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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.COM

MAY 24, 2019

SERVING NORTHERN WORCESTER COUNTY

LIFESTYLE

MEMORIAL DAY EVENTS

Assortment of activities planned for holiday, including parade, patriotic ceremonies – Page 34

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County takes first steps to raise room tax Code amendment needed to move cap to higher rate

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Thousands of people pour into the inlet parking lot to see hundreds of cars on display during the 29th annual OC Cruisin’ event held last weekend.

Cruisin’ police call stats improve Numbers may look big, but show solidly positive signs By Josh Davis Associate Editor (May 24, 2019) Police numbers are in for the Cruisin’ Ocean City event last weekend and as much as they might be taken as troubling by some, local officials see them as a major improvement. Resort officials on Monday said

the event has improved significantly since a low point two years ago, when there was vigorous debate on whether Cruisin’ should even be allowed to continue. Ocean City Communications Manager Jessica Waters said last week’s event produced 2,065 total calls for services, 1,028 traffic stops and 69 arrests during the four-day period, from last Thursday through Sunday. Traffic enforcement – by Ocean

City Police and allied agencies – totaled 2,438 citations and warnings, with 1,379 total citations handed out, according to Waters. By comparison, according to online police records, there were 206 total arrests and incidents filed in 2017 during the Cruisin’ event, compared to just 131 this year. Police Chief Ross Buzzuro said law enforcement was “very, very proacSee CRUISIN’ Page 78

For employers: minimum wage info Aspects of new law will go into effect this summer By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) Area employers who want to know more about the upcoming implementation of Maryland’s “Fight for Fifteen” minimum

wage bill are invited to attend two seminars intended to help navigate compliance issues. In addition to a meeting sponsored by the Restaurant Association of Maryland on May 29 in Columbia, the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce will also partner for a comparable event on June 5 from 9-

11:30 a.m. Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Melanie Pursel said Maryland is the sixth state to adopt a $15 per hour minimum wage, which will be phased in over six years for employers with 15 or more employees, while smaller See MINIMUM Page 76

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) Ocean City government’s pitch to boost room tax rates to 5 percent took another move forward Tuesday, as the Worcester County Commissioners approved a bill authorizing the countywide increase. Kelly Shanahan, Worcester County’s assistant chief administrative officer, told the commissioners the next step to raise room tax rates ‘The goal of would involve amending local Ocean City was law. to be proactive Although fre- and increase our quently, if erroadvertising.’ neously, called a Ocean City hotel room tax, Mayor Rick the charge is applied to all room Meehan rentals, from hotel rooms to condominiums. Shanahan said although Maryland law allows counties to raise room tax rates to a maximum of 5 percent without state approval, Worcester would need to revise its own tax code that currently includes a 4.5 percent cap. Reviewing next steps in the approval process, Shanahan said pending that days’ approval, the bill to change the code and raise the cap would become effective July 5 or 45-days from passage. Shanahan said the bill to raise the rate could then be introduced as a resolution at the commissioners meeting on July 16 with a public hearing to follow on Aug. 20, before ultimately beSee FIRST Page 78


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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

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Counterfeit funds being passed in Ocean City area (May 24, 2019) The Ocean City Police Department is warning residents, business owners and employees to be on the lookout for counterfeit currency being circulated in Ocean City. In the past week, there have been two reports of counterfeit currency, including several counterfeit $100 bills. These bills either are marked as “play money” or have Chinese writing on both sides. Ocean City police are encouraging citizens to closely examine currency by looking carefully at the money being exchanged. Police said when a cashier receives a $100 bill for a very small purchase the See COUNTERFEIT Page 5

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‘Fat tire’ event could preview bikes on beach By Josh Davis News Editor (May 24, 2019) A small part of the upcoming Jellyfish Festival dedicated to riding bicycles on the beach could lead to wider allowance of the activity later this fall and next summer. Tres Denk of the Eastern Shore International Mountain Biking Association met with the Ocean City Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Committee on May 8 to inquire about offering guided bicycle tours on the beach. For many years, Denk has organized local cycling events and he recently started a new company, “Beach to Bay Bicycling,” which hopes to offer tours throughout the county, from riverfront areas of Pocomoke and Snow Hill, to the beaches of Ocean City. He explained how so-called “fat tire” bicycles, like four-wheel drive vehicles, can lower their tire pressure to allow for better traction in sand. Along with tours, Beach to Bay Bicycling offers training and safety lessons

for beginning riders, and also has led programs for veterans and children in areas like Berlin. Denk said he approached City Hall to ask about guided bicycle tours along the shoreline, but was told, “It wasn’t going to happen here.” He said he has allowances through the county and in Salisbury, but not yet in Chincoteague, Assateague nor Ocean City. Public Works Director Hal Adkins said one of the difficulties was the complex and franchised nature of many businesses that run on or near the beach. “What people need to realize [is] – no matter whether we’re talking about this or bottles of Coke of hotdogs or ice cream in a cooler with big rubber tires – the beach is looked at as an asset. Not everyone has the right to earn an income on it,” Adkins said. “The telescope pictures [for example] … it’s a competitively bid franchise agreement resulting in massive amounts of money, no different than the beach stand operators renting chairs and umbrellas. “Unfortunately, there’s a process –

Counterfeit money alert in OC Continued from Page 3 wise thing to do is examine the currency. Often times, suspects will pass the counterfeit bill to exchange it for real currency, not necessarily to purchase big-ticket items. Also, business owners are reminded that counterfeit detection pens frequently generate false results. Counterfeiters can use bleached genuine currency or coat counterfeit notes to prevent the proper chemical reactions. In addition, the Federal Reserve Board offers these tips to detect suspicious or counterfeit currency: • Feel the paper. Genuine U.S. currency has a unique feel. The note should feel slightly rough to the touch. If the currency feels different than what you

are used to, examine it closer. • Tilt the note back and forth to observe the color-shifting ink in the righthand corner of denominations $10 or higher. Most bills will shift from copper to green. • Check the watermark and security thread by holding the currency up to a light. A watermark should be visible from both sides and will match the portrait or denomination. A security thread should also be visible from both sides and match the denomination. When held to UV light, the security thread will glow a unique color. For more information about U.S. currency and how to detect a counterfeit note, visit www.uscurrency.gov.

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Corbin Denk rides a fat tire bicycle at Bainbridge Park in Ocean Pines. Organizer Tres Denk of the Eastern Shore International Mountain Biking Association hopes to bring fat tire bikes to the Ocean City beach for guided tours. He plans to first offer demonstrations during the upcoming Jellyfish Festival. PHOTO COURTESY TRES DENK

and it’s a long process,” he continued. “But I’m an optimistic guy that, whatever the topic is, if it’s logical and it makes sense, it’s achievable.” Committee members told Denk he did not need further permission to offer fat tire bike rides within the confines of the Jellyfish Festival, but probably would not be able to take riders onto the beach, just yet. “Say you were to get approval … and ride along the beach. If that is unsuccessful, that’s going to be a one-time event,” committee President Paul Mauser, also the city’s engineering manager, said. “If we get a lot of calls here in City Hall [saying], ‘Hey, I don’t like this’ … that’s going to be it. It’s going to be one time and you’re done. “What I propose is, [attend] Jellyfish, do a closed course, then come in … and do a one-time event in the October or November timeframe where you can do an open course, try it out, see what kind of feedback

you get, and then maybe we establish winter hours or offseason times when we can bike on the beach,” he added. Special Events Director Frank Miller agreed.“It’s a very slow introduction to the residents and the public, but it allows the opportunity for people to gain interest in it,” he said. Denk said he understood that logic. “I came here today … to get the ball rolling,” he said. “I want to make sure that it’s a legacy that, when we do it, we do it properly and that it lives on beyond us. “I’m very excited for the Jellyfish thing and I just wanted to make sure I wasn’t making more waves than we knew were coming,” Denk added. Miller said he would “try to champion fall offseason riding hours” with City Manager Doug Miller, and perhaps help develop a new city ordinance related to riding on the beach.

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Ocean City approves $130M budget after ‘sincere’ debate By Josh Davis News Editor (May 24, 2019) The Ocean City Council on Monday finalized the $130 million fiscal 2020 budget, but not before elected officials had one more chance to comment on the tax rate included in the package. Earlier this month, city officials voted 4-2 to move off the constant yield, instead opting to maintain a constant property tax rate of $0.4656 per $100 of valuation. Councilman Dennis Dare was not present during the meeting. While the Maryland Homestead Tax Credit protects resident homeowners, some argued moving off the constant yield, a lower rate of $0.4585, was effectively a tax increase for nonresidents and business owners. The difference will generate $638,464 in additional property tax revenue for the city. According to budget worksheets, revenue from real property taxes is $41,860,371, which funds 48.5 percent of the general fund budget. The budget also includes a proposal to increase the room tax from 4.5 percent to 5 percent, beginning Jan. 1, 2020. That would generate an additional $604,450 in revenue. Capital projects total $2,741,806, including $2.5 million for street paving and $100,000 for storm drain cleaning. Councilman Mark Paddack said some comments in local newspapers “may not have reflected exactly what had taken place in here,” regarding the budget. Paddack previously voted for the constant tax rate, while some others on the council noted he recently ran a campaign promising not to increase taxes. “I’ve strived and spent most of my adult life to be a learner. I think learning is a lifetime adventure that we all should participate in,” he said. “When I came into this council, I came in here with a full, open heart of selflessness, that I’m going to do the best that I possibly can for the town and all the taxpayers.” Paddack said of the budget process, “This was one of the biggest eye openers I’ve ever had in my 30 years that I’ve been here, in the Town of Ocean City.”

“We cannot become what we need to be by remaining what we are,” he said, adding the city stuck with the constant yield for nine years. “My vision was to try to keep that, however … not everything is going to be exactly how we want it, and the speculation that we may have more money in the future is not how I run by budget at home and I’m sure not going to do that for the Town of Ocean City.” Mayor Rick Meehan also addressed the City Council at length. “There’s been a lot of discussion about the budget, and I think good discussion. I think the council has done a good job with handling that, and certainly [Budget Manager] Jennie Knapp and the city manager have presented a good budget,” he said. “Whether it was asked specifically or not, we do … expect them to bring us a status quo budget and we work from there. That doesn’t mean we end up with a status quo budget,” Meehan added. He said for many years one citizen complained the general fund balance was over 15 percent of the operating budget – the city’s self-mandated target for reserves – and any excess should be given back to the public. Meehan said the city instead has built up its reserves and used the general fund to pay for crucial infrastructure projects. He presented a series of slides to show what would have happened to reserves had the City Council dropped the tax rate by two cents in 2013 – as had been suggested. If that had been done, according to Meehan, the reserve fund balance would have slipped $2.8 million below the 15 percent mark by 2016, and by last year would have been just $6.3 million, or $5.9 million below 15 percent of the operating budget. Meehan said if a hurricane came through Ocean City, of similar strength to Hurricane Irene in 2011, and wiped out a single week in August, the city would lose $1.5 million. “That’s the lost revenue – that doesn’t have anything to do or doesn’t address the overtime or the expense to recover See FISCAL Page 10

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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

Changes approved for pensions, zoning code really like either,” he said. “The unknown alternative is not very appealing. “This will be the last time you have to hear me say this, but I promised that every single time it came up that I would say it: This is, I believe, a mistake,” Gehrig continued. “I don’t think I’ve ever voted for a mistake, but I’m going to officially do it twice.” Knight in a previous meeting said she would vote against the measure for the sake of consistency, because she previously opposed the IAFF contract. In a related move, the councilmembers voted 7-0 to amend the city labor code, “detailing the IAFF impasse panel procedure if negotiating parties are unable to reach an agreement.” City Solicitor Guy Ayers during the first reading on May 6 said such procedures existed for negotiations with the Fraternal Order of Police, but not for the IAFF. Approved with less controversy were several zoning items related to a proposed land swap between the Town of Ocean City and the Wenzlaff Family LLLP. In the deal, the city would consolidate land in the area of 66th Street for a planned water treatment plant, while the Wenzlaff Family would get additional space for an Advance Marine boating storage facility. Approved 6-0 was a rezoning appli-

JOSH DAVIS/OCEAN CITY TODAY

A Mayor and City Council meeting Monday at City Hall saw several notable items passed on second reading, including zoning ordinances to help facilitate a land swap, and changes to the labor code related to the collective bargaining agreement with the Career Fire Fighter Paramedics Association of Ocean City.

cation from LC-1, Commercial Zoning District with Public/Governmental Overlay Zone, to BMUD, or Bayside Mixed Use Zoning District. Knight was not in the room during the vote. Councilmembers also by a 6-0 vote, without Knight, approved a second reading for an ordinance to amend city code to adopt seven zoning code proposals approved during a March 26 work session. Finally, by a 6-0 vote with Councilman Matt James not in the room, the City Council approved an ordinance to purchase 5.78 acres of land at 12315

Sinepuxent Road in Berlin, for runway clearance at the Ocean City Airport. According to the meeting packet, the mayor and City Council, during an April 30 closed session, unanimously approved the purchase for $145,000, contingent upon a favorable environmental assessment. Councilman Mark Paddack, on May 6, noted the purchase was from a reimbursable funding source, with 90 percent coming from the Federal Aviation Administration, 5 percent from Maryland Aviation, and 5 percent from the mayor and City Council.

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By Josh Davis News Editor (May 24, 2019) City Council members on Monday ratified several changes to the city code, including sections involving multiple zoning ordinances and altering the labor code to include some firefighters in the city’s pension plan. Councilmembers on May 6 voted 51 for a first reading of the latter, to adopt changes included in the 20192022 collective bargaining agreement between the Town of Ocean City and the Career Fire Fighter Paramedics Association of Ocean City, IAFF Local 4269. According to a summary provided to the council, the changes restore eligible IAFF plan participants to the defined benefit plan and enact a 9 percent contribution rate for certain participants hired after June 30, 2013. The fiscal impact over three years was listed at $54,000. This time, the vote was 6-1 in favor. Only Councilwoman Mary Knight voted against the measure. Councilman John Gehrig, meanwhile, said he would hold his nose in a “yes” vote. Gehrig has been a frequent critic of the negotiation process that led to the collective bargaining agreement. “Once again, I think this is a step backwards and a big mistake, but it is part of a larger package – that I don’t

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Continued from Page 6 from a storm,” he said, adding losing several weeks because of a storm would cost the town “millions of dollars.” “That fund balance is there to carry us through those times. It doesn’t have to be the total wipeout – all it has to be is something significant enough that we lose revenue,” Meehan added. “Once you have a week where you close or you lose revenue, it is very difficult to rebound the rest of that year.” Meehan said the general fund balance was also important for infrastructure projects, from canal dredging to the recent storm drain cleaning. He said budget discussions this year led to an exploration “of future funding and future expenses,” including increased demands for services, and state mandates regarding minimum wage increases and a new paid sick leave policy. “There are all realities,” Meehan said. “These are things we’re going to be faced with.” Meehan said all of those issues factored into the City Council moving off the constant yield, which he supported. He called the new rate “a moderate increase.” “[The budget] also includes a moderate increase in [the] room tax at one-half percent – it hasn’t been raised in 10 years,” he said. “When you look at the cost that we face and the expenses of expanding the season and what tourism is costing just in manpower and city expenses, it’s about $670,000 a year. This will help offset that.” Additional money would help further fund investments in tourism, including in the area of sports marketing, Meehan added. “Everything wasn’t all put on one particular part of this budget. It was spread out in moderate increases,” he said. “Everything that’s being proposed, in my opinion … is for a budget that allows us to use our general fund to pay for infrastructure [and] to build our fund balance, and the proposal will secure our future and maintain a budget very close to status quo. But the increase will help sustain us in the future.” Councilman Matt James had just one

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question. “The rate you used, was that if we had stuck with a constant rate?” James asked. “That is if we had reduced the tax rate two cents in FY 2013,” Meehan said. “If we had gone with a constant rate?” James asked. “Yes, we would have stuck with that rate,” Meehan said. “So, if we had gone to a constant rate, it would have been bad, is basically what you just said,” James said. Councilman John Gehrig said for many, the budget amounted to a “forfeiture of a tax decrease” of $1.78 a month on a $300,000 home, if the constant yield had been maintained. “You’re paying the same as you paid last year which, to me, is not an increase,” he said. James worried the town would quickly find a way to spend the extra revenue, but Knapp said the money would reduce the burden of several projects from the general fund balance, allowing that to grow. “What we did, is I funded street paving from tax dollars, so we only had to take $800,000 out of [the general] fund balance to pay for the debt service on the airport, the storm drain cleaning, the AGH year-three investment” and one other project, she said. “We reduced the amount that we’re taking from fund balance, so that we can allow fund balance to grow a little bit again.” The vote to approve the budget was 5-2 with only James and Councilman Tony DeLuca opposed. City Manager Doug Miller called the budget process one of the best he’s ever been a part of. “The debate over the tax rate and the budget was one of the most sincere and best articulated debates I’ve heard in my career,” Miller said. “I know you differed in opinion, but you expressed your opposing opinions in a very dignified and informed manner, so I congratulate you on that.” For additional information about the fiscal 2020 budget, visit the town’s webpage at www.oceancitymd.gov and click on the tab labeled “FY 20 PROPOSED BUDGET.”

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PAGE 11

Ocean City Today

Councilman Dare statement on resort’s fiscal ‘20 budget (May 24, 2019) Ocean City Counhave been able to accilman Dennis Dare, who was not complish some years. present for the first vote on the city But when you cap the budget two weeks ago, this week income, you also can called on his decades of experience in stymie the services. City Hall as an elected official, city Let me give an exmanager and city engineer to explain ample. The State his support for this year’s budget and Dennis Dare Highway Administratax rate. tion informed us they Agree with him or not, his state- were going to clean the storm drains ment offers one of the better explana- on Coastal Highway to help alleviate tions of how the business of budgeting flooding. Since their storm drains are is conducted. connected to ours, in order to get the *** rain water from Coastal Highway to I was absent for the first reading the bay, the effectiveness is only as and would like to take this opportunity good as our storm drains. to explain why I support the proposed We appropriated money this past constant rate budget for fiscal year year and have included more money 2020. this year and will need to on an ongoI watched the video and read the ing basis to clean out our pipes. We news reports of the first reading, and last did a comprehensive cleaning in there seemed to be a bit of contention 1986 after Hurricane Gloria. This is over the constant something that yield versus the conneeds to be done ‘I was absent for the first stant tax rate. I’ve routinely, not every been through 37 reading and would like to take 33 years. So when TOC (Town of this opportunity to explain why staff is told to “cut Ocean City) budgthe fat” and hold the I support the proposed ets, so I have a tax rate, something constant rate budget pretty good idea of has to give. Well, a for fiscal year 2020.’ the give and take incouple of inches of volved in setting the sand in an underOcean City Councilman spending plan for ground pipe is not Dennis Dare the next year. Arrivevident like a pot ing at a budget isn’t hole is on the street, easy, but it is the most important func- so it is something that can get pushed tion the City Council performs, one off. could certainly argue. When the council approves a 5K This group has spent a lot of time run and staff is tasked with setting out the last several years developing a hundreds of cones on a Saturday Strategic Plan, Comprehensive Plan, morning at no additional cost, the Capital Improvement Plan, and Long manager may give those employees Term Financial Plan, to name the Friday afternoon off and have them major undertakings. We are focused come in Saturday morning. So, what on what it takes to provide what our doesn’t get done on that Friday afterresidents, property owners, busi- noon? I suggest the street sweepers nesses and visitors need and expect. may not run and thus the sand gets We take all that and boil it down dur- carried into the storm drains. ing several weeks each spring as we When the council considered the study every single department budget proposed budget in April, the state in detail. legislature was still in session and conThe department heads, budget sidering the increase in minimum manager and city manager did an out- wage. When it did pass, it was vetoed standing job in bringing the elected of- by the governor and then his veto was ficials what they are required by overridden. That was a moving target, charter to do: Present a balanced and the town was able to identify a budget. That means the income and way of reducing pay classifications expenses are equal. and minimizing the cost of the raising Now, I don’t recall in all the discus- of minimum wage from the current sion for all those plans any mention of $10.10 to $11 on Jan. 1, 2020. doing them for a certain dollar While it is only $123,000 for six amount or certain rate. We concen- months, that turns into a quarter miltrated on results, not the means to get lion next fiscal year. Plus FY21 will there, I suppose. I don’t recall a mo- have six months of the $11.75 minition and vote last fall when the city mum wage or about a 9 percent inmanager began his budget prepara- crease. That is a total of $.75 million tions that instructed him to present a next FY21. Keep in mind when the balanced budget for constant yield, minimum salary increases, there is a meaning a budget that raises the same domino effect up the pay scale. Next real estate taxes as last year. year we could be looking at one milThat’s not to say some elected offi- lion more. We have directed the staff cials may have voiced their desire for to study and report on the overall efa constant yield budget. That is cer- fect to our salaries. tainly a commendable goal and one we See COUNCILMAN Page 12

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PAGE 12

Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

Councilman Dare statement on resort’s fiscal ‘20 budget Continued from Page 11 One penny on the tax rate raises $899,063, so it is safe to assume if we hold the constant yield tax rate this year, we would need to raise the tax rate next year by a penny. The proposed budget with a constant tax rate in part plans for this increased expense that has been dictated by the General Assembly. The constant tax rate alone will probably be insufficient, and additional revenue building may be necessary. We are in the process of looking at two means of raising additional revenue, not only for the minimum wages increase, but for the effects of inflation overall on our budget. While inflation has been minimal, it is no less a real number. Just like our home budget is affected by rising costs, those same increases impact the town. We have pursued an increase in room tax from 4.5 percent to 5 percent effective Jan. 1, 2020. Should that come to fruition, it is mostly dedicated to advertising and marketing. If we pursue sports marketing with vigor, there may only be minimal help to the General Fund in support of all the special events provided by the town. The other revenue builder is parking. A task force worked on this all spring, has taken a break for the summer and will resume this fall and hopefully bring back recommendations for the mayor and council’s consideration. There may be recommendations to reduce in some areas and increase in others, so it is possible there will be no real change or there could be some additional revenues. This budget cannot be balanced on what may or may not happen with possible increased parking revenue. I believe it will take revenue builders in room tax and parking as well as maintaining a constant tax rate to address the impact of the minimum wage increases from now until it reaches $15 an hour in 2025. To appreciate how much this is, all one has to do is look at the minimum wage in the states that most visit Ocean City. Delaware is $8.75. Pennsylvania $7.25, Virginia $7.25, and New Jersey $8.85. What effect will the minimum wage have on our businesses? The hospitality industry is built on lower wages. Our hotels, restaurants and retail stores hire predominately minimum wage employees. As these increases come on line, will we see fewer employees, meaning lesser service? Will there be fewer hours for employees? Will store hours be reduced? Will prices increase? How much commerce will shift across the state line? It’s not a rosy picture and it is prudent for the town to plan fiscally for the impact on our budget and hope for the best for our industry. Some may say take money out of

fund balance and give it back. I say the responsible thing to do is grow our fund balance from 15 percent to 20 percent. Moody’s says a fund balance for an AA rating should be 24.5 percent. Given our vulnerability to severe weather and reliance on 100 days a year to make a living, even 20 percent is probably low. Our fund balance now is in that vicinity and should not be used to fund what are ongoing expenses. It is our “rainy day fund” and should be ready for hurricane damage, Route 90 closure during the summer or a fire at City Hall, for example. Whatever the emergency, we need to be able to act quickly. We only have 100 days of prime earnings. With a constant tax rate, the tax bill rises only if the assessment rises. If we neglect our infrastructure and reduce our services, we could see assessment decline and as a result our tax bill would decline. But no one wants to see that happen. Those 26,000 second homes owned by nonresidents and were bought by them to enjoy all Ocean City has to offer, but they also had the confidence in the town to make the investment and expect it to grow. The same can be said about our businesses. They are building new hotels with expectations of sufficient room rates to justify the investment. New restaurants have menu items priced accordingly in hopes of being successful. The town government’s responsibility to them is to keep our town safe, clean and in good repair. If we do that, assessments will rise and everyone will profit. I’m result-oriented and not fixated on an arbitrary number. If we are successful with revenue builders in the coming year, perhaps we can reduce our dependence even more on property tax revenue and reduce the property tax rate. One of the key goals has been to enhance the livability of Ocean City. So I am going to vote for this budget even though there are things in it I don’t like, or things not included, such as: • The lack of a committed resolution to increase the General Fund Reserve Policy. • Formation of a parking department. • An after-school program in Ocean City. • Resolution of tax differential. • A West Ocean City ambulance resolution. • A reduction of $13,000 for duplicated street lighting on Coastal Highway. But we’ll work on some of these and much, much more this coming year, and together we will do the best job we can for the residents, non-residents, business owners and the visitors to Ocean City.


MAY 24, 2019

PAGE 13

Ocean City Today

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PAGE 14

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

Council questions bicycles, deejays on beach Resort officials concerned about disruption caused by activities planned near inlet By Josh Davis News Editor (May 24, 2019) Some Ocean City Council members on Monday night took exception to separate proposals for events on the beach that they said might be disruptive to others or might set a precedent for future activities. One was not voted on, while the other was permitted by a narrow margin and after considerable debate. First, City Councilman Dennis Dare said he wasn’t a fan of letting bicycles of any sort on the beach, as was proposed during a Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Committee the previous week. During that meeting, Tres Denk of

the Eastern Shore International Mountain Biking Association asked about using “fat tire” bicycles to offer guided tours during certain hours. He explained riders could let the air out of the wider tires to allow for better traction on sand, similar to the over-sand vehicle guidelines for jeeps and trucks at Assateague. The consensus during the Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety Committee meeting was that Denk could be allowed to host a “bikes on the beach” event this fall as a trial run. “The beach is … for peaceful enjoyment,” Dare said on Monday. “We’ve taken exception to having windmills offshore, as far as visual pollution goes. We have restrictions on dogs, noise [and] ball playing on the beach. “Every year it seems like somebody would come into City Hall and want to

sell sodas on the beach, or suntan lotion. And we’ve been consistent throughout the years to keep the beach a place of peaceful enjoyment,” he added. Dare said a special event is different, but he was not in favor of disturbing “the solitude of being on the beach.” City Councilman Tony DeLuca said fat tire bikes and riding on the beach were part of a new craze. He said the committee favored a special event, as a trial run. “If we did anything … we might follow the rules of bikes on the Boardwalk, with hours,” DeLuca said. Currently, bikes are restricted for Boardwalk use only between 2 a.m. and 11 a.m., Memorial Day through Labor Day. “It will come before the mayor and council,” DeLuca said, adding, “We’re

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not even close to anything like that.” Councilman Mark Paddack had another thought – was riding on the beach even possible for the average beachgoer? “I’m open to seeing what happens with a special event, however in the last eight years, I spent over 2,000 hours on that sand, in that surf and on that beach,” Paddack said. “As a certified mountain bike rider in my previous career [as an Ocean City police officer], even with the fat tires, the sprocket and so forth just is really not conducive to mom, dad and the kid [riding on the beach].” Paddack said beach riding is generally only possible after a storm, “when it rips that soft burn of sand that’s built up six or eight feet … and it creates a hard base. I’m open to hear about it, but the reality is I don’t think Joe Blow citizen will be able to pull it off [using] what we have out on our beach right now,” he said. Councilman Matt James asked if the city had a problem with people riding bikes on the beach. DeLuca replied that Special Events Director Frank Miller thought that it could be an issue, in the future. DeLuca said Denk had asked to allow bicycles on the beach during the upcoming Jellyfish Festival, but “the committee had issues with that.” “That’s why we said, whoa, we’re going to test this in the fall and see what it looks like during a special event,” DeLuca said. “It is something that is starting to become more and more [prevalent].” James, like Paddack, said bike riding on the beach was so difficult that he doesn’t see it becoming an issue. The City Council did not vote on the matter. Paddack later took issue with another proposed event, to allow the “Ty UNC Daycation 4” on the beach – with a live deejay – from 9 a.m. until noon on Saturday, Aug. 17. “When I read this, I saw a lot of red flags,” Paddack said, adding he didn’t yet see any comments from the police department. Paddack said the event has run the three previous summers, but without live music. He said the event would bring four buses and about 200 people, and then later travel to a popular midtown establishment that serves alcohol, and finally to Delmar. “Without pointing fingers, I can recall during my past career being in the inlet when those four buses came,” he said. “I’m wondering whether or not they have their buses passes for dropping off. Number two, the buses stay parked in the fire lane for the threehour time period [of the event].” Paddack recalled walking out on the beach after the event one year and seeing “trash, trash and more trash.” “And in that trash was alcoholic beverages,” he said, adding he would prefer to table the matter until police could reSee BEACH Page 16


MAY 24, 2019

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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

Beach usage debated by council Continued from Page 14 view the request. “The red flag to me is this is a booze cruise,” Paddack continued. “It’s all fun and I’m OK with that – but not on our inlet beach on a [Saturday] morning … and the addition of a deejay being out on the beach playing music does not sit well with me.” Paddack also recalled an incident several years ago on North Division Street. “What was supposed to be just a simple [event] turned into a rather ugly situation for the town,” he said. Councilwoman Mary Knight said she was also concerned about the allowing live music on the beach. “My concern is the fact that they have a deejay,” she said, also citing Dare’s previous insistence that “the beach is for peaceful enjoyment.”

“We allow boom boxes, or whatever you want to bring,” she said. “I don’t think you need a deejay. I think it starts a precedent.” James countered the applicant appeared to be willing to work with city officials and beachgoers, and turn off the music if it becomes bothersome. He added the resort already has ordinances to prevent drinking on the beach. “If they’re saying they’re not going to drink and we have police in the area, they probably won’t be drinking on the beach,” he said. “I support the event.” Councilman John Gehrig agreed. “We have jets flying over our sky, much louder than our noise ordinance,” he said. “We have vert ramps and Dew Tour bowls and concerts, and we have all kinds of stuff on the beach, all the time … that’s why it’s before us as a special event. It’s not a precedent – we do

it all the time.” Paddack countered in his experience as a resort police officer, the event was “not consistent with what the Town of Ocean City does when it puts on its events.” “We might have ‘control’ and we can walk out there and ask them to turn it down and we can deny it next year – in the meantime, we have a massive melee out on the beach, like we had on North Division Street,” Paddack said. “I look at things from a different perspective of actually being out on the concrete,” he continued. “This is a private event, [with] 200 people, and who knows where it’s going to go from there … Councilwoman Knight, you’re right – we don’t need a deejay on the beach.” Despite the objections, the council voted 4-3 to allow the event, with Knight, Dare and Paddack opposed.

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U.S. Army Corps to host meeting open to public, May 30 (May 24, 2019) The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in coordination with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Worcester County, is hosting a public meeting May 30 at the Worcester County Library – Berlin Branch (13 Harrison Ave. in Berlin) from 6:30-8:30 p.m. to discuss two concurrent efforts: a project to address sediment accumulation in the Ocean City Inlet, as well as a study on the scour hole near Homer Gudelsky Park. From 6:30-7 p.m., there will be an open house in which participants can view posters, provide feedback and speak with project personnel. From 7-8 p.m., there will be a formal presentation to provide an overview of the projects, as well as open the floor for questions. The meeting will wrap up at 8:30 p.m., allowing attendees to again view materials and speak with Corps and state employees about specific concerns following the presentation. The Ocean City Inlet navigation channel is regularly used by commercial fishermen, recreational boaters, the U.S. Coast Guard and others. The Corps removes material from the inlet through dredging two or more times per year in an attempt to maintain the channel’s authorized depth of 10 feet; however, it continues to fill in with material, creating concerns for navigation. The Corps signed a project partnership agreement Feb. 14, 2019, with Maryland DNR and Worcester County for the “Ocean City Harbor and Inlet” navigation improvement project, which is 90 percent federally funded. The Corps will evaluate sediment transport in the inlet and recommend options to manage the shoaling to include structural solutions like jetties or channel modifications like deepening the channel in the inlet. As part of the “Scour Hole: Beneficial Use of Dredged Material” study, which is 100 percent federally funded, the Corps and crews from the Corps’ Engineer Research and Development Center began work in 2017 to gather field data to better understand the approximately 50-foot-deep scour hole just northwest of Homer Gudelsky Park. Work included collecting sediment samples, deploying instrument suites, and mapping the region to obtain information about the movement of sediment in and around the scour hole. The scour hole is causing shoreline instability, foundation issues and compromising the rip rap along the shoreline. Both efforts are being conducted through the Corps’ Continuing Authorities Program, which allows the Corps to partner with state and local partners for smaller water resources issues without the need for Congressional authorization.


MAY 24, 2019

PAGE 17

Ocean City Today

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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

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County balances fiscal ‘20 budget By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) Although final numbers are still forthcoming, the Worcester County Commissioners balanced their more than $201 million fiscal year 2020 operating budget this week after agreeing to transfer up to $180,000 from reserve funds, if needed, to match revenue and expenditure totals. To help address a budget that began with requests exceeding revenues by $6.7 million, the commissioners presided over major reductions in requested spending, boosted the $.835 property tax rate by a penny and raised the income tax rate percentage from 1.75 to 2.25, which would still be the lowest on the Eastern Shore. Budget Officer Kathy Whited said the property tax rate increase would be effective on July 1, which is start of fiscal 2020, with the income tax hike applicable on Jan. 1, 2020. Obtaining a balanced budget required county officials to consider their spending priorities throughout the county. Although phasing out Homeowners Convenience Centers in Pocomoke, Snow Hill and Berlin and the Recycling Center in Newark was hotly debated, the county-sponsored services survived with funding intact for fiscal 2020. Commissioner Chip Bertino, after

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confirming revenue numbers, estimated the convenience centers operate at a roughly $700,000 deficit, while the recycling center in Newark is looking at losses of about $800,000. Bertino asked if savings could be obtained by reducing hours of operation. Chief Administrative Officer Harold Higgins said that avenue would entail reassigning the eight staff members employed at the centers to other areas. “It’s a service I believe the county constituents desire and want,” he said. Commissioner Joe Mitrecic said the centers primarily cater to outlying parts of the county, while the ever-inflating costs are spread inequitably among municipalities. “It’s a service that at some point and time is going to have to be looked and it’s going to have to be cut,” he said. Commissioner Jim Bunting suggested the time may have already arrived. “In my opinion, we should do away with the centers,” he said. Commissioner President Diana Purnell noted that shuttering the centers would concentrate trash drop-offs at the Central Landfill in Newark. Bunting suggested residents could opt to contract with a commercial trash hauler for home pick up. “It’s not going to be popular with my constituents but I’m looking at it from a

responsible point of view,” he said. “I’m not worried about the politics.” Shuddering at the mention of closing the facilities was Commissioner Josh Nordstrom. “I wouldn’t even want to discuss closing down that convenience center,” he said. While opposing shutting down operations this year, Mitrecic suggested that could happen by the next budget cycle, when more cost-cutting would be required. Speculating that private trash haulers could be expensive for low- and fixed income residents, Purnell said the proposal would likely spur protests. “If you close those it’s going to be hell to pay,” she said. Public Works Director John Tustin said commercial trash haulers would cost roughly $400 for an average household, while the cost for residents to use the convenience center is $100 annually. Commissioner Bud Church said any potential savings obtained by closing the centers would be offset by increased costs for road crews. “If you close those … you’re going to see more trash on the highway that you’ve ever seen before,” he said. Bertino noted convenience center rates were last increased five years ago. Enterprise Fund Controller Jessica

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PAGE 19

Ocean City Today

‘To double Furnace Town is a mistake because it gives them a false economy.’ Commissioner Chip Bertino Wilson said the idea has been batted around previously and suggested the fee charge should be about $300 to cover actual operating costs. “The problem is when we raise rates we lose customers,” she said. Wilson estimated the last price increase caused about a quarter of the roughly 4,000 customers to discontinue use. Commissioner Ted Elder suggested boosting the yearly fee to $300 if the long-term plan is to discontinue operations, thereby conditioning residents to pursue hiring commercial trash haulers. “Is it worth the amount of money we’re putting into it as a service?” he said. Proposed cuts to social service agencies budget requests, including the Maryland Food Bank, also raised questions regarding funding priorities. After receiving $1,500 in the current year’s budget, food bank officials requested that number jump to $7,000 for fiscal 2020, while the county staff recommended maintaining current support levels. Purnell proposed granting the Maryland Food Bank $3,000 for the upcoming fiscal year. “They do a lot in this county,” she said. Mitrecic concurred and said the assistance is especially important in the

lower end of the county. “I forget how many tons of food the food bank distributed last year but it’s an unbelievable amount … that goes out in this county to go help our needy people,” he said. Following a motion by Bunting, the commissioners approved funding $3,000 for the food bank in fiscal 2020. The budget strings also tightened for several recreational and cultural budget requests. The Art League of Ocean City had requested $17,500 in funding, only to see the county staff recommend it be cut to $10,000 and then watched it fall to zero. Following a motion by Mitrecic to grant the recommended funding of $10,000, Bunting proposed foregoing the request. “It was zero last year and it should be zero this year,” he said. The motion was voted against 4-3 with Bertino, Purnell, Bunting and Elder in the majority. Conversely, Furnace Town Living Heritage Museum in Snow Hill was approved for a funding request of $40,000, twice the amount granted in the current fiscal year, but not without dissension. Mitrecic made a motion to support the request while noting without financial backing the educational facility

would likely be forced to close. “Furnace Town is a huge destination for our school system,” he said. Bunting said the funding should remain at $20,000. “That’s what they should have counted on,” he said. Bertino, while recognizing the value to the community, disagreed with taxpayers footing the costs. “Fundraising is their responsibility and we shouldn’t be paying it,” he said. “To double Furnace Town is a mistake because it gives them a false economy.” The commissioners voted 4-3 for the funding requested with Bunting, Elder and Bertino opposed. The Delmarva Discovery Center in Pocomoke, which had requested $35,000 for fiscal 2020, was approved for the staff recommended total of $20,000. Despite failing to gain traction after highlighting infrastructure needs, Nordstrom made several proposals to increase the county’s unrestricted grant to Pocomoke, which ended up being approved for $465,000, to equal the current fiscal year allotment. Nordstrom’s first pitch was to grant ten percent of casino table game revenues to both Pocomoke and Snow Hill, which he estimated would net each municipality about $38,000. To circumvent potential restrictions

on disbursement of table game monies, for which the state has yet to provide clear guidance, Nordstrom proposed sourcing the figure from the general fund. While contending that the entire county should benefit from casino revenues, Nordstrom noted Route 113 is the most direct path for Ocean Downs users who live south of Worcester. “We have fire and EMS people that have to respond to any accidents, violations [or] anything that happens along the way,” he said. Bunting said equivalent funding of $38,000 was approved through an ambulance grant for the Pocomoke Fire Department. Mitrecic said the funding request should be tied to specific project. “I have a problem giving any municipality ‘x,’ amount of dollars they can do whatever they want with,” he said. Elder said the casino funds distribution needs to be reassessed. “To keep pouring the money into the rich section of the county and not acknowledge the needs of the poorer sections of the county isn’t the way government should be working,” he said. Commissioner Bud Church said Ocean City contributes a major portion to the county’s bottom line. See CO. Page 20


PAGE 20

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

Greys Creek Nature Park concept approved By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) Looking to accommodate ecotourism visitors, Worcester County government has agreed to work with the Maryland Coastal Bays Program on a proposal to develop Greys Creek Nature Park on a 500-plus acre plot located just below the Delaware state line. Tom Perlozzo, director of recreation and parks, presented a detailed timeline to the Worcester County Commissioners on Tuesday. “This includes the vision of the park,

the developmental concept, the planned activities, the associated budget and funding,” he said. Greys Creek, which encompasses 572-acres bordering Sussex County, was conveyed from the state by a memorandum of understanding in 2006. “It has sat idle and still does at this time,” he said. “We’ve also entered into an MOU in 2014 with Maryland Coastal Bays to cooperatively manage and utilize the park on a year-round basis.” Perlozzo said the cost to Worcester will be limited as grant funding of $188,000 is tentatively on tap through

the Land and Water Conservation Fund, with that sum being matched by funds from Maryland’s Program Open Space. “We’re in the process of completing that application,” he said. “We’ve got a written acknowledgment of $188,345 to be added to the budgeted Program Open Space amount.” Perlozzo estimated Worcester would foot about $37,000 of the overall project costs of approximately $375,000. “After this, we will whittle that down using staff and in-kind services to limit the expense to taxpayers,” he said.

Co. budget to be adopted, June 4 Continued from Page 19 “Whether we like it or not, they’re the goose that lays the golden egg and I think everyone in the county benefits from Ocean City and the money they generate,” he said. The motion failed after only generating support from Nordstrom and Elder. Another motion from Nordstrom, which died for a lack of a second, would have provided Pocomoke with a onetime grant of $100,000 to held address infrastructure needs, including water filtration unit replacement, wastewater

lift station repair, and river walk and break water replacement. Nordstrom was the sole vote for another proposal requesting the county match new tax incentives offered by Pocomoke to attract new businesses. Mitrecic, who seconded a motion from Nordstrom for discussion purposes, said oversight is crucial. “Are we going to do this for beer and wine stores?” he said. Bunting suggested any potential new businesses interested in Pocomoke’s tax incentives could also contact the

Bonnie Curro

county’s economic development department, which the commissioners could approve on an individual case basis. Mitrecic said he has long supported the county providing tax incentives for any new viable businesses. “I have an issue with every business getting this break,” he said. Again, Nordstrom was the sole voice of support for his proposal. Following this week’s budget work session the commissioners will adopt the final budget on June 4.

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Two public comment periods were held over the past year to give careful consideration to the concerns of residents of the roughly 1,000 homes located in a pair of adjacent subdivisions, which include Bay View Estates and Hidden Harbor. “We made the best efforts to address those concerns and incorporate those in the proposed design of the plan,” he said. Commissioner Joe Mitrecic said the relatively low-cost project would likely yield dividends. “Anytime we can take advantage and get people on our waterways and teach them about the water and conservation it’s a huge plus for the county as a whole,” he said. Noting previous parking worries expressed by Greys Creek neighbors, Commissioner Jim Bunting asked what considerations were given to those concerns. Perlozzo said initial design plans have been amended to minimize the issue. “That’s why we moved the general entrance to the park in another location,” he said. Perlozzo also said the site is legally constrained by the Critical Areas Laws of Maryland, the Corps of Engineers Wetland Protection programs and See GREYS Page 24

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Ocean City Today 1

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Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019


MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 23

AGH Auxiliary holds volunteer award dinner (May 24, 2019) The Auxiliary of Atlantic General Hospital and Health System recently held its annual awards dinner to recognize volunteers. AGH volunteers support the hospital by donating their time and expertise in every aspect of the hospital and health system as well as in the community, providing more than 28,000 hours of service annually. AGH volunteers donate more than just their time. They also raise funds for the Foundation through lobby sales and operation of the thrift store. During the awards dinner the Auxiliary presented AGH president and CEO Michael Franklin, FACHE, with a check in the amount of $50,000 toward their $300,000 pledge to the hospital’s Campaign for the Future.

The Auxiliary of Atlantic General Hospital and Health System recently held its annual awards dinner to recognize volunteers. Pictured are volunteers honored for their 300 hours of service to the hospital.

In addition to recognizing volunteers, Kitty Reeves, Auxiliary president, presented an award to a Stephen Decatur high school student Dana Kim for her

During the awards dinner the Auxiliary presented AGH president and CEO Michael Franklin, FACHE, with a check toward their pledge to the hospital’s Campaign for the Future. Pictured, from left, are Jackie Choate, Auxiliary recording secretary; Franklin; Kitty Reeves, Auxiliary president; Nick Salafia, Auxiliary treasurer, and Todd Ferrante, chair of the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation.

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service to the hospital. Kim volunteers at the registration/information department and plans to continue volunteering throughout the summer. Kim has volunteered with Atlantic General Hospital

for four years, and has completed a record amount of over 500 hours as an Auxiliary teen volunteer. Volunteers who have contributed 100 hours, 200 hours and 300 hours of See AGH Page 24


PAGE 24

Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

POLICE/COURTS

Assault alleged Sean Patrick Driscoll, 27 of Baltimore, was charged with assault after witnesses told police he dragged a woman through a hotel parking lot on May 16. According to police, a hotel employee at the 3200 block of Baltimore Avenue told police he saw Driscoll and a halfclothed woman, Chelsie Reiser, exit a black Camaro. Reiser fell to the ground upon exiting the car and Driscoll allegedly grabbed her by the hair, dragged her back to the car, and then drove off. Police were called to the scene at 9:47 p.m. Video of the incident shown to police apparently began with Reiser “topless and on her hands and knees,” and actively pushing Driscoll away. At 10:28 p.m. that night, a second police unit saw Driscoll and Reiser arguing. Police recognized the car from a previous call and detained Driscoll and Reiser, both of whom were said to be drunk. Reiser had an abrasion on her left elbow, but refused treatment and said the injury was self inflicted. A witness told police they had seen Driscoll chasing Reiser through a parking lot across the street, then threw Reiser to the ground and dragged her to his car while she was kicking and screaming. Driscoll apparently noticed when a witness began calling for help, and “hurriedly threw Reiser back into the car and ran the driver’s door as if he was trying

to escape,” but police arrived before he could leave the area. A second witness offered a similar account. Driscoll was arrested for second-degree assault. He waived his right to an attorney during an initial appearance on May 17 and is scheduled to face trail on June 21 at Worcester County District Court in Ocean City.

Man destroys doors Gavin R. Swilley, 20 of Severn, Maryland, was charged after allegedly going on a destructive rampage that frightened his girlfriend and several others. Police, called for reports of a domestic dispute near the 100 block of the Boardwalk on May 17, apparently found Swilley’s girlfriend, Maria Tartaglia, hiding in nearby parking lot. Tartaglia told police she, Swilley and a group of friends were staying in a nearby unit that belonged to a friend. She told police Swilley has trouble controlling his anger and he “often passes out due to increased level of stress or anxiety.” She said Swilley had locked himself in the master bedroom of the unit and that another friend broke down the door to check on him. According to Tartaglia, doing so pulled the molding on the inside of the door away from the drywall. Swilley, who had been sitting on the bed inside the room, allegedly then beSee POLICE Page 80

AGH Auxiliary award festivities Continued from Page 23 service or more to the hospital and health system and all committee chairs were also recognized. Volunteers also serve on hospital teams and committees, providing crucial insight and community support to Atlantic General Hospital. The Auxiliary Coordinators were recognized for their organization and hard work training the new volunteers as they come in, and keeping their different groups running smoothly. Atlantic General Hospital has been providing quality health care to the residents of Worcester, Wicomico and Somerset counties is Maryland and Sussex County, Delaware, since May 1993.

Built through the commitment and generosity of a dedicated community, Atlantic General’s main facility in Berlin combines the warmth of personalized attention with the reassurance of medical expertise and advanced technology. The not-for-profit hospital provides quality specialty care in oncology, medical and surgical weight loss, orthopedics, and women’s diagnostics among other services. Atlantic General Health System, its network of more than 40 primary care providers and specialists, cares for residents and visitors throughout the region. For more information about Atlantic General Hospital, visit www.atlanticgeneral.org.

Greys Creek Park plan unveiled Continued from Page 20 Worcester County zoning and subdivision regulations. “It’s going to be operated by the Maryland Coastal Bays, who [will] have a research center,” he said. The center would also provide temporary housing for researchers, with the county recreation department also anticipating future outside activities. Emphasis will be placed on sustainability while developing Greys Creek, which Perlozzo said would guide choices for building systems and materials.

The goal is to develop the rural lands to support education, recreation and preservation, he said. Greys Creek Nature Park will also provide a wealth of passive recreation opportunities, including hiking, trail running, biking, kayaking, canoeing, birding and stand-up paddle boarding, Perlozzo said Tentatively slated to open in June 2021, the park could add to the approximately $18 million Worcester hauls in annually from wildlife-related activities and birding recreation, Perlozzo said.


MAY 24, 2019

PAGE 25

Ocean City Today

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Business

Ocean City Today May 24, 2019

Page 26

REAL ESTATE REPORT

NAR Home Buyer Profile sheds light on consumer views By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (May 24, 2019) The National Association of Realtors Aspiring Home Buyer Profile is an in-depth examination of the consumer preferences of non-homeowners, defined as those that rent and those that live with someone else, such as family or friends, without paying rent. The report released at the beginning of 2019 compares and contrasts the perceptions of homeownership, the American Dream, and housing affordability from the perspective of non-homeowners. When non-homeowners were asked for the chief reason why they currently do not own a home, most respondents said it was because they were currently unable to afford a mortgage. Over the last quarter of 2018, 43 percent of non-owners said they did not own a home because they were not in a position to purchase, which was down from the third quarter of 2018, when 49 percent of non-homeowners answered the same. Also in the fourth quarter, 33 percent of non-homeowners said they do not own because current life circumstances are not suitable for ownership, while 16 percent said they need the flexibility of renting. Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, says unaffordable housing has caused a number of potential buyers to hold off on purchasing a new home. “The lack of affordable and moderately-priced homes has forced nonhomeowners to delay achieving that part of the American Dream,” he said. “However, as the survey confirms, significant lifestyle changes like marriage or starting a family often spur non-owners to pursue home-ownership.” Some of the other report highlights include: • For both homeowners and nonhomeowners alike, homeownership is strongly considered a part of the American Dream. For non-owners, roughly 75 percent reported that homeownership is part of their American Dream. • Of the non-owners, 45 percent

PHOTO COURTESY FISHER ARCHITECTURE LLC

The new Cambria Hotel near the Route 50 bridge entrance to Ocean City is expected to open next spring. The hotel will feature waterfront views of the bay from its 131 rooms, along with a rooftop bar, restaurant, indoor pool and conference and lounge space.

New hotel could bolster downtown By Josh Davis News Editor (May 24, 2019) The planned opening next year of the Cambria Hotel, near the Route 50 bridge entrance to the resort, could have a significant impact on that entranceway to town. “It is our opinion that this site represents a major front door to the Town of Ocean City,” said Keith P. Fisher of the Fisher Architecture LLC firm that designed the hotel. “The architecture will immediately give people the feeling that they are now on vacation, and it’s time to relax and enjoy all that OC has to offer.” The Ocean City Planning Commission approved site plans for the hotel in 2017. According to the approval, the hotel will have 131 rooms, lounge areas befitting a destination hotel, conference space, a rooftop bar, an outdoor pool and space for a restaurant. were 34 years or under, 59 percent make an income of under $50,000, and 43 percent live in suburban areas. – Lauren Bunting is an Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.

The site was formerly home to a Cropper Concrete plant, while the new hotel is slated to open early next spring. Harkins Contracting, Inc. has overseen the construction.

‘It is our opinion that this site represents a major front door to the Town of Ocean City’ Fisher Architecture LLC Keith P. Fisher Cambria is a subsidiary of Choice Hotels International, Inc., a hospitality franchisor based in Rockville. “The building will become iconic in that it has now given an identity to a site that was once underutilized and, quite frankly, not enjoyable to look at,” Fisher said. “The hotel will be amenity rich and will give the users incredible views of the bay from its rooftop venue.” He added details of the hotel were refined after “many meetings with members of the” Ocean City Development Corporation. OCDC recognized the hotel during its annual meeting on May 8 as one of several new construction projects downtown that will boost the resort’s tax base and help create jobs.

Once the upscale hotel is up and running, the job of selling rooms there will go to Renee Seiden, regional director of sales for the Pinnacle Hospitality Group. According to Seiden, all of the rooms will have a waterfront view of the Assawoman Bay, and the hotel will feature a 3,000-square-foot event space on the first floor. “The restaurant is on the top floor and has a stunning view of the bay,” she added, although a tenant for the spot has not yet been found. “This is the largest of our hotels in terms of number of rooms,” Seiden said. “It’s the only one that will have a restaurant, currently, and it is the only one that has meeting space.” Seiden said the Cambria would represent a huge change downtown. “I think from the view perspective, the ocean is beautiful, but the bay is stunning. Not many of us get up early enough to watch the sunrise, but we’re all there for the sunset,” she said. “It’s just going to be gorgeous. “It’s a really exciting project. I think it really is going to be a beautiful gateway to Ocean City as you enter along Route 50, rather than the cement plant. It’s going to give it a whole different look and feel when you enter the town,” Seiden added.


MAY 24, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Conev attends CAI Conference

Atlantic General Hospital recently presented the DAISY Award for excellence in nursing to Iris Hudson. Pictured, in back, from left, are Gregory Stamnas, medical director, hospitalist program; Karen Christmas, clinical outcomes coordinator; Christina Brown, clinical outcomes coordinator; and Kelly Fox, RN, DAISY award coordinator; and in front, Sherry Whitt, director, medsurg; Hudson; and Colleen Wareing, RN, vice president of Patient Care Services at AGH.

Atlantic Gen. honors Hudson with DAISY excellence award (May 24, 2019) Atlantic General Hospital recently presented the DAISY Award for excellence in nursing to Iris Hudson. Hudson has been a nurse at Atlantic General Hospital for almost 20 years. She is a charge nurse on the medical surgical unit. Hudson has been a repeat nominee for both the DAISY and Nurse of the Year award. She supports the hospital

in caring for the community and serving as chair of the performance improvement/patient safety council. Colleagues of Hudson look forward to working with her and stated she is a good-hearted, kind soul. They enjoy working with her because she is a hard worker and gives all she’s got. The nomination letter stated, “Iris always does what is best for the patient. See DAISY Page 28

(May 24, 2019) Igor Conev, vice president of Mann Properties Inc. of Ocean City, recently attended the Community Associations Institute Annual Conference in Orlando, Florida. The CAI National Conference event is an annual educational, networking and leadership experienced organized and managed by experts in community living. Igor Conev Participants reviewed and discussed industry tools and services in such areas as risk management and crisis, longterm financial planning, tax and law compliance, insurance and legal challenges, cyber security and real-time solutions for condominium and HOA. Uniting homeowners, managers and service providers with the common goal

of harmony in the communities took a special place during this conference. Conev believes professional development is the single most important investment for any company. His theory is that even the most successful companies in the world must constantly endeavor to improve themselves. This is based on the idea that someone is always trying to be the best. As such, complacency is a guaranteed sentence of failure. “The only way to ensure failure is to do nothing,” Conev said. “I have always been motivated to try anything and everything I can to get ahead,” he said. “My management team and I are applying this idea to the company. We want to make sure our branding specialists are always working on new skills so that we can constantly improve the services we provide.”

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Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

New ambulatory surgery ctr. earns certificate of need (May 24, 2019) Atlantic General Hospital has received a Certificate of Need from the Maryland Health Care Commission to move forward with building an ambulatory surgery center on Route 589, near the south end of Ocean Pines. It’s the first time a certificate of need has been granted for a healthcare facility in Worcester County, since the state approved the construction of Atlantic General Hospital in 1991. Atlantic General plans to break ground on the surgery center as part of a new 98,000-square-foot facility that will also include primary and specialty care physician practices, wellness and integrative therapies and other outpatient services. The surgery center will comprise two full-service operating rooms and three procedure rooms, dramatically increasing access to surgical services while reducing cost for minor and outpatient surgeries. The construction of the surgery center is included in the organization’s $35 million master facilities plan being funded, in part, by the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation’s $10 million Campaign for the Future. The capital campaign also sup-

Atlantic General Hospital has received a Certificate of Need from the Maryland Health Care Commission to move forward with building an ambulatory surgery center on Route 589, near the south end of Ocean Pines.

ported construction of the John H. “Jack” Burbage, Jr. Regional Cancer Care Center and the Atlantic General Women’s Health Center in West Ocean City, and will help fund inpatient care redesign at the main hospital as well as expansion of the emergency department. “This is a very important step in the continuing development of our health care system,” said Michael Franklin, president and CEO of Atlantic General Hospital. “This will be the first full-service, freestanding ambulatory surgery center in Worcester County, and it will make access to care in the region much more convenient as our community continues to grow.” Atlantic General Hospital has been providing quality health care to the residents of Worcester, Wicomico

and Somerset counties is Maryland and Sussex County, Delaware, since May 1993. Built through the commitment and generosity of a dedicated community, Atlantic General’s main facility in Berlin combines the warmth of personalized attention with the reassurance of medical expertise and advanced technology. The not-for-profit hospital provides quality specialty care in oncology, medical and surgical weight loss, orthopedics, and women’s diagnostics among other services. Atlantic General Health System, its network of more than 40 primary care providers and specialists, cares for residents and visitors throughout the region. For more information about Atlantic General Hospital, visit www.atlanticgeneral.org.

DAISY award for nursing given Continued from Page 27 She is a valuable asset to the AGH team. She is passionate about patients every time she is here. No matter how big or small the situation is, Iris gets it done.” The DAISY Award, created by The DAISY Foundation in Memory of J. Patrick Barnes, honors the extraordinary work nurses do for patients and families each day. Hospital leadership brought the awards program to At-

lantic General to recognize the compassion and high level of care its nurses provide to residents and visitors of the community. Patients and visitors can nominate an Atlantic General Hospital and Health System nurse for the DAISY Award at any time. Nomination forms are available in every hospital department and health system physician office. Awards are bestowed quarterly.


MAY 24, 2019

BUSINESS BRIEFS The Wor-Wic Community College Foundation recently welcomed Mike Marshall and Jason Parker of Berlin, Stephen Pappas of Ocean City, and Phyllis Vinyard of Salisbury as new members of the board of directors. Marshall is president and CEO of Marshall Hotels & Resorts in Salisbury. He is a member of the American Hotel & Lodging Association, the Cornell Hotel SociMike Marshall ety and GlenRiddle Golf Club in Berlin, and a former member of the Greater Salisbury Committee and Green Hill Country Club. Marshall earned his bachelor’s degree from Washington and Lee University in Lexington Virginia, and completed the advanced management program in hospitality management through Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He and his wife, Kathy, live in Berlin. They have three grown children. Parker is a vice president at the Bank of Ocean City. He serves as secretary/treasurer of the board of directors of the L. Franklin and Gertrude H. Purnell Jason Parker Foundation and as an elder at the Buckingham Presbyterian Church in Berlin. He is a member of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association, an associate member of the Berlin Lions Club and Delmarva Condominium Manager’s Association, and a former member of the Downtown Association of Ocean City, Young Professionals of the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce and the Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce. Parker volunteers with Berlin Little League as a coach and with Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore. He received his associate degree in business management from WorWic and his bachelor’s degree in finance from Wilmington University. Parker is also a graduate of Maryland Banking School. He and his wife, Kristin, have two children, Claire, 6, and Wyatt, 4. Pappas is the owner and manager of The Original Greene Turtle in Ocean City and a lacrosse coach at Worcester Preparatory School. He volunteers with Stephen Pappas the Worcester County Humane Society and the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. He received his bachelor’s degree from Washington College in Chestertown. He and his wife, Danielle, live in Ocean City.

Vinyard received her bachelor’s degree at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. She serves on the board of directors of the Peninsula RePhyllis Vinyard gional Medical Center Foundation and is a former board member of the Sussex Shores Water Co. Vinyard is a member of the Trinity United Methodist Church Altar Guild in Salisbury and a former member of the Wicomico Garden Club. Vinyard created an endowed scholarship at Wor-Wic in memory of her husband, Henry Lee Vinyard Jr., a Salisbury attorney and community leader for more than 35 years.

Top agents Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Ocean City offices had several agents ranking in March and April for the Greater Baltimore Region. Ranked in March were: Nancy Reither, third; Michael Nolen, 10th; Shawn Kotwica, 12th; Peck Miller, 14th; Dan Clayland, 28th; Jamie Caine, 39th; Terry Miller, 44th; Kim Bounds, 47th; Cindy DiNicolas, 57th; Marianne Leizure, 61st; Eric Green, 66th; Bonnie Curro, 67th; Vicki Harmon, 68th; Michele Continued on Page 30

Reither cited as among top agents for Coldwell Banker (May 24, 2019) Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in the Mid-Atlantic Region announces the top agent and sales team awards for 2018 sales success. The top agent companywide and in the Greater Baltimore region is Georgie Berkinshaw, an affiliated agent with the Annapolis Church Circle office. Nancy Reither, who is affiliated with the Ocean City office, ranked No. 2 in the Greater Baltimore region. Top large team (four-plus members) honors for the Greater Baltimore region went to The Hulsman Group, affiliated with the Ellicott City office and the top small team (one to three members) in the region went to PCS Home Team, led by Sarah Garza who is affiliated with the Annapolis Plaza office. In addition to top honors, Berkinshaw also achieved Coldwell Banker International Society of Excellence designation, an honor given to the top 133 affiliated agents out of the nearly 92,000 Coldwell Banker agents worldwide. Reither achieved Coldwell Banker International President’s Premier designation, an honor given to the top 1 percent of 92,000 affiliated Coldwell Banker agents worldwide. She is consistently a top producer in

the Ocean City and Delaware beach regions. She has earned the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury Property Specialist designation and the Certified Nancy Reither Luxury Home Marketing Specialist designation from the Institute for Luxury Home Marketing. A member of the Coastal Association of Realtors, Reither is affiliated with the Coldwell Banker Ocean City 123rd Street office, Suite D, and she can be reached at 410-603-5050. Top Large Team honors went to The Hulsman Group, led by Nancy Hulsman who is affiliated with the Ellicott City Enchanted Forest office. The team also achieved the Coldwell Banker International President’s Elite designation, given to the top 8 percent of nearly 3,100 sales teams in the U.S. and Canada. The PCS Home Team, led by Garza, took top small team honors and is affiliated with the Annapolis Plaza office. The team also achieved the Coldwell Banker International Premier Circle designation, given to 16 percent of the nearly 3,100 sales teams in the U.S. and Canada.

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Ocean City Today

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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

Diakonia announces Miller as new executive director (May 24, 2019) The Board of Directors of Diakonia announces Belinda Miller as the new executive director Miller brings with her over 30 years of social work experience providing services for various groups with specific needs to include adults with developmental disabilities, mental illnesses and those who are hearing impaired/deaf which utilizes her special skill as a sign language interpreter. Her lifelong passion for helping those in need includes years of service to the many individuals and families struggling with homelessness. Miller previously served as executive director of Diakonia from 1995

until the end of 2003 when her family moved out of state for her husband’s career. Miller is excited to have the opportunity to serve Diakonia a second time. Belinda Miller The organization welcomes Miller and looks forward to working with her. She and the staff at Diakonia will continue their efforts serving those in need bringing “Help for Today & Hope for Tomorrow.� For more information, contact Allyson Bernard-Church, board chair at 203-470-3125.

BUSINESS BRIEFS Continued from Page 29 Pompa, 78th; and Ed Galyon, 90th. Top Teams: Cain Team of OC, 14th. Honored for April were: Reither, sixth; Caine, seventh; Kotwica, 14th; Miller, 21st; Galyon, 50th; Pompa, 51st; Green, 58th; Matthew James, 75th; and Terri Moran, 100th. Top Teams: Cain Team of OC, 11th; McNamara & Associates, 13th.

Promotion Taylor Bank announces that Hanna Ford has been promoted to operations supervisor of the 20th Street branch in Ocean City. Ford, a native of Worcester County, began her career at Taylor Bank as a customer service associate in 2013. She has also served as an associate trainer, senior customer service associate and management trainee.

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In her new role, she is responsible for assisting with training and development of branch staff, and managing the overall operations of the branch. Ford is a particiHanna Ford pant in the bank’s professional development program, and the Emerging Leaders Champion Program through the Maryland Bankers Association. Calvin B. Taylor Banking Company, the bank subsidiary of Calvin B. Taylor Bankshares, Inc., founded in 1890, has 11 banking locations within the eastern coastal area of the Delmarva Peninsula including Worcester County, Maryland, Sussex County, Delaware and Accomack County, Virginia. There is also a loan production office located in Onley, Virginia.

    



 



  

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Ocean City Today

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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

CFES presents funds to 30 nonprofits in three counties (May 24, 2019) A total of $107,713 has been granted by the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore to 30 local nonprofits. Twice a year, nonprofits serving Wicomico, Worcester and Somerset counties apply for Community Needs grants to help fund programs designed to address a variety of needs on the lower shore. This spring, the grants will support underserved youth, health, homelessness, addictions recovery, hunger, and environmental issues, among others. “Our Community Needs Grants serve a wide array of programs that impact the lower shore community,” said Erica Joseph, CFES president. “This truly captures the spirit of grants made by the community, for the community, and allows so many nonprofits to grow their services.” The following nonprofits received program funding: 4STEPS Therapeutic Riding Program – to teach life and career skills to individuals with disabilities through interaction with horses. Assateague Island Alliance Inc. – Aid for the growth and sustainability of this wildlife and natural resources-focused organization. Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Foundation – Structural improvements to the Children’s House by the Sea, which provides respite care for critically ill children in Ocean City. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Eastern Shore, Inc. – to pair boys facing adversity with positive role models for mentoring. Brown Box Theatre Project – to purchase improved lighting equipment. Child & Family Foundation Inc. – “Boutique Nights,” a personal enrichment program for middle and high school girls. Christian Shelter Inc. – Retro-

fitting the second-floor housing space of the homeless shelter. City of Salisbury SWIFT Program –Transportation assistance for the Salisbury Wicomico Integrated First Care Team (SWIFT) program, which provides mobile community health assistance. Delmarva Public Radio – Online and broadcast programming of the 2019 National Folk Festival. Epoch Dream Center – to enhance a mentoring program which pairs at-risk youth with individual mentors. Interfaith Partners for the Chesapeake – One Water Partnership program, which builds regional groups working to heal local watersheds, improve water quality, and bolster local environmental stewardship. Islamic Society of Princess Anne – to pilot an Arabic Language and Culture summer school program in partnership with UMES. Junior Achievement of the Eastern Shore, Inc. – Support for the JA Philanthropy program, which teaches students about the importance of philanthropy and the roles of nonprofits. Moveable Feast, Inc. – to provide healthy home-delivered meals to Eastern Shore residents with chronic illnesses. Recovery Resource Center – to pilot life skills classes for persons in addictions recovery. Salisbury Arts & Entertainment District Inc. – Support for the free, multi-day Downtown Salisbury Festival in Summer 2019. Salisbury University – for the annual Children & Young Adult Festival, which promotes children’s literature and writing. Salisbury Urban Ministries – Support for the Lazarus Food Pantry, which serves food to citizens in need in Wicomico County. Somerset Committee for the

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VOLUNTEER AWARD Ocean City Development Corporation Executive Director Glenn Irwin, left, and President Blaine Smith present the 2018 volunteer award to Saylor Amos during the nonprofit’s annual meeting on May 8 at Shenanigan’s Irish Pub and Grille on Fourth Street and the Boardwalk.

Homeless – to provide life and career skills training to residents of the Lower Shore Homeless Shelter. Somerset County Judy Center Partnership – to create a tri-county accreditation program for early child care providers. Somerset County Library – for the Rock Out While School’s Out teen program activities at the Princess Anne branch. St. James A.M.E. Zion Church – to provide educational field trips to Pemberton Elementary school students. TEAM 360 - to purchase equipment for athletes of different abilities to enable them to train and race in mainstream athletic events. Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art – to support a Youth Environmental Action Summit for third through 12th grade student-led grant projects. Wicomico County Free Library – Books and supplies for Project READ, a literacy program for adult learners. Wicomico Environmental Trust – to facilitate a consultant-led strategic planning session. Worcester Youth & Family

Counseling Services Inc. – to purchase bedding for homeless and disadvantaged children. Word of Life Center – to equip a new immigration office in Salisbury which helps immigrants become established in the community. Wor-Wic Community College – Summer Scholars program scholarships for third through ninth graders. YMCA of the Chesapeake Inc. Henson Family Location – for “Senior Socials” which connect local seniors with the community and help them stay mentally and physically fit. The semi-annual Community Needs Grant Program benefits organizations serving the lower shore of Maryland with a $5,000 maximum award per nonprofit. Applicants must be 501c3 nonprofit, faith-based organizations providing non-sectarian programs, or eligible programs within government agencies serving citizens on the lower Eastern Shore of Maryland. The next deadline for CNG grant applications is Aug. 1. For additional information visit CFES.org or call 410-742-9911.

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Ocean City Today

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AGH CEO Franklin among 52 chosen for Leadership Md. (May 24, 2019) Leadership Maryland announced recently that Michael A. Franklin, president and CEO of Atlantic General Hospital, has been selected to participate in the professional development program dedicated to building a better Maryland by harnessing the strength of its local business and community leaders. Franklin is one of 52 Michael Franklin individuals chosen for Leadership Maryland’s 27th class – the Class of 2019, who will complete the eight-month, hands-on learning program focused on the state’s most vital social, economic and environmental issues. Following a two-day opening retreat in April, the class will attend five twoday intense sessions traversing the state, focusing on Maryland’s economic development, education, health and human services, criminal justice, the environment, and multiculturalism/diversity. These sessions will be followed by a one-day closing retreat in November and a graduation celebration in December. More than 100 experts representing business, government, education and the nonprofit community will serve

as panelists and guest speakers. Franklin, who has over 30 years of healthcare management experience, joined Atlantic General Hospital and Health System as its CEO in 2005. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences from Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, and a Master of Science in Healthcare Administration from Virginia Commonwealth University-Medical College of Virginia. “I’m honored to be selected as a member of the Class of 2019,” Franklin said. “Maryland has been home for me and my family for many years, and I look forward to the additional opportunities Leadership Maryland will provide for me to give back and make our communities even stronger.” “As in previous years, the selection process was very competitive, which is a testament to our members encouraging a diverse and broad spectrum of highly-qualified executives from across the state to apply to our program and share in their experience,” said Renée M. Winsky ‘05, president and chief executive officer, Leadership Maryland. “This year’s cohort is a powerful crosssection of leaders from our state. I’m excited to see them come together as a group and do great things in their workplaces, communities and beyond in the years to come.”

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The Joint Color Guard composed of members of the American Legion Post #166, Post #123 and Post #237, the First State Detachment of the Marine Corps League, the US Coast Guard Ocean City Station and Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 1091 post the colors during last year’s Ocean Pines Memorial Day ceremony.

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First Vice Commander Robert Smith takes part in the Post Everlasting ceremony during the American Legion Post #166 Memorial Day service last year in Ocean City.

Memorial Day activities planned in county By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) Several Memorial Day activities will take place this weekend around the county, ranging from patriotic ceremonies to a parade. Here are a few events planned Friday through Memorial Day Monday: Ocean City: • The Dunes Manor Hotel on 28th Street and Baltimore Avenue will host the American Legion Synepuxent Post 166, American Legion Riders and joint Color Guard processions oceanside starting at 8 a.m. on Monday. The activities will begin in the parking lot in front of Dunes Manor and continue on the beach and include the playing of “Taps,” posting of colors, a firing squad, three-volley salute and the laying of a wreath in the ocean by the U.S. Coast Guard of Ocean City. The ceremony will be led by Commander of the South Eastern Shore District Sarge Garlitz. Rosie Garlitz of Unit #166 will offer the poem “In Flanders Fields” and will lead atten-

dees in “God Bless America.” After the ceremony, the Dunes Manor hotel will offer a buffet style breakfast. For more information, call the Dunes Manor Hotel at 1-800-5232888. • Jolly Roger Amusement Park on 30th Street will have a Memorial Day service at 1 p.m. led by Sarge Garlitz on Monday. For more information, call Garlitz at 443-735-1942. • American Legion Post #166 will host a Memorial Day service at 5 p.m. on Monday at its facility on 24th Street. Sarge Garlitz, commander of the South Eastern Shore District of the American Legion, will be the emcee. Representatives from the First State Detachment Marine Corps League, Unit #166 American Legion Auxiliary, Chapter #166 American Legion Riders, Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter #1091, American Legion Post #166 Color Guard, Sons of the American Legion #166, and officers from the Worcester County Veterans Memorial will say a few words. Chaplain Ben Dawson will perform

the invocation. In addition, the Ocean City Lions Club and Elks of Ocean City will also participate in the event. Troop #261 Boy Scouts, Pack #261 Cub Scouts and Unit #166 Junior Auxiliary will also be attending the event. The service features a posteverlasting moment, firing of the volley salute and “Taps” will be played.    Past Commander and Historian Nate Pearson will present the history of Memorial Day. Rosie Garlitz of Unit #166 will lead attendees in “God Bless America.” Refreshments will be served after the ceremony, which is free and open to the public. For more information, call Commander Tom Wengert at 443-9942513. Ocean Pines: • The Worcester County Veterans Memorial Foundation will host its 14th annual Memorial Day ceremony at 11 a.m. on Monday. “It’s a solemn ceremony to remember those who lost their lives,” Marie Gilmore, president of the Worcester County Veteran’s Memorial, said. “It

will be a patriotic service.” The ceremony, which is open to the public, will take place at the Worcester County Veterans Memorial in Ocean Pines on Route 589 near the South Gate. Graham Caldwell will be the Master of Ceremonies. Gold Star Mothers and former American POWs will also be honored. The guest speaker this year will be former Sheriff Reggie Masson, a Vietnam veteran. The Delmarva Chorus, Frank Nanna and the WWIIunes, Todd Crosby and Randy Lee Ashcraft will perform patriotic music during the hour-long event. Troop #261 Boy Scouts, Pack #261 Cub Scouts and Unit #166 Junior Auxiliary will also be in attendance. “Taps” will be played, along with a salute from the rifle team and honor guards. The Ocean Pines Memorial Day ceremony is always well attended and though some seating is provided, attendees should bring lawn chairs. Golf carts will be on hand for those who need assistance from the parking See MEMORIAL Page 35


MAY 24, 2019

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Ocean City Today

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Members of the Duncan-Showell American Legion Post #231 march in the Old-Fashioned Memorial Day Parade in Berlin, last year.

Memorial Day ceremonies in Ocean City, Pines and Berlin Continued from Page 34 lot. The ceremony will be moved indoors to the Ocean Pines Community Center in the event of inclement weather. For more information, call Gilmore at 410-208-6612 or visit www.OPVETS.com. Berlin: •A memorial ceremony will take place at Mystic Harbor on Route 611, this Saturday beginning at 10 a.m. Sarge Garlitz, commander of the South Eastern Shore District of the American Legion, will be the emcee. Chaplain Teddy Rozzano will say a prayer and the World War I poem, “In Flanders Fields” will be recited. A memorial wreath will be placed at the flag pole by military veterans. The American Legion Rifle Team consisting of members from BoggsDisharoon Post #123, Synepuxent Post #166 and Duncan-Showell Post #231 will fire the three-volley salute. Following the salute, “Taps” will be played before the singing of “God Bless America.” For more information, call Garlitz at 443-735-1942. •A memorial ceremony will take place at American Legion BoggsDisharoon Post #123 in Berlin at 8 a.m. on Sunday. Sarge Garlitz, commander of the South Eastern Shore District of the American Legion, will be the Masters of Ceremonies. For more information, call 410641-3760. •The annual Old-Fashioned Memorial Day Parade will start at 11 a.m. on Monday. The procession will travel from Stephen Decatur Middle School southwest on Flower Street to a staging area near Dr. William Henry Park. Free parking is available in a lot op-

posite of the park. The theme for the 2019 Old Fashion Memorial Day Parade is Celebrating Women in Service. There will be food, entertainment and children can enjoy activities while their parents check out the different vendor booths and yard sale tables. For more information, call 410973-2051. Pocomoke City: • Downtown Pocomoke will celebrate Memorial Day during its Fourth Friday Street Festival, Friday, May 24, from 5-8 p.m. The block party-style event will be held within the two blocks of Market Street between Front Street and Second Street. Artists, craftsmen and vendors will fill the sidewalks of Market Street to sell their work, including paintings, photography, jewelry, bath and body products, home decor and fashion apparel and accessories. Food and drinks will be available for purchase, including beer and wine. Live music will be provided by Iris, with a patriotic tribute by Bay Brass at 6 p.m. as well as a special performance by Phoenix Fire World Class Cheer at 6:30 p.m. The theme for the celebration is “USA Kicks Cancer.” A Relay for Life Jail and Bail fundraiser, where participants must raise money to get out of “prison,” will take place in the middle of the street during the event. There will also be a luminaria service to remember those who have lost their battle with cancer, support those fighting the disease and to celebrate survivors, at 7:30 p.m. In the event of rain, Fourth Friday will be canceled and will resume in June. For more information, visit www.downtownpocomoke.com.

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PAGE 36

Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

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By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) Ocean City Foodie Tour returns to the resort with new restaurants, modes of transportation along with history about the town to entertain guests. The first Ocean City Foodie Tour of the season took place on Monday and the event will continue until September as participants have the opportunity travel and sample various tastes and sights of the resort. Sandy Gillis, owner of Creative Day Spa in Ocean City and creator of OC Foodie Tour, started the event last year after participating in several food tours during her travels to other cities. Gillis offered 31 tours in the midtown and downtown areas last year. Most tours comprised of six to 12 people, with 12 being the maximum per group. “I’m looking forward to doing it again this year and I have a couple of tour guides that I’ve hired that I’ve known my whole life,” Gillis said. “They’re going to be joining my team and taking some of the tours so we could do more.” This year, the foodie tours will be offered Monday through Friday, from noon to 3 p.m. Each downtown and midtown tour takes place over a onemile walk radius to five different restaurants. Participants are encouraged to wear comfortable shoes and clothing. Each tour will be a unique experience because the restaurants visited will change frequently. For the downtown foodie tour, there are 18 participating businesses located from the inlet to First Street. They include The Angler, M.R.

Ducks, Marina Deck, Harbor Inn, Frog Bar, Jessica’s Fudge House, Trimpers, Dough Roller, Thrashers, Jolly Roger on the Pier, Dolle’s, Ripley’s Believe it or Not, Kings, Caruso Pizza, Soriano’s Coffee Shop, Fat Daddy’s, Tree House Bar and Mug and Mallet. Midtown foodie tours will take place from 28th to 37th streets, with 17 participating establishments including, Guido’s Burritos, Ripieno’s, Jolly Roger Amusements, Dry Dock 28, Buxy’s Salty Dog Saloon, Pit and Pub, Candy Kitchen, Fractured Prune, Mother’s Cantina, Victorian Room at Dunes Manor, Higgins Crab House, Sanibel’s Oceanside 32, OC Wasabi, Barn 34, Real Raw Organic, Coconut’s Bar and Grille and Shotti’s Point. In between sampling different food, Gillis plans on sharing the history of Ocean City and of the restaurants as well. “People just love learning about Ocean City, and the fires, the floods and hurricanes, the families and assorted businesses here and how the fishing got started,” Gillis said. “I’m fascinated that there’s a lot of amazing families that started in Ocean City and have done very well.” New this year, OC Foodie Tour has teamed up with OC Bay Hopper, a water taxi service based on 117th Street, to provide a dining tour by boat. These tours will take place once a week from noon to 3 p.m. on Thursdays. Guests should meet at Longboard Café on 67th Street to depart. OC Bay Hopper tours will travel to three restaurants, including Sanibel’s at Sunset Island on 67th Street, Longboard Café on 67th Street, See TOURS Page 37


MAY 24, 2019

PAGE 37

Ocean City Today

Tours also available through OC Bay Hopper water taxi Continued from Page 36 Tailchasers on 123rd Street or Mad Fish in West Ocean City, finished off with sweet treats from Dolle’s. Gillis wants residents and visitors to see different sides of Ocean City, beyond the fast food places and “usual watering holes.” “I love sharing my passion for Ocean City and the people that started here,” Gillis said. “I’m excited about teaching Ocean City’s story to visitors, and a lot of visitors had never been to Ocean City before.” Some restaurants are just beginning to open around this time, which

means there is a potentially larger list of restaurants to join the food tours. “I’m always looking to add anybody new who wants to be a part of it, and there’s no obligation with the restaurants,” Gillis said. Tickets for the tours can be purchased online at http://ocfoodietour.com/ for $79, which includes a sampling of food at each restaurant. Foodie tour enthusiasts can save $10 by using special code “foodie” on the website. Any questions or special requests can be made at info@ocfoodietour.com.

COFFEE WITH COPS Attending Coffee with Cops are Ocean City Police Department Capt. Mike Colbert, left, and West Ocean City resident Norman Jones, Wednesday, May 15, at Denny’s on 61st Street. RACHEL RAVINA/ OCEAN CITY TODAY

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PAGE 38

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

Play It Safe encourages healthy fun By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) The 30th annual Ocean City Play It Safe program, which runs from May 29 until June 14, will provide a full slate of activities to encourage healthy and safe decisions among the traditional deluge of graduating high school seniors. The annual educational campaign aimed at reducing alcohol and drug use during “Senior Week,” is produced by the Ocean City Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Committee through a partnership with the Worcester County Health Department and the Town of Ocean City. Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Committee Chairwoman Donna Greenwood said avoiding previous incidents involving high school graduates was the impetus for launching Play It Safe three decades ago. “It’s a labor of love for us,” she said. “We want them to take home wonderful memories.” Looking to foster public safety, Play It Safe provides graduates the opportunity to ride the resort buses for a weekly fee of $5 as opposed to the normal $3 per day rate. Graduates can purchase vouchers for $5, which can be exchanged at any of the multitude of scheduled events for a wristband to ride the bus along Coastal Highway.

Tickets can be purchased at: the Boardwalk Train Stations at South First Street and 27th Street, City Hall at Third Street and Baltimore Ave., the Public Safety Building on 65th Street, bayside, the convention center on 40th Street and Ocean City Recreation & Parks offices at Northside Park on 125th Street, bayside. Greenwood said several new offerings are sandwiched in with the 46 events scheduled over the two-and-ahalf-week span, including yoga on the beach and free boat rides from OC Bay Hopper, located on 118th Street next to Food Lion. Yoga on the beach will take place on Wednesday, June 5 and 12, from 11 a.m. to noon on the sands by Third Street and the Boardwalk. OC Bay Hopper will provide free rides for the first 50 Play It Safe participants on three dates June 4 and 11, both Tuesdays, from noon to 2:15 p.m. and Thursday, June 13 from 11 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Greenwood, who has been involved with the Play It Safe program since its inception and chair of the Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Committee for the past two decades, said this year will mark the return of the long-abandoned, “Dance Party on the Beach,” gathering. This year the Play It Safe event line-up includes two evenings for

high school graduates to display their best dance moves, on June 6 and 13, both Thursdays, from 8-10 p.m. at the Caroline Street Stage on the Boardwalk. Greenwood said in previous years DJ Skip McGarry had laid down grooves on the beach by the inlet parking lot. The wide array of Play It Safe activities commences on Wednesday, May 29, with free putt-putt action at Maui Miniature Golf on 57th Street from 1-3 p.m. with two more dates set on June 5 and 12 during the same time. Other Play It Safe offerings include karaoke on the beach, 3-on-3 basketball, paddle boarding, kayaking, dodgeball, beach volleyball, laser tag, scavenger hunts and T-shirt tiedying. Beat the heat at the Splash Mountain Water Park at Jolly Roger on 30th Street, which will open the gates for Play It Safe participants on Thursday, June 6, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For those in need of a thrill, Trimper Amusements at the pier will offer free rides on its Tidal Wave Rollercoaster Sundays, June 2 and 9, from 8-10 p.m. Pizza Tugos on 116th Street will sponsor pizza-eating contests for both the first 25 male and female See OC Page 39

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MAY 24, 2019

PAGE 39

Ocean City Today

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Dorrie Gaeng, left, adds a dash of color to a custom tie dye T-shirt, while Play It Safe volunteer Al “Hondo” Handy helps Claire Mercer bag her fresh creation as fellow Dulaney graduate Anna Griffith observes, at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street, last year.

OC activities for grads set for May 29 through June 14 Continued from Page 38 high school graduates on June 1 and 8, both Saturdays, with the gorging set for 2 p.m. The laundry list of fun activities winds down on June 14 with Karaoke on the beach and team relay races both held near Third Street and the Boardwalk from 6-8 p.m. Greenwood said for many longtime Play It Safe volunteers this year is bittersweet following the departure of former Vice Chairman Al “Hondo” Handy who retired in March after working four decades for Ocean City Recreation and Parks. Known for possessing a mid-mannered affable nature, Handy’s efficient and highly-organized personality lent innumerable support during the life of program, Greenwood said. “He knew every kid in town and they knew his smile,” she said. Greenwood said Handy’s replacement has yet to come on board and more volunteer help is still being sought for this year’s Play It Safe. Last year, a total of 5,515 graduates

participated in Play It Safe events, a slight reduction from 2017 when 6,198 took part in the free activities. Also in 2018, more than 200 volunteers worked 600 hours to support programming. Greenwood said the safety-focused tradition is facilitated through community members and area businesses who donate money, food and prizes. Besides the chance to win prizes such as T-shirts, hats, jewelry and restaurant gift certificates, Play It Safe encourages newly-graduated high school students to form lifetime memories of, for many, their first time away from home without parental supervisions. “They’re the ones that have to make the choices and we hope it will be a good healthy choice,” she said. Graduates can view the entire list of Play It Safe events online at www.playitsafeoceancity.com. Further information is available by calling the Worcester County Health Department at 410-632-1100 or searching “Play It Safe Ocean City,” on Facebook.

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PAGE 40

Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Skyler McClure, left, and Ava Trate, of Ocean City, enjoy halfoff entrees and sushi at Nori Sushi Bar and Grill on 114th Street, Wednesday, May 15.

Offering half-off meals at Nori Sushi Bar and Grill on 114th Street, Wednesday, May 15, from left, are co-owners John Lambrinos, Sophia Christian, and Saphara and Phil Lambrinos.

Berlin residents Sonia and Frank Baker attend the 11th annual Pirate Party Fundraiser last Friday evening at Sunset Grille in West Ocean City.

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Rockville, Maryland resident Donna Stivers, left, and her sister, Rose, of West Ocean City, get into character for the 11th annual Pirate Party Fundraiser hosted by Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services. The event took place last Friday evening at Sunset Grille at West Ocean City.

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Pirate Grey Lindsey, 18 months, and her mother, Brittany, are featured during the 11th annual Pirate Party Fundraiser last Friday at Sunset Grille in West Ocean City. Lindsey is on the board of Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services.

Berlin Mayor Gee Williams and his wife, Betsy, pose for a photo as they enjoy the festivities during Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services’ 11th annual Pirate Party Fundraiser last Friday evening at Sunset Grille in West Ocean City.

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City residents Jake Troublefield and Katie Carpenter polish off a dinner of sushi and some drinks at Nori Sushi Bar and Grill on 114th Street, Wednesday, May 15.

Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services personnel, from left, Christine Felix, Erin Sullivan and Jen Leggour get into the spirit during the 11th annual Pirate Party Fundraiser last Friday evening at Sunset Grille in West Ocean City.


MAY 24, 2019

PAGE 41

Ocean City Today

Mother, son team for sportsmanship award By Josh Davis News Editor (May 24, 2019) The Ocean City mayor and council session on May 6 led off with a proclamation to recognize a mother-son team for their accomplishments. Sen. Mary Beth Carozza said it was a big deal to be back in the resort after the recent legislative session to recognize Sanji Ramnarain as the 2018 Good Sports Coach of the Year and her son, Finn, as the 2018 Good Sports Player of the Year provided by the Mid-Atlantic Recreation and Parks Sports Alliance. According to the meeting packet, Sanji coaches seventh and eighth grade soccer in the Saturday Youth League for Ocean City Recreation and Parks. Her son participates in the Youth Indoor Soccer League on Saturdays at Northside Park, and also plays in soccer and futsal tournaments. “I really appreciate this opportunity … to recognize this unique mother-son team,” Carozza said. “This is a big deal and that’s why I have made the effort in Annapolis to try to be there in person.” She underscored, “how special it is for a mother and son to receive this award.” “To receive an award like this, you have to earn this reward,” Carozza said, adding Finn had a great attitude, was respectful to coaches and worked with younger athletes. “He’s a role model,” she said. “And then, you see that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.” Carozza said Sanji made athletics fun and about teamwork, and encouraged players to do their best. “It’s everything. It’s the long day, it’s being patient, it’s being dedicated,” she said. “It really is a very unique opportunity to be able to present to you Senate citations from the Maryland General Assembly. “Just on a personal note, it’s bringing back many years, because my father was a coach … right here in this  OUR 10TH SEASON! 

building, when there was a gym,” Carozza said. “All those memories [were] made right here.” Carozza also recognized Al “Hondo” Handy, who recently retired from the city recreation and parks department after nearly 40 years. She gave Handy citations both from the Maryland Senate and Gov. Larry Hogan.

PHOTO COURTESY MARY BETH CAROZZA

Sen. Mary Beth Carozza presents 2018 MARPSA awards to Sanji Ramnarain and her son, Finn, at City Hall on May 6. The Mid-Atlantic Recreation and Sports Alliance is a consortium of recreation and parks departments, officials' organizations and youth sports associations in the mid-Atlantic region.

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PAGE 42

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

A&E Committee, artist, community completed mural

PHOTO COURTESY JOHN DONATO

Atlantic General Hospital staff contribute to a mural during community painting sessions at the Berlin hospital on May 8. This is the fourth segment of a mural set to be displayed outside the Berlin Welcome Center on South Main Street.

By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) It’s been a long journey for those involved with the community mural project in Berlin, as it was just a little more than two weeks ago when artist John Donato put the finishing touches on the piece’s fourth and final segment. Toni Keiser, vice president of Public Relations for Atlantic General Hospital, expressed her appreciation to artist John Donato and the Berlin Arts and Entertainment District for the hospital’s inclusion in the community health section of the mural. “Our employees, medical staff, board members and volunteers, patients, and visitors truly enjoyed the opportunity to participate in the Berlin mural project,” Keiser said in a statement. “It was a fun and creative way for all to express their connection with the hospital and the community.” Donato said people kept coming to leave their mark on the mural during the time he spent painting from May 79 at the hospital and John H. “Jack” Burbage Regional Cancer Center in Berlin. “Over 48 hours, it really builds,” he said. “I had six people show up, and then I had eight people show up, and then I had 12 people show up, and then I had people that didn’t want to leave. It was great.” When Donato approaches a project, he only knows about 35 to 40 percent of what will be featured in it, he said. He added a big part of his process is creating an investigative dialogue with the other involved parties, in this case Atlantic General Hospital. He emphasized the need to really get to know the hospital’s medical staff to get a better understanding of what community health really means to them. This allows him to help tell a more intricate and visual story. “And so it’s just very interesting that 60 percent that I don’t know that goes in a mural, they fill in all those blanks, but it has to happen in a conversation, so I have to become part of the family while I’m there,” he said. For Donato, he said logistics and timing were some of the obstacles he faced for this particular segment of the mural. “Yeah, this one was definitely an accelerated timetable,” he said. Donato had about a week to complete the project. “The challenge is the part that I like,” Donato said. “ Every step of this presents challenges that pop up for me that I might not have a solution at that moment, but I ... embrace that kind of uncertainty and then start building solutions and I will reach out to people and have conversations.” Donato said he uses synthetic panels and acrylic paint when working on murals. He stressed the importance of properly preparing the materials to ensure See BERLIN Page 43


MAY 24, 2019

PAGE 43

Ocean City Today

Berlin mural’s final segment spotlights community health Continued from Page 42 durability. “Because I’m there to protect the investment of the folks that are raising the money to put these up, ”Donato said. “I want this mural to last as long as it can.” Robin Tomaselli, vice president of the Berlin Arts and Entertainment District, agreed. She said she hopes visitors will see the mural stand the test of time. “It tells a story of Berlin. It tells the history of Berlin, but it really does depict like what makes it such a great community, which happens to be every single member that lives and works here,” Tomaselli said. “So people I think are super excited when they find out ... that it’s going to be on the side of the visitor center for decades.” The journey of the mural outside the Berlin Maryland Welcome Center on South Main Street started about four years ago. The first section brought in Buckingham Elementary School students and staff, the second featured Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Services and the third was a partnership between the Calvin B. Taylor House and Germantown School Community Heritage Center. “It is super cool, and it’s been over the process of four years, and you’re talking about hundreds and hundreds of hours

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Artist John Donato puts the finishing touches on a paw print placed on a mural on May 9 at the John H. “Jack” Burbage Regional Cancer Care Center in Berlin.

of effort,” Tomaselli said. Donato said the fourth mural representing Atlantic General Hospital allowed the artwork to come full circle. He added the mural’s first segment showcased the cows roaming on the Esham dairy farm, where the medical facility now stands. “We weren’t thinking that when we started the project,” Donato said. That’s part of the adaptive process when … you start to get the feel of the project, and you start to see how the community responds to the project and as you start to build partnerships and relationships during the project.” While it was unplanned, he said it ac-

tually turned out for the best. “You will get things that you weren’t planning on having that we can work into the project that absolutely make it better,” he said. “That absolutely can make it more unique.” A photo of the mural’s most recent segment was presented last week to guests of the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation’s 26th Anniversary Celebration. It’s unclear when the artwork will be officially installed. However, now that the mural is finished, Tomaselli couldn’t be happier. “It took a village to complete that project so we’re super proud of it,” Tomaselli said.

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PAGE 44

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

NOW PLAYING ANGLER 312 Talbot St. Ocean City 410-289-7424 www.angleroc.net May 24: String Beanz, 5 p.m. May 25: Lauren Glick, 5 p.m. May 26: Pearl, 5 p.m.; Swell Fellas, 8 p.m. BEACH BARRELS 13207 Coastal Highway Ocean City 410-250-0522 www.beachbarrels.com May 24: Original Equipment, 9 p.m. May 25: Human Connection, 9 p.m. May 26: Lovin Cup, 9 p.m. May 30: Trivia w/DJ Speedbump, 7 p.m. BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com May 24: Bird Dog and the Road Kings, 9 p.m. May 25-26: Film at 11, 9 p.m. May 29: Identity Crisis, 6 p.m. May 30: Dust N’ Bones Duo, 8 p.m. BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium Ocean City 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com May 24: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 4-7 p.m.; Dave Sherman, 8-11 p.m. May 25: 33 RPM, 8 p.m. May 26: Bob Hughes, 6 p.m. May 27: Just Jay, 5 p.m. May 28: Jack Worthington, 6 p.m. May 29: Reform School 6-9 p.m.; Open Mic 9 p.m. May 30: Chris Button, 6-9 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. CAROUSEL BEACH BAR - TSUNAMI In the Carousel Hotel 118th Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-1000 www.carouselhotel.com May 24: Frank Moran, 4-8 p.m. May 25: Pearl, 4-8 p.m. May 26: Dave Sherman, 4-8 p.m. May 29: Jack Worthington, 4-8 p.m. May 30: Randy Jamz, 4-8 p.m. COCONUTS BEACH BAR AND GRILL In the Castle in the Sand Hotel 37th Street oceanfront Ocean City 410-289-6846

www.castleinthesand.com May 24: Bilenki Duo, noon to 4 p.m.; Chris Sacks Band, 5-9 p.m. May 25: The Everafter, noon to 4 p.m.; Zion Reggae, 5-9 p.m. May 26: Rick & Regina, noon to 4 p.m.; Lauren Glick Band, 5-9 p.m. May 27: Nate Lauren Glick Clendenen Duo, noon to 4 p.m.; Bob Wilkinson, Joe Smooth and Pete, 5-9 p.m. May 28: Monkee Paw, 4-8 p.m. May 29: Taylor Knox Band, 4-8 p.m. May 30: Full Circle, 3-7 p.m. COWBOY COAST COUNTRY SALOON AND STEAKHOUSE 17th Street and Coastal Highway Ocean City 410-289-6331 www.cowboycoastoc.com May 24: Montgomery Gentry, doors open at 5 p.m. May 25: Philip Michael Parsons, 8 p.m.; Southern Tyde, 10 p.m. May 26: Sam Grow, 7 p.m. DUFFY’S TAVERN 130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com Every Friday: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m. Every Saturday: Karaoke w/DJ Chuck D, 8 p.m. to midnight HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com May 24: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. May 25: Chris Button, 2 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. May 26: Pickin Party, 2-6 p.m.; The Rockoholics Band, 8 p.m. May 27: Blake Haley, 4 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 8 p.m. May 28: Dust N’ Bones, 6 p.m. May 29: Dock Party w/DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. May 30: Opposite Directions, 6 p.m. HOOTERS 12513 Ocean Gateway West Ocean City 410-213-1841 www.hootersofoc.com May 24: DJ BK, 4-8 p.m. May 25: Classic Vibe, 4-8 p.m. May 27: DJ BK, 2-7 p.m. JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB 56th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-5600 www.johnnyspizzapub.com May 25: Slappy Hour, 8 p.m. May 29: Jam Session w/Randy Lee

Ashcraft

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M.R. DUCKS BAR & GRILLE

49th Street and the bay, Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com May 24: Bobby-O on De Bay, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Jim Long Band, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Mike T, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; 9 Mile Roots, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Stellar Mojo, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. May 25: Cruz-in de Bay, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 11 a.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Nowhere Slow, 1-5 p.m.; 9 Mile Roots, 5-9 p.m.; Flowers for Taco, 6-10 p.m.; DJ Cruz, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; JJ Rupp Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Steal The Sky, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. May 26: Cruz-in de Bay, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; High Five Swan Dive, 1-5 p.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 1-7 p.m.; 9 Mile Roots, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; JJ Rupp Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Gypsy Wisdom, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; DJ Davie, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. May 27: Bobby-O on De Bay, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; Zion Reggae Band, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Davie, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. May 28: Element K, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Mike T, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. May 29: Element K, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Mike T, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. May 30: DJ Cruz, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; DJ Tuff, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Go Go Gadjet, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.

311 Talbot St. Ocean City 410-289-9125 www.mrducksbar.com May 24: DJ Batman, 5 p.m. May 25: Johnny Bling, 5 p.m. May 26: Over Time, 5 p.m. May 27: Tranzfusion, 4 p.m. OCEAN 13 13th Street on the boardwalk Ocean City www.Ocean13ocmd.com May 25: Apple & Britt, piano lounge, 6 p.m. May 26: Chuck D Karaoke, tiki bar, 8 p.m. May 30: Michael Smith, piano lounge, 6 p.m. OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. May 24-26: First Class, 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Lenny’s Deck Bar May 27-29: On the Edge, 4-9 p.m. May 30: Ravens Tail Gate Party OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford’s Landing Road Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 www.oceanpines.org May 24: Full Circle, 6-10 p.m. May 25: Slamm, 6-10 p.m. May 26: Great Train Robbery, 6-10 p.m. PICKLES 706 Philadelphia Ave. Ocean City 410-289-4891 www.picklesoc.com May 24: Joey Harkum Band, 10 p.m. May 25: Ray & the Revolvers, 10 p.m. May 26: Side Project, 9 p.m. May 27: Beats by Jeremy, 9 p.m. May 29: Joey Harkum Acoustic, 9 p.m. May 30: Beats by Wax, 9 p.m. PURPLE MOOSE SALOON 108 S. Atlantic Ave. Ocean City 410-289-6953 www.purplemoosesaloon.com May 24-25: CK the VJ/DJ, 2 p.m.; Vertigo Red, 10 p.m. May 26: CK the VJ/DJ, 2 p.m.; New Virtue, 10 p.m. May 27: New Virtue, 10 p.m. May 28-30: CK the VJ/DJ, 9 p.m.

SHENANIGAN’S IRISH PUB AND GRILLE 309 N. Atlantic Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7181 www.ocshenanigans.com May 24-25: Marty McKerran, 9 p.m. SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-6762 www.skyebaroc.com May 24: Aaron Howell, 4-8 p.m. May 25: Marcella Peters, 4-8 p.m. TRADER LEE’S LIVE 9935 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 443-614-4119 May 25: TBA May 26: Sunday Jam Sess, 7 p.m. May 29: Open Mic Night, 7 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 www.whiskersbar.com May 24: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey


MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 45

Ravens Beach Bash activities kick off Thurs. Assortment of events on tap including pub crawl, flag football and bonfire By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) Thousands of Ravens fans, donning their signature purple and black, will flock to Ocean City next weekend for the eighth annual Ravens Beach Bash sponsored by Miller Lite. “It’s a great weekend to bring in fans and add to the economic impact of Ocean City,” Deandra Duggans, manager of advertisement and branding for the Baltimore Ravens, said. “We go to the beach and have a good time.” Festivities will kick off Thursday, May 30, with a 98 Rock live broadcast and happy hour along with a cornhole tournament from 3-6 p.m. at Ropewalk on 82nd Street, followed by the Ravens Beach Bash Tailgate Party on the deck at the Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel on 101st Street from 6-9 p.m. There will be a live WBAL-AM broadcast, a deejay and free giveaways at the Clarion. Ravens cheerleaders, alumni players, and the Ravens’ mascot, Poe, will make appearances throughout the evening.

The all-you-can-eat buffet includes pulled pork, jerk chicken, fried chicken, burgers, hot dogs, salads, fruit, coleslaw, macaroni and cheese, and buffalo chicken dip with toasted pretzel bread as well as Miller Lite draft, house wine, iced tea and lemonade. There will also be a cash bar. The cost for the tailgate is $34.95 for adults, $12.95 for children 4-12 years old and children 3 and under get in free. Events will take place at various venues throughout Ocean City, although the Clarion will host a majority of the Beach Bash activities. Attendees can look forward to a parade, live broadcasts, a pub crawl, a flag football beach tournament, a light show and bonfire next weekend. This year, current and former players Orlando Brown Jr., Mark Andrews, Brad Jackson, Edwin Mulitalo, Mark Clayton, Willis McGahee and Qadry Ismail are slated to attend the Beach Bash. “This gives Ravens fans an opportunity to engage with the Ravens in a different way,” Duggans said. “They get to see our players outside of the element of competing on a field and have fun with other fellow Ravens fans.” Next Friday, aka “Purple Friday,” fans can meet at the Original Greene

Turtle on 116th Street from 6-10 a.m. for a Bacon & Beer breakfast and to check out the live 98 Rock morning show broadcast. The Purple Friday Caravan, will travel all over Ocean City bringing Ravens cheerleaders, mascots, playmakers, alumni and the pep band to different establishments, schools and other locations in the resort area. As per tradition, the Ravens hold this event every Friday there is a home game in Baltimore. “We get the kids pepped up and give them good words of motivation,” Duggans said. During the afternoon next Friday, a West Ocean City bar crawl with Ravens playmakers will commence with stops at Hooters, Sunset Grille, Harborside, Crab Alley, Micky Fins and the Greene Turtle. The event will take place from 1-6 p.m. Tickets can be purchased for $25 in advance or $35 the day of at the Clarion, although the event has sold out the last couple years. A bus will transport participants to and from West Ocean City for the bar crawl. Next Friday night, Ravens fans can check out the Flock party at Dead Freddies on 64th Street from 7-10 p.m. or watch the movie “Ralph Breaks the Internet” on the Clarion beach starting around 7:45 p.m.

Next Saturday, activities kick off at 7 a.m. with sunrise yoga on the Clarion beach with Sara Ashley for an hour. Participants will receive a free mimosa after the class. Starting at 10 a.m., the 55th annual Ravens Roost parade will make its way up Baltimore Avenue from 19th to 26th streets followed by lunch with Ravens playmakers at Macky’s Bayside Bar and Grill on 54th Street, next Saturday from noon to 1 p.m. In addition, the Ravens Beach Bash will be in full swing until 5 p.m. with an inflatable obstacle course and bounce house, tailgate games, Coke samples, photo opportunities with current players, the annual Flag Football Tournament, and music throughout the day. To register for the football tournament, visit www.corrigansports.com/ beach-bash/. A goodbye party will take place at Fish Tales on 22nd Street, bayside, from 5-8 p.m. next Saturday night in addition to the “Ravens Light the Night” event on 101st Street which includes a bonfire, live music from local band Rick & Regina, a Miller Lite portable, fireworks, and laser light show on the beach at the Clarion from 7-10 p.m. For a full list of Beach Bash activities, visit www.baltimoreravens.com /fans/beach-bash.


PAGE 46

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Rackliffe House’s 2019 exhibition, “The Enslaved at Rackliffe House and Worcester County, Maryland: A Local Story,” opened Tuesday. Among those responsible for putting the exhibit together, from left, are Rackliffe House Trust Board Member Aaron Levinthal, Curator Ray Thompson and Rackliffe House Trust Vice President Linda Ayers.

Archeological discoveries are featured as part of the Rackliffe House’s newest exhibition: “The Enslaved at Rackliffe House and Worcester County, Maryland: A Local Story.” The exhibition opened Tuesday at the museum on Tom Patton Lane, off Route 611 in Berlin.

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Purnell, Ayers, Fassitt, Derrickson, and Henry, just to name a few. “Many people in this area have really deep roots in Worcester County,” said Linda Ayers, vice president of the Rackliffe House Trust. Along with the European settlers See EXHIBITION Page 47

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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 47

Exhibition shares local history of African-Americans in Wor. Continued from Page 46 and the Native Americans who preceded them, an enslaved AfricanAmerican population also shaped Worcester County history. “We also knew that we couldn’t tell the full story of the Rackliffe House unless we included the African-American enslaved population that really was the engine that created and maintained the wealth of plantations like these,” Ayers said. “They were indispensable and involved in every part of life here.” Officials drew from local newspaper articles, wills and a diary when conducting their research for the exhibition that opened Tuesday, at the museum on Tom Patton Road, off Route 611 in Berlin. Curator Ray Thompson said he hopes visitors will learn something. “Our anticipation is that they will recognize that we have told an accurate story based on original records of what life was like here on Rackliffe Plantation and plantations near it during the 17th through 19th centuries,” Thompson said. Thompson called the plantation a “microcosm,” and said the work done there ranged from agricultural workers to shingle makers to blacksmiths. “[There was] almost every kind of occupation you can imagine because these plantations were pretty much self-sufficient, and the advantage that we have here that we think is so exciting is we have been able to tell a relatively complete story from both points of view of what life was like here,” Thompson said. A will of Plantation owner Charles Rackliffe is displayed in the exhibition. Ayers said he owned 18 slaves when he died in 1752. “The inventory stresses that they are personal property because they were listed here with livestock and crops and tools,” Ayers said. Aside from the panels of text, a glass display case is featured in the center, and shows various types of pottery. Aaron Levinthal, a board member for the Rackliffe House Trust, also

conducted archeological research in the effort to learn more about their lives. “Life, labor, family, individuals, and so what we did find was that we got a lot of locations across the years that are specific to African-American life,” Levinthal said. “So it’s not just labor, there’s also family.” Levinthal said the work has been going on for about 10 years. He also attributed the findings to the fact that the parcel’s site was “pretty intact.” It allowed researchers to learn more about the people who lived on the plantation. “But here, the archeological site here can make that story go a lot deeper,” Levinthal said. Tina Busko, executive director for the Rackliffe House Museum, said she hopes it’s an inclusive experience for those who attend. “We can learn about the people in the past,” Busko said. “We can learn about what happened here in the past and that’s really just a wonderful local story with all the descendants that are still in the area.” While the exact cost to stage the exhibit isn’t unclear, Ayers expressed her appreciation to several groups, including the Worcester County Tourism Department and the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore. “We were so fortunate to have the support of many organizations and individual donors that made it possible,” Ayers said. Busko said the museum has about 21 docents who help educate an average of 30 to 50 visitors per day. The exhibition runs on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-4 p.m. until Oct. 31. Admission costs $5 for adults, $3 for active military service members with valid identification, $2 for children ages 4-to-14 years old. Admission is free for children under 4 years old. Busko also said the Rackliffe House Trust was established in 2006. The home was later restored, and tours began in 2011. For more information, visit the museum’s website at rackliffehouse.org.

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RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Rackliffe Plantation House prepares to open the newest exhibition: “The Enslaved at Rackliffe House and Worcester County, Maryland: A Local Story,” on Tuesday. The museum is located on Tom Patton Road, off Route 611 in Berlin.


PAGE 48

Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019


MAY 24, 2019

PAGE 49

Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Recipe for fried deviled eggs ‘with a surprise’ By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (May 24, 2019) What is the actual reality when a chef presents his creation? More specifically, how does a chef perceive a particular dish at the moment of completion? Are the flavor profiles developed to a point of perfection? Is the presentation a work of art? Is the experience memorable and how does it compare to other similar dishes? Is the cook’s perception the same as the paying customer? Most of us have neither the time nor the mental stamina to explore and fully understand cookery in its most definitive state, but a successful chef must surpass the boundaries of mediocrity. It is the act of exploring the reasons behind the logic that will produce new insight and it is this detailed scrutiny that distinguishes brilliance over success. For example, something as simple as deviled eggs can be elevated to new heights if you understand the individual components and their effect on the overall structure of the dish. If one researches the history of deviled eggs, you will find that the classic creamy concoctions did not originate in the United States. The beginnings of modern day deviled eggs can be traced back to Ancient Rome. The main difference was the boiled eggs were served with a spicy sauce. Originality is a must when it comes to cookery. The idea of a spicy sauce intrigues me and my imagination immediately goes to mixing the egg yolk filling with a touch of adobo sauce and garnishing the eggs with cilantro. Pureed egg yolks are bland and the peppery sauce will not only change the taste but also the color of the filling. It is these subtle differences that gives conventionalism a new twist. My attention also turns to how the deviled eggs are showcased. Generally, the filling is piped into the cooked egg whites. This is perfectly acceptable but my curiosity leads me down a path of a different direction. The idea of a deviled egg parfait intrigues my fanciful nature. It just so happens that I have 2-ounce shot glasses in my repertoire of glassware. These tall, narrow shot glasses come with a serving spoon and this combination will highlight the layered appetizer. Since eggs and potatoes are a perfect marriage, consider cooking the potatoes in a chimichurri or pesto sauce which will incorporate a colorful and textural foundation for the parfait. Then, simply layer the miniature parfait with the flavored potatoes, piped egg yolk filling and finely chopped egg whites. The end result is a stunning amuse

bouche which is perfect for brunch. Sometimes satisfaction comes by way of simplicity. I am the queen of contrast and the thought of fried deviled eggs sounds scrumptious. A velvety egg yolk filling nestled on a crunchy egg white is a fun, innovative way to serve deviled eggs. The element of surprise is a sure way to wow your guests. Fill the fried egg whites with crab meat, top with the piped egg yolk filling, and garnish with a touch of Old Bay Seasoning. This is a mouth full that is worth every bite! Enjoy.

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PAGE 50

Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

SAFE BOATING EVENT

RELAY FOR LIFE

Members of the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary gather for a photo Sunday morning at the West Ocean City Boat Landing off Sunset Avenue during the National Safe Boating event.

North Worcester County Relay for Life co-chairs Dj Thompson, left, and Dawn Hodge receive accolades from Atlantic General Hospital President and CEO Michael Franklin during the group’s annual fundraiser on May 11 at Stephen Decatur High School.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

ARMED FORCES DAY

COFFEE WITH COPS

Celebrating Armed Forces Day at the American Legion Post #166 headquarters on 24th Street on Saturday, May 18, from left, are Advancement Chairman Joerg Leinemann, Scout Paige Lenz, 11, from Troop #621, Boy Scout Gabe Bradley, 17, Webelo Ethan Lenz, 9, of Troop #261, and Boy Scout Nicholas Coleman, 17.

The Ocean City Police Department held its annual Coffee with Cops event last Wednesday at Denny’s on 61th Street. Citizens were invited to meet with members of the police department during the gathering.

PHOTO COURTESY SARAH YONKER

AGH ANNIVERSARY Among the 500 people attending the 26th Anniversary Celebration for the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation, last Thursday, from left, are Virginia, Buddy and Laura Jenkins. The event raised $200,000 and proceeds will benefit the foundation and Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin.

PHOTO EXHIBIT The photographs of John Carter fill Studio E during May at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street.


MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 51


PAGE 52

Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019


MAY 24, 2019

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Fill fried eggs with crabmeat and pipe with yolk mixture Continued from Page 49 1 cup crabmeat, picked for shells and cartilage Old Bay Seasoning as a garnish 1. Bring a large pot of water to a gentle boil and carefully lower the eggs. Allow water to return to a hard simmer. Once the water is simmering, cook 1 dozen eggs for 12 minutes. Place the eggs in a bowl of ice water. Peel the eggs, cut them in half and separate the whites from the yolks. 2. Transfer the yolks to a medium bowl. Add the mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard and salt. Using a hand-held blender, blend the ingredients until the filling is smooth and does not have any lumps. Transfer the yolk mixture to a piping bag fitted with a tip of your choice. Refrigerate until ready to use. 3. Fill a large heavy-bottomed pot with 2 inches of oil, attach a deep-frying thermometer and heat to 350 degrees. Place the flour on a plate and season with salt and a few grinds of pepper. Crack the remaining 2 eggs into a shallow dish and beat with 2 teaspoons water. Place the panko on another plate. Line a third plate with paper towels. 4. Roll the egg whites in the flour, then dip in the egg wash, and coat in the panko. Double dip the base of the hardboiled egg in the egg and panko twice. This will ensure an even coating. 5. Fry just until the eggs turn a goldenbrown color. Place cooked eggs on a cooling rack and apply a light dusting of salt. 6. Fill fried eggs with crabmeat and pipe yolk mixture on top. Garnish with Old Bay Seasoning. Secret Ingredient – Reality. “Since we cannot change reality, let us change the eyes which see reality.” – Nikos Kazantzakis

PAGE 53

Ocean City Today

BIS provides mountain biking club By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) The fourth, fifth and sixth graders who participate in the mountain biking club at Berlin Intermediate School are apparently learning more than just how to ride a bike. “It’s preparedness for life. It really is,” said program organizer Tres Denk. Assistant Principal David Gell said about 20 students have participated in the BIS and Beyond After School Academy program and he’s been pleased with the its progress since it started last year. “Students learned how to properly maintain a bicycle, ride properly, safety measures, and how to navigate obstacles typical of biking trails found on the Eastern Shore,” Gell said. “Aside from instilling a love of mountain biking, Tres also hopes students will teach others about the sport and build support for the maintenance and creation of local trails.” Denk is the president of the Eastern Shore International Mountain Bicycling Association, an organization that strives “to create, enhance and preserve great trail experiences for mountain bikers on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay,” according to the mission statement. Denk recalled a newspaper article from 2009 informing people that bike trails were open at the Pocomoke YMCA. “So the next day, I went down and started the whole thing, started riding bikes, started building trails there, and it just grew from there,” Denk said. He, along with a group of other dads and their kids, embarked on this mountain biking journey. The organization also works to develop trails throughout the area, according to the website. Denk has had a 30-year love affair

with mountain biking. He said it started when his roommates took him on a bike trip to Frederick, Maryland. “So I went out to western Maryland, [and] I came back my bike was all busted up, [the] front wheel was wobbly, I had to take the brakes off to even come home, and Tres Denk I went right back to the bike shop, [but] I was like, man, it was the coolest thing I ever did,” Denk said. “So that was what excited me about it … how much fun I had with those folks I was riding bikes with, this group effort.” In addition to helping the cyclists learn some social skills, he also hopes to instill responsibility, teamwork, patience, and physical strength to the mountain-bikers-in-training. He said he continues his own trip down memory lane as he sees the children learn to ride bikes of their own. “The thrill that I get from someone else having that ‘I did it’ moment … when someone learns to ride a bike for the first time, I can see the picture of me, one year old, standing on my pop-pop’s bicycle, you know, six years old getting my first bike, doing a wheelie on my bike with my friends in the neighborhood,” he said.

Denk said the association and the club at Berlin Intermediate School also allows him to give back. “And it kind of [comes] full circle now. I feel like I’ve done something for my community,” he said. Additionally, Denk said he’d like to use his budding business, Beach to Bay Bicycle, as a way to pursue other opportunities for bicycle fans like himself. “That way, I can bring the trails to the people,” he said. As the father of two boys, Denk pushes safety and accessibility. “I’m trying to make the place safe for bikes,” Denk said. He said he always wanted to take his children to school via bicycle, but safety concerns have prohibited him from doing that. “I live two miles from school, and I can’t ride my bike to school,” he said. Denk said he’d like to see mountain biking programs in county schools, but more importantly see today’s participants someday volunteering to teach others. He added the older students could come return to help teach the younger children, “where it keeps going around, just like a bicycle wheel itself.” For more information on the Eastern Shore Mountain Bicycling Association, visit the organization’s website at esimba.org.

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PAGE 54

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

FRENCH SOCIETY Twelve students were inducted into the Societe Honoraire de Francais Chapitre Bastille during the Worcester Prep Spanish Honor Society and French Honor Society Induction Ceremony on March 28. French Honor Society Inductees, in front, from left, are Sophia Ludt, Anna Dashiell, Kat McCormick and Hannah Perdue, center, Lexi Willey, Millie Cammack, Summer Walker and WPS French teacher Debbie Speier, and in back, Will Mears, Daniel Chen, Cole Lamson-Reich, Eli Prushansky and Ethan Scheiber.

SPANISH SOCIETY Twenty-four students were inducted to the Pablo Picasso Sociedad Honoraria Hispanica during the Worcester Prep Spanish Honor Society and French Honor Society Induction Ceremony on March 28. Spanish Honor Society Inductees, in front, from left, are Sydney Stebenne and Carly Young; row two, Brugh Moore, Grace Hopkins, Bryn Elliott, Waverly Choy/, Vishnu Mohan and Kaden Mault; row three, Vincent Petrera, Connor Carpenter, Ava Gerachis, C.C. Lizas, Caroline Anderson, Marika Vasilikos and Graham McColgan; and in back, Joseph Schwartz, Ben Brandt, Mason Brown, Maddy Warren, Aly Matha, Ally Elerding, Ryan Brafman, Chipper Becker and Basil Christian.

WOMEN’S HISTORY LUNCHEON Follow the Dream women’s history month luncheon was held recently at Tyree AME Church in Berlin, hosted by the Worcester County NAACP. Pictured, from left, are Jim Mathias, UMES government relations director; Erica Murphy, WMDT 47 Good Morning Delmarva news anchor; Ivory Smith, Worcester County NAACP president; Victoria Jackson-Stanley, Cambridge mayor; Karen Holland, Worcester County Schools 2018 teacher of the year; Dr Annette Wallace, Worcester County Public Schools assistant superintendent; Kristin Heiser, Worcester County state’s attorney; Laurie Brittingham NAACP 1st vice president; Lou Taylor, Worcester County Schools superintendent; and Rev. Betty Smith, Tyree AME Church pastor.

READ ACROSS AMERICA Worcester County Commissioner Chip Bertino visited Ocean City Elementary School to help celebrate National Read Across America Day. Commissioner Bertino read a Dr. Seuss story with Maria Graham's and Hillary Haines' second grade classes. Read Across America Day is a nationwide reading celebration that takes place annually on March 2, Dr. Seuss's birthday.

TOP SAILOR Jacob Eash, of Ocean Pines, a graduate of Stephen Decatur High School and Worcester Tech was recently awarded the honor of Sailor of the Year for the United States Coast Guard Chincoteague field office.

TELEPRESENCE ROBOT The Ocean City-Berlin Rotary Club and Snow Hill Rotary Club made a joint donation of a telepresence robot to Worcester County Schools. Pictured, in front, from left, are Diane Stulz, coordinator of instruction for Worcester Schools, Arlan Kinney, Sonia Baker, Margaret Mudron rotary president, and Steve Gragert, and in back, Superintendent Louis Taylor, Cliff Berg, Bob Smith and William Gordy, BOE president.


MAY 24, 2019

ON GUARD

Ocean City Beach Patrol first day back on stands, May 25 By Kristin Joson Contributing Writer (May 24, 2019) Once the first day of the summer season makes its glorious mark, I think it is safe to say that we are all about letting those sunny vibes flow with absolutely no cares in the world. We welcome the upcoming warm months, the season of endless possibilities and adventures with no hesitation. We will begin as we do each year with our annual prayer service to begin the summer season. Every year, the Ocean City Beach Patrol begins the season by gathering on the Boardwalk where we pray for our residents and visitors and for a safe and successful season for all of those involved with Public Safety and emergency response in the Ocean City area; The United States Coast Guard Station Ocean City, the Ocean City Police Department, Ocean City Fire Department, and the Ocean City Beach Patrol. We encourage members of these agencies and members of the community they serve to join us as we ask for protection for those who serve, and for those they work to protect. Anyone can come to this kickoff. It will be at Somerset Street on the Boardwalk at 7 a.m. on Saturday, May 25. I know we are all anticipating that feeling of soaking up some Ocean City rays with the scent of the salty water air, the sound of crashing waves and sand between your toes. We have waited all winter for this! If this summer is like the last few summers, we are expected to see over 8 million visitors this season. For some people, it might not be all about fun adventures in the sun. However, with a bit of education, it can be! A relaxing beach weekend can turn sour with just one rogue wave or a careless mistake from a uniformed beachgoer. While most bad beach days end with little more than sunburn in need of a good slathering of Aloe Vera gel, serious injuries are more common than we’d like to believe. At the beach when there is an emergency, seconds count and you can count on your surf rescue technician to be there when and where you need them. Ocean City employees over 200 surf rescue technicians, also known as lifeguards, that man stands over 10 miles of beach. Our surf rescue technicians are the fastest, bravest, best trained lifeguards in the world making thousands of rescues each summer. With the help of Ocean City Today newspaper, we will begin our weekly

PAGE 55

Ocean City Today

series of Beach and Ocean Safety Tips. Before hitting the waves and to get you started off on the right “sandy” foot, here are a few tips to help you keep your beach trips as safe as can be. • Only swim when a lifeguard is on duty. We are dedicated to guarding and maintaining safety along Ocean City’s beach seven days a week from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. With that being said, let me remind you of one of our most important messages; “Keep your feet in the sand until the lifeguards in the stand!” The ocean is unpredictable and statistics show that most of the drownings in the world occur during a time when lifeguards are not on duty. In Ocean City Maryland over 95 percent of all drownings that have occurred in the near 85 years of the beach patrol, have occurred when guards were not on duty. • Check in with the lifeguard. We also encourage you to check in with the lifeguard each time you visit to learn about current conditions. Each day they write a beach or ocean tip on the back of their stand. Be aware that currents will naturally push you down the shore, so make note of where you started. Try remembering a stable landmark like the lifeguard’s stand or a particular condo or building on shore. Make a note of which way the current is moving. Return to that spot in the water regularly so you’re never far from a lifeguard. • Watch for rip currents. Waves don’t always break evenly along the shore, and when they don’t — i.e., when they break more strongly in some areas than others — it can cause a circulation in the water that produces a rip current. They’re the number one hazard for beachgoers and can pull even the strongest swimmers out to sea. If you see a current of choppy, off-colored water extending from the shore, steer clear. If you do get pulled out, stay calm, save your energy (let the current carry you for a while), and keep breathing. Don’t try to swim against the current! Gain your composure and start swimming parallel to the shore until you’re out of the current. Then turn and swim diagonally toward the shore. If you can’t make it to the shore, wave your arms and make noise so someone can see or hear you and get help. The best advice, again, is to check in with the lifeguard. They can tell you the best place to swim and they have a nice description of how to spot rip currents on the back of their stand. • Be aware of the waves. They’re much more powerful than you think. See TIPS Page 57

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Enjoy expansive views of downtown OC, Inlet and Assateague from the wrap-around decks. Conveniently located near many great restaurants and the beach. First floor In-law suite with full BA, large living area, breakfast bar and mini kitchen. 2nd level includes Master suite with sitting area, gas fireplace, large walk-in closet w/shelving and Island, bath with jetted tub and lavish shower, double sinks and vanity. Laundry room and addl. en-suite bedroom with and walk-in closet. Top floor has hardwood floors throughout living area, large dining rm, gas fireplace, and sliding glass doors surround the living room with tremendous views. State-of-the-art gourmet kitchen with spacious custom cabinets, center island, stainless steel appliances. Large 2-car garage & elevator. $1,395,000

30 LOOKOUT POINT Waterfront Retreat, tucked away on beautiful wide open lagoon seconds from St. Martins River. Enjoy fishing, crabbing, tubing, skiing, , kayaking, paddle boarding , wave-running the list goes on and on. This home has been a second home for this owner and been very well maintained. Open concept floor plan with beautiful ceramic tile throughout, leading out to screened porch and open air deck overlooking the lagoon. The dock is shared but your side has ample space to dock a 20' boat. Perfect beach home or rental property. Large driveway for extra parking, 1 car carport with big storage shed for all your beach toys. Make your appointment today before it's too late. Start your Coastal Lifestyle today.

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13141 ROYAL LYTHAM LANE UNIT 125 Attention All Golfers!! 4BR/3BA upgraded home in River Run Golf Community. Two Master BRs overlook 4th hole and green. Open concept living, Dining and kitchen. Engineered hard wood floor in much of the main level. Kitchen with stainless steel appliances, custom cabinets w/glass doors. Most light fixtures have been upgraded. HVAC 3 years and Hot water heater 2 years young! Ceramic tile in all bates and kitchen. Laundry room features built in bar with wine refrigerator. One car garage for your golf cart and gear. Community Clubhouse, pool, boat ramps, docks , tennis courts and much more. Come start living the coastal lifestyle now! Opportunity to participate in golf package rental program. Other properties like this have generated over 25k a year. $325,000 ©2019 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomesServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of the HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.

103 Martinique Cir • Ocean Pines

9935 Pitts Rd • Showell JUST LISTED

Wow what a beautiful home in well sought out Ocean Pines. 3BR/2BA rancher, freshly painted, new vinyl plank flooring & carpet in BRs, This home is one owner vacation home only used every other weekend for years. Very well constructed home built by Lynn Crockett. Showings are stacking up get it while you can.

No HOA Fees!! If planned communities are not for you, but you want still be close to the beach, well this is the 3BR/2BA for you. This home is located on just under an acre of land with a detached 2 car garage and another building that could be used as a work shop, art studio, she -shed, man-cave or what ever you desire. Perfect place to start your coastal living.

4 Greenwood Ln • Ocean Pines

8 Harwich Ct • Ocean Pines

Perfect Start home or beach home. 3BR/2BA, freshly painted, all new vinyl floor in kitchen & baths, new vanity in hall bath & counter top in kitchen. Large welcoming front porch for relaxing mornings or evenings, Large deck on the back for grilling or cracking crabs. Priced to sell get it while you can!

Quiet on the Cul-de-sac! 3BR/3BA, rarely been used & move-in condition. Open floor plan w/ wood burning stove. Updated w/newer kitchen appliances & floors, front loading washer & dryer, new carpet throughout. Newer HVAC, hot water heater & roof. Front deck & side screened porch. Being sold furnished w/very few exclusions. Start living the Coast Lifestyle in sought after Ocean Pines, just 6 miles from the beach. Come see this gem before it's too late.

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$189,000

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Taryn Walterhoefer 11001 Manklin Meadows Lane Ocean Pines, MD 21811 410.208.3500

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©2019 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomesServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are


Ocean City Today

PAGE 56

MAY 24, 2019

Dining Guide ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ■ RESERVATIONS: Reservations accepted ________________________________

DOWNTOWN

South end to 28th Street ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192, www.captainstableoc.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100, www.coinspub.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m. and early bird 4-6 p.m. Daily specials. ■ THE CORAL REEF CAFE / HEMINGWAY'S RESTAURANT 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612, www.ocsuites.com/dining $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Four-story atrium cafe and an elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine, fresh seafood, fresh cuts of meat, farm-to-table produce, artisanal desserts, hearty sandwiches and much more. ■ COWBOY COAST COUNTRY SALOON AND STEAKHOUSE 17th Street, Ocean City 410-289-6331, www.cowboycoastoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Hand cut steaks, beer can chicken and fresh seafood. We even pickle our own pickles for the best fried pickles you’ve ever had. Kids ride for free on OC’s only mechanical bull. Nightly drink specials, live music and national concert acts. ■ FISHTALES BAR & GRILL 21st Street and the Bay, Ocean City 410-2890990, www.ocfishtales.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar FishTales located in a premier outdoor beach location on the bay with the best sunsets. Come for the best local fare. We offer lunch and dinner with great happy hour food and drink specials. Kids play area too. So sit back and enjoy. ■ HARBOR WATCH 806 S. Atlantic Ave., Inlet, Ocean City 410289-5121, www.harborwatchrestaurant.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Bringing Ocean City the freshest seafood, an award-winning Raw Bar along with certified Angus Beef. Great view of the Ocean City Inlet and Assateague Island. Call for Banquet information. Hours are Friday and Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday, 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. ■ HOOTERS 5th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410289-2690, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Traditional or boneless wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with Alaskan snow crab legs and Maryland steam pots. Pet friendly oceanfront patio. ■ MARINA DECK 306 Dorchester St., Ocean City 410-289-4411, www.marinadeckrestaurant.com $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Check out our all-you-can-eat menu: steamed shrimp, BBQ ribs, and blue crabs and crab legs. Brand new multi-level kid’s area. Join us for lunch and dinner in our dining room or on our open air, roof top deck or at the Wild Pony Bar for our signature cocktails and breathtaking Assateague Island view. ■ PHILLIPS SEAFOOD, CRAB HOUSE 21st Street, Ocean City 410-289-7747, PhillipsSeafood.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Traditional dining, buffet and carry out. Early Bird Menu when seated before 5 p.m. All-you-can-eat buffet. Voted OC’s Best Buffet. Featuring more than 100 items including snow crab legs, carving station, made-to-order pasta, handmade crab cakes and so much more. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-289-1100, www.dunesmanor.com $$ - $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30

a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season.

MIDTOWN

29th to 90th streets ■ 32 PALM 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525, www.oceancityhilton.com/dining $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, extensive wine list and gourmet desserts. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575, www.bjsonthewater.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week, year-round. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ COCONUTS BEACH BAR AND GRILL Castle in the Sand Hotel, 37th St & the Beach, Ocean City 800-552-7263, www.castleinthesand.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Beachfront open-air dining in a tropical setting. Serving grilled sandwiches, specialty salads, appetizers, wraps, tacos and frozen drinks, beer and wine. Live entertainment. Happy Hour daily, 5-6 p.m., 2-for-1 drink specials. Waitress service on the beach Memorial Day thru Labor Day. Coconuts is open daily 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., weather permitting. ■ DRY 85 OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-8989, www.DRY85.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Gourmet “stick to your ribs” home cooking. A made-from-scratch kitchen with every sauce and every dressing hand crafted. It’s that attention to detail that takes the concept of burgers, fries, pork chops and wings and turns them completely on their head. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 31st Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600, www.johnnyspizzapub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Featuring homemade pizzas, 18 gourmet pizzas, a variety of calzones, subs, burgers, sandwiches and jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Carry out, delivery or dine in. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443-6645639, www.longboardcafe.net $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MARLIN MOON 3301 Atlantic Ave., in the DoubleTree Ocean City 410-280-1201, www.marlinmoonocmd.com $$ | Full bar Featuring Executive Chef Gary Beach. Fresh cuisine featuring locally sourced seafood, steaks and vegetables. Small plate appetizers, fresh salads. Local craft beers and cocktails. Open for lunch and dinner, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ RED RED WINE BAR OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-6801, www.RedRedWineBar.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Coastal cuisine with a focus on local seafood and hand tossed pizzas plus artisanal cheeseboards. 35+ wines By the Glass, 120+ By the Bottle. Flights. Luxurious colors and custom built couches. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ SANIBELS, OCEANSIDE 32 (in the LaQuinta Hotel) 32nd Street, Ocean City 410-213-7278, www.sanibelsoceanside32.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Happy hour daily, 3-6 p.m. Chefs Tracy and Darius serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Featuring seafood, steaks, duck, lamb, crab cakes,

rockfish, tuna and more. Homemade ice cream and beignets. Open 7 days. Eat in or carry out. ■ SEACRETS 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900, www.seacrets.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762, www.skyebaroc.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials.

UPTOWN

91st to 146th streets ■ ALBERTINO’S BRICK OVEN EATERY 13117 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-2502000, www.albertinosoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Lunch and dinner daily. Open Monday through Thursday, 4 p.m. and Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. Homemade pizza and pasta, seafood, steaks. Daily specials and happy hour. ■ BEACH BARRELS 13207 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-2500522, www.beachbarrels.com $ | Full bar Happy hour Monday through Friday, 3-6 p.m. Live entertainment Wednesday through Saturday. Featuring primo hoagie menu where premium ingredients are fresh, nothing is pre-cut. Open 7 days, 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983, www.bluefishocmd.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443664-2896, www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com $$-$$$ | Reservations recommended for large parties | Kids’ menu | Full bar Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, steaks and pasta dishes. Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ THE CRAB BAG 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-2503337, www.thecrabbag.com $-$$ | Full bar Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carry-out and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DUFFYS 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449, www.duffysoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second season and daily dinner specials. Dine in, carry out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE 128th Street, Ocean City 410-289-2581, higginscrabhouse.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535, www.clarionoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving beach-inspired dishes in our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet, open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available Friday and Saturday, 5-9 p.m. ■ MY THAI OC 13727 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-2509918, mythaioc.webs.com $-$$ | Beer, wine Authentic Thai food, full vegan menu and vegetarian options including curry, rice and noodle dishes. Homemade appetizers, soups and sauces. Seafood, meat, vegetable and tofu.

Desserts, beer and wine. Dine in or takeout. Lunch specials daily, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. ■ REEF 118 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-524-1000, www.carouselhotel.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 711 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ WHISKERS PUB 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-5242609, www.whiskerspub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Certified Angus®burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.

DELAWARE ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302436-FOXS, www.foxspizzade.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery.

WEST OCEAN CITY ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717, www.ocitalianfood.com $-$$ | Reservations Accepted | Full bar Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR AND GRILL 128741 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410213-1846, weocharborside.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Home of the Original Fresh Squeezed Orange Crush! Open every day, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Appetizers, fresh seafood, steak and pasta. Live entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HOOTERS Route 50 & Keyser Point Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1841, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu and game room | Full bar New smoked wings with half the calories. Traditional wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with raw bar and crab legs. Sports packages and live entertainment. Large parties welcome. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 $ | Kids’ menu Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo.

OCEAN PINES ■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410641-7222, www.OPyachtclub.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Amid a bay front setting, the Ocean Pines Yacht Club offers dining selections for lunch and dinner. Fresh seafood and signature drinks. Open Thursday-Sunday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ TERN GRILLE 100 Clubhouse Drive, Ocean Pines 410-6417222, oceanpinesgolf.org/dining $$ | Full bar The Tern Grille serves freshly-prepared breakfast and lunch items. Open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, weather permitting.

BERLIN ■ OCEAN DOWNS CASINO, POSEIDON’S PUB 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-641-0600, www.oceandowns.com $-$$$ | Full bar House soups, small plates, sandwiches, burgers and entrees including steaks, chicken, veggie and Eastern Shore favorites. Dining room hours: Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 10 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, noon to 8 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, noon to 11 p.m. Pub open late.


MAY 24, 2019

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Ocean City Today

ON GUARD

Tips offered by OCBP to help residents, visitors stay safe Continued from Page 55 We have found that injuries resulting from strong waves can range from simple sprains, broken collarbones, and dislocated shoulders to more serious injuries including blunt organ trauma and spinal injuries (which can lead to paralysis).   Another culprit to be aware of is shorebreak, or waves that break directly on shore (rather than breaking a few yards out and rolling in more slowly). These waves in particular have the potential to cause serious neck and spinal injuries. Never put your back to the waves (letting large waves impact your back can result in the same type of injury as a rear end auto collision). Just be sure to check in with the SRT before hitting the surf to ask about the wave conditions for the day. Your lifeguard is more than happy to point out shorebreak and let you know when and where there is a safer place to swim. • Sand holes can be dangerous. People love to dig holes at the beach, but it can be dangerous because they can collapse on the people digging them. Once a person is buried in the sand it is very difficult to dig them out. Even a small hole can trap you.  Just as a person can drown in a small amount of water, it doesn’t take a very deep hole to trap a child. The rule followed by the beach patrol is that holes may only be as deep as the knee. Lifeguards enforce the knee-deep policy for your safety. • Stay sober. Alcohol doesn’t only affect judgment, it can also dehydrate you, increasing the likelihood of heatrelated sicknesses.  The beach may seem like a great place to relax and enjoy alcoholic beverages; however, it is both illegal and unsafe to do so. Compounded by the heat, the dehydrating and disorienting effects of alcohol and impaired judgment, you can understand why Ocean City does not allow alcohol on its beach.  Alcohol depletes your body of the vital fluids it needs to keep you up and running throughout the day, and it can also give swimmers a false sense of confidence when it comes to ocean swimming. Almost every guard has a story about rescuing a swimmer who drank too much alcohol. A person who has a healthy understanding of the ocean and their own swimming ability might not usually head out very far, but after a few drinks they might find themselves feeling braver. They take risks they usually would not and can end up hurting themselves in any number of ways. We know it’s tempting to enjoy a few Pina Coladas while soaking in the sun on the beach,

but if you’re going to partake, make sure you are obeying the law and steer clear of the surf and hydrate properly. • Save your skin. Just one blistering sunburn in childhood or adolescence more than doubles a person’s chance for developing melanoma (skin cancer) later in life. Racking up more than five sunburns at any age also doubles the risk for melanoma. Keep the burns at bay by slathering on a high quality broad-spectrum sunscreen of 30 or higher (our guards use Panama Jack for sun protection). Make sure you have a source of shade like hats, umbrellas or tents that are readily available, especially during the sun’s peak hours of 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Remember if you are using an umbrella for shade, you are responsible for its safe use, never leave it unattended if you leave the beach and keep an eye on wind direction and changes in weather. Your eyes can also be damaged by exposure to the suns UV rays, so never forget to wear a pair of high quality sun glasses. Lifeguards wear polarized glasses to help cut down the glare off the water and so they can see you better. • What to bring and not to bring to the beach. Always bring any medications that you might need in an emergency (epi pen, appropriate snack for diabetics, heart medication, etc). Also bring plenty of water because once you are thirsty you are already becoming dehydrated. Don’t forget footwear, because on a hot day the sand can cause very serious 2nd degree burns by just crossing the beach to your towel. Never bring valuables to the beach. Leave them at home, in your condo or in your car and have an extra set of keys with you. Keep the above tips in mind and have an action plan before hitting the waves. Even if you’re heading to the pool or lake instead of the ocean, head our warnings. Many of the tips above apply to hanging out near any body of water. No matter where you’re headed, we’ve rounded up eight major safety tips to help you keep safe at the beach. We’ll never know how many lives will be saved by the lifeguards’ vigilance, but you can help and do your part by reading our safety advice each week and sharing the information with others. You are strongly encouraged to check in with the lifeguard each time you visit to learn about current conditions. Each day they write a beach or ocean tip on the back of their stand. Let the summer adventures begin in Ocean City, and always remember to “Keep your feet in the sand until the lifeguard’s in the stand!”

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Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

OP Chamber’s sixth annual car show at park this Sun. (May 24, 2019) The Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce will host its sixth annual Car Show on Sunday, May 26 at Veterans Memorial Park, located on the corner of Cathell and Racetrack roads. Several food and business vendors will be on hand along with music and a live radio remote. The car show will begin around 11 a.m. and trophies will be awarded at 1 p.m. in categories including Classic, Antique, Hot Rod, Modern, Customs, Jeep and People’s Choice.

CROSSWORD In the coming weeks, visitors to Maryland’s coastal bays and beaches can experience one of the world’s oldest migrations – horseshoe crabs emerging to spawn, as they’ve done for the last 350 million years.

Horseshoe crab migration to take over Maryland beaches (May 24, 2019) One of the world’s oldest wildlife migrations is set to begin on Maryland’s coastal bays and beaches. For 350 million years, the May and June full and new moons have fostered a giant migration of horseshoe crabs. Coming from the depths of the Atlantic Ocean, millions of these prehistoric arthropods clumsily invade Maryland’s beaches for this ritualistic spawn, laying their eggs on shore. The best chance for viewing these living fossils on Maryland’s Atlantic Coast and along the Chesapeake Bay this year are during the low tide of a full moon, June 17, and the new moon, June 3. Cold water temperatures may delay the early part of the spawn.  Every year during this time, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources conducts a horseshoe crab migration survey. “I’m in a unique place to be able to witness this event,” said fisheries Biologist Steven Doctor, who leads the

yearly survey. “This event has significant ecological impacts not just for future generations of horseshoe crabs but for other species up and down the coast.” On average, one horseshoe crab can deposit nearly 20,000 eggs on the beach. Ultimately, many of the horseshoe crabs eggs never reach maturity, and instead are devoured by crustaceans, fish and migrating shorebirds such as the red knot and sandpiper, who depend on this feast for survival. Despite a horseshoe crab’s armor and menacing tail, they are gentle creatures that do not bite or sting, and can only survive outside of water for a short amount of time. To help sustain the population and return back to the water, individuals who see a horseshoe crab on its back are asked to gently flip it over using two hands; and never by its telson (tail). While the horseshoe crab is not consumed, its copper-based blue blood is invaluable to cuttingedge biomedical research.

Pre-registration is available online for $12 or $15 the day of the show. Registration will be at Veterans Memorial Park beginning at 10 a.m. All cars must be registered by noon to participate in the car show. Register online at www.OceanPinesChamber.org. For more information, to register for the car show or to become a vendor, call the Ocean Pines Chamber at 410-6415306, email info@OceanPinesChamber.org, or stop in the office at 11031 Cathell Road Berlin, Maryland 21811.

Answers on page 62


MAY 24, 2019

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Ocean City Today

COMMUNITY BRIEFS

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

U.S. Air Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Mallory T. Sterrett

Graduate U.S. Air Force Reserve Airman 1st Class Mallory T. Sterrett graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Sterrett is the daughter of Reid Sterrett of Hebron, Maryland, and Mary Sterrett of Berlin. She is the sister of Mariah and Madelyn Sterrett of Hebron. The airman is a 2018 graduate of Mardela Middle and High School, Mardela Springs.

WORCESTER COUNTY WATER AND WASTEWATER ENTERPRISE FUND FY 2019/2020 REQUESTED BUDGETS AND ASSESSMENTS The Worcester County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing on the proposed operating budgets, assessments, user charges and other charges for each of the 11 sanitary service areas operated by the Worcester County Department of Public Works, Water & Wastewater Division on: Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at 10:40 a.m. in the County Commissioners’ Meeting Room Room 1101 Government Center, One West Market Street Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 The 11 sanitary service areas and proposed changes to the users fees to cover projected expenses are as follows: Assateague Pointe - increase from $85 to $90 per park trailer per quarter water and sewer flat charge; increase from $135.50 to $140.50 per equivalent dwelling unit (EDU) per quarter domestic sewer flat charge; and increase from $10 to $15 per lot grinder pump flat surcharge. Briddletown - increase from $61 to $66 per EDU per quarter domestic water flat charge; increase from $22 to $27 per EDU per quarter swimming pool flat charge; increase from $50 to $60 per EDU per quarter irrigation system flat charge; and increase in commercial water base fee ranging from $49.50 to $412.50 at present to $53 to $441.50 based on total EDU's. Edgewater Acres - increase first three tiers water usage charges ranging from $7.25 to $9 at present to $8 to $10 per thousand gallons; and increase from $93 to $98 per EDU per quarter domestic water flat charge. The Landings - increase from $230 to $240 per EDU per quarter domestic water and sewer base fee; increase from $32 to $37 per EDU per quarter Lewis Road domestic water base fee; increase from $220 to $230 per EDU per quarter accessibility fee; and new commercial water and sewer base fees ranging from $275 to $2,300 based on total EDU's and usage charges ranging from $4 to $10 per thousand gallons. Lighthouse Sound - increase from $210 to $215 per EDU per quarter domestic sewer flat charge; and increase from $85 to $100 per EDU per quarter accessibility fee. Mystic Harbour - increase from $168 to $173 per EDU per quarter domestic water and sewer base fee; increase from $168 to $172 per EDU per quarter domestic sewer flat charge; and increase in commercial water and sewer base fees ranging from $198 to $1,650 at present to $212 to $1,766 based on total EDU's. Newark - no proposed changes. Ocean Pines - increase from $170 to $175 per EDU per quarter domestic water and sewer base fee; increase from $158 to $161.75 per EDU per quarter domestic sewer flat charge; increase White Horse Park domestic water and sewer flat charge from $134 to $138 per lot per quarter; increase in commercial water and sewer base fees ranging from $198 to $1,650 at present to $212 to $1,766 based on total EDU's; and increase from $13 to $20 per EDU per quarter supplemental debt service. Riddle Farm - increase from $180 to $190 per EDU per quarter domestic water and sewer base fee; increase from $140 to $150 per EDU per quarter accessibility fee; increase in commercial water and sewer base fees ranging from $198 to $1,650 at present to $212 to $1,766 based on total EDU's; and new $9 per EDU per quarter debt service. River Run - increase from $53.13 to $54.69 per EDU per quarter domestic water base fee. West Ocean City - no proposed changes. In addition to user fees, assessments will be levied in the Mystic Harbour, Newark, Ocean Pines, Oyster Harbour, Riddle Farm, and Snug Harbour service areas or sub-areas to make debt payments. All assessments shall be made on an EDU basis. Copies of the proposed budgets for each service area are available for public inspection at the Worcester County Government Center Rooms 1103 and 1105, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, the County Treasurer's Office in the Isle of Wight Complex on Route 90 and St. Martins Neck Road, the County Library in Ocean Pines on Cathell Road, and online at www.co.worcester.md.us. For additional information, contact the Worcester County Treasurer's Office at (410) 632-0686 ext. 1217.

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Ocean City Today

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING WORCESTER COUNTY LIQUOR CONTROL ENTERPRISE FUND FY 2019/2020 REQUESTED OPERATING BUDGET The Worcester County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing to receive comments on the proposed FY 2019/2020 Liquor Control Enterprise Fund Operating Budget as requested by the Worcester County Liquor Control Department on: Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at 10:40 a.m. in the County Commissioners' Meeting Room Room 1101 - Government Center - One West Market Street Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 Copies of the detailed budget are available for public inspection at the Worcester County Government Center Rooms 1103 and 1105, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 or online at www.co.worcester.md.us. WORCESTER COUNTY 2019/2020 REQUESTED OPERATING BUDGET LIQUOR CONTROL ENTERPRISE FUND Personnel Services .................................................................................................................................$163,360 Supplies & Materials...............................................................................................................................$14,200 Cost of Goods Sold .................................................................................................................................$622,200 Maintenance & Services..........................................................................................................................$62,140 Other Charges............................................................................................................................................$5,500 Payout of Net Income (Loss) to County and Pocomoke City.................................................................$33,500 Interfund Charges ................................................................................................................................. $14,100 TOTAL REQUESTED EXPENDITURES ........................................................................ $915,000 Sales - Retail ..........................................................................................................................................$915,000 TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES ...................................................................................$915,000 For additional information, contact the Worcester County Treasurer’s Office at 410-632-0686, ext. 1217.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING WORCESTER COUNTY SOLID WASTE ENTERPRISE FUND FY 2019/2020 REQUESTED OPERATING BUDGET

The Worcester County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing to receive comments on the proposed FY 2019/2020 Solid Waste Enterprise Fund Operating Budget as requested by the Worcester County Department of Public Works, Solid Waste Division on: Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at 10:40 a.m. in the County Commissioners’ Meeting Room Room 1101 Government Center - One West Market Street Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 The Proposed Budget maintains the current solid waste tipping fees of $70 per ton for municipal waste and $80 per ton for construction and demolition debris. The homeowner convenience center permits will remain at $100 for the first two vehicles, and $100 for the third and additional vehicles within each household. As an option for homeowners, the “Pay-As-You-Throw” system will remain at a cost of $1 per bag for each 33-gallon bag disposed at any homeowner convenience center. Copies of the detailed budget are available for public inspection at the Worcester County Government Center Rooms 1103 and 1105, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 or online at www.co.worcester.md.us. WORCESTER COUNTY 2019/2020 REQUESTED OPERATING BUDGET SOLID WASTE ENTERPRISE FUND Personnel Services..............................................................................................................................$2,340,970 Supplies & Materials...............................................................................................................................$59,041 Maintenance & Services ....................................................................................................................$1,154,500 Other Charges .......................................................................................................................................$706,313 Debt Service ...........................................................................................................................................$296,500 Interfund Charges............................................................................................................................$(1,839,008) Capital Equipment ................................................................................................................................$200,000 TOTAL REQUESTED EXPENDITURES ..................................................................... $2,918,316 Tipping Fees........................................................................................................................................$3,535,000 Permits .......................................................................................................................................................$6,000 Interest and Penalties ...............................................................................................................................$2,500 Other Revenue .......................................................................................................................................$255,500 Transfer to Reserves ...........................................................................................................................$(880,684) TOTAL ESTIMATED REVENUES ............................................................................... $2,918,316 For additional information, contact the Worcester County Treasurer’s Office at 410-632-0686, ext. 1217.

MAY 24, 2019

ACT checks water health through Swim Guide app (May 24, 2019) Since 2013, Assateague Coastal Trust, has monitored and reported on the health of area waterways through the internationally-recognized Swim Guide water quality monitoring program. Swim Guide is a smart phone app that enables users to find safe beaches and swimming areas to recreate and enjoy their waterways through a simple platform that relays local area water quality. It is critical that the quality of natural water bodies be a transparent issue, and for millions of beach goers, swimmers, and surfers across the country, being in the know when it comes to water quality has proven much easier with Swim Guide. Swim Guide is a free smart phone app available from App Store, Google Play, or www.theswimguide.org. Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips stresses the importance of such a far-reaching platform. Swim Guide will help bring this important information to a much wider audience In addition to participating in the Swim Guide program, ACT is an affiliate of the Waterkeeper Alliance, and each week reports numerous water quality variables and bacteria levels on its Assateague Coastkeeper webpage, www.actforbays.org/coastkeeper.html. New for 2019, ACT will also be utilizing an interactive mapping tool known as Water Reporter, which allows users to easily identify a location within the sampling area and access that location’s latest water quality data, including pH, Dissolved Oxygen levels and bacteria levels. ACT’s water quality program monitors and reports data on the coastal bays each week. The program will run from May 16 through the Labor Day holiday in September. This year the organization is monitoring 10 locations throughout Herring and Turville Creek, Isle of Wight Bay, Assawoman Bay and the St. Martin River. Visitors to Worcester County and the coastal watershed are encouraged to contact the Coastkeeper if they would like to see additional areas monitored. Coastal bayside waterfront communities like Montego Bay, Snug Harbor, and others may contact ACT to find out how their swimming or water recreation areas can be monitored by calling 410-629-1538, or email the ACT Coastkeeper at coastkeeper@actforbays.org. More information about ACT’s water monitoring program and app download instructions can be found at www.actforbays.org/water-monitoring.html


MAY 24, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

PM. Dinner includes 14 oz. Porterhouse steak, baked potato, salad and dinner roll for $16. Pre order required: Don, 410-600-5294 or Ray, 410-215-9354 for tickets or pick them up from the bartender at the legion. Public welcomed.

FARMERS & ARTISANS MARKET

Fri., May 24 FIBER FRIENDS Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:00 AM. Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, etc. are welcomed to this informal get-together. Bring your lap work. Victoria Christie-Healy, moonlightknitting@gmail.com, 703-507-0708, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

A TOUCH OF TEA Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11:00 AM. A traditional English tea complete with sweet and savory refreshments. Bring your own tea cup. There will be a short presentation on the history of tea. Register: 410-208-4014. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

CEREMONIAL SUMMER KICKOFF IN OCEAN CITY Somerset Street and the beach, Somerset Street and the beach, 11:00 AM. Gov. Larry Hogan and Mayor Rick Meehan will kick off the summer season by placing the first umbrella of the season on Ocean City’s beach. Both will provide brief remarks about the significance of this event and what this historic tradition means to Ocean City and the town’s visitors. Mayor Meehan will also speak about upcoming events and other highlights that vacationers can enjoy this year.

screen. This event is free. 410-250-0125

Sat., May 25 ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET Whaleyville United Methodist Church, 11716 Sheppards Crossing Road, 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM. Buffet will include pancakes, bacon, sausage, scrapple, scrambled eggs, chipped beef, hash brown potatoes, toast, fruit and assorted beverages. Cost is $8 for adults and $4 for children.

CRAFTY SATURDAY MAKE & TAKE ‘MEMORIAL DAY’ Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM. Weekly themed craft for all ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Saturdays - White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM - 1:00 PM. Featuring live music, chef demos, children’s activities and other special events. Shop for everything from fresh local produce to unique handmade artisan goods. Open to the public.

Sun., May 26 BERLIN FARMERS MARKET Pitts Street and Main Street, Pitts Street and Main Street, 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM. Featuring more than 20 vendors including fresh fruits and veggies, baked goods, seafood, poultry, farm fresh eggs, organic goods, wood working, beauty products and more. Also enjoy free crafts for kids, a variety of tutorials, a petting zoo and music provided by Nate Clendenen. Ivy Wells and Allison Early, 410-973-2051

12TH ANNUAL ARTISANS FAIR Lord Baltimore Elementary School, 120 Atlantic Ave., Ocean View, Del., 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM. Artisans will exhibit both indoors and outdoors, showing textiles, metalwork, fine art, glass, jewelry, pottery, photography, woodworking and sculpture. There will also be a Farmers Market from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Other attractions are a raffle auction of artisans’ work, silent auction, baked goods, a 50/50 cash raffle and breakfast, lunch and snack items. Free admission. Proceeds benefit the college scholarship fund of South Coastal Delaware AARP.

6TH ANNUAL CAR SHOW

CANDY SUSHI

PASTOR INSTALLATION

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 11:00 AM. Make your own sushi with Rice Krispie treats and fruit roll ups. For ages 8 years and older. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Makemie Memorial Presbyterian Church, 103 W. Market St., 3:00 PM. Rev. Samuel Monte will be installed as the 31st Pastor of Makemie Memorial and the community is invited to attend. Reception following service.

Worcester County Veterans Memorial at Ocean Pines, 11144 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 11:00 AM. There will be several food and business vendors as well as music and a live radio remote. Trophies will be awarded at 1 p.m. Pre-registration is available online for just $12 or $15 the day of the show. Registration beginning at 10 a.m. All cars must be registered by noon to participate. Online registration: www.OceanPinesChamber.org. info@OceanPinesChamber.org, 410-641-5306

WRECKTANGLE RIBBON CUTTING Wrecktangle, St. Louis Avenue and 3rd Street, 1:00 PM. To celebrate the opening of the ninja-style obstacle course. Special guest is professional ninja competitor Joe Moravsky.

HOMESCHOOL CODING Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:00 PM. Homeschool students of all ages are welcome. Register: 410-2084014. Students who cannot read will need help from a caregiver. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PINE NEEDLE BASKETS Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 2:00 PM. Learn to make pine needle baskets from Native American artist, Dawn Manyfeathers. Register: 410-641-0650. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

SPRING FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, 8:00 PM. Ocean City Recreation & Parks will show a family appropriate movie on a giant projection

BOOK SIGNING Pam’s Hallmark Shoppe, White Marlin Mall, 12641 Ocean Gateway, Ste 220, 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Barbara Witherow will be signing her newly released sequel, The Tether, written under the pen name Julia Ash. This is the second installment to her dark fantasy series: The ELI Chronicles. https://juliaashbooks.wordpress.com

STEM ‘TOWERING BUILDINGS’ Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:00 PM. For ages 5-12 years. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Mon., May 27 MEMORIAL DAY PARADE Located at Dr. William Henry Park and Multipurpose Building on Flower Street, 11:00 AM - 5:00 PM. Parade begins at 11 a.m. from Stephen Decatur Middle School to Henry Park featuring bands, cars, dance and music. The day continues at Henry Park with music, food, vendors and games. Sponsored by the Berlin Community Improvement Association.

HONORING MILITARY FAMILIES DISCOUNT STEAK DINNER American Legion Berlin Post #123, 10111 Old Ocean City Blvd., 3:00 PM - 7:00

Phillips Crab House, 2004 Philadelphia Ave, 12:00 AM. In honor of Memorial Day, Monday, May 27, 2019, Phillips

Seafood is offering one complimentary entrée up to a $50 value to all currently serving military personnel and veterans. Must provide military ID or other proof of service. To make a reservation call 410-2896821. Limit one complimentary entree per person. Phillips, stephanie@breslowpartners.com, 4102896821, https://www.phillipsseafood.com/locations-and-menus/ocean-city-crab-house

MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY Worcester County Veterans Memorial at Ocean Pines, 11144 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 11:00 AM. The ceremony will feature patriotic music and pageantry, honoring the service men and women who give their lives for our freedoms. Also honoring local Gold Star mothers and American Ex-POW’s. Golf carts will be circulating from tent to parking lot for those needing some assistance. Bring lawn chairs, as seating is limited. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will move to the Ocean Pines Community Center.

MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY The Dunes Manor Hotel on 28th Street and Baltimore Avenue will host the American Legion Synepuxent Post 166, American Legion Riders and joint Color Guard processions oceanside starting at 8 a.m. on Monday. The activities will begin in the parking lot in front of Dunes Manor and continue on the beach and include the playing of “Taps,” posting of colors, a firing squad, three-volley salute and the laying of a wreath in the ocean by the U.S. Coast Guard of Ocean City. The ceremony will be led by Commander of the South Eastern Shore District Sarge Garlitz. Rosie Garlitz of Unit #166 will offer the poem “In Flanders Fields” and will lead attendees in “God Bless America.” After the ceremony, the Dunes Manor hotel will offer a buffet style breakfast. For more information, call the Dunes Manor Hotel at 1-800-523-2888.

MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE American Legion Post #166 will host a Memorial Day service at 5 p.m. on Monday at its facility on 24th Street. Sarge Garlitz, commander of the South Eastern Shore District of the American Legion, will be the emcee. Representatives from the First State Detachment Marine Corps League, Unit #166 American Legion Auxiliary, Chapter #166 American Legion Riders, Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter #1091, American Legion Post #166 Color Guard, Sons of the American Legion #166, and officers from the Worcester County Veterans Memorial will say a few words. Chaplain Ben Dawson will perform the invocation. The service features a post-everlasting moment, firing of the volley salute and “Taps” will be played. Past Commander and Historian Nate Pearson will present the history of Memorial

Continued on Page 62


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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

CALENDAR Continued from Page 61 Day. Rosie Garlitz of Unit #166 will lead attendees in “God Bless America.” Refreshments will be served after the ceremony, which is free and open to the public. For more information, call Commander Tom Wengert at 443-994-2513.

DELMARVA A CAPELLA CHORUS Mondays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 7:00 PM. All levels of singers and drop-ins welcome. Carol, 410-641-6876

Tues., May 28 STEAM STORY TIME ‘CONSTRUCTION ZONE’ Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:30 AM. Activities for young children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY TIME ‘GAMES’ Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM. Come explore the game collection. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

siasts, needle artists of all skill levels are invited to join this casual morning of sharing. Work on your favorite patterns, exchange ideas and have a great time. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Luncheon will be held on June 13. The tour of nine gardens will be from 9 a.m. to noon, with lunch at the Ocean Pines Yacht Club beginning at 12:15 p.m. Directions for the garden locations will be available at the Yacht Club at 9 a.m. Cost of the luncheon is $35; tour only is $15 (tour only tickets will be available at the Yacht Club on June 13). RSVP: Marian, 410-208-2508 by May 30.

SNOW HILL BOOK OF THE MONTH

RAVENS BEACH BASH

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 5:30 PM. This month’s selection is Bel Canto by Ann Patchett. Copies of the book are available at the library in advance. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

A Ravens filled weekend of events including player and alumni meet and greets, beach games, bonfires, a firework/laser light show and more. Headquarters located at Clarion Resort Fontainbleau Hotel. Almost every event within the weekend is free and open to the public. Rob Tune, contact.us@ravens.nfl.net, 410-701-4000, https://www.baltimoreravens.com/fans/beach-bash/

STORY TIME ‘BEACH’

GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP - LIFE AFTER LOSS Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM. A supportive and safe place for members to share stories confidentially and spend time with others who understand. No sign-ins and no special advanced requirements to attend. Gail Mansell, gmansell@atlanticgeneral.org, 410-641-9725

TED TALK ‘THE UNQUIET MIND’ Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM. In part two of the group’s investigation into mental health, the group will straddle the line between madness and sanity. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

CHRISTIAN SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE Seaside Christian Academy, 12637 Ocean Gateway A, 7:00 PM. Interested families will be a able to tour the school and learn more about it and the application process. Register: 410-213-7595 or info@seasidechristian.com.

ATLANTIC COAST SPORTFISHING ASSOCIATION Ocean City Lion’s Club, 12534 Airport Road, 7:30 PM. There will be two guest speakers who will talk on flounder fishing in the bay and stripe bass, (rockfish), bluefish. The group will also speak on the Recreational Fishing Forum with DNR officials with regards to the future of rockfish. Guests are welcome. Ron Smith, smitty3894@aol.com

‘ASK A MASTER GARDENER’ PLANT CLINIC Tuesdays through September - Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1-4 p.m. Bring your photos or bagged plant samples by and let expert Master Gardeners find solutions to your questions. Free service.

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:00 AM. Explore the world of iPads while learning from each other. Register: Norma Kessler, 410-641-7017. Men are welcome. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Art League of Ocean City Ocean City, 502 94th Street, bayside, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Come out to the Art League Of Ocean City to see four great performances including solo song writers, comedy, and bands! Art League of Ocean City Ocean City, megan@artleagueofoceancity.org, 4105249433, https://artleagueofoceancity.org/event/originals-only-24/

‘THE BROADWAY JUKEBOX: REVOLUTION’ The Blue Dog, 300 N. Washington St., 8:00 PM. Upon arrival the audience will vote for their top choices based on five categories: Classics, Contemporary Musicals, Animation, Diva and Witten by Rockers. Brown Box then curates that night’s show on the spot in this interactive, familyfriendly evening. Open to all audiences.

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OP/OC Wednesdays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB Wednesdays - Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM. Dance to the sounds of the ’50s and ’60s music. A $5 donation to benefit Veterans and local charities. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 410-208-1151, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

STORY TIME ‘SUMMER FUN’ Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TURTLE STORY TIME Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 AM. Stories, movement, songs, crafts and a visit from the library’s mascot, Luke the Maryland Diamonback Terrapin. For ages 2-5 years. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Providing physical and emotional support for survivors and caregivers to share personal experiences and challenges. Coping strategies also discussed. Anne Waples, awaples@atlanticgeneral.org, 443-614-5720

FIRESIDE CHAT Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 3:00 PM. Join this lively chat about favorite good reads and get some ideas for new authors and genres to explore.

FAMILY TIME ‘GREAT BOOK EXCHANGE’ Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 4:30 PM. Kids and adults bring in 3 books to exchange for up to 3 books. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

GOSPEL REVIVAL IN SNOW HILL Wednesdays - Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St., 6:00 PM. 302-540-2127

Bandstand in Byrd Park, 400 Dighton Ave., 7:00 PM. Music by God’s Country Crossroads and a special guest speaker. All are welcome. Bring lawn chairs or blankets.

Wed., May 29

Thurs., May 30

PUBLIC MEETING ON OCEAN CITY INLET PROJECTS

WITTY KNITTERS

DEADLINE FOR OCEAN PINES GARDEN TOUR AND LUNCHEON

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Knitters, crochet enthu-

OC/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING

The Ocean Pines Garden Tour and

BEACH SINGLES Thursdays - Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel, 10100 Coastal Highway, 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM. Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Info: 302-436-9577, 410-524-0649 or BeachSingles.org

GRIEF SUPPORT Thursdays - Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11:00 AM. Coastal Hospice provides grief support and education. Participants work together to help each other navigate through grief at their own pace. Free and open to the public. Nicole Long, 443-6146142

ONGOING EVENTS PLAY IT SAFE

ORIGINALS ONLY

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Tuesdays - Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and health lifestyle. jeanduck47@gmail.com

IPAD CHICKS

ment of Natural Resources is hosting a public meeting to discuss two concurrent efforts: a project to address sediment accumulation in the Ocean City Inlet, as well as a study on the scour hole near Homer Gudelsky Park. https://www.nab.usace.army.mil/Ocean City/

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Maryland Depart-

Town-wide program for 2019 high school graduates, featuring karaoke, volleyball, dodgeball, kayaking, mini golf, paddleboarding and more, May 29 through June 14. Those who attend a “Play It Safe” event will receive a wristband to ride the bus all week for $5. All events are free. Activities schedule: http://frugals.biz/downloads/Play%20I t%20Safe%20Printable%20Calendar.pd f. Info: 410-250-2421 or PlayItSafe@gmail.com.

FREE ADMISSION TO MILITARY PERSONNEL AND THEIR FAMILIES Ocean City Life-Saving Station Museum, 813 S. Atlantic Ave., May 18 through Sept. 2. The program is available to those currently serving in the United States Military. Must show a Geneva Convention common access card (CAC), DD Form 1173 ID dent ID) or a DD Form 1173-1 ID. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

STAR CHARITIES MONTHLY MEETING Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10 a.m., on the first Friday of each month. Anyone interested is welcome. Info: Anna Foultz, 410-641-7667.

Crossword answers from page 58


MAY 24, 2019

63 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.com and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

HIRING ALL POSITIONS!! Full time & Part time Stop by our location on 52nd street! or call 443-664-2825

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING

Now Hiring

AM Cook/Server Apply in person: Atrium Café inside Quality Inn 54th

PM HOSTESS Inquire within at 32 Palm at Hilton Suites 3200 Baltimore Ave. Ocean City, MD

Five Guys Burgers

Deep End Pool Bar Help Wanted AM Cooks Coral Reef Cafe & Bar Suites 17th St Apply within lobby level

Hiring ALL Positions!!

Ocean City, MD Now Hiring For

All Positions Year-round, at West OC, 64th St. and 136th St. locations. Stop in to fill out an application!

Full time & Part time To apply go to: www.mygcjob.com

Classifieds 410-723-6397

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Comfort Inn Gold Coast

HOTEL MAINTENANCE We are seeking to fill a hotel Maintenance position, full time, year round. Experience in hotel or condo maintenance preferred. Competitive pay and excellent benefits. We are also seeking to fill a Front Desk Agent positon. Please apply in person at The Comfort Inn Gold Coast on 112th Street Ocean City, next to the Gold Coast Mall No phone calls please

HELP WANTED Delivery Driver/ Warehouse Kendall Furniture is hiring a year-round & seasonal Driver, Delivery & Warehouse personnel. MUST have a valid driver’s license, dependable transportation, able to lift furniture and present well to customers. Call Rhonda at KMC and Associates 302-988-5087

WAREHOUSE MANAGER Local floor covering company seeks reliable, self-motivated, independent individual for full time, permanent position managing inventory control, installation coordination, warehouse management responsibilities. Must have thorough knowledge of all aspects of floor coverings & materials associated with them, excellent organizational, communication & customer service skills. Must be drug free, have good driver’s license, reliable transportation, and the ability to operate a fork lift. Salary and benefits based upon experience. Interested applicants please call 302-537-1899 or forward resume to mike@mikescarpetconnection.com

Come Join Our Winning Team! Now accepting applications for the following positions! Front Desk Overnight Front Desk Reservations Maintenance Painter Server Line Cook Looking for experienced personnel with customer service skills. Must be flexible with hours. Email resume to jobs@carouselhotel.com or stop by and complete an application at the Front Desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check.

NOW HIRING Ocean City’s ONLY Louisiana & Cajun Style Waterfront & Bar • Hostess/Greeters • Bus Persons/Greeters • Food Runners • Servers • Bartenders • General Kitchen Help Experience preferred but will train happy people that enjoy to smile and be a team player! Call today to set up interview for immediate hire!!!

410-831-9841

Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!! Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities: Year Round, Full/Part Time: Banquet Server, Server, Bartender, Busser, Food Runner, Line Cooks, Room Attendant, Night Audit, Income Auditor, Front Desk, F&B Manager, Pool Attendants, Coffee Shop Attendant, Security Guards

Free employee meal and excellent benefits. Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

ssifieds la C r u o Y r e Ord

Online

www.oceancitytoday.com

Convenient, quick, no waiting, no calls ~ Days, nights and weekends

Come be a part of our family! HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: • PT Shuttle Driver • Housekeepers • Laundry Attendants • Room Inspector • Front Desk Associates • Lifeguards • Concession Worker/ Bartender • Maintenance Worker • AM Breakfast Servers All positions are required to work weekends. Interested applicants can apply in person or submit resume to: info@fskfamily.com 12806 Ocean Gateway Ocean City, MD 21842


PAGE 64

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Chairside

AUTO/MARINE PARTS Now hiring for: Parts Advisors & Managers Locations in the Rehoboth, Bethany & Ocean City Areas Call: 302-339-6910

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE Email Resume:

molarbiz@yahoo.com Full-Time Part-Time Positions

PIZZA MAKERS LINE COOKS

Flexible Hours Competitive Pay End-of-Year Bonus

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Thunderbird Beach Motel. Now hiring FT Front Desk & Housekeeping. Apply in person, 32nd St. Baltimore Ave.

Now Hiring for Sanibel’s at Sunset Island. Servers, bartenders, bussers, food runners, hostess, bar back & kitchen staff. Apply within. 32nd & Coastal, in LaQuinta Hotel, second floor.

THE SPINNAKER Now hiring Housekeeping, Front Desk, Laundry (evening shift) Apply in person 1800 Baltimore Ave.

PGN Crabhouse, 29th Street & Coastal Hwy. PGN Crabhouse Help Wanted Waitstaff, Kitchen Help Apply Within after 11:00 am.

Holiday Inn Oceanfront 6600 Coastal Highway Ocean City, MD 21842 Now hiring for the following full-time, year-round positions for our Resort Hotel to join our busy and professional team:

Please stop by our Berlin location: 104 North Main Street Or apply on our website: difebos.com

- Front Desk - Maintenance - Housekeeping - PM Shift Housekeeping

- WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION TECHNICIANS & MANAGERS

Please stop by the Front Desk to complete an application.

(IICRC certifications a plus)

- DECK COATING APPLICATORS

106 32nd St., Ocean City

NOW HIRING!

• Housekeeping •Maintenance •Laundry •Front Desk Positions, full-time, part-time, seasonal or year-round. Must have hotel experience. Apply within, or call 410-289-5762 Make sure to check out our job postings on Indeed.com!

for our WOC kitchen facility Up to $16/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

Please call Beth Ann: 302.541.8831 or email: bethann.steele@resortquest.com Employment is contingent on a drug screen and background check. ResortQuest is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

TECHNICIANS-TOP PAY TO TOP PEOPLE Independent Goodyear with huge customer base has immediate openings for: - Technicians - Lube / Tire Techs - Service Writers We are a full service tire and auto repair shop. Our shop has been newly remodeled!! Applicants must be highly motivated and must have valid drivers license. We offer great benefits including company matched IRA plan. Locations in the Ocean City, Rehoboth and Bethany Beach area. Please call: 302-228-2353

Now Hiring DELIVERY DRIVERS Make $12-$16 per hour. Flexible Hours, Great Working Atmosphere. Apply within downtown location, 710 Philadelphia Ave., OC 410-289-1200 Holiday Inn 66th Street Pool Bar

Pool Bar Cooks Full time summer positions. Seasonal help in the grill. No experience necessary. Daytime Hours: 10:30pm to 6:00pm. Stop by or call 443-783-1672 for details

PM Positions - 6pm-close Full-time & Part-time

Reporter — Community-oriented newspaper looking for an enthusiastic full-time reporter to provide beat coverage, features and some digital storytelling. Join on with a growing company that is embedded in an exciting, fast-growing community by the shore. The ideal candidate would be experienced, digital savvy, proficient in photograghy and eager to take on quality journalism in a multi-media environment. Full time benefits.

Hiring days ~ Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays @ 11 a.m. Text John at 443-880-2486

56th Street, Ocean City ~ Bayside 410-723-5600

Digital contributor — We are looking for a part-time, in-house employee to assist us with social media, feature writing, special project coordination and digital storytelling. Must be highly organized, creative and efficient. This is an exciting opportunity, with room to grow.

Send resumes and writing samples to darin.mccann@coastalpoint.com

Office Assistant Needed Full-time Position

Fullll-Tiim Fu me/P e//PPaart-Tiim me

• Housekeeping Staff • Membership Coordinator Please apply in person at the new Health and Aquatic Club at Bayside 31264 Americana Prkwy., Selbyville, 19975 Call: 302.988.2315, x 0; or email: BaysideRecreation@troon.com •

F T / P T S E A S O N A L • Line Cooks • Bussers Servers • Bartenders - and - F T / Y R S o u s C h e f Apply to Greg Fiore:

GFiore@troon.com

Seasonal (or) Year Round We have two busy rental offices We are looking for someone who can assist in our Ocean Pines and Ocean City office. q References required q Professional/Friendly q Must be willing travel to properties mostly in Ocean Pines and Ocean City. q Must work most weekends as needed – No Evenings q Administrative skills needed Please fax resumes letters and references to or inquiries to

Hileman Real Estate, Inc. Attn: Chris to fax # 410-208-9562 or email Hilemanre@aol.com

2 15th Street Ocean City, MD 21842

Year Round Positions Available • Maintenance • AM/PM Line Cooks (experience preferred)

Apply in person or email resume to: duran.showell@marriott.com All candidates must go through a satisfactory background check.

www.courtyardoceancity.com ~ No phone call please.

is now accepting applications for the following positions:

Hostess, Cooks, A/V Staff, Boutique Sales, EMT, General Maintenance, Painter, Boat Mate For more details or to apply, please go online to www.seacrets.com/employment

Now Hiring

NOW HIRING • PM Drivers • PM Cooks • Inside Counter Help • Night-time Managers

HIRING Cashiers, Cooks Expeditors & Drivers J-1’s Welcome! 81st Street Plaza 410-422-4780

Full-Time or Part-Time, Seasonal

for Sea Colony in Bethany Beach. Hours vary; weekends and background check required. Competitive hourly pay. Must be 18 or older.

Pool Attendants Needed. Lifeguard certification NOT NECESSARY. Enjoy a job having fun in the sun. 410-2502262

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew

BUILDING ATTENDANT

- LEAD CARPENTERS/FRAMERS - INTERIOR REMODELING PROFESSIONALS Please apply in person: 12905 Coastal Hwy, Ocean City MD, online at https://oceantowerconstruction.com/careers/ or call 443-366-5556 during regular business hours

Now hiring at both locations 67th St. & Tanger Outlets PT, FT Positions Available We are looking for friendly, energetic people to join our crew Experience preferred • Grill/Sub Makers • Dishwashers • Counter Persons Serious inquiries only! Call Angie at 443-523-8377

Part Time Maintenance. Local Property Management Company. Call for appointment, 410-250-3766.

TOWN OF BERLIN EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Distribution and Collections Technician The Town of Berlin is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Distribution and Collections Technician. Qualified candidates must posses knowledge and skills of water and sewer main construction, water meters, plumbing, and inspection. Must have a basic knowledge of plumbing codes and able to interpret town codes. Must have a thorough knowledge of MOSH regulations, especially confined space and trench safety and be willing to work within those parameters. Must be able to lift 50 lbs. and walk continuously in order to perform meter reading. Qualified candidates need to have skills and experience in operating a back hoe. Preferred candidates should have a valid Class B CDL license or be able to obtain a Class B CDL within 6 months of employment. Preference will be given to all resumes received by May 31, 2019. Qualified candidates may submit their cover letter and resume to: jfleetwood@berlinmd.gov or mail to 10 William Street; Berlin, MD 21811. EOE M/F/V/D

Day & Night Time Cashiers Must have punctuality & good work ethic! Please no phone calls 13903 Coastal Hwy. Bayside (Look for big yellow airplane)

Now Hiring ALL Positions! • Cooks • Deli Workers • Pizza Station Workers • Dishwashers • Servers • Bussers • Host/Hostess Apply online at: Touchofitaly.com

Become a Better You in 2019! To Order Product Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net To Become an Avon Representative Sign Up at www. ChristinesBeautyShop.com


MAY 24, 2019

HELP WANTED

RENTALS

Delivery Warehouse Position Available Immediately. $600-$1000/week. Extreme heavy lifting required. Apply within from 12-4pm, M-F. Sleep City, 138th St., Bayside.

1BR, 1BA, Screened in Porch Cottage on Waterfront property. $4650/season. May 15-Sept. 15. 443-831-9898

West OC Dental Office. Join our successful practice as a Dental Assistant FT, MF, no evenings or weekends. Great Benefit Pkg. Fax resume to 410-213-2955 or email: contact@atlanticdental.com Alex’s Italian Restaurant Servers & Cooks Wanted. Call or text Alex 410-726-2158. MED TECH: CPR & First Aid License required. HELPER: 8am-2pm. No exp. necessary. 10602 Friendship Rd., Berlin, MD. Email: truittsandy@yahoo.com Serious applicants only! 2 Years Experienced Cleaner. Reliable w/own transportation, cleaning supplies, trustworthy & dependable. Email resume to Tessasnyder03@gmail.com Any questions call 443-614-3777. SOMERSET JEWELERS, INC. Seasonal Sales position. Boardwalk location. FT/PT. Apply in person, between Somerset & Wicomico, on the boards. 410-289-7011 SALON BY THE BAY IN WOC has available booth rentals for $170/week for Stylists, Nail Techs, Estheticians & Massage Therapists. Commission and separate rooms are available. Great opportunity! Call to inquire today. 410-507-8390

Classifieds appear in Ocean City Today & Bayside Gazette each week

Summer - 27th Street, Bayside Condo near Jolly Rogers. 2BR, 2BA, W/D & AC, cable, Wi-Fi, fully furnished. Sleeps 4-6. 2 units available. May-Sept. $1900/pp. Call Mike at 410-603-6120 MBJCPROPERTIES@ GMAIL.COM

WEEKLY • SEASONAL

R E N TA L S

RENTALS

COMMERCIAL

YARD SALE

RAMBLER MOTEL

2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443-497-4200.

Sat., 5/25 & Sun., 5/26, 8am-1pm. Trash & Treasures ... Furniture, Appliances, Ladders, Scaffolding, Lots of Stuff! 12956 Center Dr., West OC.

9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE 2BR, 2BA, Gorgeous Mobile near boat ramp. Lot rent $425/month. $63,000 cash. Call Howard Martin Realty, 410-352-5555.

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626

LOTS & ACREAGE LOTS & ACREAGE

VA C AT I O N S

Bayfront Land, Overlooks Assateague. Ready to build on. $299,900. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-3525555.

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-524-7700 www.holidayoc.com Jan Castner Shamrock Realty Group 410-610-5000

11 COSTLY HOME INSPECTION PITFALLS Free Report reveals what you need to know BEFORE you list your home for sale.

FREE Recorded Message 1-844-294-1494

ID # 2003

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT Ocean Pines Village Square. Upscale office unit. Includes conference room, reception area, 4 private offices, 3 half baths, pond view, furnished. 1500 sq. ft. $2000. NO CAM FEES. 410-430-3758 Berlin: Atlantic Business Center. Office space 350 sq. ft. for rent. Utilities incl. $400/ month. Also, several storage units available $95/month. Call 410-726-5471 or 410641-4300.

SPACE FOR RENT Steps from the Boardwalk (12th Street) 500 sq. ft. $8000 for the 2019 season. Call or text Virginia 443-783-0469

RENTALS

2BR, 1BA Starting at $700 3BR, 2BA Starting at $1300 Available Summer Seasonal Rentals @ www.hilemanrealestate.com

and online at oceancitytoday.com and baysideoc.com

PAGE 65

Ocean City Today

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

Open 6 Days A Week Mon.-Sat., 9-5 * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

SERVICES SERVICES Interior/Exterior Painting & Interior Specialist - Stained ceilings? No Problem! FREE Estimates. Prompt Service. Talk directly to the painter who does the work! Call Don 443-373-1540. House and Rental Clean Out, small and local moving, and removal of junk and furniture. Also, will clean out garages/ sheds. 302-222-7297, 302422-9390

Classifieds 410-723-6397 By Monday, 5 p.m.

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000 146th Street, Ocean City

SERVICES DONATIONS DONATIONS Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065.

Classifieds 410-723-6397

BUDGET MOVERS 443-664-5797 LOCAL & EAST COAST MOVING Full Packing Service Piano Movers - Full Service www.facebook.com/OCBudgetMovers

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINMARYLAND STATEWIDE ING-Get FAA certification to CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING fix planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military NETWORK benefits. Call Aviation InstiAUTOMOBILE DONATIONS tute of Maintenance 866-823DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, 6729. RVs Lutheran Mission Society REAL ESTATE of MD. Compassion Place ministries help local families Virginia Seaside Lots – Build with food, clothing, counsel- the home of your dreams! ing Tax deductible. MVA li- South of Ocean City near censed #W1044. state line, spectacular lots in 410-636-0123 exclusive development near www.CompassionPlace.org NASA facing Chincoteague Island. New development with BUSINESS SERVICES paved roads, utilities, pool and Place a business card ad in dock. Great climate, low taxes the Regional Small Display 2x2/2x4 Advertising Network and Assateague National – Let MDDC help you grow Seashore beaches nearby. your business! Call TODAY at Priced $29,900 to $79,900 410-212-0616 to increase with financing. your customer base and get Call (757) 824-6289 or website: oldemillpointe.com results.

Delaware New Move-In Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. Homes from low $100's, No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866--629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com SERVICESMISCELLANEOUS Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-2120616 Ask for Multi-Media Specialist - Wanda & watch your results grow.

Advertise in MDDC 410-723-6397

106 papers with a circulation of 2.3 million and readership of 4.9 million!


PAGE 66

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

BLINDS & SHADES

DOOR REPAIR

CLEANING SERVICE UnderCover Cleaning Service A PROFESSIONAL CLEANING SERVICE

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Keeping It Clean Call For A Free Estimate Donna Snyder - Owner 443-513-4024 Office 301-712-5224 Cell undercovercleaning@outlook.com

ELECTRICIAN

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Doug Singer

Master Electrician 443 691 0544 Call or Text

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HOME IMPROVEMENT

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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today / Public Notices

risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY defaulting purchaser, and the purchaser agrees to pay reasonable at201 WINDWARD DRIVE, #7 torneys’ fees for the Substitute OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Trustees, plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed Under a power of sale contained the appropriate motion with the in a certain Deed of Trust from Court to resell the property.  PurWilliam Mann, dated November 3, chaser waives personal service of 2004 and recorded in Liber 4299, any paper filed in connection with Folio 319 among the Land Records of such a motion on himself and/or any Worcester County, Maryland, with principal or corporate designee, and an original principal balance of expressly agrees to accept service of $193,600.00, and an original interest any such paper by regular mail dirate of 7.500%, default having oc- rected to the address provided by curred under the terms thereof, the said bidder at the time of foreclosure Substitute Trustees will sell at pub- auction. In such event, the defaultlic auction at the Courthouse door ing purchaser shall be liable for the for the Circuit Court for Worcester payment of any deficiency in the County, on purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorJune 11, 2019 AT 3:20 PM ney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF damages, and any deficiency in the GROUND and the improvements underlying secured debt.  The purthereon situated in Worcester chaser shall not be entitled to any County, MD and more fully de- surplus proceeds or profits resulting scribed in the aforesaid Deed of from any resale of the property.  If Trust.  The property being sold is a the Substitute Trustees cannot concondominium unit and all common vey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall elements appurtenant thereto.  Terms of Sale:  The property will be the return of the deposit without be sold “as is” and subject to condi- interest.  The sale is subject to posttions, restrictions, easements and sale confirmation and audit of the agreements of record affecting same, status of the loan with the loan serif any and with no warranty of any vicer including, but not limited to, kind.  A deposit of $17,000.00 by cer- determination of whether the bortified funds only (no cash will be ac- rower entered into any repayment cepted) is required at the time of agreement, reinstated or paid off the auction.  Balance of the purchase loan prior to the sale.  In any such price to be paid in cash within ten event, this sale shall be null and days of final ratification of sale by void, and the Purchaser’s sole remthe Circuit Court for Worcester edy, in law or equity, shall be the reCounty.  At the Substitute Trustees’ turn of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. discretion, the foreclosure purchaser, Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, if a corporation or LLC, must proRichard J. Rogers, Michael duce evidence, prior to bidding, of the McKeefery, Christianna Kersey, legal formation of such entity.  The and David W. Simpson, Jr., purchaser, other than the Holder of Substitute Trustees the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid pur- Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC chase money at the note rate from (410) 825-2900 the date of foreclosure auction to the www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com   date funds are received in the office    CGD File #: 453212 OCD-5/23/3t of the Substitute Trustees.    In the event settlement is delayed _________________________________ for any reason , there shall be no BWW Law Group, LLC abatement of interest.  All due 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 and/or unpaid private utility, water Rockville, MD 20852 and sewer facilities charges, or front (301) 961-6555 foot benefit payments, are payable by the purchaser without adjustment.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, ground rent, or condo/HOA assessments, not otherwise divested by ratOF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY ification of the sale, to be adjusted as IMPROVEMENTS THEREON of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing 205 ENTERPRISE DR. lender or its designee.  Cost of all BERLIN, MD 21811 documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all Under a power of sale contained other costs incident to settlement, in a certain Deed of Trust dated Ocshall be borne by the purchaser.  tober 3, 2017 and recorded in Liber Purchaser shall be responsible for 7089, Folio 441 among the Land obtaining physical possession of the Records of Worcester County, MD, property.  Purchaser assumes the with an original principal balance of COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

$255,375.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JUNE 11, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $25,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the

PAGE 67 borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 334154-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-5/23/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 1439 CEDAR HALL RD. POCOMOKE A/R/T/A POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 25, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4996, Folio 305 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $202,492.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JUNE 4, 2019 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of


PAGE 68

Ocean City Today / Public Notices

$20,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within

LEGAL ADVERTISING Call: 410-723-6397 Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net

ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 324041-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-5/16/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 220 NORTH HERON DR., UNIT #2 & BOAT SLIP #30 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October 12, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4561, Folio 21 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $532,500.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JUNE 4, 2019 AT 3:36 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit Number 220-2 Section VI, in “The Sanctuary Condominium”, together with an undivided percentage interest in the common elements thereof and together with the exclusive right to use Boat Slip Number 30 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #10-293758 and Tax ID #10-402255. The property, believed to be waterfront, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.

Terms of Sale: A deposit of $47,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or in-

MAY 24, 2019 surable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 336796-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-5/16/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, MD 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 209 TEAL CIR. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Perry Masciana, dated March 23, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4902, folio 519 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JUNE 3, 2019 AT 1:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $57,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification,


MAY 24, 2019 the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-615103). Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-5/16/3t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17835 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF LOUIS J. JONSKE SR. Notice is given that Anna M. Jonske, 183 Clam Shell Road, Ocean City, MD 21842, was on May 02, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Louis J. Jonske Sr. who died on March 15, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 2nd day of November, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of

Ocean City Today / Public Notices the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Anna M. Jonske Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: May 16, 2019 OCD-5/16/3t _________________________________ James E. Clubb, Esq. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, MD 21842 (410) 289-2323 K & T REALTY GROUP, LLC 186 Meadowview Lane Warrenton, VA 20186 Plaintiff vs. CLARENCE E. JOHNSON 1339 Aspen Drive Salisbury, MD 21804-2062 and RITA J. VILLANI 301 Tuna Lane Ocean City, MD 21842 and WORCESTER COUNTY c/o Maureen Howarth, Esq. 1 West Market. Street Room 1103 Snow Hill, MD 21863 and ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY described as 312 Timmons Street Snow Hill, MD 21863 Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE N0. C-23-CV-19-000116

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption from the tax .s.ale on the following property located in Worcester County, Maryland, sold by Phillip G; Thompson, Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and for Worcester County, to the Plaintiff, the parcel of land described as follows: 312 Timmons Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, Deed Reference 5000/120, Parcel Number 02..028905. The property is an improved lot, and is assessed to Clarence E. Johnson. The Complaint states among other things that the amount neces-

sary for redemption has not been paid. The sale was held on May 19, 2017, and more than six (6) months has passed since that date. It is thereupon this 7th of May, 2019, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to redeem the property or answer the Complaint by 6th of July, 2019 , or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property and vesting in the Plaintiff title to said property, free and clear of all liens and encumbrances. Beau H. Oglesby JUDGE OCD-5/16/3t _________________________________

NOTICE

TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 17798 Notice is given that the Court of Common Pleas court of Cumberland County, PA appointed Barry Cupp, 825 Flintlock Ridge Road, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 and Sheree Mann, 88 Foxfire Lane, Lewisberry, PA 17339 as the Executors of the Estate of Judith Louise Cupp AKA: Judith L. Cupp who died on November 18, 2017 domiciled in Pennsylvania, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Anna Stupi Gosden whose address is 429 Rockway Road, Catonsville, MD 21228. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Barry Cupp Sheree Mann Foreign Personal Representatives Terri Westcott Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of Newspaper: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: May 16, 2019 OCD-5/16/3t _________________________________

PAGE 69 GUY R. AYRES III AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, P.A. 6200 Coastal Highway, Suite 200 Ocean City, Maryland 21842

NOTICE OF TAX SALE

OF PROPERTY IN THE TENTH ELECTION DISTRICT, SUB-DISTRICTS 101-109, WORCESTER COUNTY, OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Town of Ocean City, Maryland municipal taxes and assessments under levies of the tax years 2017/2018 and 2018/2019 on the properties hereinafter described being due and in arrears and unpaid; and in order to compel the payment of the same, together with interest thereon, Attorney and Advertising Fees of $258, and the costs of attending the proceeding, as provided by law, by virtue of the power and authority vested in me as the City Manager and Collector of municipal taxes in the Tenth Election District, Worcester County, Ocean City, Maryland as provided by the Acts of the General Assembly of Maryland (Tax-Property Article Section 14-808 et seq. of the Annotated Code of Maryland), the undersigned City Manager and Collector of Taxes, will sell at public auction, at City Hall, 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland, on FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 2019 AT THE HOUR OF 10:00 A.M. the below described properties: Item 1 10-249961 and 9564338630: Described as Jockey Beach Club Condominium, Unit 120 B B P 2, Assessed to Marilynn Anderson, Assessed Value $113,200, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,204.40. Item 3 10-758769 and 12173574223: Described as The Meridian Condominium, Phase 1, Unit 503, Assessed to Kam Lun Yeung and Karla Au Yeung, Assessed Value $752,100, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $2,157.50. Item 4 10-048567 and 7766957340: Described as Bay Colony Condominium, Unit 6 West B, Assessed to Anthony E. Balcerzak, Jr., Megan Ann Balcerzak and Regina M. Balcerzak, Assessed Value $81,300, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,111.98. Item 5 10-048915 and 769634782: Described as Bay Colony Condominium, Unit 2 West B, Assessed to Anthony E. Balcerzak, Jr. and Megan A. Balcerzak, Assessed Value $81,300, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $841.17. Item 7 10-427126 and 9922166195: Described as Jetty’s Break Condominium, Unit 101, Assessed to Stanley R. Berger and Debra M. Berger, Assessed Value $314,100, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,710.84. Item 8 10-250897 and 6088138796: Described as Jamaica Condominium II, Unit 310, Assessed to Roxanne E. Berry, Assessed Value $161,500, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $872.71.


PAGE 70 Item 9 10-164370 and 9182724262: Described as Sails II Condominium, Unit 204, Assessed to Richard Boothe, Assessed Value $200,100, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $949.20. Item 10 10-198747 and 13223729946: Described as Lot 1550, Section 4A, Plat of Montego Bay Mobile Home Park, Assessed to Bungarra, LLC, Assessed Value $118,767, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $935.01. Item 13 10-151120 and 2990921998: Described as Cara Mar Condominium, Unit 100, Assessed to Walter Demidenko and Barbara A. Demidenko, Assessed Value $157,433, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $915.34. Item 15 10-141834 and 2850320484: Described as Sea Watch Condominium, Unit 118, Assessed to Patricia Ann Griffiths, Assessed Value $230,833, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,242.86. Item 16 10-226821 and 3740534664: Described as Sunspot Condominium, Unit 301, Assessed to Barbara J. Harmon, Assessed Value $214,000, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,110.43. Item 17 10-414970 and 11419964749: Described as The Townhouse Condominium Sunset, Unit Lut-H18, Phase 1, Assessed to Chapman V. Hom and Ellen Mansfield, Assessed Value $506,800, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,839.77. Item 18 10-389984 and 9869561301: Described as Wild Dunes Condominium, Unit 301, Assessed to Yvette C. Hudyma, Assessed Value $759,000, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,759.25. Item 19 10-741165 and 11380366387: Described as Port Astor at Sunset Island Condominium III, Unit 44 CP Ph 1, Assessed to Joseph G. Dooley Trust, Assessed Value $530,400, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $2,257.48. Item 20 10-061423 and 783196874: Described as Gull Way Condominium, Unit A12, Assessed to John Richard Klemann and Edward A. Klemann, Assessed Value $255,400, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,125.14. Item 21 10-307139 and 50307-

Ocean City Today / Public Notices 48562: Described as Surfwood Condominium, Unit 401, Assessed to John W. Kreuzburg and Nenita B. Kreuzburg, Assessed Value $261,200, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,470.08. Item 23 10-217555 and 14218133010: Described as Lighthouse Village Condominium, Unit 232 B B P2, Assessed to Kathleen R. Lauer, Assessed Value $75,500, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $866.55. Item 24 10-210976 and 13425731976: Described as Jamestown Inlet Condominium, Unit 3, Assessed to Aida L. Leblanc, John A. Hitch and Dayna L. Hitch, Assessed Value $192,300, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,233.02. Item 25 10-156386 and 13714922870: Described as Sea Harbor Condominium, Unit 207, Assessed to Adrian Mihaescu, Assessed Value $80,133, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $866.89. Item 26 10-171407 and 12892525430: Described as Lot 8 & ½ Lot 7, Block 66 N Side 139th Street, Resubdivision Plat 4 of Fenwick, Assessed to Nicolas Anthony Nemil and Michelle N. Tran, Assessed Value $142,200, Wastewater, Misc. Lien, Interest and Penalties Due $709.64. Item 27 10-249473 and 11275538544: Described as Bradley on the Bay Condominium, Unit 240, B1 P4, Assessed to Gregory C. Nigrin, Assessed Value $117,000, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $872.71. Item 32 10-751837 and 11475573243: Described as Clammers Cove Villas Condominium, Unit 1, Assessed to James N. Porter and Stacey M. Porter, Assessed Value $312,600, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,271.04. Item 33 10-357640 and 5481355294: Described as Harbor Lights Condominium, Unit 14, Assessed to Matthew Rhodes, Assessed Value $121,500, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,361.26. Item 35 10-225914 and 9823734500: Described as Seaway Condominium, Unit 14, Assessed to Thelonious T.C. Rudd, Susana G. Rudd, George R. Johnson, Jr. and Beatrice G. Johnson, Assessed Value $165,100, Wastewater, Interest and

Penalties Due $1,113.70. Item 36 10-753589 and 11348173695 and L12661252: Described as Belmont Towers Residential Condominium, Unit 304 Ph 1, Assessed to Paul W. Rutter, Jr. and Renette L. Rutter, Assessed Value $632,000, Wastewater, Personal Property, Interest and Penalties Due $2,508.30. Item 38 10-262623 and 4303940908: Described as Jamaica Condominium III, Unit 104, Assessed to Joan E. Seidenspinner, Assessed Value $114,433, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $881.28. Item 39 10-290686 and 6493145812: Described as Atlantic Mist 1 Condominium, Unit C, Assessed to Dena Shaffer and Marion Caron, Assessed Value $124,000, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $1,067.70. Item 41 10-066581 and 180217688: Described as Ocean Waye 45 Condominium, Unit 203, Assessed to Stamatios Vasillas and Fotini Vasillas, Assessed Value $74,533, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $789.39. Item 42 10-260256 and 9151740476: Described as Lighthouse Condominium, Unit 109 P2, Assessed to Joyce A. Weeks, Assessed Value $113,200, Wastewater, Interest and Penalties Due $962.19. OCD-5/16/4t _________________________________

MAY 24, 2019 The subject parcels are known as Worcester County Tax Map No. 25 Parcel 395, and Parcel 86 Lots 3-13. OCD-5/23/2t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING The Mayor and Council of the Town of Berlin will hold a public hearing on Monday, June 10th at 7:00 p.m. in the Berlin Town Hall Council Chambers, 10 William Street, on Ordinance 2019-02. The public is invited to attend and comment. A copy of the proposed Ordinance 2019-02 is available for inspection in Town Hall, between the hours of 8:30 am and 4:30 pm, Monday through Friday. Ordinance 2019-02 An Ordinance of the Mayor and Council of The Town of Berlin, Maryland approving the FY20 Budget as submitted. OCD-5/23/2t _________________________________

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY

NOTICE

Pursuant to Article III, “District Changes and Other Amendments”, Section 108-214 and Section 108-215 of the Berlin, MD Town Code, the Town Of Berlin Planning Commission will hold a Public Hearing during its regularly scheduled meeting on Wednesday, June 12, 2019 at 5:30 PM in the Mayor and Council Chambers of Berlin Town Hall, 10 William Street, Berlin, MD to consider a petition for annexation received from Acorn Berlin Lot, LLC and Acorn Berlin Chevy, LLC.

ORDINANCE 2019-10 RE: Dockless Ride Share Programs Notice is hereby given by the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City, that an ordinance was introduced for first reading at their meeting of May 20, 2019. Second reading is scheduled for June 3, 2019. A complete text of the ordinance is available for review in the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD 21842, or online at oceancitymd.gov in the May 20 agenda packet. This ordinance prohibits bicycle and electric scooter shareable dockless mobility device programs. OCD-5/23/1t _________________________________

NOTICE

LEGAL ADVERTISING 410-723-6397 legals@oceancitytoday.net

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17846 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH JOHN CASEY Notice is given that Joseph Patrick Casey, 5833 Centerville Road, Williamsburg, VA 23188, was on May 09, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Joseph John Casey who died on April 22, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal represen-


MAY 24, 2019 tative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 9th day of November, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Joseph Patrick Casey Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: May 23, 2019 OCD-5/23/3t _________________________________ Law Offices of Jeffrey Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 200 Calverton, Maryland 20705 240-473-5000 Jeffrey Nadel Scott Nadel Daniel Menchel Doreen Strothman 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 200 Calverton, MD 20705 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff v. Terrence W. Batson 1511 Cedar Street Pocomoke City, MD 21851 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. C-23-CV-18-000275

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given this 17th day of May, 2019, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 17th day of June, 2019, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 10th day of June, 2019.

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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE The motor vehicles described below have been abandoned. The owners and lien holders are hereby informed of their right to reclaim the vehicles upon payment of all charges and costs resulting from the towing, preservation, and storage of the vehicles. The failure of the owners or lien holders to reclaim the vehicles within three weeks of notification shall be deemed a waiver by the owners or lien holders of all rights, title and interest and thereby consent to the sale of the vehicles at public auction beginning May 16, 2019, or to have it otherwise disposed of in a manner provided by law. Line No Year 052.19 2003 054.19 1999 056.19 1997

Make MITSUB FORD MAZDA

Model GALANT EXPEDITION PROTEGE

Color MAROON GREEN SILVER

Style 4S 4D 4D

VIN 4A3AA46G73E113882 1FMRU1868XLB36388 JM1BC1410V0120364

Mileage N/A N/A N/A

All vehicles will be sold at auction on-line at www.govdeals.com. For details call 410-723-6643. AUTH: Ross Buzzuro Chief of Police OCD-5/16/3t ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $99,100.00. The property sold herein is known as 1511 Cedar Street, Pocomoke City, MD 21851. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-5/23/3t _________________________________ MARTIN S. GOLDBERG, ESQ. P.O. BOX 59837 POTOMAC, MD 20859 SMALL ESTATE

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 17770 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF KATHLEEN J. SYKES Notice is given that Martin S. Goldberg ESQ., P.O. Box 59837, Potomac, MD 20859, was on May 14, 2019 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Kathleen J. Sykes who died on October 4, 2017, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the

decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Martin S. Goldberg Esq. Personal Representative True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Terri Westcott One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: May 23, 2019 OCD-5/23/1t _________________________________ AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, PA WILLIAM E. ESHAM III ESQ 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, STE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Robin Gibbs Foreign Personal Representative Terri Westcott Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of Newspaper: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: May 23, 2019 OCD-5/23/3t _________________________________

NOTICE

SMALL ESTATE

TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 17795 Notice is given that the Circuit Court of City of Chesapeake county, VA appointed Robin Gibbs, 227 Country Club Blvd., Chesapeake, VA 23322 as the Adminstrator of the Estate of Alfred Russell who died on December 18, 2018 domiciled in Virginia, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is William E. Esham III whose address is 6200 Coastal Highway, Suite 200, Ocean City, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 17829 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF JOYCE JOHNSON Notice is given that William K. Johnson, 6447 Haritage Road, Berlin, MD 21811, was on May 13, 2019 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Joyce Johnson who died on April 21, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in


PAGE 72

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today / Public Notices

the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the cred-

itor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. William K. Johnson Personal Representative True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Terri Westcott One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: May 23, 2019 OCD-5/23/1t _________________________________ SMALL ESTATE

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 17860 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF

JOSEPH MATTHEW METRO JR Notice is given that Georgette M. Metro, 12913 Pine Street, Ocean City, MD 21842, was on May 15, 2019 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Joseph Matthew Metro Jr. who died on March 8, 2019, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of

the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Georgette M. Metro Personal Representative True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Terri Westcott One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: May 23, 2019 OCD-5/23/1t _________________________________

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE WALK TO THE BEACH

YOUR PLACE AT THE BEACH

13218 COLONIAL ROAD

13321 COLONIAL ROAD NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING WOW you will not one to miss this ONE. Ready to move into and enjoy. You will not believe this location. In the community of Montego Bay North Ocean City, MD. The home is in excellent condition an feature 2-bedrooms 2-bath, front eat-in kitchen floor plan, enclosed porch has air-conditioning, newer gas range, newer refrigerator, newer washer & dryer, updated bathrooms, laminated floor throughout, mobile home has a rainbow aluminum roof and vinyl siding, vinyl replacement windows throughout and being sold fully furnished and was not used for a rental. Enjoy relaxing on the patio after a day at the beach or pool. Sold Furnished For $154,900. We are the Original Montego Bay Specialist Since 1971.

Great Location walking distance to the beach This well maintained 3 bedroom/2 bath home is located in the Montego Bay community in North Ocean City. The home features a split bedroom/bath floorplan with 2 guest bedrooms and a guest bath in the front and the master bedroom and master bath in the rear, nice size living room, a laundry area, cathedral ceilings, insulated windows, New central air and Furnace 2017. Outside there is a elevated deck, storage shed, outside shower, and a 2-car cement parking pad. The community features 3 pools, including a wadding pool for the little ones, 2 tennis courts, 2 shuffleboard courts, a 9-hole miniature golf course, a bayfront boardwalk with 3 fishing piers, a canalfront fishing & crabbing area, an 8 acre wildlife sanctuary/pond with a 1/2 mile walking path around it and a 5-acre open park. In addition there are city streets & sidewalks, city water & sewer and city trash collection. Sold Furnished for $189,900. We are the Original Montego Bay Specialist Since 1971.

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

MONTEGO BAY COMMUNITY

WONDERFUL WATERFRONT CONDO

Fully furnished 2BR/2BA home. Front porch, catheral ceilings, drywall interior with baseboard and crown moldings, a huge master bedroom & master bath and a large walk-in closet, a jetted tub in the master bath, a laundry area with a full size washer & dryer, newer carpet, a fully equipped kitchen, gas heat, central air, 4 skylights, 5 ceiling fans and insulated windows. Outside there is a utility shed, a shower, a ground level deck and a 2-car cement parking pad. Community features 3 outdoor pool, Tennis courts, a 9-hole miniature golf course, a shuffleboard court, a bayfront boardwalk and more. The HOA dues are just $272 a year. $245,000

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

183 BEACHCOMBER LANE

This beautifully maintained 2BR/2BA waterfront condo is located next to the beautiful 58-acre Northside Park in N. Ocean City. The unit comes with a deeded boat slip with an electric boatlift and features a private water deck with an electric awning, an open floorplan, a breakfast bar, laminate & tile flooring and a custom painted interior. Community features 2 pools and an off-street parking. Listed at $325,000.

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

384U HIDDEN HARBOUR

Montego Bay Realty montegobayrealty@aol.com www.montegobayrealty.com

The #1 Resource for Ocean Pines News & Information

Find us on FB and on the Web: www.BaysideOC.com

*2018 OPA Survey


Commentary

Ocean City Today May 24, 2019

Page 73

Veterans deserve more than thanks Dear veterans and active duty military personnel: Thank you for your service … whoever you are. Chances are we don’t know you, what you’re like, where you’re from or what you’ll be doing tomorrow. Still, it makes us feel patriotic to say it, like we’re in this with you all the way, even though we weren’t there when the shooting started. True, many of you didn’t want to be there either, but you did your bit when called to duty, while the other 93 percent of the U.S. population had other business to attend to and we thank you for allowing us to do that. We also pay our respects to the 700,000 or so service members who died in hostile actions over the last 244 years. This number does not include the 450,000 to 500,000 Civil War deaths, since we were fighting each other. This is even though the origin of Memorial Day dates to 1866, when communities began to honor their Civil War dead. Not until 1971 did Congress make Memorial Day a national holiday and moved the observance from May 30 to the last Monday of the month, so federal and other workers could have a three-day holiday. That, of course, changed everything. The once-solemn occasion became a celebration of early summer, with a patriotic component. We place wreaths, raise flags, say prayers for the fallen and thank the living for their service, before going off to enjoy the rest of the holiday. But what if we finally realized that simply saying “thank you” to the living just isn’t enough? What if we said being a fourth-year infantry sergeant has to be worth more than $32,135 in base pay? Or that you don’t have to pay state or federal income taxes on that, or that we’ll give you vouchers for the best hospitals in the country should you fall ill, or that you’ll receive at least a stipend of some kind for the rest of your life after your hitch is up? What if we decided the best way to honor the war dead is to do something for the living beyond saying thanks? What, as we argue about everything else, were we to agree on this one thing and insisted on it?

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR ............................................ Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli NEWS EDITOR .......................................... Josh Davis STAFF WRITERS .................. Greg Ellison, Morgan Pilz, .......................................................... Rachel Ravina ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ................ Kelly Brown, Kyle Phillips PUBLISHER ...................................... Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.com. Copyright 2019

PUBLIC EYE

We’re in Elite Eight

The good news is Ocean City is the eighth most popular summer destination in the United States this year, according to TripAdvisor. The bad news, from the same source, is Ocean City is the eighth most popular summer destination in the United States this year. By I say that because the good Stewart or bad of being eighth is a of context and perDobson matter spective. Discovering the eighth-best cure for polio, for instance, is not likely to result in a writeup in the Scientific American or even qualify the discoverer for lovely parting gifts from the Nobel Prize committee. On the other hand, if someone were to win the eighth biggest Powerball jackpot ever, that someone is not going to say, “What? You expect me to settle for eighth?” So, in one respect, this is excellent news. Ocean City is in the top 10 with Orlando, which has Mickey Mouse, and Las Vegas, which offers package deals on the Seven Deadly Sins. Ocean City, meanwhile, has no famous rodents, and, sin-wise, it offers only the trial edition of the Seven So-So Sins. Besides, most of our visitors probably think Gluttony, which ranks fifth on the list of the deadly seven, just ahead of Wrath and Sloth, is a small town in England. The other locations ahead of us are Myrtle Beach, where it’s much warmer sooner, followed by tropical Maui, home of the Maui Wowie strain of an illegal substance.

New York City, at number five, has more than one performing arts center, six is winterless Key West, and at seven is New Orleans, which has 26 — yes, 26! — Popeye’s restaurants. And yet, we are in the eighth spot, even though we aren’t tropical, offer only a few moderate sins, have a performing arts auditorium somewhat smaller than the Lincoln Center, and just one Popeye’s, although this Popeye’s does have me to propel its sales volume ever skyward. But again, being able to boast about being the eighth best anything is all in how you look at it. Suppose, for instance, you were the reason the parents in the 1970s TV sitcom declared, “Eight Is Enough.” Unless you’re in the fourth grade and are late for school because you’re driving the bus, it isn’t likely that you’ll walk into class and proclaim, “Guess what? I’m my parents’ eighth favorite. Yay!” Conversely, we topped San Diego and Virginia Beach and that says quite a bit, considering San Diego is right next door to crazy Tijuana, while we’re right next door to crazy Selbyville. Meanwhile, Virginia Beach is just 133 miles down the coast, give or take the length of an aircraft carrier or two, and we beat them fair and square. As was said by the eighth husband of the glamorous but meagerly talented actress Zsa Zsa Gabor (see 1984’s “Frankenstein’s Great Aunt Tilly” for reference) on the occasion of her ninth wedding, “I feel like a winning college basket team in March: I’ve made it to the Elite Eight and am looking better all the time.”

www.oceancitytoday.com


PAGE 74

MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

Letter to the editor City has obligation to provide trash service Editor, My name is Robin Wright. My husband and I own a condo at Breakwater I at 134th Street. I am writing to say that I disagree with Director Hal Adkins that the special vehicles for nonstandard location for trash pick up is a “boutique trash” service. We bought our condo in Ocean City because of the great services the town affords its residents. Trash pick-up is one of those services. He claims no one “wish any hardship” but that is exactly what it would do. To lose parking spaces for condo owners would cause issues with parking during the summer season. I have a walking disability causing me to have to walk with braces on my legs and a cane. To come to the condo on the weekends and not be able to park at our condo is a hardship on me. To have to park several blocks away and carry luggage

and food is something I cannot do. We bought the condo for its location and parking. Also, many of our residents are seniors. Also, condo owners pay high condo fees. This allows us to employ workers in Ocean City in many fields. We hire roofers, painters, electricians, maintenance workers, power washers, and fence builders to maintain our building. Added fees for private trash collection would be a hardship on residents. And remember the money we spend at restaurants, bars, shopping and special events. Another issue to move the trash containers to the sidewalk would be an eye sore and distract from our views. It would also attract pests, bugs and smells. I think Ocean City has an obligation to its taxpayer residents to purchase what is necessary to continue pick up of trash at our locations. Robin Wright Pocomoke City

Raccoon caught in Ocean Pines county’s sixth rabies case of yr. By Josh Davis News Editor (May 24, 2019) A raccoon captured in the area of Abbott Place in Ocean Pines has tested positive for the rabies virus, the Worcester County Health Department confirmed last week. Anyone who had direct contact with the animal or has a pet that may have been bitten or scratched or may have come into contact with its saliva by other means, should call the health department at 410352-3234. Travis Brown, public information officer with the Worcester County Health Department, said it appears rabies numbers in the county are down slightly this year, with six confirmed cases thus far, four raccoons and two foxes. Last year, 26 cases were confirmed, including 19 raccoons, one skunk, one opossum, two foxes, two cats, and one bat. According to the health department, “While raccoons make up the vast majority of confirmed rabid animals in Worcester County (and in Maryland), other species are also infected. Many people are not aware that the most frequent domestic animals to contract rabies are cats.” The first rabies case this year was announced on Jan. 12, as a raccoon captured near Teal Circle in Ocean Pines tested positive for the rabies virus.

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Additional confirmed cases this year include a raccoon on Feb. 22 in Pocomoke, a fox on April 14 in Newark, a raccoon on April 16 in Pocomoke, and a fox on April 22 in Snow Hill. The health department website includes several recommendations when dealing with suspected rabid animals: • If you see a wild animal, such as a raccoon, skunk, fox, groundhog, opossum, or a feral cat behaving in a threatening or obviously sick manner, or should your pet be involved in an altercation with one of those animals, report immediately to your local police department or Sheriff’s office. • Prevent further contact by keeping pets and people away. If a pet or person has already had contact, it is important that the rabies suspect animal be obtained (safely) for rabies testing. • If a pet has had contact, do not touch the pet barehanded. Make sure the health department is contacted for further instructions if contact has occurred. Your pet’s veterinarian may also be contacted for further advice. For more information, call Worcester County Animal Control at 410-632-1340 or the health department at 410-6419559. For more information on rabies in Worcester County, visit worcesterhealth.org.

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Two Delaware men sentenced for OC robberies last Oct. By Josh Davis Associate Editor (May 24, 2019) Two Delaware men involved in a string of armed robberies in Ocean City last October were sentenced to serve more than 20 years of combined jail time. Kevone Bunting, 19, and Adrian Matthews, 21, were each convicted on two Kevone Bunting counts of robbery. According to police, two women were also involved in the thefts. Worcester County State’s Attorney Kris Heiser said both female suspects, Brittney Monique Adrian Matthews Taylor, 20, of Salisbury, and Kiya Monea Connor, 21, of Salisbury, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit robbery. The first robbery occurred on Oct. 21 in a hotel restroom near 37th street shortly before 8 p.m. Police said Matthews held a gun to a victim’s neck while Bunting stole his cell phone, credit card and cash. A short time later, the two men robbed a clerk at a convenience store, with Matthews once again pointing a gun at the victim while Bunting took money out of the register. Police used surveillance video from several Ocean City locations to get a description of the suspects and the vehicle used during the robberies. Based on that, Ocean City Police located the vehicle and all four suspects later that evening. A search of the vehicle revealed the stolen property and clothing worn by Bunting and Matthews during the robberies. Police were also able to locate a black “semi-automatic style” BB gun used by the suspects that was discarded near the beach at 60th Street. Heiser credited the efforts of Ocean City Police’s Criminal Investigation Division and Det. Perry, the lead investigator. She also thanked Assistant State’s Attorney Jared Monteiro, who prosecuted the case. Worcester County Circuit Court Judge Brian D. Shockley sentenced Bunting to serve 10 years in the Division of Correction, with five years suspended on each count of robbery. Matthews was ordered to serve 12 years in the Division of Correction, with six years suspended on each count of robbery. The sentences are consecutive, meaning Bunting received an active sentence of 10 years, and Matthews received an active sentence of 12 years.

Ocean City Today

PAGE 75

OPA Board candidates announced By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) All eight candidates who filed by the May 10 deadline have met the requirements as permitted by the Ocean Pines Bylaws, according to Board Secretary Dr. Colette Horn. The candidates, in alphabetical order, are Cynthia L. Bartolomeo, Paula Roberson Gray, 73, Tom Janasek, 53, Shawn Kotwica, Larry Perrone, 63, Camilla J. Rogers, 65, Hans Edward Solum Jr. and Gregory Turner, 60. The candidates will be vying to fill three vacant board positions, all of which are for three-year terms. Gray, who moved to Ocean Pines three years ago, ran for the board last year and missed by such a small margin, she running again and calling for more board transparency. Janasek, who has lived in Ocean

Pines since 1984, ran for the board three years ago, and is running once again after gaining more experience through his work on advisory committees such as the Environmental and Natural Assets Committee, which he chairs. Perrone has lived in the association for 36 years and will be running for the first time. He has financial experience as the chairman of the Budget and Finance Committee. Rogers, a lawyer and nurse practitioner who moved to Ocean Pines last year, will be running for the first time. She is calling for more transparency and communication at board meetings. Turner, who has been a resident of the association since 1978, ran last year on a campaign of making sure directors are held more accountable. Information regarding the other candidates were not available at press time.

For more information, contact Ocean Pines Elections Committee Chair Steve Habeger at elections@oceanpines.org or John Viola, interim general manager for the Ocean Pines Association, at (410) 6417717 ext. 3001 or gm@oceanpines.org.  Key Dates for Election: - June 7, 11 a.m. – Candidates draw for ballot order, Community Center - June 12, 7 p.m. – First candidates’ forum, Community Center          - June 22, 10 a.m. – Second candidates’ forum, Community Center - July 3 – Voter eligibility deadline     - July 8 – Ballots expected to be mailed out, however, this could be affected by the Fourth of July Holiday, which could delay mailings until July 10.  - Aug. 7 – Ballot deadline  - Aug. 9, 10 a.m. – Ballots counted and totals announced, Community Center - Aug. 10, 10 a.m. – Annual meeting


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Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

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By Josh Davis Associate Editor (May 24, 2019) A couple were arrested and charged separately on May 18 after a woman apparently passed out in a T-shirt bin and her boyfriend reportedly interfered with a police investigation into how she got there. According to a police report, officers were flagged down at 8 p.m. by a Boardwalk shop manager, who said customers reported that a woman had passed out in a T-shirt bin just outside of the store. The woman, later identified as Mollie Blondell Quinn, 26 of Stevensville,

was found lying inside a bin. Emergency services personnel were called and police started to investigate how Quinn end up in the T-shirts. While EMS were Mollie Quinn treating the woman, her boyfriend, Joseph John Garrity III, 31 of Centerville, tried several times to escort Quinn away from the scene, said police, who added that Garrity was told to desist but that he persisted. Eventually, Garrity, who was said to have been intoxicated, was escorted

from the area. Police said Quinn also appeared to have been drinking and unable to answer basic questions. Garrity was arrested Joseph Garrity III and charged with disorderly conduct and obstructing and hindering an investigation, while Quinn was charged with disorderly conduct. Both waived their right to an attorney during an initial court appearance on May 19 and are scheduled to stand trial on June 24 at Worcester County District Court in Ocean City.

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (May 24, 2019) Nicole Lee Thomas, 37, of Marysville, Pennsylvania is facing a host of traffic charges, including DUI, after allegedly crashing her vehicle on the front lawn of Ocean Down Casino last Thursday and fleeing on foot before being apprehended following a search by law enforcement. Maryland State Police responded for a single-vehicle accident without injuries at Route 589 and the Ocean

Downs Casino last Thursday just after 10 p.m. Police said witnesses reported that just prior to running her 2008 Volkswagen Jetta off the roadway, Thomas was skidding in circles and subsequently lost control and drove into a roadside ditch before ending up on the casino lawn. State police said Thomas fled the scene and was located and taken into custody following a search involving the Worcester County Sheriff’s De-

partment, Maryland Natural Resources Police, the Ocean Pines Police Department and the Berlin Police Department. Thomas was charged with eight traffic offenses, including DUI, reckless driving, negligent driving and leaving the scene of an accident involving property damage. After being released on her own recognizance, Thomas is scheduled for an initial appearance in Worcester County District Court in Snow Hill on Aug. 15.

Minimum wage seminars offered Continued from Page 1 entities will reach the mark in just over seven years. The meeting on June 5 will include expert analysis by speaker Doug Desmarais of Smith & Downey P.A., who will outline technical and practical realities of the wage law, Pursel said. Under the new wage regulations, pay increases for businesses with 15 or more employees bumps to $11 per hour on Jan. 1, 2020, with annual increases of .75 cents before reaching the $15 rate on Jan. 1, 2025. By contrast, employers with less than 15 staff members, will also be required to pay the $11 rate beginning on Jan. 1, 2020, with the pay scale going up .60 cents per year before hitting the $15 rate on July 1, 2026. In 2014, the General Assembly approved legislation that raised the state minimum wage rate from $7.25 to $8 an hour, effective Jan. 2015, then to $8.25 in July 2015, followed by $8.75 in July 2016 and $9.25 in July 2017, before reaching the current $10.10 scale last July. Pursel said there are numerous exemptions to the minimum wage law, including administrative or executive positions, resident or day camp workers, those under age 16 working a maximum of 20 hours weekly, outside salespeople, commission earn-

ers, food processors, or individuals engaged in livestock production. Other concessions included removing proposed automatic cost-of living increases, as well as retention of the state’s current tip credit. Maryland’s current minimum wage regulations exempt employees earning at least $30 monthly in tips who are paid a $3.63 hourly rate that must combine to equal at least the current $10.10 pay scale. Pursel said while minimum wage rates will not begin increasing until Jan. 1, both general exemptions and training wage for youth workers take effect this June. She also said the Maryland Department of Labor Licensing and Regulations is still updating information online, so at this point the minimum wage analysis from the Restaurant Association of Maryland would provide the most current data. The original bill language would have eliminated the current “training wage,” which permits staff under the age of 20 to be paid 85 percent of minimum wage rates for the first half year of employment. Although the “training wage” was retained, the new regulations altered the age requirement to 18 or younger. The Restaurant Association of Maryland, which lobbied extensively

to retain the state tip credit, was able to insert an amendment requiring restaurants to report the effective hourly tip rate for staff to foster transparency regarding actual earnings. The tipped rate wage statement requirement will be subject to future regulation adoption by the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing & Regulation (DLLR). The May 29 event takes place from 10 a.m. to noon at the Restaurant Association of Maryland offices located at 6301 Hillside Court in Columbia. The June 5 seminar will be held at the Aloft Hotel on 45th Street from 911 a.m. To register to attend the event visit online at www.oceancity.org and click on the “Chamber Events,” tab to find further details and a sign-up form. Pursel said the Restaurant Association is working with the Department of Labor Licensing and Regulations, payroll service providers and industry representatives to finalize wage rate details and is continuing to solicit input from impacted employers. Questions or concerns can be emailed to Melvin Thompson, senior vice president of Government Affairs & Public Policy for the Restaurant Association of Maryland at mthompson@marylandrestaurants.com


MAY 24, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Willards man will face distribution charges for heroin By Josh Davis News Editor (May 24, 2019) Mark Terris Oxendine, 30 of Willards, faces more than 20 years in prison l for allegedly attempting to sell heroin in Ocean City. According to a police report, officers were called at 6:59 p.m. on May 18 to check on the welfare of a man, later identified as Oxendine, who had passed out in a Ford Mustang parked near a 125th Street business. Police found the man with a plastic bag containing many capsules filled with a white substance. Oxendine was apparently trying to conceal the bag from police. Mark Oxendine The arresting officer recognized the substance as heroin, which Oxendine later confirmed. Police said Oxendine also had traces of the substance on his clothing. During a search of the vehicle, police found 47 capsules of heroin, an unopened pack of 10 syringes and iodine wipes, one used syringe filled with a clear liquid, and another package that had been opened with seven more syringes. Police also found a bag on the front passenger seat containing 176 empty capsules said to be “commonly used to package heroin to be sold on the street.” Also in the bag were another 149 capsules filled with heroin. Another capped syringe and a capsule of heroin was found in the driver’s door compartment, and police also found a capsule of heroin in Oxendine’s sweatshirt pocket. Inside a grooming kit in the trunk, police found a glass pipe “consistent with the use and possession of Crack Cocaine.” Police also found in the car a spring-assisted knife that’s prohibited in Ocean City. According to charging documents, Oxendine faces 20 years and up to $15,000 in fines for possession with intent to distribute, along with two additional possession charges each carrying one year in jail and a maximum $5,000 fine, two counts of possession of paraphernalia each carrying a $500 fine, and one count of possession of a spring-assisted knife with a maximum penalty of six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. Oxendine waived his right to an attorney during an initial court appearance on May 19. A trial is scheduled Aug. 21 at the Worcester County District Court in Ocean City.

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Ocean City Today

MAY 24, 2019

First steps taken to increase room tax rate Continued from Page 1 coming effective on Jan. 1, 2020. While this week’s approval requires only a simple majority, Shanahan said the subsequent resolution would require a unanimous commissioners vote. Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan told the commissioners this week that room taxes were last increased a decade ago when the economy took a downturn. “The goal of Ocean City was to be proactive and increase our advertising,” he said. Meehan said despite the recession, the resort doubled down and boosted

its marketing funds, from about $1.6 million at that time to over $6 million currently. “During those years where the economy faltered, we were able to maintain our numbers,” he said. “You don’t cut advertising when things are bad, that’s when you increase it.” Meehan said, outside of property taxes, room taxes represent resort government’s largest revenue source. Last year, Ocean City collected roughly $15.6 million from room tax charges, with Meehan estimating approximately 46 percent was pumped back into tourism and economic devel-

opment. Meehan said the higher tax rates would be instrumental in addressing an increase of about $700,000 in costs related to special events and extending the tourist season beyond summer months. While it is estimated that the 5 percent rate would pull in about $700,000 for fiscal 2020, that figure is anticipated to increase to $1.7 million the following year. “This will allow us to grow the tourism budget and plan for new tourism-related projects to grow the economy and increase revenues,” he

said. Shanahan said local municipalities, or other affected parties, would be able to offer input at the public hearing scheduled for Aug. 20. Commissioner Joe Mitrecic said the increased costs would be supported by visitors and would not affect property owners. “It’s very competitive with most of the room taxes in the area,” he said. The commissioners voted unanimously, with Commissioner Josh Nordstrom abstaining, to approve the bill that will permit the county to introduce a resolution effecting the increase.

Cruisin’ incident report shows improvement Continued from Page 1 tive” throughout Cruisin’, from posting lower speed limit signs during the beginning of the week, to better coordinating assistance with state police. “The event seemed more manageable. It seemed to be more controlled,” he said. “There was more compliance on the part of the motorists, as well as our citizenry on the sidelines. “From my standpoint … it seemed like it had just notched itself down,”

Buzzuro continued. “There wasn’t as much as some of the nonsense and the debauchery that we’ve seen in some years past.” During prior years, for example, St. Louis Avenue had effectively turned into a drag strip, Buzzuro said. “I believe it was a combination of the things that helped,” he said, crediting both lower speed limits and event organizers, who moved some of activities out of Ocean City. “There were, I think, almost 1,000

folks that went over to the Delmar raceway. When you take that out of the equation, it helped us considerably,” he said. “Overall, [there were] nothing in terms of collisions that were severe or significant, like we’ve seen in years past … Hopefully, we’ve turned a corner,” Buzzuro added. Mayor Rick Meehan thanked members of the Motor Event Taskforce, which includes representatives from the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, Ocean City HotelMotel-Restaurant Association, Maryland State highway Administration and others. “It really is a good taskforce,” he said. Meehan reiterated the apparent success of the Special Event Zone and said the city had gone the extra mile to work with property owners, businesses and police to better handle motor events in town. “You see a lot more security and you see a lot more cooperation from some of these establishments, to work with the chief to make sure that we can manage this event,” he said. He also singled out Public Works Director Hal Adkins and the department for changing the speed limit signs, as well as event promoters for

their efforts. “I really think that they’re working with us,” Meehan said. “I also want to compliment the motor vehicle clubs [and] the hot rod associations … I had more and more of those individuals come up to me and say, ‘We support what you’re doing, we want the event to be the event it was.’ “Nothing is perfect – nothing will ever be perfect – but I think we have turned a corner,” he continued. “And I think we’ve lost a few people, but that’s OK, because they’re going to be replaced by others.” Councilman John Gehrig also said the event was much improved. “We’ve come a long way,” he said. “It was a rather contentious council meeting we had last year … about this very event, and maybe not contracting with the promoter” for the event to continue.” Gehrig said it was high praise that both Buzzuro and Meehan said Cruisin’ had turned a corner. “There’s still work to be done, but from where we were to where we are now, that’s why these taskforces can work,” he said. “There are a lot of smart people on this taskforce and it just goes to show you what happens when you put people in a room and work it out.”

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Ocean City Today

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MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

Glenwood man charged after assaulting police By Josh Davis Associate Editor (May 24, 2019) Cameron Korush Haghighat, 19 of Glenwood, Maryland, was arrested and charged after allegedly striking a police officer and another man on May 19. Police were called to a 36th Street condominium at 9:31 p.m. because of reports of a fight. Officers found a shirtless and shouting Haghighat and another man, Farzin Fahandezsaadi attempting to calm him. Haghighat allegedly refused police orders and pushed Fahandezsaadi in front of them. He also reportedly resisted attempts to be placed into handcuffs and was tackled by police. Police said Haghighat appeared to be intoxicated and his “demeanor changed multiple times … from aggressively shouting insults and threats at officers, to crying and apologizing.” Haghighat was pushed to the ground by police in order to control him. Police said he struck one officer about five

POLICE/COURTS Continued from Page 24 came angry and “stood up and ripped the master bedroom door off of the hinges.” Tartaglia said Swilley then went on a rampage and damaged two additional doors. Swilley was charged with malicious destruction of property. He waived his right to an attorney during an initial appearance on May 18 and is scheduled to face trial on June 24 at Worcester County District Court in Ocean City.

times in the middle and lower portions of her body and was placed under arrest for the assault. Police said C. Haghighat there was damage inside of the condo, including a broken coffee table, damaged blinds and other signs of a fight. Fahandezsaadi had minor scratches on his neck, but said they were from shaving. He told police he did not feel assaulted because “he [Haghighat] could not kill me if he tried.” Witnesses told police a fight occurred in plain view of the street and that Haghighat was the aggressor. Haghighat was charged with two counts of second-degree assault, disorderly conduct, and refusing to obey police orders. He waived his right to an attorney during an initial court appearance on May 19 and is scheduled to stand trial on June 24 at Worcester County District Court in Ocean City.

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Malicious destruction Triston Aston Chang, 31 of Ocean City, was charged on May 17 after allegedly breaking bar property and exposing himself to a bouncer. Police were called to a downtown bar at about 2:03 a.m. A security guard told police that Chang, upon being asked to leave the premises, grabbed a hostess stand and threw it the ground, breaking the stand into several pieces. Hart said he was able to get Chang to leave the bar, but once outside Chang proceeded to pull his pants down in front of him and urinate. Chang was arrested for malicious destruction of property and indecent exposure. He waived his right to an attorney during an initial appearance on May 17 and is scheduled to face trial on June 21 at Worcester County District Court in Ocean City.

Bar brawl Travis Johnson Chavous, 27, of Schnecksville, Pennsylvania, was charged after allegedly punching and knocking out another man at a local nightclub. Police, apparently on enforcement detail at a midtown establishment, witnessed a Chavous

strike Matthew Thomas Butler in the face. Ocean City Emergency Medical Services took the injured man to Peninsula Regional Medical Center for a possible head injury. Witnesses told police the assault was unprovoked. Surveillance footage allegedly showed the two men having a casual conversation, when Chavous put his left hand on Butler’s neck and chest area, while striking him in the jaw with his right hand. Chavous was charged with second-degree assault. He waived his right to an attorney during an initial appearance on May 17 and is scheduled to face trial on June 21 at Worcester County District Court in Ocean City.

Glass smasher Donald Ryan Willoughby, 36 of Salisbury, was arrested after an alleged drunken incident at a friend’s home on May 18. Police were called at 12:18 a.m. on reports that Willoughby was acting aggressive toward his friends at a condominium on the 2200 block of Philadelphia Avenue. Willoughby apparently had fallen through a glass table and needed to be seen by Ocean City Emergency Medical Services for a cut on his lower back. Police arrived to find Willoughby being restrained by another man, Christopher Michael Peranio, whom he threatened to assault. Police observed broken glass in the living room and blood on the floor and couch, and said Willoughby appeared to be heavily intoxicated. Willoughby was arrested for intoxicated endangerment. He’s scheduled to face trial on June 24 at Worcester County District Court.

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Ocean City Today

Berlin juvenile, 16, charged in Man threatened to kill murder of 17-year-old Nichols everyone in resort unit By Josh Davis Associate Editor (May 24, 2019) A 17-year-old was shot and killed in Berlin on Wednesday and a 16-year-old is in custody and being charged with murder. Dehaven Nichols, 17, of Berlin was pronounced deceased by EMS personnel where he was discovered in a wooded area behind an apartment complex in Berlin. His body has been transported to the office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore for an autopsy to determine the exact cause of death. The accused was identified as Vershawn Hudson-Crawford, 16, of Berlin. After consultation with the Worcester County State’s Attorney, Hudson-Crawford was charged as an adult with first- and second-degree murder, along with other charges. He is currently awaiting an appearance before a court commissioner in Worcester County. Around 6:15 p.m. Wednesday, Vershawn Hudson-Crawford, along with his mother and grandmother, went to the Berlin Police Department, where the mother informed police that her son, Vershawn, had been involved in a fight. During the conversation, police learned of the victim’s location and were dispatched to the area where they found Nichols, who

was unresponsive. The preliminary investigation indicates the two teenage boys were involved in an altercation behind an apartment complex off of Route 113 in Berlin. A motive has not Vershawn Hudson-Crawford yet been determined. The Maryland State Police Homicide Unit was asked to take the lead on this investigation. The Maryland State Police Criminal Enforcement Division, Lower Shore, is providing additional assistance, along with troopers from the Berlin Barrack, the Worcester County Bureau of Investigation, and detectives, officers and deputies from the Berlin Police Department and Worcester County Sheriff’s Office. State police crime scene technicians processed the scene. Investigators have been interviewing witnesses and residents in the area. Crime scene evidence was taken to the State Police Forensic Sciences Division crime laboratory for analysis. Anyone with information about the apparent murder is urged to contact Maryland State Police at the Berlin Barrack at 410-641-3101. Callers may remain anonymous.

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (May 24, 2019) Elijah Al Tonnie, 32 of Ocean City, was charged with first and seconddegree assault and false imprisonment after a May 7 incident in which witnesses told police he wielded a knife and threatened to kill everyone in a Philadelphia Avenue unit, near the 100 block. Upon police arrival just after midnight, one witness said Tonnie was threatening a woman with a knife. According to charging documents, another witness, who was apparently dating Tonnie, told police he woke her up to confront her about calls made to another man. Tonnie then accused the woman of cheating on him, blocked her in the room and threatened to kill her. Tonnie allegedly threatened the woman with a pocketknife and, when the woman yelled

through the window for help, he threatened to stab her to death if police were called. He also apparElijah Al Tonnie ently threatened to kill everyone in the unit. The witness eventually escaped and went into a roommate’s room and told the roommate, “I thought I was going to die.” Police later found the pocketknife hidden under a pillow in the witness’s bedroom. Tonnie was arrested and the knife was placed into evidence. He waived his right to an attorney during an initial hearing on May 7, and a preliminary hearing was set for June 3 at the Worcester County District Court in Ocean City.

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MAY 24, 2019

WORLD WAR II

Victorious Legion Kondor marched in Berlin By Peter Ayers Wimbrow III Contributing Writer (May 24, 2019) This week, 80 years ago, the men of the victorious Legion Kondor marched down the Wilhelmstrasse in Berlin before cheering throngs of their fellow countrymen. At the Lustgarten, the troops were addressed by the German Führer and the dead were honored. A formal state banquet was held in the Reich Chancellery for the most highly decorated of the legion. Among those in attendance were Spanish generals Don Antonio Aranda Mata and Gonzalo Queipo de Llano y Sierra, German generals Hugo Sperrle and Baron Dr. Wolfram von Richthofen, who were the Legion’s commanders, and. of course, Luftwaffe

chief Field Marshal Hermann Göring, Hitler and other military and party dignitaries. Only a few weeks before, having provided invaluable assistance to the Nationalists’ victory in the Spanish Civil War, they had marched triumphantly down La Grand Vía, in Madrid before El Caudillo, Generalissimo Francisco Franco, while in the skies above, the legion’s pilots had joined with those of the Italian Aviazione Legionaria and the Spanish Fuerza Aerea Nacional to form the words “VIVA FRANCO” above the victorious marching troops. Several days after the Madrid parade, the German ships Wilhelm Gustloff, Robert Ley, Deutsche, Stuttgart, Sierra Cordova and Oceana arrived in

C E L E B R AT I N G

the Spanish port of Vigo, in the province of Galicia, in northern Spain. Six years later, the Wilhelm Gustloff would achieve immortality, when, after being torpedoed by Soviet submarine S-13, it sank in the frigid Baltic Sea with a loss of more than 9,000 lives, constituting the worst maritime disaster in history. On May 26, 1939, the members of the Legion Condor boarded those ships and embarked for the Fatherland. Four days later, the ships arrived off Hamburg and were escorted into the Port by the pocket battleships, Admiral Graf Spee and Admiral Scheer. There, they were greeted by Field Marshal Göring, who saluted them from the state yacht Hamburg, and later, after they marched in review, told them that

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der Führer had created a special medal to honor their service. Portraits of der Führer were distributed, with the inscription on the reverse, “Homecoming of the German volunteers from Spain, May 31, 1939,” even though it was May 30! From Hamburg, the Legion went to Berlin for another homecoming, parade and a salute from der Führer on June 6,1939. To commemorate the legion’s return, a postal stamp was created. The Legion Kondor had been Germany’s contribution to the Nationalists’ victory in the Spanish Civil War. The contribution initially began with the world’s first airlift. When the Nationalist rebellion began, the bulk of its fighting force, and its leader, Francisco Franco, were in Spanish Morocco, with no way to get to the Spanish mainland — that is, until planes supplied by the German Luftwaffe were sent to the rescue. The German planes transported Gen. Franco and his army from Spanish Morocco, across the Straits of Gibraltar, to the Spanish mainland in the world’s first military airlift. The German contribution morphed into fighters and bombers and later still, a Panzer unit. The first commander of the Legion Kondor was Gen. Hugo Sperrle, who would receive the Field Marshal’s baton in 1940. He was succeeded by his chief-of-staff, Baron von Richthofen, who became the youngest German to ever receive the field marshal’s baton in 1943. Baron von Richthofen was a distant cousin of the “Red Baron” and served with him during The Great War. The Panzer unit, called Imker (“Beekeeper”), was commanded by Baron Wilhelm von Thoma. His participation in World War II ended when he was captured at the Battle of El Alamein in October 1942. For the Germans, the advantages gained, and lessons learned, during their service in Spain were incalculable. They were able to field test, under combat conditions, their arms, men and equipment. As a result, improvements were made to the famed Messerschmitt Bf109 fighter plane, which would make it the most successful of the war. More of these planes were built than any other in history. The Germans also discovered the value of the 88-millimeter anti-aircraft gun in other uses, such as anti-tank, and made improvements to it. Tactics were also perfected. For instance, it was in Spain that Baron von Richthofen perfected the close support of the air arm with the ground troops. The Panzers also refined their tactics and the use of armor as one unit, rather than dispersed throughout the army. Thousands of future Luftwaffe pilots gained invaluable experience for See WORLD WAR II Page 86


MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

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MAY 24, 2019

WORLD WAR II

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Continued from Page 84 the coming struggle. And officers gained experience leading men in combat. The Germans also developed the first air ambulance to evacuate the wounded. Future ace, general and commander of fighters, Adolf Galland, made significant contributions. It was during the Asturias campaign that he developed carpet bombing. He created an incendiary bomb, by filling a tank with used engine oil and gasoline and lashing a 22-pound bomb to each side. He also organized a train especially to transport his squadron. Galland was replaced in spring 1938 by Werner Mölders, who would become the first fighter pilot in history to achieve 100 victories. He was the leading German ace in Spain, with 14. Mölders was instrumental in changing the German aerial fighter formation from the three-plane Vee, known, in German, as a Kette, to a two-plane Rotte. In the Rotte, the two planes flew about 600 feet apart, with the better fighter pilot taking the lead and other covering his rear. Two Rotten constituted a Schwarm. This was found to be far more effective than the Kette, and the Germans used this throughout World War II. In fact, it is still used by the RAF and the USAF. The most famous operation of Legion Kondor was “Operation Rugen” — the bombing of the Basque town of Guernica, immortalized by Pablo Picasso with his painting of the same name. In exchange for the Legion’s contribution, the Reich was able to monopolize Spanish resources, such as iron ore, tungsten, iron sulfide and cinnabarite. In addition, the Reich gained an ally — Italy. There was even some military coordination, especially between the Legion Kondor and the Aviazone Legionaria. Indeed, although the Legion Kondor received all of the

blame for the bombing of Guernica, the Aviazone Legionaria also participated. The contribution of the Legion Kondor to the Nationalist’ cause was invaluable, for it allowed Franco’s forces to control the air. During the Spanish Civil War, the three squadrons of the Legion Kondor’s Junkers Ju 52 bombers dropped 16,953,700 kilos of bombs on the Spanish countryside. Legion veterans received the Spanienkreuz (Spanish Cross) from a grateful Reich in appreciation of their service. There were three classes — gold, silver and bronze — depending upon the extent of participation. Each of these classes was further divided — bronze and silver with swords and gold with diamonds. There was also a “Next of Kin” cross. The veterans who continued to serve the Fatherland in the Luftwaffe were authorized to wear, on the right sleeve of their uniform, a cuff band with the words “Legion Kondor” in Gothic script on a dark blue base. Those who served in the army were also authorized to wear a cuff band that was red with metallic gold lettering and which read “1936 Spanien 1939.” Those who had been wounded also received a “Wound Badge,” which was authorized on May 22,1939, “... as a recognition badge to German volunteers who had received wounds in action in the fight against Bolshevism during the 1936-1939 Spanish War of Liberation.” The German soldiers and airmen also received a medal from the Franco government, designed by the generalissimo himself. Next week: Werner Mölders Mr. Wimbrow writes from Ocean City, Maryland, where he practices law representing those persons accused of criminal and traffic offenses, and those persons who have suffered a personal injury through no fault of their own. He can be contacted at: wimbrowlaw@gmail.com.


MAY 24, 2019

Ocean City Today

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OBITUARIES CARLO DIFILIPPO Ocean City Carlo DiFilippo, age 87, passed away on Thursday, May 16, 2019, at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin, Maryland. Born in Bronx, New York, he was the son of the late Rocco DiFilippo and Emilia Leo. He is survived by his wife, Santina DiCarlo DiFilippo Filippo; son, Carlo DiFilippo Jr. (Serena); daughters, Virginia Cipollone (Leo) and Clara Ziman (Jeremy); sisters, Virginia DiFilippo and Clara DiFilippo; and five grandchildren, Joey, Anthony, Valentina, Alessia and Nicolas. He was preceded in death by his brother, Francesco DiFilippo. The first born son of Italian immigrants, Carlo DiFilippo, Sr. was born in the United States, returning to Italy for part of his childhood and adolescence until he was drafted into the United States Marine Corps. Throughout his life, his achievements were remarkable. After proudly serving his country he settled in New York for some time. He was a leader providing support and opportunity for his widowed mother and younger siblings throughout his young adult years. Attending The College of the City of New York, he earned his degree in Liberal Arts and Science later receiving a Masters of Arts in Italian from the University of Wisconsin. Studying at the University of Binghamton for his PhD lead him back to Italy to eventually receive his Doctorate in Language and Literature from the Universita’ di Urbino. A published author, he was honored and awarded countless times throughout his life for his literary work. He taught at the college level for some time until he left his professorial career to begin a new chapter in his life. PhD professor turned entrepreneur, Carlo undertook many business ventures and in 1970, entered the hospitality industry in Ocean City. He raised his children instilling important values and providing experiences that shaped their lives. He lived a life dedicated to family, friends and career. Carlo will certainly be remembered for his love for riding his bicycle on the Boardwalk. A special place dear to his heart was his childhood town of Siano, (SA) Italy where he frequently returned over the years to visit friends and family. A mass of Christian Burial was held at Holy Savior on Tuesday, May 21, 2019. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. A donation in his memory may be

made to: Worcester Adult Medical Day Services, P.O. Box 159, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 for the K-Cove Dementia Unit. “Our family is filled with sadness at the void that has been left in place of our wonderful father and husband. We will never stop celebrating and honoring his life. “He was a man who loved so many. He embodied life’s most important virtues; humility, patience, decency, strength, resilience, perseverance, determination, tenderness, compassion, respect, love and pride. Please keep him and our family in your prayers.” SARA POSKUS Lawrenceville, Georgia Sara Jane Poskus (Cook), age 87, passed away at her daughter’s home in Georgia on Aug. 11, 2018. From her birth in Charlottesville, Virginia, on July 14, 1931 to her passing in August, Sara nourished those around her with love, humor and wittiness. She was born at the University Hospital in Virginia to Nellie Hayle Woodson and Irving Hawthorne Cook. Her family moved to Washington, D.C. when she was 5 years old. She moved to Maryland in 1959 and eventually to Ocean City in 1994. She married the love of her life,

Vincent Vito Poskus (Bill), on June 22, 1955. She is predeceased by Bill and her first daughter, Denise Ann Drittler. Sara is survived by her children, Cynthia Nelligan, Dale Poskus, Cyndi Chieppa and Laura Lee Poskus; grandchildren, Sean and Shannon Blanchard, Brendon Blanchard, Ashley Drittler, Dale Poskus Jr., Sara Nelligan, Krystle Thompson and Malcolm Smith; and great-grandchildren, Carter, Cameron, Crew, Coby, Nora and James Blanchard. She was a member of the Fraternal of Eagles since 1971 and a member of the American Legion. She worked at a telephone company for over 10 years, then went on to run a daycare out of her home. Sara Jane started working at the Ocean City convention center upon moving to Ocean City and worked there for over 20 years. She loved crocheting, gardening, bowling and her friends and family dearly. Donations can be made to the American Cancer Society in honor of Sara Jane Poskus. We will always carry her memory in our gardens and in our heart. There will be two services held in honor of Sara Poskus. The Memorial service on Friday, May 31, 2019 will begin at 9 a.m. at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

There will all be a Celebration of Life on May 31 at 5 p.m. at the Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. JOHN F. GREINER SR. Ocean City John F. Greiner Sr. passed away on Sunday, May 12, 2019 in Ocean City, Maryland. Born in Altoona, Pennsylvania, son of the late Margaret (Frederick) and Regis Greiner, John was raised in Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania. He was a 1969 graduate of the former Bishop Egan High School. John was a machinist at US Steel for 25 years. While working there, he played fastpitch for the US Steel Softball League. After the mill closed, John went on to obtain his Bachelors Degree in Nursing at Holy Family University and worked as a nurse for the state of New Jersey for many years. His favorite thing in life was coaching. He had coached football for Saint Michael the Archangel School in Levittown and baseball for Levittown American. He also was an official for PIAA softball and basketball for many years. John was a 4th Degree Knights of Columbus, Saint Joseph the Worker Council #4215 and then transferred Continued on Page 88


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MAY 24, 2019

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 87 to Council #9053 in Ocean City, Maryland. He was also a member of the Elks Lodge #2645 in Ocean City and the Fraternal Order of Eagles #2489. He was the beloved husband of Patricia (Malloy), and the loving father of Debra Knotts (Keith), John F. Greiner (Blair) and Michael Greiner (Lucy). He is the devoted grandfather of Trent, JP and Kasey, and brother of Mary “Jeannie” Leckner, Peggy Wilson, Dennis Greiner and Christine Moore. John will also be sadly missed by many nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in John’s name may be made to Sussex County Animal Association, PO Box 1697, Seaford, Delaware 19973. DARLENE R. WRIGHT Bishopville Darlene R. Wright, age 81, of Bishopville, died Friday, May 17, 2019 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. She was born in York, Pennsylvania, and was one of 16 children of the late Russell H. and Evelyn V. (Fair) Seigman. She was an avid bingo player and Darlene Wright loved to go to the casinos. She is survived by a son, Leonard Smith and husband, Frankie Rodriguez, of Greensboro, North Carolina; a daughter, Lisa M. Brooks of Bishopville; one brother, three sisters, four grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. A funeral service was held Wednesday, May 22, 2019 at BishopHastings Funeral Home in Selbyville with Rev. Paul Sherwood officiating. Burial wa in St. George’s Cemetery in

Clarksville. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com PAUL HENRY BURKETT Girdletree Paul Henry Burkett, age 90, died on Friday, May 17, 2019, at his home. Born in Greencastle, Pennsylvania, he was the son of the late Harry C. and Eva Smith Burkett. He is survived by his beloved wife of 69 years, Kathleen Burkett; sons, Harry Burkett of Stockton and Richard Burkett of Girdletree; and a sister, Peggy Matson of Greencastle, Pennsylvania. Preceding him in death were his sons, William and Leroy Burkett. Mr. Burkett had served in the United States Army. He was employed by Perdue Farms in the maintenance department. After retiring, he enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren, and fishing and camping. A graveside service was held on Thursday, May 23, 2019 at Springhill Cemetery in Girdletree. Letters of condolence may be sent to www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. ANNA L. CORTESE Berlin Anna L. Cortese, age 91, of Berlin, died Thursday, May 16, 2019, at Coastal Hospice At The Lake in Salisbury. She was born in Berlin and was the daughter of the late Charles Thomas and Achsah (Cathell) Jones. She had been a secretary for Moore & Pruitt Insurance and Taylor Bank. She was also a member of Buckingham Presbyterian Church in Berlin. She is survived by two sons, Nicholas A. Cortese Jr. and wife, Tana, of Berlin and Anthony T.

Cortese and wife, Mihye, of Kaneohe, Hawaii; two brothers, Franklyn Jones and Richard Jones; three sisters, Kathleen Pruitt, Achsah Jarman and Marylan Anna Cortese Shockley; two grandchildren, Christina Cortese and Nicole Cortese; many nieces and nephews and great- and great-greatnieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Nicholas A. Cortese Sr., in 1980 and three brothers, Edwin, Paul and Dale Jones. A graveside service was held on Thursday, May 23, 2019, at Sunset Memorial Park in Berlin. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to: Buckingham Presbyterian Church, P.O. Box 248, Berlin, Maryland 21811, or Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryalnd 21802. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com. JOSHUA B. VACH Wilmington, North Carolina Joshua B. Vach, loving husband and restaurateur, passed away at age 53 on Wednesday, May 15, 2019. Josh was born Oct. 21, 1965, to Richard and Mary Carroll Vach. He graduated from Worcester Preparatory School in 1983 and UNCW in 1987. On Oct. 3, 2009, he married Cindy Parcell on the sand of Wrightsville Beach. Josh grew up on the Eastern Shore of Maryland where his love for the ocean and surfing started at a young age. He was proud of the two restaurants his parents built and owned, The Quarterdeck and Wild Goose Chase in Ocean City, Maryland. He moved to Southern California

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after college to enjoy his love of surfing and continued to work in the restaurant industry. Surfing trips to the Baja Coast, and enjoying fish tacos on Joshua Vach the side of the road with his surfing buddies were the inspiration for him to establish his first restaurant. In 1993, Josh opened K38 Baja Grill on Oleander Drive with the support of his father. His passion and vision to create a genuine “surf vibe” atmosphere and to serve the fish tacos he loved was truly an original concept that Wilmington instantly embraced. The success of his first location led to what is now known as the family of Live Eat Surf restaurants with a total of eight locations. His hands-on approach in the restaurants, hard work and relentless drive to be the best each and every day enabled him to give back to the community and help many animals in need over the years. He created Cinco de Bow Wow, an annual fundraising event, to support local animal shelters and Canines for Service. Josh was a member of the UNCW Surf Club that led him to establish the UNCW Tower 7 Surf Scholarship in 2008. It has grown into the Tower 7/WBLivesurf Scholarship. Josh supported the surf community in many other ways such as feeding the volunteers and participants in the annual Surfers Healing event on Wrightsville Beach. Josh always preferred not to be in the spotlight for his generosity and community involvement. However, many organizations over the years wanted to recognize him for his good deeds. To name a few, Josh was the UNCW Distinguished Citizen of the Year in 2015 and was inducted into Wrightsville Beach Museum’s 2014 Waterman Hall of Fame for his contribution to Beach Culture. Josh was preceded in death by his parents, Richard Joseph Vach, and Mary Carroll Vach; his sisters, Mary Elizabeth Vach, Carroll Vach England; and by his beloved dog, Wyatt. Josh is survived by his wife, Cindy, and their treasured dog, Gunner; his sister, Martha Vach Redding; his brothers, Richard Joseph (Jr.) and Thomas Carville Vach, along with numerous in-laws, nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews. There will be two Celebrations of Life. One in Wilmington and the other in Ocean City, Maryland. Details will be announced at a later date in each community. Contributions in his memory can be made to: Ocean City Surf Club P.O. Box 4752, Ocean City, Maryland 21843


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Four Stephen Decatur outdoor track and field athletes will compete in the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association 3A state championship this weekend at Morgan State University in Baltimore. Pictured, from left, are seniors Daletez Smith (shot put) and Margie Rayne (shot put and discus) and sophomores Jessica Janney (high jump) and London Drummond (high jump).

Four SD track athletes headed to state meet By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (May 24, 2019) Four Stephen Decatur outdoor track and field athletes will compete in the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association 3A state championship this weekend at Morgan State University in Baltimore. The Seahawks advanced to the championship meet by placing fourth or better during the 3A East Region meet last Wednesday and Saturday at Reservoir High School in Fulton, Maryland. “Overall, I think regionals went pretty well. The competition was difficult as we expected,” Decatur Coach Jody Stigler said. “The competition at states will be strong. We need to focus and have our best meet as states.” Senior Margie Rayne won the regional discus event with a throw of 115 feet 4 inches. Rayne already beat the Decatur school record of 104 feet 3 inches set by Martina Collick in 2001 this season when she threw the discus 109 feet 9 inches. During regionals, Rayne topped her own record. “It’s pretty exciting. It’s my first year [throwing the discus],” she said. “It’s a huge accomplishment. I did it in sixth grade, but I didn’t know what I was doing then that much.” Rayne placed fourth in the shot put, with a distance of 31 feet 6.5

inches. “I didn’t do as good as I had hoped to do, but I can make it back up at states,” she said. “I didn’t get much sleep because I had school work to do – a paper – and it was a long bus ride.” Rayne is the Bayside Conference shot put champion. She is excited to go to states and not too nervous, because she competed in the indoor track championship meet a few months ago. “That really helps, because I know what to expect now,” she said. Rayne hopes to throw the discus over 110 feet at states. “I need to practice my spinning since I’m pretty new to that, and hopefully, it goes well,” Rayne said on Monday. “I’ve definitely gotten better. When I first started I threw like 50 feet and at regionals I threw 115 feet.” She is shooting for mid-30s in the shot put. “I’m just going to try my best and don’t let anyone get in my head. Just stay focused,” she said. At states during indoor track Rayne finished in seventh place in the shot put. It was her first season competing in the event. Sophomore Jessica Janney came in second place in the high jump at regionals. She jumped 5 feet 2 inches to tie the school record.

Janney holds the record with Billie Jo Burbage (1994) and Brittany Harris (2005). “I didn’t know so it was very exciting to hear. I was literally shaking at the end of the meet,” Janney said. “It was unbelievable. For my first year doing high jump, I think that’s pretty good.” Janney’s goal is to jump at least 5 feet 2 inches at states. “I would love to get 5 [feet] 4 [inches], that’s what I’m really striving for and just to have that school record, but I also have a few years to get if that doesn’t happen,” she said. “I’m just really happy to be there in the first place and to see how everyone else is doing and maybe I can learn something.” Janney said she is excited for states, but thinks some nerves may set in once she gets to the competition. “At the beginning of the season people who knew me said I’d have a pretty good chance because they know I can jump from basketball and to actually do it this whole year, getting higher and higher, it’s really amazing especially since it is my first year,” she said. “Pretty much every meet I’ve always gone higher.” Sophomore London Drummond also finished in second place in the high jump, with a height of 6 feet 1 inch.

“I don’t think I did really well. I think I could have done a lot better,” he said. “The heat, I was a little fatigued and I also had other events that day. I’m hoping to do my best at states.” His goal is to jump 6 feet 6 inches at states. Drummond, who is the Bayside champion in the high jump, said to be successful it will take “a lot of concentration, having the little things down, getting a good rest and staying hydrated because it’s going to be hot.” “I’m very excited. I’m really eager to go. I’m excited to jump,” he said. “I went last year to states, but it will still be a little nerve-racking because it’s states.” Drummond tied for 13th place in the high jump at states during the 2018 outdoor track season. Senior Daletez Smith will join his teammates at states. He took fourth in the shot put at regionals, with a throw of 41 feet 2 inches. “I feel like I could have done better. I shouldn’t have lifted [weights earlier in the day],” he said. “It’s my second time going to states – I went for wrestling [during the winter]. I have something to prove and hopefully [it motivates] me to push the shot further and actually win.” Smith said he was not nervous during practice on Monday, but once See DRUMMOND Page 90


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SD softball team’s season successful overall By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (May 24, 2019) The Stephen Decatur softball team had a successful season but, unfortunately, it ended sooner than the players and coaching staff would have liked. Decatur, the No. 2 seed in the 3A East Region Section II, hosted the thirdseeded Northeast Eagles of Anne Arundel last Tuesday in Berlin. Scott Kurtz Northeast scored two runs in the first, two in the third and four in the fourth to take an 8-0 lead. Decatur got on the board with one run in the fifth. The Eagles tacked on three additional runs in the seventh to pull ahead 11-1. The Seahawks didn’t give up, as their bats made contact in the bottom of the inning. They scored four runs, not enough for a come-from-behind victory. “I was glad to end that way [putting runs on the board] as opposed to the first six innings. It just took us awhile to find our rhythm,” Decatur Coach Scott Kurtz said after the 11-5 loss. “We battled. We always do. Just the hole we dug early made it tough. “We couldn’t string it together at the plate to stay in it,” he continued. “Late in the game we finally saw hit after hit, but it was too little too late.” Junior Sierra Eisemann had two hits and three RBIs for Decatur. Junior Amber Whittaker had two hits and two RBIs. Senior captain Alexis Black also had two hits. In six and one-third innings, Black struck out five, walked two and allowed 10 hits on the mound. “Our seniors, this is the last time they walk off the field as a Decatur

softball player and that’s an emotional moment, period,” Kurtz said. “I told them of the 20 games we played, I walked off the field proud after probably 18 of those 20.” Decatur finished the season with a 15-5 record. Kurtz said even though the team didn’t win 18 games, there were three losses the girls did everything could have done. “The other team just found the grass and landed them out there a little more than we did in those games. Obviously in the 15 wins we did everything we needed to do,” he said. “I said, ‘there were two times we took the field where you could tell the mental preparation as a team wasn’t there.’ Unfortunately, that Easton game late in the season and today [against Northeast], and I said, ‘you’ve got to learn from that.’” The team will graduate three players – Black, starting catcher, co-captain Alex Richwalski, and Nevaeh Steward. “We’re losing our pitcher and catcher, our heart and soul, and Nevaeh, who was a team player even though she didn’t get a lot of playing time,” Kurtz said. “What Lexi Black does on the field is so impressive and what Alex Richwalski does behind the mask and behind the scenes, it’s incredible.” The players will have big shoes to fill with the departure of Black and Richwalski, Kurtz said. “The talent is there. We need some leaders to step up. We’re a young team and there’s some growing up that needs to take place,” he said. “When you look at that starting nine, we got two open spots. If those girls that were on the field all year put in the work to improve and get better there’s no reason they don’t reclaim their spots. If we’ve got some hungry

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur sophomore Brooklyn Pugner makes contact as Coach Scott Kurtz looks on, during last Tuesday’s 3A East Region Section II playoff game against Northeast in Berlin.

girls looking to come up here and join in the fun, I’m looking forward to the future. The talent is there and it’s going to be interesting to see what roles the girls fall into. ” Black and Whittaker received Bayside South Conference First Team accolades. Eisemann and sophomore Brooklyn Pugner earned Second Team honors. Richwalski and freshman Skylar Griffin were presented honorable mention awards. Kurtz gave team awards to: Black (MVP), Richwalski (Unsung Hero), Whittaker (Best Attitude), Pugner (Sportsmanship), Eisemann (Most Versatile Player) and sophomore Katie Wrench (Coaches Award). In his first season leading the team, Kurtz was named Bayside South Coach of the Year.

“It is very humbling. The girls exceeded all expectations,” he said. “We set team goals and just kept checking them off. I learned a lot early on in the season and some bumps in the road helped me learn quickly what See FIRST Page 91

Drummond, Smith, Janney and Rayne prepped for states Continued from Page 89 he gets to states and is standing in the pit, it might hit him then, he added. “I know there’s some people that throw way further than me, but I just want to place top three,” he said. He hopes to throw around 46-47 feet. “This year I threw 43 feet but I’ve been practicing with the college shot, so I feel like I’m getting stronger,” he said. “I just need to have a mindset of saying even though those guys might be topping me in the first two or three throws, right before finals I just got to do my own thing and worry about beating myself rather than everybody else.”


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Ocean City Today

First-year coach feels ‘blessed’ Continued from Page 90 my players needed from me to succeed.” Kurtz said he truly believe in building up people and allowing them to lead and flourish. “My assistant coaches, senior captains and other players found their way to make positive impacts on our team and season in their own ways,” he said. “I just tried to foster that positive atmosphere. Now, the bar has been set and we need to work very hard to reach that bar next year

and hopefully surpass it.” One of the big accomplishments this season was winning a Bayside Conference championship. It was the fourth time in the program’s history the team captured the title. The last year the team won the championship was in 2000, which was before any of the current players were born. The Seahawks also took home the award in 1991 and 1998. “What a special group. We did something that was so special, it

hadn’t been done in a long time, in their lifetimes,” he said. “I was so thankful to be a part of it. Any small role I played in helping them get there I’m proud of it. “I’m blessed. I hope I can sustain the success we had and find a way to continue it, because it’s fun,” he added. LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur senior captain Alexis Black gives it her all on the mound during last Tuesday’s 3A East Region Section II playoff game against Northeast in Berlin.

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Decatur tennis players battle in regional tourney By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (May 24, 2019) Eight tennis players represented Stephen Decatur during the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association 3A East Region tournament last week. All but the mixed doubles team lost in their first match. Freshman Noah Fisher and junior Laura Meadows competed in the singles tournament. Sophomores Aaron Cohen and Micah Bourne, and junior Sarah Haskell and senior Sofia Gordy, battled in doubles competition. The six Seahawks played last Thursday at Wilde Lake Tennis Club in CoSee DECATUR Page 93

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Seahawks fall in state semifinals By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (May 24, 2019) The Stephen Decatur girls’ lacrosse team faced tough competition during the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association 3A state semifinals last Friday at Mt. Hebron High School, falling to the Westminster Owls, 155. “They were very skilled all over the field and very fast,” Decatur Coach Sara Braniecki said. “The girls hung with them. We were quickly down 30. Then after a timeout, the girls went out and tied it at 3-3. However, after that, they pulled away from us.” Junior Sarah Engle scored three goals for Decatur. Juniors Elizabeth Dutton and Katie Mitchell had one goal each. Junior goalie Isy Kristick recorded nine saves. Westminster went on to capture its second consecutive 3A state title with a 15-9 victory over C. Milton Wright. Decatur went 7-5 during the regular season and finished with a 10-6 overall record. The Lady Seahawks won the 3A East Region championship last Wednesday to advance to the state semifinals. It was the team’s fifth regional title in the last six years, seventh this

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decade, and the ninth in the last 14 seasons. Braniecki said the season was fun and filled with growth. “Midway through the season, I’m not sure many people Sara Braniecki would have predicted us winning a regional championship and heading to the state semifinals,” she said. “But there was one thing we held on to as a team – we always, always work hard and continue to get better until the last game. And they did that.” Braniecki said the Seahawks peaked during playoffs, many girls on an individual level as well as the team overall. “We had three days of practice between our Bayside championship game and our first playoff game, and we had a talk about committing and leaving the field each day better than we were at the beginning of practice. That’s what they did,” she said. The team will graduate three players: four-year starters Logan Townsend and Kennedy Duke, and Kailey Andrew. “Kennedy is a defender [and] Logan is a midfielder that will play wherever we need her,” Braniecki

said. The pair were also team captains this year. “[Defender] Kailey Andrews has been on varsity for two years and is the constant positive vibe and smile,” she said. “The coolest thing about her is that when she wasn’t a starter as a senior, she kept working so hard every single day and was playing more and more at the end of the season. That’s a strong kid with good character.” Engle led the team in points this year with 66. She scored 49 goals and had 17 assists. She also controlled 64 draws. Over her career, Engle tallied 84 goals. Sophomore Brittyn Lyra Leonard finished the season with 61 points (17 goals, 44 assists). Junior Alyssa Romano had 31 goals and eight assists. Freshman Darby Moore contributed 15 goals and 10 assists. Braniecki presented team awards to: Moore (Rookie of the Year), Romano (Most Improved), Townsend (Unsung Hero), Duke (Coaches Award), Engle (MVP) and Andrews (Sportsmanship Award). Only graduating three players, Braniecki thinks the team will be solid for the 2020 season. She is excited and looking forward to next year.

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Ocean City Today

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Decatur tennis squads to return core group Continued from Page 92 lumbia. Seniors and team captains Jonathan Petito and Grace Beres teamed up for mixed doubles. The Decatur duo took on a pair from James M. Bennett in Salisbury last Friday. Beres and Petito lost the first set, 46. “We told them to take some chances,” said Jamie Greenwood, coach of the Decatur girls’ team. The Decatur team won the next set, 6-2. “They stepped up and took advantage of [Bennett players’] errors,” Greenwood said. “They played smart, but they played aggressive.” Since each team won a set, the competition went into a tiebreaker. It was a back-and-forth battle, but Beres and Petito prevailed, 13-11. “They played well,” Greenwood said. The next day in Columbia, the duo lost their semifinal match, but won the consolation round, 6-2, 6-0. They finished in third place overall. “They played better the second set [in the semifinals],” said Steve Berquist, coach of the Decatur boys’ team. “They had to get right on the court when they got there. Once they were warmed up they played better.” Berquist said he was proud of the

pair. “They put up a good fight,” he said. In previous years, the tennis field was divided into districts for tournaments. This was the first year for a regional championship, which consisted of 1A, 2A, 3A and 4A classifications, which other sports already have. “I think we’re the last sport to have classifications,” Greenwood said. The girls’ team finished the season with a 10-4 record. “I was happy with [the season],” Greenwood said. The only schools the squad lost to were Bennett and Worcester Prep. The team will graduate three players – Beres, Gordy and Abby Crisanti. With a core group anticipated to return, Greenwood thinks the team will be strong next year. Because of the depth of talent, the girls will challenge each other and make each other better, he said. Greenwood presented awards to several players during the team’s recent banquet. Receiving recognition were: Beres and Gordy (MVP), Crisanti (Coaches Award), and sophomores Emily Stitely (Rookie of the Year), Sam Cummings (Most Spirited) and Melis Unal (Most Improved, Sportsmanship Award). The boys’ team also finished 10-4. “I was pleased with the season,”

Berquist said. “We competed well with Bennett and we beat Parkside twice this year, which was our goal.” The team lost twice to Bennett and Worcester Prep this year. “We were young in our lineup,” Berquist said. The team will graduate four players – Petito, Omar Omar, Kyle Shelton and Aaron Campbell. “We have a lot of kids coming back so I think we’ll be pretty good,” Berquist said.

The squad will lose just one of the four starting singles players. “A lot of them are planning to play in the offseason,” Berquist said. “If they do that I’m expecting them to come back better. It’s exciting.” Berquist presented accolades to: Fisher (MVP), Petito and Cohen (Coaches Award), Bourne (Rookie Award), Omar and Campbell (Doubles Award) and freshmen Jonathan Brandhuber and Ethan Hansford (Most Improved).

CHAMPS The Saltwater 2024 lacrosse team went 6-1 overall in the National Girls Lacrosse League championship, held April 7 in Pennsylvania and April 28 in New Jersey, to capture the title. They will have an opportunity to compete over Memorial Day weekend for the national title in Baltimore.


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MAY 24, 2019

OCMC Memorial Day tourney this weekend By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (May 24, 2019) Bluefish and bluefin tuna fishing is decent right now, just in time for the Ocean City Marlin Club’s 10th annual Memorial Day Tournament. “Tuna looks good. Bluefish looks good,” said Franky Pettolina, Ocean City Marlin Club president and tournament co-director. Last weekend, Pettolina said a good number of bluefin tuna were caught, ranging from 70 to 80 pounds. Most hooked, he added, were between 30 and 50 pounds. “Many boats caught their limit [and then] released extras,” he said. For private boats, the limit is two bluefin tunas ranging from 27 inches to less than 47 inches, and one from 47 to less than 73 inches. For charter boats, it’s three and one, Pettolina added. The tuna have been landed offshore between the Baltimore and Washington canyons. Pettolina said about the last 10-12 years right around this time is when the bluefin tuna show up in the area. Yellowfin tuna have been spotted, but no quality keepers, he added. Bluefish are much closer to shore, Pettolina said. Anglers have been catching quality-size bluefish be-

tween the Route 50 bridge and the inlet. “It’s as good as it has ever been for the spring [in the bay],” he said. “It’s been spectacular, and some big fish too, like seven to eight pounds.” A number of boats met their limit of 10 bluefish per person over the past week, Pettolina added. Registration for the 2019 tournament begins at 6:30 p.m. today, Friday, at the Marlin Club on Golf Course Road in West Ocean City. A captains’ meeting will follow at 8 p.m. Anglers do not have to be Marlin Club members to participate. The boat entry fee is $300 (for four anglers). Participants will fish one of two days: Saturday, May 25 or Sunday, May 26. A portion of the entry fee will again be donated to the Catherine & Charles Kratz Memorial Foundation and Scholarship Fund, which provides support, encouragement and a better life for veterans. Weigh-ins will take place at Sunset Marina in West Ocean City on Saturday and Sunday from 4:30-7 p.m. Prize money will be awarded to anglers who hook the three heaviest fish in the bluefish and tuna divisions. Added entry-level calcuttas, or side wagers, ranging in cost from $100-$500 are available for bluefish

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and tuna. Participating in the additional calcuttas increase the prize money payout for top fish. An awards banquet will take place on Sunday from 6:30-9 p.m. at the club. Four banquet tickets are included with each boat entry fee. The cost for each additional ticket is $15. “As long as we have good weather I think we’ll have a good tournament,” Pettolina said. “I hope we have a good turnout so we can raise some money for a good cause.” Anglers on nine boats fished in less than desirable weather conditions

during the ninth annual Memorial Day Tournament last year, and $2,880 was paid out to the winners. The Spring Mix II crew took first place in the tuna division with a 43.6pound yellowfin. They were awarded $1,980. The Husevo team landed a 43.4pound yellowfin, good for second place and $756. The Brenda Lou crew came in third place with a 40-pound yellowfin. The group received $144. No bluefish were caught. For information, call 410-2131613.

COLLEGE ATHLETE Worcester Preparatory School senior Virginia Bateman of Rehoboth Beach, Delaware, officially committed to play Division III field hockey at Sewanee: The University of the South in Tennessee. She is pictured with her mother, Ann Bateman, and father, Tjark.


MAY 24, 2019

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5/24/19 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

5/24/19 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...