitytoday.com

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Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

PAGE 39

Dining Guide ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ■ RESERVATIONS: Reservations accepted ________________________________

DOWNTOWN

South end to 28th Street

■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192, www.captainstableoc.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100, www.coinspub.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m. and early bird 4-6 p.m. Daily specials. ■ THE CORAL REEF CAFE / HEMINGWAY'S RESTAURANT 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612, www.ocsuites.com/dining $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Fourstory atrium cafe and an elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine, fresh seafood, fresh cuts of meat, farm-to-table produce, artisanal desserts, hearty sandwiches and much more. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-2891100, www.dunesmanor.com $$ - $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season.

MIDTOWN

29th to 90th streets

■ 32 PALM 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525, www.oceancityhilton.com/dining $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, extensive wine list and gourmet desserts. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575, www.bjsonthewater.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week, year-round. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ DRY 85 OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-8989, www.DRY85.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Gourmet “stick to your ribs” home cooking. A made-fromscratch kitchen with every sauce and every dressing hand crafted. It’s that attention to detail that takes the concept of burgers, fries, pork chops and wings and turns them completely on their head. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 31st Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443664-5639, www.longboardcafe.net

$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MARLIN MOON 3301 Atlantic Ave., in the DoubleTree Ocean City 410-280-1201, www.marlinmoonocmd.com $$ | Full bar Featuring Executive Chef Gary Beach. Fresh cuisine featuring locally sourced seafood, steaks and vegetables. Small plate appetizers, fresh salads. Local craft beers and cocktails. Open for lunch and dinner, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ RARE AND RYE 106 32nd St., Ocean City 410-213-7273, https://www.rareandrye.com Full Bar Whiskey and wine bar. Farm to table. Locally grown and prepared cuisine with an eclectic menu. Unique libations with robust selection of ryes, bourbons, whiskeys and specialty drinks. Authentic green space with industrial and rustic décor. ■ RED RED WINE BAR OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-6801, www.RedRedWineBar.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Coastal cuisine with a focus on local seafood and hand tossed pizzas plus artisanal cheeseboards. 35+ wines By the Glass, 120+ By the Bottle. Flights. Luxurious colors and custom built couches. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ SEACRETS 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900, www.seacrets.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762, www.skyebaroc.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials.

UPTOWN

91st to 146th streets

■ ALBERTINO’S BRICK OVEN EATERY 13117 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410250-2000, www.albertinosoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Lunch and dinner daily. Open Wednesday and Thursday, 4 p.m. and Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. Homemade pizza and pasta, seafood, steaks. Daily specials and happy hour. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983, www.bluefishocmd.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896, www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com $$-$$$ | Reservations recommended for large parties | Kids’ menu | Full bar Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, steaks and pasta dishes. Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 47 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ THE CRAB BAG 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-2503337, www.thecrabbag.com $-$$ | Full bar Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs,

world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carryout and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DUFFYS 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449, www.duffysoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second season and daily dinner specials. Dine in, carry out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 128th Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535, www.clarionoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving beach-inspired dishes in our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet, open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available Friday and Saturday, 5-9 p.m. ■ JULES FINE DINING 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396, www.ocjules.com $$, $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood yearround, fresh local produce. ■ NICK’S HOUSE OF RIBS 144th Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-1984, www.nickshouseofribs.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual, family friendly with upscale atmosphere. Extensive menu from our famous baby back ribs, fresh seafood, black angus steaks. ■ NORI 11403 Coastal Highway (Gold Coast Mall), Ocean City 443-880-6258 $$ | Reservations accepted | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open 7 days serving lunch and dinner. Our creative menu features hand-cut steaks, grilled fish, crab cakes, sushi and sashimi. Dine-in or carry-out. ■ REEF 118 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-5241000, www.carouselhotel.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ WHISKERS PUB 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410524-2609, www.whiskerspub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Certified Angus® burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.

DELAWARE

■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436-FOXS, www.foxspizzade.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery.

WEST OCEAN CITY

■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717, www.ocitalianfood.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 11328 Samuel Bowen Blvd., West Ocean City 410-600-1020, Foxpizzamd.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Enjoy a brand new spacious dining room. Happy hour every day from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. with $5 food specials. Full menu includes appetizers, salads, stromboli, hoagies and wedgies, pizza, spaghetti and more. Open every day from 11 a.m. to midnight. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR AND GRILL 128741 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1846, weocharborside.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Home of the Original Fresh Squeezed Orange Crush! Open every day, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Appetizers, fresh seafood, steak and pasta. Live entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HOOTERS Route 50 & Keyser Point Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1841, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu and game room | Full bar New smoked wings with half the calories. Traditional wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with raw bar and crab legs. Sports packages and live entertainment. Large parties welcome. ■ PIZZA TUGOS Routes 50 and 611, West Ocean City 410524-2922; 114th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-2922, www.pizzatugos.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Open 7 days. Pizza Tugos is a family-friendly dining restaurant that features award winning pizza, pasta, craft burgers, sandwiches, subs, appetizers and salads. Great happy hour and football specials with full bar and 54 craft beers. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 $ | Kids’ menu Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drivethru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo.

OCEAN PINES

■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410641-7222, www.OPyachtclub.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Amid a bay front setting, the Ocean Pines Yacht Club offers dining selections for lunch and dinner. Fresh seafood and signature drinks. Live music Fridays and Saturdays, 6 p.m. Happy Hour daily, 3-6 p.m. Tiki Bar opens at 3 p.m. Sunday brunch from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ■ TERN GRILLE 100 Clubhouse Drive, Ocean Pines 410641-7222, oceanpinesgolf.org/dining $$ | Full bar The Tern Grille serves freshly-prepared breakfast and lunch items. Winter hours are Friday and Saturday from 4-9 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

BERLIN

■ OCEAN DOWNS CASINO, POSEIDON’S PUB 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-6410600, www.oceandowns.com $-$$$ | Full bar House soups, small plates, sandwiches, burgers and entrees including steaks, chicken, veggie and Eastern Shore favorites. Dining room hours: Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 10 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, noon to 8 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, noon to 11 p.m. Pub open late.


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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Calendar Fri., Nov. 9 Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., 3-7 p.m. Featuring a silent auction, Christmas Home Place, White Elephant Treasures & Finds, “Take and Make” Christmas decor and craft supplies, fashion accesories and gifts and baked goods. An Italian dinner will be available for 4:30-6:30 p.m. at a cost of $10. Proceeds benefit the church’s missions. Info: 410-289-7430.

CHURCH BAZAAR AND DINNER

LIVE CHAINSAW CARVING TO HONOR VETERANS

K-Coast Surf Shop, 3505 Coastal Highway, 9:00 AM. Alex Mitchell, a Marine Veteran and local resident, will be hosting the live carving. Carving artist, Anthony Marquez, a US Marine Corps Veteran, from XVII Carving will be performing the carving. Other veteran artists will also be on-sight selling their work. Each artist will donate one piece to the cause. Proceeds will benefit the Community Building Arts Work. The Worcester County Veterans Memorial in Ocean Pines has agreed to purchase the carving. For sponsorship opportunities, contact Mitchell at 443-373-9552. http://www.communitybuildingartswork.org

LUNCH AND LISTEN STORY TIME FOR ADULTS

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 1:00 PM. Featuring everything from classics to contemporary literature. November will feature selections by author Maeve Binchy. Bring your lunch. Soft drinks will be provided. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM. Featuring Defending Jacob by William Landay. Copies of books are available in advance at the library. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

OCEAN PINES BOOK OF THE MONTH

New Bethel United Methodist Church, 10203 Germantown Road, 4:00 PM. In memory of Brother Dale Morris and Leonard Drummond. Geraldine Rhock, 410-251-6424

HARVEST HOME

Stevenson United Methodist Church, 123 N. Main St., 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM. Single crab cake sandwich, green beans, baked potato and drink for $12. Carryouts and bake table available.

CRAB CAKE DINNER

Bowen United Methodist Church, 8421 Newark Road, Newark, MD, 4:30 PM 7:00 PM. Fish dinner includes green beans, Mac and cheese, cornbread, dessert and beverage for $10. Sue Henman, 410-632-1874

FISH DINNER

PetSmart, 11330 Samuel Bowen Blvd., #100, 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM. Town Cats of Ocean City will have adoptable cats available for adoption.

PETSMART NATIONAL ADOPTION EVENT

St. Matthews By-the-Sea United Methodist Church, 1000 Coastal Highway, 4:30 PM - 8:00 PM. Featuring crafts, baked goods, silent auction, white elephant, attic treasures, jewelry, used books and more. Serving hot dogs and homemade chili. Info: Dee, 410-4229646 or Donna, 410-250-5778.

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BAZAAR

WORCESTER YOUTH AND FAMILY ANNUAL CELEBRATION

Ray Community Room, Worcester Youth & Family office, 124 N. Main St., 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM. The Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services, Inc. will be celebrating 43 years of serving the community. The event is free with complimentary hors d’oeuvres and music provided by Everett Spells. Worcester Youth and Family will recognize several individuals for their support and dedication to the agency’s mission. 410-6414598 Worcester County Arts Council, 6 Jefferson St., 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM. A juried exhibition of miniature art featuring 38 entries submitted by professional or amateur artists with work in all media. Awards will be announced at 5:30 p.m. Open to the public and refreshments will be offered. The exhibit will continue until Dec. 31. http://www.worcestercountyartscouncil.org

‘SMALL TREASURES’ OPEN RECEPTION

New Bethel United Methodist Church, 10203 Germantown Road, 6:30 PM. Free will offering. Geraldine Rhock, 410251-6424

SONS OF THUNDER IN CONCERT

Sat., Nov. 10 Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Featuring a silent auction, Christmas Home Place, White Elephant Treasures & Finds, “Take and Make” Christmas decor and craft supplies, fashion accesories and gifts and baked goods. Lunch will be offered from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Platters cost $6.50, homemade vegetable beef soup costs $3 and desserts, $2. Proceeds benefit the church’s missions. Info: 410-2897430.

CHURCH BAZAAR AND LUNCHEON

St. Matthews By-the-Sea United Methodist Church, 1000 Coastal Highway, 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM. Featuring crafts, baked goods, silent auction, white elephant, attic treasures, jewelry, used books and more. A surprise visit from

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BAZAAR

Santa and Mrs. Klaus at 10 a.m. Serving homemade soups and hot dogs. Info: Dee, 410-422-9646 or Donna, 410-2505778. Stephen Decatur Park, 130 Tripoli St., 8:30 AM. Fall Just Walk features 1-, 2-, and 3-mile routes and a free FitBit raffle. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m., warm up at 8:45 and walk starts at 9 a.m. (Heavy rain cancels.) Strollers and friendly, leashed dogs welcome. There will be a ribbon cutting for the new tennis courts at 11 a.m.

FALL JUST WALK AND RIBBON CUTTING

Community Church at Ocean Pines, Family Life Center, 11227 Racetrack Road, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM. Featuring Christmas decorations and trees, linens and things, new and gently used clothing, gifts and potpourri, children’s books and toys, a bake sale and a food concession stand and photos with Santa and Mrs. Claus. Proceeds support the Shepherd’s Nook outreach ministry.

CHRISTMAS BAZAAR

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S Atlantic Ave., 9:00 AM. Signin/registration begins at 8 a.m. The run/walk begins at the museum and proceeds along the Boardwalk to 15th Street and back, 3.1 miles. Registration is $25. 410-289-4991, http://ocmuseum.org

STORM WARRIORS 5K

CRAFTY SATURDAY MAKE AND TAKE ‘VETERANS DAY’

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:00 AM - 2:00 P., Create themed crafts using materials provided by the library. For all ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org PetSmart, 11330 Samuel Bowen Blvd., #100, 11:00 AM - 7:00 PM. Town Cats of Ocean City will have adoptable cats available for adoption. Also, the Worcester County Humane Society will have dogs and cats available from 11 A.M to 3 P.M.

PETSMART NATIONAL ADOPTION EVENT

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 1:30 PM. Designed for youngsters of all ages and abilities. Hear a story, sing songs and explore the library. Siblings, families and caretakers are welcome. Register: 410-632-3495. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

SENSITIVE STORY TIME

‘THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST’ PERFORMANCE

Snow Hill High School Auditorium, 305 S Church St., 2:00 PM and 7:00 PM. The play is presented by Lower Shore Performing Arts Company. Tickets cost $15 for adults; $12 for seniors, active military and first responders; and free to those 9 and younger. There is also a one family package for $45. Tickets are

available at the door or at www.lowershorepac.org. Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 3:00 PM. Come meet WBOC Meteorologist Dan Satterfield and have all your weather questions answered. Designed for children 10-14 years, but all are welcome. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STEM FEST ‘WHAT’S THE WEATHER?’

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT CHICKEN ‘N’ DUMPLING DINNER

Remson Methodist Church, 4249 Sheephouse Road, 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM. Cost is $13 for adults, $5 for children ages 6-12 and free to those 5 and younger. Carryouts available. Tickets can be purchased in advance or at the door. Diane, 410957-1351 Ocean Pines Community Center, Assateague Room, 239 Ocean Parkway, 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM. Cost is $15 at the door. Various chili recipes, desserts and drinks. Vote for your favorite chili.

CHILI COOK-OFF

Saturdays - White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM. Locally grown vegetables and fruits, eggs, honey, kettle korn, flowers, artisan breads, seafood, meats and more. New vendors welcome. 410-641-7717, Ext. 3006

FARMERS MARKET

Sun., Nov. 11 Assateague Island National Seashore, 7206 National Seashore Lane. In celebration of Veterans Day, Assateague Island National Seashore will offer free admission. http://www.nps.gov

FREE NATIONAL PARKS DAY

PetSmart, 11330 Samuel Bowen Blvd., #100, 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Town Cats of Ocean City will have adoptable cats available for adoption. Also, the Worcester County Humane Society will have dogs and cats available from 11 A.M to 3 P.M.

PETSMART NATIONAL ADOPTION EVENT

Mondays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 7:00 PM. All levels of singers and drop-ins welcome. Carol, 410-641-6876

DELMARVA A CAPELLA CHORUS

Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th St., 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Yard Sale put on by artists cleaning out their studios. Including original paintings, photographs, pottery, prints, fibers art, glass and more plus framing supplies, art supplies and excess art. The Art League will be selling donated art and book and excess pottery. Some artists will accept

ART YARD SALE


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CALENDAR credit cards and some are cash only. Admission is free and open to the public. 410-524-9433, http://www.artleagueofoceancity.org Worcester County Veterans Memorial at Ocean Pines, 11144 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 11:00 AM. Guest speaker will be Captain Jeff Lock, USN. Captain Lock is currently serving as the Commander of the Surface Command Center at Wallops Island. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will be held at the Ocean Pines Community Center. Faded or worn American flags may be dropped off before immediately after the ceremony. Some seating is available but attendees are encouraged to bing a lawn chair.

2018 VETERANS DAY CEREMONY

American Legion Post #166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., 1:00 PM. A joint program is scheduled with many of the organizations in the area participating. The highlight will be to honor the men from Worcester County who made the supreme sacrifice during WWI. Open to the public. Robert Smith, rls.terp22@gmail.com, 443-614-2503

VETERANS DAY CENTENNIAL EVENT

‘THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST’ PERFORMANCE

Snow Hill High School Auditorium, 305 S Church St., 2:00 PM. The play is presented by Lower Shore Performing Arts Company. Tickets cost $15 for adults; $12 for seniors, active military and first responders; and free to those 9 and younger. There is also a one family package for $45. Tickets are available at the door or at www.lowershorepac.org.

Mon., Nov. 12 Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM. Group uses exercises to stimulate the process for creative expression. No prior writing experience needed. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

WRITING FOR WELLNESS

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 3:30 PM. Children, under 2 years old, will be introduced to songs, games and finger plays. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

LAP TIME

Bridge Shell, 5 N. Philadelphia Ave., 4:30 PM. Festivities include refreshments and a chance for network beginning at 4:30 p.m. Ribbon cutting to take place at 5 p.m. 410-289-6380

1ST YEAR ANNIVERSARY RIBBON CUTTING

Worcester Youth and Family Ray Room, 124 N. Main St., 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM. Free educational session featuring Healthy Holiday Eating with Amanda Buckley, RD. Discuss health twists on traditional favorites, baking substitutions and tips for holiday gathering. Reg-

MEDICAL MONDAY

istration is encouraged but not required. Michelle, 410-641-9268, http://www.atlanticgeneral.org/MedicalMonday

tional group promoting weight loss and health lifestyle. jeanduck47@gmail.com

Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM. TOPS is a weekly support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. Berlin group No. 169. Rose Campion, 410-641-0157

Wed., Nov. 14

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 5:00 PM. Artist John Lamprei will demonstrate and instruct the class to transfer photos to wood. Bring an 8 x 10 photo. Register: 410-632-3495. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PHOTO TRANSFER TO WOOD

Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Delmarva Chorus, a women’s a cappella group, is inviting the public to an evening of singing. 410-208-4149

DELMARVA CHORUS GUEST NIGHT

Tues., Nov. 13 Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:30 AM. Learn new skills while playing with educational toys. For infant to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PLAY TIME

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 2:00 PM. Winter Solstice, the first day of winter, the longest night and shortest day is celebrated all over the world in many different, exciting ways. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

WINTER SOLSTICE CELEBRATIONS

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM. Crafts and activities using yarn. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY TIME ‘YARN CRAFTS’

Gull Creek Senior Living, 1 Meadow St., 3:15 PM - 4:30 PM. Group provides discussions and mutual support, as well as education on exercise, nutrition, coping techniques, medications and developments in treatment. Kay Rentschler, 410-641-4765, http://www.delmarvaparkinsonsalliance.org

PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP

NAMI LOWER SHORE FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP

Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM. Free, monthly program offers shared wisdom and problem solving for family members of individuals with mental illness. Carole Spurrier, 410-2084003, carolespurrier@msn.com or Gail S. Mansell, gmansell@atlanticgeneral.org, 410-6419725 Tuesdays - Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM. TOPS is a support and educa-

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, etc. welcome. Free to attend. Sue Beaman, triscuitpete@msn.com, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

KNIT WITS

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STORY TIME ‘LOVE’

Wednesdays - Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM. Dance to the sounds of the ’50s and ’60s music. A $5 donation to benefit Veterans and local charities. Dance lessons offered the first and third Wednesday of each month from 5-5:45 p.m. Dancing follows until 9 p.m. Members and their guests welcome. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 410-208-1151, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 2:00 PM. Featuring Waking Lions by Ayelet Gundar-Goshen. To obtain a copy of the book, call the library at 410524-1818. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

OCEAN CITY BOOK OF THE MONTH

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 5:00 PM. Stove top potpourri will fill your home with the aroma of the holidays, and it makes a wonderful gift. Learn how to make your own. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STOVE TOP POTPOURRI

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 5:00 PM. Learn to blend essential oils specific to your needs. Make a roller ball of oils for calmness, muscle pain, headaches and more. Register: 410-641-0650. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

ROLLIN’ WITH ESSENTIAL OILS

Wednesdays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OP/OC

you supply your own. Everything you need to complete the project will be supplied.

STEAM STORYTIME ‘BUILD A HOUSE FOR THE 3 LITTLE PIGS’

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 AM. Build a house the Big Bad Wolf can’t blow down. For 3 to 7 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STORY TIME ‘HARVEST’

Seacrets, Morley Hall, 117 49th St., 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM. The Film Festival will kick off at Seacrets with doors opening at 5:30 p.m. The Wild & Scenic Film Festival is a collection of adventure and action sport documentaries, and environmental films that are showcased in Nevada City, California each year. Fourteen films will be presented, each specifically selected by Assateague Coastal Trust. Tickets cost $25 in advance and $30 at the door. Ticket package discounts are also available. Tickets: www.ACTforBays.org/act-events or 410629-1538.

2018 WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL

REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S NOVEMBER DINNER MEETING

Doors open at 5 p.m., speaker begins at 6 p.m. followed by dinner at 7 p.m. The guest speaker will be Jody Rushton, President of the National Federation of Republican Women. Reservations: Ann Lutz, annlutz60@gmail.com or 410-2089767. Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM. Educational showcase of rare, classic, groundbreaking and bizarre animation from every era around the world. Designed for adult audiences. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

ANIMATION AFTER HOURS

Thursdays - Harpoon Hanna’s, 39064 Harpoon Road, Fenwick Island, DE 19944, 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM. Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577 or Kate, 410-5240649. http://www.BeachSingles.org

BEACH SINGLES

Crossword answers from page 38 Wednesdays - Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St., 6:00 PM. cliff0917@aol.com, 302540-2127

OC/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING

Thurs., Nov. 15 Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 10:00 AM. Refreshments served at 9:45 a.m. The November project will be Painted Holiday Pillows. Cost is $5 which includes pillow or $3 if

PINE’EER CRAFT CLUB MEETING


42

NOVEMBER 9, 2018 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.com and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew

for our WOC kitchen facility Starting at $13/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

106 32nd St., Ocean City

HELP WANTED

is now accepting applications for the following positions:

Y/R Exp. Hostess, Cooks, A/V Staff, Boutique Sales, EMT, General Maintenance & Painter For more details or to apply, please go online to www.seacrets.com/employment

NOW HIRING!

General Manager (experience a must)

& for ALL positions, full-time, part-time, seasonal and year-round. Must have hotel experience.

Apply within, on Indeed.com or call 410-289-5762

Joi o i n Te T e am Dunes e s ! Noow wH Hiri ri ng: 

Cook

Housekeepers

PT and FT Positions Available

Bartender

Front Desk Agents

Housemen



2 8th & Oceanfront -“For Shore hore … The Best Place to Work”

Hotel & Suit tes

Please apply online aatt www w..rreeal a hossp pittal alittyyygr yggrroou up p.com

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities: Year Round – Full/Part Time

Hskpg: House Staff, Wash Room Attendants F&B/Banquets: Host/Hostess, Bussers, Servers, Banquet Servers, Dishwasher Maint.: Security Guard

Free employee meal and excellent benefits.

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

JOIN OUR GROWING TEAM! Real Hospitality Group is now hiring for

STAFF ACCOUNTANTS Apply online at:

www.realhospitalitygroup.com/careers 12800 Hospitality Way • Ocean City, MD 21842

Licensed Agent Needed Rental Office, Full-time position

We are looking for a Licensed Rental Agent to join our team in our Ocean City Office. q Good Team Player q Professional q Ability to inspect and list new properties as needed q Good Office Skills q Must work weekends as needed Please fax or email resumes and letters, and references to: Hileman Real Estate, Inc. Attn: Chris Fax # 410-208-9562

hilemanre@aol.com

Accounting Clerk Wanted

Full Time - $14-$15 per hour Responsible for providing accounting support to accounting supervisors and other managers within the department. Keys daily worksheets to the general ledger system, ensures files are complete and maintained as needed, handles accounts payable duties, and assists accounting personnel. Job Tasks and Responsibilities: Perform accounting and clerical functions to support supervisors. Research, track, and resolve accounting problems. Compile and sort invoices and checks. Issue checks for accounts payable. Record business transactions and key daily worksheets to the general ledger system. Record charges and refunds. Support accounting personnel. Input type vouchers, invoices, checks, account statements, reports, and other records. Provide front desk customer service. File and tally deposits. Work with adding machines, calculators, databases and bank accounts. Match invoices to work orders. Process bills for payment. Open mail and match payments to invoices. Arrange for money to be delivered to bank. Utilize computer systems to run databases, pay bills and order supplies. Contact individuals with delinquent accounts. Ensure customers accept payments or refunds. Email Resume to: dunkindonutjobs@gmail.com Subject Line: Accounting Clerk or Apply in Person @ 9919 Golf Course Rd., Ocean City, MD Serious inquiries only, must live within a 30 minute radius of West Ocean City Maryland.

HELP WANTED

Experienced Carpenters, O.C., MD area. Must have at least 10 yrs. exp. plus references, own tools and transportation. Pay commensurate with exp. Please call Andy at 443-497-1097. EXPERIENCED DENTAL ASSISTANT for busy Dagsboro office. FRONT DESK experience with dental insurance and procedure required. 302-732-3852 or email: BrafmanFamilyDentistry@ mchsi.com

HVAC Help Wanted. Full time/year-round. Competitive wage. Contact 410-2130002.

Chairside

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE Email Resume:

molarbiz@yahoo.com

F/T Administrative Assistant

Associates degree and MS Word, Excel and Acrobat along with complete computer competence, a must.

P/T Bookkeeper

Part time for multiple established businesses located in Berlin, Maryland. Associates degree, Excel, QuickBooks and complete computer competence a must. Both Positions offer an ideal opportunity for a recent graduate. Great advancement potential for a motivated candidate. Send resume & transcript to: Administrative Position, P.O. Box 397, Berlin, MD 21811

Become a Better You in 2018!

To Order Product Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net To Become an Avon Representative Sign Up at www. ChristinesBeautyShop.com

CLASSIFIEDS 410-723-6397

Online www.oceancitytoday.com s d ie if s s la C Convenient, quick, no waiting, no calls ~ Days, nights and weekends Order Your

HELP WANTED

Manufacturing Company seeking qualified person to Process Weekly Payroll. Must be detail oriented and able to multitask. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience preferred. Please email: resumes.manufacturing@ gmail.com.

DENTAL ASSISTANT NEEDED West OC Practice, FT, M-F with benefits & monthly bonus. Radiology Cert., good clinical & keyboard skills required. Email or fax resume: contact@atlanticdental.com or 410-213-2955.

PAPA JOHN’S Now Hiring DRIVERS for the Bethany Beach area. Call Jeff 302541-8081.

RENTALS RENTALS

2BR Apt. on second floor. Year Round Rental. 1st Street. $950 per month plus utilities. No pets. Call 443497-1454. Oceanfront, 2BR/2BA, fireplace, fully furnished, W/D. Quiet unit. No smoking. No pets. Top corner unit. Avail. Mid Nov.-May. 410-8043444

WINTER WEEKLY RENTALS

4BR House $500/week 2BR Apartment $300/week Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave. 410-289-8581

RAMBLER MOTEL 9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

WEEKLY • SEASONAL

R E N TA L S

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626 VA C AT I O N S

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

RENTALS

2BR/2BA Waterfront Home Winter Rental - Unfurnished 11212 Gum Point Road, Berlin. $800/month plus utilities. Security deposit required. Available November. Call 443-397-2408. Winter Rentals available on St. Louis Avenue, right before 1st Street, Ocean City. Call 301-331-2209.

YEAR-ROUND WEST OC. HOME unfurnished, 2-story, 3BR/3BA, W/D, DW, central HVAC, 24x30 attached garage with 3/4 bathroom. No smoking/pets. Credit check & ref. req. $1600/month plus utilities. 410-202-6353 Year-Round Rentals available in West Ocean City. 2 bedroom, 1 bath and 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Call 1-877-289-1616 for more information.

Year-Round Rental. North OC. 2BR, 2BA. Unfurnished. No pets/smoking. $1350/mo., plus electric. Water included. 410-971-9240 WINTER RENTAL: 1BR/2BR/3BR Homes available in West Ocean City for November 1st Move In. Call 443-373-9177.

SEEKING RENTAL Retired Couple

w/government pensions looking to rent year-round in Ocean City. Oceanfront/ocean view. NO STEPS. Please call 443-856-7700

REAL REAL ESTATE ESTATE

3BR, 1BA Mobile in Bishopville by the Boat Ramp. $15,900 cash. Lot rent of $425; pays water, sewer, trash & taxes. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

LOTS & ACREAGE LOTS & ACREAGE

JUST REDUCED!! West Ocean City, Waterfront Lot. Two side by side. $175,000 each. Docks included. Call Howard Martin Realty 410352-5555.

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

Large Warehouse for Rent Gum Point Road New Casino - $1,250 per month. Call 410430-9797.

1BR, 1BA Starting at $695 2BR, 1BA Starting at $795 3BR, 1.5BA Starting at $1075

Available Winter Rentals @ www.hilemanrealestate.com

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

Open 7 Days A Week Mon.-Sat., 9-5 & Sun., 10-3 * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

Classifieds 410-723-6397

Ocean City Today

COMMERCIAL

Berlin: Atlantic Business Center. Office space 225 sq. ft. for rent. Utilities incl. $300/ month. Also, several storage units available $95/month. Call 410-726-5471 or 410641-4300. 2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443-497-4200.

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

Looking for space, comfort and great views? Spacious, climatecontrolled offices available, with use of Conference Room, in a modern, wellmaintained building, in prime Ocean City location. Call 410-524-3440 for appointment.

AUCTIONS

The contents of mini storage units will be sold at public auction. Units to be auctioned; B62, B82, B97, O27, O29, O115, O164, O55, O69, O79, O103, O125, O134, O155, O167, S35, S45, S69, S102, S110, S119, S121, S223, S158, S180, S185, S191, S201, S204, S501, S767. Units are being sold due to non-payment of rent. Common items in units are, household items, furniture, tools, fishing equipment, paintings, antique and vintage items. Date: SATURDAY, November 10th, 2018 Time: NEW TIME 10 AM #1 Starts at Berlin Mini Storage: Route 346 #2 Continues at OC Mini Storage: Route 50 #3 Finishes at OC Mini Storage: Route 611 Terms: CASH ONLY! Auctioneer: Tom Janasek

SERVICES

House and Rental Clean Out, small and local moving, and removal of junk and furniture. Also, will clean out garages/ sheds. 302-222-7297, 302422-9390 Call Tyler For A Free Estimate! Offering grass cutting, mulching, hedging & yard clean up. Ocean City and surrounding areas. 410-920-4292

DONATIONS DONATIONS

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065.

SERVICES

BUDGET MOVERS 443-664-5797

LOCAL & EAST COAST MOVING Full Packing Service Piano Movers - Full Service

www.facebook.com/OCBudgetMovers FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000

146th Street, Ocean City

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINMARYLAND STATEWIDE ING-Get FAA certification to CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING fix planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military NETWORK benefits. Call Aviation InstiAUTOMOBILE DONATIONS tute of Maintenance 866-8236729. DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION REAL ESTATE SOCIETY. Your donation Delaware New Move-In helps local families with food, Ready Homes! Low Taxes! clothing, shelter, counseling. Close to Beaches, Gated, Tax deductible. MVA License Olympic pool. Homes from #W1044. 410-636-0123 or low $100’s, No HOA Fees. www.LutheranMissionSoci- Brochures Available ety.org 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com BUSINESS SERVICES Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

Place a business card ad in the Regional Small Display 2x2/2x4 Advertising Network – Let MDDC help you grow your business! Call TODAY at 410-212-0616 to increase your customer base and get results.

PAGE 43

SERVICESMISCELLANEOUS Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-2120616 Ask for Multi-Media Specialist -Wanda & watch your results grow. WANTED TO BUY OR TRADE FREON R12 WANTED: CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com

Advertise in MDDC 410-723-6397


PAGE 44

Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018


Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

PAGE 45

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE

LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT 408 YAWL DRIVE

PRICE REDUCED

This carefree 2-bedroom, 2-bath home is tastefully furnished and in mint condition. It requires little care so you can enjoy your time at the beach & pools. Don’t do a thing but sit back and relax on your large screened porch. Features include a formal dining room, large living room, kitchen with breakfast bar plus the bedrooms are a nice size. It is sure to be your favorite spot away from home. Located in a great family neighborhood in North Ocean City. It’s a dream come true for only $169,900. Call 800-252-2223 to see this gem today. WE ARE THE ORIGINAL Montego Bay Specialists Since 1971.

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc© 13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700 www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

NORTH OCEAN CITY HOME

The well maintained 3BR/1BA home is located on a corner lot in the Montego community in N. Ocean City and features a large enclosed porch, an eat-in kitchen, a nonmaintenance roof and an almost new HVAC system. Outside there is a utility shed and a 2car parking pad. Community amenities include pools, tennis, min. golf, a bayfront boardwalk and much more. The HOA dues are just $247.50/yr. Listed at $156,500.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

230 OYSTER LANE

WATERFRONT WITH A BAY VIEW 717 SOUTH SURF ROAD

JUST LISTED

This 3 bedroom 2 ½ bath home is located In Caine Woods and has a wide open floor plan. Large living room with a gas fireplace. Large Kitchen and a formal Dining room. Both a open deck and enclosed sunroom, Pier and a boatlift. Wide open canal with a view of the bay. Check this one out today won’t be on the market long. Sold Furnished for $535,000.

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc© 13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700 www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

MONTEGO BAY This 3BR/2BA home is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City. The home features an enclosed porch, a family room, a breakfast bar, cathedral ceilings, new carpet, cen. air and gas heat. Community amenities include pools, tennis, min. golf, a bayfront boardwalk and much more. HOA dues are just $247.50/yr. Listed at $255,000 furnished.

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

506 SANDY HILL DRIVE

Montego Bay Realty montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com


Nov. 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

Business

Page 46

Venable Cleaners in Berlin bought by Peninsula Cleaners

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) A dry-cleaning store on Williams Street in Berlin, which has operated for nearly 100 years, has avoided closure now that it has been purchased by Peninsula Cleaners. The Venable Cleaners company, which first opened in 1924, nearly shut down all its locations as a result of lack of financial stability. “I saw that they were planning to close and I called the owner,” Nick Kypreos, a partner in Peninsula Cleaners, said. “I spoke with Bill Venable who owns the real estate in Berlin and we came to an arrangement to take over the store and rent it from him and to keep the business going and keep the employees employed.” The other two stores, located in Ocean City, have shut down as the leases have expired. All of the clothing not picked up from those locations will be available at the William Street store. Janet Evans, who has worked for Venable Cleaners for over 30 years, is happy with the outcome. “My new owner, Nick, is a great guy,” Evans said. “We have great service from something local and great customer access.” According to Kypreos, the company wanted to let customers know right away that the Berlin location was not shutting down. “We had to move quickly because they had already been telling the customers they were closing and losing clientele,” he said. “We made an announcement, called every customer and we notified them [that] we were staying open and to carry on doing business with us.” Peninsula Cleaners has been in operation for 45 years and has six locations, not including the latest addition of the Williams Street store. The drycleaning service is provided in Wicomico, Sussex and now Worcester County. The clothes will be cleaned in the company’s plant located in Seaford, Delaware. Additional services offered in the Berlin store include shoe repairs, tuxedo rentals, alterations, as well as drape, rug, linen and table cloth cleaning. “We pride ourselves in using environmentally-friendly cleaning methods,” Kypreos said. “We installed a solar panel in our plant in Seaford. We try to be as environmentally friendly as we can.” Peninsula Cleaners offers a free

REAL ESTATE REPORT

Property exchange rules, tax deferral topics for column

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Venable Cleaners’ employee Janet Evans has been named the manger of the Berlin business, which was taken over by Peninsula Cleaners. It is located on Williams Street in Berlin.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

This building on Williams Street in Berlin has been providing dry-cleaning services since 1924, and will continue to do so under the new management of Peninsula Cleaners, which took over the business, Nov. 5.

pickup and delivery service as well. This service is extended throughout Worcester County. “Our employees have a lot of experience but we [also] view our employees as family,” Kypreos said. “We feel happy we can maintain the Berlin store.” The William Street store will also serve as a drop-off location for WMDT’s Keeping Warm on the Shore Coat Drive. From Nov. 12 through Dec. 8, area residents are encouraged to donate gently used winter coats. Peninsula

Cleaners will collect and clean the coats so that they can be distributed to local charities this winter. Last year, the company cleaned and distributed 2,200 coats. “They clean the coats and distribute out through different organizations like the boys’ and girls’ clubs and Diakonia,” Evans said. For more information about Peninsula Cleaners, visit http://peninsulacleaners.com or call the Berlin store at 410-641-1400.

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Since 1921, U.S. tax law has recognized that the exchange of one investment or business-use property for another of like-kind results in no change in the economic position of the taxpayer, and therefore, should not result in the immediate imposition of income tax. The exchange rules permit the deferral of taxes, so long as the taxpayer satisfies numerous requirements and consummates both a sale and purchase within 180 days. This is often referred to as a 1031 Like-Kind Exchange. To accomplish a Section 1031 exchange, there must be an exchange of properties. The simplest type of Section 1031 exchange is a simultaneous swap of one property for another, but many people use deferred exchanges, which allow you to dispose of property and subsequently acquire one or more other like-kind replacement properties. To qualify as a Section 1031 exchange, a deferred exchange cannot be simply selling one property and using the proceeds to purchase another property (which is a taxable transaction).  Rather, in a deferred exchange, the disposition of the relinquished property and acquisition of the replacement property must be mutually dependent parts of an integrated transaction constituting an exchange of property, per the IRS.  Due to their complexity, sellers usually use attorneys to facilitate exchange agreements. The IRS further explains that both the relinquished property you sell and the replacement property you buy must meet certain requirements.  Both properties must be held for use in a trade or business or for investment. Property used primarily for personal use, like a primary residence or a second home or vacation home, does not qualify for like-kind exchange treatment. Both properties must be similar enough to qualify as “like-kind.” Likekind property is property of the same nature, character or class. Quality or See LIKE Page 47


Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

PAGE 47

New indoor farmer’s market to open, Sunday By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) As the weather gets cooler, area residents and visitors will still be able to enjoy perusing locallygrown produce and homemade goods at the new indoor farmer’s market in Ocean Pines, which opens this Sunday. Around 20 vendors will display their goods in a greenhouse at Bluebird Farms, located on 11207 Racetrack Road, near Ocean Pines. “Nancie [Corbett] … she owns Bluebird Farms … we’ve known each other and she was celebrating her five-year anniversary of Bluebird Farms,” Farmer’s Market Organizer Robin Caldwell said. “I did the catering and while I was there, I said, ‘Nancie what do you do with that beautiful huge greenhouse during the winter,’ because it was empty at the time. “She said, ‘Well, I really don’t do anything. I do Christmas trees in the winter and wreaths,’” Caldwell continued. “I was in there and it was just so warm and beautiful and it was cool

outside. The next day I called her and said, ‘Nancie, how about if we make a beautiful indoor farmer’s market,’ especially because there’s a need for it.” Caldwell is a caterer who often spends her Saturdays at the Ocean Pines farmer’s market in White Horse Park. However, as the weather turns colder, she came up with the idea to create an indoor market to escape the cold and continue to enjoy the products sold by local artisans and farmers. “I feel the winters around here can get a little bit long so just having something people can go to on a Sunday will be great,” Caldwell said. “The local vendors just do not want to be a vendor in the farmer’s market in the winter. It’s just too cold. We’re not trying to compete with anybody, we’re just trying to offer the services and the products in the winter months.” Another motivator for Caldwell was the rainy summer which washed out potential profits on several weekends. “This year it got rained out a lot

and it’s disappointing when it happens,” she said. Activities are being planned during the indoor market, such as visits from Santa Claus every Sunday during December, and wreath-making classes until the new year. “We will be having a lot of different activities,” Caldwell said. “In January, we’re going to keep it going and we’re doing indoor goat yoga, some flower-arranging classes and cooking

classes just to keep them interested.” The market will close in the spring, when Bluebird Farms resumes using the greenhouse to grow plants. The farmer’s market will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Sunday, though during holiday weekends it will be open for longer periods. For more information or to inquire about vendor spots, contact Bluebird Farms on Facebook or call 410-2084475.

REAL ESTATE REPORT

Like-Kind Exchange explained Continued from Page 46 grade does not matter. Most real estate will be like-kind to other real estate. For example, real property that is improved with a residential rental house is like-kind to vacant land. If not a simultaneous swap of properties, you must meet two time limits to defer or the entire gain will be taxable.  The first limit is to identify potential replacement properties within 45

days from the date you sell the relinquished property. The second limit is that the replacement property must be received and the exchange completed no later than 180 days after the sale of the exchanged property or the due date (with extensions) of the income tax return for the tax year in which the relinquished property was sold, whichever is earlier. — Lauren Bunting is a licensed Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.

AMERICAN LEGION

BINGO

Every Thursday, Doors Open at 4:30 Games Begin at 6:30 Our Payouts Have Been Increased!!

Jack Pot Game $500 Within Allotted Number

Pick 7 game $5,000 in 19 numbers or less Open to the Public

PHOTO COURTESY NANCIE CORBETT

Robin Caldwell, a resident of Ocean Pines, stands inside the Bluebird Farms greenhouse, located on 11207 Racetrack Road, where a new indoor farmer’s market will open, Sunday, Nov. 11.

Cheers, Cheers for 40 Years…

Christmas Bazaar 40th Annual

Friday, November 9th – 3-7pm Saturday, November 10th – 10-2pm

Atlantic United Methodist Church 4th Street & Baltimore Ave • Ocean City, MD

For your holiday shopping ~

Silent Auction ~ over 100 great items and gift baskets Christmas Home Place ~ trees, wreaths and home decor “Take & Make” ~ Christmas décor & craft supplies (new this year) Bakery Delights & Gifts ~ cakes, pies, candy, soups, gifts, etc White Elephant Treasures & Finds ~ treasures !!! “Fashion Accessories & Gifts” ~ everything $6! (new this year) Friday Bazaar Hours ~ 3-7pm Italian Dinner served 4:30 – 6:30 Includes Baked Ziti with meat sauce, Italian bread, salad, beverage and dessert ~ $10.00 Carry-out available! To pre-order carry- out, call 410-289-7430

Saturday Bazaar Hours ~ 10-2pm Serving our Traditional Luncheon 11-1pm

Menu: Chicken Salad Sandwich Platter w/chips, cole slaw and pickle ~ $6.50 Egg Salad Sandwich Platter w/chips, cole slaw and pickle ~ $6.50 Homemade Vegetable Beef Soup w/bread $3.00 Homemade Desserts ~ $2.00 • Beverages ~ $1.50 Carry-Out Available! “Sponsored by Martha Circle”


Ocean City Today

PAGE 48

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Worcester Youth to host Annual Celebration, Nov. 9

(Nov. 9, 2018) Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services, Inc. will hold its Annual Celebration to celebrate 43 years of serving the community, Friday, Nov. 9. The celebration will be held in the Ray Community Room, in the Worcester Youth & Family office, on 124 North Main Street in Berlin, from 5-7 p.m. The event is offered free of charge, with complimentary hors d’oeuvres provided by Phillip Cropper and Worcester Technical High School. Local jazz musician Everett Spells will provide live entertainment. Taylor Bank is sponsoring the Annual Celebration. Each year, Worcester Youth & Family recognizes individuals for their support and dedication to the agency’s mission. The honorees are presented with wall décor in their name in the shape of a “sun” to represent the “rays of hope” these individuals have offered the community. This year the following community members will be recognized: Judge Peggy (“Mary Margaret”) Kent, Worcester County Circuit Court, Outstanding Supporter; Pat Oltman with Stevenson United Methodist Church, Outstanding Contributors; Helen Wiley, with St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Outstanding Contributors; Carol Rose and Suzanne Parks, with Buckingham Presbyterian Church,

Outstanding Contributors; and Mary Yenney and Susan Hogan, with The Community Church of Ocean Pines, Outstanding Contributors. Also honored will be Dr. Jennifer Leggour for her 10 years of outstanding service as Worcester Youth & Family’s Clinical Director. This year, Worcester Youth & Family served more than 1,000 friends and neighbors by: helping to prevent homelessness; supporting and empowering at-risk adolescent girls and boys; offering cultural, educational, and wellness experiences to children during out of school time; providing comprehensive counseling and therapy services to those coping with life’s stressors; and advocating for neglected and abused children so they may have a brighter future. Worcester Youth & Family is a nonprofit organization based in Berlin and has been serving the community since 1975. Worcester Youth & Family serves people of all ages by offering a broad spectrum of services, including mental health counseling, youth and adolescent enrichment programs, advocacy for abused and neglected children, and empowerment programs for those less fortunate. For more information about the event, call the office at 410-641-4598.

UnderCover Cleaning Services, LLC Coastal and MCBF support

A Professional Cleaning Service • Licensed and Bonded 443-513-4024/301-712-5224 (cell) LIKE

COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL

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us on

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• House & Condo • Window Cleaning Cleaning • Carpet Cleaning • Rental Properties • Closet Cleaning Cleaning • Garage Cleaning • Customized Cleaning • Spring Cleaning • Move-In/Out Cleaning • Community • New Construction Clubhouses Clean-Up • Office Cleaning • Warehouse Cleaning • Medical & Dental • Church Cleaning Offices • Apartment & • Bank Cleaning Condo Cleaning • Restaurant Cleaning • Boat Cleaning

Let Us Help With Your Holiday Cleaning or Party Events

SENIOR CITIZENS

10

% DISCOUNT - 65 & Up

Will pick up flowers from a florist of your choice; ROYAL prepare choice of cheese, veggies or chocolate SERVICES: platter; and prepare unit upon arrival

community garden in Berlin

(Nov. 9, 2018) The Coastal Association of Realtors, in partnership with the Maryland Coastal Bays Foundation, received a $2,100 Placemaking grant from the National Association of Realtors to help fund construction of a community garden at the new Berlin branch of the Worcester County Public Library. The Placemaking Microgrant Program administered by NAR is intended to help Realtor associations partner with others to plan, organize, implement and maintain placemaking programs in their communities. The grant funded soil, gardening equipment, a glider bench and trellises. The new garden is a revival of a garden established eight years ago at the former Berlin library. Since its first harvest, the former garden has provided over 5,000 pounds of fresh produce to the homelessness organization Diakonia. The new garden will carry on that tradition, while also serving as a community gathering space and an educational tool, teaching sustainable community gardening to scout and school groups, as well as the general public. “The aim of this grant program is to

help our local communities become better places to live and visit by transforming an unused space into a vibrant public space for the community to gather and enjoy,” said Coastal President Joel Maher. A group of Coastal members and staff presented the funding to volunteers Pat and Ron Pilling, as well as representatives from Maryland Coastal Bays Foundation, the Berlin Library and Worcester County during a Realtor build day on Oct. 8. Coastal members built the new bench and a wheelbarrow, and also did some weeding and composting in the garden. This is the third Realtor Placemaking grant awarded on Maryland’s Lower Eastern Shore. Last year, a grant was awarded to build a Pocket Park on Smith Island in Somerset County. In 2016, a Placemaking grant funded construction of a community chalkboard in downtown Berlin. Placemaking grants are awarded to local and state Realtor associations to help them and their members create new public spaces and destinations in See GRANT Page 49


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

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The Coastal Association of Realtors, in partnership with the Maryland Coastal Bays Foundation, received a $2,100 Placemaking grant from the National Association of Realtors to help fund construction of a community garden at the new Berlin branch of the Worcester County Public Library. Pictured, from left, are Coastal Executive Vice President Page Browning, Del. Mary Beth Carozza, Realtor Vicki Harmon, Realtor Cam Bunting, Realtor and Coastal President Joel Maher, Realtor and Coastal President-Elect Bernie Flax, Coastal Affiliate Member Larissa Luck, Realtor and Coastal Director Steve Parsons, Sen. Jim Mathias, Community Garden Coordinators Pat and Ron Pilling, Worcester County Environmental Programs Planner Katherine Munson, and Maryland Coastal Bays Foundation Watershed Coordinator Steve Farr.

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Joins AGH Dr. David Wanalista has joined Atlantic General Health System to provide rheumatologic care at Atlantic General Rheumatology in Berlin, and Atlantic General Specialty Care in Ocean View, Delaware. Wanalista has 14 years of clinical experience in private practice and has also spent the David Wanalista last three years teaching the next generation of physicians as a clinical professor of internal medicine at Inspira Medical Center in Vineland, New Jersey. He earned his medical degree at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine before completing his internship and residency in internal medicine at ScrantonTemple Residency Program in Scranton, Pennsylvania. He completed his fellowship in rheumatology at Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia. Wanalista is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine with certifications in internal medicine as well as the subspecialty of rheumatology. Wanalista is accepting new patients. Appointments can be made by calling Atlantic General Rheumatology, in Berlin, at 410641-9482 or Atlantic General Specialty Care, in Ocean View, at 302-541-9690.

master’s degree in public administration from Virginia Commonwealth University. Before joining the United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore to serve Claire Otterbein her home community, she served at both the Ronald McDonald House Charity and the Development Office at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. Now in its 74th year, United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore continues to be the largest non-governmental source of funding for 80 critical programs in Wicomico, Worcester, Somerset and Dorchester counties.

United Way helps Eastern Shore residents obtain educational success by reducing the achievement gap between low and middle income stuCaroline Phillips dents, financial stability by advancing the economic security of families and individuals in our community, and good health by improving access to and awareness of local health and wellness services. United Way provides over $1.6 million to community programs, impacting one of every three individuals on the lower shore. For more information, visit www.unitedway4us.org.

Grant will help construct garden Continued from Page 48 a community, like turning a parking spot into a people spot (parklet) or a vacant lot into a pocket park. “Our association and our members are actively engaged in the community and know the neighborhoods and the properties that would benefit most from these placemaking projects,” Maher said. “This program is a wonderful way for us to extend our members’ outreach and invest in the communities that we call home.” Visit www.coastalrealtors.org for more information and to apply for the Placemaking Grant.

New coordinators United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore announces the addition of their two new Community Outreach coordinators serving the lower four counties, Claire Otterbein and Caroline Phillips. Otterbein, raised in Ocean City, is a graduate of Towson University with a degree in art history. She brings over 15 years of nonprofit experience, including executive leadership with the Julia A. Purnell Museum, Worcester County GOLD and the Crisfield Heritage Foundation before joining the United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore. Currently, she serves on the board of directors at the Julia A. Purnell Museum and the Crisfield Arts & Entertainment District Project. Phillips earned a degree, while playing Division I Field Hockey, in political science from Appalachian State University and a

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PAGE 50 BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 57 FALCONBRIDGE RD. A/R/T/A 57 FALCON BRIDGE RD. OCEAN PINES A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated May 5, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4436, Folio 154 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $292,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on NOVEMBER 20, 2018 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $23,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lien-

Ocean City Today / Public Notices holder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 329596-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, MD 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 12801 OLD STAGE RD. BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from David A. Ehatt and Cheryl Ehatt, dated May 17, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4727, folio 523 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the

undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on NOVEMBER 19, 2018 AT 3:40 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $20,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2013-42850). Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees

NOVEMBER 9, 2018 ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, MD 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 209 TEAL CIR. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Perry Masciana, dated March 23, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4902, folio 519 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on NOVEMBER 19, 2018 AT 3:39 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $57,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current


NOVEMBER 9, 2018 year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-615103). Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 715 142ND ST., UNIT #430 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated March 11, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4052, Folio 428 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $108,500.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on NOVEMBER 20, 2018 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit No. 430 in Lighthouse Village Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on

Ocean City Today / Public Notices the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without

interest. (Matter No. 326449-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 4340 East West Highway, Suite 600 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 11000 COASTAL HWY., UNIT #1907 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Daniel J. Forte and Bonita Anne Forte dated March 10, 2010 and recorded in Liber 5444, folio 343 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on NOVEMBER 16, 2018 AT 2:00 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit No. 1907 in the “Capri Condominium” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #10-127998. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any,

PAGE 51 shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale. Trustees’ file number 66130. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________ Council, Baradel, Kosmerl & Nolan, P.A. 125 West Street, 4th Floor Annapolis, Maryland 21401 (410) 268-6600

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE FEE SIMPLE RESIDENTIAL DWELLING 107 Belt Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain OpenEnd Deed of Trust (“Deed of Trust”) from Scot Wessels, (“Borrower”) to American General Financial Services (DE), Inc. (“Lender”), dated August 21, 2007, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland (“Land Records”) in Liber 4982, Folio 072, and further secured by an Assignment of Deed of Trust from Springleaf Financial Services, Inc., f/k/a American General Financial Services, Inc., d/b/a


PAGE 52 American General Financial Services (DE), Inc. (“Assignor”) to U.S. Bank National Association as Indenture Trustee for Springleaf Mortgage Loan Trust 2013-1 (”Assignee”), dated May 4, 2014, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland (“Land Records”) in Liber 6366, Folio 030 (“1st Assignment”), and further secured by an Assignment of OpenEnd Deed of Trust from U.S. Bank National Association as Indenture Trustee for Springleaf Mortgage Loan Trust 2013-1 by Nationstar Mortgage, LLC as Attorney in Fact (”Assignor”) to Strategic Realty Fund, LLC (“Assignee”), dated July 26, 2016 and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber 6835, Page 1 (“2nd Assignment”), and further secured by an Assignment of Mortgage/Deed of Trust from Strategic Realty Fund, LLC (“Assignor”) to 7E Investments, LLC (“Assignee”), dated February 28, 2018 and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber 7217, Page 446 (“3rd Assignment”), and further secured by an Assignment of Deed of Trust from 7E Investments, LLC (“Assignor”) to Onyx & Shadow Equities, LLC (“Assignee”),  dated May 15, 2018 and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber 7217, Page 448 (“4th Assignment”), and default having occurred under the terms thereof, and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in front of the Courthouse Door, Circuit Court for Worcester County, 1 West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863 on: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 at 11:00AM All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon SITUATED IN Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Open-End Deed of Trust. The property is believed to be improved by a residential dwelling. The property address is 107 Belt Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863. Said property is in fee simple and is sold in an “as is condition” and subject to all covenants, conditions, liens, restrictions, easements, rightsof-way as may affect same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $18,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or certified check, or other form acceptable to the Substitute Trustee, in his sole discretion.  Balance of the purchase price is to be paid in cash within ten (10) days of the final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.   If payment of the balance does not take place within ten (10) days of ratification, the deposit may be forfeited and property may be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from

Ocean City Today / Public Notices any resale of the property. Interest to be paid on unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the deed of trust note from date of sale to date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustee in the event the property is purchased by someone rather than the note holder. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , including, but not limited to, exceptions to the sale, bankruptcy filings by interested parties, or court administration of the foreclosure, there shall be no abatement of interest. Taxes, ground rent, water, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges, assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward.  If the Substitute Trustee is unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit. Upon refund of the deposit, this sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claims against the Substitute Trustee.   NOTE:  The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable, but is offered for informational purposes only.  Neither the auctioneer, the beneficiary of the Deed of Trust, the Substitute Trustee nor his agents or attorneys make any representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of information. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS ARE URGED TO PERFORM THEIR OWN DUE DILIGENCE WITH RESPECT TO THE PROPERTY PRIOR TO THE FORECLOSURE AUCTION.  For additional information, please contact the Substitute Trustee. Brian T. Gallagher, Substitute Trustee Tidewater Auctions, LLC 410-825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com Ad #70042 OCD-10/25/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 163 WINTER HARBOR DR. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October 12, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5046, Folio 587 among the Land

Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $200,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on NOVEMBER 13, 2018 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. The property will be sold subject to a prior mortgage, the amount to be announced at the time of sale, if made available to the Substitute Trustees. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $18,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property,

NOVEMBER 9, 2018 and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 328928-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-10/25/3t _________________________________ Tax Certificate Consultants, Inc. c/o James F. Truitt, Jr. 20 East Timonium Road, Suite 106 Timonium, Maryland 21093 Tax Certificate Consultants, Inc. c/o James F. Truitt, Jr. 20 East Timonium Road, Suite 106 Timonium, Maryland 21093 Plaintiff V. Brian D. Jones Aaron Jones Naomi Jones 11829 STEAM MILL HILL ROAD and Worcester County, Maryland (for Maryland Annotated Code 141836(b)(1 )(v) purposes only) and Any and all person having or claiming to have any interest in the fee simple in the properties and premises situate; lying and being in the County of Worcester described on the Tax Rolls Worcester County Collector of State and County Taxes for said County known as: 11829 Steam Mill Hill Road, Whaleyville, MD 21872, 3rd (third) Election District, described as follows All that lot of land and imps 15245 SQ FT STEAM MILL HILL N OF WHALEYVILLE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY IN EQUITY Case Number:· C-23-CV-18-000297


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the following property 11829 Steam Mill Hill Road, Whaleyville, MD 21872 in the County of Worcester, sold by the Collector of Taxes for the County of Worcester and the State of Maryland to the Plaintiff in this proceeding: All that lot of land and imps 15245 SQ FT STEAM MILL HILL N OF WHALEYVILLE The complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption have not been paid. It is thereupon this 12th of October, 2018 by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Ordered, That notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this order in some newspaper having general circulation in Worcester County once a week for three (3) successive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to appear in this Court by the December 15, 2018, and redeem the property 11829 Stearn Mill Hill Road, Whaleyville, MD 21872 and answer the complaint or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the Plaintiff's title, free and clear of all encumbrances. Beau H. Oglesby JUDGE 10/12/2018 12:17:25 PM Entered: Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, MD October 16, 2018 True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-10/25/3t _________________________________ Samuel I. White, PC 5040 Corporate Woods Drive, Suite 120 Virginia Beach, VA 23462 JOHN E. DRISCOLL, III, et al Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees v. GERALD ALAN SHOCKLEY SHARON DENISE TUCKER A/K/A SHARON DENISE TUCKER SHOCKLEY Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 23C16000944

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 22nd day of October, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 103 Woodland Court, Snow Hill, MD 21863 will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 19th day of November, 2018, provided a copy of this NOTICE be published at least once a week in each of three successive weeks in the some newspaper of general circulation published in said County before the 12th day of November, 2018. The Report of Sale states the

Ocean City Today / Public Notices amount of the sale to be $131,250.00. Susan R. Braniecki CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-10/25/3t _________________________________

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 17595 Notice is given that the Probate & Family Court for Bristol County, MA appointed Patrick W. Fitzgerald, 1605 Providence Road, Baltimore, MD 21286 as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Paul Fitzgerald who died on December 15, 2016 domiciled in Massachusetts, USA. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Patrick W. Fitzgerald Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of Newspaper: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: October 19, 2018 OCD-10/25/3t _________________________________ TOWN OF BERLIN

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Mayor and Council of the Town of Berlin will hold a public hearing on Monday, November 26th at 7:00 p.m. in the Berlin Town Hall Council Chambers, 10 William Street, on Ordinance 2018-05. The public is invited to attend and comment. A copy of the proposed Ordinance 2018-05 is available for inspection in Town Hall, between the hours of 8:30 am and 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday. Ordinance 2018-05 An Ordinance of the Mayor and Council of The Town of Berlin, Maryland a Maryland Municipal Corporation, amending Chapter 108, Article I, Section 108-5, entitled “Defini-

tions,” by adding a definition of “Group Home.” OCD-11/1/2t _________________________________ TOWN OF BERLIN

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Mayor and Council of the Town of Berlin will hold a public hearing on Monday, November 26th at 7:00 p.m. in the Berlin Town Hall Council Chambers, 10 William Street, on Ordinance 2018-06. The public is invited to attend and comment. A copy of the proposed Ordinance 2018-06 is available for inspection in Town Hall, between the hours of 8:30 am and 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday. Ordinance 2018-06 An Ordinance of the Mayor and Council of The Town of Berlin, Maryland a Maryland Municipal Corporation, enacting an ordinance permitting a Group Home to be allowed as a conditional use subject to approval by the Board of Zoning Appeals in the B-1 Zoning District subject to area limitations. OCD-11/1/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PASSAGE OF BILL 18-4 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 18-4 (Public Safety - Animal Control) was passed by the County Commissioners on October 23, 2018. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § PS 2-101(b). (Amends this subsection of the Animal Control Subtitle of the Public Safety Article to include definitions of the terms "Suitable Shelter", "Tethered", "Restraints" and "Unsafe Weather Conditions" as referenced in the Subtitle.) § PS 2-101(v). (Adds this new subsection to the Animal Control Subtitle to establish standards for tethering an animal, requiring that such tether must be at least fifteen feet long; prohibiting chain as a restraint; prohibiting certain collars; and requiring a minimum space between the animal’s neck and the collar.) § PS 2-101(w). (Adds this new subsection to the Animal Control Subtitle to establish standards for suitable shelter of animals if left outdoors and unattended; and requiring that animals be brought inside a home or building during unsafe weather conditions.) § PS 2-101(x). (Adds this new subsection to the Animal Control Subtitle to establish that shade must be provided if an animal is to be left outdoors and unattended and the forecasted weather is 85 degrees Fahrenheit or higher; provides that animal shelters shall not be considered shade.) This bill becomes effective fortyfive (45) days from the date of its passage. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester

PAGE 53 County Government Center outside Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at www.co.worcester.md.us. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. DOUGLAS M. MCCLELLAND 5104 Coastal Highway Unit 101S Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-18-000224

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 24th day of October, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 5104 Coastal Highway, Unit 101S, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 26th day of November, 2018, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 19th day of November, 2018. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $88,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PASSAGE OF BILL 18-5 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 18-5 (Zoning - Surface Mining) was passed by the County Commissioners on October 23, 2018. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § ZS 1-330(c)(24). (Adds this new subparagraph to the Standards for Surface Mining to provide that the County Commissioners may, by resolution, adopt further standards for reclamation of County-owned surface mining operations.) This bill becomes effective fortyfive (45) days from the date of its passage. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester County Government Center outside


Ocean City Today / Public Notices

PAGE 54 Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at www.co.worcester.md.us . THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PASSAGE OF BILL 18-6 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 18-6 (County Government - Competitive Bidding Threshold) was passed by the County Commissioners on October 23, 2018. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § CG 4-202(a). (Repeals and reenacts this subsection to revise the bidding threshold to require competitive bidding for any single purchase involving an expenditure of more than twenty-five thousand dollars of County funds.) This bill becomes effective fortyfive (45) days from the date of its passage. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester County Government Center outside Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at www.co.worcester.md.us . THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENT TO WORCESTER COUNTY WATER AND SEWERAGE PLAN RECLASSIFICATION OF SEWER PLANNING AREA MYSTIC HARBOUR SANITARY SERVICE AREA WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND The Worcester County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider a requested amendment to the Worcester County Comprehensive Water and Sewerage Plan as submitted by Hugh Cropper, IV., on behalf of Sea Oaks Villages, LLC., to reclassify the sewer planning area for a single property to accommodate a proposed Residential Planned Community (RPC) The proposed amendment seeks to change the designation for the property from S-3 (planned to be served within a six to ten year period) to S-1 (planned to be served within two years) and will include information in The Plan for the Mystic Harbour Sanitary Service Area (MHSSA) to include a revised table for Allocation of Equivalent Dwelling Units (EDUs) for sewer service that will accurately reflect the planning and connection activities in the MHSSA. The EDU Allocation Table for the available sewage treatment capacity in the MHSSA will be revised to allocate 63 sewer EDUs to the subject property from a

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

NOTICE OF LIVE AUCTION Beach Equipment Franchise – North End Parcels $500 Minimum Bid Requirement for each Parcel A public auction will be held on Wednesday, December 5, 2018 at 10:00 a.m., in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue in Ocean City, Maryland. Registration begins at 9:00 a.m. Auction begins at 10:00 a.m. The following north-section beach parcels will be auctioned: 85th, 86th & 87th Streets 88th 89th, 90th Streets and 91st Street end 92nd end (north), 93rd Streets and 9400 Condo Flying Cloud, Pyramid & Plaza Condos Century I, English Tower & Marigot Beach Condos Atlantis, Quay & Golden Sands Condos Capri, Irene & Rainbow Condos

High Point South, High Point North & Seawatch Condos Fountainhead, Carousel & 118th Street 119th, 120th & 121st Streets 128th, 129th & 130th Streets 131st, 132nd & 133rd Streets 134th, 135th & 136th Streets 137th, 138th & 139th Streets 140th, 141st & 142nd Streets 143rd, 144th, 145th & 146th Streets to MD/DE Line

ON AUCTION DAY, the successful bidder shall: (1) Provide satisfactory proof of identity and legal age (i.e. Driver’s License or Government-issued Photo ID) (2) Pay a One Thousand Dollar ($1,000.00) non-refundable deposit for each successful bid. Please bring cash, cashier’s checks or certified checks payable to the Mayor and City Council. PERSONAL CHECKS NOT ACCEPTED. On the dates specified below, the successful bidder shall: (1) Submit a personal Credit Report on or before Monday, December 10, 2018 (2) Sign a statement authorizing the Mayor and Council to make inquiry of personal background, financial and credit worthiness on or before Monday, December 10, 2018. (3) Pay 20% of the annual fee for each parcel less the $1,000.00 deposit to the Billing Office in City Hall on or before Monday, December 10, 2018. (4) Provide a brief plan of management on or before Monday, December 10, 2018, clarifying if you will directly oversee the operation or, if not, how day-to-day operations will be handled; providing details of your experience with the beach equipment rental industry; and advising if you have obtained necessary equipment and boxes or of your arrangements to acquire necessary equipment. (5) Obtain, at the operator’s own expense, comprehensive general liability insurance coverage and products liability insurance coverage in at least the amount of $1,000,000.00 combined single limit, which insurance coverage shall name the Mayor and City Council as an additional insured, and a certificate of insurance evidencing such coverage shall be furnished to the Mayor and City Council by the operator and be approved by Ocean City’s City Clerk before contract endorsement. (6) The second-highest bidder will have first right of refusal should the initial successful bidder neglect to meet credit, experience or management requirements. A sealed bid will be conducted if the second-highest bidder declines the award. The Mayor and Council may reject any and all bids for any reason it deems appropriate and may rebid upon such terms, conditions and manner it deems appropriate. (7) Sign a three year contract (2019-2021) for each parcel. An auction bid packet can be found at http://oceancitymd.gov/oc/departments/city-clerk/ or email dchavis@oceancitymd.gov to request the information. Please direct questions to 410-289-8842. OCD-11/8/2t ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ combination of the "Infill and Intensification", "Vacant or Multi-Lot", and "Commercial" categories in Area 1 (north of the airport) to accommodate an RPC that includes 59 townhomes and 24,000 square feet of commercial development.

hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday (except holidays). Interested parties may also call 410-632-1220, ext. 1601. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-11/1/1t _________________________________

The public hearing on this application will be held on TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2018 at 10:20 a.m. in the COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MEETING ROOM Room 1101 County Government Center One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863

SHAPlRO & BROWN. LLP 10021 Balls Ford Road, Suite 200 Manassas. Virginia 20109 (703) 449-5800

The case file may be reviewed at the Department of Environmental Programs, Room 1306 - Worcester County Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 between the

KRISTINE D. BROWN, et al. Trustee(s) Plaintiff(s) vs. COLENE R. BROGAN Defendant(s) Mortgagor(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF WORCESTER, MARYLAND CIVIL NO: C-23-CV-18-000148

NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 29th day of October, 2018 by the Circuit Court for the County of Worcester, Maryland and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Kristine D. Brown, William M. Savage, Gregory N. Britto, R. Kip Stone and Thomas J. Gartner, Trustees, of the Real Property designated as 20 Sandyhook Road, Berlin, MD 21811, and reported in the above entitled cause, will be finally ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 26th day of November, 2018 next; provided a copy of this order be inserted in Ocean City Digest, P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, MD 21843 published in said County of Worcester once a week for three successive weeks before the 19th day of November, 2018. The report states the amount of


NOVEMBER 9, 2018 the sale to be $124,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR COUNTY OF WORCESTER True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-11/1/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for a Class: "B" BEERWINE-LIQUOR License: 7 Day, By: Petraq Gjikuria, 12943 Windy Drive, Ocean City, Maryland 21842; Kozma Gjikuria, 710 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. For: Omega OC, LLC For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Omega Eats 2606 Philadelphia Avenue Ocean City, Maryland 21842 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: November 19, 2018 @ 1:00 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. OCD-11/8/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for a Class: "B" BEERWINE-LIQUOR License: 7 Day, By: Timothy Lee Brushmiller, 30213 Merganser Way, Fenwick, Delaware 19975; Adam Richard Davis, 23 South Main Street. Berlin, Maryland 21811. For: Viking Tree, LLC For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Viking Tree Trading Co. 114 North Main Street Berlin, Maryland 21811 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: November 19, 2018 @ 1:10 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. OCD-11/8/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for a new license and to designate this property as Multiple License #2 for a Class: "B" BEERWINE-LIQUOR License: 7 Day, By: Kevin Christopher Myers, 12502 Deer Point Circle, Berlin, Maryland 21811. For: OC Bar, LLC For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Bad Monkey West

Ocean City Today / Public Notices 12902 Ocean Gateway Ocean City, Maryland 21842 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: November 19, 2018 @ 1:25 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. OCD-11/8/2t _________________________________

26th day of November, 2018. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $195,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-11/8/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for a new license and to designate this property as Multiple License #2 for a Class: "B" BEERWINE-LIQUOR License: 7 Day, By: Aleksejs Buinovskis, 37494 Oliver Dr. Selbyville, DE 19975; Dzmitry Haltsou, 7260 Hillside Ave. Apt. 109, Los Angeles. CA 90046; Sviatlana Kazlova, 200 Mainmast Circle, Berlin, MD 21811; lryna Klimins, 413 Robin Drive Unit 203, Ocean City, MD 21842; Deniss Klimins, 413 Robin Drive Unit 203, Ocean City, MD 21842. For: Pines Public House & Eatery Corp. For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Pines Public House & Eatery 11002 Nicholas Lane Ocean Pines, Maryland 21811 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: November 19, 2018 @ 1:35 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. OCD-11/8/2t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. DORIS K. MARCHESE 6 Knight Terrace Court Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-18-000186

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 30th day of October, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 6 Knight Terrace Court, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 3rd day of December, 2018, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the

Advertisements for Bids

BEACH PHOTOGRAPHER’S FRANCHISE Town of Ocean City, Maryland Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Chapter 39, Article III, of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, that the Mayor and City Council will accept bids for the operation of the Beach Photographer’s Franchise Business. All bidders are subject to the conditions, terms and provisions of Chapter 39, copies of which may be obtained in the City Clerk’s Office or by visiting www.oceancitymd.gov. All bids shall be awarded to the highest bidders except that, should the Council determine there are irregularities in such bidding, they may reject such bids as they deem appropriate and postpone the awarding of bids. In the event of tie bids, the first in time received, shall be deemed the successful bid. A bid packet can be obtained at www.oceancitymd.gov. 1. The franchise will be for a term of four (4) years, provided the operator is not in default or otherwise in violation of any terms of this Article. The operator shall have an option to renew any franchise for one additional four (4) year term upon the same terms and conditions except that, the annual franchise fee shall be ten percent (10%) greater than the annual franchise fee for the initial term. 2. An operator shall be permitted to hold both franchises. If different operators hold franchises, each operator shall operate autonomously from the other, with no joint purchasing or usage of equipment, products processing facilities, retail outlets or other operational matters. 3. Each operator will be limited to a maximum of fifteen (15) employees on the beach at any one time. 4. Bids must be submitted on the bid form provided by the City Clerk’s Office by Monday, December 3 at 1:00 p.m. Bids must be placed in an envelope, sealed and clearly marked “Bid on Beach Photographer’s Franchise”. 5. The Mayor and Council will reject any bid less than One hundred fifty thousand dollars ($150,000) per year. 6. The bid shall be accompanied by a cashiers or certified check in the amount of fifty percent (50%) of the

PAGE 55 first years bid amount. 7. All bids shall be presented, opened, and acknowledged by the Mayor and City Council at the opening of the regularly scheduled meeting of December 3, 2018. The meeting is scheduled to begin at 6:00 p.m. in the City Hall Council Chambers, 301 Baltimore Avenue. 8. Bidders agree to authorize the Mayor and City Council to make inquiry of personal background, financial history and credit worthiness, and agree to provide a copy of their credit report. 9. Each successful bidder will be required to have $1,000,000.00 combined single limit for comprehensive general liability insurance which must include personal injury, including but not limited to libel, slander, and invasion of privacy. The Mayor and Council shall be named as additional insured, and a certificate evidencing such coverage must be filed in the City Clerk’s Office before the operator engages in the selling of photographs on the beach. Submit Bid as instructed above to: City Clerk’s Office Town of Ocean City P.O. Box 158 Ocean City, Maryland 21843 Phone: 410 289-8842 E-mail: dchavis@oceancitymd.gov OCD-11/8/2t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. BEVERLY ANN LADICK WALTER LADICK 10412 Exeter Road Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C23CV16000006

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 1st day of November, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10412 Exeter Road, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 3rd day of December, 2018, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 26th day of November, 2018. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $242,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-11/8/3t _________________________________


Ocean City Today / Public Notices

PAGE 56 TOWN OF BERLIN

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS RFP # 2018 – 01 DEMOLITION AND REMOVAL SERVICES Due Date: Friday, December 7, 2018 Time: 11:00 A.M. EST The Town of Berlin is seeking Proposals for Demolition and Removal Services of certain buildings. Qualified firms are encouraged to visit the Town of Berlin website at berlinmd.gov/maryland-government/request-for-proposals/ for official RFP. EEO. OCD-11/8/2t _________________________________

detailed in the Bid Documents. Bid Documents for the HorseDrawn Carriage Franchise Service may be obtained by calling 410-2898824 during normal business hours, or via the Procurement page of the Town’s website. The Town of Ocean City is not responsible for the content of any Bid Document received through any third party bid service. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their Completed Bid Documents. Sealed Bid Documents are due no later than Monday, November 26, 2018 by 4:30 p.m. and will be opened and read aloud at the Mayor and City Council Work Session held on Tuesday, November 27, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. Bids are to be submitted to the Town of Ocean City, Attn: City Clerk, 301 N. Baltimore Avenue Room 220, Ocean City, MD 21842. Late Bid Document will not be accepted. OCD-11/8/2t _________________________________

Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 1st day of May, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written no-

HORSE-DRAWN CARRIAGE FRANCHISE SERVICE The Town of Ocean City is seeking bids from qualified and experienced vendors to provide a Horse-Drawn Carriage Franchise Service that is in conformity with the specifications

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17608 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF LAURA MARIE TRUITT Notice is given that Tina Marie Tilghman, 34446 St. George Road, Laurel, DE 19956, was on November 01, 2018 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Laura Marie Truitt who died on October 8, 2018, with a will.

tice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Tina Marie Tilghman Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: November 08, 2018 OCD-11/8/3t _________________________________

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Commentary

It’s over and time to start looking ahead

The reverberations of ringing telephones and vigorously employed door knockers have begun to fade, and residential mailboxes are on their way to recovery from the swelling induced by the reams of campaign literature deposited therein. And with these things, many Worcester County residents are probably reflecting on the past month or two and saying to themselves and others, “Wow, I’m glad that’s over.” They would be referring to one of the most hectic, energetic and aggressively fought political campaign seasons in years. From the state level to Ocean City’s municipal elections, candidates seemed to seek every opportunity and means of conveying their message to the public. That is, of course, exactly what they should have been doing. With one local exception, which would be Ocean City Councilman Lloyd Martin, whose low-key “vote for me or don’t” campaign style continues to work, candidates in all races went out in full pursuit of their objectives. That approach served Ocean City Councilman Matt James and Councilman-elect Mark Paddack well in the local contest, just as it did most of the Worcester County Commissioners. But it was the Maryland Senate race between Republican Del. Mary Beth Carozza and Democratic Sen. Jim Mathias that brought out more Worcester County voters than any other battle on the ballot. More votes were cast in this contest in Worcester than there were for governor, and it was Worcester that put Carozza far ahead of Mathias. Carozza clearly benefitted from the popularity of Gov. Larry Hogan, who endorsed her. She also was helped by a strong Republican community in northern Worcester County, and by an Ocean City business community still angered by Mathias’ vote for the new paid sick leave law that he managed to tweak, but voted for nevertheless. But that’s history now and we have to look ahead. In that respect, we wish this election’s victors well, encourage them to stand by their principles when appropriate, seek compromise when it serves their constituents’ interests, and work just as hard on the job as they did on the campaign trail.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR ............................................ Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli ASSOCIATE EDITOR .................................. Josh Davis STAFF WRITERS .................. Greg Ellison, Morgan Pilz, .......................................................... Rachel Ravina ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ................ Kelly Brown, Kyle Phillips PUBLISHER ...................................... Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net. Copyright 2018

PUBLIC EYE

Nov. 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

Page 57

Finally, some silence

After spending months of sleepless nights trying to separate the factual wheat from the chaff from all the politicking phone calls I began receiving sometime in July, three things have occurred to me. First, never did I think in all my years that I actually would welcome getting just my usual weekly allotment of 50 dozen annoying calls. It’s true. There’s something soothing lately about being advised that “Donations Are Urgently Needed By for the Dog Mange Rehab AsStewart sociation,” as well as the routine, but just as fasDobson more cinating, “Amazing Credit Card Opportunity Just For You.” As opposed to the constant political messages, these things have kind of a welcomeback-to-normal, reassuring quality. “Hello? You have a Can’t Miss Investment Opportunity Just for Me? Oh, please, tell me more about it!” “Hello? Have I ever considered the Super No-Clog High-Tech Rain Gutter System for my home? No, I haven’t. Let me get a note pad so I can write down all the details.” “Hello? You say the Society for the Prevention of Pinworm Infestations is itching for my help? Tell me how I can do my part without delay.” It’s true, sadly, that these kinds of telephone solicitations are superior to those endured during the campaign cycle. That’s because I know they’re outright lying to me. I don’t have to do an internet search of the First Federal Bank of Batavia to know its cash-back credit card program ab-

solutely will not allow me to “Spend Frivolously and Make Money Too!” Not so obvious, to me anyway, were some of the political exhortations that came through the receiver. Skeptic that I am, when the caller says, “Candidate X is not an actual human, but is a spore-being created by radicals out of black mold,” I feel obligated to research it. I mean, who knows? These people are working to guard our democracy, so they could have something there. Similarly, any caller who tells me that soand-so has secretly pledged to support oil and gas exploration in my family room bears checking out. For all I know, our vigorously pursued push for energy independence may have reached that stage and I might have to seek national monument status for my recliner. These are serious times, after all, and people are prone to think and do just about anything, which brings me to my next point. I lied — make that misspoke — about lying awake at night trying to separate fact from fiction. I don’t do that. The truth is I lie awake at night because, well, I lie awake at night, and I need something to do during that period. So it’s either contemplating the possible existence of spore-beings or watching “Shoe Shopping With Jane” on QVC. With regard to all the phone calls, what really gets me is how I was and continue to be inundated by these calls when I am on the “do not call” list, which was, apparently, created by spore-people, for all the good it does. And the third thing? I invite everyone to join with me in observing a moment of telephone silence.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 58

Letters to the editor Partnership applauded as Artrageous event successful

Editor, The combination of the Ocean City Center for the Arts and the Ocean City Performing Arts Center is a winner. Artrageous, sponsored by the Art League of Ocean City and performed at the Performing Art Center on Oct. 28 was a wonderful experience. Thanks to Rina Thaler, executive director of the Art League, and the many other people who made this possible. Thanks also to the sponsors of Artrageous who made the performance free for 1,200 Worcester County middle and high school students. Sponsors were Humphreys Foundation, Optimistic Club, The Town of Ocean City, T.E.A.M. Productions, The Harrison Group, Maryland Coast Dispatch, Ocean City Today, Ocean 98, WMDT, WRDE, and Delmarva Public Radio. Jeff McArthur Ocean City

More than 2,000 attend Artrageous performance

Editor, Art does touch lives. More than 800 audience members on Sunday and 1,200 students

on Monday who attended the Artrageous performance at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center were inspired by the color and excitement of art being created on stage right before their eyes. The Art League of Ocean City is proud to have brought this national touring company of performers to the resort. In addition, sponsorships from the Humphreys Foundation and the Optimist Club and support from T.E.A.M. Productions, the Town of Ocean City, the Harrison Group, and our media sponsors made the Monday performance free for middle and high school students in Worcester County. We would like to thank Worcester County Superintendent of Schools, Lou Taylor; Tamara Mills of Worcester County Board of Education; Megan Wallace of Worcester Preparatory School; and Brownwyn Betz of OC Homeschoolers for their collaboration. This is a great example of how the arts can bring our community together. We thank all who attended the Sunday performance as well as the sponsors of Artrageous for making this wonderful event possible. Rina Thaler Executive Director Jamie Albright Board Member Art League of Ocean City Ocean City Center for the Arts

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Two arrested, charged following OC DUI crash

By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) Two people accused of driving under the influence were arrested in connection with a Nov. 4 crash on 59th Street, according to an arrest report from the District Court of Maryland. Patricia Michelle Franklin, 52, of Gretna, Louisiana, and Michael Joseph Thom, 60, of Middle River, Maryland, were each charged with two counts of driving a vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and driving a vehicle while being impaired by alcohol, according to an arrest report. Franklin was also charged with unsafe backing of a motor vehicle. Patricia Franklin Following their arrest, the two submitted to a breath test, according to a report. Franklin had a .11 BAC and Thom had a .14 BAC, according to the report. Police were called about a crash around 4:44 p.m. on the 200 block of 59th Street in Ocean City, where they saw a parked black Chevrolet Impala in the parking lot with significant front-end damage. The car’s owner was not present at the time of Michael Thom the crash, police said. Franklin, who was driving a Toyota Tundra, identified herself to police and said she had misjudged the distance between the cars as she backed out of a parking space, according to the report. The officer also spoke with Thom, who confirmed that Franklin was driving. A witness told police he saw the crash and didn’t see who was driving, but saw Thom get out of the driver’s seat after parking. Franklin said she and Thom argued about who should drive after the couple left a bar. She added that she changed seats with Thom after the crash and that he proceeded to park the car.


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

Nolan nets five years in plea deal for brutal June assault

ALL CLEAR Maryland National Guard members run landmine sweeps on the beach near the inlet parking lot last Saturday during the disaster response exercise “Operation Tourist Boom.” GREG ELLISON/ OCEAN CITY TODAY

Kolacz ordered to pay $81K in restitution for felony theft By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) After being ordered last month to pay more than $81,000 in civil restitution for embezzlement from St. George Greek Orthodox Church, Teresa M. Kolacz heads back to court next month to face a dozen felony counts, including theft of $100,000 or more and 11 counts of forgery. Upon uncovering the maleficence this spring, church officials with St. George’s contacted Ocean City Police, who later arrested Kolacz, 51, of Berlin, who was employed by the religious institution. The Worcester County State’s Attorney’s Office determined that Kolacz had

PAGE 59

allegedly defrauded the church for over $100,000, with the misappropriations dating back to June 2017. On July 17, Kolacz was arrested on charges that she embezzled sixfigures from St. George’s treasury. In addition to the civil case on Oct. 25, Kolacz has a jury trial scheduled for Teresa K. Kolacz Dec. 6 in Worcester Circuit Court. St. George Greek Orthodox Church, 8805 Coastal Highway, was founded in 1985 and has a current congregation of approximately 250 members.

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) One of a trio of suspects who severely beat and robbed a man in June near 81st Street, was sentenced to five years in jail in Worcester Circuit Court last Wednesday. Patrick Nolan, 22, of Parkesburg, Pennsylvania, facing nine counts including first-degree assault and felony robbery, accepted a plea deal for one count of conspiracy to commit Patrick Nolan first-degree assault. Also facing charges for the violent robbery are Jason Guzman, 18, and Nicole Yake, 20, both of Parkesburg, Pennsylvania. An unidentified juvenile was also arrested but not charged as an adult in the incident. Police said the victim, who was found lying on 81st Street bleeding from a large facial cut, said he was attacked by three males who relieved him of an expensive belt, and ripped three gold chains from his neck. The victim, who received treatment at Atlantic General Hospital for a concussion, broken nose and cuts requiring medical staples, told police he had been talking to the foursome for about a half hour before the attack, after which the

group fled in a dark colored van. While still on scene reviewing surveillance footage from an adjacent hotel, police saw a vehicle matching the suspects’ near the fight scene. Police saw Nolan exit the van and search the ground using a phone, where investigators had earlier found evidence that included gold chain links and a pair of bloodstained glasses. Nolan attempted to flee upon spotting the police, but was captured within a few blocks. Police also detained the other three subjects in the van. When questioned, police said Yake leveled rape accusations against the assault victim, claiming that motivated Guzman and Nolan’s assault. Yake also admitted to recording the robbery and assault on her cell phone, which police said shows Guzman and Nolan stomping repeatedly on the victim’s head, before stopping to remove items from his person, and then resuming the physical assault. When interviewed that same day, police said Yake revised her rape accusation to sexual harassment, before admitting she was not assaulted at all. She was arrested in July for allegedly aiding in the attack. Guzman has a jury trial set for Nov. 14 in Worcester Circuit Court, with Yake scheduled on Jan. 3 for a jury trial.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 60

Disorderly man accused of exposing himself to police

By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) A 25-year-old man apparently couldn’t keep it in his pants following his arrest on Nov. 4 outside a mid-town hotel in Ocean City. Ryan Michael Lewis, of Parkville, Maryland, was arrested on Nov. 4 and charged with trespassing on private property, two counts of second-degree assault and two counts of indecent exposure, according to an arrest report from the District Court of Maryland. Following his arrest, he was taken to the booking facility, where police later told him to put his hands through a port to be placed in handcuffs, and he “removed his penis from his pants and placed it on the port in-

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stead.” Police responded to a report of a disorderly person around 6:58 p.m. at the hotel at 5400 Coastal Highway. The bouncer and bartender at the hotel bar told police a man, later identified as Lewis, went behind the bar and pushed the bartender, according to a report. They Ryan M. Lewis then tried to remove Lewis from the bar, but a scuffle ensued. He was removed from the bar, but stayed in the parking lot, according to the report. Police told Lewis if he returned to the property he would be arrested, according to the arrest report. He began to walk away, but screamed “Dude, just f****** take me to jail.” Police then told him to leave the area, but Lewis continued screaming obscenities and walked back onto the hotel’s property. He was then taken to the Ocean City Police Department Booking Facility where he allegedly tried to cover a camera with wet paper towels, according to the report. Police told him to stop, but he then allegedly exposed himself.

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

POLICE/COURTS

Intoxicated in public Matthew Adam Fitzpatrick, 36, of Salisbury was arrested on Nov. 2 and charged with intoxicated endangerment, according to an arrest report from the District Court of Maryland. Police were called about a man who had been kicked out of a downtown bar and then proceeded to act in a disorderly fashion. Police confronted Fitzpatrick, who allegedly could not identify where he was staying. When asked his age, Fitzpatrick reportedly told police he was “1000 years old.” An officer then saw Fitzpatrick urinate on a building, according to the report.

Fight draws crowd Hunter William Kurtz, 21, of Berlin, was arrested on Nov. 3 and charged with disorderly conduct and two counts of second-degree assault, according to an arrest report from the District Court of Maryland. Police went to a fight in progress around 8:40 p.m. at the intersection of Talbot Street and St. Louis Avenue, where approximately 20 people gathered as one man tried to restrain an-

other. Two men told police Kurtz was attempting to get into a fight with them, according to the report. One man said Kurtz tried to hit him after he walked out of a bar. A witness told police Kurtz grabbed and push the other man, according to the arrest report. He then tried to break up the fight, but said Kurtz also grabbed him by the neck. Several other people the separated them.

Dancing in the dark Khalif Jamal Watson, 24, of Middletown, Delaware, was arrested and charged with intoxicated endangerment, according to an arrest report from the District Court of Maryland. A resort patrol officer saw a man wearing dark clothing, later identified as Watson, walking around 1:33 a.m. in the middle lane of northbound Coastal Highway, with his back turned to oncoming traffic. The officer said “Watson had his arms extended outward and appeared to be doing a dance.” Police said a car driving toward Watson had to honk his horn, brake and change lanes to avoid hitting him.

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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 61

WORLD WAR II

Kristallnacht marks start of destruction of Jewish shops

By Peter Ayers Wimbrow III Contributing Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) This week, 80 years ago, “Kristallnacht” came to Germany. This may be the single most shameful moment for that generation of Germans. It may be that some, or many, truly did not know of the millions that were murdered by their government in their name. Possibly they really believed their government’s “resettlement” stories. Besides, most of the extermination camps were outside of Germany. And maybe they believed their government’s justification that the ones being held in the camps within Germany, like Buchenwald, Dachau, Flossenberg, BergenBelsen and others really were, “enemies of the state.” But Kristallnacht occurred out in the open, before their very eyes. True, some expressed disquiet and discomfort. And maybe by that time the Nazi regime had such a hold on German life that nothing could be done. In any event, nothing was done, and little was said. By the time the Nazis came to power, more than half a million Jews lived in Germany, most of whom considered themselves Germans first and Jews second. In the previous World War, they, like their German neighbors, had fought and died in the Kaiser’s Imperial Armies. In fact, the officer who awarded Adolph Hitler the Iron Cross, of which he was so proud, was Jewish. But, by 1938, the Nazis had been able to undo centuries of assimilation by labeling the Jews as the “enemy within” and blaming them for the defeat in the Great War and the country’s subsequent economic difficulties. Through a series of laws known as the “Nuremberg Laws,” German Jews had been marginalized in German society. They were no longer allowed employment in the Civil Service. They were stripped of their citizenship. Marriages and sexual relations between Jews and non-Jews were prohibited. The German propaganda machine

was cranked up and directed against them. They were prohibited from using public hospitals, public parks, and libraries. Beaches were closed to them. Identification cards were required to have a large “J” stamped on them. On Oct. 18, 1938, 12,000 Polish Jews were expelled from Germany. They were given a few hours’ notice and were only allowed to take one suitcase per person. All their remaining possessions were seized by the Nazis, and their German neighbors. They were taken from their homes to the nearest railway stations where they were put on trains to the Polish border. Once they arrived at the Polish border, only four thousand were admitted into Poland. The remaining eight thousand huddled along the border waiting for the Polish government to allow them into their native country. Conditions for them were deplorable. In March of that year, Poland, knowing what was occurring within its neighbor, and being anti-Semitic, itself, had enacted legislation which stripped anyone who had lived abroad for five years of their Polish citizenship. The legislation was intended to prevent the Polish Jews living in the German Reich from returning to Poland. In August, German authorities announced that all residence permits were being cancelled and would have to be renewed. Everyone knew that the Jews’ permits would not be renewed. But Poland announced that it would not accept anyone subject to the law that it had enacted in March, after October. Therefore, the German authorities moved to beat the deadline. One of the deported couples who had been living, legally, in Hanover for more than 27 years, Sendel and Rivka Grynszpan, had a 17-year-old son named Herschel, who lived in Paris, with his aunt and uncle, Abraham and Chawa Grynszpan. His intent had been to emigrate to Palestine, but he was told he would have to wait a year. So, he went to Continued on Page 62

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 62

WORLD WAR II Continued from Page 61 France, before the Germans, unbeknownst to him, deported his family. While he was in Paris, his family, and thousands of other Polish Jews, were trapped on the border between the two anti-Semitic governments. Herschel’s sister Berta sent him a postcard, on Oct. 31, describing their experience and saying, “We haven’t a penny. Could you send us something...?” Her postcard arrived on Nov. 3. Four days later, Herschel walked into a gun shop on the Rue de Faubourg St. Martin and bought 6.35 caliber revolver and took the metro to the German Embassy, where he asked to see an embassy official. He was shown into the office of Ernst vom Rath, a minor diplomat. Upon entering the official’s office, he pulled out his newly-purchased gun and shot vom Rath three times in the abdomen. He died two days later. It was the 15th anniversary of the

failed “Beer Hall Putsch,” a significant date in the history of the Nazi Party. That night, Propaganda Minister Dr. Joseph Goebbels, speaking at the famous Munich beer hall, encouraged retaliation against the Jews. Almost immediately, Jews, their businesses, their homes and their synagogues were attacked. Although the Nazi leaders attempted to portray it as a “spontaneous” response to the murder of vom Rath, the attacks were organized and carried out, mostly, by the SA — the paramilitary arm of the Nazi party. Almost every synagogue — more than 2,000 — in the Reich, was damaged or destroyed. About 100 Jews were killed, while 30,000 were sent to concentration camps. This marked the first time that large numbers of Jews were sent to the camps. More than 7,000 Jewish shops and businesses were damaged or destroyed. The name “Kristallnacht” was derived

from the shattered glass that littered the streets of Germany’s communities that had come from the broken windows of Jewish homes, shops, businesses and synagogues. Literally translated, the word Kristallnacht means “Crystal Night.” A more appropriate translation is “Night of the Broken Glass.” As hundreds of synagogues, homes and businesses burned, the firefighting companies sat idle, having received orders to intervene only if there was danger of the fire spreading to non-Jewish property. Since, in the view of the German government, the Jews were at fault, laws were passed which confiscated any insurance payments due them. The effect of “Kristallnacht” was to reveal the true Nazi attitude and way of doing things and to harden world opinion against the German Reich. Dr. Goebbels responded to the furor by saying, “This is one dead man who is

NOVEMBER 9, 2018 costing the Jews dear. Our darling Jews will think twice in the future before gunning down German diplomats.” As to the fate of the “cause” of all this — Herschel Grynszpan — he languished in French jails, waiting for a trial that never occurred. After the French surrender, he was transferred to German “facilities.” Although he did not survive the war, the rest of his family did, having finally gained admittance to Poland. In 1939, they emigrated to the USSR. After the war, they emigrated to Israel. Next week: Japanese occupation of Canton Mr. Wimbrow writes from Ocean City, Maryland, where he practices law representing those persons accused of criminal and traffic offenses, and those persons who have suffered a personal injury through no fault of their own. He can be contacted at: wimbrowlaw@gmail.com.

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TROY ADAM ODENDHAL Supply, North Carolina Troy Adam Odendhal, 56, formerly of Severn, Maryland, died unexpectedly on Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018 at his home in Supply, North Carolina, on his beloved front porch overlooking the Lockwood Folly River. Troy was born Dec. Troy Odendhal 25, 1961 in Baltimore to Patricia and Cliff Odendhal of Berlin, Maryland. Troy joined the Army after graduating from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, which was where he met the love of his life, Mary Jane. The pair’s marriage in Seoul, South Korea, was one of Troy’s most vivid memories - trading nuptials during one of the monthly air raid drills. Troy was hired by the National Security Agency at Ft. Meade immediately upon discharge where he worked for 34 years until his retirement as a senior computer scientist in 2017. Troy will be remembered for his volunteer and community work in many fields. For over 25 years, he was a volunteer fireman in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, spending his time at the Odenton and Riviera Beach stations, often in an official capacity. “Coach Troy,” as he was lovingly called, coached his son’s soccer and baseball teams at the Severn Athletic Club where he helped shape his son and friends into who they are today. Troy’s main hobby prior to and into retirement was as an amateur radio enthusiast, where he became a well-respected member of the Radio and Scanner community thanks to his genius with their programming questions. Troy also enjoyed traveling the world with his wife and had several big Continued on Page 63


NOVEMBER 9, 2018

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 62 trips planned. As long as Troy was able to have a cold beer, he was a happy tourist. Troy is survived by his wife, Mary Jane; daughter, Jennifer (Al) Horsman, Glen Burnie; son, Justin Odendhal, Philadelphia; grandsons, Owen, Brady, Grant and Liam Horsman, Glen Burnie; brothers, Cliff (Donna) Odendhal, Glen Burnie, Chuck (Joselle), Chase, and John, Pasadena; and his parent’s Patricia and Cliff Odendhal of Berlin. A celebration of life will be held in Maryland at a later date. Memorial donations may be made to the American Heart Association. Online condolences are encouraged and may be offered at www.whitefuneralservicesupply.com White Funeral & Cremation Service, Bolivia/Supply Chapel. SHIRLEY JEAN (BENTON) FURLONG Ocean Pines Shirley Jean (Benton) Furlong, age 83, died on Monday, Oct. 29, 2018 at Atlantic General Hospital. Born in Bethesda, Maryland, she was the only child of the late Casious Park Benton and Edna May Gandy Benton. She was preceded in death by her husband of 54 years, Marion Shirley Furlong Herbert Furlong. Surviving, are her children, Marion Sue Furlong and her beloved companion, Harry Edward Downs, of Ocean Pines, and son, Park Edward Furlong and his wife, Sharon, of Feasterville, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Furlong was a graduate of Bladensburg High School, Class of 1952. She had worked at Bowie High School as a secretary for the guidance office for 27 years. She and her husband retired and moved to Florida for five years and then back to Maryland’s Eastern Shore, settling in Ocean Pines in 2000. She enjoyed traveling, collecting sea glass and trips back to their Florida condo. She always had a great love for her dogs and her surviving cat, Abby. A funeral service was held on Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018 at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Rev. Boyd Etter officiated. Interment was private for the family. A donation in her memory may be made to the Worcester County Humane Society, P.O. Box 48, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. STEPHEN MICHAEL OUTTEN North Carolina Stephen Michael Outten, age 33, passed away on Oct. 27, 2018 at Summitt Medical in Tennessee. Born in Langley, Virginia, he was the son of Michael Outten and Sue Outten.

Ocean City Today He is survived by his grandmother, Patricia Fischer (Don); son, Conner Outten; brothers, Mark Outten (Leah) and David Outten; uncles, Bill Outten Stephen Outten and Danny Outten; aunt, Debbie Sutton; and several nieces and nephews. Stephen was a founder at Caledonia Creative Content, a novelist, and a former marketing and public relations manager at Ascension Care Management. He studied English Literature Middle Tennessee State University in 2009; English Language at University of Tennessee at Martin, class of 2007; and Blout Undergraduate Initiative at University of Alabama 2007. He attended Pratville High School, class of 2003, and O’Fallon Township High School, class of 2000. Stephen was a novelist and wrote several novels including; “The Senators Daughter,” “Whiskey Cotillion,” “Stones Throw River,” “Scarborough Fair” and “The Shadow’s Whisper.” Stephen’s hobbies included reading, writing fiction, running, collecting comics, and he was an avid Batman fan. He was a member of Scots-Irish/Ulster Scots. He liked the Baltimore Orioles, MLB, Atlanta Braves, Nashville Sounds and Nashville Predators. A graveside service was held on

Monday, Nov. 5, 2018 at Evergreen Cemetery. Visitation was held at Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin on Monday, Nov. 5. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in Stephen’s memory to St. Jude’s Children Hospital at 501 St Jude Place Memphis, Tennessee 38105. PAULA FAULKNER WRIGHT Berlin Paula Faulkner Wright, age 82, passed away on Sunday, Oct. 28, 2018 at the Gull Creek Retirement Community. Originally from Sallisaw, Oklahoma, she moved to the east coast where she ended up living on Gibson Island, Maryland before moving to Vero Beach, Paula Wright Florida, only to return to Maryland to be closer to her daughters. She was preceded in death by her husband, Ernest Brinton Wright, III. She is survived by her daughters, Rachel Waltjen and her husband, Rick, of Pasadena, Maryland, and Courtney Wright of Berlin, Maryland. Paula managed the Public Defenders office in Annapolis, Maryland before retiring to play golf and spend

PAGE 63 summers at the beach. She was an involved member of various churches. Paula loved to sing in the church choir, golf, read a good book and play bridge. She also enjoyed spending time with her family, friends and her cat, Telya. We would like to thank Cassandra Coulbourne and everyone at Gull Creek and Coastal Hospice for taking exceptional care of our Mom. We are truly grateful. Services will be private. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in Paula’s memory to Coastal Hospice at P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21804. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. DR. ARIS CONSTANTINE SPENGOS Berlin Dr. Aris Constantine Spengos, age 93, died on Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury, Maryland. Born in Constantinople, he was the son of the late Constantine and Fotini Spengos. He is survived by Dr. Aris Spengos his beloved wife, Ariane A. Spengos; children, John C. Spengos and his wife, Continued on Page 64


PAGE 64

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 63 Nicola, of N. Kingstown, Rhode Island, Theodore S. Spengos and his wife, Maria, of Ellicott City, Maryland; and son-in-law, Calvin H. Deininger of Wallingford, Pennsylvania. There are five grandchildren, Steven C. Deininger, Emma M. Deininger, Theodore A. Spengos, Ariane T. Spengos and Melinna R. Spengos. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Tina A. Deininger. Also surviving are numerous nieces and nephews. Dr. Spengos earned his doctorate in engineering at University of Michigan, and had worked for the Scott Paper Company 26 years. He was a member of St. Georges Greek Orthodox Church in Ocean City, 20-year member of the Kiwanis, Ocean Pines Environmental Committee, and the Worcester County Water Committee. He enjoyed sailing, crabbing, boating and gardening and was an avid fan of the Philadelphia Eagles and Flyers. A funeral service was held on Monday, Nov. 5, 2018 at St. Georges Greek Orthodox Church in Ocean City. Rev. Anastasios Bourantas officiated. Interment followed in Evergreen Cemetery near Berlin. A donation in his memory may be made to: St. Georges Greek Orthodox Church Building Fund, 8805 Coastal Hwy., Ocean City, Maryland 21842.

Ocean City Today Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. GREGORY AKERS HALL Ocean City Gregory Akers Hall passed away at his home in Ocean City, Maryland on Oct. 25, 2018. Born in Baltimore on May 25, 1949, he was the son of the late Arthur and Shirley Hall. He attended St. William of York School, Mt. St. Joseph High School and UMBC. Greg served honorably in the U.S. Army and completed a tour of duty in Vietnam. Following his military service, Greg taught high school social studies at Trinity Preparatory School in Ilchester, Maryland. In 1971, Greg moved to Ocean City where he ran a successful beach stand business. With his brother, Jim, he was co-owner of ProTrac Go Carts and Miniature Golf course. He acquired his pilot’s license and co-owned a small airplane in Ocean City. Greg became a certified diver, obtained his captain’s license and established a MD Coast Towing, a dive charter and salvage business. He became a member of BoatUS and subsequently owned a prosperous business, TowboatUS, Ocean City which he was still operating at the time

of his death. Greg was known for his philanthropy, supporting multiple organizations and charities including the Art League of Ocean City, Ocean City Recreation and Parks, Ocean City Surf Club, and Believe in Tomorrow. He was a member of the OC Marlin Club, American Legion and numerous other organizations. Captain Monty Hawkins noted “An ardent scuba diver and underwater salvage expert, Capt. Greg Hall was a co-founder of the Ocean City Reef Foundation in 1997, and its president until 2011. Even before the Foundation’s forming he was involved with, and present for, sinkings of small CG cutters, several tugs and barges, dozens of Vietnam-era tanks and armored personnel carriers, and the WWII sub Blenny — all of which were reefed under the Maryland Reef Program. That project was cut from the state budget in 1997. As the Foundation’s president, Capt. Greg carried on in similar fashion, even sinking a 157-foot Coast Guard buoy tender that was named after his father, the “AT Hall.” Though no longer president after 2011, he was still active in operations and weighed in on all board decisions until his untimely death. Never one to brag, Capt. Greg did all he could to make the Maryland Coast a better diving destination. In doing so, he left a legacy of im-

NOVEMBER 9, 2018 proved marine habitat - there’s a lot more coral off our coast now than when he began his efforts.” In his leisure time, Greg enjoyed watching NASCAR races, motocross and traveling around the world for diving trips. He was an avid reader, collected antiques and enjoyed cooking. He was especially fond of the holidays with family and enjoyed giving gifts to his nieces and nephews at Christmas. He is survived by seven siblings, Barbara Shade, Monica Anthenelli, James Hall, Betsy Harrison (Alfred), Nancy Long (Michael), Amy Laird and Thomas Hall (Cynthia). Greg also had 15 nieces and nephews and 18 great nieces and nephews. He was godfather to Zachary Hall. He was predeceased by his niece, Caitlin Laird, and brothers-in-law, James Anthenelli and Buddy Laird. Greg unselfishly donated his body to the MD Anatomy Board. A celebration of Greg’s life and service for family and friends will be held at the American Legion in Ocean City on Nov. 24, 2018 at 11 a.m. The family asks that donations in Greg’s name be made to: OC Reef Foundation, P.O. Box 1072, Ocean City, Maryland 21843, or a charity of one’s choice. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.


Sports & Recreation

Nov. 9, 2018

Ocean City Today

Page 65

www.oceancitytoday.com

Storm Warriors 5K fundraiser for OC museum, Saturday

PHOTO COURTESY MARY BERQUIST

The Berlin Pop Warner Junior Varsity cheerleaders will compete in the regional tournament this weekend in Trenton, New Jersey.

Berlin cheerleaders off to regionals Pop Warner Junior Varsity squad set to compete in New Jersey this weekend By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) The Berlin Pop Warner Junior Varsity cheerleaders are on their way to the regional tournament in Trenton, New Jersey, with hopes to advance to the championship, held at Walt Disney World’s Wide World of Sports on Dec. 3. The JV team consists of 18 girls who range in age from 10-13 years old. They will perform a two-minute 30-second routine consisting of cheer, dance, tumbling, tosses, pyramids and stunts. “They’re very nervous, but also very excited,” JV Head Coach and Pop Warner Coordinator Debbie Donahue said. “They’ve got a hard routine to perform so hopefully they keep those nerves in check and put it all out there and we’ll see how it turns out.” The squad started training for the

competition in August, getting together four nights each week, or 10 hours a week. Once school started, practices were cut to six hours per week. In addition, the cheerleaders perform every Saturday during Pop Warner football games.

‘They’re very nervous, but also very excited. They’ve got a hard routine to perform so hopefully they keep those nerves in check and put it all out there and we’ll see how it turns out.’ JV Head Coach and Pop Warner Coordinator Debbie Donahue For seven members of the squad, this is their first regional competition. Five others have been on the team for at least one or two years, and six cheerleaders have competed at the JV level for the past four years, performing on teams which have made it to the championship finals in Disney,

Donahue said. They will be competing against teams from Delaware, Maryland, Washington D.C., New York, New Jersey, New England and Pennsylvania on Saturday, with their first routine at 3 p.m. “They’ve done very well,” Donahue said. “So the bar is set really high and the new girls coming in have a lot to work up to. It’s a great experience for them.” If the team earns first or second place at regionals, the cheerleaders will advance to the national championship at Walt Disney World’s Wide World of Sports, held during the first week of December. All-adult volunteers go through certification programs and participants rely on donations to attend national championships. It costs $1,000 per person to travel to nationals. The squad has nine coaches this year. “We are in the process of deciding which way we are going to go,” Donahue said. “We are looking at different events we can do, such as small See BERLIN Page 66

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) The fifth annual Storm Warriors 5K Run/Walk will kick off this Saturday, at the Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, at 9 a.m. Participants will run or walk from the museum, at the southern end of the Boardwalk, to 15th Street and back. The event is sponsored by OC TriRunning Sports and a fundraiser for the museum. “About six years ago, I went to a conference for small museum tourism people and one of the directors was from Tennessee and said they came up with an idea to have a 5K, and it was really a wonderful fundraiser for the organization,” said Nancy Howard, Ocean City Museum Society president. “So, I came back and thought, ‘Hmm ... I wonder.’ So I took it to our board and they agreed and it does do well.” Last year, the 5K raised approximately $15,000 for the museum. As of earlier this week, more than 70 participants had already registered for the fundraiser. “It’s not the number of runners or people who participate, it’s the generous people who are [our] sponsors,” Howard said. “And in this town where we have so few people but so many causes and so many opportunities to give, the town just gives until it hurts. In Baltimore, they have the exact same number of causes, but they’ve got thousands more people. We have a small number of people and they just give ... I don’t know how they do it but they do.” Plak That in West Ocean City is providing plaques for race winners in a number of categories including top male, top female and for age groups 14 and under, 15-19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59 and 60 and over. All proceeds from the event will go to the Life-Saving Station Museum for designing exhibits, artifact collection and building upkeep. The museum has been a staple in Ocean City since 1978 and is designed for visitors to experience the role of surfmen in addition to the resort’s history. The museum is a nonprofit that primarily receives funding from donations and fundraisers. “The Ocean City Life-Saving Museum is a jewel in the Ocean City See STORM Page 66


Ocean City Today

PAGE 66

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Storm Warriors 5K event to take place on OC Boardwalk

The Bank of Ocean City sponsors the Stephen Decatur High School football team and following each game, a most valuable player is chosen. As part of its annual $500 pledge, the bank makes a donation to the Stephen Decatur High School Athletic Boosters in that player’s name. Decatur junior Devin Waters was the MVP for the final game of the season. Decatur shut out the Show Hill Eagles, 61-0, last Friday in Berlin. Waters rushed 150 yards on six carries and had two touchdowns. Pictured, from left, are Coach Bob Knox, Waters and Caleb Miller from the Bank of Ocean City.

Continued from Page 65 crown,” Howard said. “I think it is an underappreciated gem. It’s fun but it’s a different kind of fun. It’s a learning kind of fun.” The museum was built in 1891 and replaced an earlier station house. It housed crew and equipment used to rescue vessels and stranded people off the coast. This station predated the Coast Guard, and men would even live inside the station while they performed their duties, Howard said. In 1915, the Revenue Cutter Service combined with the U.S. Lifesaving Service to become the United States Coast Guard, and the station was used until 1965. In 1977, the landmark was relocated from Carolina Street to the inlet. This is the museum’s 40th an-

niversary and it offers several interactive exhibits and programs, especially during the summer, with educational entertainment for guests of all ages, according to Howard. “It’s something a lot of people don’t associate with Ocean City but certainly those of us who live here should have an appreciation for what the museum stands for,” she said. Race registration costs $25. Participants can register online or day off at 8 a.m. Registration includes a race Tshirt. A packet pickup will also take place from 8-8:45 a.m. on Saturday. Light refreshments will be provided after the race. For more information, visit www.ocmusuem.org or call 410-2894991. To register for the race, visit http://octrirunning.com.

Continued from Page 65 fundraisers, bake sales, etc. but we’re also asking for sponsorship and donations from local businesses.” Last weekend, the Berlin Pop Warner Junior Peewee cheerleaders competed in their regional event in New Jersey, earning third place out of six teams. Unfortunately, only first and second place winners advance to Disney. “They [were] amazing at the competition but at the end the other teams were better,” Head Coach Heather Selby said. “They worked their butts off until the minute they were off the mat. The other coaches and myself were so proud of them and so excited when they rocked that mat. They definitely made me ugly cry

tears which is what I told them they better do and they accomplished it.” Despite coming home early, the Peewee girls have not thrown in the towel, and are looking forward to competing next year. “They all know we just have to work harder next year,” Selby said. Berlin Pop Warner is accepting monetary donations for its football and cheer programs. Donations are tax deductible and can be mailed to: Worcester County Youth Football P.O. Box 1517 Berlin, Maryland, 21811. For more information on the Worcester County Youth Football and Cheerleading Berlin Seahawks, call 443-783-8623 or visit www.BerlinSeahawks.com.

Decatur football team wins 61-0 in final game of 2018 Berlin JV cheerleaders hope to advance to championship

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) The Stephen Decatur football team ended the season with a bang, winning the final game of the season last Friday, 61-0, over the Snow Hill Eagles in Berlin. “The boys played better than they

have played,” Decatur Coach Bob Knox said. “It’s really nice for the seniors. They got to go out with a win for their last game.” Knox said the coaching staff tried to get the seniors playing offense involved in the action by giving them See SHUTOUT Page 67

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Shutout nice win for senior players Continued from Page 66 the ball for an opportunity to score. “We wanted to make it memorable for them,” he said. “It’s a nice win at the end of the season and a nice stepping stone for next year.” Junior running back Devin Waters racked up 150 yards on six carries. He scored two touchdowns. On defense, Waters had five tackles. Senior fullback Ty’Quan Briddell Bob Knox rushed three times for 22 yards with one touchdown. He also caught a 25-yard pass from freshman quarterback Ashten Snelsire for a touchdown. Briddell made six tackles on defense. Junior DaCameron McAfee had five tackles and two sacks. Senior Connor Carpenter tallied seven tackles. “It was nice to end the season on a high note, especially for the seniors,” Knox said. “Hopefully it’s something to build on and encouragement to get better in the offseason.” Decatur finished the season with a 3-7 record. “[The season] didn’t go as expected. I thought we’d be a little better than that,” Knox said. On the plus side, Knox said, “It was a pleasure to coach the kids, especially the seniors.” “They were a great group of kids,” he added. A number of main contributors will be graduating – four offensive linemen, all of the team’s wide receivers, three of the four defensive backs and one defensive lineman, Knox said. “That’s a lot, but hopefully we will fill in the gaps with the younger kids coming in,” he said. “The JV had a successful season. There’s a good group of JV kids coming up and hopefully they’ll have a bright future.”

AWARDED Ocean City Aquatics Swim Director Lori Ciminelli presents Worcester Preparatory School sixth grader Paige Barnhart the Bronze President’s Volunteer Service Award for completing 50 volunteer hours assisting with swim lessons and teaching water safety this summer.

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Coach Greenwood, players anticipate good ‘19 season

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) The Stephen Decatur boys’ soccer team earned the No. 2 seed in Section II of the 3A East Region tournament and hosted the third-seeded Chesapeake Cougars of Anne Arundel, last Tuesday in Berlin. Both teams received first-round byes. “We didn’t play well. They were 56-1 and I think we might have underestimated them,” Decatur Coach Jamie Greenwood said after his team’s 2-0 loss. “We just didn’t adjust to counteract their offense. But on the upside, we’ve got a lot of kids returning.” Decatur ended the season with an 8-4-1 record. “Once we found our rhythm – around the fourth or fifth game in, when we finally got everyone in the right position – I thought we played well.” Three of the team’s four losses were on the road. “There are some adjustments we’ve got to work on for next year,” Greenwood said. “Overall, I was happy with the season and most of the kids will be back next year.”

Number of ‘young, motivated’ girls to return next year

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Senior captain Kevin Beck controls the ball for Stephen Decatur during last Tuesday’s 3A East Region Section II second round game against Chesapeake in Berlin. Decatur lost 2-0.

The team will graduate three full-time starters – captains Kevin Beck and goalie Brett Berquist, and Brady Ford. Overall, 10 players will graduate, which includes “a lot of role players,” Greenwood said. “We have a good core group returning – eight of the 11 starters. We have a good JV program. JV Coach Jake Ray did a good job this year.” Greenwood said he is anticipating a good season in 2019. “The boys are too,” he added. “Hopefully they work in the offseason to get better.”

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur junior Drew Haueisen fights off a Chesapeake player during last Tuesday’s regional playoff game in Berlin.

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By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) The Stephen Decatur girls’ soccer team’s season ended last Monday in the second round of the 3A East Region tournament. The Lady Seahawks, seeded fourth in the 3A East Section II, took a trip to Salisbury last Monday to face the topseeded James M. Bennett Clippers. Both teams received first-round byes. Bennett won the match, 6-1. Decatur finished the season with a 4-9 record. “Overall, the season was very up and down, but the girls ended making great improvements and playing the best they had all season,” Decatur Coach Maggie Berke said. The team will graduate nine players, six of them starters. “I think the team next year looks promising,” Berke said. “A lot of young, motivated girls are returning, so it should be a positive year.”

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Ocean City Today

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

PAGE 69

SD cross country athletes participate in regional meet

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) Stephen Decatur runners competed in the 3A East Region cross country meet last Thursday at Centennial High School in Ellicott City, and that was where their season ended as no athletes advanced to the state championship. “Regionals went OK. Overall, I think we ran about average,” Decatur Coach Jody Stigler said. “It probably wasn’t our best race of the year … The competition and course was Jody Stigler difficult, but we have grown accustomed to that over the past few years competing in that region.” The Decatur girls’ team came in fifth place overall. Leading the Lady Seahawks was sophomore Mary Mergott. She crossed the finish line 17th overall (22:07.90). Rounding out the top-five Decatur runners were senior Kailey Andrews (19th, 22:12.20), junior Mikayla Denault (28th, 23:03.90) and seniors Dori Krasner (30th, 23:33.34) and Erica Hicks (33rd, 23:58.38). “I thought the girls started out just a little bit too slow and then they started catching people,” Stigler said. “If they would have started a little faster, they may have had a good chance to qualify.” Decatur’s boys’ team finished eighth overall. Scoring points for the Seahawks were junior Sam Rakowski (39th,

19:02.04), senior Chad Fischer (41st, 19:10.37), freshman Tristan Dutton (45th, 19:24.83) and juniors Shamar Baines (48th, 19:42.04) and Austin Cheynet (49th, 19:46.04). Stigler said he thought the season went well overall. “There was definitely a big improvement for all runners between the start and the end of the season,” he said. Decatur won several meets during the regular season. During the 16-school Bayside Conference championship, the Decatur girls’ squad finished third overall and the boys’ team placed fourth. Runners who finished in the top 15 in each race earned All-Conference honors. Krasner, Rakowski, Mergott and Andrews took home awards. Only a handful of athletes will be graduating, so Stigler thinks the program will be strong next year. “Our boys team is pretty young and we are only graduating one of our topeight runners. If the boys work hard between now and next fall, I think they could potentially have a pretty strong team next year,” Stigler said. “The girls will graduate three of the top-seven runners, so they will have more and larger shoes to fill. We do still have some pieces, but I think they will have some question marks going into next year and how well we will do will be determined by how hard we work this offseason, and get some new runners up to speed.” Stigler expects a fair amount of cross country athletes to participate in indoor track this winter, which kicks off Nov. 15.

SD volleyball players skilled, but ‘couldn’t pull it together’

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Nov. 9, 2018) The Stephen Decatur volleyball team’s playoff run ended Monday, when the Lady Seahawks lost to the Northeast Eagles of Anne Arundel in Pasadena. Northeast earned the No. 2 seed in Section II of the 3A East Region tournament. Decatur received the No. 3 seed. The Eagles took the first game, 2516, but the Seahawks won the second, 25-19. Northeast topped Decatur, 2519, in the third and fourth games. “I am proud of how hard the girls fought during this game,” Decatur Coach Sara Patrick said. “We have three seniors.

They are our captains and they played really well [Monday]. Adriana [Serpe] was strong at the net and had tons of aces. Morgan [Hayman] did a great job blocking and Grace Sara Patrick [Beres] held the team together with her leadership.” Decatur finished the season with a 6-10 record. “The season was frustrating. The girls had a lot of skill, [but] we just couldn’t pull it together at times,” Patrick said. “We look solid for next year. We have a strong sophomore class moving up to varsity.”

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Jewelry (new, used, estate, costume) Bake Sale • Chinese Auction • White Elephant • Freshly Baked Cookies Books • Raffles • Crafts Enjoy a delicious lunch and choose from homemade crab cakes, Maryland crab soup, New England clam chowder, shrimp salad, bratwurst, BBQ and hot dogs. Choose your dessert from our bake sale or freshly baked cookies.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 70

SURF REPORT

OC Surf Club supports community

By Dave Dalkiewicz Contributing Writer (Nov. 9, 2018) The Ocean City Surf Club (OCSC) is one of the premier organizations serving and contributing to this, our wonderful area. Its many programs go a long way in providing various environmental, youth-oriented and educational situations pertaining directly on a local level. Since its beginning in 2014, a large variety of programs have streamlined through the organization. From competitions to the youth central meetings and classes of the Surfing into Integrity program, in and out of the water, the club brings a wealth of continued good will. This good will extends to every facet, even to a hotly contested competition. No mystery as to why this might happen. The club is an “all good” kind of thing. Ill will? Naw. Bad will?Nope. The club has a big heart and nothing as of this writing is going to change that significant notion. The OCSC was formed to celebrate our ocean community, its heritage and future. This line is taken directly from the club’s mission statement. Obviously the club is centered around surfing with youth mentoring

66th Street Bayside

and scholarship probably being the single-most, largest aspect. Scholarship monies get into the $10,000 range on a yearly basis and obviously go a tremendous distance in enhancing a recipient’s higher education. The rewarding of scholarships is a real test of a nonprofit organization. Nonprofit is a key phrase in defining the OCSC. Other defining terms that come to mind are charity, service, community and volunteerism. This is what the OCSC is all about. There’s a social aspect to the club as well and speaking of, a social gathering is scheduled for Wednesday, Nov. 14, from 5-8 p.m. at the Longboard Café on 67th Street, bayside in Ocean City. Surfing is much the individual activity and doesn’t necessarily lend itself to a group. It’s just you and the wave. A team of players or a partner isn’t necessary to go surfing, although it makes good sense to not go alone. This social gathering could be a good way to meet other like-minded people. Maybe get involved with the OCSC.

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In recent conversation with President Tommy Vach he mentioned that growing the club was a prime concern. Why not contribute a bit of time and effort to a greater cause, a greater good. Young and not so young are involved. Male, female, students, parents; everyone is welcomed. Go ahead. Show up and get anidea for yourself of what the OCSC is all about. More information is available online at oceancitysurfclub.com. A breakdown of mission statement, scholarships, youth programs, environmental activities and membership is all laid out. Check it out and we hope to see you on Nov. 14 at the Longboard Café. Stay tuned to this column for more specific information on the activities and programs of the Ocean City Surf Club. — Dave Dalkiewicz is the owner of Ocean Atlantic Surf Shop in Ocean City.

NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Wor. Rec & Parks provides Toys for Tots drop-off spot

(Nov. 9, 2018) Worcester County Recreation & Parks is teaming up with Toys for Tots again this holiday season and will serve as a public donation drop-off location. All are invited to participate by dropping off a new, unwrapped toy now through Dec. 10 in the Worcester County Recreation Center lobby in Snow Hill. “Last year our drive helped collect about 100 toys,” Program Manager Brianna Goddard said. “It is wonderful knowing that these donations go to young children in our community.” Donate a toy and make a big impact on a child’s holiday this year. Toys can be dropped off during regular business hours. Operating hours are available at www.worcesterrecandparks.org. For more information on the Toys for Tots drive, call the WCRC at 410632-2144 or email at recandparks@co.worcester.md.us.

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NOVEMBER 9, 2018

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11.9.18 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

11.9.18 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...