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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.COM

AUGUST 23, 2019

SERVING NORTHERN WORCESTER COUNTY

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Room tax increase gets county’s vote Worcester commissioners agree unanimously to raise rate to 5 percent in 2020 By Elizabeth Bonin Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Ocean City government can expect a sizable increase in revenue in 2020, as the Worcester County Commissioners unanimously voted to increase the hotel tax rate from 4.5 to 5 percent after the public hearing on Tuesday. The tax increase will start Jan. 1, 2020. The last increase on the hotel tax was from 4 to 4.5 percent in 2008. Though the name in the measure states “hotel,” it includes all rental properties such as condominiums. Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan asked for the hotel tax increase earlier this year, with the city budget office estimating that the half-percent tax boost would produce an additional $700,000 during the last half of this

fiscal year, and $1.7 million for the 2020-21 fiscal year. The commissioners voted in May to proceed with the discussion of increasing rate and to pursue the unanimous commissioner consent required by state law. Meehan, the council and the tourism industry contended from the outset that the increase was necessary to cover the rising costs of special events, advertising and marketing – particularly digital and sports marketing, the latter of which included consideration of a new sports complex. “It’s not just putting a full page ad in the Baltimore Sun anymore,” Meehan said. “It’s being on the internet. We’ve rebuilt our website twice. It’s digital marketing. It’s social media.” In various meetings, Meehan has pointed out that even with an increase, Worcester County will still have the lowest hotel tax in the area. Annapolis is at six percent and Baltimore is eight See ROOM Page 71

Worcester County rentals will need licenses as well Commissioners see move as means of control and as generator of revenue

PHOTO COURTESY STEVE DOCTOR

NEW RECORD Kristy Frashure of Pasadena, holds the 74.5-pound dolphin she caught last Friday while fishing on Haulin N’ Ballin during the 26th annual Capt. Steve Harman’s Poor Girls Open ladies-only tournament. The 74.5-pound dolphin is a new state record. See story on page 79.

By Elizabeth Bonin Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Rental property owners will be required to obtain a Worcester County rental license in the new year, following the Worcester County Commissioners’ passage Tuesday of a taxation and revenue measure. Rental property owners in Ocean City will not be required to obtain a county license since they are already

operating under the Ocean City rental license program. An application and license fee structure for the county program have yet to be developed. According to Ed Tudor, the county director of review and permitting, rental owners must submit a floor plan and designate which sections of that plan may be rented. The floor plans do not have to be certified as long as they are accurate. Tudor estimated that the county will need to hire two employees to manage the new rental licensing program. The county would also need to implement a See WORCESTER Page 70


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AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

ELIZABETH BONIN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Joe Wilson, president of the Coastal Association of Realtors, presents several changes to the proposed bill on boarding and lodging rentals at the Worcester County commissioners meeting on Tuesday.

Revisions needed after county rental zoning bill fails to pass By Elizabeth Bonin Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) A proposed zoning measure that would include a new section regulating short-term rentals in Worcester County will be revised before the county commissioners resume the discussion of how or whether to proceed. The commissioners on Tuesday suggested that Ed Tudor, the director of review and permitting, make changes regarding the additional parking requirement, the relationships of the renters and square footage of rental units before they take up the matter again. According to Tudor, the bill was not reviewed by the Department of House and Urban Development in regard to fair housing laws, but were viewed and approved by the county attorney. As it’s now written, the bill would require an additional parking spot for short-term rentals, which currently re-

quires two spaces for a rental of any size. Joe Wilson, president of the Coastal Association of Realtors, thought the parking requirement could prevent certain properties from renting. “I don’t even know if some houses are capable of adding another parking spot,” Wilson said. “If that’s the case, are they just not allowed to rent? What’s the consequences to the owner of the property?” Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic suggested that the county will examine parking on new developments as a whole in the future because Ocean City has different parking requirements than the county. Ocean City’s parking requirement is based on the bedroom count, which can cause the need for a great number of parking spots. As for the relationships of the renters, the bill states that a rental must be restricted to one family or housekeeping See PROPOSAL Page 5

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Ocean City Today

Ocean City Fishing Pier ranked No. 1 in Md. Website FishingBooker, aka Airbnb for fishing charters, grants resort town top spot By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The Town of Ocean City can add “best fishing pier” to its list of accolades after FishingBooker named the resort’s fishing pier the No. 1 spot to fish in Maryland. “Right in the heart of one of America’s favorite beach resorts, Ocean City Fishing Pier is the perfect choice for a little vacation fishing,” the FishingBooker press release states. “Located on Ocean City’s award-winning beach, this is the only pier in town that lets you cast out in the open Atlantic.” The pier is located just off the Boardwalk downtown, and does not require guests to have a fishing license. There is an entrance fee of $8, and the pier does rod and net rentals

JOSH KIM/OCEAN CITY TODAY

FishingBooker names the Ocean City Fishing Pier, located just off the Boardwalk downtown, the No. 1 fishing spot in Maryland.

for $10 and $8 respectively. For spectators, the fee is just $0.50. “Fishing in Ocean City is not just a pastime but it is part of our commu-

nity’s history,” Ocean City Communications Manager Jessica Waters said. “Having FishingBooker name the Ocean City Fishing Pier No. 1 on their

list is not only a great honor, but is a wonderful tribute to the men and women who could see the potential in our sleepy fishing village.”

Proposal includes short-term rental regulation Continued from Page 3 unit of unrelated persons. There is no plan to regulate this other than the property recording the renter relationships. “Read literally, this provision would appear to make it unlawful for a group of six unrelated friends or two unrelated families to rent a house in order to vacation together in Worcester County,” Wilson said. Commissioner Ted Elder believed that the government was digging farther than it should by regulating the relationships of the renters. “It’s not the government’s business who’s sleeping with who,” Elder said. The third issue commissioners re-

quested to change was the regulation that limits two people per bedroom. “It should be based on square footage,” Commissioner Chip Bertino said. “I don’t know what that equation should be as far as square footage is concerned, but that seems more equitable.” Wilson said his biggest concern was the occupancy limit. “If you have a 600-square-foot bedroom and only put two people in it, that doesn’t make a lot of sense, particularly with a family and you’ve got several kids who want to all stay in the same room,” Wilson said. “Why would you limit that?” Tudor explained that this regulation

was to protect the character of a singlefamily neighborhood where a rental property might be located. He defined the “character of a neighborhood” as one in which neighbors are familiar with one another. According to Tudor, short-term renters generally don’t have the same regard for neighbors as long-term renters or permanent residents. “It changes the sense of place,” Tudor said. Commissioners Mitrecic and Jim Bunting moved to approve the bill. Commissioners Joshua Nordstrom, Bertino, Church and Elder moved to deny. Bertino then moved to bring the bill back

with changes and Church seconded. Wilson seemed to think that the public hearing was a win for Realtors. “The commissioners did a good job of recognizing that what they had in front of them still needed some work,” Wilson said. Another change the bill mandated is rental inspections. Most of the time, according to Tudor, government officials will only inspect a short-term rental upon complaint and will not enforce entry. Once the bill’s revisions have been made, the revamped legislation will go through the same chain of approvals before it reaches the commissioners for another review.

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

SALLE to throw local art and music festival Event will include alcohol, food and variety of acts at Ocean City’s Sunset Park By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Sunset Park will soon be packed with local food, local beer, local art vendors and local musicians after City Council gave thumbs up to the State Association of

Liquor License Establishments (SALLE) for its Ocean City Art & Music Festival, during Monday night’s council meeting. The new festival, which is catered to the local 21 and up crowd, is tentatively scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 7, from noon to 6 p.m. Early bird tickets to the festival will cost $20, and dayof tickets will run for $25. “It’s to showcase local artists and talent,” event organizer Eric Chaplin

JOSH KIM/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Event organizer Eric Chaplin says the Ocean City Arts & Music Festival, to be held at Sunset Park, is all about Ocean City locals, and hopes to raise money for the Believe in Tomorrow Foundation.

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said. “It’s definitely something for our local family … because we have had a very, very long summer.” Local restaurants such as Pickles Pub and Ocean 13 will be working with SALLE to provide festivalgoers all of their beer-fueled hunger needs. Speaking of beer, enthusiasts of the beverage can look forward to a wide selection of drinks from Burley Oak, Backshore Brewery and Evolution Craft Brewing Company. Local artists will feature their work throughout the park, while bands such as Side Project, Loud Love, Paint the City Green and Rogue Citizens will play from the stage at Sunset Park. While the festival may seem like its just fun and games, Chaplin said the focus was community engagement. “We’re all working together to bring something to the community that [it] can enjoy,” Chaplin said. In addition, SALLE will be working with another nonprofit in its ef-

forts to help the community. “Portions of the proceeds will be going toward the Believe in Tomorrow Foundation,” Chaplin said. The Believe in Tomorrow Foundation helps accommodate families who have critically ill children. In addition to offering refuge, the foundation also hosts activities and events to help alleviate the pressure and stress that families face when a loved one is hospitalized. “Please show support,” Chaplin said. “It is a local event for the locals, about the locals, and it’s a time for [them] to enjoy themselves…and support the bands and everyone who will be there.” For more information about the Believe in Tomorrow Foundation check out its Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/pg/BelieveinTmw/about/?ref=page_internal and for more information about SALLE check out its Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/salleofmd/.

Bills adjust articles to mirror county rental license program By Elizabeth Bonin Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The Worcester County Commissioners passed one bill to remove the mobile home excise tax and another to make language consistent in the taxation and revenue article during the Tuesday commissioner’s meeting. According to Ed Tudor, director of review and permitting, the hotel rental tax bill cleans up language and makes terminology consistent with other bills. “It makes it consistent with the rental licensing provision,” Tudor said. The bill also identifies those who will be required to pay the hotel rental tax. It extends the tax to any type of property, including a recre-

ational vehicle or manufactured home, that is being rented. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic moved to approve the bill and Commissioner Jim Bunting seconded. The mobile and manufactured home park license bill abolishes the excise tax for mobile and manufactured homes, which currently requires these homes to have a license. According to Tudor, these homes will now be covered under the rental licensing program. Owners of a mobile home park will be responsible for rental fees. No comments were offered during the public hearings for either bill. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic motioned to approve and Commissioner Joshua Nordstrom seconded.

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Ocean City Today

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City Engineer Terry McGean proposes widening the sidewalks of Robin Drive, which he says are too narrow and blocked with utilities, making it difficult for pedestrians to use.

Robin Drive project faces scrutiny City Council agrees to take second glance after seeing criticism in public meeting By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Lack of time, lack of information and lack of parking were the three main gripes with the Robin Drive sidewalk-widening project discussed at Monday night’s City Council meeting. After facing a skeptical crowd of residents and property owners, the council elected not to act on City Engineer Terry McGean’s request to approve the project, agreeing instead to examine it further at a work session. Earlier, McGean used Google Earth to show the areas that were of particular interest for the project: Philadelphia Avenue and Sparrow Lane. McGean pointed out narrow sidewalks, awkwardly placed utility poles and what he deemed unused parking spaces. His main argument, however, involved a photo of a woman pushing her baby stroller in the street, rather than the

sidewalk. “I could not sleep at night as your city engineer after seeing that picture and not try to do everything I could possibly do to solve that problem,” he said. McGean argued that the woman was walking on the street because of the utilities blocking the sidewalk path, and also because of all of the curb cuts. Councilman Matt James pointed out that the woman could have just walked on the north side sidewalk, which elicited a peal of similar comments from the public. McGean proposed eliminating six parking spaces between the two entrances of Old Pro Golf on the north side and all of the parking on the south side of Robin Drive. McGean said this would allow the city to create an 8-foot sidewalk on the north side and a 10-foot sidewalk on the south side. He told the council the owners of Old Pro Golf Course and Buxy’s Salty Dog Saloon did not oppose the loss of parking, and that the parking spaces appeared to be ill-used. The cost of the sidewalk-widening

project was estimated to be $135,000, although that price tag covers the sidewalks alone and not the attendant roadwork or storm drain relocation. Not in the plans is a bike lane, which Councilman Tony DeLuca proposed adding after witnessing heavy bicycle traffic there. He suggested widening the north side walk to 8 feet to allow for a bike lane and protecting the parking on the south side. McGean replied that parking would still be lost. “That’s an additional three feet of sidewalk, and 10 feet for bike lanes. That’s 13 feet, so there’s no way to do that without losing parking,” McGean said. Having yet to hear from the public on the issue, Councilman Mark Paddack suggested tabling the project. “I want to hear what the public … has to say before we render any decisions on this, Paddak said. “Upon the conclusion of hearing our citizenry…I’d like to remand this back to the council for a work session with Terry and Hal.” Council President Lloyd Martin agreed, but said he wanted to hear from See CITY Page 10


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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Worcester County student Piper Gooding presents to City Council her pin design, which won silver at the national SkillsUSA championship in Louisville, Kentucky, during Monday’s council meeting.

CITY COUNCIL BRIEFS By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The following took place during Monday night’s Ocean City Council meeting:

SkillsUSA Worcester County student Piper Gooding won a middle school division national silver medal in pin design at the SkillsUSA National Championships in Louisville, Kentucky.

Police commission Ocean City Police Chief Ross Buzzuro showed the council incident call data, which he said remained level this year. One irregularity was the 911 hang-ups, which almost doubled this season. Buzzuro said that the hang-up calls were not pranks, but most likely a technological issue.

Council Secretary Mary Knight said that she had researched the issue online, and found that Apple phones have functions that make it easy to mistakenly call the police. Buzzuro then showed the council crime data stemming from 2004 to 2019, which showed a significant decrease in crime. Buzzuro then went on to discuss updates on the lights on bikes distribution project, which had seen huge success in July. The police were able to distribute 142 lights during the month of July. Councilman Tony DeLuca then brought up the issue of cars parking along Route 50 near Hooper’s Restaurant. Mayor Rick Meehan and DeLuca expressed concerns about pedestrian safety there, as people were parking on both sides of the street, which has no intersection. See CITY Page 11

City engineer focuses on safety Continued from Page 8 the full council first. Councilman John Gehrig suggested sacrificing parking on the south side to add a bike lane, but McGean said that it would not be possible because of the curb cuts. “There is no way within a 50-foot right-of-way to have two travel lanes, two parking lanes, two five-foot sidewalks and two five-foot bike lanes,” McGean said. The detailed discussion, however, was lost on some members of the audience, with Robin Drive property owner Robert Sheldon criticizing the lack of information provided to the neighborhood. “The one thing I would’ve have liked to have seen … is basically the information about all of this happening,” Sheldon said. “To have that little write-up in OC Today that says something about sidewalks … we really didn’t get any information about it.” He said that more people could have attended the meeting, if it had been advertised earlier. Another issue that was echoed by many of the attendees was the claim that the parking spaces on Robin Drive were not regularly filled.

Several property owners disputed this claim and argued that the loss of parking would hurt them financially. “My building is an eight-unit on Robin Drive … two-bedroom units, I only have eight spots,” Delegate Wayne Hartman said. “To say the least, my building depends on that street parking. I depend on that street parking.” Some members of the audience supported the Robin Drive project, but wanted more research to be done before implementing it. Resident and property owner Danny Robinson told the council he had come to the meeting prepared to oppose the project, but changed his mind after McGean’s presentation. Nonetheless, he said parking was still an issue, and that removing the spaces would hurt not only the residents , but also overflow beach and tourism parking. After hearing from the public, council members agreed that the project needed more scrutiny. Council Secretary Mary Knight moved to discuss the project in a work session —a suggestion Paddack had made an hour earlier— and the council agreed unanimously.


AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

JOSH KIM/OCEAN CITY TODAY

City Engineer Terry McGean presents to City Council his plan to widen sidewalks on Robin Drive during Monday night’s council meeting.

CITY COUNCIL BRIEFS Continued from Page 10 DeLuca said that he and Meehan were working with SHA and Worcester County Commissioner Joe Mitrecic to solve the issue. Buzzuro said that he had brought the issue to the attention of the Maryland State Police and the Worcester County Sheriff’s office, and would discuss safety measures with them as well. Buzzuro went on to discuss the initiatives of the Homeless Outreach Team (HOT), which include helping the homeless obtain government identification and housing. Following the HOT update, Buzzuro updated the council on Boardwalk ordinances, which included noise violations, deceptive advertising, donation solicitations and street performer complaints. He finished the police commission update by telling the council that plans for drone use in the town would be presented to the council in the fall.

Transportation committee Mayor Rick Meehan began by informing the council that bus ridership was down 5 percent this August as compared to the same period last year. Ridership for the month of July was down 4.7 percent. Despite this, buses saw an 883-passenger increase during the White Marlin Open. Meehan then told the council that the committee had received a positive response from MTA Administrator Kevin Quinn in regard to loaning articulating buses from Baltimore to Ocean City. The accordion-style buses are able to hold twice as many passengers as standard transit buses and would be a solution to the decrease in bus drivers. Tram revenues were up in July and August—11 and 9.65 percent respectively. However, Meehan did say that while August saw positive revenues, the committee had originally projected an 18 percent increase. Meehan concluded his updates by talking about projects undertaken by the Public Works Department. Those include a possible traffic signal addition, ramp installation on 2nd Street and a building demolition that would allow the creation of a municipal parking lot. Before the council moved on to the next meeting minutes, Councilman Mark Paddack asked Meehan, who is the chair of the committee, to set up a meeting to

discuss the ridership issue before the strategic planning meeting in October. Meehan agreed to Paddack’s request. Bicycle and pedestrian advisory committee DeLuca began by informing the council about the lights on bikes program. The group received a $1,000 donation to the program, he said. Councilmen Matt James, Paddack and DeLuca met three nights and gave out a total of 156 lights. He then spoke about the West OC hiker-biker trail, and how the group was analyzing the crosswalks on the south side of Route 50 for visibility concerns. The group completed and submitted the Bicycle Friendly City application on Aug. 7, and awards will be announced in November. DeLuca mentioned the test bike racks, and then closed his updates by discussing impediments on 72nd and 72rd Street Town Alley. The group hopes to put a sidewalk alley in the area for bicyclists to use.

Consent agendas Council members voted to approve a host of items in the consent agenda. These items were meeting minutes of a regular session and a work session that took place on Aug. 5 and Aug. 13, respectively, an event addendum for the Best Day Foundation, an event request for the Parade of Brothers and an event addendum for the We Build You Play Beach Volleyball series.

Budget amendment The council voted unanimously to approve the second reading of ordinance 2019-13, budget amendment number two, despite concerns from local Tony Christ. Christ said that he was concerned with adding money to the advertising budget. He said that he wanted to see evidence that supported adding money to the advertising budget. The council members quickly moved on to pass the budget amendment. Although the council had already voted, city Budget Manager Jennie Knapp reiterated that the town has an ordinance in place that designates two percent of gross-room revenue toward advertising. She said no additional money or costs were generated from the budget amendment.

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

RENDERING COURTESY HAL ADKINS

The city has been slowly assembling property on the entire block of bayside land between 66th and 67th Street to develop a water treatment plant that will replace an old plant on 44th Street.

Ocean City desires property for water plant By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) A new water treatment plant is on tap for Ocean City in the middle of the next decade, following both a closed session and regular session City Council vote to buy a $1.1 million gas company property on 67th Street.

“We have been looking to purchase that property from the gas company for years,” City Council President Lloyd Martin said. “In fact … we had first right of refusal to purchase.” The council voted 5-1 in closed session on Aug. 13, with Councilwoman Mary Knight absent, and Councilman

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Matt James opposed to the purchase. Members of council voted again in favor of the purchase on Monday, during a regular session meeting, 6-1 with James voting in opposition again. The purchase will move on to a second reading vote, which will be taken at the council’s Sept. 3 session. The project has been in the works for the last two years, Public Works Director Hal Adkins said. The city has been slowly assembling property on the entire block of bayside land between 66th and 67th Street, he said. “First, we purchased the old VFW Lodge site, then the 67th Street gym, we then came to an agreement on a land swap with Advanced Marina that would consolidate their parcels and allow us to consolidated ours too,” Adkins said. Ocean City has three water treatment plants: on 14th, 44th and 136th Streets. The new plant will replace the one on 44th Street, which has outlived its usefulness and lacks the land needed to enhance it. According to the master-planning document, the new plant’s site would be ideal because of its centralized location. “A central location would decrease

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water age during off-season operations, which corresponds with the Town’s objective for reducing disinfection byproduct formation,” the document said. Furthermore, the central location would place the plant near the Department of Public Works main facility, which would allow more efficient observation and maintenance of the plant. The city draws its water from the Ocean City and Manokin aquifers, and has 22 wells ranging from 300 to 350 feet in depth. The property, which the town bought from Sandpiper Energy Inc., will be cleared and redeveloped from scratch. Adkins said that the project is still in its early design stages, so there are no specific details available at the moment. However, he did mention that the overall design would include site planning and pipe sizing for a desalination addition, in the event that Ocean City found itself in a situation like Dare County, North Carolina, where fresh water sources have become scarce. The project does not have a set start date, but it would likely begin in either fall of 2023 or spring of 2024.


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

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This spacious 4/5 bedroom 3 1/2 bath Home situated between Ocean City and Assateague Island National Seashore. In addition, the home features a large detached garage that is perfect for all those recreational toys and beach items. 10 foot first floor ceilings and 9' elsewhere, Nice moldings, over-sized master bedroom, gas fireplace, eat in kitchen area, Bayside is a luxury amenity- filled community minutes to the Beach, Boardwalk, Historic Berlin, Golfing and Assateague Island and includes a Kayak Dock/launch, Crabbing Pier, Clubhouse, Indoor Pool, Outdoor Pool, Tennis Courts, Fitness Center, Billards/Game Room & Playground. Great biking and jogging as well. Your HOA fee also includes all lawn maintenance, trash pickup and irrigation. Perfect home or vacation property.

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This "Stephen Faulk" Custom built home is situated in the 900-Acre Waterfront Marina Golf community of Glen Riddle and is simple, elegant, and meticulously maintained. Features include an open floor plan concept that flows very nicely and is perfect for entertaining or for a large family, first and second floor master bedrooms, retractable awnings on first and second floor decks, energy efficient home with its solar insulation under the roof, and tankless hot water heater. In addition this home has a spacious and well-planned kitchen that has plenty of cabinet space, grade-A Silestone counter tops and stainless steel appliances. There are Hardwood floors downstairs with built-in cabinets, pocket doors, abundance of recessed lighting, and windows throughout. Tons of storage space in this 4 bedroom 3.5 bath with a walk-in attic. A definite bonus of this home is the Generac generator auto-switch system covering the first floor, Encapsulation of Crawl Space, and the 4 season porch which offers total comfort all year round. Looking for a quality home in an amenity-enriched community... look no further. This is the one.

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What a Lot....Waterfront, Waterview and Dock in Public Landing along the Chincoteague Bay. Property is connected to septic, 4"well on site, 200 amp service on site, Dock in place, pump house on site. Elevated views of the entire bay. Boat access $237,500 to the bay or Ocean. Private and serene area. This is an amazing lot that is truly ready to build on. Located in one of the nicest waterfront areas in Worcester County.

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Great Buy!! on this 4.28 Waterfront Lot in Hidden Harbor. Close to Beaches, Restaurants and shopping. Dock permit in place. Direct Access to the Bay or Ocean . Enjoy kayaking, boating, wave runners all out your back door. Property currently wooded but would allow 25% coverage to be cleared. Fantastic space for your Pets or Kids to play. The neighborhood would be perfect for biking, jogging, walking. One of the few remaining Lots in this quiet neighborhood. Motivated Seller. Priced to sell.

Priced to sell~ Build your Coastal Home on one of the last remaining lots in Premier Waterfront Community of Heron Harbour. Featuring deep water dockage, direct access to Bay or Ocean, and Quality Vinyl Bulkhead. Southern Exposure. Dock your Boat or Water Toys outside your backdoor. Boat lifts are permissible. A wonderful community to enjoy jogging, walking, biking or taking your pet for a stroll. Community offers tremendous number of amenities including 3 pools, Clubhouse, 2 tennis courts, fitness center and more. Come see for yourself why this is one of Ocean City’s most desirable Communities.

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

MACO presents new food safety regulations Home businesses, certain organizations can expand services beginning Oct. 1 ByElizabeth Bonin Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Certain organizations can serve food for 30 consecutive days and home businesses can sell cottage food products to retail food services starting Oct. 1. Jessica Speaker, assistant commissioner for health in Baltimore City, and Patricia Vauls, chief Office for Food Safety, explained two bills that detail these changes at the “Delicious or Deadly” discussion at the Maryland Association of Counties conference last Friday. Speaker said certain associations and groups qualify as “excluded organizations,” which are nonprofit fraternal, civic, war veteran, religious or charitable organizations that don’t serve food to public more than four days a week, with an exception once a year. Currently, these organizations can serve food to the public for 14 consecutive days. The new regulation will increase to 30 consecutive days. According to Speaker, the upside of the updated regulation is that excluded organizations can host longer events and have a greater participa-

tion by members — they can cook in their private kitchens and bring that food to an event. The downside, she said, should be obvious: potentially hazardous foods can be cooked in unregulated, private kitchens, thus increasing the risk for food borne illnesses. Speaker said someone might cook food in the home kitchen in less than idea circumstances, bring it to a church function and cause illness. She added that there are many unknown factors in private kitchens, particularly animals, children, vermin/pesticides, temperature control, general sanitation and personal hygiene. Speaker said county regulators face two challenges: community food safety education and trace-backs. Since excluded organization members can cook in their private kitchens, it will be more difficult to trace the cause of a food-borne illness than it would be in a regulated commercial kitchen. To alleviate these challenges, a new proposed state regulation would require an excluded organization to provide written notice to departments stating the date on which food will be prepared, methods of storing and serving and procedures taken to ensure food safety. Stuart White, who supervises the Worcester County

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ELIZABETH BONIN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Jessica Speaker, assistant commissioner for health in Baltimore City, presents on the updates on excluded organization regulations at the Maryland Association of Counties conference last Friday.

food inspection program, suggested that those cooking for events in their private kitchens take a food safety course. “That would cover all the basic food safety and food handling information as far as taking and maintaining proper temperatures and a sanitary atmosphere,” White said. Temporary food service facilities will also extend their allowable continuous operation from 14 days to 30. These facilities are typically fairs, carnivals, public exhibition, construction sites, recreational events and fundraising events. Vauls spoke about the changes regarding selling cottage food products. These are potentially non-hazardous products such as jams, jellies, preserves, fruit butters, hard candy and coffee beans. Cottage food products can be made at a home-based business without a license. As the current regulation stands, a home business may only sell cottage food products in state, at a farmer’s market, public event, personal delivery, mail and from consumer to resident. They cannot sell out of state, to a retail food service or via internet. The new regulation will allow a home-based business to sell cottage food products to a retail food service, such as a grocery store, convenience

store, retail market, retail bakery or food cooperative. It is not a restaurant, coffee shop, cafeteria or mobile seller. Vauls said that this update will expand economic opportunities for small home businesses selling cottage food products. However, there are requirements if a business chooses to sell to a retail food service. It must create a label that details where it was made, what it may contain and the fact that it was not produced in food service facility. The label must also list a phone number and email of cottage food business and the date the product was made. These precautions will ensure that if there is a problem, it’s easy to trace the possible source. White said that it’s difficult to predict any impact on the county since cottage food businesses are unlicensed. He advised that consumers who buy these products be aware that they are made in an unlicensed facility. The cottage food owner must also submit documentation of passing a food safety course, which must be renewed every three years. It must submit copies of labels for approval and then wait until the Maryland Department of Health gives approval to begin selling to a retail food market.

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

Public Information Act focus of presentation By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) What information do state and local government officials and agencies have to give to the public upon request? This was the main question Wednesday Aug. 14, during the Public Information Act session at the Maryland Association of Counties Summer Conference held at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on 40th Street. “The basic, underlying principle of the PIA is that the public has a right to know what its government is up to,” Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Hochstetler told the audience. “Basically, if the government is working for the people, they should be able to know what is going on.” But, what is public information? Does it include emails between employees and their bosses? Does it include drafts of a work report on an employee’s home computer? What about texts between City Council members on their personal phones? The answer is: it’s complicated. While an employee may have written a project draft at home, in his or her pajamas using a “soccerkid@gmail.com” Google Docs account, it still counts as public record. What about those text messages then? If something as personal as a pri-

vate email account is considered public record, would text messages count too? “It’s any material — video, audio, hard copy records, electronic records, camera footage — any documentary material that is made or received by the governmental unit …In connection with a transaction of public business,” Hochstetler said. The importance lies in the content of the material, and not where it was made or where it was stored. So, if local government officials were texting each other funny photos of a dog, that most likely would not be considered public record. Now the question becomes: Who gets to request public records? The answer to this question is much simpler — anybody. From prisoners, to commercial businesses, to nonresidents and even trolls, each of these entities has the ability to request public records. In addition, governments and agencies must follow a schedule: They must notify the requester within 10 days about the status of his or her request, and the government cannot withhold the information longer than 30 days. Nonetheless, this does not mean obtaining government information is a free-for-all, as the PIA does allow five exemptions. First, there is information protected by laws, so think attorney-client information. A citizen would not be able to ac-

JOSH KIM/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Hochstetler presents a session on the Public Information Act during the Maryland Association of Counties Summer Conference at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on 40th Street, Aug. 14.

cess records of what a council member said to his or her lawyer. Personal records are also usually a no go, so someone can’t figure out how many guns a neighbor owns, or whether or not their kid really did get all A’s on the report card. Information that reveals a person’s medical records or mental health history is also off limits. Custodians — those in charge of the records — may also withhold information that they deem too sensitive to be released publicly. An example of the fourth exemption

would be emergency responses. In the past, businesses have attempted to access emergency response records to gain phone numbers, addresses and emails for marketing purposes. The last exemption is a special court order, which ties in a lot with the fourth example. If a requester is persistent, the custodian can ask a judge to grant him or her permission to withhold the information. Another tactic that governments and agencies may use is to charge a fee for the information. They are allowed to charge requesters based on the time consumed and the resources used to find the records. The first two hours of service is free, but following that the custodian may charge the requester as much as $350 for the information. However, it is not in the best interest of government and agencies to withhold information from the public. Often, when attention is drawn to a public information request, it’ll draw the attention of legislators, and amendments made in response often favor the requester. “You really want to do your best and try to satisfy the person who is making the request, and not draw attention to, or make someone angry about [the request],” said David Carey, Associate Judge of Harford County District Court.


AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

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AUGUST 23, 2019

State prepares for July 2020 Styrofoam ban MACO educates on new bill regulations, explores future of fewer single-use plastics ByElizabeth Bonin Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Food service businesses and schools have less than a year to phase out Styrofoam products. At the Maryland Association of Counties conference last Friday, Senator Lori Charkoudian, (D) of Montgomery County’s District 20, reminded everyone that food service businesses and schools cannot sell Styrofoam products after July 1, 2020. She told the audience that singleuse plastics are the largest contributor of pollution, that Styrofoam can take hundreds of years to breakdown,

and releases toxins into the atmos- and online efforts. phere when it is burned. The Ocean City Council’s Green Sandi Smith, a representative with Team has already been assisting with the Maryland Coastal Bays Program, those efforts by promoting and adversaid the danger with Styrofoam is tising restaurants that have already that it never goes switched to alternaaway. tive products. ‘Animals consume “What we’re try“The animals ing to do is to eduwind up digesting plastic and we’re it,” Smith said. “Ancate and empower consuming the fish.’ imals consume and embrace plastic and we’re Sandi Smith, Maryland Coastal change,” Smith consuming the Bays Program representative said. fish.” Much of the Before the ban team’s efforts are goes into full effect, the Maryland De- geared toward behavior modification. partment of Environment is required Smith said even though Styrofoam is to conduct a public information cam- the less expensive packaging option, paign and continue as the ban begins. the goal is for businesses to choose This will include mailing information the environmentally friendly option. packets to food service businesses “Hopefully, when this passes and and schools as well as direct contact people see an impact on it, it’ll change

their behavior,” Smith said. “It’ll motivate people to start doing the right thing.” Three Anchors is one such restaurant that has already moved away from Styrofoam products. According to General Manager Mark Stearns, the restaurant doesn’t use any Styrofoam products. It has biodegradable plastic straws, paper straws at the bar, biodegradable cardboard carryout boxes and glass serving products instead. “We’re trying to make sure the things we use are environmentally safe, friendly and biodegradable and aren’t about to sit in a landfill for a thousand years,” Stearns said. Senator Cheryl Kagan, (D) who serves Montgomery County’s District 17 and is on the Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee, said businesses can continue to go through their stock if they still have Styrofoam after the ban is in effect. She added that she hasn’t heard any complaints. According to Kagan, the cost for alternative products is only “pennies more” and 52.4 percent of Maryland residents live in an area that has already banned Styrofoam products. “We’re not hearing a lot of concerns about doing the right thing for the environment,” Kagan said. This ban will not include use for raw meat, which has a higher safety concern than other food products. Smith hopes that the Green Team will find an alternative product for raw meat in the future. “It’s about getting the product out there and getting it to a price point that’s workable,” Smith said. Charkoudian closed the presentation by mentioning that a ban on plastic straws did not pass state legislation, but she is hopeful that a revised version will pass in the future, as well as other types of single-use plastics. “Just because we can’t get rid of them in one legislation session doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try to do what we can in one legislative session,” Charkoudian said.  OUR 10TH SEASON! 

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Ocean City Today

Professional surfers teach autistic children By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) More than 225 children had a day of surf, sand and fun at the 10th annual Surfers Healing camp on the beach of Castle in the Sand on 37th Street on last Wednesday. Families from all over the region could have a day on the beach during the six-hour surfing camp offered by the Maryland chapter of the international organization, Surfers Healing. Surfers Healing began in California in 1996, when founder Israel “Izzy” Paskowitz discovered his son, Isaiah, who has autism, felt more at peace and comfortable in the ocean. “I believe that Isaiah responded so dramatically to the ocean that day because it helped calm him during a time of sensory overload,” Paskowitz said. “It was a therapeutic experience for him. “That day in Hawaii, I had a feeling that maybe, just maybe, surfing might help other kids with autism like it had helped Isaiah,” he continued. Last Wednesday’s event also happened to be the 10th anniversary of Surfer’s Healing taking place in Ocean City. The event, albeit focused primarily on surfing, included face painting, hula hoop contests, caricature draw-

ings, an arts and crafts booth, games and several vendors offering services related to autism and other mental disabilities. “[Surfers Healing] started on the East Coast in either Virginia Beach or North or South Carolina and then there was one in New Jersey and we were like, ‘We need one in the middle somewhere,’” Ocean City Co-Coordinator Woody German said. “I was trying to get one going and I ran into some other friends who were trying to get one going and we all just got together and got involved. There’s a boatload of people who were involved in making this thing happen.” During the event, professional surfers from Hawaii, California, Puerto Rico, New Zealand and Australia helped teach children, ages 4 to 18, how to surf and spend time in the ocean. There were 10 sessions overall, with the first one starting at 9 a.m. and the final one ending at 3 p.m. Children lined up to wait for their turn to have a one-on-one session with a professional surfer to then go out and surf for about 20 minutes, or at the very least, cover three to four waves. “What our local organization does is fundraise so we can fly [the professionals] here, put them up, feed them

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

More than 225 children on the autism spectrum are taught how to surf by professional surfers during the 10th annual Surfers Healing event on 37th Street, Aug. 14.

and they being the professionals specifically trained to teach surfing to children with autism, take the kids out and just have fun,” Co-Coordinator Kelly Loeser said. “It’s a day where they don’t have to worry about tantruming or having high anxiety because everyone here understands it

and gets it and no one judges them. They can be themselves.” Kate Thomas, of Easton, had tears in her eyes when she saw how much fun her son, James, 5, was having that day. “He goes to school at Sweet Bay See DAY Page 21

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

Funding approved: Showell project continues By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Construction of the Showell Elementary replacement school continues after Worcester County Board of Education members unanimously approved a $1.9 million requisition during a meeting Tuesday Bill Moschler, Oak Contracting Project Manager, and Facilities Planner Joe Price provided a construction progress report to board members. Moschler said workers removed trees and stumps from the site and implemented site raceways for telecommunication over the past 30 days. Crews are working on a number of projects, including delivering an

emergency generator and implementing stormwater and piping structures. As for the building process, Moschler said several projects are in progress, including constructing door frames, exterior stud framing and sheathing, roofing, ductwork, and bringing in line for plumbing, electrical and sprinklers. Additionally, installation of metal walls is expected to happen within the next 30 days, according to building plans. Construction began in September 2018 and is expected to finish by September 2020. Superintendent Lou Taylor recommended the county’s board of educa-

tion approve the requisition for construction of the replacement school. There was $39.8 million contracted to build the new educational institution, according to an invoice provided to board members. PHOTO COURTESY WCPS There’s been about $8.6 million paid so An aerial view of the construction site shows the progress of the refar, with roughly placement Showell Elementary School. The Worcester County Board $29.3 million re- of Education unanimously approved a $1.9 million requisition during a meeting Tuesday. maining. Vice President Eric. W. Cropper Sr. moved to ap- member Barry Q. Brittingham, Sr. prove the requisition, which Board seconded.

Day of fun and surf for children on spectrum Continued from Page 19 Magnolia Academy in Stevensville, which does ABA therapy for kids with autism, and they talked about it and we decided to do it this year, to make a day of it,” Thomas said. “I just thought it would be freeing for him because he does go to school yearround and I thought it would be a good experience for him. It was won-

derful just to see him out there. He just has a lot of limitations ... he’s very structured, he’s very ordered and to see him out in the ocean on a surfboard is just beyond amazing.” The event was also touching for the professional surfers who came out to teach the children how to surf. “I was lucky enough to have friends who were a part of it and

started doing it back home,” said Chase Johnson, a professional surfer from Orange County, California. “This is year five now out here. I love helping the kids, it’s fun for them, fun for us and it’s great to see the change that occurs when they get in the water. It’s cool to see them have a moment of peace almost, which is something they’re totally not used to

and helps their senses calm down.” Registration for the event takes place in early April and lasts around a week. Families cannot register in Ocean City; it must be done online at www.surfershealing.org. For more information about Surfer’s Healing, visit the Ocean City Facebook page at Surfers Healing Ocean City or visit www.surfershealing.org.

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

Minor injuries in Wildcat coaster incident in OC Five people sent to Atlantic General after carts collide

ELIZABETH BONIN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Two buildings are proposed to be added to the Manklin Station commercial development located on the south side of Manklin Creek Road and the east side of Ocean Parkway, in Ocean Pines.

Manklin Station passes step one By Elizabeth Bonin Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The proposal for the final two buildings of the Manklin Station Commercial development passed the Technical Review Committee on Wednesday, Aug. 14. The two buildings each consist 6,000 square feet of retail and office space.

The commercial development is located on the south side of Manklin Creek Road and the east side of Ocean Parkway, in Ocean Pines. According to Jennifer Keener, county zoning administrator, the proposed two buildings will move on to the Planning Commission. Steven Engel, one of the principles of Vista Design, said that the

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By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) An incident on the Wildcat ride at Jolly Rogers Amusement Park on 30th Street sent five riders to Atlantic General Hospital last Friday. Ocean City police went to assist EMS around 8:20 p.m. when a car on the Wildcat failed to stop as it was pulling into the loading area and struck the rear of another car that was loaded with passengers. Of the riders, there were adolescents and one adult. No injuries were reported on the scene, but all five were escorted to the hospital for precautionary reasons. Dean Langrall, director of sales and marketing for Bay Shore Development Corporation, the company that manages Jolly Rogers, said no damage was caused to the Wildcat and an investigation into the cause for the failure is underway. The ride was inspected by the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulations and was deemed mechanically sound for operation and resumed public use on Saturday.

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

Busted bridge barrier causes boats to wait By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Boat traffic was delayed Sunday night around 7:30 p.m. after a car crashed into the westbound gate on the Route 50 bridge. The State Highway Administration and the Ocean City Police Department closed westbound Route 50 for about an hour, and eastbound lanes were intermittently blocked for PHOTOS COURTESY JANA POTVIN, SHA gate repairs, SHA Assistant District The west gate on the Route 50 Engineer Jana Potvin said. The bridge closed to boat traffic Bridge dangles awkwardly after around 9:20 p.m., and reopened a driver who was blinded by the sun hit it on Sunday. around 10:48 p.m. following gate repairs. Police department spokeswoman Ashley Miller said the driver reported he had not seen the stop bar in the down position, because the sun had been in his eyes. Police did not arrest the driver, and no injuries were sustained. Potvin said that the next routine maintenance operation for the bridge was scheduled for Wednesday, Sept. 25, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The drawbridge opens about 1,600 times a year, SHA District Community Liaison Bob Rager said. He said, despite regular testing and maintenance, the bridge could still have issues such as the time it remained open during the White Marlin Open. “We don’t have any special work planned as a result of the incident during the WMO,” Rager said. “We’ll continue to maintain the bridge as usual, fix any issues as needed and push ahead with long-term rehabilitation plans.”

Cop car hit after it’s cut off By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The Ocean City Police Department found itself in a different situation Saturday, when it had to dispatch officers to a car crash that involved one of its own Tiara Mitchell officers and 24-year-old Tiara Mitchell of Philadelphia. “The police wagon was travelling northbound on Coastal Highway at 48th Street [when] a passenger car made a turn at 48th Street in front of the wagon,” Ocean City Police spokeswoman Ashley Miller said. According to the court document, Mitchell failed to yield the right of way while making a U-turn from the south bound lane at 48th

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 25


Lifestyle

Ocean City Today Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertainment, Events, Features, Music

Aug. 23, 2019

Page 26 Second ArtX event includes art, films, music and vendors

PHOTO COURTESY STEPHANIE JONES

More than 200 Jeep owners participate in the Jeep Week parade on the Ocean City beach last year.

Jeep Week activities all weekend By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Jeep enthusiasts can participate in several activities including obstacle courses and parades throughout Worcester County during the 10th annual Jeep Week this weekend. As many as 1,400-1,500 Jeeps are expected. “It’s all about the Jeep enthusiast and the Jeep community,” Live Wire Media owner and event coordinator Brad Hoffman said. “It’s like the ultimate vacation for a lot of these people. They come down and they enjoy the end of the summer in Ocean City.” Jeep Week was created by Will Lynch and Chris Cropper 10 years ago as a means to promote businesses in Ocean City and provide an entertaining week for Jeep owners and enthusiasts. Hoffman joined the Jeep Week team five years ago as a sponsor. “Some people wonder what Jeep culture’s all about,” Hoffman said. “There’s a lot of stuff for the kids to

do.” “The monster truck rides are enjoyable. We have music at the event. We have a deejay spinning music, and I feel like it really kind of fits the beach,” he added. “Jeeps have always been synonymous with the beach and beach culture.” Jeep owners can participate in some nighttime fun as well as the daytime obstacle courses and Ocean City convention center activities. Hooters in West Ocean City will have an LED light show from 8-10 p.m. on Saturday. There will be a contest on best lights and music by DJ BK. There will also be a Night Jam OC wrap party at Ponzetti’s on 142nd Street from 10 p.m. to 12 a.m. this Saturday, featuring music by King Schascha and Black Dog Alley. Jeep parades will take place Friday through Sunday from 7:30-9:15 a.m. The parade will begin at 29th Street and continue down to the inlet. Around 300 Jeeps will ride down the beach toward the inlet each day. Spectators can watch the parade

from the Boardwalk. Parade participants are advised to arrive at the Jolly Roger parking lot on 30th Street early to ensure the parade begins on time. The 50-acre Jeep Jam at the MAYS Sports Complex in Pittsville, created in part by course builders Cropper of CC Customs, Chris Russell of Superior Contracting, and John DeForce, has returned this year. “You have mild trails along with some rock crawling in a specific obstacle course area,” Hoffman said. Also returning for the second year by popular demand is the beach obstacle course, which is located north of the pier between Somerset and Dorchester streets in Ocean City. “It’s a little Jeep course on the beach, which brings more participants, which brings more revenue and keeps it local,” Hoffman said. “This has some hills and different obstacles, not serious obstacles. A stock jeep can do it or a modified jeep, but it’s fun.” There are three shifts for the beach See JEEP Page 27

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Artists, music lovers and film enthusiasts are encouraged to stop by Northside Park on 125th Street in Ocean City for the second annual ArtX event this weekend. ArtX, which features music, films, food and art, replaced the former Arts Alive event, which was held for 17 years. The event focuses on artistic expression and creativity, hence the name: ArtX. The ArtX festival was designed in part by the Ocean City Special Events Department and Rina Thaler, executive director of the Art League of Ocean City on 94th Street. ArtX highlights painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, photography, mixed media and fine wood. “We knew coming from last year that the activities were key,” said Frank Miller, Ocean City Special Events superintendent. “The patrons really enjoyed the interactive experiences that they were able to take part of at ArtX. We added additional activities this year on top of the traditional elements, the artists and vendors we have at ArtX, the live music component that we have at ArtX, the cinema element and the workshops offered through the Art League of Ocean City.” Participants can register for workshops at the park or in advance at artleagueofoceancity.com. “This year will be bigger and better,” Thaler said. “We’ve added a lot of different things, like we’ve gotten Salisbury University involved and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore and a sculpture walk that the Salisbury students are doing … a professor from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore is bringing a selfie photo booth that they bring out to events and we’re adding a youth plein air and have these kits that the children can pick up and go around the park and sit down and paint and draw.” ArtX will include music on the outdoor stage from as Melissa Alesi, Tyler Greene, Catch the Drift Duo, Rivers and Rhodes, Taylor Knox and BeatLegacy. A film festival will take place inside the east gym of Northside Park. Short films and documentaries are scheduled both days with opportunities to See ARTX Page 28


AUGUST 23, 2019

PHOTO COURTESY STEPHANIE JONES

Jeep enthusiasts enjoy a beach obstacle course near the inlet during the ninth annual Jeep Week last year.

Jeep Week activities at OC convention center, on beach Continued from Page 26 course each day except on Sunday, which only offers the morning course. The morning course runs from 10 a.m. to noon. The first afternoon shift will take place from 1-3 p.m. and the last shift will go from 4-6 p.m. Activities at the convention center on 40th Street will run from at 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. DJs will provide music each day. Children also might enjoy “Sarge,” a monster truck ride. “We’ve had ride trucks in the past, but this one is going to be really, really cool,” Hoffman said. Al Pine North America will bring a new display and activation trailer which will have all their products on display. The company will also do installations and sales on site as well. Last year, the company broke a world record on sales during the event, Hoffman said. The company will be offering Jeep Week-only specials this year. A KICKER XRV will also have a trailer with hands-on products. Vendors and representatives from I.G. Burton of Berlin, the title sponsor, are showcasing various products throughout the week at the convention center. I.G. Burton will also welcome people to its dealership in Berlin on Sunday from 1-4 p.m. for a Jeep sendoff, open house party. Andy Cohen from “Junkyard Empire,” a reality television series filmed at Maryland’s Damascus Motors, will make guest appearances throughout

the event. “He’ll be on site hanging with the Jeep people and talking jeeps and about Junkyard Empire,” Hoffman said. “He’ll be at the beach crawl, convention center and just be a part of Jeep Week this year.” This year’s Jeep Week is dedicated in memory of Hoffman’s close friend, Sean Baker who passed away unexpectedly two weeks ago. He was 41. “He was a friend of mine that designed a lot of the jeep graphic posters and also designed a lot of our stickers,” Hoffman said. “He was our head judge for the show. Sean was just a big behind-the-scenes part of the planning of Jeep Week. “He was such a great giving guy,” he continued. “He always wanted to give and help out there in the trenches during the event, whether it was judging or designing or getting graphics ready or making sure the website was right. Those people don’t always get the credit when they’re behind the scenes because they’re not visible … his work is visible. He was a true artist and designer when it came to all that.” General admission for the convention center and MAYS Sports Complex is $10. A two-day and three-day pass is available for $15 and $20, respectively. For more information or to see the full schedule of events, visit www.oceancityjeepweek.com or call Hoffman at 443-366-5944 or email brad@live-wire-media.com.

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 There are a few obstacles in your career path right now, Aries. Thankfully, you have a clever way to navigate right around them. All it takes is a little charm.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 It can be difficult to make decisions when under pressure, Taurus. This week you may be put on the spot to answer some difficult questions.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21

Fifty-five vendors display their artwork, jewelry and other merchandise during the inaugural ArtX event at Northside Park on 125th Street last year.

ArtX at Northside Park this wknd. Continued from Page 26 interact with the producers. Most of these films were available during the Ocean City Film Festival earlier this year. Pay-for-play options will be available at the otherwise free event, such as workshops from the Art League of Ocean City, sand art, caricatures and T-shirt tie dying. “We’ve thrown in some nontraditional free activities for people to take part in and the Art League has also added some additional pay-to-play activities,” Miller said. This year, there will also be a kite display courtesy of the Kite Loft on Sixth Street as well as larger-than-life family activities, such as oversized Jenga and chess as well as several cornhole locations and Instagram hotspots set up throughout the 58acre park.

Last year, around 3,000 to 5,000 people came out to the inaugural event. Miller hopes this year will be bigger and better. “We know we’re still growing the event and trying to build the event into something that guests would want to be a part of and they want to return to every year,” Miller said. “We have plans for next year already but we’re still gauging what’s popular and unpopular to try and continue to hone the event into what it should be.” Food and nonalcoholic beverages will be available for purchase. A selection of beer, wine and craft brews provided by Shore Craft Beer will be for sale as well. Proceeds will benefit the Art League of Ocean City. The event is also pet friendly. At the end of the first day, guests can stay for a special concert by Ripe

– a nationally recognized funky jazz band from Boston, with an opening performance by the Swell Fellas. This free concert will take place at 8 p.m. on the West Lagoon Field of Northside Park. Spectators are advised to bring chairs or blankets. “There’s horns and brass involved. It’s going to been a great sound to have at Northside Park,” Miller said. “There’s a lot of things to do … you just have to find them.” Event hours are Saturday from noon to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will be followed by Sundaes in the Park on Sunday, which will include live music by Jaded Love (an American rock tribute band) and fireworks. For more information about the event, visit oceancitymd.gov/oc/departments/special-events/artx/ or ococean.com or call 410-250-0125.

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CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Cancer, a minor health scare could have you rethinking your diet and exercise regimen. Speak with a doctor about the best course of action if you want to overhaul your health.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Leo, some tough choices will be falling on your shoulders in the days ahead. Not everyone may agree with your decisions, but you need to stand by them.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 There is only so much that debate will accomplish, Virgo. You may have to sit back and go with the flow on this one, even if that may be difficult.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 All it may take is a weekend getaway to completely recharge your mind and body, Libra. Trips do not have to be long to prove rejuvenating. A change of scenery is important.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 Scorpio, make a list of the pros and cons of a career change and then mull it over carefully. Explore if salary, environment or status are driving factors in wanting something new.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21

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Memories of good times could have you temporarily living in the past, Sagittarius. That is okay as long as you can come back to the present when necessary.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Capricorn, put your pride to the side and focus on what would be best for the majority of people in your family circle. Then you can gear your decisions toward their well-being .

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 Aquarius, if your diet and exercise regimen hasn’t been as successful as you’d hoped, you may want to speak with a dietician. Then you can get back on track.

WORKSHOPS: Saturday 1-3 p.m. Seashell Mosaic 4-6 p.m. – Paint Pouring Sunday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Paint Pouring

Now may be a good time to invest some money into a luxury purchase, Gemini. This can be anything from an extensive vacation to a new car. Just consider the budget beforehand.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20

Kurt Pelnke, from Greensboro, paints a plein air-style piece during the inaugural ArtX event at Northside Park on 125th Street last year.

Pisces, there are a few cosmic disturbances on the horizon but nothing you cannot handle with a little finesse. Expect things to blow over shortly.


AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 29

Mandu returns to OC after two years in South Korea By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Fresh off a two-year stint in South Korea, Boardwalk troubadour Max Mandu has spent the summer honing his musical chops serenading the public with cover tunes and original compositions, while simultaneously plotting a life path embracing creativity. Mandu landed back in the U.S. this April after spending a few years teaching English to youngsters in South Korea. “After college I lived in South Korea for two years [where] I was teaching English,” he said. “I was interested in seeking out the wider world … and wanted to do something unconventional before I settled into any kind of long-term career.” After graduating from William and Mary College in Williamsburg, Virginia with a degree in linguistics, Mandu, known as “Max Mohr” offstage, headed east for instructional duties but also became inspired to pursue musical endeavors. “I started playing music when I was a kid,” he said. “I took piano lessons from a very young age.” After learning to tickle the ivories at the age of 7, in time Mandu’s musicianship developed further. “That was kind of my musical introduction,” he said. “Then when I was a teenager I taught myself guitar with the knowledge I had gained from piano.” By the age of 15, Mandu had continued evolving musically after investing years developing vocal deliveries, which culminated with an impromptu performance on the Boardwalk during a family vacation to the shore. “I tried it out on the Boardwalk a couple times when I was a teenager [and] that really got me hooked,” he

said. “I wasn’t making that much at the time, but the fact that someone would give me a dollar for playing out here, I thought that was amazing.” The initial foray into performing as a teenager helped to further fuel Mandu. “I ended up writing my college application essay about playing on the Boardwalk,” he said. “I kept music going throughout college.” While attending William and Mary College Mandu played in a duo with classmate Aidan Selmer called the Fox Trap Compromise. Uncertain of next steps after graduation, Mandu decided to follow his heart and relocate to Asia. “That was an amazing time to feel like a local in another country and learn another language,” he said. Much to Mandu’s amazement the instructional gig in South Korea, in addition to wider cultural aspects, uncovered a vibrant outdoor music scene. “There’s tons of street performers there,” he said. “I spent some time hanging out with them and that kind of kept the fire going.” Despite being located far from the U.S., Mandu quickly discovered similarities with Western pop music among the wide array of entertainers. “On one hand they have the same kind of pop repertoire we do [such as] Maroon 5, Coldplay and Ed Sheeran,” he said. “All that stuff is very popular there, but the K-pop, Korean pop, music scene is huge.” Mandu said a common scene on the streets of South Korea are teenage groups practicing vocals and choreography. “They have these nine- or 10-person boy bands or girl bands,” he said. “They’re super coordinated with amazing outfits.”

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PHOTO COURTESY MAX MANDU

Street musician Max Mandu has spent the summer honing his chops on the Boardwalk and plans to continue pursuing a creative path moving forward.

Mandu said the genre is known for super-sleek, highly-produced pop music. “That’s the big music force in Korea,” he said. “You see groups like that out on the street.” Of more significance, while living abroad Mandu befriended a street musician, Aancod, who proved an apt inspiration. “There was one street performer in South Korea that I spent some time with who was really inspiring,” he said. “I learned from his style, which is using this loop pedal to create a one-man band effect.”

Mandu explained the process involves “beat-boxing,” to create a guitar sound while performing a song overtop the rhythm. Although raised in Asia, Mandu said his cohort was born in the west. “He’s actually a Caucasian guy but he speaks fluent Korean and he’s got a huge beard and super long dreads,” he said. “He’s got a crazy story [and] was adopted by a Japanese family as a kid.” With Japanese as his foundational language, Mandu said when Aancod came of age he caught a dose of wanderlust before eventually settling in See SEE Page 31


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Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Enjoying a high-rise view of the ocean during dinner at OC 360 at the Fenwick Inn on 138th Street, Saturday, from left, are Mark, Lily, 11, and Peggy Secrist of Cordova, Maryland.

Amy and Eugene Michaels of Tyrone, Pennsylvania, eat dinner at the Fenwick Inn’s OC 360 on 138th Street, Saturday.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Carlos Paguaga, from Orlando, and Shelby Johnson of Miami, Florida, look over the ocean view at the Fenwick Inn on 138th Street, Saturday.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Sitting down to order a meal at Abbey Burger Bistro on 126th Street, Saturday, from left, are Gabe, 10, Jeff, and Christian Labofish, 12, of Edgewater, Maryland.

Harrison Leon and Summer Bingaman of Salisbury grab a drink at Abbey Burger Bistro on 126th Street, Saturday.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Taking a seat outside at Abbey Burger Bistro on 126th Street, Saturday, from left, are Ron Sauter, Stephen Otto and Pierce Johnson from Anne Arundel, Maryland.

Susie and Steve Melnyk of Harford County, Maryland, clink their drinks at Abbey Burger Bistro on 126th Street, Saturday.


AUGUST 23, 2019

PAGE 31

Ocean City Today

See Mandu perform on Bdwk. Continued from Page 29 Korea. “He had this identity crisis when he was 20 and began traveling the world playing music,” he said. “I met him maybe five years into his journey.” The unanticipated peer helped further spark Mandu’s creative juices. “He was a super amazing musical figure that really made an impression … and made me want to continue that spirit,” he said. After winding down the teaching assignment, Mandu began formulating next steps after returning stateside this spring. “I didn’t really have any life built in the U.S. because all my friends were in Korean or off in places around the world,” he said. “I loved Ocean City when I was a kid [and] loved playing on the Boardwalk so [I thought] let’s go back there.” Intent on pursuing a performance path, Mandu was quick to recognize that perfection is elusive without practice. “I knew if I really wanted to improve as a musician I needed to be out there practicing all the time [and] interacting with people,” he said. “I figured the Boardwalk would be a great location to do that.” While talk might be cheap, Mandu understood singing in tune carries a value, which did little to quell early jitters. “I was definitely nervous at first, but I just forged through it and everyday just kept going out and got better all the time,” he said. “I learned how to use my sound system the best to attract people.” Peer reactions was also an initial concern, which Mandu said subsided after becoming acquainted with fellow Boardwalk performers. “I’ve met the other performers and they’re all really cool,” he said. “I didn’t know if there was some kind of underground organized street performers mafia where they had it all set up who gets what street and I’m some newbie on their turf.” Largely concentrated on the Boardwalk by Fourth Street, Mandu said interacting with adjacent merchants has also been a pleasure. “Shenanigan’s [Irish Pub] has been cool,” he said. “I met the owner, Greg Shockley, and he … thanked me for being out there.” The summertime musical apprenticeship has also provided Mandu an opportunity to develop his performance catalog, which features over 120 covers along with original compositions. “I have 30 originals, but I only play maybe five to 10 of them regularly because some … were old ones I wrote when I was an angsty teenager and they don’t quite stand the test of time,” he said. “My originals are always the ones closest to my heart [that] I’m hoping I can get out there.” As warm weather begins to fade in the coming months, Mandu is hatching

plans to continue creating music. “I met a couple of people who work with talent agencies,” he said. “I’m thinking about moving … somewhere on the East Coast … to get hooked up with a talent agency to get some eventtype gigs.” Regardless of the next geographical locale, Mandu anticipates continuing to hone performance skills in public. “I realized life is short and you’ve got to keep doing the things that make you feel alive,” he said. “I wanted to continue having an unconventional life and live an adventure.” Although certainly an aberration, Mandu related an unknown recent benefactor whose generosity was noteworthy. “This only happened one time, but I got a hundred-dollar bill as a tip last week,” he said. “That totally blew my mind and made my whole weekend.”

PHOTO COURTESY MAX MANDU

Boardwalk performer Max Mandu is hoping to land gigs through a talent agency after summer ends while continuing to post new original music on YouTube and Instagram.

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Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

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JOSH KIM/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Celia Bailey, of Brazil, left, and Kathy and Charles Baker, of Colombia, Maryland, say that the best part of living in Montego Bay is their friendly neighbors.

Montego Bay oldest, largest residential community in OC By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) What do Sesame Street, Wood Stock and Montego Bay all have in common? This year, they all turned 50. “Montego Bay is the oldest and largest residential community in Ocean City,” said Harriet Piler, Montego Bay Civic Association’s (MBCA) former secretary. “It was started by a man named James (Jim) Caine back in 1969…and was originally a mobile home park.” The residential community and town officials — such as Mayor Rick Meehan, Police Chief Ross Buzzuro and various City Council members — celebrated its anniversary by throwing a pondside party last Saturday, in the 600 block of Harbor Drive in Montego Bay. The north Ocean City bayside neighborhood began with very humble roots. As Piler said, it was originally designed as a mobile home residence. However, as the years went on, Ocean City’s zoning laws started to change, and with that change began the evolution of Montego Bay. Former MBCA President Mike Donnelly said that the community became known as “God’s little secret,” as million-dollar homes began to be built on land that Caine once sold for $5,000. Donnelly, who has owned property in Montego Bay since 1979, said that there used to be only 40 to 50 permanent residents and roughly 75 to 150 summer residents. Now, there are almost 260 yearround residents, and he said during the summer almost all 1,523 homes are occupied. Similarly to Donnelly, several of the residents have owned property in Montego Bay for decades.

“My mom purchased the property in the 70s, and I bought it when she died in 2009,” Kathy Baker, 64, of Columbia, Maryland, said. Celia Bailey, 58, of Brazil, has owned property in Montego Bay for 33 years. She now lives full time in Montego Bay, and said that the community has always treated her well. Both Baker and Bailey said that their favorite part of Montego Bay was the community atmosphere. Baker said that neighbors and strangers alike always warmly greet her during her morning walks. For Gerry Woytowitza, 80, of Silver Spring, Maryland, Montego Bay is much more than just a friendly community—it is a living memory. “I used to bring my mother here, and I have fond memories of her,” she said. “She got sick...while we were here, See ORIGINALLY Page 33

JOSH KIM/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Gerry Woytowitza of Silver Spring, Maryland, has fond memories of Montego Bay, and spends her days enjoying the company of her children and grandchildren.


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Walker explains why poultry has dark and white meat By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) As the sun unwinds from a dazzling day, I decide to take a walk where I can be one with myself. The warmth of the sand is comforting as my tired feet dig into the serenity of the Eastern Shore. Gentle waves kiss the shore and return to the Motherland sea. A seagull seems to befriend me. I acknowledge my companion and enjoy the company. As I listen to the surreal sound that surrounds my being, I cannot help but wonder if one knows why poultry has white and dark meat? The answer is quite fascinating. Allow me to explain. It turns out the colorization of meat is not due primarily to blood and its oxygen-carrying hemoglobin but to oxygen-storing myoglobin, which is located in the muscle cells. Tissues with different colors contain different concentrations of myoglobin. For example, chickens and turkeys do a lot of standing but little flying, so their breast muscle is white and their legs are dark. Game birds, on the other hand, spend a lot of time in the air, and their breast meat may be as dark as the drumsticks. Food for thought goes beyond building recipes. It is this type of knowledge that makes a well-rounded cook. Unexpected company will be arriving tomorrow and I have no idea what to prepare. Planning a menu depends on array of factors for a successful meal. I must say goodbye to my new friend, and concentrate on my main course. My deck is an arsenal of grills and my passion for grilling is obvious. As I rack my brain for possibilities, the idea of grilled turkey drumsticks comes to my mind. There are three main procedures one should follow when grilling turkey legs. First, and foremost, you should brine the meat for optimum juiciness and tenderness. Next, one should precook the turkey before grilling it, otherwise you will have one tough bird. Finally, marinate the legs to ensure fantastic flavor. Brining has become synonymous with Thanksgiving turkey, but it can be used in so many more ways. Brining is the process of submerging a cut of meat in a brine solution, which is basically salt dissolved in water. In very simple terms, the meat absorbs extra liquid and salt, resulting in a juicier and tastier final dish.

This technique benefits lean cuts of meat that have a tendency to dry out during cooking. If you are not brining your chicken, turkey, or pork, you might want to reconsider. The extreme temperatures of grilling can toughen any piece of meat. Turkey legs are no exception and must be precooked before grilling. Gently simmering the drumsticks in chicken and vegetable stock incorporates flavor and ensures even cooking. Once the drumsticks are cooked, simply marinate for a few hours and you are ready to grill. At this point, you want to grill the meat over a very hot grill. This will achieve a good char which will add to the flavor and the presentation. If you love to grill and want to surprise your guests with something new, consider caveman pops. Liquid Smoke, Worcestershire sauce, and hot sauce are just a few of the ingredients that give these pops a kick. Caveman pops are fun and delicious. Enjoy!

Caveman Pops Brine 4 quarts of water 1 cup kosher salt 1 cup sugar 1 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons dried crushed rosemary 2 tablespoons peppercorns 3 bay leaves 1. In a pot, combine water with salt, sugar, brown sugar, rosemary, peppercorns and bay leaves. Bring to a boil then remove from the heat. Allow mixture to cool, then pour into a large container. Submerge turkey legs in the brine. Cover, and refrigerate for at least 12 hours. When turkey legs have been brined, rinse thoroughly in cold water and pat dry with paper towels. See BRINE Page 35

Originally mobile home community Continued from Page 32 and ended up at the hospital and passed away...She had such a good time [here].” However, Woytowitza’s mother’s legacy continues as her children, grandchildren and relatives gather each year in Montego Bay, enjoying summer after summer crabbing and fishing and being together as a family. “Congratulations,” former State Sen. Jim Mathias said. “As Frank Sinatra said, ‘another beautiful day is yet to come.’”

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PAGE 34

AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

NOW PLAYING ANGLER 312 Talbot St., Ocean City 410-289-7424 / www.angleroc.net Aug. 23: Diggs & Burns, 6 p.m. Aug. 24: Funk-Shue, 6 p.m. Aug. 25: Pearl, 5 p.m. Aug. 29: Jack & T, 5 p.m.

17th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-289-6331 / www.cowboycoastoc.com Aug. 23: Adam Yarger, acoustic, 6 p.m.; DJ Tops Cut Off Team, 9 p.m. Aug. 24: Scott Bandy, acoustic, 6 p.m.; DJ Tops Cut Off Team, 9 p.m. Aug. 29: Throwback Thursday w/Saving Adel (ticketed event), 9 p.m.

BEACH BARRELS

DUFFY’S TAVERN

13207 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-0522 / www.beachbarrels.com Aug. 23: G-Men, 9 p.m. Aug. 24: Tranzfusion, 9 p.m. Aug. 25: Bingo w/DJ Rupe, 6 p.m. Aug. 26: Sounds of Strange, 9 p.m. Aug. 29: Dust N’ Bones, 9 p.m.

130th Street, Ocean City, Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 / www.duffysoc.com Every Friday: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m. Every Saturday: Karaoke w/DJ Chuck D, 8 p.m. to midnight

BJ’S ON THE WATER

12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1846 / www.ocharborside.com Aug. 23: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Aug. 24: Chris Button, 2 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. Aug. 25: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m. Aug. 26: Blake Haley, 4 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 8 p.m. Aug. 27: Dust N’ Bones, 6 p.m. Aug. 28: Dock Party w/DJ Billy T, 4 p.m.; Trivia w/DJ Bigler, 8 p.m. Aug. 29: Opposite Directions, 6 p.m.

75th Street and the bay, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com Aug. 23: Over Time, 9 p.m. Aug. 24: Dust N’ Bones, 9 p.m. Aug. 28: Ricky LaRicci & the Leftovers, 6 p.m. Aug. 29: Nikki & Gene, 8 p.m. BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street, Ocean City, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium 443-664-2896 / www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com Aug. 23: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 4-7 p.m.; Dave Sherman, 8 p.m. Aug. 24: Rockoholics, 8 p.m. Aug. 25: Bob Hughes, 6 p.m. Aug. 26: Just Jay, 6 p.m. Aug. 27: Jack Worthington, 6 p.m. Aug. 28: Reform School, 6-9 p.m.; Open Mic, 9 p.m. Aug. 29: Chris Button, 7-11 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave., Ocean City 410-289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com Every Thursday-Sunday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. CAROUSEL BEACH BAR - TSUNAMI In the Carousel Hotel, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-1000 / www.carouselhotel.com Aug. 23: Troy Hanna, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 24: Pearl, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 25: Dave Sherman, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 27: Frank Moran, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 28: Jack Worthington, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 29: Randy Jamz, 4-8 p.m. CARRIBBEAN POOL BAR In the Plim Plaza Hotel 109 N. Atlantic Avenue, Ocean City 410-289-6181 / www.plimplazaoc.com Aug. 23: Three on the Tree, 1 p.m.; Rogue Citizens, 7 p.m. Aug. 24: Walk of Shame, 1 p.m.; The Runner-Ups, 7 p.m. Aug. 25: No Byscuyts, 1 p.m. Aug. 26: Dave Sherman, 1 p.m. Aug. 27: TBD Aug. 28: TBD Aug. 29: TBD COCONUTS BEACH BAR AND GRILL In the Castle in the Sand Hotel 37th Street oceanfront, Ocean City 410-289-6846 / www.castleinthesand.com Aug. 23: Darin Engh, noon to 4 p.m.; Lime Green Band, 5-9 p.m. Aug. 24: Kevin Poole & Joe Mama, noon to 4 p.m.; Identity Crisis, 5-9 p.m. Aug. 25: Rick & Regina, noon to 3 p.m.; Lauren Glick Band, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 26: Nate Clendenen, noon to 3 p.m.; Bob Wilkinson, Joe Smooth & Pete, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 27: Chino Rankin, noon to 3 p.m.; Dave Hawkins & Joe Mama, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 28: Sean Loomis Solo, noon to 3 p.m.; Aaron Howell Duo, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 29: Kevin Poole Solo, noon to 3 p.m.; Chris Diller Solo, 4-8 p.m. COWBOY COAST COUNTRY SALOON AND STEAKHOUSE

HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL

HOOTERS 12513 Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City 410-213-1841 / www.hootersofoc.com Aug. 23: DJ BK, 6-10 p.m. Aug. 25: Classic Vibe, 3-7 p.m. Aug. 27: Trivia w/DJ BK, 7-9 p.m.

FIRST CLASS Lenny’s Beach Bar: Friday and Saturday, Aug. 23-24

M.R. DUCKS BAR & GRILLE 311 Talbot St., Ocean City 410-289-9125 / www.mrducksbar.com Aug. 23: Kevin Poole, 5 p.m. Aug. 24: Bonedaddys, 5 p.m. Aug. 25: Bird Dog, 4 p.m. Aug. 28: DJ Batman, 5 p.m. Aug. 29: Timmie Metz Duo, 5 p.m. OCEAN 13 13th Street on the Boardwalk, Ocean City www.Ocean13ocmd.com Aug. 10: Bryan Russo, 6 p.m. Every Sunday: DJ Jeremy, tiki bar, 8 p.m. Every Thursday: Michael Smith, 6 p.m. OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB 101st Street, Ocean City In the Horizons Restaurant, in the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 410-524-3535 / www.clarionoc.com Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. Aug. 23-24: First Class, 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Lenny’s Deck Bar Aug. 23-27: On the Edge, 5-10 p.m. Aug. 28: On the Edge, 4-9 p.m. Aug. 29-Sept. 2: On the Edge, 5-10 p.m. OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 / www.oceanpines.org Aug. 23: Tranzfusion, 6-10 p.m. Aug. 24: The Patty Reese Band, 6-10 p.m. Aug. 25: First Class, 6-10 p.m. Aug. 29: Kings Ransom, 6-10 p.m. PICKLES 706 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City 410-289-4891 / www.picklesoc.com Aug. 23: Beats by Jeremy, 9 p.m. Aug. 24: Eastern Electric, 9 p.m. Aug. 25: Karaoke w/Jeremy, 9 p.m. Aug. 27: Beats by Adam Dutch, 9 p.m. Aug. 29: Beats by Wax, 9 p.m. PURPLE MOOSE SALOON 108 S. Atlantic Ave., Ocean City 410-289-6953 / www.purplemoosesaloon.com Aug. 23-24: Tripwire, 10 p.m. Aug. 25-26: JJ Billings Band, 10 p.m.

ON THE EDGE Ocean Club Nightclub: Friday, Aug. 23 through Monday, Aug. 2 Aug. 27-28: DJ Mazi, 9 p.m. Aug. 29: Don’t Back Down (Tom Petty Tribute Band), 10 p.m. SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay, Ocean City 410-524-4900 / www.seacrets.com Aug. 23: Bobby-O on De Bay, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Jim Long Band, 5-9 p.m.; S.T.O.R.M., 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Mike T, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; Kristen & the Noise, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. Aug. 24: Bobby-O on De Bay, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Light Up the Moon, 1-5 p.m.; S.T.O.R.M., 5-9 p.m.; DJ Cruz, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Lima Bean Riot, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; DJ Tuff, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Steal The Sky, 10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. Aug. 25: DJ Mike T, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; DJ Magellan, 4-8 p.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 4-9 p.m.; Gary Hoey, free concert, 4-8 p.m.; The Benjamins, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. Aug. 26: Bobby-O on De Bay, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; The Green (ticketed event), 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Nowhere Slow, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Aug. 27: Bobby-O on De Bay, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Goin’ UP on a Tuesday, 2-5 p.m.; Opposite Directions, 5-9 p.m.; JJ Rupp Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Aug. 28: Bobby-O on De Bay, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Full Circle Duo, 5-9 p.m.; JJ Rupp Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Aug. 29: Bobby-O on De Bay, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; The Freddie Long Band, 5-9 p.m.; Jah Works, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.;

DJ Tuff, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. SHENANIGAN’S IRISH PUB AND GRILLE 309 N. Atlantic Ave., Ocean City 410-289-7181 / www.ocshenanigans.com Aug. 23-24: Seamus Kelleher, 9 p.m. SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / www.skyebaroc.com Aug. 23: Monkee Paw, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 24: Marky Shaw, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 25: David Pruitt, 4-8 p.m. Aug. 28: Rick Artz (from Love Seed Mama Jump), 4-8 p.m. Aug. 29: Dalton Elliot (from American Idol), 4-8 p.m. TRADER LEE’S LIVE 9935 Stephen Decatur Highway, West Ocean City 443-614-4119 Aug. 24: Outta the Cellar, 9 p.m. Aug. 25: Jam Sess, 5 p.m. Aug. 28: Live Acoustic Taco Night, 5-8 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17, Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 / www.whiskersbar.com Aug. 23: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Brine turkey for caveman pops Continued from Page 33

Marinade chicken stock vegetable stock 8 turkey drumsticks 1 ½ tablespoons Browning Seasoning Sauce 3 tablespoons Liquid Smoke 5 tablespoons Balsamic Vinaigrette 2 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce 2 tablespoon favorite hot sauce 3 tablespoon canola oil 1 ½ tablespoons black pepper 1 tablespoon garlic powder

1 tablespoon onion powder 1 tablespoon dried thyme 1 tablespoon dried crushed rosemary 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1. In a large Dutch oven, gently simmer turkey legs in equal amounts of chicken and vegetable stock until they reach a temperature of approximately 155 degrees. Remove from stock and allow to cool. 2. Using a 2-gallon Ziploc bag, combine cooked turkey legs with the remaining marinade ingredients. Place filled Ziploc bag in a large bowl and refrigerate for at

least two hours. 3. Remove turkey legs from Ziploc bag and place on a sheet pan. Place turkey legs over a hot grill, close the lid, and cook until you obtain a nice char on all sides. Remove and serve immediately. * Food Lion carries turkey legs, ask the butcher if you do not see them. * Brown Seasoning Sauce can be found in the spice isle at your neighborhood supermarket. Secret Ingredient – Details. “Success is the sum of details.” – Harvey S. Firestone

HISTORICAL DISPLAY Historical Ocean City images have been installed on the brick wall outside Fun City Arcade, downtown near the Caroline Street entrance to the Boardwalk. Fun City owner JELAR Corporation and proprietor Jerry Greenspan collaborated with the Ocean City Development Corporation, through its Public Art Program, to replace a handful of smaller postcard images that were beginning to fade. PHOTO COURTESY GLENN IRWIN


PAGE 36

Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

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Beach patrons enjoy the tide pool that formed behind the stand of the lifeguard at the inlet.

Tide pools form this time of year By Kristin Joson Contributing Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) This is the time of the year when beach patrons will visit the beach and could possibly be entertained by the formation of tide pools. I remember playing in them when I was a kid and it was always a good time. Water that forms a pool on the beach is a normal occurrence that typically happens during this time in the season. We commonly refer to them as tide pools. However, they are not only formed by the outgoing tide but are also formed when large waves are driven further onto the beach by wind or during storms. Tropical activity in the Atlantic during this time of the year can cause larger than usual waves and surf conditions. When this happens, these waves bring more water onto the beach and if it becomes trapped in a low area a “tide pool� may form. These low areas on the beach are formed as waves push sand into large mounds running parallel to the shore with the area behind the mound (to the west) being lower than this newly formed retaining mound. As water is pushed over this mound, it cannot make its way back into the ocean as runoff and becomes trapped in the low lying area. Although the amount of water, the size of the low lying area and the depth of low lying area, may vary from a few inches to a few feet deep and the size may be as small as a

backyard pool or as large as several city blocks, most tide pools are only a few inches deep and less than a block long. Because of the relatively small quantity of water, the sun heats it and it is much warmer than the ocean and it usually has no wave action making it very inviting. When a child comes to the beach and finds a tide pool, they become very excited. It is like having a backyard pool on the beach. However, tide pools pose their own dangers. Because a tide pool seems like the perfect place for small children to play, parents often do not give the same attention to their children as they would if they were playing in the ocean. Further complicating this is the fact that most often the tide pool ends up forming behind the guard stands. This means that the surf rescue technician (lifeguard) is only scanning this area as part of their secondary scan giving much less attention to this water hazard than the large body of water directly in front of them. Parents often have a false sense of security due to the shallow depth of most of these tide pools but those of us in water safety realize it only takes 1 inch of water to drown a toddler. A second hazard associated with this phenomenon is the risk of injuries from running and jumping into such a shallow area. Although not a safety concern another potential issue has to do with this trapped water becoming stagnant, dirty and smelly. Therefore, the Public Works Maintenance Department sculpts the

beach to facilitate the drainage of these tide pools after they have remained for a couple of days. Sometimes you might find a tide pool that behaves more like a waterslide than a pool. I got to witness this a couple of years ago in the northern area of Ocean City. In this instance, wave action was bringing more water into the low area while breaks in the retaining mound allow water to flow back into the ocean resulting in strong currents being formed in the tide pool. When this happens, the tide pool becomes far more dangerous as people playing in the tide pool might find themselves washed into the ocean. This action is the perfect model of what is happening out in the ocean as waves come across the underwater sand bar and then make there way back out to the deeper water which is the mechanics and cause of the deadly rip currents you have heard so much about. Ocean City is a barrier island located between the ocean and a back bay and behaves in a unique way compared to other types of beaches around the world. Rip currents, tide pools, steep drop offs at the crest of the beach as well as other natural occurrences are all very normal and have existed for all of my 47 years of coming to Ocean City and for hundreds of years before. What is different, are recent changes in worldwide weather events, such as warmer ocean waters closer to shore, changes in prevailing ocean currents in recent years, increased tropical activity in the Atlantic and an See TIDE Page 39


AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 37


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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

WELCOME

SAND ART

Art League of Ocean City Director Rina Thaler, left, welcomes First Lady Yumi Hogan to the Ocean City Center for the Arts Gallery on 94th Street, Friday, Aug. 16.

The Charles siblings of Elkton, from left, Avante, 8, Aaliyah, 6 and Maya, 12, display freshly crafted sand art during the Sundaes in the Park event on Sunday at Northside Park on 125th Street.

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

SNACK TIME MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

DONATION Volunteers from Star Charities donate $1,500 to the Maryland Achilles Chapter at the Worcester County Veteran’s Memorial on Friday, Aug. 16.

APPRECIATION Volunteers Donald Luffy, left, Carol Horwitz and Bob Katz enjoy the Art League’s Volunteer Appreciation Dinner at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on June 17.

Karin Pazola of Ocean View, Delaware, savors vinegar-drenched Thrasher’s French fries on the Boardwalk near Eighth Street, last Sunday.

SELLING TICKETS Art League Board Members Barbara Patrick, left, and Emily Schwab sell raffle tickets for an original David Lussier plein air painting during First Friday’s opening reception at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street.


AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

ON GUARD

Tide pools can be fun when enjoyed safely, OCBP says Continued from Page 36 overall change in climate patterns (based on historical data from NOAA). Warmer water is a major contributor to topical storm activity, which are like giant engines that use warm, moist air as fuel. All of these special circumstances can also be seen at barrier island beaches throughout the world based on prevailing weather patterns. Although I have given some cautions about tide pools, they can be fun when enjoyed safely. This season small tide pools have already formed in a couple of locations. Hopefully you will be lucky enough to see one and pass along our cautions to the people you are with. And remember, you can always introduce yourself to the lifeguard and ask them any questions that you have. They are a more than happy to inform you about the current beach conditions. As we move into the late summer season Ocean City can expect more exciting and fun acts of nature to reveal themselves. You never know what you are going to get with Mother Nature.

PAGE 39

OCBP to host first 5K event, Sat. By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The Ocean City Beach Patrol will hold its inaugural 5K event this Saturday, available to the public as well as surf rescue technicians, on the 40th Street beach, beginning at 8 a.m. Sgt. Matt Postell, coordinator of the 5K, wanted to replace the original triathlon event, which had been held for 13 years. “It got so competitive to the point where we weren’t real happy putting people on the course anymore, and so we decided instead to do something a lot more fun and safer,” Postell said. The event is open to the public. Participants should arrive at 7:30 a.m. in order to get their body marked. Currently, around 50 to 60 people have already signed up for the 5K. A majority of the participants are surf rescue technicians from the Ocean City Beach Patrol. The 5K will begin on 40th Street and work its way down to 16th Street. Participants will then turn around and return to 40th Street. A majority of the run will take place on hard, packed down sand and a shorter segment will be on soft sand. “There’s a portion that’s gonna be soft sand which will take up a quarter of a mile and that’s really just to facil-

itate the turnaround so that not everyone’s crisscrossing each other’s path,” Postell said. “It also will serve to make it sort of like a crazy adventure Matt Postell running in the soft sand.” The event takes place during low tide, so the hard sand will be as compact as a regular road, he said. Postell advises amateur runners or anyone who is not on the beach patrol to run with shoes to soften the impact on their joints. The money raised by the 5K this year will go toward funding spinal injuries research. After the run is completed, there will be an award

ceremony for the fastest runners as well as a quick discussion about what the funds will be used for. Additional donations will also be accepted. “It’s going to be a great event,” Postell said. “We think it’s going to be a lot of fun. I mean, running on the beach is awesome and 5Ks are awesome. So the combination of doing a 5K on the beach, I would think any runner would really enjoy doing it.” Postell is already considering plans for next year’s event, because he wants to ensure more people will participate. Walk-up registration will cost $10. For more information, call the Ocean City Beach Patrol at 410-2897556.

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PAGE 40

AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

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Around 60 artists competed during OC plein air event (Aug. 23, 2019) Raymond Ewing of Lewes, Delaware, took top honors in this year’s “Artists Paint OC” event with his painting, “Boat at Ready.” The top prize of $1,000 was sponsored by Emily and Paul Schwab. More than 60 participants — popular regional artists as well as painters from around the country — painted from Aug. 711 at picturesque spots around Ocean City. The event culminated with the Wet Paint Party & Sale on Saturday, when the artists brought their freshly-painted work indoors to hang on the walls of the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street and be judged and sold. David Lussier, acclaimed plein air artist of Somersworth, New Hampshire, judged the work and awarded cash prizes, including several themed awards. Besides Ewing, other cash winners included Jim Rehak of Seaford, Delaware, second place, and Carla Huber of Woolford, Maryland, third place. Honorable mentions went to: Lin McNamara of Severna Park, Maryland, Jill Glassman of Berlin, and J. Stacy Rogers of Lewes, Delaware. Bradford Ross of Easton, took home the Best Use of Light award. Mick McAndrews of Downington, See PLEIN Page 41

Rajendra KC of Falls Church, Virginia, was awarded first place in the “Artists Paint OC” Quick Draw competition.

Raymond Ewing of Lewes, Delaware, took top honors in this year’s “Artists Paint OC” event, held Aug. 7-11, with his painting, “Boat at Ready.” More than 60 artists painted at picturesque spots around Ocean City.

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

Plein air artwork on display and for sale through Aug.

PHOTO COURTESY OCEAN PINES ASSOCIATION

Volunteers help stuff bags for Worcester County teachers at Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services in Berlin.

Bags filled with supplies for new teachers in Wor. County (Aug. 23, 2019) Two dozen volunteers at Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services recently helped stuff bags for new teachers in Worcester County. The bags were filled with items donated by nearly 50 local businesses and community groups. Donated items included pens, paper and hand sanitizer, as well as coupons and discount cards. The bags will be presented during a new teacher orientation breakfast, next week. Ocean Pines donated pool passes for each new teacher. “I love to give back to our educational

team,” Ocean Pines Operations Director Colby Phillips said. “Educators are so important, as these are the people who help raise our children to follow their dreams by teaching them so much. It’s always important they are recognized for what they do not only for our children, but for the community.” Morgan Coulson, Worcester Youth communications director, helped to organize the collection. “We’re thrilled with the turnout from local businesses and community See FIFTY Page 43

Continued from Page 40 Pennsylvania, won Best Maritime, in honor of Ed and Emmy Challenger. Siobhan Duggan of Lewes, Delaware, earned the Best Hospitality award, and David Simpson of West Ocean City, won Best Nocturne. On Sunday morning, artists gathered on the downtown Boardwalk for the Quick Draw competition, sponsored by the Ocean City Development Corporation, where they produced original paintings within two hours. Quick Draw winners were: Rajendra KC of Falls Church, Virginia, first place; Dennis Young of New Castle, Delaware, second; Ross, third; and Glassman, honorable mention. The plein air artwork will be on exhibit and available for purchase at the Ocean City Center for the Arts through the end of August. More information about the event is available online at www.artleagueofoceancity.org or by calling the Ocean City Center for the Arts at 410-524-9433. The Ocean City Center for the Arts at 502 94th Street, is the home of the Art League of Ocean City, a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing the visual arts to the community through education, exhibits, scholarship, programs and community art projects.

PAGE 41


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Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

DONATION Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City President Dick Clagett presents a $300 donation to Jeremy Goetzinger, founder of Achilles International Maryland, the local chapter in Ocean Pines. The organization's mission is to enable people with all types of disabilities to participate in mainstream athletics, promote personal achievement, enhance self esteem, and lower barriers to living a full life."

RECOGNITION Jim Simon, left, receives recognition for his work with the Lions Vision and eye glass collection. He is pictured with Lions Club Outgoing President Norm Cathell.

CELEBRATION

TOP ESSAY

The Democratic Women's Club celebrated summer at the Dunes Manor Hotel in Ocean City with a luncheon and fashion show, featuring clothing from Crazy Ladyz on June 20. The DWC will resume regular meetings on Sept. 16, at the Ocean Pines Community Center. Coffee and conversation at 9:30 a.m., meeting begins at 10 a.m.

Chairman of the Worcester County Garden Club, Joanne Kirby, presents Worcester Preparatory School student, 16-year-old Hannah Perdue of Salisbury, a first-place winner award for her entry in the National Garden Clubs Inc. Essay Contest. The annual contest is sponsored by the Worcester County Garden Club, District I, Federated Garden Clubs of Maryland, Inc.

SCHOLARSHIPS Ocean City Elks #2645 awarded scholarships to 12 senior graduates this year – nine from Stephen Decatur and three from Worcester Prep. Two students were presented $6,000 ($1,500 for four years), two $4,000 ($1,000 for four years), two $2,000 ($500 for four years) and six received $1,000 ($500 per year for two years). Pictured are Kevin Mathews exalted ruler; David Poore, scholarship chairman; scholarship recipients Sierra Payne, Kaitlyn Peters, Danielle Munn, Logan Townsend, Jack Walinskas, Matt Durkin and Ethan Sheiber; Pat Flynn, scholarship chair; and John Loftus, state president. Scholarship recipients not pictured: Zain Brady, Jude Al-Hamad, Samantha Short, Alyvia Ciurca and Noparat Puntakarn.

PRESENTATION District 7630 Lt. Governor Elect Bob Smith, and member of the Ocean City-Berlin Rotary Club, presents a Paul Harris Fellow and a RYLA staff T-shirt to Kim Heffner of the Carousel Hotel for her dedication to coordinate the Rotary Youth and Leadership Awards, which has been held at the Ocean City hotel for five years. Pictured, from left, are Ocean City Berlin Rotary Club President Margaret Mudron, Smith, Heffner, RYLA Chair Phil Reed and District Gov. Nominee Stephen Capelli.


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

AGH Goes Purple kickoff, Aug. 30 (Aug. 23, 2019) Atlantic General Hospital has announced its Goes Purple kickoff event on Friday, Aug. 30, in collaboration with Worcester Goes Purple and community partners. The community education and resource event in observance of Opioid Awareness Day, will promote opioid awareness by providing information on recovery and peer support, integrative therapies, Naloxone training and other resources for addiction treatment. The event will take place in Atlantic General Hospital Main Lobby in Berlin, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There is no cost to participate. Worcester Goes Purple has secured grant funding from the Worcester County Arts Council for the installation of an art rock river. Rocks will be available during the event to be painted and placed in the River of Care and River of Hope in

honor of those who have died from an overdose or are struggling with addiction. For more information, contact Donna Nordstrom, Atlantic General Hospital cirector of Community Health, at 410-629-6820 or dnordstrom@atlanticgeneral.org. Worcester Goes Purple is an opioid addiction awareness and prevention campaign taking place in September across Worcester County. The campaign’s mission is to start the conversation within the community about drug education and prevention, the signs and symptoms of addiction, and where community resources can be found for assistance. “Going Purple” is currently looking for volunteers or business partners to join the movement. Show support by wearing purple, displaying purple in yards or homes, putting a purple light-

bulb in business storefronts, or business owners can create a purple product. For more information about participation in this campaign, contact WGP Event Coordinator, Debbie Smullen at 410-870-5161 or at dasmullen@worcesterk12.org. Atlantic General Hospital has been providing quality health care to the residents of Worcester, Wicomico, and Somerset counties in Maryland and Sussex County, Delaware, since May 1993. Built by the commitment and generosity of a dedicated community, the hospital’s state-of-the-art facility in Berlin combines old-fashioned personal attention with the latest in technology and services. It provides quality specialty care such as weight loss surgery, orthopedics, outpatient infusion and chemotherapy for individuals with cancer or blood/au-

Main Street, in Berlin. The nonprofit assists area youth and families through a variety of programs, including the Berlin Youth Club, SABERS and SAGES, as well as offering therapeutic services. For more information, visit www.GoWOYO.com.

toimmune disorders, and a comprehensive women’s diagnostic center. Atlantic General Health System, its network of more than 40 primary care providers and specialists, care for residents and visitors throughout the region. For more information about Atlantic General Hospital, visit www.atlanticgeneral.org.

OPEN 7 DAYS 11AM

Fifty local businesses donate Continued from Page 41 groups,” she said. “We believe that supporting teachers in their own life will lead them to be great, happy educators and ultimately that benefits the children they work with.” Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services is located on 124 North

River rocks of hope painted by members of the community will be placed in the River of Care and the River of Hope. Rocks will be available during the Atlantic General Hospital Goes Purple kickoff event on Friday, Aug. 30.

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PAGE 44

Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

SURF REPORT

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Dalkiewicz talks benefits of neighboring Assateague Is. By Dave Dalkiewicz Contributing Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) A recent surf contest reminded me of the virtues of Assateague Island. It’s beautiful there with only the starkness of nature to help preserve and maintain that natural beauty. We’re quite fortunate to have the accessibility and acceptance though it almost didn’t happen. Back in the day lots were platted and plans made for the creation of a community and town. That was over 50 years ago. The event that stopped the town’s creation was the Ash Wednesday Storm of 1962. This was a cold winter nor’easter that lasted multiple days. Today, Assateague Island consists of a State Park and a National Park. There is no residential area but camping is available. The surf can get very good with much of it due to the natural flow of sand and water as opposed to the dredging pumping that can occur in Ocean City. Popularity has grown exponentially, by leaps and bounds, as of late. Ten to 20 years ago the island was a well-kept secret. On a recent Saturday, the parking lot at the State Park

was full by late morning with a line of cars waiting to get in. Reservations for camping get booked weeks and even years in advance. Day trips are just as popular if not more so. Surfing can be an all-day event on the island with plenty of room to spread out. Crowds never seem to be a problem. There’s even an off-road section all the way to the southern part of the island. Four-wheel drive vehicles will allow passage right up on the beach. This is another favorable feature to our neighbor to the south. There is such a dichotomy, such a difference of Ocean City and Assateague. The honky tonk verses natural beauty, night life verses no night life. Makes for a wonderful situation and one which we are very fortunate to have. So there you have it, there it is. Practically a perfect set-up with preservation guaranteed due to the State and Federal Parks. So fortunate to coincide with our southerly neighbors there can be no better way to spend our hallowed tax monies. So open, wild, revered and spread out for miles and miles. What’s not to like? Thank God for Assateague. – Dave Dalkiewicz is the owner of Ocean Atlantic Surf Shop in Ocean City.

Fourth annual Ocean City Film Festival held in March

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Bring your Chairs/Blanke ets and enjoy our Bannds in the Sand.

(Aug. 23, 2019) The Ocean City Film Festival was ranked one of the “Top 100 Best Reviewed Festivals” by FilmFreeway in June. This ranking, according to real FilmFreeway users, places the Ocean City festival in the top 1.5 percent of more than 8,000 film festivals and creative contests around the word. FilmFreeway is an online service where independent filmmakers submit their films for potential screenings at film festivals around the world. “This ranking is a testament to the countless hours of hard work and care that you and your staff have devoted to creating such a wonderful event,” FilmFreeway stated. “We’re especially proud to be partnered with amazing events like yours that help independent films continue to thrive.” The third annual Ocean City Film Festival was held in the resort March 8-10. The fourth annual festival is

scheduled for March 5-8, 2020. FilmFreeway is accepting submissions from filmmakers for the 2020 festival. “We love seeing all the talent that comes from local artists, but we’d always love to see more films that are shot right here in OC,” said Film Festival Director William Strang-Moya. “Ocean City is a beautiful landscape and there’s so much that artists can take advantage of right here in town.” More information and updates on the festival is available online at www.ocmdfilmfestival.com. The Ocean City Center for the Arts at 502 94th Street is the home of the Art League of Ocean City, a nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing the visual arts to the community through education, exhibits, scholarship, programs and community art projects. More information is available at 410-524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org.


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

Several Appalachia Service Project volunteers from Community Church of Ocean Pines prepare to install insulation in a Kentucky home.

WPS students participate in Appalachia Service Project (Aug. 23, 2019) As soon as school let out for summer, groups of Worcester Preparatory students, parents and faculty loaded into caravans headed to Kentucky and West Virginia as part of the Appalachia Service Project. Volunteers from the Worcester Prep community participated in one of three Appalachia Service Project church trips: The Community Church of Ocean Pines, Trinity United Methodist Church, and St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church. The Appalachia Service Project mission trips are part of a Christian ministry that inspires hope and service through volunteer home repair in Central Appalachia. The Community Church of Ocean Pines group, coordinated by Worcester Prep teacher Allison Bescak, traveled to Magoffin County, Kentucky, for a week to repair homes and make them warmer, safer and drier. The other two Appalachia Service Project groups, from Trinity United Methodist Church and St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church in Salisbury, traveled to West Virginia to assist families in need. Led by Bescak, Appalachia Service

Project coordinator, the 45 volunteers (23 from Worcester Prep) who traveled to Kentucky hosted fundraisers and collected donations from parishioners and local businesses, such as Chesapeake Eye Center, to help fund the trip. “We travel there with the hopes of changing peoples’ lives, but in reality, it is our lives that are changed for the better,” she said. “This is a ministry with a little construction on the side. Being uncomfortable in our own skin ultimately forces change and growth that is hard to put in words.” This was not the first Appalachia Service Project trip for most of the Worcester Prep students or parents. Many have volunteered for three to four consecutive years. Reflecting on her four years with Appalachia Service Project, senior Gracie Gardner added, “Knowing I am making a difference first hand, my ASP trips have truly been the best weeks of my summers.” “Witnessing extreme poverty in our own country, volunteering with peers my age, and bonding with families we serve, has been a life-changing experience I will never forget,” she said.


AUGUST 23, 2019

PAGE 47

Ocean City Today

NORI SUSHI BAR & GRILL

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SERVICE PROJECT The Community Church of Ocean Pines group, coordinated by Worcester Prep teacher Allison Bescak and as part of the Appalachia Service Project, traveled to Magoffin County, Kentucky, for a week to repair homes this summer.

Second walking tour added for ‘Runaway Bride’ By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Residents and visitors have two more chances to take a free “Runaway Bride” guided walking tour in Berlin next week. Earlier this month, Ivy Wells, Berlin director of community and economic development, added a second tour to the weekly event because of the high demand generated by the celebration of the movie’s 20th anniversary. “It just goes to show this movie touches a lot of people’s hearts,” Wells said. In the film, Richard Gere plays a journalist who tracks down a bride, Julia Roberts, who has become notorious for leaving her grooms at the altar. Wells said there’s been an average of 50 people who’ve attended the tours See PARTICIPANTS Page 50

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Tour Guide Mary Raley informs residents and visitors about Julia Robert’s character, Maggie Carpenter’s iconic blue house on Baker Street on Monday during a free “Runaway Bride” guided walking tour throughout Berlin. Those interested can register for one of two tours next Monday, Aug. 26.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 48

AUGUST 23, 2019

Dining Guide ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ■ RESERVATIONS: Reservations accepted ________________________________

DOWNTOWN

South end to 28th Street ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-2897192, www.captainstableoc.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410524 3100, www.coinspub.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything homemade. Happy hour 3-6 p.m. and early bird 4-6 p.m. Daily specials. ■ THE CORAL REEF CAFE / HEMINGWAY'S RESTAURANT 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612, www.ocsuites.com/dining $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Four-story atrium cafe and an elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine, fresh seafood, fresh cuts of meat, farm-to-table produce, artisanal desserts, hearty sandwiches and much more. ■ COWBOY COAST COUNTRY SALOON AND STEAKHOUSE 17th Street, Ocean City 410-289-6331, www.cowboycoastoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Hand cut steaks, beer can chicken and fresh seafood. We even pickle our own pickles for the best fried pickles you’ve ever had. Kids ride for free on OC’s only mechanical bull. Nightly drink specials, live music and national concert acts. ■ THE DOUGH ROLLER South Division Street and Boardwalk 410-289-3501; 3rd Street and Boardwalk 410-289-2599 $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Breakfast served daily at West OC, 3rd, 41st, and 70th street locations. Dayton’s Boardwalk famous fried chicken and seafood, cooked to order at S. Division Street. Check out our new bar and happy hour specials at our new West OC location. Order online at www.TheDoughRoller.com. ■ FISHTALES BAR & GRILL 21st Street and the Bay, Ocean City 410-289-0990, www.ocfishtales.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar FishTales located in a premier outdoor beach location on the bay with the best sunsets. Come for the best local fare. We offer lunch and dinner with great happy hour food and drink specials. Kids play area too. So sit back and enjoy. ■ FROG BAR Inlet Village, Ocean City 410-289-3764 $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open daily, 8 a.m. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Two-hour parking available at the Inlet Village parking lot (under the bar) free for bar patrons. Great place to sit and have a beer and relax. Enjoy appetizers, salads, sandwiches, burgers and chowders while enjoying the view of the inlet and Assateague Island. ■ HARBOR WATCH 806 S. Atlantic Ave., Inlet, Ocean City 410-289-5121, www.harborwatchrestaurant.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Bringing Ocean City the freshest seafood, an award-winning Raw Bar along with certified Angus Beef. Great view of the Ocean City Inlet and Assateague Island. Call for Banquet information. Hours are Friday and Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday, 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. ■ HOOTERS 5th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-2892690, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Traditional or boneless wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with Alaskan snow crab legs and Maryland steam pots. Pet friendly oceanfront patio. ■ PHILLIPS SEAFOOD, CRAB HOUSE 21st Street, Ocean City 410-289-7747, PhillipsSeafood.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Traditional dining, buffet and carry out. Early Bird Menu when seated between 3-4 p.m. All-you-can-eat buffet. Voted OC’s Best Buffet. Featuring more than 100 items including snow crab legs, carving station, made-to-order pasta, handmade crab cakes and so much more. ■ SANIBELS, OCEANSIDE 32 106 32nd Street, Ocean City 410-213-7273, www.sanibelsoceanside32.com $-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Fresh local seafood, hand-cut steaks, daily selection of fresh oysters, lite-fare, handhelds and entrees. Happy hour daily, 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. featuring fresh oysters for a “Buck A Shuck” food and drink specials. Private party and event packages are available. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-289-1100, www.dunesmanor.com $$ - $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.

(Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season.

MIDTOWN

29th to 90th streets ■ 32 PALM 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-2892525, www.oceancityhilton.com/dining $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, extensive wine list and gourmet desserts. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575, www.bjsonthewater.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week, year-round. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ COCONUTS BEACH BAR AND GRILL Castle in the Sand Hotel, 37th St & the Beach, Ocean City 800-552-7263, www.castleinthesand.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Beachfront open-air dining in a tropical setting. Serving grilled sandwiches, specialty salads, appetizers, wraps, tacos and frozen drinks, beer and wine. Live entertainment. Happy Hour daily, 5-6 p.m., 2-for-1 drink specials. Waitress service on the beach Memorial Day thru Labor Day. Coconuts is open daily 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., weather permitting. ■ THE DOUGH ROLLER 41st Street and Coastal Highway 410-524-9254; 70th Street and Coastal Highway 410-524-7981 See description under downtown location. ■ DRY 85 OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-8989, www.DRY85.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Gourmet “stick to your ribs” home cooking. A made-from-scratch kitchen with every sauce and every dressing hand crafted. It’s that attention to detail that takes the concept of burgers, fries, pork chops and wings and turns them completely on their head. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 31st Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600, www.johnnyspizzapub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Featuring homemade pizzas, 18 gourmet pizzas, a variety of calzones, subs, burgers, sandwiches and jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Carry out, delivery or dine in. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443-664-5639, www.longboardcafe.net $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MARLIN MOON 3301 Atlantic Ave., in the DoubleTree Ocean City 410-280-1201, www.marlinmoonocmd.com $$ | Full bar Featuring Executive Chef Gary Beach. Fresh cuisine featuring locally sourced seafood, steaks and vegetables. Small plate appetizers, fresh salads. Local craft beers and cocktails. Open for lunch and dinner, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ RED RED WINE BAR OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-6801, www.RedRedWineBar.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Coastal cuisine with a focus on local seafood and hand tossed pizzas plus artisanal cheeseboards. 35+ wines By the Glass, 120+ By the Bottle. Flights. Luxurious colors and custom built couches. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ SEACRETS 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900, www.seacrets.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762, www.skyebaroc.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials. ■ THREE ANCHORS 7805 Coastal Highway Unit B, Ocean City 410-5248930, info@threeanchorsoc.com $-$$ | Full bar Serving up unique coastal cuisines and spirits. Enjoy local beer selections at both the upstairs and downstairs bars or grab a table on the second floor deck for

the clam strips casino and a swordfish burger, both local favorites. Open for brunch and lunch weekends and daily for dinner. Happy hour 4-6 p.m., Monday-Friday at the bar. Smoothie and ice cream shack open daily at 10 a.m.

UPTOWN

91st to 146th streets ■ ABBEY BURGER BISTRO OC 126th Street, behind the Holiday Inn, Ocean City 410289-2525, 410-250-2333, www.abbeyburger.com/ocean-city $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Large parties welcome. Craft beer. Award winning burgers. Voted Best in Maryland, Wild Game. ■ ALBERTINO’S BRICK OVEN EATERY 13117 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-2000, www.albertinosoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Lunch and dinner daily. Open Monday through Thursday, 4 p.m. and Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. Homemade pizza and pasta, seafood, steaks. Daily specials and happy hour. ■ BEACH BARRELS 13207 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-0522, www.beachbarrels.com $ | Full bar Happy hour Monday through Friday, 3-6 p.m. Live entertainment Wednesday through Saturday. Featuring primo hoagie menu where premium ingredients are fresh, nothing is pre-cut. Open 7 days, 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983, www.bluefishocmd.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896, www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com $$-$$$ | Reservations recommended for large parties | Kids’ menu | Full bar Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, steaks and pasta dishes. Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ THE CRAB BAG 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-250-3337, www.thecrabbag.com $-$$ | Full bar Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carryout and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DUFFYS 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449, www.duffysoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second season and daily dinner specials. Dine in, carry out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 128th Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535, www.clarionoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving beach-inspired dishes in our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet, open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available Friday and Saturday, 5-9 p.m. ■ MY THAI OC 13727 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-9918, mythaioc.webs.com $-$$ | Beer, wine Authentic Thai food, full vegan menu and vegetarian options including curry, rice and noodle dishes. Homemade appetizers, soups and sauces. Seafood, meat, vegetable and tofu. Desserts, beer and wine. Dine in or takeout. Lunch specials daily, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. ■ NORI 11403 Coastal Highway (Gold Coast Mall), Ocean City443-880-6258 $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open 7 days serving lunch and dinner. Our creative menu features hand-cut steaks, grilled fish, crab cakes, sushi and sashimi. Dine-in or carry-out. ■ REEF 118 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-524-1000, www.carouselhotel.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., seafood, ribs,

steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ TEA BOSS CAFE 11805 Coastal Highway, Unit B (Food Lion Plaza) 410-213-4693 $ | Kids’ menu Bubble Tea, Sushi Takeaway, Ice Cream Rolls, Bingsu. Family and large group friendly. Newly opened cafe serving variety of Asian specialty desserts and sushi. Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. ■ WHISKERS PUB 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609, www.whiskerspub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Certified Angus®burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.

DELAWARE ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436FOXS, www.foxspizzade.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery.

WEST OCEAN CITY ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717, www.ocitalianfood.com $-$$ | Reservations Accepted | Full bar Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room. Early bird specials every day from 4-6 p.m. ■ THE DOUGH ROLLER West Ocean City, 12849 Ocean Gateway 410-2137655 See description under downtown location. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR AND GRILL 128741 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846, weocharborside.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Home of the Original Fresh Squeezed Orange Crush! Open every day, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Appetizers, fresh seafood, steak and pasta. Live entertainment everyday. ■ HOOTERS Route 50 & Keyser Point Road, West Ocean City 410213-1841, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu and game room | Full bar New smoked wings with half the calories. Traditional wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with raw bar and crab legs. Sports packages and live entertainment. Large parties welcome. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 $ | Kids’ menu Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo.

OCEAN PINES ■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410-6417222, www.OPyachtclub.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Amid a bay front setting, the Ocean Pines Yacht Club offers dining selections for lunch and dinner. Fresh seafood and signature drinks. Open everyday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ TERN GRILLE 100 Clubhouse Drive, Ocean Pines 410-641-7222, oceanpinesgolf.org/dining $$ | Full bar The Tern Grille serves freshly-prepared breakfast and lunch items. Open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, weather permitting.

BERLIN ■ OCEAN DOWNS CASINO, POSEIDON’S PUB 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-641-0600, www.oceandowns.com $-$$$ | Full bar House soups, small plates, sandwiches, burgers and entrees including steaks, chicken, veggie and Eastern Shore favorites. Dining room hours: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, 4-11 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to midnight; Sunday, noon to 11 p.m. Pub open late.


AUGUST 23, 2019

PAGE 49

Ocean City Today

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PAGE 50

Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

Participants can visit iconic movie landmarks in town Continued from Page 47 sponsored by the Gulyas family. “They’re more popular than we expected,” Wells said. People can have their pictures taken with cardboard cutouts of Roberts and Gere at a photo station. The selfie station is available from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday at the center on 14 S. Main St. Tour Guide Mary Raley of Ocean Pines took a moment to greet the crowd of tourgoers wearing a wedding veil. “Hi everyone. Welcome to Berlin. I mean to Hale,” Raley said. The fictional town’s name is drawn from the late Berlin nurseryman G. Hale Harrison and the Hale Harrison Brilliant Peach grown by the Harrison Brothers orchards and nurseries from the turn of the century to the 1960s. Area residents and visitors showed up to the Berlin Welcome Center for the 4 p.m. tour. “I didn’t realize it was filmed here,” Idaho resident Holly Weaver said. Others said they heard about the tour from the newspaper and social media. Ocean Pines resident Barbara Shotwell said she was looking forward to the tour. Raley began with a brief introduction about what people could expect from the roughly 45-minute tour of the town. She planned to show some of the landmarks featured in the film, including the Atlantic Hotel, Rayne’s Reef or the “Falcon Diner,” and Robert’s house on Baker Street. Raley said the entire film was shot in Maryland, including the football scenes, which were shot at Snow Hill High School. As tour participants took a stroll along Main Street, they observed that shops featured in the movie had posters in the windows, and wedding bows adorned the town’s lampposts. A fan of the film herself, Raley said she loves sharing the movie’s history with others. “I know the history of the town and I just think it was so wonderful that we were chosen and that it was a fun time, a great time and it really put us on the map,” she said. Raley also took a moment to share an anecdote in front of Victorian Charm, which was the wedding dress shop in the film. “Here’s something interesting that nobody knows: the gal who owns this store, Debbie [Frene], actually dated Richard Gere’s bodyguard for a short time,” Raley said. “She’s married now, but not to the bodyguard.” Selbyville resident Cindy Giddings said she enjoyed it. “I thought it was very interesting, and I really learned a lot, and it brought back a lot of memories,” she said. Additionally, there are numerous ways “Runaway Bride” lovers can cele-

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Participants of the “Runaway Bride” guided tour listen to Mary Raley as she provides information about the movie in front of the Atlantic Hotel on Main Street, Monday, Aug. 19. The tour covers landmarks from when filming took place in Berlin. There are two more free guided tours next Monday, Aug. 26.

brate the monumental anniversary. Patrons of the Calvin B. Taylor House Museum can learn more about the “Runaway Bride” era in Berlin through photo albums, newspaper clippings and memorabilia on display this month in the Harrison Room to get a better sense of what the town looked like 20 years ago. For more information, visit the museum on 208 N. Main St. in Berlin. Fans can also participate in a 25question movie trivia game. Contestants with 10 correct answers would be eligible for a free one-night stay at the Atlantic Hotel on Main Street. Completed trivia papers should be submitted to a collection box in the welcome center’s vestibule by Aug. 31. Wells said winners would be announced on Sept. 4. The townwide bash will culminate with the Berlin Arts and Entertainment Committee’s showing of Runaway Bride at 8:30 p.m. this Saturday at the intersection of Jefferson and Main streets. Wells said Jefferson Street would close for the event. Robin Tomaselli, vice president of the Arts and Entertainment Committee, which is hosting the event, said guests could participate in a wedding-themed costume contest with prizes awarded to the best-dressed man, woman and child. A parade on Jefferson Street is also planned. “It’s a good way to celebrate the movie, to celebrate the history of Berlin … and it should be a fun free event for people of all ages,” Tomaselli said in a July interview. Tomaselli also said moviegoers could sit in style with cafe table and chairs for $40. It includes light fare, a beverage and a piece of wedding cake. Proceeds benefit the Berlin Arts and Entertainment Committee. For more information, visit Berlin’s Arts and Entertainment Committee’s website at artsinberlin.org. The last guided tours will take place at 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 26. Those interested in attending should call 410-629-1716 to register.

CROSSWORD

Answers on page 53


AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 51

Wor. Prep students visit universities in Delaware and Pa. (Aug. 23, 2019) Worcester Preparatory School college counselors led a group of students on a summer road trip to visit four universities in Delaware and Pennsylvania over two days. Seven students accompanied Director of College Counseling, Victoria (Vickie) Garner, and Assistant to College Counseling, Katie Oxenreider, as they navigated Swarthmore College, Villanova University, University of Pennsylvania, and University of Delaware. The seven Worcester Prep students who participated were: Ian Betterson, ‘22, Waverly Choy, ‘21, Josh Conway, ‘22, Grace Hopkins, ‘21, Sophia Ludt, ‘21, Riley Schoch, ‘22,

Breakfast

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Served Tues-Sun, 8am-11am

Wonderful Homemade Breakfast Fresh Smoothies | Acai Bowls Tropical Outside Seating An Amazing Experience!

DINE IN or GRAB & GO

302-581-0217 300 Coastal Highway, Village of Fenwick Fenwick Island, DE Open at 5 for Award-Winning Sushi

Worcester Preparatory School college counselors led a group of students on a summer road trip to visit four universities in Delaware and Pennsylvania over two days. The group is pictured at University of Pennsylvania.

and Summer Walker, ‘21. The students experienced college information sessions with admission counselors, in addition to campus tours with student ambassadors from each college. They were exposed to four diverse

campuses where they learned firsthand about real life college experiences from student tour guides. Garner is Worcester Prep’s fulltime director of College Counseling with more than 30 years of experience as a college counselor and inde-

pendent school administrator. She is a highly respected member of the college counseling profession and has visited more than 500 colleges and universities throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East.


PAGE 52

AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

Fri., Aug. 23

crafts using materials provided by the library. For all ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FREE MUSEUM PROGRAM FREE MUSEUM PROGRAM

FIBER FRIENDS

OC JEEP WEEK

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:00 AM. Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, etc. are welcomed. Bring your lap work and join this informal get-together. Victoria Christie-Healy, moonlightknitting@gmail.com, 703-507-0708, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM. The Off-Road Expo held at the convention center, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., will feature vendors, vintage Jeep displays and show specials including parts. Jeep Jam, held 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Mays Sports Complex in Pittsville will offer an off-road park with trails and obstacles. Open to the public. General admission (includes both locations) costs are $10 per day or 2-day passes for $15. The Beach Crawl staging is at Jolly Roger back parking lot each day at 6:45 a.m. prompt. The parade, beginning at 7:30 a.m., proceeds along the beach from 30th Street to the Inlet parking lot. The Beach Sand Course, on the beach north of the pier, in front of Somerset Street, offers 3 shifts: 10 a.m. to noon; 1-3 p.m.; and 4-6 p.m. Brad Hoffman, 443-3665944, https://www.oceancityjeepweek.com

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM. The Off-Road Expo held at the convention center, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., will feature vendors, vintage Jeep displays and show specials including parts. Jeep Jam, held 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Mays Sports Complex in Pittsville will offer an off-road park with trails and obstacles. Open to the public. General admission (includes both locations) costs are $10 per day; 2-day passes for $15; or 3-day passes for $20. The Beach Crawl staging is at Jolly Roger back parking lot each day at 6:45 a.m. prompt. The parade, beginning at 7:30 a.m., proceeds along the beach from 30th Street to the Inlet parking lot. The Beach Sand Course, on the beach north of the pier, in front of Somerset Street, offers 3 shifts: 10 a.m. to noon; 1-3 p.m.; and 4-6 p.m. Brad Hoffman, 443-366-5944, https://www.oceancityjeepweek.com

READ! BUILD! PLAY! Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:00 PM. A special type of story time that will focus on one book and include building and/or play to support the story. For children up to age 5 years. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Sat., Aug. 24 INDOOR YARD SALE Church of the Holy Spirit, 10001 Coastal Highway, 7:00 AM - 12:00 PM. 410-7231973

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S. Atlantic Ave., 10:00 AM. Saturdays feature “Aquarium Feeding.” 410289-4991, http://www.ocmuseum.org

ARTX Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, 12:00 PM - 8:00 PM. ArtX will include artisan work for sale covering classic and unique categories such as music, cinematography and photography, sculpting, painting, ceramics, drawing, glass and more. Enjoy films from the March film festival and live music throughout the event. Guest of all ages will find hands-on activities, including frisbee illustration, Zentangle, beading and speed painting. More serious workshops are available for advanced registration at artleagueofoceancity.org. A free concert by RIPE and the Swell Fellas begins at 8 p.m. The event offers food and beverage selections including craft beer and wine. ArtX is pet-friendly. For the event schedule and map: https://ococean.com/application/files/9 715/6581/3548/ArtX19_Brochure_1.4_ FINAL_WEB.pdf. 800-626-2326, http://www.OCocean.com

SPACE ACADEMY CRAFTY SATURDAY MAKE & TAKE ‘PROCESS ART’ Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM. Create themed

BENEFIT FOR FIRE VICTIM Germantown School, 10223 Trappe Road, 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM. Benefit for fire victim John Maxwell. Platters and sandwiches of pulled pork and bar-bque chicken, with 2 sides, will be sold. Cost is $12 for platters and $5 for sandwiches. Hot dogs sold for $1. Carry out or eat in. 410-641-0638

SUPER BINGO

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S. Atlantic Ave., 10:00 AM. Fridays feature “Land, Sky & Sea.” Held outside the museum on the boardwalk. 410-2894991, http://www.ocmuseum.org

OC JEEP WEEK

end. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Space themed craft, games and activities. Each kid will receive a certificate of completion at the

Willards Lions Club, Main Street. Doors open at 5 p.m., early bird games at 5:30 p.m., 6 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Regular bingo starts at 7 p.m. Pays $125 per game. Assorted food and desserts for sale. Benefits the Willards Volunteer Fire Company. 410-430-1135

SOUTHERN GOSPEL CONCERT Wilson United Methodist Church, 10722 Bishopville Road, 7:00 PM. Featuring “Port City Quartet” of Wilmington, NC. A love offering will be collected. Everyone is welcome. Rev. Paul Sherwood, 410-352-5728 or 443-523-5116

FREE OUTDOOR MOVIE ‘RUNAWAY BRIDE’ Jefferson Street, 8:30 PM. Bring a chair, snacks and enjoy the film where it was filmed. Adults and children are encouraged to wear their best ‘Runaway Bride’ movie costumes to win prizes. The Berlin Arts and Entertainment Committee will also be offering a special café table seating option, which will include a beverage, light fare and a slice of wedding cake. Robin Tomaselli, 410-6411800

FARMERS & ARTISANS MARKET Saturdays - White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM. Featuring live music, chef demos, children’s activities and other special events. Shop for everything from fresh local produce to unique handmade artisan goods. Open to the public.

Sun., Aug. 25 BERLIN FARMERS MARKET Pitts Street and Main Street, 9:00 AM 1:00 PM. Featuring more than 20 vendors including fresh fruits and veggies, baked goods, seafood, poultry, farm fresh eggs, organic goods, wood working, beauty products and more. Also enjoy free crafts for kids, a variety of tutorials, a petting zoo and music provided by Troy Mawyer. Ivy Wells and Allison Early, 410-973-2051

the March film festival and live music throughout the event. Guest of all ages will find hands-on activities, including frisbee illustration, Zentangle, beading and speed painting. More serious workshops are available for advanced registration at artleagueofoceancity.org. The event offers food and beverage selections including craft beer and wine. ArtX is pet-friendly. For the event schedule and map: https://ococean.com/application/files/9715/6581/3548/ArtX19_Bro chure_1.4_FINAL_WEB.pdf. 800-6262326, http://www.OCocean.com

OC JEEP WEEK Jeep Jam, held 9:30 a.m. to noon at Mays Sports Complex in Pittsville will offer an off-road park with trails and obstacles. Open to the public. General admission costs are $10 per day. The Beach Crawl staging is at Jolly Roger back parking lot each day at 6:45 a.m. prompt. The parade, beginning at 7:30 a.m., proceeds along the beach from 30th Street to the Inlet parking lot. The Beach Sand Course, on the beach north of the pier, in front of Somerset Street, offers 1 shift: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Brad Hoffman, 443-366-5944, https://www.oceancityjeepweek.com

SUNDAES IN THE PARK AND FIREWORKS Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Featuring live music by “Jaded Love” (American rock tribute band) and free entertainment and activities for children too. Also, create your own sundae for a nominal fee. Additional ice cream novelty and beverage options are available for purchase. Bring your picnic basket and beach chairs. The night will end with a fireworks display at 9pm. In the event of inclement weather, this event will be moved inside the complex. 410-2892800 or 800-626-2326

Mon., Aug. 26 MONDAY MOVIE MATINEE ‘VIOLETS ARE BLUE’ (1986) Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:00 PM. Light refreshments provided. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

THE MOBILE MENTOR Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 2:00 PM. Providing one-on-one assistance for those who want to make the most of their tablet or mobile device. Explore digital library resources such as books, magazines, audiobooks, music, movies and TV. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

ARTX Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM. ArtX will include artisan work for sale covering classic and unique categories such as music, cinematography and photography, sculpting, painting, ceramics, drawing, glass and more. Enjoy films from

RUNAWAY BRIDE WALKING TOUR Berlin Welcome Center, 14 S Main St., 4:00 PM. In celebrations of the 20th Anniversary of the release of Runaway Bride, the town will hold free walking tours every Monday in August. Tour guide Mary Raley will share stories of


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

CALENDAR the filming and point out each location. There will be trivia questions in most of the downtown shop windows and visitors can pick up an entry form inside each shop or at the Berlin Welcome Center.

SNOW HILL BOOK OF THE MONTH Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 5:30 PM. This month’s selection is “Back When We Were Grownups” by Anne Tyler. Copies of the book are available at the library in advance. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM. TOPS is a weekly support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. Berlin group No. 169. Rose Campion, 410-6410157

FREE MOVIE ON THE BEACH Carousel Resort Hotel and Condominiums, 11700 Coastal Highway, 8:30 PM. Featuring “Dumbo.” Bring a beach chair or blanket. In the event of inclement weather, the movie may be held inside the hotel. 410-250-0125, http://www.oceancitymd.gov

BEACH FIREWORKS Talbot Street beach, 10:30 PM. 410-2892800

DELMARVA A CAPELLA CHORUS Mondays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 7:00 PM. All levels of singers and drop-ins welcome. Carol, 410-641-6876

Tues., Aug. 27 FAMILY TIME ‘ROCKETS’ Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM. Have fun with a rocket craft activity. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

OC BEACH DANCE PARTY Caroline Street Stage, Caroline Street and the Boardwalk, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Free interactive entertainment and music by DJ Knappy. Bring a beach chair or blanket to enjoy the music and dance in the sand. 410-250-0125 or 800-626-2326, http://www.ococean.com

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Tuesdays - Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and health lifestyle. jeanduck47@gmail.com

‘ASK A MASTER GARDENER’ PLANT CLINIC Tuesdays through September - Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1-4 p.m. Bring your photos or bagged plant samples by and let expert Master Gardeners find solutions to your questions. Free service.

Wed., Aug. 28

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OP/OC Wednesdays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB Wednesdays - Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM. Dance to the sounds of the ’50s and ’60s music. A $5 donation to benefit Veterans and local charities. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 410-208-1151, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

OC/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING Wednesdays - Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St., 6:00 PM. 302-540-2127

Thurs., Aug. 29 END OF SUMMER PARTY Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 AM. Treats, prizes and fun for children of all ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Providing physical and emotional support for survivors and caregivers to share personal experiences and challenges. Coping strategies also discussed. Anne Waples, awaples@atlanticgeneral.org, 443-614-5720

FAMILY BEACH OLYMPICS Carousel Resort Hotel and Condominiums, 11700 Coastal Highway, 6:30 PM 8:30 PM. Held Thursdays through Aug. 29. Featuring a variety of contests for all ages including sand castle contests, tugof-war, relays and more.

Fontainebleau Hotel, 10100 Coastal Highway, 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM. Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Info: 302-436-9577, 410-524-0649 or BeachSingles.org

GRIEF SUPPORT Thursdays - Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11:00 AM. Coastal Hospice provides grief support and education. Participants work together to help each other navigate through grief at their own pace. Free and open to the public. Nicole Long, 443-614-6142

ONGOING EVENTS

STORY TIME ‘FAIRY TALES’ Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FORGE FRIDAY FORGE Youth and Family, 7804 Gumboro Road, Pittsville, every Friday, 6:308:30 p.m. This is a contemporary youth and family ministry, designed for kids ages 5-65 years. The program providees a meal, music, games, activities and a life lesson that can be of use to anyone. Info: Rob, 443-366-2813.

BUS TRIP TO HARRINGTON CASINO The bus will leave from the Ocean Pines Yacht Club parking lot at 10 a.m. on Oct. 17 and return at approximately 5 p.m. Cost is $20 and includes $15 slot play and $7 food voucher good towards the lunch buffet. Open to all. Reservations: Tom or Barbara Southwell, 410-6415456.

BOWLING LEAGUE The Young at Heart Bowling League Ocean Pines - Ocean City will bowl on Fridays for 24 weeks, commencing the third Friday of September, (9/20/2019). Season ends March 20, 2020. Senior citizens only. Tom Southwell, 410-641-5456

‘ACHIEVING SURGICAL WEIGHT LOSS SUCCESS’ SEMINAR Atlantic General Bariatric Center Conference Room, 10231 Old Ocean City Blvd., Suite 207, Berlin. Takes place the first Monday of each month at 1 p.m. This is a free, in-person seminar. Additional opportunities are also available in the form of an online webinar. Register: 410-641-9568.

STAR CHARITIES MONTHLY MEETING Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10 a.m., on the first Friday of each month. Anyone interested is welcome. Info: Anna Foultz, 410-641-7667.

FREE WELLNESS WORKSHOPS

FRIDAY NIGHT SERVICES

Free workshops dealing with hypertension, chronic pain self-management, chronic disease self-management, diabetes, fall prevention and cancer. If you would like to register for one of these workshops or you would like more information about bringing any of the workshops to your business or group, contact Jill at MAC, 410-742-0505, Ext. 159. A new workshop, titled “Building Better Caregivers” has been added. It’s a free, 6-week workshop for caregivers of those with conditions that affect memory.

Temple Bat Yam, 11036 Worcester Highway, Berlin, every Friday, 7:30 p.m. A reform Jewish Synagogue. Info: 410641-4311.

FREE FISHING ROD LOANER PROGRAM

POLISH AMERICAN CLUB

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway. Adults can check out a rod and tackle to use in bay and river waters. An adult library card is required. For more information and regulations, call 410524-1818.

Columbus Hall, 9901 Coastal Highway (behind St. Luke’s Church), Ocean City, 2-4 p.m. The group meets the second Wednesday of each month. Those of Polish or Slavic descent welcome. No meetings in June, July and August. Helen Sobkowiak, 410-723-2639 or Maryann Lula, 410-250-2548

FREE VESSEL SAFETY CHECKS For a free vessel check, by a certified United States Power Squadron vessel examiner, contact Tony Curro at tcurro@mchsi.com.

WITTY KNITTERS Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Knitters, Crochet enthusiasts, needle artists of all skill levels are invited to join this group for a casual morning of sharing. Work on your own patters and exchange ideas. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

813 S. Atlantic Ave., May 18 through Sept. 2. The program is available to those currently serving in the United States Military. Must show a Geneva Convention common access card (CAC), DD Form 1173 ID dent ID) or a DD Form 1173-1 ID. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

SUNSET PARK PARTY NIGHTS

THE DISCOVERY CLUB

Sunset Park, 700 S. Philadelphia Ave., 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Free concert featuring “Full Circle” (rock - classic to current). Admission to the park is free, while beverages, including beer, are available for purchase. It is recommended to bring your own seating. 410289-7739, http://www.ocdc.org

Delmarva Discovery Museum, 2 Market St., Pocomoke City, Wednesdays, 10:3011:30 a.m. Children, ages 3-5 years, will enjoy books, art, singing and movement coordinating with the week’s theme. Caregivers are invited to join in. www.DelmarvaDiscoveryCenter.org

BEACH SINGLES

FREE ADMISSION TO MILITARY PERSONNEL AND THEIR FAMILIES

Thursdays - Clarion Resort

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum,

AUMC THRIFT SHOP Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., Ocean City, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Open Monday through Saturday, year round. Located behind the church with a donation drop off room that is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 410289-4458

Crossword answers from page 50


54

AUGUST 23, 2019 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.com and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

FALL COACHES

HELP WANTED

- WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION TECHNICIANS & MANAGERS

Worcester Preparatory School, a coeducational college preparatory day school serving over 500 students in grades PK-12, is currently seeking coaches for Volleyball and Soccer. Minimum of 2 yrs. experience and CJIS Background Screening required. EOE

(IICRC certifications a plus)

- DECK COATING APPLICATORS - LEAD CARPENTERS/FRAMERS - INTERIOR REMODELING PROFESSIONALS Please apply in person: 12905 Coastal Hwy, Ocean City MD, online at https://oceantowerconstruction.com/careers/ or call 443-366-5556 during regular business hours

Contact: Matt McGinnis 410-641-3575 or mmcginnis@worcesterprep.org

Comfort Inn Gold Coast We are seeking to fill the following positions:

~ Housekeeping ~ Both Seasonal and Year Round positions available. Please apply in person at The Comfort Inn Gold Coast at 112th Street, Ocean City, next to the Gold Coast Mall

106 32nd St., Ocean City

No phone calls please

NOW HIRING!

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

West OC Dental Office. Join our successful practice as a Dental Assistant PT/FT, M-F, no evenings or weekends. Great Benefit Pkg. Fax resume to 410-213-2955 or email: contact@atlanticdental.com

Help Wanted. Year round Cook and Servers. Alex’s Italian Restaurant, Rt. 50 West, West OC. Apply in person. Enter through Pizzeria if before 3 p.m. 410-213-7717

PIZZA DRIVER and CASHIER WANTED With tips, $12 to $15 an hour for both positions. P/T or FT Pinos Pizza 81st Pop in anytime to inquire or call/text 410-422-4780

Hostess, Cooks, A/V Staff, Boutique Sales, EMT, General Maintenance, Painter, Boat Mate

Positions, full-time, part-time, seasonal or year-round. Must have hotel experience. Apply within, or call 410-289-5762

NO OW HIRIN NG

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Princess ince Bayside Beach Ho otel 480 4801 01 Co Coastal asta Hw wy y • Ocean Citty y, MD M 21842

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

NOW HIRING: Housekeepe H pers & Houseman p

AM Dining Room Manager

Please vis visit our we website at:

www.realhospitalit p ty ygrou oup p.com///c careers

We are currently recruiting an experienced AM Dining Room Manager to help our team oversee our busy restaurant. Must have strong management experience in a large restaurant, ability to train staff, excellent communication skills and ability to solve problems. Micros and computer experience strongly preferred. Excellent salary and benefits package. Send resume and salary requirements to: Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 410-524-3535 ~ Fax: 410-723-9109

Please bring an updated resu e ume to the event.

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!! Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

EOE M/F/D/V

Sales Manager The Clarion Fontainebleau Resort Hotel is seeking an experienced, year- round hotel Sales Manager to join our team. Previous hotel and conference sales experience and current market experience a plus. This is a fulltime, year-round position reporting to the Director of Sales. Must be able to supervise and oversee events. Must also be an outgoing energetic team player ready to sell our beautiful property that boast 250 guest rooms and 85 Suites along with the 40,000 square feet of meeting space! Applicant must be detail oriented and computer literate – Delphi experience a plus. Excellent benefits, working conditions and salary (commensurate with experience). Qualified applicants only, forward resume with salary requirements to: Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Human Resources 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Fax: 410-723-9109 ~ lwatson@clarionoc.com EOE M/F/D/V

ssifieds la C r u o Y r e Ord

Joi o i n TTee am Dunes e s ! Noo w Hiri ri ng: 

Banquet Servers Banquet Houseman Housekeepers Housemen

Bartenders Servers Cook



2 8th & Oceanfront -“For orr Shore … Th The Best Place to Work”

BEACH STAND JOBS - Get paid to work on the beach renting umbrellas and chairs. Hours 9am-5pm. Call 410726-0315.

is now accepting applications for the following positions:

• Housekeeping •Maintenance •Laundry •Front Desk

Make sure to check out our job postings on Indeed.com!

Now Hiring Maintenance & Housekeeping Help. Fulltime. Full benefits. $12/hour. Call Club Ocean Villas II, 410-524-0880.

NOW HIRING Full Time, year round employees for:

• Housekeeping • Food & Beverage • Front Desk Great benefits including medical, dental, vision and employee travel. *Eligible for a $200 sign on bonus* Apply to our job postings under Hyatt Place Ocean City MD on indeed.com or text 76977 to 844-311-6432

For more details or to apply, please go online to www.seacrets.com/employment

Comfort Inn Gold Coast Assistant Executive Housekeeper We are seeking to fill the position of Assistant Executive Housekeeper. This is a full time, year round position with competitive pay and benefits. Hotel Housekeeping supervisory experience required. Please apply in person at 112th street, Ocean City, next to the Gold Coast Mall.

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!! Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities: Year Round, Full/Part Time: Hskpg House Staff, HSKPG Supervisor, Wash Room Attendant, Line Cooks, Servers, Banquet Servers, Hostess/Host, Busser, Dishwasher, Maintenance Mechanic, Security Guard, Grill Cooks, Hostess, Overnight Front Deck, Overnight Cleaner, PM Lobby Attendant, Groundsman

Free employee meal and excellent benefits.

Hotel & Suit tes

Please apply online at at www w..rreeal a hossp pitta alittyyygr yggrroou up p.com

Online

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

www.oceancitytoday.com

Convenient, quick, no waiting, no calls ~ Days, nights and weekends


AUGUST 23, 2019

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

RENTALS

HELP WANTED - Main Street Storage and U-Haul. Must be a RELIABLE, DEPENDABLE AND RESPONSIBLE person! Part-time, Tues., Thurs. and some Saturdays (days only). Apply in person, 9842 Main Street, Suite 3, Berlin.

ACCT CLERK/ADMIN ASST - WOC Company has immediate opening for FT, year-round help. Duties include AP, AR, filing, bank deposits, Word Excel & other admin. duties. QuickBooks and Microsoft Suite exp. required. Send resume and salary requirements to: kclark@monogrambuilders. com.

WINTER RENTAL. 1BR Beachy, poolside apartment- 47th Street. Avail. September 1. $895/mo. Utilities included. www,oceancity21.com. 443-506-2738.

Adult w/Some Carpentry or Other Residential Improvement Experience. Must have hand tools and transportation. Call 410-208-9159 or 410-726-1040. Cleaner Experienced w/Check-In & Check-Outs. Reliable with own transportation. Will supply cleaning supplies. Excellent pay. Call Donna 301-7125224 for interview.

Chairside

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE Email Resume:

molarbiz@yahoo.com

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Law Office. Part-time/fulltime. Computer, Word Perfect, Dictaphone, telephone and bookkeeping required. Familiar with E-filing a plus. Will train. Please respond by sending resume to PO Box 56, Ocean City, MD 21843.

RENTALS RENTALS Oceanfront Boardwalk Condo. 2BR, 2BA, washer/dryer. October 1, 2019-April 30, 2020. $875 per month plus utilities. 410-598-5572

R E N TA L S

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626 VA C AT I O N S

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-524-7700 www.holidayoc.com

Photographers

Available Summer Seasonal Rentals @ www.hilemanrealestate.com

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

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PAGE 55

Ocean City Today

2 Bedroom, 2.5 bath, 123rd Street, Bayside. Email for details: OC.prop.to.sell@gmail. com

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DEEPLY DISCOUNTED BELOW MARKET WATER FRONT FORECLOSURE AFTER REPAIR VALUE ESTIMATED AT $1,000,000.00 PRICE AT $719,900.00!!!!!!! 46 ALTON POINT OCEAN PINES MD 21811 THIS RARE OFFERING IN TERNS LANDING FEATURES THE BEST WATERFRONT LOCATION IN THE COMMUNITY FEATURING 4BR, 2BA, BOAT DOCKAGE, LARGE DECK, SUN ROOM AND MORE. THE PROPERTY IS IN NEED OF PAINT, CARPET, FLOORING AND SOME UPGRADES AND IS PRICED AS AN ASSIGNMENT OF THE BANKS FORECLOSURE CONTRACT AND SOLD IN AS IS CONDITION. FIX IT UP & FLIP IT, OR MOVE IN AND ENJOY THIS SPECTACULAR WATERFRONT HOME AND ENJOY HUNDREDS OR THOUSANDS OF $$$$ OF IMMEDIATE EQUITY. DON’T MISS THIS. YOU WILL NEVER SEE THIS PRICE IN TERNS LANDING WITH THIS BEAUTIFUL LOCATION. THIS IS AN OFF MARKET SALE. BROKERS WELCOME AND PROTECTED. CONTACT JIM SAPIA AT 443-745-6905 OR EMAIL JAMESSAPIA1@GMAIL.COM FOR APPOINTMENTS AND PICTURES VISIT AND SIGN UP FOR OUR FORECLOSURE WEB SITE AT MARYLANDFORECLOSURES.NET

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PAGE 56

AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today Aug. 23, 2019

Page 57

New Believe in Tomorrow facility groundbreaking By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) It was a cause for celebration last Thursday for board members, volunteers and supporters of the Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Foundation when the organization finally broke ground on its new pediatric housing facility on 65th Street. When completed in late 2020, this new respite property will prioritize U.S. military families who have critically ill children, as well as children with short life expectancies. With seven locations throughout the Delmarva area, Believe in Tomorrow will be established as the largest pediatric oncology respite program in the United States as well as the world. The new respite property, comprised of a two-story condominium with three bedrooms and two bathrooms as well as a rooftop deck, will be adjacent to the Believe in Tomorrow Children’s House By the Sea, which is a five-condominium building on 66th Street. The new facility will cost around $1 million when completed. Initial construction funding is being provided by a $250,000 gift from Believe in Tomorrow supporter Sunny Vargas in memory of her late husband, Larry McDaniel, who was also a volunteer and donor. Additional funding is being provided by a $100,000 award from the NASCAR Foundation in honor of Carl Dakes, a Believe in Tomorrow volunteer and recipient of the NASCAR Betty Jane France Humanitarian of the Year Award last year as well as a $100,000 grant from former senator Jim Mathias and current senator Mary Beth Carozza. Brian Morrison, CEO of Believe in Tomorrow, repeatedly expressed his gratitude to the people who helped make this groundbreaking possible. “What a great day for Believe in Tomorrow and most importantly, what a great day for the families and children that this building is going to serve for many, many years,” Morrison said. “When completed this new property will prioritize military pediatrics, critically ill children whose families are in the military and prioritize children with very short life expectancies. “The expansion of this firmly establishes Believe in Tomorrow as the largest pediatric respite program in the entire United States and the entire world,” he continued. “Mayor Rick Meehan, you lead one of the most generous and welcoming cities in the entire state of Maryland. Since 1986, restau-

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Public officials, volunteers and Gov. Larry Hogan and his wife, Yumi, dig up the first few shovelfuls of dirt for the new Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Foundation respite housing facility on 65th Street, Thursday, Aug. 15.

rants and businesses have quickly embraced Believe in Tomorrow and the children and families that have traveled the country to stay here. If anyone has ever wondered where hope and optimism reside, you can find those qualities alive and well here in Ocean City every day of the week, every day of the year.” Dozens upon dozens of guests arrived for the groundbreaking ceremony, including Meehan, Mathias, Carozza and Delegate Wayne Hartman as well as Believe in Tomorrow volunteers and donors such as Todd and Jill Ferrante, Bunk Mann, Igor Conev and Jason Gulshen and Believe in Tomorrow Prom Queen EJ Foxx. Additional honored guests included Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and his wife, Yumi, who have been proud supporters of Believe in Tomorrow for several years. “This is a really great day for Believe in Tomorrow, for Ocean City and for the state of Maryland,” Hogan said. “Like so many of you and so many Marylanders, I’ve spent most of my life coming to Ocean City with my family ... but for so many families, coming to Ocean City is just a beloved place to get away, relax and reconnect.” Hogan gave Morrison an official governor’s citation in recognition for his services to children prior to the ceremonial groundbreaking. “Today I am just honored to be a

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

A rendering of the completed respite housing condominium is on display during the groundbreaking ceremony on 65th Street, Thursday, Aug. 15.

small part of this to help everyone who’s done all the hard work,” Hogan said. “My wife, Yumi, and I have seen firsthand the comfort, the hope and the joy that Believe in Tomorrow brings to some many families who are facing very difficult challenges. What began with one oceanfront condo here in Ocean City more than three decades ago, has become an internationally recognized foundation which has provided over 900,000 overnight stays to deserving

children and families. “It truly is a testament to the power of compassion and I’m proud to support continued growth of Believe in Tomorrow and all of its programs,” he continued. But perhaps no one was more overjoyed about the new construction than Children’s House by the Sea Respite Coordinator Wayne Littleton. “It’s a very exciting day for the BeSee NEW Page 58


PAGE 58

Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

New facility will cost around $1M when completed Continued from Page 57 lieve in Tomorrow Foundation, especially the Ocean City Respite Housing Program,” Littleton said. “Hopefully this time next year we’ll be able to bring down eight families instead of six and we’ll have a beautiful facility that hopefully people will just drive up the street just to see. “My biggest fear is people are going to see this one and they’re not going to want to stay at the other houses,” he joked. “It’s a very exciting day for our charity and we appreciate everyone who has a hand in what we do here. Everybody is part of our family.” The Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Foundation is headquartered in Baltimore, and has provided over 900,000 overnight accommodations to critically ill children and their families through its pediatric respite and hospital housing programs. The organization believes in keeping families together during a child’s medical crisis, and that the gentle cadence of normal family life has a powerful influence on the healing process. The foundation was established in 1982 and created the first pediatric respite program in the United States in Ocean City in 1986. Believe in Tomorrow is a leading

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Celebrating the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Believe in Tomorrow respite house on 65th Street, from left, are Ryan, 16, David, Keri and Caden Codzolino, 14, of Eldersburg, Maryland, and Children’s House by the Sea respite program coordinator Wayne Littleton and his wife, Gerri.

provider of support services to U.S. military families with critically ill children, and to families throughout the country being treated in major children’s hospitals. The Believe in Tomorrow Children’s House at Johns Hopkins recently celebrated its 25th anniversary. It is the only family-centered residential facility on the grounds of the hospital.  Believe in Tomorrow is in the process of mobilizing contributions for a wide array of building materials,

skilled construction services, and funding that is needed to complete this project. Anyone interested in joining this effort is encouraged to contact Believe in Tomorrow Chief Operating Officer

Maryanne Davis, who is coordinating this process, at mdavis@believeintomorrow.org, 410-744-1032; or Morrison at bmorrison@believein tomorrow.org, 410-744-1032.

MATHIAS HONORED During the Maryland Association of Counties Summer Conference in Ocean City, longtime public servant James N. Mathias last Thursday was presented the William Donald Schaefer Helping People Award for Worcester County on the Boardwalk outside the Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum. For more than 30 years, Mathias has demonstrated his lifelong commitment to helping people as a city councilman, mayor, state delegate and state senator, fully embracing former Gov. Schaefer’s mantra to help the little guy.


AUGUST 23, 2019

PAGE 59

Ocean City Today

Tacos, burritos, nachos among Tino’s offerings By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Martin Sanchez, who has over 30 years of experience in the restaurant business, recently opened Tino’s, a Mexican eatery, on 81st Street in Ocean City. Sanchez was already interested in purchasing a business in Ocean City when he was approached by the owner of the Mexican restaurant in early May. He took over the small carryout eatery on May 15 and reopening one month later. “I know I needed to get into the restaurant business again,” Sanchez said. “I didn’t really want to do full service so this was the right spot for me.” Sanchez used to run a steakhouse restaurant in Salisbury but wanted to go back to providing something more casual. “Mexican food is something I wanted to do for a while,” he said. “I wanted to do something fast, casual and what I’m good at. I like MexicanAmerican food. I’ve always loved burritos, tacos and something easy.” Tino’s offers chicken, steak, pork and ground beef burritos or burrito bowls with toppings including pinto or black beans, guacamole, salsa, let-

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Owner Martin Sanchez prepares a large order of tacos for takeout at Tino’s Mexican Grill on Tuesday. (Below) Located on 81st Street bayside, Tino’s Mexican Grill offers casual Mexican food.

tuce, chipotle ranch, sour cream and a variety of sauces. Customers can also get beef, chicken, ground beef, and pork tacos as well as street tacos with cilantro, onions and lime. In addition, Sanchez serves fish tacos comprised of either mahi, crab cakes, fried oysters or shrimp, as well as See TINO’S Page 60

OPEN HOUSES AUG. 22 - AUG. 29 DAY/TIME

ADDRESS

BR/BA

STYLE

PRICE

AGENCY/AGENT

Assateague Point, Berlin

1BR/2BR/3BR

Mobile

From $100,000

Tony Matrona/Resort Homes

Condo, Towns & SF

Nanette Pavier/Holiday Real Estate

3BR/2.5BA

Duplex/Townhouse

From $299,900

Kathleen Clark/Monogram Realty

9 139th St., Sand Villa #4

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$399,900

The Britts Team/Keller Williams Realty

Saturday 10-12

Sandyhook Rd., Ocean Pines

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$174,900

Donna Frankowski/Shamrock Realty

Saturday 12-3

103 Broad St., Berlin

3BR/3BA

Single Family

$374,900

Lydia Rittersbacher/Hileman Real Estate

Saturday 11-2

8 Beach Ct., Ocean Pines

3BR/3BA

Single Family

$614,900

Lauren A Smith/Keller Williams

11309 River Run, River Run

3BR/3BA

Single Family

$339,900

Lauren A Smith/Keller Williams

Saturday 3-6

13 White Horse Dr., Ocean Pines

3BR/3BA

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$274,900

Power of 2/Hileman Realty

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57 White Horse Dr., Ocean Pines

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$184,900

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PAGE 60

AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

REAL ESTATE REPORT

New condominium loan policies By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The National Association of Realtors sent out a press release last week commending the Department of Housing and Urban Development for finalizing new Federal Housing Administration condominium loan policies. The changes, many of which NAR has championed for over a decade, should yield thousands of new homeownership opportunities and help alleviate affordability restraints impacting markets across the country. “We are thrilled that Secretary Carson has taken this much-needed step to put the American Dream within reach for thousands of additional families,” said NAR President John Smaby, a secondgeneration Realtor and broker at Edina Realty in Edina, Minnesota. “It goes without saying that condominiums are often the most affordable option for firsttime homebuyers, small families and those in urban areas. This ruling, which culminates years of collaboration between HUD and NAR, will help reverse recent declines in condo sales and ensure the FHA is fulfilling its primary mission to the American people.” Specifically, the new guidance ex-

tends certifications from two years to three (each condominium building/project has to be approved/certified and in the past that certification was only good for two years). The new guidance also allows for single-unit mortgage approvals, provides more flexibility with owner/occupancy ratios, and increases the allowable number of FHA loans in a single project. The rule will go into effect in mid-October and stands to make a difference in loan availability for buyers needing lower money down loans. In our resort town market, there are many affordable options in condos, but FHA loans were not usually an option. With more than 8.7 million condo units nationwide, only 17,792 FHA condo loans have been originated in the past year. NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun recently noted that even though median prices for existing condos have risen slightly, their relative affordability means condominiums remain a natural answer to inventory shortages holding back home sales growth. “Condos are typically more affordable than a detached single-family home, but only a small fraction of condos are FHAcertified,” he said last month. – Lauren Bunting is an Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.

WELCOME Mike Foelber, general manager of the Princess Royale in Ocean City, welcomes State Sen. Mary Beth Carozza to the Maryland Tourism Coalition's Summer Soiree at the Hotel and Conference Center on Aug. 14.

Tino’s offers casual Mexican cuisine for carryout in OC Continued from Page 59 quesadillas, nachos and chips and salsa. According to Sanchez, customers have enjoyed his offerings. “They’re very receptive to my cooking,” Sanchez said. “Even with my experience of 38 years in the restaurant business, it’s still a little bit scary going into a restaurant and not knowing how people are going to receive your flavors, but everybody

seems to be liking it a lot.” Tino’s offers fresh ingredients with the meals prepared directly in front of the customers, so they know what they are getting with their orders. Tino’s Mexican Grill is currently open on Mondays from 4-10 p.m. and Tuesday to Thursday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Fridays through Sundays the restaurant is open 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. For more information, call 410524-0400.

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN

WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN!

401 NAUTICAL LANE

152 SANDY HILL DRIVE

JUST LISTED Don’t let this one get away. Now is the time to make every day a vacation. Located in one of the most desirable communities in North Ocean City just off 130th street . Completely remodeled with new floors, paint, carpet. The home features 2-bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, kitchen with a breakfast bar, double stainless steel sink, electric range, frost free refrigerator with ice maker dishwasher plus a eat in kitchen. The 10 x 39 enclosed porch is perfect for relax after a day at the beach. This home is located on a 40 x 90 deeded lot with no ground rent or ground lease attached. The community amenities include bayfront boardwalk with 3-fishing & crabbing piers, 2-adult pools, 1-kiddie pool, 2-tennis courts, 2-shuffleboard courts, miniature golf course, 8 acre wildlife sanctuary with a 1/2 mile paved walking/jogging path, and an 5 acre open park. The HOA fee is just $272.00 per year. Sold Partially Furnished For $184,900. We are the Original Montego Bay Specialist Since 1971.

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

This Residential Building Lot is Located in The Montego Bay Community in North Ocean City. The lot is zoned for mobile home, modular, and custom built 1 1/2 stories homes. The Montego Bay community features 2 adult pools, 1 kiddie pool, 2 tennis courts, 2 shuffleboard courts, 9 hole miniature golf course, bayfront boardwalk with fishing and crabbing piers, 8 acre wildlife sanctuary pond with a 1/2 mile walking path around it and a 5 acre park. Home owners fee is only $272/year. Offered at $124,990

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

MONTEGO BAY WATERFRONT!

DIRECT OCEANFRONT

Magnificent oversized lot with 62' of waterfront. Property includes a private dock, pier, and electric boatlift. Home features 3BR/2BA, insulated windows and doors, laminate flooring, and a large open living area. Home is conveniently located within walking distance to the pool, the beach, stores, restaurants, Northside Park and more. Home is being sold fully furnished. Community amenities include 2 inground swimming pools, 2 tennis courts, shuffleboard court, 9 hole mini-golf, an 8 acre wildlife sanctuary with a pond and blacktop walking trail, and a bayfront boardwalk with 3 fishing/crabbing piers...all for only $272.00 a year. $425,000

Call Bill Rothstein

800-745-5988 • 443-280-2530 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

This beautifully maintained 1BR/1.5BA condo located

on 138th Street. Walking distance to the city busline, restaurants/bars, amusements and the MD/DE stateline. Features include a covered oceanfront balcony with hurricane shutters, a fully equipped kitchen with a newer refrigerator and a new garbage disposal, a half bath in the bedroom, drywall interior, a ceramic tile shower surround and a stack washer & dryer. The building has been well maintained and features an elevator, a basement for owner's storage and off-street parking. A new roof was

198 BEACHCOMBER LANE

installed in the fall of 2018. The unit is being sold fully furnished. $275,000

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

montegobayrealty@aol.com www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

13800 WIGHT STREET #202

Montego Bay Realty Montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com


AUGUST 23, 2019 Stern & Eisenberg Mid-Atlantic, P.C. 9920 Franklin Square Dr., Suite 100 Baltimore, MD 21236 410-635-5127

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 14 DRAWBRIDGE RD. OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joan Lee Trent a/k/a Joan L. Trent, dated March 31, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4684, folio 453 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on SEPTEMBER 9, 2019 AT 2:05 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $32,000 in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, will be required at the time of sale. If form of payment is not cashier’s or certified check, it must be cleared with the Substitute Trustee at least 24 hours prior to the sale. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If the purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of ratification, the purchaser relinquishes their deposit and the Sub. Trustees may file an appropriate motion with the court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub. Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged

Ocean City Today / Public Notices against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 5.00% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, (including agricultural transfer taxes, if applicable), documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub. Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub. Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Steven K. Eisenberg, Paul J. Moran, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-8/22/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 11609 SEAWARD RD., APT. #70B OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated January 13, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4859, Folio 230 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $150,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on

SEPTEMBER 3, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without inter-

PAGE 61 est. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 333257-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-8/15/3t _________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 12415 TORQUAY ROAD WEST OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Samer Ramadan, dated February 23, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4878, Folio 094 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $210,000.00, and an original interest rate of 8.500%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on September 3, 2019 AT 3:20 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.  The property is improved by a dwelling.  Terms of Sale:  The property will be sold “as is” and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.  A deposit of $85,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester


PAGE 62 County. At the Substitute Trustees’ discretion, the foreclosure purchaser, if a corporation or LLC, must produce evidence, prior to bidding, of the legal formation of such entity.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  All due and/or unpaid private utility, water and sewer facilities charges, or front foot benefit payments, are payable by the purchaser without adjustment.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, ground rent, or condo/HOA assessments, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE.  If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser, and the purchaser agrees to pay reasonable attorneys’ fees for the Substitute Trustees, plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.  Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction.   In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property.  If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit without interest.  The sale is subject to postsale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the

LEGAL ADVERTISING legals@oceancitytoday.net

Ocean City Today / Public Notices loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Michael McKeefery, Christianna Kersey, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC   (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com CGD File #: 454559 OCD-8/15/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, MD 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 12801 OLD STAGE RD. BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from David A. Ehatt and Cheryl Ehatt, dated May 17, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4727, folio 523 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on AUGUST 26, 2019 AT 3:40 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $20,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk

and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes (including agricultural transfer taxes, if applicable), and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2013-42850). Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-8/8/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 10551 FLOWER ST. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated November 14, 2009 and recorded in Liber 5392, Folio 264 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $146,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on AUGUST 27, 2019 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as

AUGUST 23, 2019 is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $12,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale


AUGUST 23, 2019 even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 324364-2) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-8/8/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 6266 TAYLOR LANDING RD. GIRDLETREE, MD 21829 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 12, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5170, Folio 17 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $157,500.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on AUGUST 27, 2019 AT 3:36 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are ad-

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Ocean City Today / Public Notices justed as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 333781-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-8/8/3t _________________________________

Williams, Moore, Shockley & Harrison, LLP Peter Buas, Esq. 3509 Coastal Highway Ocean City, MD 21842 Bobby Ray Waters, Jr. AKA Bobby Ray Walters Plaintiff v. James Thompson, et al. Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND Case No.: C-23-CV-19-000083

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 2nd day of August, 2019, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Peter S. Buas, Trustee of the real property designated as Unit No. 9 and Boat Slip No. 9, in the Timberloft Townhouse Condominium, 122 Newport Bay Drive, Ocean City, MD 21842, and reported in the above entitled cause, will finally be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 2nd day of September, 2019; provided, a copy of this Order be inserted in a newspaper of general circulation published in Worcester County, Maryland, once in each of three successive weeks, before the 26th day of August, 2019. The Report states the amount of the Assignees' Sale to be $274,269.31. Susan Braniecki CLERK True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-8/8/3t _________________________________ JOSEPH B. MATHIS ESQ. OFFIT KURMAN 8171 MAPLE LAWN BOULEVARD SUITE 200 MAPLE LAWN, MD 20759

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17945 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF EDWIN M. LEWIS AKA: EDWIN MICHAEL LEWIS Notice is given that Joseph A. Lewis, 7232 Stover Court, Alexandria, VA 22306, was on August 06, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Edwin M. Lewis who died on April 13, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 6th day of February, 2020. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with

the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Joseph A. Lewis Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: August 15, 2019 OCD-8/15/3t _________________________________ ERIC T. FIFER JENSEN, HASSANI & FOCAS, P.A. 22 WEST PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE, STE. 606 TOWSON, MD 21204

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17955 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF LEONORA C. ORDAKOWSKI Notice is given that Todd D. Ordakowski, 26 Breezeway Lane, Berlin, MD 21811, was on August 12, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Leonora C. Ordakowski who died on July 29, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 12th day of February, 2020. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written no-


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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

tice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Todd D. Ordakowski Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: August 15, 2019 OCD-8/15/3t _________________________________

Town of Ocean City

BID SOLICITATION HMGP Phase II Materials

The Town of Ocean City is seeking

bids from qualified and experienced vendors to provide materials for the HMGP Phase II project to be in conformity with the specifications detailed in the Bid Documents. Bid Documents for the HMGP Phase II project may be obtained from the Town of Ocean City’s Procurement Department by either emailing the Procurement Manager, Catrice Parsons, at cparsons@oceancitymd.gov or by calling 410-723-6647 during normal business hours, or via the Bid tab on the Town’s website. Vendors are responsible for checking this website for addenda prior to submitting their bids. The Town of Ocean City is not responsible for the content of any Bid Document received through any third party bid service. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their Completed Bid Documents. There will not be a pre-bid meeting for this solicitation. HMGP Phase II Labor will be bid separately from this solicitation Sealed Bid Documents are due no later than Friday, September 20, 2019 by 1:00 p.m. and will be opened and read aloud at same time. Bids are to be submitted to the Town of Ocean City, Attn: Procurement Department, 204 65th Street, Bldg. A, Ocean City, MD 21842. Late Bid Document will not be accepted. Minority vendors are encouraged

to compete for award of the solicitation. Catrice Parsons, CPSM, CPPO, CPPB Procurement Manager Town of Ocean City, Maryland OCD-8/22/1t _________________________________

Town of Ocean City

BID SOLICITATION HMGP Phase II Labor

The Town of Ocean City is seeking bids from qualified and experienced vendors to provide labor for the HMGP Phase II project to be in conformity with the specifications detailed in the Bid Documents. Bid Documents for HMGP Phase II Labor may be obtained from the Town of Ocean City’s Procurement Department by either e-mailing the Purchasing Associate, Leila Milewski, at lmilewski@oceancitymd.gov or by calling 410-723-6643 during normal business hours, or via the Bid tab on the Town’s . Vendors are responsible for checking this website for addenda prior to submitting their bids. The Town of Ocean City is not responsible for the content of any Bid Document received through any third party bid service. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their Completed Bid Documents. A Pre-Bid meeting will be held on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. in the Purchasing Department located at 204 65th Street, Building A, Ocean City, MD 21842. HMGP Phase II Materials will be bid separately from this solicitation Sealed Bid Documents are due no later than Friday, September 20, 2019 by 1:30 p.m. and will be opened and read aloud at same time. Bids are to be submitted to the Town of Ocean City, Attn: Procurement Department, 204 65th Street, Bldg. A, Ocean City, MD 21842. Late Bid Documents will not be accepted. Minority vendors are encouraged to compete for award of the solicitation. OCD-8/22/1t _________________________________ BARBARA ANN SPICER 9515 DEERECO ROAD, SUITE 902 LUTHERVILLE, MD 21093

OCEAN CITY TODAY Legal Advertising Call NANCY HAWRYLKO 410-723-6397, Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17962 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF AUGUST VANSCAY SEIBEL AKA: AUGUST V. SEIBEL, VAN SEIBEL Notice is given that Thomas Mark Seibel, 26225 Crosswinds Landing, Selbyville, DE 19975, was on August 16, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of August Vanscay Seibel who died on August

AUGUST 23, 2019 6, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 16th day of February, 2020. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Thomas Mark Seibel Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: August 22, 2019 OCD-8/22/3t _________________________________

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY

ORDINANCE 2019-14 RE: Real Property Purchase Notice is hereby given by the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City, that an ordinance was introduced for first reading at their meeting of August 19, 2019. Second reading is scheduled for September 3, 2019. A complete text of the ordinance is available for review in the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD 21842, or online at oceancitymd.gov in the August 19 agenda packet. This ordinance authorizes the purchase and financing of real property known as Parcel 6670, 67th Street, for the construction of a water treatment plant. OCD-8/22/1t _________________________________


Commentary

Ocean City Today Aug. 23, 2019

Page 65

Advertising money’s where it should be Prompted by the upcoming increase in the room tax and the $1.7 million in revenue it eventually will generate for Ocean City government, the question that has been and will continue to be asked is whether the city needs to spend $7 million or so on advertising and marketing. The answer is there’s no way to know with any certainty, although a fair gauge would be the Small Business Administration’s advisory that says 8 percent of gross revenues is a good number that enterprises should consider. As it happens, that’s just about $7 million for Ocean City government, and a sizable share of that is spent in the resort rather than being spread out across the Mid-Atlantic region in an effort to draw more people to this beach. And let’s face it, as much as people might want to think of Ocean City as a community first and a commercial enterprise second, it remains that not much of a community would exist without the commerce. The reality is Ocean City was founded not as a fishing village, but as a resort business, around which a community grew, and the more that business expanded, the more community growth it could support. This doesn’t mean property owners must accept whatever tax deal is put before them, or that the time won’t come when the proceeds of the room tax — and the set-aside for advertising — won’t reach a level that’s difficult or even impossible to defend from a political perspective. Politics and the effort to balance the demands of voters with the requirements of a good business model are the governors that keep this engine in check. In the meantime, the advertising money coming in from the room tax is generated by the sector that also happens to be contributing the most in property taxes. It only makes sense that the benefits it receives should be commensurate with its contributions, especially when it constitutes no financial burden on anyone else.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR ............................................ Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli STAFF WRITERS .................. Greg Ellison, Morgan Pilz, ................. Rachel Ravina, Joshua Kim, Elizabeth Bonin ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea DIGITAL MARKETING SALES .................. Jennifer Lowe CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ................ Kelly Brown, Kyle Phillips PUBLISHER ...................................... Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.com. Copyright 2019

Age isn’t just a number Seventy-two years ago this week, I squirmed my way into the world heedless of an inner voice that said, “Go back, it’s a trap.” By It’s a good thing I didn’t Stewart pay attention for a variety of Dobson reasons, all of which, of course, would be secondary to the fact that my mother was not up for housing a tenant on a year-round basis. It occurs to me, however, that over the course of all this time, I have discovered certain truths about our and my own existence. For instance, it has become more apparent recently that people will lie to you routinely. As evidence, I offer the long worn-out expression, “age is just a number,” which I have been hearing ad nauseum for some time now by kind souls who either think it’s a nice thing to say, or believe it’s necessary to prevent a guest appearance by Mr. Grumpy. Obviously, this adage cannot be true, or I would have discovered many of life’s attractions much earlier than the regularly scheduled program would allow. “Bartender, a beer and a shot, if you please.” “What are you, seven? Get out!” Conversely: “My, my, my, if it isn’t Taylor Swift, Demi Lovato, Maren Morris and …” “Beat it, pop-pop.” The truth is I have no illusions about this aging business, although it is a fact I can still

PUBLIC EYE

do as many pushups now as I could back in the day, when the drill instructor would say, “drop down and give me 50.” I weighed 145 then, and could run off those bad boys faster than a lizard on hot sand and clap my hands between each one. It’s true. It’s also true that I can still give you 50. It just won’t look like it, since I continue to lift those 145 pounds, while the other 50 I gained since then remain on the floor, having dropped down on their own. It’s kind of like grading on the curve, I suppose. This doesn’t mean, of course, that you can’t fake the age-is-only-a-number thing by concealing certain undeniable giveaways. “Bartender, give me a beer and a shot (and wake me when I nod off).” “Two tickets to the 7 o’clock show, please (pssst! Seniors discount, right?)” “Yep, 22 or 72, I’m still up at 2 a.m. (just getting home with the former, and just getting up with the latter).” The other thing you should do is resist what is apparently an age-induced desire to use words like “whippersnapper” and end your sentences with emphatic expressions. I don’t know what it is, but ever since I turned this page, that little inner voice has been telling me, “Say it … say it … just get it out of your system.” Okay, I will: “Get off my lawn!” There. I have to admit, I do feel better now and that’s important at my age, which is not just a number. No sir, I’m not buying it. Not buying it all ... by cracky!

We invite you to share your opinion, but all letters are subject to verification, so please include your name and phone number. All letters are subject to editing for space and to protect the author and this newspaper from legal action. Email letters to editor@oceancitytoday.net. For questions, call 410-723-6397.


Letters Worcester NAACP talks ‘Neighborhood Policing’ Editor, Worcester County NAACP held a “Neighborhood Policing” discussion with Worcester County law enforcement on Aug. 15. The law enforcement professionals who donated their time and expertise are appreciated. The practice of community policing involves getting to know your community, partnering with citizen groups and individuals, crime prevention, and being a resource not a threat to fellow residents. This initiative is crucial to public safety. The Worcester County Sheriff’s Department was represented by Sheriff Matt Crisafulli and Capt. [Douglas] Dods.

Ocean City Today Aug. 23, 2019

to the editor

Thanks also to Chief Arnold Downing, Berlin; Chief David Massey, Ocean Pines; Lt. Brian Craven, Pocomoke; and Chief Andy McGee, Snow Hill. There were so many years of faithful service to our community within our August meeting. Ivory P. Smith Sr. President.

Local club appreciates scholarship assistance Editor, The Ocean City/Berlin Optimist Youth Foundation wishes to thank the many local businesses and individuals who helped make our 10th annual scholarship golf outing a success. Over $13,500 was raised for the foundations endowment account to

perpetuate scholarships for SDHS seniors well into the future. The tournament was held Aug. 7 at the Ocean City Golf Course. We thank the Diamond Sponsors, Gregg and Tina Custis; and the Gold Sponsors, OC Elks Lodge #2645, American Legion Post #166 and Larry and Patty Campbell. Silver Sponsors were Atlantic Health and Fitness as well as Atlantic Orthopedics. Bronze Sponsors were Atlantic Health and Fitness, Atlantic Physical Therapy, Ayers Jenkins Gordy and Almand, Bayside Skillet, Smokers BBQ, Burbage Funeral Home, Resorts Services and Management, OC Grand Prix, Bull on the Beach, Mike’s Carpet Connection [2], Bank of OC, Baja Amusements, Bonfire, 1st Service, Arctic HVAC, Taylor Bank, Anthony’s Liquors, Sea Floor of OP,

Have an opinion? We invite you to share it, but all letters are subject to verification, so please include your name and phone number. All letters are subject to editing for space and to protect the author and this newspaper from legal action. Email letters to editor@oceancitytoday.net. For questions, call 410-723-6397.

Page 66 Crab Alley, Choptank Coop, The Caproni Family [2], The Acton Family [2], Henry and Cathy. Other donors were Action Island Imprinters, Seacrets, OP Yacht Club, Ayers Creek Adventures, Candy Kitchen, Trimper’s, Comcast, Shorebirds, Surfside Rooster, Original Greene Turtle, Piaza, Abi’s Diner, Greene Turtle West Ocean City, Frog Bar and Grill, OC Monogram, Island Creamery, Believe in Tomorrow, Walmart, Lombardi’s, Captain’s Table, and Mike’s Carpet Connection. Members Ron Frew, Lew Frey, Rich Caproni, Charles Smith, Wayne Littleton, Bob Reifsnyder, Les Crook also donated prizes. Local golf courses also donated prizes. Seaside, Newport Bay, Eagle’s Landing, Bay Creek, Ocean Resorts, Rum Pointe, Man O’ War, Light House Sound, Rookery and Ocean Pines courses donated rounds of golf. We also wish to thank Buddy Sass, Annette Cropper and the entire staff at OC Golf for assisting make the event a success. Charles Smith President


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

SDHS turf, track project wraps up By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The installation of Stephen Decatur High School’s track and turf field was given another push toward completion Tuesday after Worcester County Board of Education members unanimously approved a third requisition totaling nearly $397,000. Facilities Planner Joe Price said he anticipated the project would finish by early next week. “Everything on the field is covered now,” Price said. “All the fences are covered with plastic. The field is covered with plastic.” Price also said crews were expected to spray the field on Wednesday. The goal posts, soccer goals and discus cage were installed on Aug. 12, according to Price, and the repairs to the track were completed. Price added crews placed sand over the field on July 26 and put the raw material over it a few days later. Price said several projects were completed in July, including placing the midfield Seahawks logo, drawing the lettering at both end zones. Price added that the football, soccer, field hockey, and lacrosse lines were drawn on the field last month. The Worcester County Commissioners approved $1.31 million to install the turf field and resurface the running track

PHOTOS COURTESY WCPS

Crews work to repair the track as part of other renovations to Stephen Decatur High School. The Worcester County Board of Education unanimously approved a roughly $362,000 requisition during a meeting Tuesday.

at Stephen Decatur High School on Seahawk Road in Berlin. According to an invoice, a balance of roughly $362,000 remained after the third requisition was paid. The Keystone Purchasing Network Program and FieldTurf USA Inc. started work on the project in May. Board member Sarah D. Thompson appeared pleased as she heard Price’s progress report.

“I am so tickled. This is my baby,” Thompson said. Thompson moved to approve the requisition, which Board member Barry Q. Brittingham seconded. Carrie Sterrs, coordinator of public relations and special programs, said there would be a dedication event on Sept. 20 during halftime of a Stephen Decatur High School Seahawk’s home football game.

Worcester seniors take college prep classes and tests By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Recent graduates may have left the halls of their respective Worcester County Public Schools high schools, but their involvement in advance placement courses and dual class enrollment will live on. County seniors completed an exit survey to provide feedback on several aspects of their public school experience. Dr. Annette Wallace, chief operating officer and chief academic officer for ninth through twelfth grades, said most of the data collected comes from the students themselves. “Aside from [advanced placement] and dual enrollment … everything in this report is self-reported,” Wallace said during a Worcester County Board of Education meeting on Tuesday. Amy Gallagher, coordinator of accountability and assessment for Worcester County Public Schools, said the district relies on programs to conduct data through Naviance, a college and career readiness tool, as well as National Student Clearinghouse, a nonprofit education reporting service. Of the 518 Worcester County PubSee WORCESTER Page 69

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Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

Domestic dispute call results in two arrests for assault By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) A confusing contest of he-said, she-said led to the arrests of both parties last Tuesday after police responded to a domestic dispute call at a downtown motel. Allen Robert Hall, 30, of Essex, Maryland, and Amy Leigh Mitchell, 34, of Baltimore, were both charged with seconddegree domestic assault after police Allen Hall interviews of the two led to a stalemate of accusations. Police went to the motel around 3:17 a.m., and reported seeing and hearing the couple argue outside of their unit. Amy Mitchell Police interviewed Mitchell first, who told police that she and Hall had been arguing earlier in the evening. According to district court documents, Mitchell told police she was sleeping when Hall had pulled her out of bed by her ankles, after which she began packing to leave.

JOSH KIM/OCEAN CITY TODAY

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Police said Mitchell told them Hall began throwing items at her at that point, and then attempted to push her out of the room. It was at that point, court documents said, that she punched Hall in the face and shoved him away, causing Hall to fall into a large picture on the wall, breaking the glass of the frame. That was when Hall had called police, the court document said. The officer then questioned Hall,

who denied any physical altercations, at first. However, Hall eventually told police his side of the story, in which Mitchell had been the primary aggressor. Hall said he had been asleep when Mitchell burst into the room and punched him in the face, according to police reports. He told police that he left the room and had planned to return once Mitchell fell asleep to avoid further

confrontation. When he returned, Hall claimed that Mitchell attacked him and punched him, so he attempted to remove her from the room, police reported. Mitchell told police that the assault had been mutual. “Everything that went on was equal,” Mitchell reportedly said to the officer. “As much as he did to me, I did to him.”


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Ocean City Today

Family First focuses on prevention services By Elizabeth Bonin Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Worcester County can help keep families together with the Family First Prevention Services Act of 2018 that will take effect on Oct. 1. What the act entails was explained by Rebecca Jones-Gaston, director of Maryland Social Services, during the Maryland Association of Counties conference last Thursday The act was signed as a part of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018. According to Jones-Gaston, a federal program authorized by the Social Security and known as Title IV-E helps pay a large portion of foster care costs and as such is the biggest funder for

social services. Currently, this funding applies to circumstances involving children already in foster care and foster care staff, but the new act restructures the finances so states can be reimbursed for programs for families who are candidates for foster care. It moves away from reimbursing states who have placed children in group care and embraces a broader spectrum of services. Jones-Gaston said they are still working on a list of programs the federal act will fund. “We don’t have all the answers and that scares people,” Jones-Gaston said. Roberta Baldwin, director for social services in Worcester County, said

the act will help identify service gaps in the county and fund some programs that are already in place. This includes “trauma-informed” programs, which are based on the premise that a person’s behavior could be caused by a previous traumatic event. “That supports the effort to support children and families heal and stay together,” Baldwin said. “It refocuses on prevention services - to prevent children from coming into foster care.” One program Baldwin hopes to implement with the help of Family First is the Start Program, which would work with Worcester County families in which substance abuse is a primary risk factor.

“It will allow us to provide intensive in-home services to those families to help parents receive treatment services, reduce trauma and promote well-being within that family,” Baldwin said. She hopes that overall, Family First will allow Worcester County to reduce the need to place children in foster care. “By strengthening families, we would see a decrease in the issues that children are facing in other settings through school and the juvenile delinquent system,” Baldwin said. Baldwin and Jones-Gaston believe that children do better in a family system, whether or not they’re related by blood.

Worcester receives high marks for AP tests a score of three or higher, which shows a 5 percent increase from 2018. There were 31.6 percent of Maryland seniors who scored a three or higher on the advanced placement test in 2018, ranking the state fourth in the nation behind Massachusetts, Connecticut and Florida, according to a statement from the Maryland Department of Education. Maryland’s

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overall participation is third in the country. “Maryland continues to be a leader nationwide in advance placement, and Worcester County continues to meet or exceed the level of passing when you compare our student performance to Maryland performance, so we’re very excited about that,” Gallagher said.

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Stephen Decatur High School had 195 students electing to participate, which translates to 30.6 percent of the student population, according to reports. Pocomoke High School had 71 students, or roughly 21.5 percent, taking classes while 50 students, or 15.8 percent, participated. “We’re also very proud when we look at our advanced placement enrollment and advance placement performance on the assessment that our Worcester County graduates continue to demonstrate improvement,” Gallagher said. The advanced placement test scored from one through five. Students who receive a three or higher can receive college credit for the class. There were 383 Worcester County Public School students who completed 543 advanced placement exams, according to school officials. Of those exams 69.6 percent received

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Continued from Page 67 lic School graduates of the class of 2019, 362 students graduated from Stephen Decatur High School, 82 students graduated from Snow Hill High School and 74 students graduated from Pocomoke High School, according to data. Additionally, many students elected to take advanced placement and dual enrollment courses while in high school. Stephen Decatur High School had the most student participation with 158 students, or about 51.3 percent of the student population, according to data reports. Snow Hill High School had 39 students, or approximately 48.8 percent of the student population, taking classes and Pocomoke High School had 26 participants, which made up 43.3 percent of the student population. As for dual enrollment classes,

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

‘Tussle’ leads to charge of assault By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) A domestic violence call turned into a brief police pursuit of suspect Cole Andrew Lambrose, 21, of Salisbury after witnesses claimed he had hit his girlfriend during an argument. According to court documents, Lambrose and his girlfriend had gotten into an argument that escalated when she attempted to walk away from him. The girlfriend claimed that when she did not acknowledge Lambrose yelling at her, he backhanded her in the face. An off-duty officer corroborated the victim’s accusation, and said that he saw Lambrose strike the victim with one of his shoes, the court document said.

A witness reportedly attempted to break up the altercation. She claimed that she yelled that the police were on the way, and then Lambrose fled the scene. Cole Lambrose Police found Lambrose at a building near the area. An officer reported that when Lambrose spotted the officers, he ran away toward Coastal Highway. The document said that the suspect ran to the 10 block of 36th Street, before he stopped and submitted to the police. During an interview with the police, Lambrose apparently told the officer that he had gotten in a “tussle” with his

girlfriend, but that he had walked away from the confrontation after people had intervened. When the officer asked Lambrose to clarify what he meant by tussle, the suspect reportedly retracted his statement, and said that the altercation had not been physical. The officer said that Lambrose had dried blood on his forehead and a black eye. The suspect claimed that the dried blood had been from a fall, and that the black eye had been from an earlier fight. Police said the victim claimed that this had not been the first time that Lambrose had hit her. After speaking with Lambrose, the victim and the witnesses, the officer arrested Lambrose for second-degree assault.

Sewage dumping case ends with fine, probation (Aug. 23, 2019) An Ocean Pines man was fined and placed on probation after pleading guilty in Queen Anne’s County Circuit Court Monday to dumping raw sewage into state waters, according to an announcement from Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh. Frosh said David C. Clazey previously operated a business, Safe Harbor Sanitation, which provided sewage pumpout services to marinas on the Eastern Shore. On Oct. 26, 2018, a citizen saw Clazey discharging the contents of his pump truck into a storm drain behind the businesses at Kent Landing in Stevensville. See PINES Page 72

Worcester institutes rental license program Continued from Page 1 public information campaign to educate renters on the program. Tudor said if the campaign is aggressive enough, thousands of license applications could result. During the public comment portion of the session, Pocomoke resident and real estate broker Rico diMattia said the

license could be an extra burden for some who are licensed by other authorities. He said the license should be waived for rental operators who are Realtors. “We’re already licensed real estate brokers and operators,” diMattia said. “We’re audited. We have a history with the state.”

Commissioner Bud Church, of the Berlin-West Ocean City District, counted that since the goal of the program is to “level the playing field,” there should be no exceptions, no matter who is already licensed or how much income their rental generates. Pocomoke District Commissioner Joshua Nordstom said he thought the county license program would be an improvement for rentals, but that he had reservations about the ambiguity of certain portions. “I feel very uncomfortable voting moving this forward without a fee structure in place because we’re basically saying ‘We’re going to do something. We just don’t know how much we’re going to charge and we’ll tell you that later,’” Nordstrom said. Ocean Pines Commissioner Chip Bertino had similar reservations regarding the cost of the program. He advised waiting to see if the program could pay for itself before the county began implementing the program and adding staff. Ocean City Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic, however, moved to approve the rental license program.

“We can keep pushing this down the road forever,” Mitrecic said. “Sometimes, I think that’s what we try to do instead of standing up and voting on it. We need to have a rental license in effect in the county.” Church seconded the motion, adding that the county could manage the rental license program with its current staff and hire additional staff if needed. Mitrecic highlighted that there is still plenty of time to determine the fee structure and other costs following the passage, as it will not take effect until Jan. 1, 2020. The extra time to design the program was still not comforting to all. “I don’t think that having everything together for the next meeting would be too much,” Bertino said. “I’m very uncomfortable voting without having all the pieces in front of us.” With Nordstrom abstaining and Bertino voting against, the bill passed, thus requiring all rental properties in Worcester County to obtain a rental license. By 2020, county staff must draw up an application and fee structure, decide if additional employees are needed, determine what software to use and how to track the program.

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 71

Room tax to increase to 5 percent in 2020 Continued from Page 1 percent. Rehoboth recently increased from eight to 11 percent, though it should be noted that Rehoboth does not have sales tax, therefore making the total room tax within a half percent of Worcester County. “We need to remain competitive,” Meehan said. Susan Jones, executive director of the Ocean City Hotel Motel Restaurant Association, told the commissioners there are 1,000 new hotel rooms in Ocean City. “We have to work together collectively to figure out how to fill those rooms,” Jones said. “We can’t bring you the room tax revenue unless we do advertise.” However, not all agreed an increase would benefit the resort or the county. According to Ocean City resident Vincent Gisriel, the last time the tax was increased a half percent, two percent

POLICE/COURTS Continued from Page 24 Keenan Brandon, said MacDonald became violent as he accused him of stealing his skateboard. Brandon said that he shoved MacDonald out of the way because of his aggression and close proximity. MacDonald grabbed his head and punched him approximately10 times.. He said that he and MacDonald had been roommates since May. Police arrested MacDonald for domestic assault and malicious destruction of property.

Driver of scooter dies after crash (Aug. 23, 2019) On Tuesday, Aug. 20, at approximately 8:30 p.m., Maryland State Police Barrack responded to a motor vehicle collision on Route 50. The initial investigation indicates that a 2015 Chevy Cruz operated by Regan Marti was traveling eastbound on Route 50 in the second lane when a 2003 People Scooter attempted to make a U-turn from the westbound lane and was struck by the Chevy Cruz. The driver of the Chevy Cruz, Regan Marti, 21 of Goshen, Connecticut, was uninjured. The driver of the People Scooter, Caleb S. Clark, 20, of Ocean City, was transported by a helicopter to Baltimore Shock Trauma for his injuries. Clark succumbed to his injuries on Wednesday, Aug. 21. He has been sent to the Office of Chief Medicial Examiner in Baltimore. Route 50 was closed for approximately one hour as an accident reconstructionist was on scene. The Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, Maryland State Highway and Ocean City Fire and EMS assisted with the incident.

of the hotel tax revenue was set aside for Ocean City advertising. He said the resort advertising budget hit $6.9 million in 2018 and wondered how much more could be needed. “We may have reached a point of diminishing returns,” Gisriel said. Ocean City resident Tony Christ suggested that the county will receive a revenue increase from the 1,000 new hotel rooms regardless of a room tax increase. He said that the previous tax increases have harmed Ocean City tourism. “It’s caused Ocean City to lose its most valuable asset, which was the blue-collared worker and their families,” Christ said. “They’re gone. After the public comments, Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic pointed out that Ocean City has the most hotel rooms in the county. He moved to

ELIZABETH BONIN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City resident Vincent Gisriel makes his case against the hotel tax rate increase at the Worcester County commissioner meeting this Tuesday.

pass the tax increase. “I don’t the propose the county tell Ocean City how to spend their money because I’m sure we wouldn’t like

Ocean City to tell us how to spend ours,” Mitrecic said. Commissioner Jim Bunting seconded the motion.


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Ocean City Today

Pines man pleads guilty in case of sewage dumping Continued from Page 70 After Clazey left, the citizen called the police. Frosh said Clazey admitted to discharging raw sewage into the storm drain and that an investigation revealed that he no longer held a septage hauler’s license in Queen Anne’s County, or any surrounding county. As a result, he was unable to properly dispose of sewage at the various countyowned wastewater treatment plants. Clazey has since closed his sewage business. Circuit Court Judge J. Frederick Price ordered three years of probation before judgment for Clazey and imposed a fine of $10,000, suspending all but $2,000 paid to the Maryland Clean Water Fund. “Mr. Clazey’s illegal dumping created an environmental hazard,” said Attorney General Frosh. “His illegal activity was a threat to the Chesapeake Bay and the health of the community. We are grateful to all citizens who take the initiative to report environmental violations.” Official statements and news reports on the case listed his address as Ocean City or Berlin, but charging documents showed an Ocean Pines address.

WORLD WAR II

USSR-Nazi Pact catalyst of WWII Soviets bail out on France, sidle up to Germany over concerns about Poland By Peter Ayers Wimbrow III Contributing Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) This week, 80 years ago, the German Reich and the USSR executed what is, variously, known as the Molotov- Ribbentrop Pact, the Nazi-Soviet Pact, the HitlerStalin Pact, the German-Soviet NonAggression Pact, and whose formal name was the “Treaty of Non-Aggression Between Germany and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.” In addition to the Treaty of Versailles, it was probably the one document that guaranteed Europe would be plunged into war. For, it was by this document, that the Third Reich was able to attack Poland without fear from the Soviet Union and a “two-front” war. Indeed, a secret provision of the treaty called for the Soviet Union to occupy almost one-half of Poland, and to have a “free hand” in dealing with Estonia, Latvia, Finland and Romania. That Nazi Germany and the U.S.S.R. could come to an agreement regarding Poland should have come

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as no surprise to anyone. Not having existed for over a century and a half (except for the short-lived, Napoleonically created “Duchy of Warsaw”), Poland was recreated by the victorious Allies after World War I. In so doing, the Allies sowed the first seed for the next war when Poland was given a corridor to the Baltic Sea, thereby separating East Prussia from the rest of Germany and making the German port city of Danzig (now the Polish city of Gdańsk) a “Free City” under the auspices of The League of Nations, but dominated by Poland. After its recreation, Poland didn’t help itself when it attacked Russia, which was still dealing with defeat, Civil War and the invasion by the western powers. As a result of the Polish victory, it advanced its eastern border 150 miles into what had formerly been a part of the Russian Empire and incorporated 4.5 million Ukrainians and 1.5 million Belorussians. Although, the Poles, Ukrainians and Belorussians are all Slavs, the Poles are Catholic and use the Latin alphabet, while the others are Orthodox and use the Cyrillic alphabet. And, historically, neither the Russians nor the Germans have really liked, or respected, the Poles. The portions of the agreement dealing with Poland were nothing new. They were first proposed on April 15, 1920 by the Soviet Union’s special representative in Berlin, Victor Kopp, when he asked the German Foreign Office if, “ ... there was any possibility of combining the German and the Red Army for a joint war on Poland.” During the 1920s and until the Nazi’s rise to power in Germany, the two countries edged closer and closer, with the Soviet Union providing Germany with secret factories and bases with which to reconstruct its armed forces, while shipping Germany much needed raw materials. In exchange, Germany provided the technology and training needed to create a modern, powerful Red Army. Several things coalesced to diminish the relationship. One was the ascendency of the Nazi Party in Germany, with its virulent attitude toward Communism and the Soviet Union. Second was The Appointment Of Maxim Maximovich Litvinov As The Soviet foreign minister in 1930. Litvinov was a firm believer in collective security and he worked very hard to form a closer relationship with France and Great Britain. He was able to obtain the recognition of the Soviet Union from the United States, and the admission of the USSR into the League of Nations. He was also Jewish, which was anathema to the new German rulers.

Victor Kopp

Prior to the Munich Conference, and the dismemberment of Czechoslovakia, the Soviet Union had promised, by treaty, that if France went to war over Czechoslovakian independence, the Soviet Union would join. However, there were two stumbling blocks to Soviet aid to Czechoslovakia. One, of course, was that it had no common border with Czechoslovakia, nor with Germany, so that the Red Army would have to march through some country — Poland, Hungry or Romania —none of which wanted the Red Army within their borders for any length of time. The other problem was that France never stepped up and fulfilled its promise to Czechoslovakia. Therefore, with Germany rearming, and working in great concert with Italy, the USSR made one final attempt to put something together with France and Great Britain. When those efforts failed, Stalin felt that he had no choice but to reach an accommodation with the German Reich. On May 3, 1939, Litvinov was dismissed and Vyacheslav Molotov succeeded him as Soviet foreign minister. Stalin directed Molotov to immediately, “...purge the ministry of Jews.” Molotov later recalled, “Thank God for those words! Jews formed an absolute majority in the leadership and among the ambassadors. It was not good.” The Germans, correctly, took it as a sign of a change in attitude in the Soviet hierarchy and a change in the direction of Soviet foreign policy. Hitler later remarked that, “Litvinov’s replacement was decisive. It came to me like a cannon shot as a sign of a change in Moscow toward the Western powers.” Even Litvinov, when later asked about his dismissal said, “Do you really think that I was the right person to sign a Treaty with Hitler?” Two weeks after Litvinov’s dismissal, the Soviet ambassador to the Reich, Alexei Merekalov, told German officials that he wanted to make clear, “... that there were no conflicts in foreign policy between Germany Continued on Page 74


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

OC woman arrested for peek-a-boo burglary By Josh Kim Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) A Frankford, Delaware resident encountered the shock of lifetime when she found Maureen E. Gray, 42, of Ocean City hiding behind her bathroom door last week during an attempted burglary. On the evening of Aug. 15, Gray reportedly snuck into the Star Lane and Peppers Corner Road home through the unlocked front door. The resident said she became aware of Gray’s presence when she entered the bathroom and found Gray standing be-

hind the bathroom door. When she saw Gray, she claimed to have screamed for her boyfriend, the homeowner, who grabbed his Maureen Gray rifle and confronted the suspect. An altercation reportedly ensued, resulting in minor injuries to Gray, and property damage. The two subdued Gray, and the homeowner held her at gunpoint until Delaware State Police arrived.

Gray was taken to Beebe Medical Center to treat her injuries. This was not Gray’s first trip to the Frankford home. She had apparently burglarized the home on Aug. 9, around 10:44 p.m. At the time, the residents were not at home, but a house sitter was present. According to the Delaware State Police, the sitter heard an alarm sound in a nearby pole building, and when she looked outside she found Gray on the property with a window air-conditioner unit and the window screen on the ground. Gray reportedly left the property after

being confronted by the house sitter. However, it was later discovered that Gray had taken property from the front porch. After Gray was released from the hospital, she was sent to Troop 4, where police charged her with two counts of second-degree burglary, three counts of theft, reckless endangering, two counts of criminal mischief and attempted theft. Police said Gray was arraigned before the Justice of the Peace Court, and she was committed to the Delores J. Baylor Women’s Correctional Institution on a $14,700 cash bond.

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Ocean City Today

OBITUARIES

WORLD WAR II

TRAVIS S. WRIGHT Ocean City Travis S. Wright, age 45, passed on Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019, at his home in West Ocean City. Born and raised in Arlington, Virginia, he was the son of Gary J. and Cheryl Smathers Wright of Arlington, Virginia. He is survived by his wife, Jody Kelly Travis Wright Wright, and sister, Carly Jill Wright of Alexandria, Virginia. Travis was a graduate of the College of Charleston, South Carolina, where he lived for eight years and developed his passion for culinary arts. He was the executive chef of the Shark on the Harbor, which he owned and operated with his wife, Jody, for the past 19 years. He was proudly voted Chef of the Year for the Restaurant Association of Maryland. His passion for the industry and for his team will forever be remembered throughout the community. He was an avid Washington sports fan, and followed the Nationals, Wizards, Redskins and Capitals. When he wasn’t working, he enjoyed traveling, riding bicycles, attending sporting events and seeing Continued on Page 76

Continued from Page 72 and the Soviet Union, and that, therefore there was no reason for any enmity between the two countries.” On May 20, 1939, the new Soviet foreign minister told German officials that the Soviet Union no longer wanted to discuss only “economic matters” with the Reich, but also wanted to establish a “political basis.” German officials saw this as another sign that they could do business with the Soviet Union. In the meantime, the Soviet Union continued to negotiate, through June and July, with France and Great Britain. Germany and the USSR agreed, on July 26, to, “... a new arrangement that took account of the vital political interests of both parties.” Two days later, Molotov instructed Ambassador Merekalov to open political talks. On Aug. 1, the Soviet ambassador told the Germans that there were two conditions to the talks: (1) a new economic treaty; and (2) cessation of anti-Soviet attacks by the German media. The Germans immediately agreed to both conditions. All the while, the Soviets were also negotiating with France and Britain, but those two countries were moving at a more leisurely pace. While these machinations were occurring, the Red Army was engaged in an undeclared war on the other side of the world, with the Empire of

Japan, which has come to be known as “The Nomonhan War.” German Foreign Minister, Joachim von Ribbentrop, on Aug. 3, told Soviet diplomats that, “... there was no problem between the Baltic and the Black Seas that could not be solved between the two of us,” and that, “... there is one common element in the ideology of Germany, Italy and the Soviet Union — opposition to the capitalist democracies ...” Two days later, German negotiators were told that the terms of the trade agreement must be concluded first, before other areas of the relationship could be discussed. With a target date of Aug. 25 for the invasion of Poland, the pressure mounted for the Germans. But Stalin also wanted to see how the contest with Japan was going to be resolved. By Aug. 10, the details of the trade agreement had been resolved, but the Soviets still would not sign. The British and French delegations had traveled, by ship, to the USSR and once there, did not have the authority to conclude the agreement the Soviets wanted, especially in regards to Poland. On Aug. 15, Molotov suggested to the German ambassador the possibility of, “... settling, by negotiation, all outstanding problems of Soviet-German relations,” especially, “... should the German Foreign Minister come here....” On Aug. 19, Hitler cabled Stalin asking that the German Foreign Minister be received by Aug. 23, at the latest, to resolve their differences, because, “Poland has become intolerable.” Later that evening, Stalin responded that von Ribbentrop would be welcomed. Later still, the trade agreement between the two countries was executed by their respective representatives. In the meantime, the Red Army, under rising star Gen. Georgi Zhukov, was administering a drubbing to the Japanese that they would not soon forget at the Battle of Khalkin Gol. Foreign Minister von Ribbentrop flew to Moscow, and in the early morning hours of Aug. 24, 1939, a “Ten-Year Non-Aggression Pact” was signed by Molotov and von Ribbentrop, as a beaming Stalin watched. The Western World was stunned, when it learned of this development. Those that could read, knew that the fate of Poland had just been sealed. It’s only hope lay in the promised help from woefully unprepared Great Britain and unenthusiastic France. Having learned that the Reich’s foreign minister was proceeding to Moscow to sign the agreement, French Foreign Minister Georges Bonnet labeled it “a disaster” for his country, and convinced Premier Édouard Daladier to convene the Defense Council to see if there was some way that France could wiggle out of its commitment to Poland, as it had

AUGUST 23, 2019

done with Czechoslovakia. After receiving assurances from Gen. Maurice Gamelin and Adm. Jean François Darlan that French armed forces were ready to meet the challenge, France decided to stand by its promise — more or less. The leaders of the Western Democracies would have been beyond stunned if they had known of the secret protocols to the new treaty. With these secret protocols, Stalin and Hitler intended to reform the map of Eastern Europe to more closely approximate the way it looked at the beginning of World War I. Then, the Russian Empire had included Latvia, Estonia, most of Lithuania, the eastern part of Poland, the province which the Rumanians called Bessarabia, and the Duchy of Finland. As a result of World War I, Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania and Finland had achieved, and enjoyed, independence. For entering the war on the side of the victorious allies, Rumania had been awarded Bessarabia. Now, Stalin wanted those territories returned to the Soviet Union. The new agreement gave the Soviets a free hand to address these “problems.” The Soviets did not wait long before moving. Less than three weeks after Germany and Slovakia attacked Poland, the Red Army occupied the eastern part of the country. Although Lithuania had originally been in the German sphere of influence, pursuant to the secret part of the treaty, after the dust settled around Poland, Stalin suggested that the Germans take a larger share of Poland in exchange for Lithuania, and some cash, to which the Germans quickly agreed. Within a few weeks, the three Baltic countries had agreed to allow their gigantic neighbor to establish military bases in their countries. Within a year they were admitted to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. While this was occurring, the Soviets were negotiating with Finland to rearrange its boundaries to give Leningrad/St. Petersburg more of a buffer. When the Finns proved obstinate — and stupid — the Red Army was sent to take what the Soviets wanted — and had originally requested. Rumania transferred Bessarabia and Northern Bukovina to the newly created Moldova in 1940, which then also joined the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics. Other than the recent independence of the three Baltic countries, the rest of the changes, implemented by Stalin, pursuant to the agreement with Germany, remain in place today. Next week: Invasion of Poland Mr. Wimbrow writes from Ocean City, Maryland, where he practices law representing those persons accused of criminal and traffic offenses, and those persons who have suffered a personal injury through no fault of their own. He can be contacted at: wimbrowlaw@gmail.com.


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 74 live music. He loved animals and especially enjoyed time with their dogs, Belle and Luna. A Celebration of Life is planned for Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019 at The Shark on the Harbor at 4 p.m. A donation in his memory may be made to: Jesse Klump Suicide Awareness and Prevention Program, 10737 Piney Island Dr. Bishopville, Maryland 21813, or the Worcester County Humane Society, P.O. Box 48, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. MARGARET REGAN VIGNALE Ocean City Margaret Regan Vignale, age 85, of Ocean City, died Monday, Aug. 12, 2019 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. She was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and was the daughter of the late John Patrick Sr. and Katherine (Hanigan) Regan. Margaret Vignale She retired as a seasonal dispatcher for the Ocean City Police Department where she had worked for over 20 years. She was a member of St. Mary’s Star of the Sea Catholic Church in Ocean City. She is survived by a son, Joseph Vignale Jr. and wife, Esther, of Bishopville; two daughters, Terri M. Grell and husband, Henry, and Kathy M. Aronow and husband, Alan, all of Somers, New York; six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and a brother, Charles E. Regan of Howard County, Maryland. She was preceded in death by her husband, Joseph Vignale Sr. in 2015; a brother, John P. Regan Jr.; and two

sisters, Catherine E. D’Anthony and Marilyn Jean Cunneen. Services and burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21802. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com. ARTHUR JAMES WHITE Snow Hill Arthur James “A.J.” White, age 76, died on Monday, Aug. 12, 2019 at Hartley Hall Nursing and Rehab in Pocomoke. Born in Newport News, Virginia, he was the son of the late Edward C. and Evangeline Dunaway White. He is survived by “A.J.” White his wife, Rebecca Martin White, and children, Karen Berrier and her husband, Frank, of Pocomoke, and Jennifer Burke and her husband, James, of Snow Hill. There are three grandchildren, Katherine White, Lee Berrier and Rachael Burke, and one great-grandchild, Lily White. Also surviving, are several nieces and nephews; a brother, Edward White and his wife, Kathy, of Greenbackville, Virginia; and brothers-inlaw, Jack Taylor, also of Greenbackville, Charles Martin and his wife, Linda, of Snow Hill, and Ronald Martin and his wife, Gaile, of Denver, Colorado. Preceding him in death were his sisters, Lavenia Taylor and Eva Jane Marsh. A.J. was a graduate of Atlantic High School, served in the Army National Guard, and had worked as a pressman for Moore Business Forms, and was a self-employed painter. He was a member of Spence Bap-

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tist Church, where he served as a deacon and trustee. He was an avid fisherman and member of Just a Mere Bass Fishing Club. A funeral service was held on Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019 at Spence Baptist Church in Snow Hill. Rev. Kenneth Elligson officiated. Interment followed in Spence Baptist Cemetery. A donation in his memory may be made to: Spence Baptist Church, 7603 Spence Church Rd., Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. WILBUR D. QUILLEN Berlin Wilbur D. Quillen, age 89, of Berlin, died Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019 at Harrison Senior Living of Snow Hill. Wilbur was born in Showell and was the son of the late Howard D. and Della Catherine (Powell) Quillen. He worked for the former I.W. Long Co. Wilbur Quillen as a carpenter. Wilbur was a life member of AMSA and North Carolina Beach Buggy Association. He is survived by a daughter, Teresa Q. “Terry” Johnson and her husband, Edward, of Snow Hill; a son, Howard D. Quillen and his wife, Heather, of Berlin; a brother, James E. Quillen of Georgia; eight grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, a niece and four nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife, Estinia D. Quillen, and a brother, Robert Quillen. A funeral service was held on Saturday, Aug. 17, 2019 at Bishop-Hastings Funeral Home in Selbyville with Pastor Mike Deisem officiating. Burial was in Riverside Cemetery in Berlin. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com. HERBERT PAWLUKEWICZ Ocean City Herbert Pawlukewicz, age 88, of

H. Pawlukewicz

Ocean City, Maryland (born in Newark, New Jersey), died on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019 in Berlin, Maryland. He was the son of the late Andrew and Julia (Saroka)

Pawlukiewicz. He is survived by his wife, Frieda Pawlukewicz, and his children, Justine “Dolly” Pawlukewicz and son, Michael Pawlukewicz; grandchildren, Frank Crespo, Jennifer Crespo and Zoey Jane Crespo; Goddaughter Andrea; nieces, Bernadette, Cheryl and Lisa; as well as several nephews and a host of family and friends. He was predeceased by his daughter, Jane Crespo; his three brothers, Anthony Paulukiewicz, Andrew Paul and Stanley Pawkawitz; and two sisters, Julia Padner and Isabel Ciuba. Herbie was a member of The Polish Club, AARP, Caine Woods Association, St. Luke’s Parish, VFW #663, and a citizen advocate for the cities of Ocean City, Maryland, and Perth Amboy, New Jersey, where he resided for many years. He advocated for the old OC Boardwalk benches to be recycled throughout the city. The best is the one at the end of his OC street, Twin Tree Road, where people come to watch the sunset at “Herbie’s Benches.” He enjoyed gardening, fishing, crabbing, boating, cruising and traveling. In his younger years, he had a row-boat rental business. He loved baseball and worked as a bat boy for the Newark Bears. He served in the U.S. Army, stationed in Germany, and worked for Smith’s Transfer Corporation for 38 years, Teamsters Local 560. He and his family had been coming to Ocean City, Maryland since the late 1960’s and eventually Herb retired here, over 20 years ago, with his wife, Frieda. Everyone will remember him for his sociability, friendship, great sense of humor and willingness to help others. There was a breakfast for all, Mon-


AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 77

OBITUARIES day, Aug. 19, 2019, at the ClarionBreakers Pub-in Ocean City, a viewing at St. Luke’s Catholic Church, and a Mass of Christian Burial, followed by his resting place in Gate of Heaven, Dagsboro, Delaware. In lieu of flowers, please consider a memorial to his favorite charity: St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital: www.stjude.org/donate/donate-tos t - j u d e . h t m l ? c I D = 14262&pID=24671&frequency_selected=2&sc_icid=wtg-mm-memorialcards. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. CALVIN ELTON SMACK JR. Ocean City Calvin Elton Smack Jr., age 72, died Friday, Aug. 16, 2019 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Born and raised in Berlin, he was the son of the late Calvin Elton Smack Sr. and Margaret Elizabeth Baker Smack. He is survived by Calvin Smack Jr. his wife, Diane Smack, and daughters, Stephanie Mervine and her husband, Mark, and Natalie Long and her husband, Jon. He was an adored grandfather to Paige and Evan Long. Also surviving are two brothers, Tommy Smack and his wife, Angela of Cape St. Claire, Maryland, and Ronnie Smack and his wife, Charlotte, of Berlin; Ruth Phillips, mother of his children; his nephews, David, Chris and Brian; and nieces, Elizabeth and Sarah. Mr. Smack was a graduate of Stephen Decatur High School, class of 1964 and had served in the United States Navy on the USS Sierra. Later, he worked as an electrician in the family business and with Sonny Adkins. Calvin was an avid fisherman and golfer, and animal lover, but most of all, he cherished his family. A funeral service will be held on Saturday, Aug. 24, 2019 at noon at Stevenson United Methodist Church, 123 N. Main Street in Berlin. Viewing will be from 11 a.m. to noon. Celebrant Art Scott will officiate. Internment will follow at Evergreen Cemetery in Berlin. A donation in his memory may be made to: the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company, 1409 Philadelphia Ave. Ocean City Maryland 21842. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

OBITUARY NOTICES Obituary Notices are published free each week in the Ocean City Today. E-mail: editor@oceancitytoday.net Obituary Notices are published as space allows. Every effort is made to publish all that are received.

Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. KATHLEEN GAIL BEEBE Snow Hill Kathleen Gail Beebe (Kathy), 58, of Snow Hill, Maryland, made her transition into eternal rest on Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2019, after a very courageous and lengthy battle with leukemia. Born on Oct. 9, 1960 in Baltimore City, she was the daughter of Joan and Kathy Beebe Edward Ilgenfritz of Hydes, Maryland. Kathy enjoyed swimming, gardening and a good book. She loved her dogs dearly and took care of helpless animals. She had a long career as a bartender in which she made countless friends, most recently at 28th St. Pit and Pub. Kathy will be remembered for her kindness, caring heart, humor and always putting others first. Kathy was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Kevin Beebe. In addition to her parents, Kathy is survived by her two sons, Kevin Beebe and Matthew Beebe and his wife, Asucena Beebe of Snow Hill; two grandsons, Kaleb Beebe of Pocomoke City and Robert Beebe of

Snow Hill; brother, Mark Ingenfritz and his wife, Patty; and nephew, Eddie of Kensington. She is also survived by numerous in-laws, nieces and nephews. Kathy’s family would like to express their appreciation for the support that surrounded her during her illness by the 28th St. Pit & Pub and her many friends and family members. A memorial service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy may be made in Kathy’s honor to: Kenille’s Kubbard and Pet Pantry, P.O. Box 598, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. Arrangements are in the care of Holloway Funeral Home, P.A., 501 Snow Hill Road, Salisbury, MD 21804. To send condolences to the family, please visit www.hollowayfh.com. JEROME LEONARD BERKOVICH Los Angeles Jerome Leonard Berkovich passed away unexpectedly on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019 at the age of 63. Jerome grew up on the Eastern Shore, graduating from Stephen Decatur High School in 1974. After school he moved to the West Coast and spent the past three decades living in Los Angeles but was a frequent visitor to Ocean City and his

family on the shore. Jerome was heavily involved in Alcoholics Anonymous and was passionate about helping people during their recovery journey. J. Berkovich Jerome is survived by his three sisters, Marlene Suzuki, Darlene Brown and Charleen McPherson; his brother, Gabriel Berkovich; and his nieces and nephews, Travis Brown, Ashley Brown, Gabriel Berkovich Jr., Sapphire Suzuki, Nicole Suzuki, Trent McPherson and Timothy McPherson. He is preceded in death by his mother and father, Elizabeth Sheroke and Alex Berkovich. Jerome was a builder, contractor and business owner, a traveler and prankster, and a dedicated Alcoholics Anonymous sponsor. He was a strong shoulder to lean on in troubled times and had a hand always ready to lift up anyone who fell. Jerome was a kind man and he will be missed. He was a giver all of his life and, even in passing, gave one last gift to his friends and family: an example of a life well-lived we will all strive to follow. A celebration of life will be held in Los Angelos, California, on Sunday, Sept. 1.


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Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019


Sports & Recreation

Ocean City Today Aug. 23, 2019

Page 79

www.oceancitytoday.com

Poor Girls Open ladies-only event another success

PHOTO COURTESY HOWARD LYNCH

Kristy Frashure, left, caught this 74.5-pound dolphin while fishing on Haulin N’ Ballin during the 26th annual Capt. Steve Harman’s Poor Girls Open ladies-only tournament, last Friday. She is pictured with, from left, Breanna Hall, boat owner Kristin Jezierski, Jackie Davis, Tammy Bielot and Toni Johnson. Frashure now holds the state record for “common dolphinfish.”

Frashure catches new state record 74.5-lb. dolphin By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Aug. 23, 2019) When Kristy Frashure was fighting a monster dolphin, she, her teammates and crew aboard Haulin N’ Ballin knew it was a big fish, but they never imagined it would be a new state record. Last Friday, Frashure was participating in the 26th annual Capt. Steve Harman’s Poor Girls Open ladies-only fishing tournament with Breanna Hall, Jackie Davis, Tammy Bielot, Toni Johnson and Kristin Jezierski, who owns the boat with her husband, Aaron. Howard Lynch was the captain and the mates were Burro Gonzalez and Jose Luis Enriques. Fishing in the Poor Man’s Canyon, lines were dropped at 8 a.m. and shortly after all the action happened. “We caught the fish about 9:20 a.m., so it wasn’t too long after we put lines in,” Frashure said. “It just so happened we had two of them on at once so we let the angler [Davis] who had never been out before fish a little bit, then the big one got on the line and I just happened to be there and See FRASHURE Page 80

PHOTO COURTESY KRISTIN JEZIERSKI

Haulin N’ Ballin mates Burro Gonzalez, left, and Jose Luis Enriques gaff the monster dolphin caught by Kristy Frashure.

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Aug. 23, 2019) Records continue to be broken annually during the Capt. Steve Harman’s Poor Girls Open, and this year was no different. “It went fantastic,” said Earl Conley, co-director of the Open. “There were no complaints, everything went smoothly and fishing was pretty good.” A record 925 female anglers fished on 184 boats during the 26th annual tournament, held last weekend. A total of $269,940 – a new tournament record – was presented to the winners. That’s about a $40,000 increase from 2018, when $229,565 was paid out with 149 boats registered. Perhaps the most talked about accomplishment was Kristy Frashure reeling in a 74.5-pound dolphin aboard Haulin N’ Ballin, last Friday. The catch was a new Maryland state record. To top it all off, Poor Girls Open organizers presented a check for $140,000 to American Cancer Society representatives during the tournament awards banquet at Harrison’s Harbor Watch at the inlet, last Sunday. “When you tie a cause to an event you can definitely see how it affects people,” Conley said. “This is a group that does not rest on past accomplishments. They motivate the community to get behind the cause of finding cures for breast cancer,” said Mary Bellis, senior community development manager, Northeast Region, for the American Cancer Society Inc. “The Harman family is just amazing. The work that goes into the tournament during the busy summer months is a tremendous gift.” Since 2005, the total donated to the American Cancer Society by the Harman family through the tournament and other events is over $1.1 million. “This was another outstanding tournament,” Bellis said. “This was the largest number of anglers in the history of the event. Even the challenging [rainy] weather on Wednesday did not keep folks from coming out to register.” The tournament did offer online registration for the first time this year. About 50 teams signed up online. Conley said the process will be tweaked and improved for next year, where teams will have a separate line on final registration day to pick up their tournament information and See ACS Page 80


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Ocean City Today

AUGUST 23, 2019

Frashure tops record set just 3 weeks ago Continued from Page 79 got handed the rod.” Frashure battled the dolphin for what felt like an eternity, she said. “As soon as it jumped the mates and the captain, they knew. They said, ‘that’s a monster. That’s amazing. That’s a winner,” she said. “It jumped about six times,” Jezierski said. Frashure fought the fish for about 23 minutes. “[That’s] what they tell me,” she joked. “It was terrible,” she said during the tournament awards banquet last Sunday at Harrison’s Harbor Watch at the inlet, now laughing after the fact. “It was extremely difficult. We had the leader five or six times then he just kept running back out. It was a hard fight.”

Frashure said no one on the boat had any idea how much it weighed, but once it was on board they could see it much better up close. “We were guessing on the boat between 40, maybe a 60-pounder. Never did we imagine it would be 74 pounds,” she said. “It was just chaos [on the boat]. Everyone was ecstatic [and] jumping around. “Of course, I was exhausted,” she continued. “We did have a little celebration. We had no idea it was that big, but it was definitely the biggest mahi we have ever seen.” Lines were out of the water at 3:30 p.m. and then the group headed to Bahia Marina on 21st Street, bayside, to weigh their catch. “As soon as they pulled it up and it said 74 pounds we all started screaming, [and were] super excited, but

when they said it was a state record that’s really when the whole marina kind of exploded in cheer,” the 40year-old nurse from Pasadena, Maryland, said. The fish weighed in at 74.5 pounds. A Maryland Department of Natural Resources biologist identified the species as common dolphinfish — Coryphaena hippurus — (also known as mahi mahi) and its official weight was certified by Bahia Marina. Frashure’s catch topped Jeff Wright’s Atlantic Division record for common dolphinfish of 72.8 pounds, which was set just three weeks ago on July 28. The previous record had been held since 1985. To now have a state record, Frashure said is “very exciting.” “This is a great team, great owner, captain, mates, everybody. I’m just

super excited to be on a great team,” she said. “And it couldn’t happened during a better tournament for breast cancer.” Proceeds from the annual ladiesonly tournament are donated to the American Cancer Society and earmarked for breast cancer research and program development. Frashure’s state-record fish took top honors in the tournament’s dolphin division. She and her Haulin N’ Ballin teammates received $13,447.50. This was the fourth year Frashure has participated in the Poor Girls Open. She also fishes in the Ocean City Marlin Club’s Heels & Reels ladies tournament. Frashure said her family and children also enjoy fishing so she spends a good amount of time on the water.

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Continued from Page 79 gifts. The DA Sea crew took first place in the billfish release division with five white marlin releases. The ladies won $140,270. The C Boys team released four white marlins, the last at 11:13 a.m. The group was awarded $33,402. The No Quarter team released four white marlins, the last at 2:16 p.m., to finish in third place. The anglers were presented $22,268. Frashure’s state-record dolphin took top honors in the division. She and her Haulin N’ Ballin teammates received $13,447.50. Jody Eid’s 40.2-pound dolphin she landed on Talkin’ Trash finished in second place. The team won $7,168.50. Christine Fried caught a 23.2pound dolphin aboard Seek and Destroy. The fish was worth $4,779. Brooke Moretz landed a 65.3pound tuna at 10:41 a.m. to take first place in the division. She and her Marli teammates were awarded $12,772. Brandi Carr caught her 65.3-pound tuna at 2:40 p.m. aboard Reel Chaos, to come in second place. She was presented a check for $6,763. Cabana angler Carlie Carey picked up a 64.9-pound tuna. The group received $4,509. Ginger Fleming reeled in a 69.7pound wahoo while fishing on Restless Lady II. The fish was worth $12,030. Bar South angler Michelle Espinosa caught a 47.8-pound wahoo. The team won $6,318. Bonnie Asquith hooked a 30.5pound wahoo aboard Rhonda’s Os-

prey. The crew took home $4,212. The top junior angler of the tournament was AnnaBelle Schiavino. She caught seven dolphins while fishing on Ringleader and was presented $2,000 and rod and reel. This was the first tournament without Kathleen Harman, who passed away on July 23 at the age of 92. “It was all in Kathleen’s memory this year,” Conley said. In 2004, the tournament was renamed to honor the founder of the event, the late Capt. Steve Harman. He and his wife, Pam, started the Poor Girls Open in 1994 to provide women with an opportunity to compete for prizes and money in a ladiesonly tournament, and to raise money for local charities. Harman died in February 2004, so organizers thought it was appropriate the tournament be renamed in his memory. Women enjoy fishing in the tournament because it benefits a worthy cause — breast cancer research. Many cancer survivors participate in the event. Proceeds will be donated to the American Cancer Society and earmarked for breast cancer research and program development as part of the “Pink Ribbon Classic at the Beach Series” – an assortment of local activities to raise breast cancer awareness while garnering money for the organization. “The funds raised will support the American Cancer Society’s breast cancer initiatives. This includes programs and services for breast cancer patients and survivors, information on prevention, screening and treatment,” Bellis said. “Most of the funds will support re-

search. The American Cancer Society is currently funding 160 breast cancer-related grants totaling more than $64.3 million. Since 1989, breast cancer deaths are down 40 percent in the U.S.” The Open is the first event of the Pink Ribbon Classic at the Beach Series. Most of the events will take place in October, which is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Other events this year include a card game and party; mah-jongg and golf tournaments; Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5K walk and run; pickleball round robin; and the Pamper Yourself For Charity Raffle. For more information and to register for events, visit www.pinkribbonclassicevents.org. The Pink Ribbon Classic Series was started in 1996 by a group of volunteers. Since its inception, the series has raised about $3.6 million for breast cancer research, awareness, programs and services. Some of the local programs and services available in this area include free wigs for patients and Road to Recovery, which connects local drivers with patients to transport them to and from treatment. There is also the Hope Lodge, which provides lodging during treatment; Cancer Survivors Network available at www.cancer.org, a 24-hour-a-day cancer information center; and 1-800227-2345 for patients to access ACS services. In addition, resources for caregivers, information on screening and prevention, and referral to local, regional and national outlets is available.

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Ocean City Today

Capt. Steve Harman’s Poor Girls Open organizers and the Harman family present a check for $140,000 to American Cancer Society representatives during the tournament awards banquet at Harrison’s Harbor Watch at the inlet, last Sunday. LISA CAPITELLI/ OCEAN CITY TODAY

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AUGUST 23, 2019

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

POOR GIRLS OPEN (Left) The C Boys team released four white marlins during the 26th annual Capt. Steve Harman’s Poor Girls Open, last weekend. The group was awarded $33,402 for second place in the release division. (Right) Ginger Fleming kisses the 69.7-pound wahoo she landed while fishing on Restless Lady II during the Open. The first-place wahoo was worth $12,030.

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Berlin Little League team returns By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) The Junior Berlin Little League All-Star team returned home from the World Series, held in Taylor, Michigan, in style with a police procession and escort by the Maryland Red Knights Motorcycle Club on Monday. Several local officials including Berlin Mayor Gee Williams, Worcester County Commissioner Bud Church and Worcester County Sheriff Matt Crisafulli as well as the parents and family members of the Berlin Little League All Stars came out to the Worcester County Athletic Complex in Berlin to congratulate the team on making it all the way to the World Series. Berlin – district, state and regional champions – lost its first game to the South East Regional championship team from Florida on Sunday, Aug.11, 15-2. Berlin battled back with a win against the South West Regional championship team from Oklahoma, last Tuesday, 193, in four innings. The all stars lost their final game to a

team from Michigan, 5-1, last Wednesday. The Berlin team finished the season ranked fourth out of 1,500 U.S. Junior Little League squads and eighth internationally. “We’re just glad to be home,” Head Coach Kris Mandley said. “These boys have accomplished so much. It would have been nice to win the whole thing but being fourth in the nation and eighth in the world as a Junior League champion is unreal, and I’m sure everyone here is excited to get a night in their own beds.” His son, Dylan, 14, described the experience as “unbelievable.” “We started off in a small town and worked our way up to [the World Series],” he said. Many of his teammates agreed. “It was crazy how such a small town can go so far,” Roman Keith, 14, said. “I felt a lot of pressure but I knew that we were out there to have fun and we were out there for a purpose.” “When you think about everyone back home watching and representing Berlin, Maryland, and the East Region it was just a great feeling,” Stephen Wade,

14, added. John Tartufo, treasurer for the Maryland Chapter Three Red Knights, wanted to celebrate the team’s great achievements and escort the boys back to Worcester County. The motorcycle group met the team’s bus in Salisbury and escorted them to Berlin. “I thought it would be fitting to give them a hero’s welcome because they are truly heroes,” Tartufo said. “They went so far in this series and that’s what we do for our heroes.” In addition, Tartufo and the Red Knights collected $1,000 to donate to Berlin Little League when they heard two of the families could not afford to go watch their children play in the World Series. The Red Knights are an international motorcycle club made up of fire service personnel, supporters, and their families which is dedicated to promoting motorcycle safety and projecting a positive image of motorcycling. Williams and Church also expressed their pride in the team. “We are very proud of you,” Williams told the boys. “It’s not just a talent and the extraordinary team effort that you make, but we’re very proud of the character that you’ve shown, not only for our community but for Little Leaguers all over this country. We’re very proud of you and look forward to your future contributions to your town, your state, your country and your families.” “I can’t tell you how proud, not only the Town of Berlin but Worcester County and the state of Maryland are of what you accomplished,” Church said. “Everybody was talking about Berlin Little League. You put Berlin Little League on the map. I want you all to remember this day, because 20 years from now, you’ll still be talking about this day and this experience.”


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Ocean City Today

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Overnight fishing offered during OC Marlin Club event By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Aug. 23, 2019) Hours were extended for the Ocean City Marlin Club’s 60th Labor Day White Marlin Tournament last year, allowing anglers to fish overnight, and the format will again be implemented this year. “It was well received,” said Jimmy Giles, co-chairman of the tournament with Bob Wimbrow and Bill Fenwick. “Some stayed overnight. It was a nice option for those who wanted to.” The time schedule gives teams an opportunity to take advantage of the early morning and late evening bite. Last year, 51 boats participated and $40,680 was paid out to the winners. The new format was supposed to be implemented in 2017, but the tournament was canceled because of bad weather stemming from remnants of Hurricane Harvey. It was also canceled in 2016 because of Tropical Storm Hermine. Giles said they are hoping for good weather this year. Registration for the Marlin Club’s 61st annual Labor Day White Marlin Tournament, the resort’s longest-running fishing competition, will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 29, at the Ocean City Marlin Club on Golf Course Road in West Ocean City. A captains’ meeting will follow. A representative from each boat must attend. “We have seen record or near record tournament participation this year,” Giles said. “More boats means more guaranteed prize money.” Seventy-five percent of the entry fee will be returned in guaranteed prize money. The tournament is open to both Marlin Club boat members and nonmembers. The cost to participate is $500 per boat. “All are welcome to participate,” Giles said. “It’s a great way to spend the holiday weekend. It’s a great time.” Many crews participate in the tour-

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

ESCORTED HOME The Red Knights Motorcycle Club escorted the Junior Berlin Little League All-Star team from Salisbury to the Worcester County Athletic Complex in Berlin on Monday, Aug. 19 after the boys participated in the World Series in Taylor, Michigan. The team finished fourth in the nation in its division this season and ranked eighth in the world.

nament annually, he added. Anglers are eligible to fish two of three days: Friday, Aug. 30, Saturday, Aug. 31 and/or Sunday, Sept. 1. Day one, lines in at 8 a.m. and out at midnight. Day two, lines in at midnight and out at 3:30 p.m. Crews can choose to fish overnight for their two tournament fishing days. “Overnight fishing is permitted, but not mandatory,” Giles said. Participants can leave from either the Indian River inlet or Ocean City inlet. The billfish division is catch and release only. One hundred points will be awarded for each released white marlin, sailfish and spearfish. Anglers will earn 150 points for blue marlin released. No points will be awarded for boated billfish. Added entry-level calcuttas, or wagering pools, which range in cost from $200 to $500, for billfish release are available. In addition, anglers can sign up for the daily billfish release division, which costs $500 to enter. Winner takes all. A billfish release calcutta for boats 34 feet and smaller is also available. It costs $500 to enter and is winner takes all. A Master Angler Award will be pre-

sented to the person who self-hooks and releases the most billfish during the tournament. “The timing of this tournament typically coincide with some of the season’s best marlin fishing,” Giles said. “Mid-August to mid-September is typically the peak of the billfish [fishing] season, which adds to the excitement.” The heaviest swordfish calcutta costs $500 to enter and is winner

takes all. The minimum length for swordfish is 48 inches. “This year’s rules allow deep drop sword[fish] fishing during all eligible fishing hours, not just during the overnight period,” Giles said. There are also divisions for heaviest meatfish (tuna and dolphin) brought to the scale. The anglers who boat the three heaviest tuna (yellowfin, big eye or See OCMC Page 84

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AUGUST 23, 2019

Ocean City Today

High school athletes attend inaugural ‘Rise Up Huddle’ By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Aug. 23, 2019) Discipline was the core message delivered to hundreds of Worcester County public high school athletes, coaches and community members who attended the inaugural “Rise Up Huddle” event at Stephen Decatur High School on Monday. The gathering pulled together student-athletes from Stephen Decatur, Pocomoke and Snow Hill high schools for an uplifting presentation by keynote speaker Timothy Alexander. Truly a testament to success despite adversity, Alexander was a top state-ranked high school football player from Alabama who was being recruited by multiple Division I colleges until a horrific car accident in October 2006 left him paralyzed. Initially diagnosed with brain damage, Alexander defied the medical prognosis and fought back against overwhelming physical challenges to graduate from Erwin High School in May 2007. “Discipline is the most important thing a person can have,” he said. “No one really knows what it took for me to get to where I am today [but] that’s discipline.” Alexander continued pursuing educational goals, starting off at Wallace State Community College, where he eventually made the Dean’s list for academic excellence, and later earning a master’s degree in criminal justice and communication management from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Stephen Decatur High School teacher Amy Fenzel-Mergott organized the inaugural Rise Up Huddle event as “mental preparation,” in light of the academic year and sports seasons commencing. “Rise Up Huddle has been a vision of mine for a couple of years,” she said. During her introductory remarks, Fenzel-Mergott paid tribute to Gail Gladding, the Pocomoke High School

girls’ basketball coach and close cohort who died earlier this month. “She was a true warrior inside and out,” she said. Noting time is a commodity of unknown quantity, Alexander told the assembled youths he had brushed off sage advice received during high school prior to the life-altering car accident. “Years ago somebody told me, ‘take advantage of high school because it’s going to go by so fast,’” he said. “I didn’t believe it … but when I went from walking one day to rolling the next, that changed my entire life.” Alexander acknowledged embracing the long and arduous path forward to rebuild and attain success seemed an impossibility at first. “I tried to take my life three times in one week because I go from being 6-foot5 and 195 pounds to now I’m wheelchair See ALEXANDER Page 85

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Timothy Alexander poses with students after delivering a rousing presentation centered on discipline during the inaugural “Rise Up Huddle” event on Monday at Stephen Decatur High School in Berlin.

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GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

More than 440 high school athletes, coaches and community members filled the auditorium at Stephen Decatur High School on Monday for the inaugural “Rise Up Huddle” event.

Continued from Page 83 longfin) and dolphin will win prize money. Added entry-level calcuttas for meatfish cost $200, $300 and $500. The minimum qualifying weight for tuna is 30 pounds and 10 pounds for dolphin. Daily catches will be weighed at Sunset Marina in West Ocean City from 5:30-7:30 p.m. An awards banquet is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 1, at the club. Banquet tickets cost $15 per person. For more information, call the Marlin Club at 410-213-1613 or visit www.ocmarlinclub.com.


AUGUST 23, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Alexander speaks to students

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full circle,” he said. He found Alexander’s life story highly relatable. “Being a young kid just trying to fit in … it didn’t make sense for him to stand out until after he started becoming different and … realizing he was meant to be different,” he said. “Eventually he started coming full circle with everything and then said, ‘this is what my life was meant to be.’” Fenzel-Mergott deemed the evening successful and anticipates the Rise Up Huddle event becoming an annual tradition to provide an opportunity for fellowship. Alexander stressed all in attendance should remember the mantra, “We don’t need it to be easy, we just need it to be possible.” “If you want to do something great with your life … you’ve got to start practicing being great on and off the field,” he added. The Rise Up Huddle event was made possible through support from: Berlin American Legion Post #123, Ocean CityBerlin Optimist Club, Taylor Bank, Knights of Columbus Council #9053, Atlantic General Hospital, Snow Hill Lions Club and the Stephen Decatur High School Athletic Boosters.

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Timothy Alexander, a top state-ranked high school football player being recruited by multiple Division I colleges was left paralyzed after a car accident in 2006, was the keynote speaker for the inaugural “Rise Up Huddle” event on Monday at Decatur High School.

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time,” he said. “If you want to make the world a better place you be the better person first.” Prior to Alexander, Worcester County Schools’ Superintendent Lou Taylor attributed his own success to early lessons gleaned from high school sports. “Athletics is where it all began for me,” he said. “Today I stand before you as the superintendent, first and foremost because I had great parents, I had a faith in God and because I had coaches who cared for me.” Taylor admitted that insight was not as evident in the moment. “People remember years from now how you behaved and represented yourself,” he said. “It will make a difference in your careers and your life.” Stephen Decatur High School senior Ellie Dutton, who is on the varsity cross country and lacrosse squads, said Alexander’s story was eye opening and motivational. “It was really inspiring what he said about motivation [and] just having belief,” she said. “As an athlete you do lose your belief sometimes.” Stephen Decatur High School senior DaCameron McAfee, a member of the varsity football team, agreed the gathering provided useful wisdom for developing minds. “I really liked the reoccurring messages [and] how he brought everything

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Continued from Page 84 bound and 105 pounds,” he said. Alexander said after accepting that despite the unanticipated physical limitations he was in essence unchanged, the clouds of depression slowly subsided. “When I didn’t respond physically I was able to respond mentally,” he said. “When I was focusing on what I couldn’t do it was causing my life to go downhill but when I started focusing on what I could do my life began going on. I’m talking about being so disciplined that you work on renewing your mind every single day.” Alexander recognized while a path forward on the gridiron was off the table, more than a decade of playing football had provided the grounding to chart a successful life path. “It’s just a game but what you learn from the game is everything,” he said. “Everything I learned in football it transitioned over [and] that’s why I can call myself a leader today.” Alexander said there were three key points he contemplated to rebound from adversity. “Who are you, why are you here and who do you do it for?” he said. “When my back was up against the wall I started figuring out who I was.” Resiliency is defined as how quickly we respond to adversity, Alexander said. “What you will be, what you will become is all based on how you use your

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(Aug. 23, 2019) Local martial artists, the CMA Marlins, traveled to Greensboro, North Carolina recently to compete at the AAU Junior Olympic Games. The AAU Junior Olympics is the largest amateur multi-sport event in the United States. This year marked the 53rd AAU Junior Olympic Games and was carried out during 11 days. Over 16,000 athletes participated in 22 sports. Eight students of CMA Marlins, ranging in age from 6-17, entered 48 events over the span of two days and earned 48 medals. The student-athletes competed in forms (poomsae), forms with weapons, self defense techniques, and board breaking. Weapons that the Marlins team competed with were the bo staff, nunchucks and the folding fan. Self defense techniques are demonstrated with open hand against multiple attackers of various size and strength. Board breaking competition includes creative breaking, flying/jumping breaks, repetitive hand/foot breaks, and power breaking (large stacks of boards) by either hand or foot. The students were judged on traditional techniques, skills, speed, power and creativity. The final medal count was 23 gold, 20 silver, and five bronze. The students were excited to do so well and this event helped them realize what can happen when they work hard. The team, based at Chesapeake Martial Arts in Ocean Pines, trains for 11 months of the year. Members compete in local, regional and national events. The 2019 Junior Olympics team members were Nick Graham, Sienna McVicker, Matthew DeHuarte, Dorian Messick, Madison Mitchell, Maia Holland, Syalwon Shakya and Dominique Azbell. Coaches include Master Sunil Shakya (Sifu Sunil), Master Tanja Giles, Jason Dawson, Master Nick Graham, General Manager Salina Karki, Rob McVicker

and Simona Holland. “At their age they have the support of the instructors and parents to assist them in learning how their bodies react to training,” Coach Dawson said. “We want them to be healthy while working hard.” Coach Shakya said he “could not be more proud of the kids and their hard work to get them to this stage.” “They have come such a long way from their first practice,” he said “To see them compete at this level is a great feeling for everyone.” Competitions and the team building that naturally occurs while preparing for these events creates memories that will follow them through life, Coach Giles said. “The coaching staff of the tournament team remembers competing at various events both as children and adults, and in Master Sunil’s case, all over the world. We know first hand how impactful those experiences are,” Giles added. The tournament team is a nonprofit and has multiple sponsorship opportunities to support these student athletes. Contribute to the team’s fundraising events by donating gift cards, equipment, gas cards, and any other auction items. Any monetary contributions are appreciated. Contact Fundraising Chair Lisa Mitchell at 443-373-1307. CMA is owned by GrandMaster Kim Heaney and Master Jim Heaney and was based in Ocean City, for several years before moving to the larger facility in Ocean Pines, in 2016. CMA trains all ages in various martial art styles and wellness programs including Tai Chi, Krav Maga, Kung Fu, and also has family classes. CMA Kids Care is a program for before or after school, half-day and all-day child care, and is open year-round, including during school professional days and school delays. Extended hours for pick-up are available at no extra charge and free transportation is provided for after-school programs.

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COLORFUL CATCH A dolphin jumps out of the water that was caught by lady anglers fishing on the Yellowfin captained by Dean Metcalfe last Saturday, during the 26th annual Capt. Steve Harman’s Poor Girls Open tournament. The group reeled in 12 dolphins and released one white marlin.


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FREE HORIZONS OCEANFR RONT REST TA AURANT ort Fontainebleau Hotel Inside The Clarion Reso Oceanfront & 101st St Street reet • Ocean City City, MD Horizonsoc.com Reservations Suggested 410-524-7500

Profile for ocean city today

8/23/19 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

8/23/19 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...