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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.NET

JUNE 8, 2018

LIFESTYLE

SUMMER READING County students receive backpacks filled with books through McGuffey program – Page 26

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County agrees on spending with 6-1 vote

Union, chief disagree on alarm action

Funding nonprofits dominates debate

They call them cuts, he says they’re not

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Worcester County income and property taxes will remain the same for the next year, as the Worcester County Commissioners on Tuesday adopted their fiscal year 2019 budget, balanced at about $190 million, though Ocean City Commissioner Joe Mitrecic, was the lone nay vote. “I find myself in a familiar situation, and I can’t support this budget,” Mitrecic said. “I have two issues.” First for Mitrecic was the funding of nonprofits. In this budget, the county sharply reduced or eliminated funding for organizations that had previously received county funds. Mitrecic said the piecemeal way the county approaches this issue should be resolved. “We should have some sort of meeting to formulate a policy,” he said. “I don’t disagree with the idea of the policy, but we’re picking and choosing without a formula or criteria. Then, to add insult to injury, we compare them to feral cats.” His other issue is how the resort is treated in this budget. Ocean City didn’t get two things it was asking for: an extra $100,000 for tourism advertising and $600,000 over two years for security measures on the Boardwalk. “We’re expecting $300,000 more in revenue” from West Ocean City because of the recent buildup in the area. So See MITRECIC Page 64

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

SEA-BOUND SEAL The National Aquarium’s Animal Rescue team releases a male harbor seal at the 40th Street beach access in Ocean City, on Thursday. Marmalade was rescued after stranding on the shore of Ocean City in March. He had labored breathing, lacerations on the body and pneumonia. He also had seal pox on his left front flipper, which is contagious to other seals, and uncomfortable. While under the care of the Animal Rescue and Animal Health teams, Marmalade received IV fluids, antibiotics and steroids to help him heal.

Pounds of pot, plus pills, LSD Failure to check out on schedule leads to discovery of big stash

(June 8, 2018) Justin L. Culley, 19, of Enola, Pennsylvania, was arrested on multiple drug charges Monday after police found several pounds of marijuana, dozens of prescription pills and hallucinogens in his motel room. Ocean City police were called to a motel on First Street and Baltimore Avenue by motel management after the cleaning crew discovered the substances in his room.

The crew had entered the room after Culley failed to check out at the scheduled time. Justin L. Culley When police arrived, they found the marijuana, more than 300 prescription pills, a large amount of mushrooms, LSD and MDMA (Ecstasy). A K-9 team also scanned the suspect’s vehicle and found more mushrooms and more than $1,100 in cash.

Culley returned to the motel hours later and was placed under arrest. He has been charged with three counts of possession with intent to distribute LSD, possession of marijuana over 10 grams, two counts of possession of a controlled dangerous substance with intent to distribute, and four counts of possession of a controlled dangerous substance. Culley was seen by a Maryland District Court Commissioner and transferred to the Worcester County Jail where he is being held without bond.

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) Fire department staffing matters have resulted in a shift in alarm responses, with an ambulance unit no longer included on responses to automatic fire alarms at highrise buildings in Ocean City. Ryan Whittington, president the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 4269, told the City Council on Monday that department policy had required both a fire engine and ambulance respond to automatic fire alarms at high-rise structures. “In the past, our service delivery to a high-rise with an automatic fire alarm has never been disputed because it makes sense to send enough firefighters and EMTs to the scene,” he said. “Unfortunately, this service delivery is being reduced.” Whittington said the service cutback was officially implemented last Thursday. “What that means, if you live or stay in a high-rise building, you no longer get an ambulance on the scene on initial dispatch for an automatic fire alarm,” he said. Ocean City Fire Chief Chris Larmore, said later in the week, that the changes apply only to responses for automatic fire alarms at structures seven stories or taller. “Over 90 percent of these calls are not property or life hazards,” he said. “In the See ALARM Page 59

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) In addition to boosting network coverage, a dozen cell phone towers recently installed on the Boardwalk by communications company Crown Castle will also provide two dozen new camera feeds for the resort’s City Watch surveillance system. City Engineer Terry McGean said the equipment costs were absorbed by Crown Castle. “They put cameras at each of the tower locations for our City Watch system,” he said. “It’s not a feed we put on the web, it’s a feed we use internally for See CAMERA Page 4

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Ocean City Today Business ..................................47 Calendar ..................................41 Commentary..............................57 Classifieds ................................43 Entertainment ..........................32 Lifestyle ....................................26 Obituaries ................................69 Public notices ..........................51 Sports ......................................73 Publisher: sdobson@oceancitytoday.net News: editor@oceancitytoday.net Sales: sales@oceancitytoday.net Classifieds: classifieds@oceancitytoday.net Phone: 410-723-6397 www.oceancitytoday.net and at Facebook/Ocean City Today Published Fridays by FLAG Publications, Inc. 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842 P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Available by subscription at $150 a year.

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County agrees to hold off on radio upgrade until autumn Worcester will incur about $24K in removal costs for old system in favor to resort

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Both the county and resort governments are switching to new P25 radio systems, but at different rates, and Ocean City’s Director of Emergency Services, Joe Theobald, asked the commissioners on Tuesday to delay scrapping the old system until after Labor Day. Keeping the old EDACS system online will cost the county money, but it’s not currently known how much. The county’s service contract with EDACS ran out in March, meaning it’s on the hook for repairs if something breaks. Also, removal of the old system was included in the service contract, so the cost to remove superfluous technology, estimated to be about $8,000 from each of three locations, will also be borne by Worcester County. The county and resort have maintained a shared radio system since 2001. “Unfortunately, the ongoing installation of these systems has resulted in several unanticipated challenges that required additional diagnosis, engineering, software development, field testing and reprogramming to the Worcester County radios,” Theobald

wrote in a memo to County Administrator Harold Higgins. Worcester County Emergency Services Director Fred Webster said the resort was choosing to roll out its new system in phases, and waiting to transition public safety uses until last. The county had originally planned to decommission the EDACS system in July. “Because Ocean City is using our system daily for medical transport we still need the existing system,” Webster said. He explained that once an Ocean City ambulance leaves the resort, the personnel switch to the county system to maintain communications with its communications center at 65th Street. “The same applies to police units transporting prisoners to the Worcester County Jail in Snow Hill. Fire units responding to Berlin, Bishopville, Showell and Ocean Pines depend on this as well as county fire/EMS units,” Webster said. Commissioner Chip Bertino asked if there was a date the resort expected to be using the new system, which there was not. He also asked if this affects the way the county is expected to accept and approve the system upon final delivery and testing, to which Webster said it did not. Webster said existing county staff would be able to maintain the radio system until the resort was prepared to make the switch.

Camera system not just for crime prevention, city argues Continued from Page 3 public safety.” Ocean City Police and the Emergency Services departments monitor the City Watch camera system, McGean said. “They feed to what we call ‘City Watch,’ which is essentially our camera surveillance system we have throughout town,” he said. After rejecting an initial proposal from Crown Castle last April to install a dozen distributed antenna systems on the Boardwalk and seven more on side streets between Baltimore and Philadelphia avenues, in July the City Council voted 5-2 to accept the deal, based on efforts to conceal the apparatus. Although not similarly financed by an outside contractor, McGean said the city has also replaced an antiquated closed-circuit camera system at the Ocean Bowl Skate Park on Third Street. “That system was no longer working, so we installed new cameras that

are also part of the City Watch system,” he said. “It literally was just cameras that … fed into the office at the skatepark.” While still able to be monitored on site, McGean said public safety officials could now view the skate park feeds. Councilwoman Mary Knight said the expanded City Watch camera system helps with a host of public safety issues, adding, “It’s not just for crime prevention.” The surveillance system also assists police when children get lost or adults get separated on the Boardwalk, Knight said. “We will pull up footage to look where the child was last seen,” she said. The increasing number of surveillance cameras also tends to discourage bad behavior, Knight said. “Unfortunately, we live in a society where bad things happen,” she said. “People are deterred from bad behavior when they know they’re being watched.”


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 5

Volunteer fire aims to keep troops

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) In hopes of bolstering its numbers, the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company brought Christine Bennett on board this week to fill the newly created volunteer retention and recruitment coordinator position. Bennett, a native of New Castle County, Delaware, spent the last three years working for the Minquadale Fire Company, after starting as a volunteer for the Goodwill Fire Company at the age of 15. Despite living in the Wilmington until recently, Bennett is no stranger to the shore. “My family has a summer home in Ocean View, Delaware,” she said. “I lived at the beach in the summer since I was 16.” After a dozen years in the volunteer firefighter field, Bennett said she understands the challenges to locate personnel from a diminishing pool of candidates. “I think volunteer fire service recruitment and retention is a national challenge,” she said. “You only have so many people coming in the door.” Ocean City Fire Chief Chris Larmore echoed those sentiments. “Nationwide call volumes are going up and, in a lot of places, volunteerism is going down,” he said. “Everybody is really pushed to try and get employees.” In addition to experience in the field, Bennett has an academic background, after graduating magna cum laude from Delaware Tech Community College with associate’s degrees in fire science and fire protection engineering. Bennett credits then Minquadale Fire Chief Joe Day for helping to launch her career path. “I’ve been there three years and got to do a lot in that position,” she said. “I handled their cadet program, as well as retention and volunteerism.” Bennett said it has been rewarding to observe new members progress to

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greater heights in the fire company. “It was great to see somebody start out with no fire service experience and make it all the way through to where they’re a senior firefighter,” she said. Larmore said Bennett will take a leadership role in developing and maintaining a volunteer recruitment program and serve as the main point of contact during and after new members one-year probationary period. “We’ve got a lot of people that apply [but] the retention part is where we really have the challenge,” he said. Although the volunteer fire company has approximately 227 current members, Larmore said about 80 are highly active responders. “Those 80 members — she needs to know them like a brother or sister,” he said. The position was created to see that volunteers are meeting expected activity levels, Larmore said. “Who manages those volunteers to make sure they’re doing their drills,

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Berlin Mayor Gee Williams on Wednesday emailed a statement addressing J. Bergey’s comments during a public meeting Tuesday night on the findings of the Matrix Consulting Study. He attached a copy of the most recent audit of the Berlin Fire Company, from June 30, 2017, and included the following: “This most recent audit of BFC finances reports their assets include $2,224,504 in cash, and another $617,539 in restricted cash. This total of cash on hand equals $2,842,043 of the BFC’s total assets, including property and equipment, totals $5,468,872. This information is on page 3 of the attached audit report. “In April of this year, the Mayor and Council made an inquiry to the auditing firm as to the handling of money for the planned new station 3, east of Berlin on US 50. The response from PKS & Company was as follows: • In 2015 the BFC moved approximately $450,000 from the EMS building fund, contingency fund and operating funds and designated these funds for the proposed new building (Station 3). • In 2016 and 2017, the funds received from Worcester County of approximately $325,000 for out of town calls to service were designated for Station 3. • Then in 2017, $403,567 was moved from the new building fund to

a fund for the main headquarters reducing the amount allocated for Station 3. • During this time, the BFC received approximately $112,000 of donations for Station 3 and incurred $7,579 in expenses related to the proposed new building. “Unfortunately, near the end of the meeting there was a provocative statement, not made by any member of the Berlin Fire Company or any representative of the Town of Berlin, that sought to undermine the credibility of our town’s genuine concerns about the financial management of the BFC. “A brief, but heated discussion followed and I recognize that my response was strong, but I maintain was appropriate, in light of the dispersions that were made to apparently undermine a better working relationship that both the Town and the BFC are working to accomplish. “The town stands by the findings and recommendations of the Matrix Consulting report. We are looking forward to resolving any differences between the Town and the BFC and are confident a well-thought, well-defined contract for Fire-EMS services, currently being discussed between the Town and the Fire Company, is the foundation for long term success that will insure the continuation of top-notch fire- fighting and EMS services to the residents and guests of Berlin for decades to follow.”

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under the age of 21. Personnel under the age of 21, accompanied by plainclothes law enforcement officers, will be visiting bars, restaurants and alcohol retailers attempting to purchase alcoholic beverages. The OCPD and Worcester County Sheriff’s Office reminded all business owners that serving alcohol to underage citizens is not only illegal but can have a detrimental impact to their business and the underage individual involved.

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Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 7

Berlin Fire Company butts heads with town

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Although progress might have been made, hard feelings apparently remain between the Town of Berlin and the Berlin Fire Company officials, judging from the exchanges between representatives of both Tuesday night. At a meeting designed to help the public understand the fire company funding study released by Matrix Consulting Group in April, one town councilman walked out after the study and some council member comments were characterized in rough fashion as uninformed. Robert Finn, a senior manager with Matrix and retired fire and police chief from the Dallas/Fort Worth area, opened the meeting with about 20 minutes of background on the study. The audience was almost all public officials and fire company personnel, including Mayor Gee Williams and Councilmen Dean Burrell, Elroy Brittingham, Thom Gulyas and Zack Tyndall, as well as Fire Company President David Fitzgerald. Finn said work on the study started in mid-December and the finished product included recommendations “that we think will enhance the relationship between the fire company and the town, and ensure that the service levels can continue and the fire company doesn’t run into any long-term funding issues.” Between 2013 and 2017, Finn said, about 57 percent of calls were in town, while 43 percent were from elsewhere in Worcester County. To pay for services, the town provides an annual payment of $400,000 and EMS billing adds about $350,000. Including county funding and private donations, fire company and EMS combined revenue is $1.92 million, while expenses were $1.785 million – and trending upward, Finn said. “The expenses are rising at a faster rate than revenues are increasing, so, long term, that might be an issue,” Finn said. “One thing you don’t want is that your revenues and your operating expenses are so tight that there’s no op-

JOSH DAVIS/OCEAN CITY TODAY

A sizable contingency from the Berlin Fire Company sits on one side of the room, with town officials on the other, during a meeting with Matrix Consulting Group at Berlin Intermediate School on Tuesday night.

portunity to put aside funds for capital expenditures.” Currently, Finn said, the fire company “puts aside and operates on a cash basis.” “They save money, and when there’s enough money to buy a fire truck, they can buy a fire truck,” he said. “They don’t go into debt to purchase any of their capital assets. So, in terms of debt-to-earnings ratio, they’re pretty solid because they don’t carry any debt.” Rather than the town giving the company a flat amount, Finn said it was important to develop a contract for services “so that the fire company were treated like any other department in the town.” “Just like public works [or] the water department — they come in and present what they think they need for the next year in order to provide the operations,” Finn said. “It gives a mechanism for the town to have some control over how the monies are spent, and it also gives an opportunity for the fire company to come in if something has changed from year to year – and they need more funding or less funding – to be able to present why that’s the case to the town and be able to receive what they feel is appropriate funding

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a concern and recommended its use be transferred to the county for alerts during severe weather. When the floor was opened to the public, resident Joe Shelton said he believes there’s an ongoing “peeing contest between the city and the fire department,” and compared it to a witch hunt. Williams countered that town officials had never criticized the quality of fire or EMS services, although there See FIRE Page 8

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Fire company meeting contentious Continued from Page 7 were issues of “funding, accountability and transparency of finance.” “It’s nobody’s fault, but this is an inherited system where the financial accountability is much more in tune with the 1950s – not the 21st century,” Williams said. David Lewis from the Berlin Fire Company asked if a tax increase would be necessary to cover the apparent $600,000 gulf between current fire and EMS funding and the fire and EMS needs shown in the study? “The study indicated to us that $1 million would be needed to fully fund EMS and fire,” Williams said. “For us to generate an additional $600,000 out of our budget, we would have increase the property tax rate by approximately 11 cents per [$100 of evaluation]. If that’s what ultimately has to be done, fine, but it has to be done together. “If we work together, we’ll find solutions,” he continued. “We can get to a place where everyone benefits, and the public needs to know where that money is being used, how it’s being invested, what’s the operational expenses, what are the capital expenses, and how are these decisions being made. And I think those are reasonable questions for the public to ask.” Tyndall estimated the increase would cost the owner of a $200,000 home an additional $220 each year, or about $18 per month. Marc Brown, a 33-year veteran of the Berlin Fire Company, said town funding totaled $567,000 in 2011. “Eight years later, inflation has cost us and now we’re at $400,000,” he said. “That’s just something to put in the back of your mind.” Brown said in more than three decades there has never been a year when the fire company did not present a budget request “and go line by line and answer every question [the Town Council] wanted to hear.” “We always didn’t get what we wanted – sometimes they’d throw us a bone and we got a little more,” Brown said. “It’s always been a two-way street – until the last five or six years.” He said membership has suffered greatly because of the funding decrease, with more than 50 people who were serving in 2010 no longer with the fire company. “We are feeling the effects of not being supported financially by our town – our membership is feeling the pain. It will cost the citizens,” Brown said. “I hope it doesn’t, but I could see that happening.” Brown compared the situation to hiring a contractor. “If you brought a paving company in to pave the street … would you want to audit him and know how he’s running his business, or would you be satisfied with the service he’s providing?” he said. Burrell called for unity and said the

Town Council is asking the citizens to “work with us – us and the fire department – to ensure that our fire department is funded equitably.” “If that takes a tax rate increase or whatever it takes to fund our fire department, we are ready to do that. But it has to come under the scrutiny of the public,” Burrell said. “I’m going to ask this group to take your opinions, your expertise, and let’s bring them together – let’s bring them together to work toward a solution,” he continued. “I’m not talking about soundbites for the press or anything like that – I’m talking about genuinely working together. We can do this thing, I know we can.” Tyndall added the council and fire company recently had productive meetings and “we’re all open to working with one another.” However, J Bergey, fire company CPA, had issues with some of the evening’s comments. “I’m sitting here listening to this shit … and you don’t know what you’re talking about,” he said. For instance, he said, it was untrue the fire company operated on a cash basis. “You all keep saying ‘cash basis, cash basis.’ That’s the next thing that’s going to be in the newspaper,” Bergey said. “The financials are done on accrual basis – not cash basis. “None of you know what you’re talking about – that’s the biggest part of it. You keep saying we move stuff around … that’s bullshit!” he added. “You don’t have any financial expertise,” Bergey said. “You’ve got an auditor that’s telling you the fire company is underfunded …. You’ve got 57 percent of the services and you pay 27 percent of the bottom line. “Dean hit it right on the head – there’s so many opinions and all that kind of bullshit going on – it’s just a lot of mumbo-jumbo smoke and mirrors,” he continued. Williams sprung out of his seat when Bergey again claimed, “It’s all just bullshit.” “No, it’s not! It is not! It is not!” Williams said. Burrell also stood up. “I just want to say one more thing,” Burrell said. “I talked about [us] having different ideas and different opinions, and I believe that is a good thing. But for this thing to work we’re going to have to try to understand each other,” he said. “I’m going to have to try to understand where you all are coming from, and you’re going to have to try to understand where we are coming from. “And, to sit in a public meeting and say, ‘you don’t know shit’ – I don’t want to be in here, so I bid you good night,” Burrell said, leaving the room. Following the meeting, on Wednesday morning, Bergey clarified what led to his frustration. “Those guys were standing up there last night trying to piss in the commu-

nity’s boots and tell them that it was raining. It’s so disingenuous to have someone stand up there that they have fed all this crazy shit, and this guy is a fireman – a professional fireman – and he’s trying to intertwine his good fire recommendations about response times and all that stuff, and reconcile it with a 25 mile-per-hour speed limit and no sirens – it’s so incongruent, it just pissed me off to no end.” Bergey said the consultant lacked credibility, referring to cash-basis accounting when talking about replacement reserves. “To somebody that doesn’t understand the financials – they’re talking about something and not even using the right terminology, so how could anybody have a good understanding of what even they were saying? That’s what frustrated me about it,” he said. The real headline, Bergey said, was that the consultant comes from a fire company “that does the same amount of calls – around 1,400 fire and EMS calls per year” as the Berlin Fire Company, but with a three-times larger budget. “Their budget for providing that service for their town and their community is $6 million,” Bergey said. “The Berlin Fire Company provides for their community three life-support ambulances 24/7 and a top-of-the-line fire service for $1.9 million – it’s three times as much for the same 1,400 calls per year. “And that guy came from a service where they had no volunteers, and that’s what the town is trying to get rid of. They want to get rid of the volunteer service so they can take over whatever they think they can do,” he added. He also balked at the consultant’s suggestions to lower the speed limits in town and do away with the fire siren, the latter of which is still necessary because the siren alerts firemen about five minutes before the outdated 911 systems can send phone or pager alerts, Bergey said. “It’s really getting to be to a ridiculous point, and it’s pushed the volunteer fire company to where they cannot provide the service anymore,” Bergey said. “The main point is that the consultant that was telling them to cut back on a $2 million budget for 1,400 calls was from a fire company that did the same 1,400 calls, and their budget was $6 million – that’s the real key to the whole thing,” he continued. “I didn’t want the newspapers and the people that were there that weren’t financially savvy … to understand that they were not using the right terminology, and whatever message they were trying to relay wasn’t financially sound and it didn’t make any sense. “It’s just real frustrating that the Town Council sees fit to spend money and not support their own community members that are volunteering their time. It’s just really beyond me how they can do it,” Bergey said.


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 9

MML summer conference kicks off Sunday Annual event brings local governments together to debate top issues of day By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Medical cannabis, paid sick leave, and police body camera use are the topics set aside for debate as representatives from governments across the state converge on the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on 40th Street in Ocean City beginning on Sunday this week.

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The annual summer conference will bring together municipal and regional governments from Maryland communities far and wide to share ideas on how each area is handling issues, and what might be learned from the attempted solutions. From noon on Sunday until 2 p.m. on Wednesday, the convention center will be packed full of seminars, presentations, discussions and vendors soliciting attendees attention and offering aid to decision makers. For example, large cities, small towns and villages all have their own

discussion forums, where members of those governments can interact and share ideas scaled to their population centers. “Engaging Millennials in Government,” “Combating Opioids: Best Practices” and “Effective Records Management” are only three of the dozens of seminars that will carry the weekend for elected officials. During breaks in the sessions, the main floor of the convention center will come alive with the sights and sounds of vendors offering municipalscale products and services such as

fire engines, record keeping and personnel management. The keynote speaker appears on Monday, June 11, during the opening general session beginning at 10 a.m. This year’s speaker is Shannon Huffman Polson, author of “The Grit Project,” and one of the first US Army women to captain and pilot an Apache helicopter. The theme of this year’s conference is “L.E.A.D.: Learn, Engage, Access, Deliver,” and supports Maryland Municipal League President Jake Romanell’s theme of “Live to lead.”

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PAGE 10

Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

Solid waste, liquor control, water/sewer costing more By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Water and wastewater, which permits the development of the county, solid waste, which provides a place to dump waste materials, and liquor control, which was voted out of existence more than a year ago, are costing taxpayers more than ever, and the county commissioners appear ready to stop kicking the can down the road — next year. This year’s approved county budget transfers about $1.6 million from the general fund to subsidize these business-like activities to cover deficits. In the past, when shortfalls were observed, the money could be transferred between “enterprise funds” (budgets for revenue-producing services) without taxpayer input, if reserves were available. However, these transfers would come from the Liquor Control Department, which usually had the money to spare, according to a former director of the department. When the county moved to strike the Liquor Control Department, it set a July 1, 2017 exit date for all operations. However, a legal tangle with the way the county handled the sale of one of the department’s stores in Pocomoke City has kept the it alive for another year, and nearly another $1 million in operations costs to go along with it. The appeal has now reached the Court of Special Appeals, the intermediate appellate court in the state. Last year, the county budgeted about $1.02 million to keep the Pocomoke Shore Spirits running. This year, it’s been downgraded to $915,000, with the major increases in personnel at about $200,000 from $148,000 and services at $59,250 from $26,250. The increase in services fees is attributed to legal costs dealing with the appeal, Jessica Wilson, enterprise fund controller said. Water bills are also set to increase on July 1 for every service area the county maintains, except for West Ocean City, which will see no change this year. At Assateague Point, customers could see a $10 grinder surcharge, water and sewer rates for trailers go from $80 to $85 and the sewer-only rate jump to $135.50 from $127.50. In Briddletown, the water-only commercial rates are proposed to increase based on the number of EDUs the business uses. For one EDU the rate goes from $45 to $49.50, for two EDUs it jumps to $68.75 from $62.50, between three and 13 EDUs the rate goes to $137.50 from $125, between 14-24 the rate hikes to $206.25 from $187.5, from 25-39 EDUs the quarterly rate jumps from

$250 to $275 and for more than 40 EDUs the rate increases to $412.50 from $375. In Edgewater, the water and sewer base fee is proposed to increase $10 from $150 to $160 each quarter, and the flat rate domestic charge is set to do the same, from $223 to $233. At The Landings, the base fee is proposed to go from $215 to $230, and the charge per EDU is set to increase to $220 from $210. At Mystic Harbour, the sewer debt per EDU fee is set to increase from $54 to $64, with an increase to the base fee from $162 to $168, the sunset water-only charge increases slightly from $43.75 to $45, as does the sewer-only fee as it goes from $164.25 to $168. The commercial water base charges are increasing. With one EDU the fee will go from $180 to $200, two EDUs goes from $250 to $275, between three and 13 EDUs the fee hikes to $550 from $500, between 14-24 EDUs increases to $825 from $750, between 25 and 39 EDUs the charge increases to $1,100 from $1,000 and more than 40 sees an increase to $1,650 from $1,500. In Ocean Pines, the water and sewer per EDU charge is dropping from $47 to $37, while the water and sewer base fee increases from $154 to $170, the sewer-only charge jumps from $146 to $158 and the White Horse Park charge goes from $122 to $134. The commercial water base charges are also increasing there. With one EDU, the fee will go from $180 to $200, two EDUs goes from $250 to $275, between three and 13 EDUs the fee hikes to $550 from $500, between 14-24 EDUs increases to $825 from $750, between 25 and 39 EDUs the charge increases to $1,100 from $1,000 and more than 40 sees an increase to $1,650 from $1,500. Finally, in the solid waste division, the commissioners are split pver what to do with the convenience centers, with some thinking it’s best to increase fees to cover shortages, others believe closing the centers is the fiscally responsible move, and a third school of thought that hypothesizes that the closure of the centers would lead to more litter on the roads. According to Wilson, the county issues about 4,500 convenience center permits each year, enough to cover less than 10 percent of the county’s population. Residential permits are $100 for the first, the second is free and $100 for the third permit. Commercial permits are $25 per vehicle. Wilson could not provide a breakdown of how many of each permit type sold each year. From there, the county derives See COUNTY Page 11


JUNE 8, 2018

O

Ocean City Today

PAGE 11

BRIAN GILLILAND/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Participating in the Coastal Association of Realtors candidate forum on Thursday at the Ocean Pines library, from left, are Josh Nordstrom (D), candidate for county commissioner District 1; Bud Church (R), incumbent county commissioner District 3; and Zackery Tyndall (D), candidate for county commissioner District 3. Six other candidates and incumbents participated.

Realtors sponsor Worcester commissioners’ forum in OP

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) While the Worcester County Commissioners are tasked with governing the entire county, the candidates’ forum, held last Thursday at the Ocean Pines library, had a decidedly Ocean Pines feel to it, as the county’s largest population center took center stage from the nine incumbents and hopefuls in attendance. Almost all of the challengers were there, and five sitting commissioners attended. On the challenger’s side was Josh Nordstrom, District 1

Southern, Zackery Tyndall, District 3 Sinepuxent, Virgil Shockley, District 4 Western and Judy Butler, District 5 Ocean Pines. Incumbents were Bud Church District 3, Ted Elder District 4, Chip Bertino District 5, Jim Bunting, District 6 Northern, and Joe Mitrecic District 7 Ocean City. Not attending were incumbents Merrill Lockfaw, District 1 Southern, who is facing Nordstrom in November, and Commissioner President Diana Purnell, who is running unopposed. See TAX Page 12

County self-supported funds subsidized by taxpayer money Continued from Page 10 about $355,000 in revenue. It also expects to bring in about $3.29 million from tipping fees, $183,200 from recycling and $225,000 in other revenue. To balance this budget, the county is transferring in more than $1.03 million from the general fund’s recycling heading, almost $655,000 from the general fund’s convenience center heading and about $268,500 from reserves. This balances the solid waste budget at $6.02 million for fiscal 2019. “We are not acting in a fiscally responsible manner with this budget,” Commissioner Jim Bunting said. He said he favored raising the fees and made a motion to that effect, which died due to a lack of a second. “The concern is that if we raise rates, we lose customers,” Commissioner Chip Bertino said, and then followed with a question to Wilson:

“If we lower rates, do we get more customers?” Wilson said the commissioners were free to try it. “If we take out the transfers, we’ll have trash all over the place,” Commissioner Bud Church said. The commissioners were stuck for a few minutes, as no motions were made on the topic, but, procedurally, they needed to approve this budget during this meeting so the resolution could be properly endorsed for the following meeting. “We can’t just keep charging more and more,” Commissioner Joe Mitrecic said. “The landfill and solid waste need to be looked at, and not just at one meeting.” He said the commissioners should “suck this budget up this year and look for options” before fiscal 2020 hits. Mitrecic made a motion to approve the solid waste budget, which passed 6-1 with Bunting opposed.

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Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

Tax differential, CAFOs, Route 589 discussed Continued from Page 11 Bunting and Mitrecic are also running unopposed. Candidate Gary Millhoff, who is challenging Bud Church in the June 26 primary, was also not present at the forum. All of the other contested races will be decided on Election Day, Nov. 6, 2018. The forum was moderated by Stewart Dobson, editor of this newspaper, and consisted of questions prepared by event sponsor Coastal Association of Realtors, and from the audience as well. Sometimes the questions were posed to the board and the candidates took turns answering, but individual candidates were also expected to answer questions alone. The questions didn’t necessarily relate to the districts each candidate sought, but as a county commissioner, the candidate would be expected to vote on issues outside of their districts at nearly every meeting. Being in Ocean Pines, the issues most directly relating to that community fostered the most discussion. Chief among the residents’ concerns was the proposed Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation on Peerless Road. Bunting said the proposal has not

been before the commissioners, but he said if the project met the rules as they were at the time the application was made, there was little the county could do but approve the project. Bunting said the process is no different than if someone wanted to build a residential home on the property. The issue that got the most discussion from the candidates, however, was that of Ocean City’s request for a tax differential, and the impact that would have on the rest of the county. “Ocean City’s intention is not to unduly tax Worcester, but as a way to get more fair funding from the county,” Mitrecic said. “Other areas get 70 percent of their taxes back.” Intention or not, at least one sitting commissioner said that higher taxes in the rest of the county would be the result. “If OC prevails in its lawsuit, taxes could go up four, five or seven cents because we don’t know what the overlap is,” Bertino said. “That’s the way it’s going to be. I don’t think Ocean City gets to raise taxes on the rest of the county because they chose to duplicate services.” Bunting said he was against a tax differential or tax setoff because the money would never find its way back

into the hands of the property owners. Ocean City as a municipality’s county taxes would be lowered, but the government may not respond with a direct tax cut in response to the property owners, he said. What they might do instead is keep the extra money the setoff or differential provides while offering a small tax cut to the residents. Shockley said he didn’t think any tax differential would show up on Ocean City residents’ tax bills, but he said he also remembered sitting on a board where everyone got along and lawsuits were unnecessary. The audience also wanted to know when the orange barrels would be removed from Gum Point Road, and the question was posed to Ted Elder. He said Route 589 is one of the county’s priority projects on the state register, and the county would have to wait to see which ideas would be acted on by the Hogan administration. Opiates were also on the participants’ minds, and Nordstrom said the county would have to be prepared to join a lawsuit by governments to sue the pharmaceutical companies that marketed opiates for pain relief on the condition they were not addictive. Church said attacking the problem begins with education.

The audience was concerned about county workers making a livable wage. Shockley said no one in Worcester County with a family could survive on less than $40,000 annually. Bertino said the commissioners were looking at a plan to increase the pay of the county’s lowest tier employees. However, when the first phase of that plan was presented in January, Bertino, Bunting and Merrill Lockfaw voted against it. Bertino’s objection was procedural, rather than being hostile to the proposal. “I understand the need, but I have a problem doing it now instead of at budget time,” he said at the time. When the county finally adopted the plan two weeks later, Bunting and Bertino remained opposed, while Lockfaw switched his vote to affirmative. Early voting for the primary starts on June 14, and a voted must be registered as a Democrat or Republican in order to participate in the Maryland primary. The in-person primary is set for June 26. Of these candidates, the only one facing a primary challenge is Bud Church. The rest of the races will be decided Nov. 6, 2018.


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 13

EPA whistleblower back on shore to manage campaign

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Like many others who have spent time in the White House, Kevin Chmielweski’s story of the past two years is a whirlwind. For Chmielewski, it started during the April 2016 Trump campaign stop at Stephen Decatur High School, when he was pulled up on stage by the candidate, who called him a “star” and a “gem.” He was working as a member of the advance team, which sets things up in anticipation of a candidate’s arrival, and makes certain travel arrangements. Chmielewski was no stranger to this type of work, having already worked in this capacity for Gov. Rick Scott of Texas before he became the Secretary of Energy, candidate Mitt Romney, former Vice President Dick Cheney, former President George W. Bush and several others. Now, a little more than two years later, he’s said he’s left Washington D.C. behind, and has returned to the coast as one of the managers of West Ocean City’s Sunset Grille. While his living situation has changed, some other things haven’t. “I’m dyed in the wool Republican. I’m the biggest Republican ever,” he

said. And his thoughts on the man he worked so hard to get into office? “I’d run through a brick wall for him. Right here, right now,” he said. Chmielewski, 39, is married to Brianna and has two daughters Kailea, 4, and Braelyn, 1. After President Trump was elected, Chmielewski continued his advance duties for Vice President Mike Pence and, for a time, the Department of Homeland Security. He was working under Gen. John Kelly, who was about six months removed from being named White House Chief of Staff. “Anyone who knows Gen. Kelly knows he doesn’t sleep,” he said. See BERNAL Page 14

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JUNE 8, 2018

Most county, town WWTPs weather wet weather well

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Managing the inches of rain the lower shore has received in the past month has been hard enough for residents, but for the systems designed to treat everything that runs down a sewer pipe and the people who maintain those systems, it has been a nightmare scenario. Fortunately, the county and municipality wastewater treatment plants held up well during the deluge, with only one municipality, Berlin, reporting a small overflow. “We had a slight overflow of treated effluent, which we reported as required. Other than that, we had no other issues,” Town Manager Laura Allen said. Effluent is the liquid portion of waste or sewage that is discharged from the plant. Reports are made to the state, but no public notification is required. “There were no problems reported at the town’s wastewater plant from

the recent heavy rainfall. Fortunately, we are equipped to handle these events,” Jim Parsons, chief deputy director of Ocean City Public Works said. The lion’s share of water and wastewater treatment is performed by Worcester County, which maintains the plants throughout the north end of the county, including all of the treatment in Ocean Pines. County Public Works Director John Tustin said there were no weather-related issues at the county’s treatment plants. Water and wastewater Director John Ross said it wasn’t that the storm had no impact, as retaining ponds and other management devices were taxed, but no overflow was reported. Snow Hill and Pocomoke City, at the southern end of the county, maintain their own water and sewer plants, and town managers Kelly Pruitt of Snow Hill, and Bobby Cowger of Pocomoke City, said there were no issues with either of their plants.

Bernal taps Chmielewski to run bid for Sheriff’s Office Continued from Page 13 So about four months into it, Chmielewski was offered a position at the Environmental Protection Agency doing the same work, but for more money and hopefully, shorter hours. Chmielewski’s family remained on the lower shore, and didn’t get to see him much, he said. Moving to the EPA would provide him more time to spend with his wife and children. “That’s what I like about President Trump — he’s not a politician, and as a new father I loved to watch him around his kids,” he said. He said the president’s children all adored Donald Trump, and none of them drank, smoked or did drugs, which Chmielewski contended wasn’t an easy example to set when growing up wealthy. Growing up on the shore as a child of divorced parents, Chmielewski said he realized his children were being raised the same way as he was, more or less without a father, so he said he was happy to accept the reduced role at the EPA. However, it wasn’t long before he noticed some of the behaviors EPA Secretary Scott Pruitt is currently being investigated for, and alerted the president’s personnel office. Chmielewski said he was concerned about Pruitt’s security detail, which he said rivals that of the president himself, and the lavish travel arrangements required by his new boss.

“It’s all from me,” Chmielewski said of the investigations. “Scott Pruitt is a criminal.” While he may have left Washington D.C. behind for now, he hasn’t left politics behind. “There are more politics here than in Washington D.C. anyway,” he said. Chmielewski has agreed to manage Scott Bernal’s bid for Worcester County Sheriff. “I could have gone anywhere,” he said. Offers come in all the time to interview here or there, or to contribute to this or that, but he said he wanted to return home to be with his family and to help a man who had helped him so much in the past. “I was a knucklehead kid, getting all Cs and Ds at school and had dreadlocks,” he said. “It’s not a secret.” Chmielewski met the neighbor of his best friend, Scott Bernal, about 30 years ago. “My best friend’s parents were also divorced. We went over to Scott’s every day,” he said. “He’s one of the best men I’ve known in my life.” To pay him back for his support during some difficult years, Chmielewski said he wanted to use whatever recognition he’s achieved to help Bernal get into office. “I want to use this small, little power I have to be a catalyst for Scott to achieve what he wants,” he said. “If I use my one second of fame to help him, it’ll be worth it.”


JUNE 8, 2018

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JUNE 8, 2018

Crisafulli D.A.R.E.s to seek Wor. County Sheriff’s Office

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

T-SHIRT DESIGNERS Dorrie Gaeng, left, adds a dash of color to a custom Tie-Dye T-shirt, while Ocean City Recreation Manager Al “Hondo” Handy helps Claire Mercer bag her fresh creation, as fellow Dulaney High School graduate Anna Griffith observes, at the Center for the Arts on 94th Street, Saturday. The event is one of many offered to high school graduates in June through the Play It Safe program.

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) If school security is a campaign issue this election cycle, and according to the candidates it is, then Matt Crisafulli, candidate for Worcester County Sheriff, thinks he is the most qualified for the position. Crisafulli, who filed for the office on the first day it was legally allowable to do so in February 2017, has been teaching the schools’ Drug Abuse Resistance Education classes since 2005, has been at the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office for 19 years, and a law enforcement officer for 23 years. “I helped form the school security division. I feel I know the teachers and administrators, and I’ve been en-

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dorsed by the teachers, current Sheriff Reggie Mason and former Sheriff Chuck Martin,” Crisafulli said. “I filed on the first day to show my dedication to the position.” Crisafulli said his experience in the schools and his dedication to making the future brighter is what has been driving his campaign for more than a year. “We need to make tomorrow better than today, and we’re always able to make improvements,” he said. “I want to use my experience to make Worcester County the safest place to live, work and do business.” And for Matt Crisafulli, that starts at the schools. “I’m concerned about school violence — it scares me. I want to make sure our children are protected,” he said. “Our children can’t learn as efficiently if there’s fear in the school.” To combat that fear, he suggests more officers. “I want to ensure all schools are protected by a full-time deputy. Every school would have a marked police car within view,” he said. “It’s not going to alleviate the problem but it will act as a deterrent.” By getting more training for deputies and with the blessing of school administrators, he said he would like to transition the deputies patrolling the local public schools to school resource officers who are more involved in mentoring and developing educational curricula rather than providing criminal enforcement. “Facilitating the education process builds trust,” he said. “The officers would still have criminal investigative functions, but we could get more out of them.” Crisafulli is a big proponent of the community policing paradigm, which allows officers to be more directly involved with the community and to patrol certain areas to encourage familiarity with the residents and engage in community activities. “I want to establish a citizen academy for adults and an explorer post for young adults and teens so they get to know the role of a deputy, and a summer program for kids,” he said. By measuring and monitoring areas of known criminal activity, See DRIVE Page 18


JUNE 8, 2018

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JUNE 8, 2018

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Matt Kuauer, from Walkersville High School in Frederick County, finishes in second place in the pizza-eating contest at Pizza Tugos, last Saturday. The event is just one of 45 offered to recent high school graduates through the Play It Safe program in June. GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

CHOWING DOWN (Top) Emily Plumly, left, and Christy Wilkinson, from Mt. Hebron High School, share a laugh while inhaling slices during a pizza-eating contest, hosted by Play It Safe, at Pizza Tugos on 116th Street, Saturday. (Above) Play It Safe program volunteer Kathleen Lensch spreads the slices for competitors, who recently graduated from high school.

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Drive, determination at core of Sheriff hopeful’s campaign Continued from Page 16 Crisafulli said he would be able to determine where quality of life issues exist, and formulate plans to counteract them. “I’m all about partnerships with the community,” Crisafulli said. “As a leader, I’ll need to take a step back and figure out where the money is being spent, and redeploy assets as necessary.” By shuffling existing assets under an existing budget, Crisafulli said he could maximize the efficiency in the office, which means a good working relationship with the county. “With the county commissioners, it all goes back to communication,” he said. He hopes that communication will

help alleviate another big problem in the nation and in Worcester. “The opioid epidemic is a national problem — no place is safe. I want to ensure education, prevention and strict punishments for peddlers of this poison,” he said. From there, it’s just a matter of filling in the cracks. “There’s no job description for a law enforcement officer. The more we can do the better for our agency and improve the county’s quality of life. You can never do too much, and nothing is guaranteed,” he said. “Under my leadership, you can expect teamwork in the schools, agencies and allied police. It will be a huge team effort under my leadership.”


JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

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Aloft Hotel approved for 7 a.m. build start Contractor checks decibel levels, finds noise created no louder than area traffic

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) Deeming the Aloft Hotel construction site on 45th Street large enough to maintain noise levels within prescribed decibel levels for adjacent neighbors, the City Council on Monday approved a request to allow mechanical and construction work to begin at 7 a.m. Planning Director Bill Neville said contractor Whiting-Turner hopes to start four major concrete pours, which are time-specific events. The company also sought a blanket request to fire up power tools earlier than normally permitted during summer. The city generally restricts construction activities until 9 a.m. between May and September. Neville noted two years earlier the council had turned down a similar request for a construction project on the Boardwalk by 11th Street. “In that case, the building was under construction just inches away from a neighbor,” he said. More recently, Neville said the council approved a comparable request to start concrete pours before 9 a.m. at the Crystal Beach Hotel project at 2500 North Baltimore Ave. “That was a case where the nearest neighbor was the next block across the street,” he said. Whiting-Turner superintendent Jason Williams said due to the site’s size and bayside location, decibel readings were taken along corresponding property lines to gauge the noise impact on neighbors. “At no point did our decibel readings exceed that of traffic along Coastal Highway,” he said. Councilman Tony DeLuca made a motion to approve the request based on regular observation of the site. “I live right across the street from the project,” he said. “My balcony See COUNCIL Page 22

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Ocean City Today

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JUNE 8, 2018

US Wind responds to Harris’ latest offshore amendment Requires new impact study on marine life, mitigation measures before going live

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By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Rep. Andy Harris (R1) has offered an amendment to the fiscal year 2019 Commerce, Justice and Science appropriations bill to require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to conduct surveys on the impact of offshore wind on marine and animal life. The problem with that is, according to US Wind, those surveys have already been completed to a certain extent, and more studies will follow before the first turbine begins to spin. The new amendment would also determine the need for mitigation measures. Harris authored, offered and had his amendment passed by the House Appropriations Committee. “Commercial fishing and seafood processing are prominent industries in Maryland’s First District. The fishing community has expressed concern that US Wind’s proposed offshore wind farm project will harm their fishing operations off the coast of Ocean City,” Harris said in a release after the amendment passed. “In addition to the several concerns already voiced by the local communities, the United States Coast Guard, and the National Park Service, it is imperative that we fully understand the negative effects on our fisheries that will be caused by this wind farm project.” Salvo Vitale, general counsel for US Wind, replied. “The Federal lease area, which allows for our project, is the result of years of intensive planning, public hearings and approvals eventually granted from State of Maryland and Federal regulatory entities,” he wrote. “Environmental assessments of all kinds, including studies on offshore wind’s impacts on marine life, are done at the very early stages of wind energy area identification, and more comprehensive environ-

mental impact analyses are done before any developer can begin putting steel into the water.” And that was just to get started. “Moreover,” he wrote, “US Wind has had very productive discussions with environmental organizations during which we have outlined all that we’re implementing to go above and beyond our obligatory adherence to environmental and marine life protections.” This is not Harris’ first attempt to stymie offshore wind development in Maryland. He previously offered an amendment to the omnibus spending bill signed by President Donald Trump in March blocking payment for inspectors on wind farms fewer than 24 miles offshore. The amendment was pulled from the final bill. “We knew that powerful special interests would work hard to drop this amendment from the final bill,” Harris said at the time. “But meanwhile we have bought valuable time to get to the truth about how harmful the updated windmill plan would be to the viewscape of Ocean City due to the much larger, taller windmills now being planned.” However, that argument appears to have been abandoned by Harris. The four megawatt turbines originally pitched for the project will have become obsolete by the time US Wind goes to install them, so the company is evaluating using fewer, but taller, turbines. The largest of these, at 8.4 megawatts, would require less than half of the smaller devices at about 90, instead of 180. “We will continue to work with the National Wildlife Federation and local environmental groups to ensure that there is no adverse impact to marine life or other natural resources as a result of our project,” Vitale said. “US Wind is fully committed to delivering the significant renewable energy, economic and job benefits that our project represents in this emerging economy for Maryland, and in the most responsible manner as a trusted corporate citizen to the lower Eastern Shore communities.”

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JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

BRIAN GILLILAND/OCEAN CITY TODAY

DEAD AIM Josh Sockriter of Baltimore takes aim at Trimper’s classic shooting gallery on the Boardwalk.

Council approves Aloft Hotel builders early start request Continued from Page 19 faces it and I can’t hear a thing.” Councilwoman Mary Knight said she observed the site during a concrete pour last week and also thought the noise was underwhelming. “I went down to listen … and I couldn’t hear anything either,” she said. Knight did inquire if early-morning delivery trucks could be routed to avoid backing into the site. “Will you have vehicles backing up making that beeping sound?” she asked. “If they could pull in, that definitely would satisfy a lot of people.” Council president Lloyd Martin agreed the backing up sounds could prove bothersome. “That beeping at 7 a.m. could be higher than anyone wants to hear,” he said. Williams said most deliveries would be scheduled for later in the morning, but some backing maneuvers are unavoidable. “The concrete trucks do need to back up to the hopper,” he said. Dave D’Alessio, Whiting-Turner project manager for the Aloft Hotel, said adjacent properties would be notified when concrete pour dates are scheduled. “We will notify the local businesses and condominium buildings ... so they are aware what days we’re pouring concrete,” he said. Councilman Dennis Dare said beeping sounds from heavy equipment backing up has generated complaints in other instances. “During beach replenishment, we have bulldozers running up and down the beach and no one ever complains until they back up,” he said.

The pitch of backup beeps is intended to penetrate in the interest of safety, which may require preventative measures to appease those within ear shot, Dare said. “You might want to position box trucks so it reflects sound up,” he said. Dare also said giving prior notice for concrete pours could still prove an inconvenience for beach visitors at nearby hotels and condo units. “To tell them a day ahead they’re going to be getting up at 7 a.m. is not what they bargained for,” he said. Dare also suggested amending the motion to permit the council to revisit the issue if subsequent noise complaints occur. Councilman Wayne Hartman raised concerns about the impact on an adjacent hotel, which markets itself as providing complete guest satisfaction. “If somebody goes to the front desk and complains about anything, they have to refund 100 percent,” he said. To help curtail potential complaints, Hartman asked if trucks could be diverted away from the nearby hotel. “Is it safe to ask that all the concrete trucks can be on the parking lot and not going down the street by the hotel,” he said. Williams said he has previously provided contact information to neighboring hotels and condominiums, but would reach out again to assure potential issues are resolved satisfactorily. “I hope it’s not an issue,” Hartman said. “I don’t want to do anything to slow down the progress.”

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JUNE 8, 2018

Delmarva Power request to end substation tests denied Council asks Planning and Zoning to revisit call to stop requirement began in 2012

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) After residents raised concerns about safety and property values, the Ocean City Council rejected, at least for now, a request from Delmarva Power to remove mandated electro-magnetic field and noise level testing at its 138th Street power substation. The Planning and Zoning Commission voted 3-2 during its April meeting to forward the request to the council, with members Joel Brous and Peck Miller absent. Planning Director Bill Neville told the council on Monday the power company wants to amend a 2012 conditional use permit requiring bi-annual testing for EMF [electro-magnetic field] and noise levels from adjacent properties within 300 feet of the site, with results reported to neighbors and the city. The substation on Sinepuxent and Derrickson avenues between 137th and 138th streets is in a R-2A (lowdensity residential) zone, which permits public utility structures as a conditional use, Neville said. The 2012 approval required the applicant pay for an independent environmental specialist to test bi-annually, with levels not to exceed 2,000 mG (milligauss), the unit of measurement for EMF levels. “The report summaries indicated the current operation of the substation was significantly lower than that … peaking at 48-50 mG,” he said. “This was also presented to be consistent over the five-year testing period.” Neville said the Planning Commission in April recommended an additional condition, which would require testing if new reactors were installed to confirm EMF and noise levels are below established limits. After Neville’s remarks, Councilwoman Mary Knight made a motion to reject the recommendation from planning and zoning. “Being part of the discussion in 2012 … I think we all became electrical engineers,” she said. Councilman John Gehrig launched a discussion after seconding the motion and noted nearby residents brought the matter to the council during its April 16 meeting. “The concern with the citizens was the raw data was not provided,” he said. “Delmarva Power provided an executive summary that was … distributed to residents.” Gehrig also noted residents asked who was responsible to ensure compliance with the conditional use permit and if the summary reports were

sufficient. “There was also a mention in the planning and zoning [meeting] transcript that the City Council received those reports,” he said. “I never saw any of the reports and the citizens have a concern.” While not questioning the testing results, Gehrig said the information flow was less than ideal “The deal is we’re going to do the test twice a year, and … distribute all of the data,” he said. “If the residents don’t understand the data, that’s not up to the consultant, or anyone, to say they’ll never understand … so we’re going to summarize it.” Although not part of discussions in 2012, Neville said during his time with the city the full 400-plus page testing reports were made available when requested. “I’ve only experienced what happened this last cycle, where we had the public hearing and full data reports were requested and we were able to make those available,” he said. Gehrig also questioned the inclusion of an option for residents to request a one-off yard test. Neville said that stipulation was added to alleviate concerns regarding property sales, with individual testing results available to assist home sellers. Appreciating that residents want safety assurances and Delmarva Power needs to provide stable power delivery, Gehrig asked if the yard test option was a potential compromise. “Does the test need to be so elaborate that it cost $40,000 when an alternative was someone coming out to my yard to do this test?” he said. “I understand if the readings are far below what is permitted why this modification of the conditional use is being sought.” Still, Gehrig wondered if the summary reports provided to residents met the original conditional use terms. Neville said the conditional use approval requires the city to share testing reports however it deems suitable, while also suggesting the council might explore how maximum testing levels were established. “Another good question would be the gap between the measured levels and this acceptable public exposure standard,” he said. “There seems to be a significant difference in those two numbers … I’m not sure why the 2,000 mG level was written in.” Gehrig, while voicing support for rejecting the request, acknowledged both sides have legitimate concerns. “I think compliance needs to be the letter of the law [and] we need a period of full compliance,” he said. “A deal was struck … and the terms need to be met before we change the terms.” Gehrig suggested exploring options to cut testing costs and potentially See COUNCIL Page 58


JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

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Lifestyle

Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertaiment, Events, Features, Music

JOSH DAVIS/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Wor. Co. students given backpacks filled with books

“This just reinforces that, getting a chance to have these books,” she said. Davidson also underscored the importance of reading during time away from school. “Students who don’t keep at it during the summertime can lose months of learning that they’ve gained in the classroom during the regular school year. Just to continue to read over the summer will set them up for success in fourth grade and prevent the summer slide,” she said. Showell Media Specialist Kate McCabe sees the benefit of McGuffey both as a teacher and a parent. “When my children come home, they keep that book bag with them all year. Throughout the summer they’re filling it with other things, but they get to keep those books,” she said. “As

Page 26 Diamondback terrapin survey conducted locally

Showell Elementary School students on Monday were among the thousands of Worcester County children given free books as part of the 13th annual McGuffey Bookworm Club. The program is overseen by the Worcester County Commission for Women and Friends of the Worcester County Commission for Women.

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Showell Elementary School students were among the thousands of Worcester County children on Monday to receive bright orange McGuffey Bookworm Club backpacks filled with books for summer reading. Now in its 13th year, McGuffey is a countywide program of the Worcester County Commission for Women and Friends of the Worcester County Commission for Women, and covers all Worcester County elementary schools, including Seaside Christian Academy and Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic School. Roughly 8,000 books are distributed to 2,000 students each year. On Monday, Elizabeth Davidson’s third-grade students were first to line up at Showell. “I think the kids really look forward to it and it sets them up for success,” Davidson said. “They might not have books at home, so having these books to start them off and kickoff summer is just a nice opportunity.” The program is well timed, because the Showell Elementary school year concludes with a reading celebration to stimulate excitement for summer reading, Davidson said.

June 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

a teacher in school, to see children go home with a book they get to keep, it’s just another way to support reading … and that means a lot.” McCabe also recognized the importance of fighting the summer learning drop-off. “Reading is important every day,” she said. “This is just one moment that we’re highlighting it and [the students] are making a pledge to promise to keep reading, and that’s going to help them succeed in every part of their life.” Copy Central owner Linda Dearing, who oversees the program, said it was started because the Commission for Women was looking for a worthwhile project to sponsor. The program was named after the McGufSee ABOUT Page 27

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) The Maryland Coastal Bay Program completed a week of diamondback terrapin surveys from May 29 to June 2, to help determine the population in the Assateague Bay. For the past eight years, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources has teamed up with the Maryland Coastal Bays Program for an annual survey to observe the terrapin population in the MarylandDelaware waterways. “Right now, their status is apparently secure, due to lack of population data,” Environmental Scientist Katherine Phillips said. “It’s important to know their status in Maryland. Not only are they our state reptile, but they are also an indicator species for marsh health and estuary health. The more you see, the better the health of the estuary.” Phillips has been surveying terrapins for two years and has a soft spot for the aquatic reptiles. “Terrapins are just so charismatic,” Phillips said. “They’re so pretty and kind of elusive, so it’s real cool to get out and see them out in the water in their habitat.” The reptiles are brackish turtles, which means they are sustained by both salt and freshwater. “Diamondback terrapins are the only exclusively brackish water turtle we get on the East Coast of the United States,” Patrick Simons, a volunteer for the survey, said. “Since they are brackish water turtles they have unique adaptations to living in partially salty, partially fresh water. “One of my favorite things is when it rains, they’ll drink the layer of fresh water that collects on the top and they’ll even be seen opening their mouths and waiting for raindrops to fall in their mouths,” he continued. Volunteers and members of the Coastal Bays Program went out to count terrapins for the past week, whenever the weather permitted it. The volunteers saw an average of 12 turtles per hour. “Friday was really sunny,” Simons said. “We saw 53 turtles over a span of three hours. Weather really affects the number of terrapins we see every day.” Last Thursday, the members counted 46 terrapins. On Saturday, See DURING Page 27


JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 27

About 8,000 books distributed through prog. Continued from Page 26 fey Readers series of textbooks widely used in American schools during the 19th and 20th centuries. “There was a need for children to have books, especially on the lower end of the county, to help maintain their reading level throughout the summer,” Dearing said. She said students look forward to receiving their books and backpacks each year. “They absolutely love it,” she said. “If it can excite them enough to be interested in books and make them want to get more at the library over the summer when they’re not in school, then that’s our objective – just to get them enthused enough to want to keep reading.” Generally, the program distributes books to first, second and third graders. This year kindergarten students were also included. “The economy has turned around a little bit and we’ve gotten some more funding, so we added kindergarten,” Dearing said. “Showell has 117 students alone and I know there’s probably about 125 at Ocean City Elementary … I want to say maybe 500 kindergarten students [in Worcester County received books] this morning.” The program is coordinated with

the school system and requires dozens of volunteers at each school to hand out backpacks and help swear children into the McGuffey Bookworm Club. Also assisting are women at the Worcester County Jail, who each year stuff the backpacks with books, bookmarks, and informational letters for parents. For volunteers, the reward is “just the pleasure of seeing these children and their happy faces,” Dearing said. “We have children who are in high school now that got these bags and books. That’s how many years we’ve been doing it,” she said. The nonprofit endeavor is made possible by donations, which Dearing said in the past have included major sponsors like Verizon and Choptank Electric Cooperative, as well as area nonprofits like Kiwanis. “Any nonprofit group or business that wants to sponsor a classroom or just any individual that would like to sponsor a student, they can contact me or anybody that they know on the commission. And it is tax deductible,” she said. To donate to the McGuffey Bookworm Club, contact Dearing at Copy Central on 11065 Cathell Road in Ocean Pines, call 410-208-0641, or visit www.copycentralmd.com. Checks can be mailed to the

Friends of the Worcester County Commission for Women at P.O. Box 1712, Berlin, Maryland, 21811.

For more information on the importance of summer learning programs, visit www.summerlearning.org.

During survey, 117 terrapins seen over three-day period Continued from Page 26 the surveyors spotted 18 within 1.5 hours. No surveys were conducted on Tuesday or Wednesday, May 29-30, due to poor weather conditions. Overall, 117 terrapins were spotted within three days. Diamondback terrapins are more than just the state reptile and the mascot of the University of Maryland; they play a crucial role in the ecosystem of the bays and coastal areas. “They’re carnivores – they’ll eat a wide variety of different snails and carrion, but a lot of what they eat is snails called periwinkles,” Phillips said. “Periwinkles like to eat marsh grass. If their population goes unchecked, they’ll eat a lot of marsh grass, which can cause major damage to the ecosystem.” Male terrapins grow up to six inches long. They grow and mature faster than females, reaching matu-

rity between five and six years. Females develop as large as nine inches, and mature slower than males, reaching maturity around eight to nine years. Terrapins can hold their breath anywhere from 45 minutes to five hours. “It will be awhile before they reproduce, which is why keeping our juveniles safe is important,” Phillips said. “If they’re not reproducing then we won’t have a sustainable population.” Terrapin populations have been a concern for environmental scientists as a man-made device ends up killing hundreds of juveniles and adults a year – crab pots. Old-fashioned crab pots, while intended for the harvest of blue and soft-shelled crabs in the area, often snare unsuspecting terrapins, who end up drowning in the traps. Measures have been taken by the Maryland See TERRAPIN Page 28


Ocean City Today

PAGE 28

JUNE 8, 2018

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20

Aries, you feel especially creative this week and want to focus on the future. You may have concrete ideas, but don’t know just how to put those plans into action. Seek assistance.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21

Taurus, learning to detach from thoughts and feelings can help you learn which ideas are important and which ones are extraneous. This can help you reduce stress.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The last terrapin survey of the week took place in the bay, Saturday, June 2, with, from left, volunteer Patrick Simmons, Environmental Scientist Katherine Phillips, and volunteers Fred and Sandy Eckfedlt.

Gemini, if you feel like something is lacking in your life right now, you may want to surround yourself with some friends who provide inspiration and compel change.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22

Terrapin population status ‘secure’ Continued from Page 27 Department of Natural Resources to try and reduce the number of terrapins caught in crab pots. “We give excluder devices away for free,” Phillips said. “They can be installed into the entrance of your crab pots. They are legally required in the coastal bays by the Department of Natural Resources.” The excluder prevents fully matured terrapins from mistakenly en-

tering a crab pot, as their shells are too large to enter the reduced space. However, there are still cases of juvenile terrapins getting caught. There are other ways humans can do their part to help the terrapin population, such as not collecting riffraff on the shorelines. “A living shoreline is when you use more natural measures – having a natural beach with native vegetation to put on – to reduce erosion and sta-

Mondaayy Only

bilize the shoreline versus using riffraff or a bulkhead,” Phillips said. “That way [the terrapins] can still access their nesting habitats. They nest in bare sand. If they can’t access or don’t have any sand available, they won’t be able to nest.” For more information about diamondback terrapins or to sign up for future surveys, contact Phillips at kphillips@mdcoastalbays.org or call 410-213-2297 ext. 109.

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Cancer, rather than looking to others for validation, take an inward look and praise yourself. There are so many things you do well, and these are deserving of attention.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23

Leo, you could have some psychically tuned feelings this week and will seem to know about things before they happen. Trust your instincts.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22

Make yourself more available to your loved ones over the next few days, Virgo. Try connecting with them by discussing your goals and asking advice.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23

Libra, compassion and understanding will drive your actions over the course of this week. You seem especially connected to others and their feelings.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22

Scorpio, a hectic schedule may have you feeling tense and resentful of all your responsibilities. Concentrate on one task at a time rather than obsessing about it all.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21

Reminiscing about the past can be a good way to connect you with your history, Sagittarius. Just do not dwell too much on what should’ve been. Use it as a chance to grow.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20

Capricorn, strengthen relationships by letting other people know how much you appreciate them. This will help you feel a greater sense of joy as well.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18

Aquarius, you may feel enthusiastic this week about what life has to offer. Make the most of your rejuvenated spirit. Make an effort to reconnect with an old friend.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20

Feeling nervous about the outcome of some endeavors is natural, Pisces. But if you work through various scenarios, you will feel more relaxed.


JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 29

OCBP honors Capt. Schoepf by presenting annual relay

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) The 20th annual relay event honoring former Ocean City Beach Patrol Capt. George Schoepf will take place this Sunday on the beach at Seventh Street, beginning at 10 a.m. Schoepf was captain of the Ocean City Beach Patrol for nearly 10 years and served the organization for more than 40, from 1950 to 1996. After serving for a couple years, he was promoted to sergeant, then to lieutenant. Schoepf moved his family from Pennsylvania to Salisbury and accepted a job at Wicomico High School teaching physical education and coaching track and cross country. “He, along with Capt. [Robert S.] Craig, moved the patrol to an organization that is based on policy and procedure and not just a good old boy ‘frat’ type of club,” Beach Patrol Capt. Butch Arbin said. “I learned many things from Capt. Schoepf … some of which we have continued and some that needed to change.” When the patrol personnel increased to over 100 in the 1960s, it was Capt.  Schoepf’s idea to divide it into crews of seven and have each report to a crew chief who would check attendance and tardiness, if any, as well as see to it that crew members did the required workouts, etc. The idea of an annual crew competition was also Capt. Schoepfs. The competition was good public relations with the visitors who had a chance to see the various running and swimming abilities of the guards and continues to be an annual event in Ocean City. “His background as a teacher and coach made him ideal to lead an organization made up of athletic individuals,” Capt. Arbin said. “Capt. Schoepf was a real mentor to many men (females did not join the patrol until 1978) and they credit him with being like a father to them.” When Capt. Craig retired in 1986, Schoepf took over and, although many still refer to the members of the patrol as “lifeguards,” the official title became “surf rescue technician” or SRT for short. After Capt. Schoepf’s death in 1997, the relay was created in his honor to celebrate his years of service. In this relay, lifeguards and family members of Capt. Schoepf, including his daughter and grandchildren, will pass along a metal buoy throughout the entirety of Ocean City’s shoreline, spanning 10 miles before returning the buoy back to Seventh Street. “Seventh Street was his beach,” Capt. Arbin said. “This is our way of thanking George for all his years of service.” Metal buoys were used during Capt. Schoepf’s time as an assistant lieutenant in the 1980s. Using the buoy for the relay is symbolic for lifeguards and what they use to save lives. More than 100 lifeguards have already signed up to participate in the event. This list includes beach patrol alumni, who may or may not have

worked under Capt. Schoepf, as well as current lifeguards. “A lot of the volunteers are actual guards that are involved with guarding the beach while the event is going on,” Capt. Arbin said. “While a guard is running the relay, another will take their place at their stand and shift back once that guard is done. A lot of leapfrogging will be going on.” People interested in watching the relay can do so from any point on the beach. The beach will still be open for beachgoers to relax and swim. Anyone interested in participating in the relay should stop by the nearest lifeguard stand and ask about how to join. Or, contact the beach patrol headquarters at 410-289-7556, or visit www.ococean.com/ocbp.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

RAVENS FANS Four-legged fan, Phoebe, barks in support for Roost 82 of Parkville, Maryland, with her owners, Dustin and Liz Goates, during the Ravens parade last Saturday in Ocean City.

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PAGE 30

Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ravens’ cheerleaders pose in front of Ocean 13 bar and bistro on the Boardwalk at 13th Street to promote 2018 Strawless Summer on Friday, June 1. Strawless Summer encourages restaurants to reduce plastic waste. Biodegradable straws will be available at restaurants who promote this cause.

Baltimore Ravens fans Zack and Debbie Morris, left, and Katryna Katulski and Steve Velasco smile for a photo during the Ravens’ Roost Convention at Castle in the Sands on 37th Street, Saturday, June 2. They supported Roost 54 of Owings Mills.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Ravens Roost Convention at Castle in the Sands on 37th Street held a crazy hat contest on Saturday, June 2. Winner and runners-up, from left, are Diane Irwin, Joanne Keats, Keith Drexel, Cindy Spessert, Jennifer McCleaf, Cindy Atkinson and Jane and Mike Guessford.

Brandon Voigt of Towson, left, and Alex Olson of West Virginia, hold up trophies during the Ravens Roost Beach Bash at the Clarion Hotel on 101st Street, Saturday, June 2.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Baltimore Ravens linebacker Kamalei Correa poses for a photo during the Ravens Roost Beach Bash at the Clarion Hotel on 101st Street, Saturday, June 2.

GLAM Jewelry designers Adrien and Marci Kotula display their wares at the Ravens Roost Convention at Castle in the Sands on 37th Street, Saturday, June 2.


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 31

Law Enforcement Torch Run Relay in OC and Berlin

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) A brigade of volunteers and police officers on foot, on horseback, in cars and buses, even some on motorcycles, made their way through Ocean City and Berlin on Monday during the annual Law Enforcement Torch Run Relay for Special Olympics Maryland. The group of perhaps several hundred started at The Grand Hotel on 21st Street in Ocean City and also stopped along the Boardwalk, at the Ocean City Fire Department Station 5 in West Ocean City and Ocean City Elementary School, as well as in Berlin at Worcester Preparatory School, Buckingham Elementary School, downtown, and the Berlin Fire Company station on Main Street. At Buckingham Elementary, participants were welcomed by what seemed to be the school’s the entire student and teacher population, as they lined up outside on a sunny spring day to watch the spectacle and to provide a warm welcome. Leading up to the event, participants sold commemorative T-shirts to raise money for Special Olympics Maryland. Participation in the run itself was $15 per runner, or for the same price you could simply get the shirt and support the cause. The local Torch Run is part of a larger statewide effort, split between eastern, western, central and southern Maryland, and each year ending in Towson. Ocean City Police Sgt. Dennis G. Eade, who organized the local leg, said the event has raised more than $35 million for Special Olympics Maryland in a little over three decades. “The sale of these T-shirts is what raises all the funds for us,” Eade said Monday during the stop at Buckingham. “When we actually do the Torch Run itself … and we get out and get to see everybody and run the roads, it’s about inclusion and awareness, and opening everybody’s eyes to what it is exactly Special Olympics offers our folks

PHOTO COURTESY LINDSAY RICHARD

Worcester County law enforcement officers, friends and supporters participate in the Law Enforcement Torch Relay benefiting the Special Olympics of Maryland on the Ocean City Boardwalk, Monday.

with intellectual disabilities.” Eade has been involved in the Torch Run for two decades. Way back in the day, he said, the event was essentially one long run from Ocean City to Salisbury. “We realized along the way that we were passing a lot of cornfields and chicken fields,” he said. “We thought, if it’s about awareness, then we need to start getting into these communities and starting reaching out to schools and doing things like this, so that we can increase that awareness.” Hence the redrawn route that now includes three schools, two fire departments, the Ocean City Boardwalk, and a busy downtown-shopping district. “We were wasting a lot of our energy and time running for nobody between here and Salisbury. We now make little stops like this, which means the world to us,” he said. “This is what it’s all about, when you cut right down to it – the interaction and awareness. “A lot of people today will be asking what all this is about, and that’s how we raise awareness for Special Olympics Maryland,” Eade continued. “And, I just love doing it.” For more information about Special Olympics Maryland, visit www.somd.org.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 32

JUNE 8, 2018

NOW PLAYING BJ’S ON THE WATER

DUFFY’S TAVERN

75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com June 8: Full Circle, 9 pm June 9: Dust N Bones, 9 p.m. June 13: Monkee Paw, 6 p.m. June 14: Bettenroo, 8 p.m.

130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com June 8: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m.

BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium Ocean City 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com June 8: Randy Lee Ashcraft & the Saltwater Cowboys, 4-7 p.m.; Dave Sherman, 8 p.m. June 9: Randy Lee Ashcraft & the Saltwater Cowboys, 8 p.m. June 10: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m. June 11: Walt Farovic, 7 p.m. June 12: Charlie Z, 6 p.m. June 13: Michael Smith, 6 p.m.; Open Mic, 9 p.m. June 14: Chris Button, 7 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. CAROUSEL PATIO BAR AND GRILL In the Carousel Hotel 118th Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-1000 www.carouselhotel.com June 8: Kaleb Brown, 4-8 p.m. June 9: Pearl, 4-8 p.m. June 10: Dave Sherman June 12: Rick Kennedy, 4-8 p.m. June 13: Jack Worthington June 14: DJ Jeremy, 6-10 p.m. COCONUTS BEACH BAR AND GRILL In the Castle in the Sand Hotel 37th Street oceanfront Ocean City 410-289-6846 www.castleinthesand.com June 8: Darin Engh, noon to 4 p.m.; The Swell Fellas, 5-9 p.m. June 9: Rick & Regina, noon to 4 p.m.; the Everafter, 5-9 p.m. June 10: Shortcut Sunny, noon to 3 p.m.; Lauren Glick Band, 4-8 p.m. June 11: Nate Clendenen, noon to 3 p.m.; Bob Wilkinson, Joe Smooth & Pete, 4-8 p.m. June 12: Taylor Knox Solo, noon to 3 p.m.; The Breakers, 4-8 p.m. June 13: Chris Thomas Solo, noon to 3 p.m.; Chris Button & Joe Mama, 4-8 p.m. June 14: Chino Reggae, noon to 3 p.m.; Kevin Poole, Chris Thomas & Joe Mama, 4-8 p.m.

HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com June 8: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. June 9: Side Project/Chris Button, 26 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. June 10: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. June 11: Blake Haley, 4-7 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 7 p.m. June 12: Dust N Bones June 13: Karaoke w/Jeremy or Trivia w/DJ Bigler June 14: Opposite Directions, 6 p.m. HOOTERS 12513 Ocean Gateway West Ocean City 410-213-1841 www.hootersofoc.com June 8: DJ Wax, 4-8 p.m. JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB 56th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-5600 www.johnnyspizzapub.com June 8: Tear the Roof Off, 9 p.m. June 9: Slappy Hour, 8 p.m. June 13: Randy Lee Ashcraft & the Saltwater Cowboys MARINA DECK 306 Dorchester St. Ocean City 410-289-4411 www.marinadeckrestaurant.com June 14: Karaoke, 9 p.m. M.R. DUCKS BAR & GRILLE 311 Talbot St. Ocean City 410-289-9125 www.mrducksbar.com June 8: DJ Batman, 5 p.m. June 9: Over Time, 5 p.m. June 10: Timmie Metz, 4 p.m. June 13: DJ Batman, 5 p.m. OCEAN 13 13th Street on the boardwalk Ocean City www.Ocean13ocmd.com June 8: Bob Stout (piano lounge), 6 p.m.; Marky Shaw and his Funky Brunch (tiki bar), 8 p.m. June 9: Bob Stout (piano lounge), 6 p.m.; Walt Farovic (tiki bar), 8 p.m. June 10: Karaoke w/DJ Jeremy (tiki bar), 9 p.m. June 12: Beats by Jeremy OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant

In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. June 8-9: Power Play Lenny’s Deck Bar June 7-10: First Class, 4-9 p.m. June 11-12: On the Edge, 5-10 p.m. June 13: On the Edge, 4-9 p.m. June 14-17: On the Edge, 5-10 p.m.

OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS Harborside Bar & Grill: Sunday, June 10, 2-6 p.m. and Thursday, June 14, 6 p.m. Seacrets: Tuesday, June 12, 5-9 p.m.

OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford’s Landing Road Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 www.oceanpines.org June 8: Three on the Tree, 6-10 p.m. June 9: Taylor Knox, 6-10 p.m. PICKLES 706 Philadelphia Ave. Ocean City 410-289-4891 www.picklesoc.com June 8: Beats By Jeremy, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. June 9: Andrew Robear, 10 p.m. June 11: Karaoke w/Jeremy, 9 p.m. June 12: Beats By Adam Dutch, 9 p.m. June 14: Beats by Wax, 9 p.m. PURPLE MOOSE SALOON 108 S. Atlantic Ave. Ocean City 410-289-6953 www.purplemoosesaloon.com June 8-9: CK the DJ/VJ, 2 p.m.; Slamm, 10 p.m. June 10: CK the DJ/VJ, 2 p.m.; CK the DJ/VJ, 9 p.m. June 11: CK the DJ/VJ, 9 p.m. June 12-13: VJ Mazi, 9 p.m. June 14: CK the DJ/VJ, 9 p.m. ROPEWALK 82nd Street and the bay, Ocean City 410-524-1009 www.oceancity.ropewalk.com June 8: Ward Ewing, 4-8 p.m. June 9: Brit & Neal, noon to 4 p.m.; Chino, 4-8 p.m. June 10: John K, noon to 4 p.m., Chris Diller, 4-8 p.m. June 11: Pat O, 4-8 p.m. June 12: Monkee Paw, 4-8 p.m. June 13: John K, 4-8 p.m. June 14: Monkee Paw, 4-8 p.m. SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay, Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com June 8: DJ Bobby-O, 11 a.m. to

5 p.m.; Jim Long Band, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Anthem, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; DJ Mike T, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Stellar Mojo, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. June 9: Cruz-in de Bay, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Jim Long Band, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Cruz, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Anthem, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; DJ Tuff, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Garden State Radio, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. June 10: DJ Bobby-O, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Whiskeyhickon Boys, 5-9 p.m.; I&I Riddim Reggae, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Davie, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Garden State Radio, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. June 11: DJ Bobby-O, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; I&I Riddim Reggae, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Davie, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. June 12: DJ Bobby-O, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Opposite Directions, 5-9 p.m.; I&I Riddim Reggae, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Mike T, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. June 13: DJ Bobby-O, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Full Circle Duo, 5-9 p.m.; Zion Reggae Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Cruz, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Matisyahu & Stephen Marley (sold out) 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.; The Rockets, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; DJ Mike T, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. June 14: DJ Bobby-O, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Rew Smith, 5-9 p.m.; Innasense, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; DJ Cruz, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Go Go Gadjet, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-723-6762 www.skyebaroc.com June 8: Test Kitchen, 4-8 p.m. June 9: The Stims, 4-8 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 www.whiskersbar.com June 8: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey


JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 33

More than 200 seniors graduate from Decatur HS

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) Family, friends and loved ones showed roaring support for the 286 graduates of Stephen Decatur High School, Wednesday, May 30, at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on 40th Street in Ocean City. “This is a very special graduation class to me,” Principal Thomas Zimmer said. “When I was first named a principal eight years ago, it was at Berlin Intermediate School and these students on stage were in fifth grade. “I’d like to think we matured together. It was great to get to know them then and it has been a wonderful experience to see them mature and be ready to cross the stage and do great things in this world,” he continued. Special guests of the 64th Stephen Decatur graduation included Worcester County Public Schools Superintendent Louis Taylor, Board of Education President William Gordy, Chief Academic Officer and Vice Superintendent Dr. John Quinn, and several members of the board of education. “Each one of you has something great inside of you, something that is

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Graduating seniors take their seats during Stephen Decatur High School’s commencement ceremony at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street, Wednesday, May 30. (Below) Psychology teacher Courtney Bova gives the farewell address during graduation.

uniquely yours and when you share it with the world, we will all take notice,” Taylor said. The Worcester County Board of Education uses a three-tiered senior recognition program where each student receives a cumulative weighted GPA, which is calculated at the end of the third marking period in English, math, social studies, science, world languages and Advanced Placement courses. Class rank with valedictorian and salutatorian honors ended several years ago. Students who earned a 5.05 GPA or higher received Summa Cum Laude honors. Those receiving a 4.9-5.04 GPA earned Magna Cum Laude accolades and students earning a 4.8-4.89 GPA were presented Cum Laude distinction. All honorees stood for recog-

nition during the commencement ceremony. The graduates received $7.7 million in scholarships from colleges and universities. They accepted $3.4 million. Of the 286 graduates, 131 students (46 percent) will enroll at a four-year college or university in the fall. Eighty-four (29 percent) will enroll in a two-year college, two (1 percent) will study at a trade or technical school, 14 (5 percent) will enlist in the military, eight (3 percent) plan to work in a field related to their study, and 47 (16 percent) will work outside their field of study. “Our class is not just about numbers,” Lilian Rakow, class president, said. “Talk to anyone inside our school See BOVA Page 34


Ocean City Today

PAGE 34

JUNE 8, 2018

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MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Senior Hattie Brous shakes hands with Worcester County Public Schools Board of Education member, Sara Thompson, before receiving her diploma during Stephen Decatur High School’s graduation ceremony at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street, Wednesday, May 30.

Bova encourages students to ‘be in the here and now’ Continued from Page 33 and out in the community, and they will agree that the class of 2018 is one of the most kindhearted, friendly, inspired groups of young people they have ever seen. That being said, this is not where our legacy will end.” The 2018 graduates celebrated a successful academic and athletic year, earning multiple awards and achievements for their skills in the classroom and on the field. Some other awards were presented for law, economics, engineering, writing and art. “Through hard work, academic achievement, dedication and drive, they have left their mark on us,” Zimmer said. “Now it is their time for them to go out and make their mark on the world.” Psychology teacher Courtney Bova was chosen by the students to be their graduation keynote speaker. Bova started at Stephen Decatur four years ago. “All you sitting on this stage tonight have made my last four years of Decatur truly unforgettable,” Bova said. “I’ve gotten to see you grow and mature since your freshman year when we entered Decatur together on that day. We’ve had homerooms together, planned lib dubs, raised money for Relay for Life, tried cases in mock trials, and had so many lunchtime discussions where I think we solved just about every problem in the world. “The fact that I get to be here tonight, to have had the opportunity to work with these amazing students sitting before you is truly humbling,” Bova added. “Your caring and compassion comes through in all that you do, and I hope that moving forward you continue to embrace all of the opportunities presented to you, to make this world a better place, just like you did while you were in Stephen Decatur High School.”

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Class president Lilian Rakow gives an invocation to the audience and fellow graduates.

Each speaker offered words of wisdom for the graduates before they accepted their diplomas and turned their tassels. “Be in the here and now,” Bova said. “Take in this moment and all of the moments to come. We spend so much of our lives waiting for what happens next, we forget to see all the greatness around us. Take in a moment. Take in each day, even the crappy ones, because they go by way too fast.” “While it is true you will be leaving the security of your parents’ homes and the security of the school that has nurtured you and guided you, and often protected you over the last four years, a new exciting phase is about to begin,” Zimmer said. “The world is wide and it is filled with opportunity. Seize those opportunities and strive to achieve whatever goals you have set.” “As Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel said: ‘This is the world that you are born into and you are responsible for it,’” Taylor said. “That responsibility must seem like a heavy burden, but I am encouraged. I insist that each of you, after leaving the halls of Stephen Decatur High, [that] you use the knowledge gained here. The future depends not on the stars or fate, but on the decisions that each of you will make.”


JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 35

ON GUARD

PHOTO COURTESY KRISTIN JOSON

Assistant Crew Chief Melanie Hovington continually scans her beach in Ocean City observing all water and beach activities.

OC Beach Patrol urges high school grads to ‘Play it Safe’ By Kristin Joson Contributing Writer (June, 8, 2018) It might come as a surprise to learn that one of the most important skills a lifeguard uses is the scan. It is a skill they are taught, practice and use all day long. It literally becomes a part of who they are. I have heard many guards say they can’t even go on a beach, even on a day off, without scanning. The guards are constantly scanning their area and the water in front of them for signs of danger. Their area includes a 360-degree area around their stand not only in the front but also in the back to the dune line. This is the time of the year when trouble could be lurking behind their stands. It’s what some endearingly refer to as the “June Bugs.” The trek to Ocean City to enjoy their new-found freedom is a tradition thousands of graduates participate in each year. I did it as a high school graduate and my children did it as well. We survived! The typical graduates are full of confidence, and feel immune to any dangers. They sometimes allow the excitement of the atmosphere to impede their judgment just enough to get them into trouble. When we get a warm sunny day, the water temperatures are inviting. If you add a town full of celebrating graduates to the mix, the lifeguards have their work cut out for them. At no other time of year do we see more teenagers chase each other down the beach and into the ocean only to end up diving into shallow water. The more experienced among them dive shallow and usually do not suffer any consequences of this risky behavior. The less fortunate will spend the rest of

their vacation trying to explain the scabs on their forehead and nose. The really unfortunate will not be able to run or dive, ever again. While beach patrol members respond to spinal injuries every year, none are more tragic than those that occur when young people are injured from diving into shallow water. It is not their age so much, but the fact that these injuries are so preventable that makes them particularly tragic. Beach patrol “Rule Number One” is: “Keep your feet in the sand until the lifeguard’s in the stand.” Rule Number Two is: “Check the water depth with your feet, not your head.” Our ocean water is not as clear as pool water, and we don’t have the depth printed along the edge in big black numbers like it is at the local swim club. While lifeguards try to stop accidents before they happen, even whistle blasts sometimes don’t catch the attention of those who are horsing around and chasing each other. Surf rescue technicians are often left cringing in their stands, hoping that those who just dove into the foot-deep water will pop up unscathed. This is usually followed by what we call an impromptu beach safety presentation (EDU – the semaphore abbreviation for education) as the closest lifeguard explains the dangers of their actions. While 40 percent of spinal injuries occurring in the surf are caused by people diving into shallow water, the majority result from body surfers and body boarders riding waves that are breaking too close to shore. We encourage people to keep their arms stretched out in front of them when body surfing, and to avoid riding waves that are breaking close to the sandbar or beach. We hope that everyone who visits our beach will enjoy See THINK Page 37

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 36

JUNE 8, 2018

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Try chocolate chili sauce on grilled proteins By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (June 8, 2018) I absolutely adore the art of grilling. Rain, snow and high winds do not keep me from partaking of one of America’s favorite pastimes. I know the grill like the back of my hand; years of practice are my book of instructions. Neighbors panic when they see me come out with my arsenal of lighter fluids and oils. The lighter fluid is crucial to starting the coveted flame but canola oil is what sparks the flames to dance to a tune of merriment. My schedule is incredibly busy and the opportunity to get outside and enjoy nature is limited. Solitude and the sizzling of the meat is my meditation for the day. A glass of vino adds to the festivities. Contrary to popular belief, grilling and barbecuing are two entirely different cooking methods. The four major differences are the type of heat source used, the amount of time it takes to cook, the type of meat that is selected, and the flavor of the smoke. The following explanations should clear up any questions. Grilling is a direct heat method. High temperatures from either a gas or charcoal grill radiate directly

below the cooking surface of the grill grate. Since the heat is only coming from one direction, the meat being cooked needs to be flipped in order to cook evenly. This direct form of heat cooks the meat through radiation and conduction. Radiant heat from charcoal or gas flames and the heat energy in the grill grate transfers directly through conduction since the meat is on the grate’s surface. The lid can be on or off, depending on the purpose intended. Barbecue is characteristically a low and slow, indirect heating method. The heat source cooks the meat indirectly; this means the coals or flames are either far below or to the side of the meat. During the cooking process, the lid of the grill or smoker is kept closed, and the meat is cooked through convection heat as the heat circulates around the meat. Different cuts of meat require different levels of heat to cook properly. Since the high heat will cook the meat quickly, grilling is best suited for small, tender cuts. Steaks, chops and seafood are perfect for quick grilling. Large, tough cuts of meat with

great amounts of connective tissue are ideal for the slow cooking of barbecue. Taking a tough piece of meat and transforming it into a tender, succulent masterpiece is the secret of barbecuing. Ideal meats for this cooking method include pork shoulder, brisket and ribs. Not only do different cuts of meat need various cooking temperatures, they need to cook for distinctive lengths of time. The high heat temperatures of grilling bring the internal doneness up very quickly. Whereas in barbecuing, the lower temperatures and indirect heat take much longer to circulate around and transfer through the meat. Smoke as a rule is not used in grilling but is always used in barbecuing. Wood chips and chunks benefit from the lower temperature and longer cooking process. The type of wood used is a matter of personal choice. An instant-read thermometer is a must for those who are serious about grilling and barbecuing. It allows you to quickly spot-check meat for its internal temperature. You can purchase one for as low as $10.99 on Amazon. Leave-in probes thermometers are not recommended for grilling. School is ending and company will

be arriving very shortly. Grilled food adds a whole new dimension to the flavor profile of your menu. Yes, you can take the simple route and cook with store bought barbecue sauce. But how about changing things up and slather homemade sauce on your favorite protein. Chocolate and chili are a great combination. The chocolate adds depth and enriches the color of the sauce. The Mexican chilies give the sauce extra flavor and at the same time provide texture. Chocolate and chili grilling sauce would also make a lovely gift for your guests. Fill a 4-ounce glass Mason jar with chocolate chili grilling sauce. Place the filled jar with the recipe in a small bag with tissue paper. The small bags and tissue paper can be purchased from the Dollar Store. It is these small touches that makes your cookout memorable. Enjoy! * The following recipe calls for dried guajillo peppers. These peppers are one of the most popular varieties amongst Mexican chilies. They are not hot and have a hint of a berry taste. The seeds are removed because they can cause bitterness. Guajillo peppers can be purchased at Food Lion in the international section. See DIFFERENCE Page 37

COMMUNITY BRIEFS

Scholarship Mediacom Communications presented Ryan Danaher, a 2018 graduate of Stephen Decatur High School, with a $1,000 scholarship as part of the company’s World Class Scholarship Program. The award recognizes the Bishopville resident for outstanding leadership and academic accomplishments. Mediacom annually gives $1,000 scholarRyan Danaher ships to 55 graduating seniors to provide support for the students’ post-secondary education. This marks the 17th consecutive year Mediacom has funded World Class Scholarships for students who live in areas served by the cable and broadband company. On average, approximately 1,200 students apply for the scholarships each year.

Awarded Comcast NBCUniversal awarded approximately $110,000 in scholarships for the 2018-19 school year to 101 Maryland students as part of its annual Leaders and Achievers Scholarship Program.

Among them were Worcester County students Piajah Johnson of Pocomoke High School and Laila Mirza of Worcester Technical High School in Newark. The program, funded by the Comcast Foundation, is a one-time, $1,000 scholarship awarded to the best and brightest high school seniors for their community service, acLaila Mirza ademic performance and leadership skills. The students were recognized during a special event held at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis on May 16. Since 2001, more than $28 million has been awarded to nearly 27,000 high school seniors across the country as part of the Leaders and Achievers Program.

Singers needed Delmarva women’s a capella chorus is looking for singers for the Ocean Pines 50th anniversary celebration on June 21. The chorus needs 50 singers for this one-time event. Attend practice with the group on Mondays at 7 p.m. at the Ocean Pines Community Center. No auditions required. Call Jean Beatty, publicity chair, Delmarva Chorus, at 410208-4149 for details.

PHOTO COURTESY DIANE MCGRAW

SCHOLARSHIPS Three Stephen Decatur High School seniors were awarded scholarships for their academic achievements, extracurricular involvement and dedication to the community from The Women’s Club of Ocean Pines. Recipients, from left, are Michael Mareno, Hallie Edmunds and Savannah Nilo. They are pictured with Women’s Club members, from left, Second Chair Donna Potenza, First Chair Susann Palamara and Donna McCracken, Scholarship Committee chair.

Your Online Community: www.oceancitytoday.net


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 37

ON GUARD

Think before diving or riding breaking waves Taking responsibility for your own actions and spreading the caution about spinal cord injuries is the greatest form of prevention we have. Many people just do not realize that wet sand is just as un-yielding as concrete and that it is the bones of the spinal column that cause the damage and possible paralysis that results from the impact of your head, neck or back with the beach. Most people would never think of at-

Continued from Page 35 many happy, healthy returns. The Ocean City Beach Patrol has worked with trauma doctors to develop a specialized technique to manage suspected head, neck and back injuries. Although every surf rescue technician is trained and skilled in the use of these techniques, it is far better for our beach patrons to have injuries prevented rather than treated.

tempting a flip in the middle of a parking lot for fear of striking the ground. However, many of these same individuals will attempt these aerial maneuvers on the beach or into a few inches of ocean water, with the all too often result, of witnessing our spinal injury management technique first hand. Please, use your head to protect your spine and think before diving or riding breaking waves into the beach.

Have fun but remain safe. An additional factor that has a major influence on risky behavior both on the beach and throughout Ocean City is the addition of alcohol to celebrating teenagers. These recent graduates have worked there entire school careers to achieve this new found freedom, and we do not want that freedom to end in Ocean City. Graduates, remember to have fun but please, “Play it Safe!”

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Difference between grilling and barbecuing ¼ cup dark brown sugar ½ cup apple cidar vinegar 2 teaspoons liquid smoke 3 tablespoons cocoa powder 1 tablespoon kosher salt 2 teaspoons black pepper 1 ½ teaspoons ground roasted cumin 1 teaspoon ground coriander ½ teaspoon ground allspice ½ teaspoon ground cloves ¼ cup fresh lemon juice, plus zest of 1 lemon ¼ cup fresh lime juice, plus zest of 1 lime, divided

Continued from Page 36

Chocolate Chili Grilling Sauce

Ingredients ¼ cup canola oil 1 small yellow onion, chopped 3 garlic cloves, minced 4 dried guajillo chilies, (stems and seeds removed) 1 teaspoon dried crushed red pepper seeds 4 ½ ounces tomato paste ¼ cup molasses

1. In a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan, heat canola oil over medium heat and sauté the onions and garlic until translucent, approximately 7 minutes. 2. Meanwhile, place the chilies in a small bowl and pour enough hot water to submerge them. Allow to soak for 15 minutes. 3. Drain the chili water from the chilies and transfer the softened chilies to a blender with ½ cup chili water along with the onion mixture including any leftover oil. Puree mixture into a smooth paste.

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4. Combine chili paste mixture and remaining ingredients except for the lime juice and lime zest back into the medium heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring mixture to a simmer, reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer for 20 minutes, constantly stirring. 5. Remove from heat and stir in lime juice and lime zest. Allow to cool. Place in an airtight container and refrigerate until ready to use. Secret Ingredient – Differences. “Strength lies in differences, not in similarities.” – Steven Covey

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Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

ACS SUPPORTERS

LITTLE ACTORS During a unit on planting, students in Jennifer Fohner's Pre-Kindergarten class at Ocean City Elementary School acted out the story, “The Turnip” with Salisbury University Intern Cynthia Delaney. Pictured, from left, are Frederick Senger, Sophia Ciorrocco, Lila Ball, Alex Sheldon, Emily Pennington and Cade Kufchak.

Ocean City Elementary School students, faculty and staff donated $1 to wear purple and "painted the school purple" to support the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life on May 14. In addition, everyone participated in an ACES Relay Walk to support the cause. Ocean City Elementary was able to donate $742.89 to this year’s "Relay for Life" by combining the purple day donations with their 100th Day of School penny collection.

STRAIGHT-A STUDENTS GUEST ARTIST Nina Mickelsen of Lewes, Delaware, shows her bright, colorful silkscreen canvasses during First Friday's opening reception at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street, June 1.

It was a straight-A performance for 13 Stephen Decatur High School students, who earned a total of 780 As over 15 consecutive terms. They were honored during the annual Berlin-Ocean City Optimists WeXL Banquet at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on May 8. Pictured, in back, from left, are Kyla Taylor Jack Reimer, Rachel Prengaman, Laila Mirza, Justine Graham, Zachary Davis, Maggie Bunting and Mihail Beja, and in front, Brianna Watts, MacKenzi Wagner, Maya Knepp and Preston Whittaker. Not pictured: Andrew Burke.

TOURISM WEEK The Commissioners recently gathered with industry professionals from across the county to proclaim May 6-12 as Tourism Week in Worcester County and to celebrate the contributions and accomplishments of Worcester County Tourism and its many state and local partners to grow tourism locally. Pictured, in front, from left, are Gregory Purnell, Michael Day, Donna Abbott, Susan Jones, Lisa Challenger, and Melanie Pursel; second row, Denise Sawyer, Debbie Keitt, Ginger Flemming, Barbara Tull, Isabel Morris, Karah Lacey and Stacey Weisner; and in back, Commissioners Chip Bertino, Diana Purnell, Jim Bunting, Ted Elder, Joe Mitrecic, Bud Church and Merrill Lockfaw.

MEMORIAL PLANTING The General Levin Winder Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) recently held a memorial planting in the Butterfly Garden at Snow Hill Elementary School. Jacqueline Spurrier, Conservation Committee vice chairman, organized the event during which a butterfly bush was dedicated in memory of deceased chapter members Ellen Barnes, Lenore Huffer, Shirley Phillips and Margaret Stanley. Chapter Regent Patricia Ayers paid tribute to the deceased members and Chaplain Ann Fowler delivered the


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 39

Dining Guide ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ■ RESERVATIONS: Reservations accepted ________________________________

DOWNTOWN

South end to 28th Street

■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410289-7192, www.captainstableoc.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410524 3100, www.coinspub.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything homemade. Happy hour 3-6 p.m. and early bird 4-6 p.m. Daily specials. ■ THE CORAL REEF CAFE / HEMINGWAY'S RESTAURANT 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612, www.ocsuites.com/dining $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Four-story atrium cafe and an elegant dining room, Floridian/islandstyle cuisine, fresh seafood, fresh cuts of meat, farmto-table produce, artisanal desserts, hearty sandwiches and much more. ■ COWBOY COAST SALOON 1706 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City 410-289-6331, cowboycoastoc.com $-$$ | Reservations for large parties | Kids’ menu | Full bar Ocean City's only country bar and nightclub featuring live music with renowned national acts, nightly events and specials, OC's only mechanical bull and Cowboy’s Roadhouse serving hand cut Texas sized steaks, fresh seafood and mouthwatering BBQ all made from scratch. ■ FISHTALES BAR & GRILL 21st Street on the bay, Ocean City 410-289-0990, www.ocfishtales.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar FishTales is located in a premier outdoor beach location on the bay with the best sunsets. Come for the best local fare. We offer lunch and dinner with great happy hour food and drink specials. Kids play area too. So sit back and enjoy. ■ HOOTERS 5th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-2892690, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Traditional or boneless wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with Alaskan snow crab legs and Maryland steam pots. Pet friendly oceanfront patio. ■ PHILLIPS SEAFOOD, CRAB HOUSE 21st Street, Ocean City 410-289-7747, PhillipsSeafood.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Traditional dining, buffet and carry out. Early Bird Menu when seated before 5 p.m. All-you-can-eat buffet. Voted OC’s Best Buffet. Featuring more than 100 items including snow crab legs, carving station, made-to-order pasta, handmade crab cakes and so much more. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-289-1100, www.dunesmanor.com $$ - $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season.

MIDTOWN

29th to 90th streets

■ 32 PALM 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410289-2525, www.oceancityhilton.com/dining $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ THE BIG EASY ON 60 5909 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-2305, www.thebigeasyon60.com $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Come try some Ocean City favorites as well as our take on traditional Louisiana cajun dishes. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575, www.bjsonthewater.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week, year-round. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining.

■ DRY 85 OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-8989, www.DRY85.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Gourmet “stick to your ribs” home cooking. A made-from-scratch kitchen with every sauce and every dressing hand crafted. It’s that attention to detail that takes the concept of burgers, fries, pork chops and wings and turns them completely on their head. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 31st Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600, www.johnnyspizzapub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Featuring homemade pizzas, 18 gourmet pizzas, a variety of calzones, subs, burgers, sandwiches and jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Live music Fridays, Saturdays and Wednesdays. Carry out or delivery until 4 a.m. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443-664-5639, www.longboardcafe.net $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ OCEAN PINES BEACH CLUB 49th Street and the beach, Ocean City 410-5242957, www.oceanpines.org/dining $$ | Full bar Enjoy Beach Front Casual Dining, swimming pool and music on Saturdays at 1 p.m. Fresh seafood sandwiches, wraps, tacos, nachos, hot dogs, hamburgers, salads, signature drinks and more. Open daily, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. ■ P.G.N. CRABHOUSE 29th Street, Ocean City 410-289-8380 $ | Kids’ menu | Beer, wine The Kaouris family has been serving the finest crabs, seafood, steaks and chicken to Ocean City locals and visitors since 1969. ■ RARE AND RYE 106 32nd St., Ocean City 410-213-7273, https://www.rareandrye.com Full Bar Whiskey and wine bar. Farm to table. Locally grown and prepared cuisine with an eclectic menu. Unique libations with robust selection of ryes, bourbons, whiskeys and specialty drinks. Authentic green space with industrial and rustic décor. ■ RED RED WINE BAR OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-6801, www.RedRedWineBar.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Coastal cuisine with a focus on local seafood and hand tossed pizzas plus artisanal cheeseboards. 35+ wines By the Glass, 120+ By the Bottle. Flights. Luxurious colors and custom built couches. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ ROPEWALK 82nd Street on the bay, Ocean City 410-524-1109, www.ropewalkoc.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Watch the sunsets. Indoor dining and bar, deck dining and tiki bar. Serving brunch on Saturdays and Sundays. Serving lunch and dinner, 7 days a week in casual atmosphere. Happy hour specials all day, every day. ■ SEACRETS 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900, www.seacrets.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762, www.skyebaroc.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials.

UPTOWN

91st to 146th streets

■ BAYSIDE CANTINA 141st Street, Ocean City 410-250-1200, baysidecantina.com $-$$ | Full Bar Owned and operated by the Phillips family. Now open and offering fresh, simple and authentic flavors of classic Mexican favorites. Happy hour from 4-7 p.m. featuring $4 classic margaritas, sangria, draft beers and nacho bar in bar, lounge and patio. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983, www.blue-

fishocmd.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-6642896, www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com $$-$$$ | Reservations recommended for large parties | Kids’ menu | Full bar Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, steaks and pasta dishes. Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ THE CRAB BAG 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-250-3337, www.thecrabbag.com $-$$ | Full bar Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carry-out and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DUFFYS 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449, www.duffysoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second season and daily dinner specials. Dine in, carry out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 128th Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535, www.clarionoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving beach-inspired dishes in our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet, open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available Friday and Saturday, 5-9 p.m. ■ JULES FINE DINING 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396, www.ocjules.com $$, $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ NICK’S HOUSE OF RIBS 144th Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410250-1984, www.nickshouseofribs.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual, family friendly with upscale atmosphere. Extensive menu from our famous baby back ribs, fresh seafood, black angus steaks. ■ REEF 118 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-524-1000, www.carouselhotel.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ SHANGHAI BUFFET & BAR 131st Street, Ocean City 443-664-8335 $$ | Full Bar OC’s largest seafood, all-you-can-eat buffet featuring soups, raw sushi and sashimi, steamed and baked seafood along with classic Chinese entrees and many classic desserts and fruits. Open 7 days a week. ■ WHISKERS PUB 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-5242609, www.whiskerspub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Certified Angus®burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.

DELAWARE

■ THE COTTAGE CAFE Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710, www.cottagecafe.com $, $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Seafood and happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ FLYING FISH CAFE & SUSHI BAR The Village of Fenwick, 300 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-581-0217, www.flyingfishfenwick.com $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Featuring the freshest and most innovative sushi,

sashimi, and rolls plus creative and delicious small plates. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436FOXS, www.foxspizzade.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch and dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and allyou-can-eat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round.

WEST OCEAN CITY

■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717, www.ocitalianfood.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 11328 Samuel Bowen Blvd., West Ocean City 410600-1020, Foxpizzamd.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Enjoy a brand new spacious dining room. Happy hour every day from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. with $5 food specials. Full menu includes appetizers, salads, stromboli, hoagies and wedgies, pizza, spaghetti and more. Open every day from 11 a.m. to midnight. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR AND GRILL 128741 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846, weocharborside.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Home of the Original Fresh Squeezed Orange Crush! Open every day, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Appetizers, fresh seafood, steak and pasta. Live entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HOOTERS Route 50 & Keyser Point Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1841, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu and game room | Full bar New smoked wings with half the calories. Traditional wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with raw bar and crab legs. Sports packages and live entertainment. Large parties welcome. ■ PIZZA TUGOS Routes 50 and 611, West Ocean City 410-5242922; 114th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-2922, www.pizzatugos.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Open 7 days. Pizza Tugos is a family-friendly dining restaurant that features award winning pizza, pasta, craft burgers, sandwiches, subs, appetizers and salads. Great happy hour and football specials with full bar and 54 craft beers. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 $ | Kids’ menu Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo.

OCEAN PINES

■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410-6417222, www.OPyachtclub.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Amid a bay front setting, the Ocean Pines Yacht Club offers dining selections for lunch and dinner. Fresh seafood and signature drinks. Live music Fridays and Saturdays, 6 p.m., Happy Hour daily, 3-6 p.m. and Sunday brunch beginning July 14 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ■ TERN GRILLE 100 Clubhouse Drive, Ocean Pines 410-641-7222, oceanpinesgolf.org/dining $$ | Full bar The Tern Grille serves freshly-prepared breakfast and lunch items. Winter hours are Friday and Saturday from 4-9 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

BERLIN

■ OCEAN DOWNS CASINO, POSEIDON’S PUB 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-641-0600, www.oceandowns.com $-$$$ | Full bar House soups, small plates, sandwiches, burgers and entrees including steaks, chicken, veggie and Eastern Shore favorites. Dining room hours: Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 10 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, noon to 8 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, noon to 11 p.m. Pub open late.


PAGE 40

Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

OP setting for murder mystery novel By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) Timonium resident and author, Dana Phipps, recently published her first novel, “Murder in Ocean Pines.” “I’ve been spending my summers with my family since 2009 in Ocean Pines and still am,” Phipps said. “Before that, I spent my time in Ocean City for a number of years.” Dana Phipps “Murder in Ocean Pines” takes place in 2013, as the community celebrates its 45th anniversary. The main characters, a husband and wife duo, become the center of a horrific crime. Cici King lives happily with her husband, Greg, in the scenic resort community of Ocean Pines, or so she thought. What the unsuspecting housewife does not know is her husband despises her, and is planning something so horrific, it will shock the entire community. “I’m crazy about mysteries and murder so I thought I would try to write a

murder novel,” Phipps said. “I love Ocean Pines. I thought it would be a great setting, but what is neat about it is that it is a residential and resort community. “This is a murder novel. I like that there aren’t a lot of people there in the offseason, and that helped with the planning of the murder,” she continued. The 270-page “Murder in Ocean Pines” was released on Amazon in midMay for $15.99. Her book will soon be available in the Ocean Pines Library in the Maryland section, as well as for purchase at Pam’s Hallmark in White Marlin Mall in West Ocean City. “I’m very, very excited about it,” Phipps said. “I wanted it to be something that people’s interest would be held, and it would be a page turner. That’s why I wrote it.” Phipps will sign copies of her book on Aug. 4 at Bethany Beach Bookstore at 6:30 p.m. Phipps was a former teacher of special and elementary education in Baltimore. She served as director and owner of a Sylvan Learning Center in Westminster, Maryland. As an education specialist at Shep-

pard Pratt Hospital in Baltimore, she was a liaison between the schools and the hospital where she advocated for obtaining the appropriate educational placements and programs to meet the specific needs of emotionally handicapped adolescents. To learn more about “Murder in Ocean Pines,” contact Phipps at tdbeachnut@aol.com or call 443-8451164. Phipps is also the author of two children’s books, “Emily and Hurricane Isabelle”  and  “Emily and Her Pouting Puffer Fish.”

CROSSWORD

Answers on page 42


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 41

Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

FRI, JUNE 8 Barn 34, 6-9 p.m. Kickoff party and legend inductions. Proceeds benefit the Ocean City Surf Club’s programs. Brad, 443-366-5944, oceancitysurfclub.org

OC SURF FEST KICK OFF PARTY

Stevenson United Methodist Church, 123 N. Main St., Berlin, 4-6:30 p.m. Includes single crabcake sandwich with green beans and seasoned baked potato. Cost is $10. Carryouts and bake table available.

CRAB CAKE DINNER

Germantown School Community Heritage Center, 10223 Trappe Road, Berlin, 7-11 p.m. Tickets cost $25 and can be reserved by calling 410-6410638. Light fare offered. Proceeds benefit the heritage center.

‘DANCING UNDER THE STARS’

Townwide at various locations, Ocean City, MD, All Day. Free events for 2018 high school graduates including karaoke, volleyball, dodgeball, kayaking, bowling and more. Attend a ‘Play It Safe’ event and recieve a wristband to ride the buss all week for $5. 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://playitsafeoceancity.com

‘PLAY IT SAFE’ ACTIVITIES

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, All Day. Honoring police, firefighters, EMS, active and retired military with free admission to the museum for individuals and their families. http://www.ocmuseum.org

SALUTE TO SERVICES

Columbus Hall, 9901 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 6:30 p.m. Doors open at 5 p.m. Possible to win the $1,000 big jackpot each week. 410-524-7994

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BINGO

N. Division Street and beach, Ocean City, MD, 9 to 11 p.m. Special 3-minute displays at 9 p.m., 9:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. and 11 p.m. Featuring high-powered, colored search lights that move and sway to music.

BEACH LIGHTS

SAT, JUNE 9 Furnace Town Living Heritage Village,

BLUEGRASS, BREW & BBQ CONCERT

high school graduates including karaoke, volleyball, dodgeball, kayaking, bowling and more. Attend a ‘Play It Safe’ event and recieve a wristband to ride the buss all week for $5. 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://playitsafeoceancity.com Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, All Day. Honoring police, firefighters, EMS, active and retired military with free admission to the museum for individuals and their families. http://www.ocmuseum.org

5-7 p.m. Gates open at 4 p.m. Furnace Town presents Sarah Beth Meadows & Kellen Burger Road, of West Virginia. Brew available from Evolution Craft Brewery Company and Tall Tales Brewery; BBQ served by NoBBQ and Backyard Louie’s BBQ; and dessert available from The Ugly Pie. Tickets cost $12 for adults and $6 for children under 16 years and members of Furnace Town. Tickets: www.eventbrite.com or at the door. Furnace Town Folk School has added a master class workshop from 1-2 p.m. for those interested in learning how to play bluegrass. www.furnacetown.org, 410-632-2032 or info@furnacetown.org.

SALUTE TO SERVICES

Castle in the Sand, beachfront, 3701 Atlantic Ave, Ocean City, MD, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. “Anything Goes Team Challenge” features young, old, girls and guys riding whatever they want. Proceeds benefit the Ocean City Surf Club’s programs. Admission is free. Brad, 443-366-5944, oceancitysurfclub.org

BEACH LIGHTS

Ocean City beach from Wicomico to N. Division streets, June 9 and 10 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Open to all traditional and non-traditional soccer teams — featuring Recreational and Competitive brackets. westcoat@mac.com, 443-204-3785

SUN, JUNE 10

OC SURF FEST

SAND DUELS BEACH SOCCER CHALLENGE

Manklin Meadows Racquet complex, 11443 Manklin Creek Road, Ocean Pines, June 9 and 10, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., weather permitting. Come out and view competitive pickleball in action. Featuring 180 players from across the USA.

OP PICKLEBLL 2018 SUMMER CLASSIC

BEAUTIFUL RIDE FUN RAISER FOR ESIMBA

Pickles Pub, 706 Philadelphia Ave, Ocean City, 5-9 p.m. New video games, music, food and drink specials, Wheel o Fortune, raffles, 50/50. Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:30 a.m. Speakers will be Zack Garmoe, a member of the Chesapeake Conservation Corp and Amanda Poskaitis, a marine scientist who coordinates the Coastal Bays oyster Gardening Program and horseshoe crab survey. All welcome. Jack Barnes, 410-641-7662

OCEAN PINES ANGLERS CLUB MEETING

Townwide at various locations, Ocean City, MD, All Day. Free events for 2018

‘PLAY IT SAFE’ ACTIVITIES

White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Held every Saturday. Locally grown vegetables and fruits, eggs, honey, kettle korn, flowers, artisan breads, seafood, meats and more. New vendors welcome. 410641-7717, Ext. 3006

FARMERS MARKET

N. Division Street and beach, Ocean City, MD, 9 to 11 p.m. Special 3-minute displays at 9 p.m., 9:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. and 11 p.m. Featuring high-powered, colored search lights that move and sway to music.

Castle in the Sand, beachfront, 3701 Atlantic Ave, Ocean City, MD, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. “Walk Do Plank Pro” showcasing some of the best pro longboarders in the country, competing for money and prizes. Proceeds benefit the Ocean City Surf Club’s programs. Admission is free. Brad, 443-366-5944, oceancitysurfclub.org

OC SURF FEST

Ocean City beach from Wicomico to N. Division streets, June 9 and 10 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Open to all traditional and non-traditional soccer teams — featuring Recreational and Competitive brackets. westcoat@mac.com, 443-204-3785

SAND DUELS BEACH SOCCER CHALLENGE

Calvin B. Taylor House Museum, 208 N. Main St., Berlin. 6 p.m. The High and Wides will be performing this free concert. Bring a chair and a picnic. 410-6411019, www.taylorhousemuseum.org

CONCERT ON THE LAWN

Community Church at Ocean Pines, 11227 Racetrack Road, 3 p.m. Tickets cost $10 and are available at the door. Dave Holloway, 410-641-5672 or June Todd, 410-289-7373

PINE TONES CHORUS CONCERT

Ocean City beach at 7th Street. Beach

CAPT. SCHOEPF LIFEGUARD RELAY

relay honoring contributions of Capt. Schoepf and the sacrifices of all past and present Ocean City Beach Patrol. 410289-7556 Manklin Meadows Racquet complex, 11443 Manklin Creek Road, Ocean Pines, June 9 and 10, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., weather permitting. Come out and view competitive pickleball in action. Featuring 180 players from across the USA.

OP PICKLEBLL 2018 SUMMER CLASSIC

Townwide at various locations, Ocean City, MD, All Day. Free events for 2018 high school graduates including karaoke, volleyball, dodgeball, kayaking, bowling and more. Attend a ‘Play It Safe’ event and recieve a wristband to ride the buss all week for $5. 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://playitsafeoceancity.com

‘PLAY IT SAFE’ ACTIVITIES

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, All Day. Honoring police, firefighters, EMS, active and retired military with free admission to the museum for individuals and their families. http://www.ocmuseum.org

SALUTE TO SERVICES

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BUFFET BREAKFAST Columbus Hall, 9901 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. Allyou-can-eat includes two styles of eggs, sausage, bacon, fried potatoes, creamed chipped beef, toast, pancakes, French toast, coffee and juice. Cost is $10 for adults and $6 for children. 410-5247994

SUNDAY OUTDOOR INFORMAL WORSHIP SERVICE

Bethany United Methodist Church, front lawn, 8648 Stephen Decatur Highway, Berlin, MD, 8:30 a.m. Bring a lawn chair or blanket. bethany21811@gmail.com, 410-641-2186 N. Division Street and beach, Ocean City, MD, 9 to 11 p.m. Special 3-minute displays at 9 p.m., 9:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. and 11 p.m. Featuring high-powered, colored search lights that move and sway to music.

BEACH LIGHTS

MON, JUNE 11 Kylan Barn, 30603 Dusty Lane, Delmar, MD, 4 p.m. The ceremony will start at 5 p.m. Open to anyone interested in learning more about this barn-style wedding and event venue. There will be a DJ and light refreshments. 410-251-5914,

RIBBON CUTTING AND OPEN HOUSE

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Ocean City Today

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JUNE 8, 2018

CALENDAR www.kylanbarn.com

Continued from Page 41

FRIENDS OF THE OCEAN PINES LIBRARY MEETING

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Refreshments at 9:30 a.m., meeting at 10 a.m. Guest speaker will be Charlie Paparella, photographer, writer and editor. 410-208-4014 Townwide at various locations, Ocean City, MD, All Day. Free events for 2018 high school graduates including karaoke, volleyball, dodgeball, kayaking, bowling and more. Attend a ‘Play It Safe’ event and recieve a wristband to ride the buss all week for $5. 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://playitsafeoceancity.com

‘PLAY IT SAFE’ ACTIVITIES

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, All Day. Honoring police, firefighters, EMS, active and retired military with free admission to the museum for individuals and their families. http://www.ocmuseum.org

SALUTE TO SERVICES

Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 7 to 9 p.m. The group meets each Monday. Women interested in learning the craft of a cappella singing welcome. 410-6416876

DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS

N. Division Street and beach, Ocean City, MD, 9 to 11 p.m. Special 3-minute displays at 9 p.m., 9:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. and 11 p.m. Featuring high-powered, colored search lights that move and sway to music.

BEACH LIGHTS

TUE, JUNE 12 DRY 85 OC and Red Red Wine Bar OC, 12 48th St., Ocean City, noon. Join Maryland Governor Larry Hogan and distinguished guests for the official ribbon cutting for these two new restaurants. Lisa Bolter, lisa@redredwinebar.com

RIBBON CUTTING

Townwide at various locations, Ocean City, MD, All Day. Free events for 2018 high school graduates including karaoke, volleyball, dodgeball, kayaking, bowling and more. Attend a ‘Play It Safe’ event and recieve a wristband to ride the buss all week for $5. 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://playitsafeoceancity.com

‘PLAY IT SAFE’ ACTIVITIES

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, All Day. Honoring police, firefighters, EMS, active and retired military with free admission to the museum for individuals and their families. http://www.ocmu-

SALUTE TO SERVICES

seum.org Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 1 to 4 p.m. Got bugs or other plant problems? Bring your bagged samples by and let the master gardeners find solutions to your questions. 410-208-4014

ASK A MASTER GARDENER

Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 5:30 to 7 p.m. The group meets each Tuesday. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and health lifestyle. jeanduck47@gmail.com

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

N. Division Street and beach, Ocean City, MD, 9 to 11 p.m. Special 3-minute displays at 9 p.m., 9:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. and 11 p.m. Featuring high-powered, colored search lights that move and sway to music.

BEACH LIGHTS

WED, JUNE 13 34TH ANNUAL JR. GOLF SCHOLARSHIP TOURNAMENT

Ocean Pines Golf Club, 9 a.m. shot gun start. Entry fee is $80, which includes greens fee, cart, team prizes, men’s and ladies’ closet-to-the-pin prizes, door prizes, continental breakfast, on-course refreshments and lunch at Taylor’s Neighborhood Restaurant. Ocean Pines golf members’ entry fee is $50 with a cart package and $65 without. Sign up individually or as a foursome. Entry deadline is June 6. Scotty Wheatley, 410-641-7486 Carousel Resort Hotel and Condominiums, 11700 Coastal Hwy, Ocean City, 8:30 p.m., weather permitting. Featuring “Frozen.” Info: Ocean City Recreation & Parks, 410-250-0125 or www.oceancitymd.gov

FREE MOVIES ON THE BEACH

Townwide at various locations, Ocean City, MD, All Day. Free events for 2018 high school graduates including karaoke, volleyball, dodgeball, kayaking, bowling and more. Attend a ‘Play It Safe’ event and recieve a wristband to ride the buss all week for $5. 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://playitsafeoceancity.com

‘PLAY IT SAFE’ ACTIVITIES

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, All Day Honoring police, firefighters, EMS, active and retired military with free admission to the museum for individuals and their families. http://www.ocmuseum.org

SALUTE TO SERVICES

Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 8 a.m. Meets every Wednesday. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m.

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OP/OC

410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 3 to 7 p.m. Held every Wednesday (May 2-Sept. 26). Locally grown vegetables and fruits, eggs, honey, kettle korn, flowers, artisan breads, seafood, meats, jewelry, clothing, artwork and more. Open to the public. New vendors welcome. 410-641-7717, Ext. 3006

OP FARMERS & ARTISANS MARKET

Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., Ocean City, MD, 5:30 to 9 p.m. The group dances every Wednesday. Dance to the sounds of the ‘50s and ‘60s music. A $5 donation to benefit Veterans and local charities. Dance lessons offered the first and third Wednesday of each month from 5-5:45 p.m. Dancing follows until 9 p.m. Members and their guests welcome. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 410-208-1151, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB

Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St, Ocean City, MD, 6 p.m. The group meets every Wednesday. cliff0917@aol.com, 302540-2127

OC/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING

N. Division Street and beach, Ocean City, MD, 9 to 11 p.m. Special 3-minute displays at 9 p.m., 9:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. and 11 p.m. Featuring high-powered, colored search lights that move and sway to music.

BEACH LIGHTS

THU, JUNE 14 Ocean Pines Beach Club, 49th Street and the beach, Ocean City, 5:30 p.m. Matt Ortt Companies, LLC has taken over management of the Beach Club and the Ocean Pines Yacht Club. The Business After Hours will be held, as well, from 57 p.m. All Worcester County business people (employers and employees) are invied. Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce, 410-641-5306

RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY

Townwide at various locations, Ocean City, MD, All Day. Free events for 2018 high school graduates including karaoke, volleyball, dodgeball, kayaking, bowling and more. Attend a ‘Play It Safe’ event and recieve a wristband to ride the buss all week for $5. 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://playitsafeoceancity.com

‘PLAY IT SAFE’ ACTIVITIES

Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, All Day Honoring police, firefighters, EMS, active and retired military with free admission to the museum for individuals and their families. http://www.ocmuseum.org

SALUTE TO SERVICES

Ocean City Senior Center, 104 41st St., Ocean City, MD, 10 a.m. Social half-hour with refreshments begins at 9:30 a.m. Guest speaker will be state senator Jim Mathias. An optional luncheon will follow the meeting. New members welcome. Bob McCluskey, 410-250-0980

AARP MEETING

Clarion Hotel, 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 4 to 7 p.m. Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. 302-436-9577, 410-5240649, http://www.BeachSingles.org

BEACH SINGLES

N. Division Street and beach, Ocean City, MD, 9 to 11 p.m. Special 3-minute displays at 9 p.m., 9:20 p.m., 9:40 p.m., 10 p.m., 10:20 p.m., 10:40 p.m. and 11 p.m. Featuring high-powered, colored search lights that move and sway to music.

BEACH LIGHTS

ONGOING EVENTS Assateague Island North Beach parking lot, 6633 Bayberry Drive, Berlin. Held Saturdays through September and Tuesdays in July and August, 8-9 a.m. Low impact exercise for all levels. Bring a beach towel. Suitable for ages 8 years and up. All gifts of donation go to Assateague Island National Seashore.

EXERCISE ON THE BEACH

Held July 23-27 from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at St. Mary Star Of The Sea, 1705 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City. Each day at “Shipwrecked!! Rescued by Jesus,” kids travel through faith-building rotations that reinforce relevant Bible points and immerse kids in new adventures. All are welcome. Register: vbspro.events/p/events/stmaryvgs18. Info: Rita, 410-289-7028 or religioused@stmarystaroftheseaocmd.com.

VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL

Kiwanis is selling $5 entries for the Aug. 24 race to benefit Kiwanis Children’s programs like scholarships and student leadership clubs in local schools. Win up to $3,000. The race will be held at Frontier Town Lazy River on Route 611. Winner need not be present to win. Tickets: 410-973-1233.

KIWANIS DUCK RACE

Crossword answers from page 40


JUNE 8, 2018

43 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew

for our WOC kitchen facility Starting at $12.00/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Year-Round Part-Time is now hiring for the following positions:

Distillery Tour Guides, Cooks, A/V Staff, Gardener, Security, General Maintenance, Seasonal Receptionist. For more details or to apply, please go online to www.seacrets.com/employment

Office Assistant Needed Full-time Position

We have two busy rental offices. We are looking for someone who can assist in both our Ocean Pines and Ocean City office. q References required q Professional/Friendly q Must be willing to travel to properties mostly in Ocean Pines and Ocean City q Must work most weekends as needed q Administrative skills needed Please fax resumes, letters, and references to Hileman Real Estate, Inc. Attn: Chris Fax # 410-208-9562 No Phone Calls Please

FRAMERS PAINTERS DECK COATING APPLICATORS INTERIOR REMODELING PROFESSIONALS WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION TECHNICIANS & MANAGERS ~ IICRC, WRT, ASD certifications a plus ~ VALID DL, Background check, Drug & Alcohol-free environment

Please send your resumes at oceantowerconstruction@yahoo.com or call 443-366-5556 during regular business hours.

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities:

Year Round, Full/Part Time: Room Attendant, Hskpg House Staff, Laundry Supervisor, Wash Room Attendant, Hskpg Supervisor, Line Cooks, Banquet Servers, Servers, Hostess/Host, Busser, Purchasing Agent, Dishwasher, Maintenance Mechanic, Security Guard, Reservation Agent, Front Desk, Restaurant Manager, Office Administrator

Free employee meal and excellent benefits.

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

Sea Colony Fitness

WEEKEND SUPERVISOR email:

HELP WANTED Chairside

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE Email Resume:

molarbiz@yahoo.com

jennifer.neal@resortquest.com

or apply online at: Careers.WyndhamWorldwide.com Employment is contingent on a drug screen and background check. ResortQuest is an EOE.

$1000 SIGNING BONUS FOR PLUMBERS WITH POSEIDON PLUMBING & HOME SERVICES!

We offer paid training, vacation and personal days. We also offer a quality benefits package incl. health, dental, vision and life ins. Wage is BOE from $18-$25. Hours do vary as we are a service company. Based in the Berlin/Ocean City area. What we require: • Valid Driver's License • Reliable form of contact • Background Check • Ability to pass a drug test • Positive attitude and willingness to learn. If you feel that you can fill this position call us to set up an interview. We can be reached at 410-251-1096.

NOW HIRING

• Servers • Bartenders • Delivery Drivers • Cooks • Managers

Holding Interviews Tuesdays & Thursdays @ 11 a.m. 5601 Coastal Hwy., Bayside

HOTEL CAREER FAIR Real Hospita aliity Group is hiring for for Home2 Suites Ocean ce e City ity - Opening Soon Join us for for w walk in interrviews on Monday, June 18th, 2018 • 10am 0am - 4pm at Faiirfield Inn & Suites Ocea an City 2501 Philadelphia delphia Ave, A Ocean City y, MD 21842

Op Open p positions in: Housek Ho ousekeepin ng Food & Beverage Front Offi fice Maintenance Mai

APPLY ONLINE E PRIOR R TO THE EVENT! Please visit our web ebsite at:

www.realhospitalitygrou up p.com/careers Please bring g an updat p ed resume um me t o the event.

Come be a part of our team! HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS

FT Seasonal Room Inspector Must be available on weekends Hiring Full or Part Time Lifeguards Pool hours are flexible and evening shifts 6pm-10pm are available. Full Time Pool Bar Cook Must be available from Noon-9pm. Seasonal position – Full or Part Time hours. Groundskeeper Seasonal position 8am-4:30pm. Must work weekends

Applications available at the front desk or email to info@fskfamily.com 12806 Ocean Gateway Ocean City, MD 21842

HELP WANTED

CARPENTERS • FRAMERS GLAZIERS for Premier Glass & Screen. Health Insurance, Vacation & Holiday Benefits. Email resume: premierglass@mchsi.com or call: 302-732-3101 SECURITY MANAGER Seeking an experienced, motivated and mature individual to lead security at busy restaurant/bar. Salary based on experience. Email shawn@bahiamarina.com.

Help Wanted • Cashier • Kitchen Help • Dishwasher

Apply within Asian Garden, 1509 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City

P/T Customer Service Representative

Looking for a cheerful, friendly, smiling face to join our office team. Greet/assist customers, sell gift cards & club memberships, general office duties, administer marketing promotions, database upkeep, etc. Good typing and computer skills required. Must be dependable and willing to work all shifts day, night, weekends.

Apply online at TangerOutlets.com/careers. No phone calls please. Tanger Outlets Ocean City EOE. DFW.

$10.50 - $18.75 per hour + Bonus Pay commensurate with experience.

LINE COOK • PREP COOK DISHWASHER • BARTENDER

email resume:

billguckin@gmail.com or call Bill 10am-10pm 215.313.5667 Fenwick Island

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Golf Sales Manager

We are currently recruiting a Golf Sales Manager. The successful candidate will be responsible for selling, coordinating, and packaging overnight accommodations, golf, and food & beverage. Previous golf packaging experience is a must. Excellent benefits package available. Compensation commensurate with experience. Apply in person or fax resume with salary requirements Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Human Resources 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Fax: 410-723-9109 ~ lwatson@clarionoc.com EOE M/F/D/V

Online www.oceancitytoday.com s d ie if s s la C Convenient, quick, no waiting, no calls ~ Days, nights and weekends Order Your


PAGE 44

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

IS HIRING! Full and Part-Time Opportunities Available Store Leadership AND Customer Service Associate

West Ocean City AND Ocean City MD Stores

WORK ON THE BEACH THIS SUMMER • Now Hiring Students for Over 80 Positions • Provide Exceptional Beach Service to Visitors • Make Lifelong Friends & Memories • Prepare to Sharpen Sales & Customer Service Skills • Vibrant & Energetic Individuals Wanted • Hourly + Commission + Tips

Come See Us at Ocean City Job Fair on April 15 from 9A-2P

Apply at EightyFiveAndSunny.com/Employment

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Food & Beverage Manager

We are currently recruiting an experienced food & beverage manager to oversee and be responsible for our busy dining room & convention center. Must have strong management experience in a large restaurant, banquet and/or convention services experience, ability to train staff, excellent communication skills and ability to solve problems. Must be able to work a flexible schedule including weekends and holidays. Excellent salary and benefits package. Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Human Resources 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Fax: 410-723-9109 ~ lwatson@clarionoc.com EOE M/F/D/V

Ocean City Today

HELP WANTED

SEASIDE INN, FENWICK FT, Seasonal: LAUNDRY ATTENDANTS, HOUSEKEEPERS. Excellent pay. Apply at: Seaside Inn 1401 Coastal Hwy. Fenwick Island, 19944.

LIFEGUARDS WANTED

Certified Lifeguards for community pool. F/T & P/T positions available. Hours are 10AM to 8PM seven days a week. Extra hours in July & August. Must pass drug test & background check. Weekends & holidays required. Pay commensurate with training & experience. Apply in person with valid certifications to White Horse Park 11647 Beauchamp Rd. Berlin, MD 8AM-4PM.

*ALL POSITIONS*

HELP WANTED

Year-Round Position Open at the Country Inn and Suites, in OC for Housekeeping, Laundry & Breakfast Attendants. Apply within 12303 Coastal Hwy. Alex’s Italian Restaurant Experienced, Year-round Cooks & Servers. Apply in Person. Rt. 50, West OC, or call 410-726-2158 & ask for Alex.

PGN Crabhouse, 29th Street & Coastal Hwy. Help Wanted. Waitstaff, Kitchen Help. Apply Within after 11 am. HIRING ALL POSITIONS!!

Full time & Part time Stop by our location on 52nd street! or call 443-664-2825

AWARD WINNING

MARLIN MOON

inside the newly renovated DOUBLE TREE by HILTON in Ocean City is now hiring for all positions. FOH, BOH, STARBUCKS KIOSK and AM and PM SOUS. Be a part of an award-winning team. Please apply at Hilton, 32nd Street, Ocean City, OCMDHOTELS.com, or follow the ad on our Facebook page

GROUNDSMAN/ LABORER

IMMEDIATE opening for groundsman/laborer for busy Northern Worcester County tree service. Looking for a motivated individual who is willing to show up for work every day ready to give his/her best. Duties include dragging brush to the chipper and chipping it, jobsite cleanup, loading wood, driving company truck, and other as required. MUST HAVE VALID DRIVERS LICENSE, be physically fit and able to lift heavy loads, reliable transportation, and ability to pass DOT physical with drug test.

Please CALL Pete at 443-235-0915 Absolutely no texts will be answered.

HELP WANTED

Experienced Cleaners needed for Part-time work in Ocean City & Bethany. Must have vehicle and cell phone and pass background check. Please call 410-202-2887.

NOW HIRING SEASONAL EMPLOYEES The Ocean Pines Public Works Department is hiring seasonal employees. Work could include the operation of mowers, both push and riding; maintaining flowers, lawns and shrubs in area parks and in and around OPA-owned facilities, cleaning of restrooms and routine maintenance duties. Email or contact if interested: hr@oceanpines.org. 410-641-7717 Century Taxi - Now hiring taxi drivers. Call Ken 443-2355664. Experienced Cleaner Reliable w/own transportation, cleaning supplies, trustworthy & dependable. Call 443-513-4024. Only serious inquiries apply.

Now Hiring Security Guard

HIRING J-1’s NOW

LOCALS WELCOME!

Cashiers $10-$12 hr. Drivers $12-$16 hr. Cooks $9.25 hr. Applications to be filled out at 81st St. anytime.

AUTO TECHNICIANS GREAT OPPORTUNITIES!!!!

EARN UP TO $27.00 HR. Busy auto tire & service center established in 1984 with locations in Berlin/ Ocean Pines, MD; Long Neck, DE; & Ocean View, DE is now accepting applications for:

- Technicians - Lube Techs - MD State Inspectors

Must have own tools & valid drivers license. ASE's a HUGE PLUS Co. matched retirement plan & much more!!!

Call 443-366-5446 or 443-614-3740

NOW HIRING SUMMER 2018

• Make Lifelong Friends • Housing Assistance & Paid Internships Available • Live & Work At The Beach APPLY TODAY

MyTelescopePictures.com/ Employment

Full-Time, Year-Round Health Benefits Apply in person Tues. thru Thurs., 9-3 p.m. @ Golden Sands 10900 Coastal Highway

Hiring

JUNE 8, 2018

HELP WANTED

SERVICE PLUMBERS Minimum 3 years experience, DL required. Benefits, great bonus program! Potential of $30+/hour. PLUMBER’S HELPER No experience - will train. Email resume to Carol@ CharlesMoonServices.com

WORK ON THE BEACH RENTING UMBRELLAS AND CHAIRS. HOURS 9-5. CALL OR TEXT 410-726-0315.

Groundskeeping/Janitorial 7 days a week, 4-6 hours per day. Leave a message at 443-513-1371. Kings Arms Motel. Hiring Front Desk, Maintenance and Housekeeping. Apply within. 410-289-6257. Part-time Maintenance Assistant for property management company. Send resume to: cmcquay@defenderresorts.com or mail to PO Box 878, Ocean City, MD 21843.

Part-Time, YR Teachers Wanted for Premier Driving School. No experience necessary. 410-877-7100

Hiring ALL Positions!!

Full time & Part time To apply go to: www.mygcjob.com

Starbucks/Made Market Kiosk Attendant Flexible hours Apply in person: Double Tree by Hilton 3301 Atlantic Ave. Ocean City, MD

Property Management Assistant

Room Attendants Maintenance

To Order Product Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net

Comfort Inn Gold Coast We are seeking to fill the positions of

These positions may be full or part time, are yearround, and require a flexible schedule. We offer excellent pay and benefits. Experience is preferred but we will train the right person. $200 bonus after first 4 full weeks of employment. Please apply in person at 112th Street, Ocean City, next to the Gold Coast Mall

Full Time w/ Benefits

Send resume to eugene@oc-rem.com

Become a Better You in 2018!

To Become an Avon Representative Sign Up at www. ChristinesBeautyShop.com

Now Hiring

FT & PT DELIVERY DRIVERS, MAKE $12-$16 PER HOUR Apply within - Downtown location 710 N. Philadelphia Ave.

Classifieds ~ 410-723-6397 w w w. b a y s i d e o c . c o m w w w. o c e a n c i t y t o d a y. c o m

Order Your Classifieds Online ~ www.oceancitytoday.com


JUNE 8, 2018

RENTALS

RENTALS

Year-Round Rentals available in West Ocean City. 2 bedroom, 1 bath and 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Call 1-877-289-1616 for more information.

West OC Waterfront Cottage. Available JuneSept. Starting at $4,000. No pets. 443-831-9898

WEEKLY • SEASONAL

RAMBLER MOTEL

R E N TA L S

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626

9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

VA C AT I O N S

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DOWNTOWN OCEAN CITY Immaculately clean 2BR apartment. Sleeps 5. June 1 to October 15. Price is $2,250 per person including utilities, plus deposits. No smoking, parties, or pets. All male or all female. Taking applications. Call or text 410-422-2100

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com

1BR, 1BA Starting at $1000 3BR, 2BA Starting at $1125 2BR, 2BA Starting at $1200 4BR, 2.5BA Starting at $1700

Available Winter Rentals @ www.hilemanrealestate.com

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

Open 7 Days A Week Mon.-Sat., 9-5 & Sun., 10-3 * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

Check out the

y r o t c e r i Service D

For a variety of Local Services

Ocean City Today

ROOMMATES

Female Roommates Wanted. Seasonal/YR cozy house to share. Safe neighborhood in OP. 2 rooms w/ shared bath $750/each. Utilities included. Just move in. Pets ok. No smoking. Employed females only. 410-208-3570.

OPEN HOUSE OPEN HOUSE

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, June 10, 1-4pm. #2 48th St., Unit 1012. Oceanfront, 3BR, 3BA. Ask for Open House at Sales Office. $859,000. www.Gatewaygrand1012.com

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE

Beautiful 3BR, 2BA home on 1 Quarter Acre. Large kitchen and living room. Shows like new. Minutes to the beach. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

LOTS & ACREAGE LOTS & ACREAGE

DIRECT BAYFRONT South Point 1.9 Acre Lot. Approved for well & septic permit. Overlooking Sinepuxent Bay. Price Improvement $389,900. Call Howard Martin Realty, 410-352-5555.

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443497-4200.

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

Looking for space, comfort and great views? Spacious, climatecontrolled offices available, with use of Conference Room, in a modern, wellmaintained building, in prime Ocean City location. Call 410-524-3440 for appointment.

www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.com

SERVICES

FURNITURE

PAGE 45

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH

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FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

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PAYING CASH for junk A/C’s. Will also pick up other scrap metal or appliances free of charge. 302-222-7297

SERVICES

BUDGET MOVERS 443-664-5797

LOCAL & EAST COAST MOVING Full Packing Service Piano Movers - Full Service

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DONATIONS DONATIONS

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065. www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.com

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINMARYLAND STATEWIDE ING-Get FAA certification to CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING fix planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military NETWORK benefits. Call Aviation InstiAUTOMOBILE DONATIONS tute of Maintenance 866-823DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, 6729. RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION HELP WANTED SOCIETY. Your donation EARN $500 A DAY: Lincoln helps local families with food, Heritage Life Insurance clothing, shelter, counseling. Wants Insurance Agents * Tax deductible. MVA License Leads, No Cold Calls * Com#W1044. 410-636-0123 or missions Paid Daily * Agency www.LutheranMissionSociety.org Training * Life Insurance ReBUSINESS SERVICES quired. Call 1-888-713-6020 Place a business card ad in WANTED TO BUY OR the Regional Small Display TRADE 2x2/2x4 Advertising Network – Let MDDC help you grow FREON R12 WANTED: your business! Call TODAY at CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY 410-212-0616 to increase CA$H FOR R12 cylinders or your customer base and get cases of cans (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com results. Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Delaware New Move-In Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes from low $100’s. No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com.

SERVICES-MISCELLANEOUS Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-2120616 Ask for Multi-Media Specialist -Wanda & watch your results grow.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 46

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June 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

Business

Page 47 REAL ESTATE REPORT

New Bright MLS to cover Maryland and also Delaware

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Managing partners of Ocean 13, from left, Nicholas Sikora, Jeremy Brink and Steve Bowers, pose for a photo in the bar area on the Boardwalk at 13th Street, Friday, June 1. Missing from the photo is partner Jamie Stewart.

Ocean 13 Seafood, Steakhouse and Piano Lounge open

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) Less than one year after opening Ocean 13, a bistro and bar on the first floor of the Beach Plaza Hotel on 13th Street and the Boardwalk, Jeremy Brink and his partners purchased a second spot for a restaurant directly above it. Ocean 13 Seafood, Steakhouse and Piano Lounge opened in late May. “I’ve been in the restaurant industry since I was a kid,” Brink said. “My first job was at a restaurant.” Brink opened his first establishment last year on Memorial Day weekend with co-owners Nicholas Sikora, Jamie Stewart and Steve Bowers. Ocean 13, aptly named for its location on 13th Street, is a tiki bar located beneath the Beach Plaza hotel. The bar serves fish tacos, carnitas, wings and burgers, among other items. Brink said what sets itself apart is that the food is made in-house daily with fresh ingredients. “We do fresh ingredients, we do fresh sauces, vegetables and meats, and all that stuff,” Brink said. “Everything is homemade – every dressing,

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Beach Plaza Hotel on the Boardwalk at 13th Street is now the home of Ocean 13 Seafood, Steakhouse and Piano Lounge.

every sauce, every veggie setup, we made everything from scratch. “All of us are foodies,” he continued. “We love great food and want to share great food with people on the Boardwalk and we feel the Boardwalk’s ready to not just have funnel cakes and fries.” The new seafood and steakhouse will offer a variety of dishes, from tuna poke for an appetizer, to a 35-ounce tomahawk steak. Some other items include pan seared scallops, cream of crab chowder, crab cakes and home-

made ice cream sandwiches. Adolfo’s Italian restaurant was in the space now occupied by the seafood and steakhouse eatery. The owner gave Brink the inspiration needed to purchase the space last December when they put it up for sale. “We found out Adolfo’s was leaving, and I had a funny conversation with the old owner before they were closing,” Brink said. “He said, ‘You know Jeremy, whoever comes in here, is going to be direct competition with See RESTAURANT Page 48

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (June 8, 2018) A new multiple list service (MLS), called Bright MLS, is gearing up to take effect in the Delmarva area that will cover the entire states of Maryland and Delaware. In total, the new regional MLS is comprised of 43 Realtor associations from parts of six states— Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia (it does not include the Eastern Shore of Virginia) and Washington, D.C. This trend to consolidate MLS’s is national, and it shows that the real estate industry is undergoing exponential change. “The physical, political and philosophical boundaries of MLSs no longer fulfill what brokerages need to conduct business,” Bright MLS’s website states. “Bright MLS was created from a desire to be the change that real estate professionals demand. We want to empower everyone to get more out of the MLS.” The consolidated MLS system does allow subscribers who work on the border of a county or state to belong to just one MLS system. For example, until now, when you were a licensed Realtor in Maryland and Delaware, you had to subscribe to both MLS’s who used different MLS software providers. Bright will now be able to provide subscribers with access to listing information for a larger geographic area, and updated technology that includes apps for the general public to use as well. The customer search engine is available at homesnap.com and also as an app for your phone by searching Homesnap Real Estate. Bright communicates are guided by three principles: • MLS Simplified – Reduce duplication, so a larger group of subscribers have one set of rules, one fee, one system and one process. • Greater Innovation – Pioneer imaginative and relevant solutions that position everyone for the future. • More Information – Offer a broad ecosystem of robust property information and analytics to power real estate businesses. — Lauren Bunting is a licensed Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 48

JUNE 8, 2018

Restaurant ribbon cutting June 21

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Continued from Page 47 you.’ And I said, ‘You’re an Italian restaurant but you’re absolutely right.’” “So, I talked to all the partners and said, ‘Why don’t we just check it out?’” he continued. “We walked in and just fell in love with it instantly. I went up there and said, ‘seafood and steakhouse it’s gotta be.’” Originally owned by the Phillips family, the restaurant space has an old-fashioned, Prohibition-style atmosphere. A piano bar and lounge is located to the immediate right of the hotel front desk, and the entrance to a large dining room overtakes the left. “I love the bar up there. [It’s] so retro,” Bowers said. “Down here we have a beachier bar: most people don’t want classier cocktails. Upstairs you can be real creative and bring in different liqueurs, juices and mixes and get really creative and actually be a bartender and mixologist [rather] than just pouring rum and coke.” “You can’t beat the atmosphere up there,” Brink said. “It’s like you’re stepping back in time.” According to Brink, there were very little renovations involved, as he wanted to keep the Prohibition theme, though there are several projects un-

The National Association of Realtors has announced that Bernie Flax, a Realtor from Ocean Pines, has become a Sterling R Major investor in the Realtors Political Action Committee. RPAC is a national bipartisan grassrootsbased political advocacy organization that works to protect the real estate industry and the dream of homeownership for Ocean Pines Bernie Flax residents and across the country. Flax has supported RPAC for 12 years and has been a member of the National Association of Realtors since 2006. She currently holds the position of president-elect for the Coastal Association of Realtors, and is the owner/broker of EXIT Realty At The Beach in Ocean Pines. Since 1969, RPAC has promoted the election of pro-real estate candidates across the United States. The purpose of RPAC is to elect officials who understand and support the interests of real estate professionals and their home buying, selling and investing clients. RPAC uses its resources to seek to elect candidates that understand and support real estate, and to develop public policies that allow consumers to own homes and build their communities See BRIEFS Page 49

derway. “We want to paint some stuff, we want to change things here and there, [and] do our own spin on it but we love the old Prohibition feel you have in there and it just spoke to us,” Brink said. “It was already cool and ready to go as it is.” The restaurant is on the Boardwalk and has a direct view of the ocean, with large panel windows to take in the view. While the bistro is far more casual and beach themed, the new steakhouse will be a place for foodies and those who want a memorable experience. “Upstairs is definitely higher end. If you show up in shorts and a polo, you’ll feel OK,” Brink said. “But you can also show up in a suit and tie and you’d feel completely fine. We cater to everybody who loves good food. “Down in the bistro; it’s a beach. It’s a tiki bar. Have fun. Wear whatever you want,” Brink continued. In addition, the restaurant is taking part in the No Straws Summer program, to reduce plastic waste. Customers can still receive a straw if they ask for one, and the straws used are biodegradable. Brink plans on offering breakfast

buffets Thursdays through Sundays by the time the restaurant is completely open officially in a few weeks. He also has arranged to hire piano players to perform in the lounge Thursday through Saturday as well as some special events throughout the summer. The restaurant has a front-row seat to the annual Ocean City Air Show, held next Saturday and Sunday. “You sit on our deck, you’re at the air show,” Brink said. “Every Sunday at the Tiki bar I personally run karaoke. [There are] 375,000 songs to choose from,” Brink said. “We do drink specials the whole night. And we do $2 Tuesdays. All domestic beers and all rail drinks are $2 from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.” A ribbon-cutting ceremony to formally open the steakhouse will take place on Thursday, June 21 at 4 p.m. A full menu will be unveiled at the official opening. Restaurant hours will be from 4-10 p.m. on weekdays, and 9 a.m. to 11p.m. on weekends. Parking is free at the Beach Plaza hotel for dining customers. Reservations can be made at 410289-6213 or go to https://www.ocean13ocmd.com.

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This 3BR/2BA home is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City and is steps away to the beach, shopping and restaurants. Features include an enclosed porch, an open floorplan, a kitchen island/breakfast bar and a floored attic.Community amenities include pools, tennis, min. golf and more all for just $247.50/yr. Listed at $279,000 furnished.

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Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 49

BUSINESS BRIEFS Continued from Page 48 through commercial investment.

Top advisor Deeley Insurance Group announces Travis Hinman, CRIS, as its top client advisor for April. Hinman is a Commercial Lines client advisor designing risk management plans to safeguard his client’s assets. For over nine years, he has worked with Travis Hinman business owners to build insurance programs that not only fit their immediate needs but help their businesses grow. He specializes in transportation, construction and manufacturing risks. With offices located in Willards, Maryland and Lewes, Delaware, Deeley Insurance Group is a privately held independent insurance agency specializing in employee benefits, business and personal insurances. To learn more, visit deeleyinsurance.com.

Ribbon cutting Join Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and distinguished guests along with owners Brian and Lisa Bolter for the official ribbon cutting to open two new restaurants in mid-town Ocean City. DRY 85, named one of the Top 40

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Whisky Bars in America by Whisky Advocate, is an industrial lofty space in Annapolis focused on bourbon, craft beer, craft cocktails and gourmet comfort food. Red Red Wine Bar, with its eclectic Bohemian vibe was named winner of the 2015 Best Wine & Beverage Program in Maryland by the Restaurant Association. The Bolters expanded to the beach with two new locations. DRY 85 OC and Red Red Wine Bar OC, located on 48th Street oceanside, are open for lunch and dinner every day at 11:30 a.m. Breakfast is offered daily during the summer at 9 a.m. Both will operate year round. For more information, visit dry85.com and redredwinebar.com.

New COO Hospitality and development specialist Blue Water Development announces Dean Geracimos as chief operations of-

ficer. He will be based out of Blue Water’s corporate office in Berlin. Geracimos, a long-time Ocean City native, will primarily advise on day-to-day operations, acquisitions and building internal infrastructure models to streamline and standardize transitions across Blue Water’s exDean Geracimos panding portfolio. Geracimos has vast and varied experience helping companies make the monumental leap from small businesses to competitively thriving organizations. His resume includes restaurants, medical imaging facilities, shopping centers and more, in addition to starting the top golf package company in its market. Through his diverse expertise, he became a sought-after business consultant and eventually progressed to town

councils, serving as mayor of Chesapeake City, Maryland for three terms. Founded by Jack and Todd Burbage in 2002, Blue Water Development is a real estate developer specializing in commercial and hospitality properties operating in Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Maine, New Jersey and North Carolina. Learn more at http://www.bluewaterdevelopmentcorp.com.

Company leaders The Mark Fritschle Group at Condominium Realty, LTD., has announced its listing and sales leaders for May. Top listing agents by units are: Joy Snyder, Kevin Decker and Dave Whittington. They were also top listing agents by volume. Top settled units are: Decker, Snyder, and Joe Wilson and Sheri Smith. Top settled by volume are: Decker, Wayne Phillips and Snyder.


PAGE 50

Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

Realtors meet with elected officials in D.C. (June 8, 2018) During the National Association of Realtors (NAR) Annual Legislative Meetings & Trade Expo in Washington, D.C., Realtors from across the country, including members from the Coastal Association of Realtors, traveled to Capitol Hill to meet with their federal elected officials. The purpose of the visits is to share with elected officials NAR’s legislative priorities, which this year include strong net neutrality protections, long term reauthorization of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), tax policy improvements and equal access to housing opportunities. NAR believes that net neutrality is important to small, main street businesses – like Realtors – that depend on open Internet access every day to run their busi-

nesses and serve their customers. Congress must enact common-sense “rules of the road” that will ensure the Internet is an open, competitive place for consumers and for businesses. Realtors went to Capitol Hill to encourage their elected officials to support legislation that ensures Internet service providers may not block, throttle, or establish paid prioritization, and must be transparent in their network management practices. Members also advocated for the 21st Century Flood Reform Act, which would comprehensively reform and reauthorize the NFIP for five years. As it stands, the program is set to lapse on July 31. A lapse in the NFIP inhibits about 40,000 property sales per month.

As implementation of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act moves forward, NAR said it’s clear that Congress has more work to do to address significant tax law problems that unfairly inhibit current and prospective homeowners. On Capitol Hill, Realtors asked legislators to double the state and local tax deduction limit for married couples, index tax limits to inflation, make the exclusion for forgiven mortgage debt permanent, and extend the deduction for energy-efficient commercial buildings. In observance of the 50th anniversary of the Fair Housing Act, Realtors asked their legislators to support a bill that will protect Americans from housing discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

The NAR Code of Ethics was amended in 2009 to include sexual orientation as a fair housing protection and amended again in 2014 to include gender identity. The LGBTQ community continues to face discrimination in housing, and Realtors feel these protections need to be added to the Fair Housing Act. “It’s always great to meet with our legislators on Capitol Hill,” said Coastal President Joel Maher. “This year, we took them some very pertinent issues that really impact our industry and the lives of our clients. We were proud to present our legislators with the facts, and we hope they will stand with us to support homeownership.” For more information about CAR, visit www.coastalrealtors.org.

Coldwell Banker collects items for food drive one interested in donating may drop off food to the Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage branch office locations on 64th Street and 120th Street in Ocean City. At the end of the campaign, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage will distribute the donations to regional food pantries. The need for food donations is dire over the summer months as sup-

plies have been depleted from winter and after Easter. The Healthy Food Drive is unique in its focus on nutritious foods. Oftentimes, low-income families do not have access to healthy foods that support children’s needs and development. “The summer months are one of the most difficult times for food pantries to stay stocked, so this is a great opportu-

nity for our network to come together and help keep our communities fed with nutritious meals,” said Lynn Mauk, branch vice president of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage’s Ocean City offices. “I encourage everyone that is able to contribute to join us in donating food to a truly worthy cause.” For more information, visit ColdwellBankerHomes.com.

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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

JUNE 8, 2018 JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BORDERLINKS I CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-18-000117, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Borderlinks Condominium building complex located at 438 Ocean Parkway. Berlin. MD 21811, the following described property located in the Community of Ocean Pines, in the Third Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, JUNE 22,2018 AT 9:00 A.M. Units Ak-11 Ar-18 Bz-52 Aa-1 Bu-47 Ba-27 Be-31 Bj-36 Aq-17 Ab-2 Bz-52 Aa-1 Ak-11 Be-31 Be-31 Bz-52 Ab-2 Bi-35 Bj-36 Bk-37 Be-31 Bo-41 Bi-35 Aa-1

Time Intervals Wk 23 Wk 42 Wk 18 Wk 21 Wk 35 Wk 22 Wk 21 Wk 17 Wk 14 Wk 35 Wk 20 Wk 32 Wk 35 Wk 22 Wk 24 Wk 39 Wk 33 Wk 35 Wk 21 Wk 21 Wk 9 Wk 20 Wk 21 Wk 24

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Borderlinks I Condominium as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and By-Laws recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and subsequent Time-Share Instruments as to each condominium unit, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2018 maintenance fee, if applicable, and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratifi-

cation by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-6/7/3t _________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BORDERLINKS I CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-18-000119, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Borderlinks Condominium building complex located at 438 Ocean Parkway. Berlin. MD 21811, the following described property located in the Community of Ocean Pines, in the Third Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 2018 AT 9:15 A.M. Units Ad-4 An-14 Bc-29 Ag-7 Bq-43 Ad-4 Ad-4 Ag-7 Br-44 Bf-32 Bx-50 Bc-29 Bq-43 Al-12 Aj-10 An-14 Br-44 By-51 Bg-33 By-51

Time Intervals Wk2 Wk23 Wk35 Wk31 Wk31 Wk35 Wk 11 Wk39 Wk26 Wk32 Wk33 Wk42 Wk30 Wk32 Wk33 Wk46 Wk25 Wk23 Wk34 Wk37

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Borderlinks I Condominium as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and By-Laws recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and subsequent Time-Share Instruments as to each condominium unit, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be

excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2018 maintenance fee, if applicable, and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-6/7/3t _________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BORDERLINKS I CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-18-000118, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Borderlinks Condominium building complex located at 438 Ocean Parkway. Berlin. MD 21811, the following described property located in the Community of Ocean Pines, in the Third Election District of Worcester County. Maryland, on FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 2018 AT 9:00 A.M. Units Ba-27 Ae-5 Ak-11 Bk-37 Ar-18 Bk-37 Aa-1 Ab-2 Bu-47 Ar-18 As-19 Aa-1 Ak-11 As-19 Ab-2 As-19 Aq-17 Aa-1 Bv-48 Be-31 Bu-47 Ar-18

Time Intervals Wk25 Wk34 Wk24 Wk31 Wk37 Wk38 Wk33 Wk 14 Wk29 Wk1 Wk39 Wk22 Wk6 Wk22 Wk 15 Wk16 Wk28 Wk 10 Wk26 Wk25 Wk22 Wk22

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bor-

PAGE 51 derlinks I Condominium as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and By-Laws recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and subsequent Time-Share Instruments as to each condominium unit. and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2018 maintenance fee, if applicable, and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-5/31/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, MD 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 209 TEAL CIR. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Perry Masciana, dated March 23, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4902, folio 519 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JUNE 18, 2018 AT 2:35 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of


Ocean City Today / Public Notices

PAGE 52 record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $57,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-615103). Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-5/31/3t _________________________________

LEGAL ADVERTISING

Call: 410-723-6397 Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net

JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BORDERLINKS I CONDOMINIUM OCEAN PINES, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-18-000120, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Borderlinks Condominium building complex located at 438 Ocean Parkway. Berlin. MD 21811, the following described property located in the Community of Ocean Pines, in the Third Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 2018 AT 9:15 A.M. Units Al-12 Aj-10 Au-21 Bb-28 Bf-32 Aj-10 Bn-40 Bn-40 Bn-40 Bq-43 By-51 Bg-33 Aj-10 Bx-50 Bx-50 By-51 Bc-29 Bx-50 Bx-50 Ad-4 Bc-29

Time Intervals Wk22 Wk32 Wk35 Wk37 Wk 11 Wk27 Wk29 Wk42 Wk26 Wk23 Wk21 Wk33 Wk31 Wk29 Wk30 Wk31 Wk27 Wk22 Wk2 Wk21 Wk21

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Borderlinks I Condominium as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and By-Laws recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and subsequent Time-Share Instruments as to each condominium unit, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2018 maintenance fee, if applicable, and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence: otherwise, the

deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-5/31/3t _________________________________ Buonassissi, Henning & Lash, P.C. 1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300 Reston, Virginia 20190 (703) 796-1341

TRUSTEE’S SALE 11700 Coastal Highway T-1109 Ocean City, MD 21842 In execution of the Deed of Trust dated June 21, 2005 and recorded June 27, 2005 in Liber 4467, folio 603, among the Worcester County land records, the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom may act, will offer for sale at public auction on June 11, 2018, at 2:00 PM, at the front of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, the following property: ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforementioned Deed of Trust. TAX ID: 10-146933 The property and improvements will be sold in “as is” physical condition without warranty of any kind and subject to all conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same. TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder’s deposit of $28,500.00 by cashier’s/certified check required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust. Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. The balance of the purchase price together with interest thereon at 2.375% per annum from date of sale to receipt of purchase price by Trustees must be paid by cashier’s check within 10 days after final ratification of sale. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. All real estate taxes and other public charges and/or assessments to be adjusted as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, any condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the date of sale shall be purchaser’s responsibility. Purchaser shall pay all transfer, documentary and recording taxes/fees and all other settlement costs. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title

JUNE 8, 2018 for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the Deed of Trust including but not limited to determining whether prior to sale a bankruptcy was filed; a forbearance, repayment or other agreement was entered into; or the loan was reinstated or paid off. In any such event this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit without interest. This communication is from a debt collector. (81634) Richard A. Lash, David A. Rosen, Douglas W. Callabresi, and Robert E. Kelly, Substitute Trustees Auctioneers: Alex Cooper Auctioneers 908 York Road Towson, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-5/24/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 3701 COASTAL HWY., UNIT #331 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October 5, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5007, Folio 5 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $162,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JUNE 19, 2018 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit 331, in Building “G”, Phase III, in the “Bradley on the Bay Condominium” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in


JUNE 8, 2018 the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 314247-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD.,

Ocean City Today / Public Notices TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-5/31/3t _________________________________ GUY R. AYRES III AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, P.A. 6200 Coastal Highway, Suite 200 Ocean City, Maryland 21842

NOTICE OF TAX SALE OF PROPERTY IN THE TENTH ELECTION DISTRICT, SUB-DISTRICTS 101-109, WORCESTER COUNTY, OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Town of Ocean City, Maryland municipal taxes and assessments under levies of the tax years 2016/2017 and 2017/2018 on the properties hereinafter described being due and in arrears and unpaid; and in order to compel the payment of the same, together with interest thereon, Attorney and Advertising Fees of $258, and the costs of attending the proceeding, as provided by law, by virtue of the power and authority vested in me as the City Manager and Collector of municipal taxes in the Tenth Election District, Worcester County, Ocean City, Maryland as provided by the Acts of the General Assembly of Maryland (Tax-Property Article Section 14-808 et seq. of the Annotated Code of Maryland), the undersigned City Manager and Collector of Taxes, will sell at public auction, at City Hall, 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland, on FRIDAY, JUNE 15, 2018 AT THE HOUR OF 10:00 A.M. the below described properties: Item 1 10-131588 and 2685318780: Described as Balmoral Cove V Condominium, Unit A B 2, Assessed to Thomas R. Bender & Lynn C. Bender, Assessed Value $175,900, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,289.13. Item 4 10-267390 and 4381341754: Described as Jockey Beach Club Condominium, Unit 360 B C P 3, Assessed to Joshua L. Bowen III & Martha A. Bowen, Assessed Value $116,400, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $944.17. Item 5 10-309093 and 12377348856: Described as White Marlin Condominium, Unit A 202, Assessed to William P. Cabada & Christina M. Cabada, Assessed Value $213,600, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,215.74. Item 7 10-289858 and 4754745672: Described as Siesta Villas Condominium, Unit 101 N, Assessed to David Carabelli, Assessed Value $115,800, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,038.74. Item 12 10-173086 and 13707325720: Described as Orleans Court Condominium, Unit 67, Assessed to Federal National Mortgage Association, Assessed Value $101,300, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $925.18. Item 13 10-327431 and 5250351086: Described as Lighthouse Cove Condominium, Unit B, As-

sessed to Craig L. Garfield, Jr., Assessed Value $165,600, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,222.00. Item 16 10-258669 and 12488540198: Described as Plat Montego Bay Section 6C, Lot 339 3600 Sq Ft, Assessed to Michael O. Green, Assessed Value $125,000, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,165.76. Item 18 10-432081 and 10461167691: Described as Coral Seas Condominium, Unit 210, Assessed to Belinda K. Higgs, Assessed Value $356,800, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $2,359.03. Item 19 10-205417 and 3448931124: Described as El Marlyn Condominium, Unit 3, Assessed to Robert J. Hoffman & Sherry Hoffman, Assessed Value $145,800, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,359.10. Item 22 10-21339 and 3539132386: Described as Rusty Anchor East Condominium, Unit 12, Assessed to Jack M. Irvin, Jr., Assessed Value $245,600, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,300.12. Item 23 10-066786 and 1254377722: Described as Ocean Waye 45 Condominium, Unit 204, Assessed to Richard C. Jackson, Assessed Value $73,400, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $630.59. Item 28 10-289726 and 7281945648: Described as Siesta Villas Condominium, Unit 101 S, Assessed to Douglas M. McClelland, Assessed Value $115,800, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,029.98. Item 30 10-126398 and 13607917896: Described as Golden Sands Club Condominium, Unit 1703, Assessed to Heather Munsterman, Assessed Value $245,000, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,029.78. Item 36 10-425689 and 9908366133: Described as Port Astor at Sunset Island Condominium, Unit 54N, Ph 6, Assessed to Irene J. Polun, Assessed Value $548,100, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,422.84. Item 37 10-118727 and 2465516500: Described as Golden Sands Club Condominium, Unit 1517, Assessed to David L. Rothschild, Neil E. Rothschild & Herman B. Rothschild, Jr., Assessed Value $329,700, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,446.33. Item 38 10-233011 and 6704135746: Described as Light House Village Condominium, Unit 430 P 4, Assessed to Roland A. Ruiz, II, Assessed Value $104,500, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,363.13. Item 43 10-118816 and 7003716516: Described as Atlantis Condominium, Unit 306, Assessed to Bernard Siler, Assessed Value $285,700, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,210.85. Item 44 10-099773 and 2251113194: Described as Bridge Point Condominium, Unit 226 S 3, Assessed to Vallee Arthur Stanley, Assessed Value $258,000, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,448.17. Item 46 10-052823 and 1046575454: Described as Eldorado Condominium, Unit 202, Assessed to

PAGE 53 Robert V. Woolley, Jr. & Rose A. Woolley, Assessed Value $116,700, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $782.93. OCD-5/17/4t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. CHRISTOPHER GALLO LISA GALLO 39 Westfield Circle Ocean Pines A/R/T/A Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-17-000105

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 18th day of May, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 39 Westfield Circle, Ocean Pines A/R/T/A Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 18th day of June, 2018, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 11th day of June, 2018. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $510,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-5/24/3t _________________________________ MARIANNA BATIE ESQ LAW OFFICE OF MARIANNA BATIE 9748 STEPHEN DECATUR HIGHWAY, STE 112 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17405 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF JOHN GRAHAM STALLINGS Notice is given that Belkis N. Mezquita Stallings, 21709 Chandler Drive, Berlin, MD 21811, was on May 17, 2018 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of John Graham Stallings who died on January 17, 2018, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate


Ocean City Today / Public Notices

PAGE 54 of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 17th day of November, 2018. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Belkis N. Mezquita Stallings Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: May 24, 2018 OCD-5/24/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING WORCESTER COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS AGENDA

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018 Pursuant to the provisions of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held before the Board of Zoning Appeals for Worcester County, in the Board Room (Room 1102) on the first floor of the Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland. 6:30 p.m. Case No. 18-26, on the application of Kevin Parsons of Becker Morgan Group, on the lands of the Worcester County Board of Education, requesting an exception from the Forest Conservation Regulations to allow offsite afforestation associated with the proposed reconstruction of the Showell Elementary School in the E-1 Estate District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(k)(2), ZS 1-203(c)(2), and Natural Resources Sections NR 1-412 and NR 1-416, located at 11318 Showell School Road, on the Northeast corner of the intersection with Racetrack Road, Tax Map 15, Parcel 91, in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland.

6:35 p.m. Case No. 18-27, on the lands of Stockyard Inc, requesting a special exception to reconstruct a legally existing non-conforming pylon sign associated with Hooper’s Restaurant and a special exception to relocate and reconstruct a legally existing non-conforming water sports monument sign in the C-2 General Commercial District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(c)(3), ZS 1122(d)(1), ZS 1-210(d)(3), ZS 1-305 and ZS 1-324, located on Ocean Gateway (US Route 50), on the north east corner of Inlet Isle Lane and Ocean Gateway, Tax Map 27, Parcels 569 & 587, in the Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. 6:40 p.m. Case No. 18-30, on the application of Hugh Cropper, IV, Esquire, on the lands of Mark Odachowski, requesting a special exception to establish a seasonal resort development in the R-4 General Residential District and the extension of the R-4 General Residential district boundary no more than 50 feet into the R-2 Suburban Residential District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-110(d), ZS 1-116(c)(3), ZS 1-208(c)(17), ZS 1305 and ZS 1-350, located at 12424 Old Bridge Road (MD Route 707), west of Hastings Lane, Tax Map 26, Parcel 191, Lot C, in the Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. 6:45 p.m. Case No. 18-29, on the application of Mark S. Cropper, Esquire, on the lands of Brooklyn’s Estate, LLC, requesting a special exception for the accessory use of a principal structure or use of land for the commercial hosting of non-agricultural functions and events on a farm, in the A-1 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(c)(3), ZS 1-201(c)(33) and ZS 1-325, located at 10442 Katelyn Lane, approximately 818 feet north of MD Route 90 (Ocean City Expressway), Tax Map 15, Parcel 256, Lot 5, in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. 6:50 p.m. Case No. 18-28, on the application of the Department of Development, Review and Permitting, on the lands of William Topper, requesting an After-the-Fact variance to the Ordinance prescribed right side yard setback from 3 feet to 2.27 feet (an encroachment of 0.73 feet), an Afterthe-Fact variance to the Ordinance prescribed rear yard setback from 5 feet to 4.77 feet (an encroachment of 0.23 feet) and an After-the-Fact variance to the Ordinance prescribed front yard setback from 10 feet to 7.89 feet (an encroachment of 2.11 feet) associated with an existing recreational vehicle in the A-2 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(c)(4), ZS 1202(b)(12) and ZS 1-318(d)(1)B, located at 365 Timberline Circle, approximately 417 feet north of Dolphin Drive, Tax Map 16, Parcel 94, Lot 365, Phase 3, of the White Horse Park Campground Subdivision, in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS OCD-5/31/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS BOARD OF PORT WARDENS Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 106, “Waterways,” Article II – “Shoreline Development” of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Port Wardens Ordinance of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD Thursday June 14, 2018 At 2:00 PM A request has been submitted to instl (2) EZ load, PWC floats w/all assoc poles. Max chwd ext 28’ at 175 Pine Tree Rd Parcel #8020A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Hidden Oak Farm LLC Owner: John Ginder PW18-044 A request has been submitted to instl (1) btlft on (2) exist chwd poles & (2) exist poles, a staircase to water & 4’x6’ triaglr dock extension. Max chwd ext 18’ at 317 N Heron Gull Ct Parcel #6062A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Hidden Oak Farm LLC Owner: Michael Tangora PW18-045 A request has been submitted to instl 53’ of replcmt blkhd, a 5x35’ para dock w/a 6’x23’ pier, & (1) boatlift set up for (2) PWC/s. Max chwd ext 30’ at 314 Oyster Ln Parcel #8020A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Hidden Oak Farm LLC Owner: Nicholas Wunder PW18-046 A request has been submitted to instl (1) btlft & (1) PWC lift w/all assoc poles, modify exist para dock by cutting west end of dock at angle to accept btlft. Max chwd ext 16’ at 10614 Pine Needle Rd Parcel # 1699A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Hidden Oak Farm LLC Owner: Rob Argentieri PW18-047 A request has been submitted to instl (1) elev btlft w/all assoc poles. Max chwd ext 10’ at 310 S Heron Gull Ct Parcel #6070A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Hidden Oak Farm LLC Owner: M & M Builders and Contractors LLC PW18-048 A request has been submitted to move (3) exist piles w/in 5’ of prop line on north & drive 6 addt’l piles, (2) at each to form cluster piles; instl 4 addt’l cluster piles (3 at ea loc) 25’ west of exist dock, max chwd dist of 75’ at 317 Blue Heron Ct. Parcel #5313A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Nolen Graves Owner: Nolen & Mary Graves

JUNE 8, 2018 PW18-049 A request has been submitted to instl 12’x16’ float jetport w/tide mgrs per manuf recom, NTE confines of exist slip. Max chwd distance 20’ comm wlkwy at 205 125th St Slip 428 Parcel #6060A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Ocean City Boatlifts & Marine Construction Inc c/o Permit Ink Owner: William & Kimberly Dockman PW18-050 A request has been submitted to rmve exist 5x40 dock & repr w/vnyl replcmt18” chwd, 72 lf of deter blkhd w/batter pile cross-section & re-constr new 5x40 dock max of 8’ chwd exist blkhd/MHW/MLW at 309 Tuna Ln Parcel # 3307 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: J. Stacey Hart & Associates Inc. Owner: George & Holly Stone PW18-051 A request has been submitted to instl (1) btlft w/assoc piles max 18’ chwd of exist blkhd face/MHW/MLW w/in exist boat slip at 203 S Heron Dr Slip 80 Parcel # 6067A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: J. Stacey Hart & Associates Inc. Owner: James & Lisa Binns PW18-052 A request has been submitted to instl btlft w/poles into exist slip, NTE confines of slip on a 225’ chwd community perp pier at 311 Seabay Ln Unit Slip 6 Parcel # 6702 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Ocean City Boatlifts & Marine Construction Inc c/o Permit Ink Owner: Wade Nixon PW18-053 OCD-5/31/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENT TO WORCESTER COUNTY WATER AND SEWERAGE PLAN TO AMEND THE EDU ALLOCATION TABLE FOR THE MYSTIC HARBOUR SANITARY SERVICE AREA WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND The Worcester County Commissioners will hold a public hearing to consider a requested amendment to the Worcester County Comprehensive Water and Sewerage Plan as submitted by Bob Mitchell, Director of Environmental Programs, on behalf of the Worcester County Commissioners, to amend the Equivalent Dwelling Unit (EDU) Allocation Table for the available sewage treatment capacity in the Mystic Harbour Sanitary Service Area. The proposed amendment seeks to revise the EDU Allocation Table for the Mystic Harbour Service Area to allocate 34 EDU's from the "Infill and Intensification" category in Area 1 (north of the airport) to the Frontier Town Campground category in Area 2 (south of the airport) to accommodate a 101 campsite expansion on the existing campground property. The public hearing on this appli-


JUNE 8, 2018 cation will be held on TUESDAY, JUNE 19, 2018 at 10:20 a.m. in the COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MEETING ROOM Room 1101 County Government Center One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 The case file may be reviewed at the Department of Environmental Programs, Room 1306 - Worcester County Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday (except holidays). Interested parties may also call 410-632-1220, ext. 1601. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-5/31/2t _________________________________ TOWN OF BERLIN

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR ORDINANCE 2018-04 The Mayor and Council of the Town of Berlin will hold a public hearing on Monday, June 11, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. in the Berlin Town Hall Council Chambers, 10 William Street, on Ordinance 2018-04. The public is invited to attend and comment. A copy of the proposed Ordinance is available for inspection in Town Hall, between the hours of 8:30 am and 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday. Ordinance 2018-04 An Ordinance amending the Code of the Town of Berlin, Chapter 22, “Parks and Recreation”, §49.7 to allow the waiver of parks reservation fees for certified non-profit organizations. OCD-5/31/1t _________________________________ AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMOND, P.A. SUITE 200 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 ROBERT J. LEE Plaintiff, v. THOMAS KELSO, et al, Defendants. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO: C-23-CV-18-000113

ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all right of redemption in the following property described below in the State of Maryland, sold by the Collector of Taxes for Worcester County and the State of Maryland to Plaintiff in this proceeding: Item Number: 96, Account Number 03041832, Property Description: LOT B-09-106, 13563 SQ FT, TAIL OF THE FOX DR, PL OCEAN PINES SEC 9; Deed Reference: 873/99, et seq.; Assessed to: Robert E. Warfield & Others. The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts nec-

Ocean City Today / Public Notices essary for redemption have not been paid although more than six (6) months and a day from the date of sale has expired. It is thereupon this 30th day of May, 2018, by the Circuit Court for WORCESTER County: ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks on or before the 2nd day of July, 2018, warning all persons interested in the Property to appear before this Court by the 29th day of July, 2018 and redeem the Property described above and answer the Complaint or thereafter a final Judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption to the Property, and vesting Plaintiff with title, free and clear of all encumbrances. Beau H. Oglesby JUDGE Entered: Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, MD May 30, 2018 True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-6/7/3t _________________________________ James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842 STEPHEN VIQUEIRA 16608 Gaines Road Broad Run, VA 20137 Plaintiff vs. ESTATE OF MILDRED SHOWELL GINN c/o Donda Lee Showell, Pers. Rep. 1101 Maple Street Delmar, MD 21875 and WORCESTER COUNTY c/o Maureen Howarth, Esq. 1 West Market Street Room 1103 Snow Hill, MD 21863 and ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY described as 402 Dighton Avenue Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-18-000097

ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption from the tax sale on the following property located in Worcester County, Maryland, sold by Phillip G. Thompson, Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and for Worcester County, to the plaintiff, the parcel of land described as follows: 100’ X 220’, 402 Dighton Avenue, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, Parcel Number 02016060, Deed Ref. 1947/294, said property being assessed to Mildred Showell Ginn (deceased). The Complaint states among other things that the amount neces-

sary for redemption has not been paid. The sale was held on May 19, 2017, and more than six (6) months has passed since that date. It is thereupon this 26th of April, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for three consecutive weeks, on or before the 26th of June, 2018, and redeem the property and answer the Complaint, or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property and vesting in the Plaintiff title to said property, free and clear of all liens and encumbrances. Brian D. Shockley JUDGE Entered: Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, MD April 27, 2018 True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-6/7/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for a Class: "B" BEERWINE-LIQUOR License: 7 Day. By: Robert J. Masone, M.D., 29471 Eagle Crest Road, Milton, DE 19968; Ricky A. Johnson, 12 Decatur Street. Berlin, MD 21811. For: WOCMD, LLC For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Squarz Pizza 2 12744 Ocean Gateway Ocean City, Maryland 21842 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: June 20, 2018 @ 1:00 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. OCD-6/12/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for an Upgrade in Type from BEER-WINE to BEER-WINELIQUOR and Request to Expand Licensed Property Class: "B" BEER-WINE-LIQUOR License: 7 Day. By: Jason Everett Ball, 37909 Eagle Lane, Selbyville, DE 19975; Krista Elizabeth Ball, 37909 Eagle Lane, Selbyville, DE 19975; Teresa Marie Mclain, 3701 217D Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842. For: Café Mirage, LLC For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Café Mirage 12817 Coastal Highway Ocean City, Maryland 21842 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Cen-

PAGE 55 ter, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: June 20, 2018 @ 1:10 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. OCD-6/12/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for a Class: "B" BEERWINE-LIQUOR License: 7 Day. By: Sophia Christian, 1334 Ocean Parkway, Berlin, MD 21811; Christopher B. Christian, 1334 Ocean Parkway, Berlin, MD 21811. For: YCPSB, LLC For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Nori Sushi Bar & Grill 11403 Coastal Highway Ocean City, Maryland 21842 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: June 20, 2018 @ 1:25 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. OCD-6/12/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Application has been made by the Undersigned for a Class: "B" BEERWINE License: 7 Day. By: John Alfred Cascino. 6950 Grenada Drive, Salisbury. MD 21804; Louis John Smith, 11800 Red Cedar Lane, Berlin, MD 21811. For: JA Cascino, LLC For the premises known as and located at: T/A: Vinny’s Pizza & Italian Grill 2500 A Philadelphia Avenue Ocean City, Maryland 21842 There will be a public hearing on the application in the Board Room, Room 1102 in the Government Center, Snow Hill, Maryland, on: June 20, 2018 @ 1:40 P.M. The Board welcomes written or oral comment at said public hearing from any interested party. OCD-6/12/2t _________________________________ SMALL ESTATE

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 17434 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF DEIRDRE BYRNE Notice is given that Terrence Byrne, 8706 Caribbean Drive, Ocean City, MD 21842, was on May 25, 2018 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Deirdre Byrne who died on May 14, 2018, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal represen-


PAGE 56 tative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Terrence Byrne Personal Representative True Test Copy

Ocean City Today / Public Notices Register of Wills for Worcester County Charlotte K. Cathell One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: June 7, 2018 OCD-6/7/1t _________________________________ JAN-PAUL LUKAS ESQ STEVEN D. COX, LLC 105 WEST MAIN STREET SALISBURY, MD 21801

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17437 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MARC ALAN ZEVE Notice is given that Kathy Ann Zeve, 206 South Washington Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863, was on May 29, 2018 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Marc Alan Zeve who died on May 27, 2018, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 29th day of November, 2018. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Kathy Ann Zeve Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County

JUNE 8, 2018 One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: June 07, 2018 OCD-6/7/3t _________________________________ JACOB DEAVEN, ESQ. PARKER, SIMON & KOKOLIS, LLC 110 N. WASHINGTON STREET, SUITE 500 ROCKVILLE, MD 20850 SMALL ESTATE

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 17222 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF PATTI JEAN FERRAER Notice is given that Thomas J. Kokolis Esq., 110 N. Washington Street, Suite 500, Rockville, MD 20850, was on May 29, 2018 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Patti Jean Ferraer who died on December 13, 2017, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Thomas J. Kokolis Esq. Personal Representative True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Charlotte K. Cathell One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: June 07, 2018 OCD-6/7/1t _________________________________


Commentary

A pointless tariff with bad results

Dear Rep. Andy Harris, In March, after the U.S. Department of Commerce imposed a second round of preliminary tariffs on Canadian newsprint, which constitutes about two-thirds of this country’s supply, we asked you as our congressman to consider the damage that would do to newspapers large and small. You replied that government has a duty to correct trade imbalances, implying that Canadian newsprint dumping is causing U.S. newsprint manufacturers to lose sales. With a final tariff that could raise paper prices by up 30 percent on the table this September, we repeat that is not the case. This country’s paper producers, which oppose these import duties, are leaving the newsprint business because newspapers are using less of it every year. The New York-based hedge fund, One Rock Capital, must have known that when it bought the struggling North Pacific Paper Co. in Longview, Washington in October 2016, because it filed its unfair trade complaint just 11 months later. The question, then, is whether One Rock is asking for government help because it didn’t understand the market, or is it using government to beef up its investment for purposes of profit later? Meanwhile, newspapers need reasonably priced newsprint to survive and, on this level, to continue to serve as the main conduit of community information. That’s why we’re wondering if this tariff proposition truly is about fair trade at all, since trying to correct a sales imbalance by forcing buyers out of business doesn’t make sense. Maybe the government wants to punish newspapers, or it’s backing a hedge fund to the detriment of everyone else, or it’s another way to strike at friendly Canada in pursuit of some other goal. Whatever the reason, higher paper costs will kill scores of newspapers and cost thousands of jobs. On June 14, newspaper representatives will visit the capital to explain how these tariffs will aggravate, not improve, the paper products situation. We ask you to listen to them and to help us protect the 18 jobs that we provide. We don’t pretend to know much about trade or economics, but it does seem illogical to believe that declining sales of anything can be fixed by raising the price.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR ............................................ Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli ASSOCIATE EDITORS .......... Josh Davis, Brian Gilliland STAFF WRITERS .................. Greg Ellison, Morgan Pilz ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea .......................................................... Chantal Gaasrud CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ................ Kelly Brown, Kyle Phillips PUBLISHER ...................................... Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net. Copyright 2018

June 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

Page 57

Toothpaste: biting commentary By Stewart Dobson Editor/Publisher I’m not allowed to do the shopping at our house because of my inability to abide by our household Magna (grocery) Carta. These are rules that must be obeyed at any grocery or retail establishment, with the exception of tackle shops and hardware stores, which, as we all know, are the demilitarized zones of male impulse buying. Otherwise, the rules are (1.) Read the labels; (2.) Check the unit prices; (3.) Use coupons; (4.) Do not be distracted by product packaging, as in going to the store for bread, only to spy something cool or shiny and buy it for no reason. (4a.) Example: Billy Bob’s Individually Wrapped Chili Beans. Under extreme circumstances, I am permitted to make emergency runs, as was the case when I was spotted heading for the bathroom with Vice-Grips to address a dwindling supply of toothpaste. “GO … TO … THE … STORE.” Which I did with some excitement, until I entered the bewildering and confoundingly complex Aisle of Oral Hygiene, a feng shui world of mandibular and maxillary marketing from C (Colgate) to shining C (Crest), with lesser members of the club in between. Here’s the thing: a normal person has 32 teeth, while Colgate and Crest by themselves offer 104 different varieties. This means we, or maybe you, since I had a couple yanked to help my dentist with his Go Fund My Lexus Campaign, could brush each tooth three times with a different toothpaste and have enough left over to fight tooth decay in the Philippines. Yes, that island nation has the worst oral hygiene in the world, according to Dentists

PUBLIC EYE

Money Digest, while we are obsessed — obsessed, I tell you — with White, Bright White, Extreme White, Optic White, Optic White Radiant, Optic White Express, Sparkling White, Ultra White, 3D White, 3D White Brilliant, 3D White Luxe and 3D White Diamond Strong. And this is just one row, because also available are Pro-Health (as opposed to anti-health, I suppose), Gum Health, Enamel Health, Stain-Fighting, Good Breath, Minty Breath, Cinnamon Breath, Deep Clean, Fair-to-Middlin’ Clean, Touchy Tooth Sensitive and, lastly, toothpaste that’s anti-cavity. You walk in to buy one simple tube of toothpaste, but find that you need a degree in chemistry and a color chart that shows, incongruously, the various degrees of white, or at least the difference between Ultra, Optic, 3D and Extreme. White is white, I say. If I go to a clothing store to buy a white shirt, I expect it to be white, as in not even a trace of any color. It’s not as if I’m going into a drug store and saying, “I’m looking for something in an Oyster Shell White, or perhaps a Snowflake.” It’s toothpaste, not Sherwin-Williams. And about this 3D White business — will people need special glasses to see my teeth at their best and, if so, will an image of my biters be projected out into the audience to “oohs” and “aahs?” As I worked my way down the aisle, my cell phone rang and I put it to my ear. “Where are you? You’ve been gone for four hours!” “I know. I’m reading the labels and I’m now between Super Glow Tooth Rust Inhibitor and Superbly Sensitive.” “Just buy something.” “I will, just don’t expect me for dinner.”


Ocean City Today

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JUNE 8, 2018

Snow Hill gov’t building’s Council has mixed feelings security hurt by lightning on Delmarva Power request County estimates repairs at more than $49K for key scan control panels

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (June 8, 2018) Flooding wasn’t the only aftereffect of the several inches of rain this area has received during the past few weeks, as the county revealed a lightning strike had compromised building security at the State’s Attorney’s Office, the Government Center and the County Courthouse in Snow Hill. County Emergency Services Director Fred Webster said the electrical storm on May 12 damaged eight key scan control panels used to control building access. “In the meantime, we have no way to change the door time zones for upcoming meetings, add new employees who need door access control or replace [entry cards) for existing employ-

ees who may have lost or broken their cards,” Webster said. “We also have no way to turn off any lost cards or those of employees who may retire or quit.” Webster said the cost to repair the system was about $49,400. According to the proposal from Absolute Security in Salisbury, the cost covers 12 replacement reader units, 12 network communications boards, three power supplies and 24 plug in power supply transformers. The proposal also contains 44 hour of labor to install the replacement security measures. Webster proposed that the commissioners pay for the bill upfront, then use insurance money to pay itself back to get the repairs underway sooner rather than later. Commissioner Chip Bertino asked if the total damage to the county government facilities exceeded $49,000 from the storms, and Webster replied in the affirmative.

We Have Crabs!!!

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Continued from Page 24 switching to annual EMF and noise level tests. “At that point it seems like … overkill,” he said. “There hasn’t been complete compliance [but] I don’t think it’s intentional.” Gehrig also suggested Delmarva Power could put full reports online with web links included in the summary data provided to neighbors. “Some people may not care but some people clearly do,” he said. Councilman Tony DeLuca adopted a clear stance on the topic. “To me, this is as simple as if I lived there, I’d like to have the test done,” he said. Councilman Dennis Dare said Delmarva Power made a serious financial investment when it built the substation. “Years ago, large motors in the wastewater and water plants were failing in the middle of summer because of voltage being dropped,” he said. Once the city explored the issue with the utility provider, Dare said it was discovered the problem related to delivering power cleanly. “They spent a lot of money on this project to try and do that,” he said. The substation provided benefits outside the water treatment plants, Dare said. “Every elevator in Ocean City has a large eclectic motor running it [and] because of this project fewer people are being stuck in elevators,” he said. Dare said five years of tests resulting in readings far below the 2,000

mG threshold should offer sufficient evidence. “It just proves that the electric company wasn’t going to do something that was harmful and put [themselves] in a liable situation,” he said. In lieu of the bi-annual testing, Dare suggested monitoring could be done onsite. “The piece of equipment they’re talking about doesn’t have moving parts,” he said. “It’s not going to break down and explode.” Dare also noted the same EMF frequencies are used for Wi-Fi networks, cell phones, blue tooth devices, microwaves, florescent lamps and vacuums. “We have more exposure at home in our kitchens than we do probably at this substation,” he said. In light of the new ideas discussed, Councilman Wayne Hartman suggested the council remand the topic back to planning and zoning. “It can go back to them [when] there’s seven people there and have these other considerations … available,” he said. Knight agreed to the compromise and withdrew her earlier motion, while also encouraging Delmarva Power to improve communications with adjacent neighbors to alleviate subsequent concerns. “By denying the planning and zoning recommendation, it gives everybody the opportunity to start clean and build that relationship,” she said. “Maybe a year or two from now this will not be a discussion.”

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JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 59

Since 1982

Alarm response reasons disputed Continued from Page 1 past, these calls only warranted a oneengine response.” Larmore said the ambulance unit was added several years ago after a few instances where medical attention was requested by people evacuating high-rise buildings. “After review, we believe that the infrequency of the need for an ambulance does not justify the response,” he said. Whittington contended that the service modification was related to staffing issues partly brought about by the union’s new contract with the city. The three-year labor agreement ratified by both parties last March instituted a new schedule that replaced the department’s long-time schedule of 24 hours on and 72 hours off with a new regimen of two 10-hour day shifts and two 14-hour night shifts, followed by four days off. “In October 2017, with the new schedule that was implemented, your firefighters and paramedics informed you we didn’t think it was best for us, the department or the citizens that we serve and protect,” he said. Whittington added that during this year’s budget hearings, Larmore said in addition to the schedule issue, that federal mandates and an overreliance

on part-timers was causing a staffing shortage. “In April 2018, our fire chief came before you and said he … required additional staff or you faced the possibility of potential reductions in services,” he said. “Tonight, I’m here to share with you your first reduction in services to the citizens and visitors.” Larmore doesn’t see it that way and said the changes in the response matter grew from a review started in January to address an increased reliance on “out of crew,” personnel to answer the continually increasing number of offseason calls for service during 2017. “These are not ‘reductions in service.’ In fact, they are reallocations to provide better service and ensure availability to those calls with a higher priority,” he said. When all scheduled personnel are on calls, Larmore said “out of crew” members are contacted to assist. “The idea … is to never be out of crews [but] it’s really a balancing act to make sure all your people are being utilized,” he said. “We don’t want two or three crews standing around.” Although the city and fire union did agree on a contact, it wasn’t until after negotiations reached an impasse and we’re put back together at the last

hour. The impasse, which the union can’t breach under the current city code, led the union to launch a successful petition drive last year to put the question of binding interest arbitration on this November’s election ballot. The voters will decide on Nov. 8 if Local 4269 should have the option of turning to an independent arbitrator if future labor negotiations reach an impasse. On Monday, Whittington disputed reports that the fire department’s challenge to fill open shifts was tied to a handful of staff on medical leave. “The five persons that were referenced by the town recently have not given dates when they will be out for the summer,” he said. “The number of open shifts, because those people are still on the schedule, is just going to get worse.” Although some have argued union members need time to adjust to the new schedule, Whittington questioned that perspective and argued it was the source of current staffing problems. “We have to face reality — it’s because of the new schedule implementation that requires double the number of staff members to report in any given day,” he said.

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Ocean City Today

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JUNE 8, 2018

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“I need your vote to make the vital change necessary for positive change in District 3.”

When elected, I will encourage the citizens of District 3 to reach out to me with their concerns and questions.

When elected, I will support our first responders on the continuing opioid epidemic facing our county. When elected, I will continue to maintain the high quality of education and safety that we provide our students.

When elected, I will work with my fellow commissioners to implement smart growth and bring new opportunities to Worcester County. Serving in the military for 33 years and working for Worcester County for 13 years, has provided me with the experience, knowledge, and dedication that I need to become your next Commissioner.

Worcester County Commissioner District 3

Thunderbirds confirmed for OC Air Show after fatal crash (June 8, 2018) The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds have confirmed they will perform at the 2018 OC Air Show, scheduled for June 16-17 over the Ocean City beach and Boardwalk. The 11th annual event will also feature a plethora of military performers to include the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. The Thunderbirds resumed their 2018 show season schedule last weekend at Langley Air Force Base. They stood down for several weeks following the crash of Thunderbird #4 during a training flight on April 4. The pilot, Maj. Stephen “Cajun” Del Bagno, was killed. In addition to the Thunderbirds and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, the show lineup will feature a variety of military performers including the C5M Super Galaxy, C-17 Globemaster III, the United States Special Operations Command Para-Commandos Parachute Team and a search and

rescue demonstration by the U.S. Coast Guard. The OC Air Show will be one of only eight air shows in 2018 to feature a flight performance of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. Also known as the Lightning II, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is a single-seat, singleengine, all-weather stealth fighter undergoing final development and testing by the U.S. Department of Defense. The fifth generation combat aircraft is designed to perform ground attack, aerial intelligence and air defense missions. The C-5M Super Galaxy and C-17 Globemaster III, both from the 436th Airlift Wing based at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware, will each fly on one day only. The C-17 will make an appearance on June 16 and the C-5M on June 17. For more information about the 2018 OC Air Show, visit http://ocairshow.com/ or follow the show on Facebook.

Skytypers to feature new show

(June 8, 2018) The GEICO Skytypers Air Show Team has prepared a new demonstration for the Ocean City Air Show on June 16-17. The resort show will be the ninth stop this season for the squadron of World War II-era aircraft. The Skytypers fly six SNJs powered by 600-horsepower Pratt and Whitney engines. As WWII training aircraft, the SNJs were designed to perform all the maneuvers of fighter planes from the same era, but at slower speeds. “The SNJs flown by our team were originally used as training aircraft for WWII pilots,” said Long Island resident and Team Flight Leader Larry Arken. “We consider it an honor to

demonstrate the amazing abilities of these vintage warbirds on behalf of our sponsor, GEICO, while sharing some rarely seen aviation history with air show crowds. Now more than 75 years old, the SNJ-2 is a testament to the engineering genius of that era. These aircraft are a dream to fly.” A majority of the team’s low-level flying demonstration takes place in front of the crowd, as the team executes ,pre than 20 tactical maneuvers during its 18-minute performance. “We are excited to reveal a new routine to our supporters for the 2018 Air Show Season,” said lead solo pilot Steve Salmirs, who choreographed the Skytypers’ new demonstration for this season.


JUNE 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 61

The Pine Tones Chorus will present its annual spring concert at the Community Church of Ocean Pines, on Route 589 and Beauchamp Road, on Sunday, beginning at 3 p.m.

Pine Tones spring concert, Sun. Opp (June 8, 2018) The Pine Tones Chorus will present its spring concert at the Community Church of Ocean Pines, on Route 589 and Beauchamp Road, on Sunday, beginning at 3 p.m. Tickets cost $10 and can be purchased at the door. The concert celebrates the 50th anniversary of Ocean Pines and features music from the 1968 era when the Ocean Pines community was founded. Songs from the Beatles, and Simon & Garfunkel were smash hits of those days and still have wide appeal, such as “Let It Be” and “Bridge Over Troubled Water.” Other award-winning selections of that year include “Up Up and Away” by the Johnny Mann Singers and “Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You” by Frankie Valli. Fans of stage and screen will recall “Consider Yourself” from the show Oliver. The lively novelty song “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang” will include some stagecraft touches. “The concert offers an enjoyable trip down memory lane,” said chorus president Dave Holloway said. “With

so many of my traditional favorite songs, it’s difficult to name the very best one, but if I must chose it would be ‘Michelle,’ as sung by the men of the chorus.” June Todd is the chorus director and Jenny Anderson is the group’s pianist. Featured musicians will include Tom Baione on string bass, Becca Doughty on drums and Bob Palladino playing jazz piano. This instrumental trio will begin playing about 10 minutes before the concert. The Pine Tones Chorus includes 50 singers from Ocean Pines, Ocean City and nearby areas. The chorus has been entertaining local audiences in the Ocean Pines and Ocean City areas for more than 30 years. For additional information, call Holloway at 410-641-5672, or Todd at 410-2897373. Funding for chorus activities comes from ticket sales as well as the Worcester County Arts Council, Maryland State Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. These organizations are dedicated to cultivating a vibrant cultural community where the arts thrive.

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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Mitrecic objects to resort’s share of budget Continued from Page 1 why, he asked, wouldn’t the county jump at the chance to add another $100,000 into the mix? Those businesses, Mitrecic contends, benefit from zip-code-based advertising the resort spends money on, so the remedy is clear. “We might need to pursue a separate zip code and marketing plan,” he said. As for the security features, called bollards or low solid posts to prevent unauthorized vehicle access, Mitrecic said the county increased Ocean Pines’ police department funding, while the proper municipalities in Worcester get nothing toward police. Finally, he talked about the tax differential. “Ocean City is getting $90,000 less than it did last year. If Ocean City wins its court case, it may not want a piece of

the $7 million, it might get it all, and then you’ll have to explain why tax bills in the county went up. You’ll have no one to blame but yourselves,” Mitrecic said. The resort is seeking a court order declaring that it is entitled to a tax differential or tax setoff from the county for services the county provides but the city doesn’t use because it has its own version. Among the things Ocean City and Worcester County can’t agree on is the value of the services. The results of studies performed by each government are millions of dollars apart. Other commissioners had problems with the budget document, with the funding decisions, or with the criticism they’ve received — mostly by nonprofits and employees of nonprofits — but voted for the budget anyway.

Commissioner Ted Elder, who made the “feral cats” comparison last month, addressed the criticism from Mitrecic and the public during his turn to talk. “You don’t know my story of when I was young and making minimum wage. I managed to buy my first home, and it was a struggle to find the money to afford heat,” he said. “All of the nonprofits do good work.” The Art League of Ocean City saw funding it expected to receive cut this year, as did the Delmarva Discovery Center in Pocomoke City and Furnace Town outside of Snow Hill, but it was the art league that drew the most discussion. “The fact of the matter is they had a deal before I came on here,” Elder said. “They got $100,000 or $20,000 over five years. The fact is it went for six years. When does that time run out?

“We have our hands in the pockets of all of the taxpayers. When I went to work starting out, I had a peanut butter sandwich and drank water from the fountain. I take my money to pay for nonprofits,” he said. “I donate hundreds — thousands to nonprofits. Not taxpayer money, my money. I decide what to do with my money.” As for the taxpayer’s money, little had changed since the last work session held in mid-May. There was a surplus of about $830,000 generated from cuts the commissioners made at a previous work session in May, and that was spent on two dump trucks with snowplow attachments, a road-grader and a contribution to county employee retirement benefits, as well as some other small purchases. After those purchases and after getting in all the final numbers, there was still a surplus of $117,700, which was added to the Benefit and Insurance Contingency fund. Instead of funding the municipalities via revenue sharing or a percentage-based method, Worcester County provides towns with unrestricted grants — lump sum payments they can use for whatever purpose the town chooses. Ocean City’s grant was increased by almost $122,000 this year, while Berlin, Snow Hill and Pocomoke City all got a $10,000 bump to their unrestricted grants, bringing them to $465,000 each. Berlin had no special requests or projects this year. Snow Hill got half of the money needed to repave Coulbourne Lane, but also lost out on its bid to have additional funding from the county in lieu of tax payments on property. Because Snow Hill is the county seat, county offices take up real estate that would otherwise belong to the town and be charged taxes on its use. Snow Hill calculates this loss of revenue at around $320,000 per year, while the county pays the town $150,000 per year. Pocomoke City asked the county to help fund its ongoing water pipe replacement project, which is supposed to correct the town’s long-standing issues with sediment laden and unpleasant smelling drinking water. The town asked for $55,000 to help complete the project, but this request was denied. Ocean Pines, despite being the largest population center in the county, is also not an incorporated municipality, so its funding works differently. It does not get an unrestricted grant, but certain requests are filled on case-bycase bases. The Ocean Pines Association, the governing body of Ocean Pines, requested additional funding for road and bridge repairs, as well as improved police aid. While the roads and bridge funding was eliminated, the county did slightly increase its police grant.


JUNE 8, 2018

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Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

RAVENS PARADE A parade float for Roost 79, Windsor Mills, drives down Baltimore Avenue during the Ravens parade, last Saturday. (Left) Members of the Baltimore Marching Ravens, from left, Carolyn Stancoff, Dylan Cushner, Ian Fink, Chris O, and Rusty Perrin, play the Ravens theme song as floats go along Baltimore Avenue. MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

PAGE 67

From the desk of: Ed Tinus

Age: 59 years Occu: Master Upholsterer, Universal Mechanical T Te ech

Why I am seeking office:

For God, Country, and Community. T To o serve with transparent, interactive, representation. We have the technology for all voters to securely be engaged with the political process. We will have an App for your smart devices, vehicle that will drive you to the open doors of legislation in Annapolis from the comfort of your own home, download Bills and take an active roll with digesting the verbiage. Citizens and government working together interacting on your Rights, Laws, T Ta axes, returning more power to the people of our community. Regardless of your party affiliation. T To o protect the services for our DD 214 Veterans as well our first responders, they are my real heroes. T To o serve with honesty, integrity, and morals to lead us into a Better Maryland. Praying that my Trust in God, as a Forth Degree Knight of Columbus, guides me to represent you well. Amen.

Three issues and where I stand:

1: Voting integrity, every election cycle some of our votes are mishandled, lost, or simply not counted. The archaic method of voting has outgrown itself. The SBE does their very best trying to upload paper ballots to integrate with our technology. A few basic measures can make your votes more secure with little cost. That all forms of photo I.D. from MV VA A will have U.S. citizenship displayed, that your voting registration is swipe stripe coded on the bottom back. This way when you move your voting registration it is automatically transferred. Even in the event of death as your license expires so does your voting status. The merchant processing equipment can be adapted to this I.D. process, minimizing the cost and time 2: Our Constitutional Rights are undermined and disregarded. Ex: Our new law for gun control HB 1302 violates several laws. Our representatives have overstepped the boundaries of what the Maryland Constitution allows them to enact a law of this Constitutional nature. We the People through a popular vote must first amend the Maryland Constitution granting our General Assembly the right to do so. The Republic and society has no checks and balances in place to hold our elected officials accountable. With the Ed App a new level of communication will allow the voters to have a voice of repeal. We must not make laws that break laws. 3: Protecting Social Security, restoring the Chesapeake Bay, funding our first responders and education needs. T To o reduce taxes through wiser spending.

In closing:

We stand at the edge of a great divide, on one side is our traditional method of representation. Where Wayne H offers his O.C. councilman experience of regulations, fines, and taxes to give him the ability to vote for you in Annapolis. Remember the taxpayers of Worcester County are paying for 50% of the inlet dredging. Joe S stands on this traditional side also. Working as a Hogan appointed DNR agent to follow the leadership of Mr. Hogan. Mr. Hogan signed HB 1302 into law, the unconstitutional gun regulations. Joe states that he will protect your gun rights? Ed Tinus offers the leadership into real, effective change. Standing steadfast, calling for the evolution of representation through technology, where citizens and government work together for a Better Maryland. Both parties do not want to lose power to the voters for intervention. I never ask for donations therefore I am not beholden to any special interest. The voters will hold me accountable.

Vote Ed Tinus for Delegate 38C Vo united-us.org

Paid for by Friends of Ed Tinus , Curtis Andrews, Treasurer


Ocean City Today

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JUNE 8, 2018

Missing man found dead in bay canal Monday afternoon

JOSH DAVIS/OCEAN CITY TODAY

BALCONY FIRE Ocean City Fire Department personnel on Wednesday respond to an apparent deck chair fire at the Bonita Beach Hotel on 81st Street.

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (June 8, 2108) After he was reported missing on Sunday, the body of Cesar Alcides Martinez Saravia, 23, of Montgomery County, was discovered in a bayside canal near 67th Street Monday afternoon. Martinez Saravia was reportedly last seen in the area of 62nd Street on Saturday at approximately 7 p.m. Friends of Martinez Saravia contacted police Sunday morning to report his disappearance, after which the Ocean City Fire Department Dive Team and Maryland Natural Resource Police undertook a search. During the investigation, video surveillance footage was uncovered

that helped police locate Martinez Saraviaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body in a bayside canal just south of 67th Street on Monday. Marylandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of the Chief Medical Examiner is performing an Cesar Saravia autopsy to determine the manner and cause of death. Police reported there were no obvious signs of injury and foul play is not suspected at this time. The investigation is continuing.

Grand jury indicts Redding for felony heroin distribution

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) Elizabeth Blair Redding, 26, of Ocean City is facing heroin distribution charges, including three felony counts carrying 20year maximums, after being indicted by a Worcester County grand jury on May 15. The charges stem from a pair of alleged drug transactions last October in West Ocean City, where Redding is accused of selling undercover detectives heroin in quantities sufficient for distribution. Redding is facing charges for felony heroin distribution, maximum sentence of 20 years and/or $15,000 fine, and misdemeanor possession,

for an alleged drug sale on Oct. 26. Another reported transaction with undercover drug agents on Oct. 30 netted Redding the same charges, plus an additional felony count for drug distribution within 1,000 feet of schools, which carries a maximum sentence of 20 years and/or $20,000 fine. The day following the grand jury indictment, an arrest warrant was issued and was served on May 23, with Redding released that same day on $2,000 cash bond. The felony drug distribution case goes to Worcester County Circuit Court for a motion hearing on Aug. 7, with a jury trial scheduled for Sept. 6.

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OBITUARIES STEPHEN N. PARKER Whaleyville Stephen N. Parker passed away peacefully in his home in Whaleyville, Maryland on May 28, 2018. Stephen is survived by his loving wife, Lisa Challenger; his daughter and son-in-law, Elisabeth and Richard of Tacoma, Washington; his son and daughter-in-law, Gabriel and Allison of Plymouth, Massachusetts; and his daughter and son-in-law, Emily and Brian of Somerville, Massachusetts; his grandchildren, Gigi, Ethan, Madison and Julian; his stepdaughters, Natalie, Mackenzie and Olivia; his brother-in-law, John Raye; brother, George Parker; and brother and sister-in-law, Philip and Lisa Parker; adored and adoring nieces and nephews, and loyal but goofy canine companion, Tek. Stephen was born in Buffalo, New York. He attended Cornell University where his passion for being a bit of a smart aleck gave way to a passion for ecology and natural history. He began his career as a real estate developer in New York City, but always maintained his hobbies as an outdoorsman, particularly by fishing and birding in his beloved town of Chatham, Massachusetts. Years later, he returned to his original calling, moving to the Eastern Shore of Virginia to work for the Nature Conservancy’s Virginia Coast Reserve, where he ultimately became the director. He was extremely proud of their work, and relished in the opportunity to discuss their eelgrass restoration project in the Chesapeake Bay, the most successful project of its kind. He was deeply committed to nature in both work and life, as evidenced by his choice to live in a rustic, century-old house on a salt marsh for years. He passed this love of the natural world on to his children and grandchildren. Stephen was also highly active in his community on the ESVA, working for causes that simultaneously benefitted needy communities and the environment. As a founding board member of the Bayview Citizens for Social Justice, he revitalized a neighborhood by creating affordable housing, a working farm to support the community, and building a sustainable water management system.

OBITUARY NOTICES Obituary Notices are published free each week in the Ocean City Today. E-mail: editor@oceancitytoday.net Mail: Ocean City Today, P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Fax: 410-723-6511 Obituary Notices are published as space allows. Every effort is made to publish all that are received.

Ocean City Today Through his civic work he won awards from the Northampton NAACP and the Partnership for Livable Communities. Upon Stephen’s retirement from the Nature Conservancy, he and Lisa built a beautiful life in Berlin, Maryland. He quickly became a part of the Challenger clan. They enjoyed their days full of dog walks, horse shows, gardening and local festivities. Lisa was devotedly by his side through many difficult health challenges over the last several years. Stephen always found joy in music, black coffee, the Boston Red Sox (when they were winning), books and family. Many will remember him for his dry wit, the likes of which Delmarva had never seen. Donations can be made to the Nature Conservancy - Virginia Coast Reserve, P.O. Box 158, Nassawadox, Virginia 23413 in his honor. Arrange-

ments are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. MARGARET ANN MADDY Ocean City Margaret Ann Maddy closed her eyes for the final time on May 14, 2018. Known as Margie, Maddy, Mom, or Mom-Mom, she leaves behind four children, Sharon Sigalas of Ios, Greece, Judy Vogel, Duane Maddy and Jon Maddy of Ocean City; seven grandchildren, Joey Vogel, Wesley and Kevin Maddy, Martina and Lea Sigalas and Brandon and Jessica Maddy, and four great-grandchildren. Born and raised on a small cattle farm in West Virginia, she loved fishing, camping and ice skating. As an

PAGE 69 adult, she was fond of painting, ceramics, crocheting and photography. She was employed at Westinghouse for 10 years. During her Margaret Maddy time there, she wired torpedoes for the Navy. Loved by all, she never met a stranger. A loving and supportive mother, she was always there for her family. She will be deeply missed. She will return to Grandview, West Virginia to be buried alongside of her husband in the fall. A celebration of life will be held at Taylor’s Restaurant in Ocean Pines on Thursday, June 21 from 2-4 p.m. where friends and family are welcome. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com.


Ocean City Today

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JUNE 8, 2018

WORLD WAR II

China planned flood of Yellow River in 1938 By Sam Ghaleb Contributing Writer (June 8, 2018) This week, 80 years ago, the Yellow River, in China, flooded. The world has many great rivers — the Amazon in South America, the Mississippi in the United States, the Nile in Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia, the Ganges in India, the Yangtze and the Huang He (Yellow) rivers in China, the Volga in Russia, and the Zambezi in East Africa. None of these rivers has been as treacherous to its surroundings as the Yellow River in China. Throughout history, floods have proven to be the deadliest natural disasters. This is mainly due to the high population densities around rivers, as well-behaved rivers provide the resources needed for agriculture, transportation and industry. It is no accident that all of the ancient civilizations arose around rivers. Like the Nile in Egypt and the Euphrates in Mesopotamia, The Yellow River is called, “the cradle of Chinese civilization,” as its basin is the birthplace of the northern Chinese civilizations and is the most prosperous region in early Chinese history. But frequent devastating flooding has also earned it the unenviable name, “China’s Sorrow.” Although historically the Yellow River has caused more deaths — 6.8 million by some

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counts — the Yangtze River has had more than 1,000 recorded floods. In terms of human loss of lives, the Yellow River ranks first. The top three deadliest floods in history were due to the Yellow River flooding its surrounding land and washing away many towns and cities in its path. In all, the Yellow River flood of 1931 was responsible for taking close to 3.7 million lives. The flood of 1887 caused a death toll of about 2 million and the 1938 flood caused almost 900,000 people to lose their lives. It also should be noted that not all of the dead were the victims of the initial flood waters. Disease and famine that followed the disasters probably killed more than the flood waters themselves. The Yellow River is prone to flooding because of the broad expanse of plain that lies around it. One of the major reasons for the flooding is the high silt content that gives the river its yellow tint (and thus its name). The silt, which constitutes as much as 60 percent of its volume — builds up until the river actually is higher than the surrounding land. The tendency to flood is exacerbated by ice dams that block the river in Mongolia, back up the water, and then release devastating walls of water when they break. The Yellow River Flood of 1938 was not a natural disaster, but was man-made. It came when China was fighting for its life trying to resist the Japanese invasion. By the beginning of 1938, and after six months of undeclared war, China had lost vast stretches of territory in the northern and central parts of the country. It had seen most of its key cities, including Nanking, the capital, fall into the hands of the Japanese, had suffered incalculable losses in lives and property, and had been compelled to move her capital to Hankow. Nevertheless, as the New Year dawned, China faced the invaders with a national solidarity unique in its history. With a

grim determination, its people fought the attempted conquest of their country to the bitter end. China was training a million new recruits, had moved its universities and famed art treasures far inland, had adopted the “scorched earth” policy by torching cities and towns about to be captured by Japanese troops, and had contemptuously rejected humiliating peace terms. When summer came to China in 1938, the rainy season brought floods in both the Yangtze and Yellow River regions. And while the floods bogged down the push of the Japanese against Hankow, it laid waste to so much of China’s productive farm land that severe famine resulted in some districts. Besides destroying millions of dollar’s worth of property and causing the loss of thousands of lives, the floods rendered many more thousands homeless. The 1938 flood of the Huang He was planned as a weapon to slow the advance of the Japanese troops. Nationalist Chinese troops under Chiang Kai-Shek deliberately broke the dykes in an attempt to block the Japanese. The strategy was controversial, and to this day many Chinese believe that it was unnecessary. To achieve full surprise of the invading Japanese force, the Chinese Nationalist government decided not to inform the mass public before destroying the dyke. The flood submerged millions of homes, and since they were not informed beforehand, many of the people living along its banks were killed. The flood waters began pouring out from Huayuankou in the early morning on June 9, 1938. As a result, the course

Yellow River Flood, 1938

of the Yellow River was diverted southwards for nine years afterward, covering an area of 21,000 square miles of land in Henan, Anhui, and Jiangsu provinces. All in all, the flood waters took close to 900,000 lives. Still debated is whether it was necessary to destroy the dyke in Huayuankou to cause the flood. Militarily. The Chinese Nationalist government of Chiang Kai-Shek claimed that the strategy could be considered partly successful, because the flood had created “problems for the mobility of the Japanese Army” and left the Japanese forces in central China in a stalemate with the Chinese forces as of 1940. After the war, the Nationalist government started rebuilding the dykes. By 1947, it was completed and the Yellow River returned to its pre-1938 course. When the Communists came to power in China in October of 1949, they embarked on a program of building dams for flood control. The dams, however, have not proven entirely effective and have been the target of criticism from environmentalists in China and around the world. Next Week: Battle Of Wuhan


JUNE 8, 2018

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Sports & Recreation

June 8, 2018

Ocean City Today

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www.oceancitytoday.net

Charlie Coates

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Fish-Full Thinking crew drove their boat right into the Bahia Marina parking lot on 22nd Street last Friday to unload Brandon Miller’s thresher shark. It weighed 183.3 pounds, but it wasn’t the largest thresher they caught during the 22nd annual Mako Mania tournament, held last weekend. The next day, Nick Skidmore landed a 644.9-pound thresher. The team took first and third place in the thresher division and won $8,115.

Winning mako weighs 200.9 lbs.

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (June 8, 2018) With the recreational minimum size limit of Atlantic Shortfin Mako Sharks increased from 54 to 83 inches (fork length), some wondered if any would be brought to the scale during the 22nd annual Mako Mania tournament, held last weekend. The doubts were squashed when the first fish weighed at Bahia Marina on 22nd Street last Friday was a large mako. Steve Randazzo’s mako, caught aboard FOMO, measured exactly 83 inches and weighed 200.9 pounds. The crew was awarded $28,900, which included the bonus $1,000 Winner Takes All for largest mako. “It was good to see the length met,” said Earl Conley, Mako Mania co-director. “It put to rest everyone’s worry that it was hard to find one that big.” Because of emergency regulations implemented by the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration to address overfishing of makos, organizers of the shark tournament added several release calcuttas, or wagering pools, this year. An estimated 50 sharks were released during the tournament. Not all

boat release reports were submitted to event officials. Conley said recreational fishermen and charter captains are aware of the importance of sustainability of fisheries and support the cause. The SeaMent crew released six makos to take first place in the division. The team was presented $17,700. They also earned the $1,000 W.W. Harman award for releasing the most makos. The Portabella team released three makos and won $3,159. The Absolute Pleasure and Siren crews both released two makos each. Absolute Pleasure released its last mako earlier in the day, so the group finished in third place. They took home $8,667. The Siren team was awarded $3,690 The Nontypical crew pocketed $684 for releasing one mako. Last Saturday, about 10 minutes after lines went in the water, a thresher shark took the Fish-Full Thinking’s bait. Nick Skidmore fought the shark for more than two hours aboard the 25-foot boat. Since it was so large it had to be towed from offshore back to the dock. The thresher weighed 644.9 pounds. It is bigger than the Maryland

state record of 642 pounds, but since the fish was shot – which is legal for the tournament – it was inconclusive at that time if it would take over the top spot in the books. On Wednesday, Skidmore found out it wound not qualify for the state record. The official statement released by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources states: “After careful consideration, the Department of Natural Resources Fishing and Boating Services has carefully made the decision to disqualify Nick Skidmore’s 644.9 thresher shark. Under the department’s State Records Rules and Procedures and Official FishMaryland Rules, fish that have been snagged, shot, gaffed*, speared, scaled, or mutilated are not eligible. (*Gaffing is illegal in the Chesapeake Bay, but is allowed for securing and boating fish in ocean waters. Gaffing [including use of detachable “flying gaffs”] is a common and accepted method of boating fish for ocean and offshore fishing). The current 642-pound thresher shark record held by Brent Applegit still stands.” See THRESHER Page 74

Decatur lacrosse players honored by Bayside Conf.

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (June 8, 2018) Twenty-five Stephen Decatur lacrosse players earned spots on All-Bayside South Teams for their performances during the spring season. Senior captain Charlie Coates led the Decatur boys’ lacrosse team, tallying 75 points. He scored 35 goals and had 40 assists. “That’s a good season,” Coach Scott Lathroum said. “He scored a lot of points for us this year.” He was named to the First Team-Attack. Senior captain Collin Eichelberger received First Team-Midfield honors. He had 30 goals and 10 assists (40 points). First Team-Defense awards were presented to senior captain Hayden Zaiser and junior Alexander Johnston. Senior Parker Wheeler finished second on the team in points, with 41. He recorded 24 goals and 17 assists. He took home Second Team-Attack honors. Junior Kevin Beck landed a spot on the Second Team-Midfield. Junior Collin Eitel won 65 percent of the face-offs he took this year. He scored Second Team accolades for his efforts. “He had a great season,” Lathroum said. Senior Quinn Ebaugh was named to the Second Team-Defense. Junior Chase Porter netted 22 shots and logged 18 assists (40 points) and received All-Bayside South Honorable See CHLOE Page 76


Ocean City Today

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JUNE 8, 2018

Thresher shark tips scale at 644.9 pounds during Mania Continued from Page 73 Skidmore’s post on his Facebook page Wednesday read: “I’m okay with their decision, rules are rules. While it’s a bummer, it will in no way, shape, or form ruin the best fishing weekend of my life! Maybe next time we will have to throw a rope around its tail and drag it backwards for 30-40 min slowly drowning the fish to death to have it qualify for a ‘record.’ Gotta be a better way!!” The thresher was shot boatside for the safety of the crew. Skidmore felt that method was more humane than dragging it for a long period of time to drown it. He was fishing with Brandon Miller and Ryan Oberholtzer. The crew received $6,225 for the

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first-place catch in the thresher division. Miller hooked a 183.3-pound thresher the day before, which finished in third place. It was worth $1,890. SeaMent angler Ed Ream landed a 355.2-pound thresher, good for second place and $10,035. The Teaser crew swept the bluefish division. Randy Garner’s 2.2-pound bluefish took first and Ricky Winsor’s 2-pounder placed second. The team received $5,640. Thirty-seven boats carrying 176 anglers were entered into this year’s tournament, a drop from a record 77 boats registered in 2017. Nearly $87,600 was presented to 2018 tournament winners. “From the amount of people we had, it was a successful tournament,” Conley said. “The weather forecast was not good. [Participation] was more weather related than because of the increase in length [of mako sharks]. “The people who fish this tournament a lot weren’t really concerned about the increase in length,” he added. The tournament allowed participants to fish two of three days. Thirtyfive of the 37 boats headed offshore last Friday. All fished Saturday. Two were eligible to fish on Sunday, but because of poor conditions they did not.

Steve Randazzo’s mako, caught aboard FOMO last Friday, measured exactly 83 inches and weighed 200.9 pounds. The crew earned first place during the 22nd annual Mako Mania tournament, held last weekend, and was awarded $28,900. LISA CAPITELLI/ OCEAN CITY TODAY

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Ocean City Today

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PAGE 75

SPORTS BRIEFS

Swim lessons Worcester County Recreation & Parks is offering three separate sessions of youth swim lessons this summer. Classes are open to children ages 3 and up and will take place at the Shad Landing Pool in the Pocomoke River State Park in Snow Hill. Each session will last two weeks and run Mondays through Thursdays. Fridays will serve as inclement weather makeup days. Session one will run from July 9-19, session two from July 23-Aug. 2, and session three from Aug. 6-16. Depending on the level, there will be two different available time frames of lessons from ei-

ther 8:30-9:15 a.m. or 9:30-10:15 a.m. The cost to participate in each session is $45 per person and $40 for each additional child. Class space is limited and is offered on a first come, first served basis. To register, contact Kelly Buchanan at 410-632-2144, ext. 2503 or kbuchanan@co.worcester.md.us.

Camp Worcester County Recreation and Parks staff announce the return of the Pocomoke River Camp, which is open to youth in grades fourth through eighth. Campers will have their choice of canoe, kayak, or paddleboard for the first

three days on the river. They will also go fishing and learn about different wildlife and the environment. On the last day, campers will be transported for an extended day trip for more exploring. The camp will take place Monday through Thursday, June 25-28 from 9 a.m. to noon. In the event of inclement weather, the makeup date will be Friday, June 29. The cost is $75. To register, contact Trudy Porch at 410-632-2144, ext. 2520 or tporch@co.worcester.md.us.

Tournament The Ocean City Marlin Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next competition is the 39th annual Small

Boat Tournament, June 16-17. Registration is scheduled for Friday, June 15 at 6:30 p.m. at the Ocean City Marlin Club in West Ocean City. The cost to participate is $250 per boat to fish inshore or offshore. To fish both, the cost is $500. Participants do not need to be Marlin Club members. The inshore division includes categories for flounder, sea bass, tog, bluefish and rockfish. Offshore division categories include tuna, dolphin and billfish release. Weigh-ins will take place at Sunset Marina in West Ocean City, June 16-17, from 3-6:30 p.m. For more information, visit www.ocmarlinclub.com or call 410-213-1613.


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Chloe Sass named Bayside Defensive Player of the Year Continued from Page 73 Mention for attack. Honorable mention Second TeamMidfield awards went to sophomore Eric Gwinn and senior Dom Klebe. Sophomores Andrew Ball (defense) and Tony Scafone (goalie) also earned honorable mentions. Lathroum presented team awards to: Eichelberger, 2018 overall MVP; Coates, MVP Offense; Zaiser, MVP Defense; Scafone, Coaches Award; and Wheeler, Sportsmanship Award. Senior Liam Deck took home the Warrior Award. “It goes to a guy who always gives everything. Who is a ‘warrior’ the whole game and all season,” Lathroum said. Decatur finished the year with a 9-5 record. Senior captain Chloe Sass earned Bayside South Defensive Player of the Year. She played in the midfield and on defense for the Decatur girls’ squad. “While she is domiChloe Sass nant all over the field and has the speed to be everywhere, her defensive mentality makes her irreplaceable on the defensive end,” Decatur Coach Sara Braniecki said. “In two big wins over Parkside and Bennett toward the end of our season, Chloe played a huge role. “She face-guarded our opponents’ most threatening offensive players. She is the perfect athlete to do this, because of her mental toughness, her agility, and her game sense,” Braniecki continued. “She commits to her role as a ‘faceguarder,’ but also makes quick decisions as to when she should contribute to the team defense instead.” Braniecki said Sass, who also received First Team honors, was a “fabulous leader.”

Ocean City Surf Club hosts Surf Fest all weekend

Sarah Engle

“She is passionate about lacrosse and her team, making her a great role model for the younger girls on our team,” Braniecki said. Sophomore Sarah Engle led the team in points this season, with 40. She scored 27 goals and had 13 assists. Engle also won 45 draws. She was named to the Bayside South First Team. Senior captain Lily Belle Baker (midfield) and sophomores Isy Kristick (goalie) and Abby Yesko (defense) also scored spots on the First Team. Juniors Kennedy Duke (defense) and Logan Townsend (attack) and sophomore Alyssa Romano (attack) received Second Team accolades. Honorable mention awards went to junior Halle Friedman (defense) and senior attackers Maggie Bunting, Caroline Engle and Hattie Brous, a team captain. Braniecki presented team recognitions to: Bunting, Sportsmanship Award; Friedman, Most Improved; Yesko, Unsung Hero; Sass, Coaches Award; Engle, MVP Offense; and Kristick, MVP Defense. Decatur finished the season with a 77 record.

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By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) The Ocean City Surf Club presents OC Surf Fest this weekend. Festivities will kick off tonight, Friday, at Barn 34 on 34th Street, from 69 p.m. Competitions in the ocean behind Castle in the Sand hotel on 37th Street will run from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The event has taken place the past four years and was formerly called “Longboard Weekend Pro Surf Contest.” “We changed the format, so we changed the name,” said Brad Hoffman, vice president of the Ocean City Surf Club. “The idea was we’d bring pro longboard back to Ocean City and that was a component of longboard weekend. “This year, we wanted to change the format on Saturday,” he continued. “We wanted to make it more inclusive of all types of surfboards and surfers. In the past, it was limited to just longboards. This year it’s called ‘Anything Goes.’ That means any kind of board that anybody wants to ride in the teen challenge on Saturday is [accepted].” On Friday, the Surf Club will host a Legends Induction and kickoff party at Barns 34 from 6-9 p.m., which is open to the public. Surfers who have contributed to the area and were positive role models for the community will be honored. Hors d’oeuvres and drink specials will be available. “It’s just a big, fun weekend,” Hoffman said. “I enjoy the fact that I grew up a surfer and skater in this community and it’s great to put something together that the community comes out and supports, that the money stays here locally. I have a lot of pride in growing up in competitive surf.” On Saturday, “Anything Goes” is open to surfers of all ages and ability. Participants will be allowed to ride whatever board they want. There will be activities for children, giveaways handed out and Ocean City Surf Club membership discounts will be offered

Wyatt Harrison

on the beach. On Sunday, pro-surfing contest, “Walk Da Plank,” will showcase some of the best pro longboarders in the country, competing for money and prizes. “This is where you have some of the biggest pros from the East Coast coming in,” Hoffman said. “I’ve got people coming in from Costa Rica for this contest. We’re one of the dominant premiere pro longboard contests on the East Coast, so you can see what it’s like to [witness] some of the best surfing in the contest. I’ve got one guy, Tony Silvagni, who’s been a winner in our contest in the past [who] is now a world champion. “This weekend is the biggest fundraiser the club does the whole year,” Hoffman added. “This is how we [fund] our programs, like Adopt a Beach – where people adopt a beach – we do a scholarship program and then we do a Surf with Integrity with the Stephen Decatur Middle School, so this is our fundraiser event that helps us with our programs and helps fund all those programs.” Slots are still available for teams to compete. Participation costs $250 for a team of five. Teams can sign up until Saturday at 8:30 a.m. There is no fee to watch the competitions. For more information, contact Tommy Vach at 443-366-5885, Hoffman at 443-366-5944, or email tommy@voxpopms.com. Visit oceancitysurfclub.org to learn more.


Ocean City Today

JUNE 8, 2018

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More than 5,000 to play in soccer tourney By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) The 24th annual Sand Duels Soccer Challenge will take place on the beach between North Division and Wicomico streets, this Saturday and Sunday. “We’re not look for who’s the best,” Director Scott Westcoat said. “This isn’t to find the greatest sand soccer team in the land, it’s more or less about the entire experience of coming to Ocean City, participating in a sport they’re probably heavily invested in, or just want to come down for a good time.” The event consists of men’s, women’s, coed, youth and senior divisions. Players range in age from 8-80 years old. Competitions will take place from 8 a.m. to

7:30 p.m. “We saw the rise in soccer back in 1994 with the World Cup, and I was working at the Capital’s Center at the time and just saw different ways that the professional sports teams were reacting and getting out in the community,” Westcoat said. “[Plus] it’s the beach. I love the beach. I used to live in OC for the summers and love soccer, so we put everything together.” Games will be played on 24 fields, starting at 8 a.m. on Saturday. Five hundred and forty-eight teams will compete throughout the weekend. “We have over 5,000 players,” Westcoat said. “We bring a contingency of probably 15,000 to 20,000 with parents, siblings, grandparents and other interested spectators. Then with the soccer on

the beach, people on the Boardwalk say, ‘Hey that’s kinda neat.’ “We bring a lot people that are there for the event, but we are also sort of a spectacle for other people who aren’t as familiar with the premise of beach soccer,” he continued. There are different sections throughout the day. Players who participate in the morning competitions will finish at 2 p.m. New teams will begin at 2 p.m. and play until about 7:30 p.m., leaving plenty of opportunities for players to explore Ocean City. “Every player and every coach get a nice gift bag and everyone’s guaranteed three games,” Westcoat said. “Then, we give awards in first and second for every division. So about 35 percent come away

Brine Lacrosse Festival this wknd.

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (June 8, 2018) Games will be played all over Worcester County, today through Sunday, during the annual Brine Lacrosse Festival, hosted by Aloha Tournaments. Girls’ lacrosse games will begin tonight and boys’ matches will start on Saturday. Both competitions will run from 8 a.m. until about 6 p.m. each day. The boys’ lacrosse tournament will take place in three different locations throughout Maryland and Delaware: River Soccer Complex in Frankford, Delaware, North Worcester Sports Complex on Route 113 in Berlin, and at Seaside Christian Academy in West Ocean City. The girls will play at Northside Park on 125th Street in Ocean City. “[There’s] a tremendous amount of interest in both summer lacrosse tournaments and family trips to the beach with family, friends and teammates,”

Event Organizer Michael Cooke said. “So, we decided we wanted to bring the two together and create an opportunity for teams to get better and play against different teams from all over the East Coast.” The boys’ tournament consists of 150 teams, while the girls’ competition features 70 squads. The tournaments are open to players ages 8-15 and include club and recreational teams. “Anyone can stop by and watch some great lacrosse,” Cooke said. “Check out our vendor village, which we call the tiki village, which will be filled with music, sponsorship activation, merchandise and great food and activities. They’re free to stop by there anytime.” The championship matches will take place on Sunday. The finalists on Sunday will receive medals and free gear from the tournament’s sponsor, Brine Lacrosse. “From the player’s standpoint, it of-

fers players great competition, [and a] fun, safe, competitive atmosphere and plenty of downtime at the beach in Ocean City to hang out with family and friends,” Cooke said. “These are some of the best lacrosse teams in the country that are traveling to Ocean City for the weekend to compete, so you’re going to see some great action on the fields,” he continued. “There’s a great atmosphere off the field where spectators are enjoying the game of lacrosse.” For more information about the tournaments, call 410-252-5642 or visit www.alohatournaments.com or email info@alohatournaments.com. Aloha Tournaments has developed over 30 lacrosse events all over the country for players 6 years old through high school age. It annually hosts over 50,000 players and 125,000 fans at its events every year, drawing players and families from several states and internationally.

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with some kind of a medal or award.” The tournament will not sell any concessions on site, so players are encouraged to purchase from the Boardwalk vendors. “Rather than draw out the process and say, ‘Hey you’re here to play soccer the entire weekend,’ we want [the players] to come, play and enjoy the other amenities of Ocean City,” Westcoat said. “Catch some sun, eat at a nice restaurant, stop by and watch some of the other teams play, but really, we pride ourselves on the entire experience of the family coming down.” Beachgoers can observe the competitions for free, and a 30-foot soccer ball tent used as headquarters will be set up for any questions regarding the tournament. For more information or to sign up for next year, check out ocbeachsoccer.com, “Sand Duels Beach Soccer” on Facebook or call 443-2772600.

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Ocean City Today

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By Dave Dalkiewicz Contributing Writer (June 8, 2018) This weekend will be a huge one for Ocean City surfing and the Ocean City Surf Club. It’s become an annual event. Party on Friday, Surf Fest Team Challenge on Saturday, Walk da Plank Longboard Pro on Sunday. Each day, each event is significant. Friday’s party kicks things off in conjunction with the Ocean City Legends induction. Since 2001 there has been an induction “class” with a number of legends now totaling about 100. Festivities will be at the Barn 34 restaurant which has become a central point for the Ocean City Surf Club. Legends criteria: At least 50 years old; been involved with surfing 30plus years; lived “aloha;” and in some fashion given something back to the sport. Saturday’s Surf Fest Team Chal-

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lenge is the former Longboard Team Challenge. It’s still done in a team format but has morphed into an “anything goes” regarding vehicle type. This new idea intends to promote more participation. The emphasis is fun and more fun. Sunday’s Walk da Plank Longboard Pro is a premier surf contest complete with prize money, enthused spectators, professional judges, and oh so talented contestants. That factor alone would be reason enough for an audience. To view quality, premium level surfing can be such a treat. One that doesn’t happen too often. The Ocean City Surf Club has only been around for a few years. It became an offshoot of the Ocean City Chapter of Surfrider Foundation, which still goes on. The Surf Club advocates and promotes surfing in as broad a manner as possible. This weekend will become a gathering of the clan. Surfing’s never lent itself to a collective, clubby atmosphere. Always more individualistic in nature, this weekend’s activity will counter that thought and offer gathering together as a major mainstay. Granted, it’s always better to surf with others if only for a safety factor

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and pockets of like-minded individuals will get together in a defacto or even an accidental sense. It seems to lift the fun factor especially if those that one is surfing with have some sense of etiquette and know the rules of the road. Surfing doesn’t require a five- or nine- or 11-person team and another opposing squad to play against. This is probably why it doesn’t lend itself so much to a group situation. Possible, even probable, but not necessary. But, this is one of those group times. It’s a celebration, one that can offer something for everyone, from participant to casual observer. Come check it out. More advanced notice would have been better and hopefully you’ve heard before this reading. Friday’s party at Barn 34 is open to everyone, starting about 6 p.m. Saturday’s Surf Fest Team Challenge and Sunday’s Walk da Plank Longboard Pro are centered at 37th Street on the beach fronting the Castle in the Sand hotel, both starting about 8 a.m. Come check it out and get a glimpse of what surfing is all about. – Dave Dalkiewicz is the owner of Ocean Atlantic Surf Shop in Ocean City.

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 80

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6/8/18 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

6/8/18 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...