Page 1

TECH TRAINING: A new West

JOB FAIR: Thousands of job

OC business aims to prepare children, young adults and even senior citizens for careers in technology PAGE 32A

seekers are expected to interview this weekend for seasonal and year-round positions PAGE 45A

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: BUSINESS . . . . . . . . . . 45A CLASSIFIED . . . . . . . . . . 1C ENTERTAINMENT . . . . . . 5B LEGALS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6C

LIFESTYLE . . . . . . . . . . . 1B OPINION . . . . . . . . . . . 20A OUT&ABOUT . . . . . . . . . 17B SPORTS . . . . . . . . . . . . 39A

HERE COMES PETER COTTONTAIL! EASTER EVENTS OUTLINED ON PAGE 1B

Ocean City Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.NET

MARCH 29, 2013

Eure named 2013 Teacher of the Year

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Tasers may be tip of budget iceberg as city hits perilous FY-13 waters ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer

Karen Eure was named Worcester County’s 2013 Teacher of the Year last Friday at the school district’s annual award banquet at the Clarion. With 25 years of experience teaching kindergarten at Snow Hill Elementary School, Eure was selected as the best of a group of 14 county-level finalists — one from each of the county’s schools. She will now serve as Worcester’s candidate in the Maryland Teacher of the Year competition. See full story on Page 3A.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

MD. BILL COULD CHANGE LOCAL LIQUOR, NIGHTLIFE LANDSCAPE Casino to get extended sales hours in exchange for wholesaler freedom ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) A policy change working its way through Annapolis could have a big impact on the resort area’s bars and nightlife, further loosening restrictions on Berlin’s Ocean Downs casino while also changing the game

for liquor purveyors and regulatory agencies in a threeway deal. The Maryland State Senate is still working through the details of Senate Bill 949, while the House of Delegates has passed House Bill 999. The two bills are similar, although the Senate version – See EF LICENSE on Page 28A

Casino at Ocean Downs

(March 29, 2013) Tension over this spring’s impending budget difficulties appears to be on a rapid rise at City Hall, as a request this week to purchase Tasers for the Ocean City Police Department ignited a largely philosophical “If we try to debate that saw both sides of tackle a $4.5 council’s erstmillion budget while aisle objecting to City gap with $11,400 Manager worth of Tasers, David Recor’s we’re going to assertion of factual information. be here until “If we try to this time next tackle a $4.5 million budget gap budget year.” with $11,400 OCEAN CITY MANAGER worth of Tasers, DAVID RECOR we’re going to be here until this time next budget year,” said an exasperated Recor. Although that number — $4.5 million — is largely speculative, it has become clear that the city’s overall deficit for the upcoming 2014 fiscal year is going to be larger than the $1.5 million Recor had projected earlier this month. “That $1.5 million was a neutral budget,” Recor explained. “That’s if none of our departments make any further funding requests. But there are obviously other factors being taken into account as we go forward in this process.” Despite this week’s light legislative agenda, the council spent a great volume of time discussing a request by OCPD Capt. Greg Guiton to buy an additional See COUNCIL on Page 29A


Ocean City Today

2A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

NEWS 3A

SHES’s Eure named 2013 Worcester County Teacher of the Year Twenty-five year teaching veteran will now move on to Maryland competition ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) Karen Eure, a 25year kindergarten teaching veteran at Snow Hill Elementary School, was named Worcester County’s 2013 “Teacher of the Year” last Friday during a banquet at the Clarion Hotel in Ocean City. “I am stunned and amazed to be here representing the most wonderful group of teachers anywhere in the country,” Eure said. “You are the ones who make this the best job in the world.” Every year, the state of Maryland charges each of its 24 school districts — 23 counties, plus Baltimore City — with selecting a top teacher to serve as a candidate alongside teachers from other districts in the contest for Maryland Teacher of the Year. At each of the county’s 14 public schools, a selection committee of administrators is formed to receive nominations for that school’s best teacher. Following a review, the committee selects one nominee to represent the school at the county level. All 14 candidates were present at last

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

Worcester County’s 2013 Teacher of the Year award winner Karen Eure, right, is congratulated by fellow candidate Arlene Hager, of Showell Elementary School, during the Teacher of the Year banquet held last Friday in Ocean City.

week’s culminating event, along with their families and colleagues, not knowing which one of them would be named the winner following an intensive selection process earlier this year. A panel, consisting of former county teachers as well as education professionals from local universities, made the selection based on a 1,200-point rubric involving work sam-

ples as well as in-person interviews. Before Eure’s name was announced, 2012 Teacher of the Year Tony Bevilacqua delivered the evening’s keynote address, in which he encouraged teachers to not lose sight of how profound an impact their dedication can have. Bevilacqua cited a recent study by famed Harvard University economist

Raj Chetty, “which suggested that if a student, in their K-12 experience, can have just one teacher that is a top five percent teacher – in other words, a Worcester County teacher – that the impact of having such a high quality teacher translates to an additional $9,000 in earnings per year.” “It literally puts dollar signs on good lesson plans, which is something that we as teachers tend to forget,” Bevilacqua said. “The study proves that what we do is an investment in our children and our communities.” Bevilacqua noted that he had worked in several other school districts, but always saw working in Worcester as a step up, and applied for jobs in the county several times before he was given a position. Elsewhere, he said, many teachers “had forgotten that what they do is an art form.” Worcester County Board of Education President Bob Rothermel echoed the sentiment. “John Steinbeck is credited as saying, ‘I’ve come to believe that a great teacher is a great artist, and that they are as few in number as any of the other great visual artists,’” Rothermel said. Eure was presented with the award by County Commissioner Virgil Shockley, two of whose children Eure has taught during her tenure. See EURE on Page 11A

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Ocean City Today

4A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

Questionable summer conditions on city buses draws concerns June 2013 scheduled to be most event-heavy in resort history ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) Like the ghost of sickness past, the resort’s recurring concern about the questionable summertime conditions on its buses resurfaced in City Hall last week, reigniting last summer’s spat over bus safety amid growing concern’s over the resort’s packed schedule this summer. Further, despite an ongoing element of popular fear over violent behavior on public transportation, it was also reaffirmed this week that the major toll on resort buses and bus drivers is not intentional physical destruction, but violations of a more fluid nature. “Last year was not a bad year [for property loss],” said Transportation Superintendent George Thornes. “Did we have some problems, yes … but we’ve have much worse years than that.” However, Thornes noted, “there were more clean-ups interior-wise last year than we’ve had in the past nine years.”

When there seemed to be some confusion as to what interior clean-ups entailed, Thornes clarified the issue to be “bodily fluids.” In a somewhat perverse sign of its own success, the popularity of the bus system’s ability to safely – and cheaply – ferry tired and intoxicated riders around the island appears to be indicated largely by the increasing volumes of urine and vomit mopped up off its floors. The city has always struggled with the inherently rowdy nature of the buses, which were implemented with the express purpose of keeping intoxicated tourists off the streets and from behind the wheel. But its use by teenage visitors – particularly those participating in the Play it Safe program – has often been at the center of the debate. Play it Safe, currently approaching its 24th season, offers free events designed to keep the high school-age revelers who flock to the resort in June away from illicit activities. It also provides them with wristbands good for free bus fare Last year, after former Councilman Joe Hall suggested that bus safety was becoming a concern, other city officials suggested that the mass dissemination of Play it Safe wristbands was the culprit, sparking a row over the popular

program, of which Hall is a major supporter. Last week, Councilman Dennis Dare again broached the issue, when the application for Play it Safe’s 2013 activities came up for approval. “I do have one concern and that has to do with the behavior on the buses,” Dare said. “The loss of buses from service when windows are broken or rails are removed … and more so, the drivers that come on board in the spring and quit soon after [is a problem].” But Councilman Brent Ashley was quick to note that, during last year’s same debate, he, Hall and City Manager David Recor had ridden the bus during the wee hours of the morning and observed that Play it Safe participants were not the problem during the peak times of risk for destructive behavior and for, more critically, circumstances that require a mop-up crew. “I think the bottom line was that there wasn’t that much damage or vandalism in June,” Ashley said. “There weren’t a lot of wristbands that night we rode the bus,” Recor said. “The behavior at the time was not related to participation in the Play it Safe event.” The problem, it seems, does not lie with any specific demographic group and instead with the sheer volume of riders, typically spurred on by the in-

creasing concentration of events in June. After the weekend of the 2012 OC Air Show, which also coincided with a massive car show and multiple sports tournaments, Thornes reported that bus ridership was up by 14,256 riders, a 16.2 percent increase over the 2011 air show. Furthermore, the peak of that weekend saw 87 bus deployments over a 24-hour period, the biggest in the town’s history. Each deployment represents one bus and driver for an 8-hour shift, and since the city owns fewer than 87 buses, some vehicles had to be cleaned and prepped rapidly for multiple shifts in one day. Conversely, over a winter weekend, the city might have only five deployments in 24 hours. With June 2013 scheduled to be the most event-heavy in the resort’s history – “slammed,” according to Recor – the problem will likely only increase, as the resort tries to cover more ground with a smaller workforce due to the hour restrictions imposed by the federal Affordable Care Act. “I would just ask that they [Play it Safe’s organizers] be very diligent in dispensing the wristbands, to make sure it’s to participants,” Dare said. “The young adults that come and participate in the events aren’t the problem, they’re the responsible ones.”

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MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

NEWS 5A

Tram wraps denied, but MGH will press Old Bay in resort ads ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) Although the city has decided not to accept a proposal to swaddle its trams in Old Bay ad copy, the agency for the purveyor of America’s favorite crustacean garnish – and happens to be the city’s own marketing contractor – will be pressing forward with an increased advertising presence in the resort area. “We were disappointed, but it’s not the end of the world,” said Andy Malis, president of MGH Advertising. “There are a bunch of different things that they [McCormick & Co.] are going to be doing in town to promote Old Bay.” Two weeks ago, the City Council was presented with an unsolicited plan to increase the scope of its transit advertising. Direct Media, the contractor who sells advertising space on transportation equipment on the city’s behalf, requested the change to its contract in response to interest in buying full-body advertising wraps for the trucks that pull the Boardwalk tram cars. Although some elected officials seemed supportive of the idea in principle, there was some unease as to the proper value of a product that had never been bid competitively. The council decided to go back to the table to negotiate a more comprehensive pricing struc-

ture, but those discussions between the city and its advertising contractors apparently proved unfruitful. Currently, the trucks that pull the tram cars feature no advertising. The roofs of the towed passenger cars do have ads, to be viewed by ocean-side hotel patrons. The city’s fleet of buses features full-body advertising graphics, which is what McCormick would like to purchase for the tram trucks. The city’s contract with Direct Media presently does not solicit such advertising on the tram trucks, but could be amended to include such. Although MGH already works with the city, with a budget of more than $4 million, to coordinate its advertising to visitors outside the resort, Direct Media’s contract meant that MGH was unable to do internal transit marketing on its own accord. “We approached them because they’re the only ones allowed to sell the space,” Malis said. MGH’s offer to Direct Media was $24,000 for the 110 calendar days that the tram operates. Under the contract it has with Direct Media, the city receives a 60 percent profit share of the proceeds, which would be $14,400. This pricing is similar to that seen for the city’s bus wraps. But there was debate on the council as to how much more exposure – and how much added monetary value – the tram wraps of-

fered over their bus counterparts. Given that the trams move much slower, and tend to stand out to the Boardwalk’s even slower-moving pedestrian audience, the consensus seemed to be that their advertising value was greater. “I’m not sure that Direct Media shouldn’t have come to us first to discuss what the value of that would be before they moved in that direction [to establish a price with MGH],” said Mayor Rick Meehan. “Really, they’ve come to us with the proposal. I’m not sure that the revenue equals the exposure.” There was also some question as to whether such heavy branding would benefit the resort’s image. “I know that this is part of an overall advertising plan for Old Bay in our area that will bring even more ‘talk’ [to the resort],” said Council Secretary Mary

Knight. “It is a revenue source … Old Bay is very significant in this area. It’s an extremely well-known brand.” However, city Public Works Director Hal Adkins noted that the contract for transit advertising will be coming up for bid again after this summer, at which time it would be easy for the city to add tram wraps into the agreement. “Direct Media may get it again, I don’t know, but I would expect any enhancements to the product they’re allowed to sell would be discussed with whoever gets the contract,” Adkins said. In the mean time, Malis said that he is continuing with a large-scale marketing plan for Old Bay in the resort area, which is likely to be rolled out to the public soon. “I think we’re about a week away from getting all the approvals through [from McCormick],” Malis said.

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Ocean City Today

6A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

Sullivan retires fromOC Rec and Parks Dept. after 14 years ‘Sully’ credited for success forresortevents,including Sundaes, Art’s Alive, ’fests

Ocean City Councilwoman Mary Knight presents John “Sully” Sullivan with a key to the city during a recent City Council meeting. Sullivan is retiring from the Recreation and Parks Department after 14 years.

(March 29, 2013) Special Events Director John Sullivan has retired after more than 14 years with the Town of Ocean City. Sullivan, who joined the town in March 1999, has spent his career working in the Recreation and Parks Department’s Special Events division. Since joining the Town of Ocean City, Sullivan, who is affectionately known as “Sully” by his colleagues, was responsible for the success of

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countless events in the resort town, including Sundaes in the Park, Concerts on the Beach, Art’s Alive and numerous Springfests, Sunfests and Winterfests. While his formal responsibilities included planning, coordinating and executing the town’s various special events, he was also responsible for managing hundreds of private events within Ocean City. “I am most grateful for the opportunity to serve the residents and many guests in Ocean City,” said Sullivan. “I will miss the many wonderful and professional employees of the town, but most of all I will miss the members of the Special Events division.” Sullivan has a bachelor and masters of education from the University of Delaware and had a one-year fellowship at Stanford University in National Security Strategy. Before joining the Town of Ocean City, he served 30 years in the United States Army, where he began his career in 1969. His plans after retirement include enjoying his children, grandchildren, playing golf and going to the beach. “I am going to miss my time as an employee of the Town of Ocean City,” he said, “but I am excited to enjoy every day being a Saturday.”

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MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

NEWS 7A

OC Council establishes hard schedule for commission system ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) After a somewhat uncertain two months since their controversial reinstatement, the City Council’s legislative subcommittee and commission system appears to be back on solid ground, as city government has established a formal schedule for their meeting and reporting. According to City Manager David Recor, the council’s sub-bodies will work on a monthly rotation. At the first regular meeting of the full council each month, the council will review the agendas for that month’s upcoming sub-committee meetings. The sub-committee sessions will then happen the following week, and reports and recommendations will be brought back before the full council at the regular session of the week after that. “We want to make sure these minutes are reviewed and distributed effectively,” Recor said last week. For example, the agendas for the April committee and commission meetings will be reviewed at the April 1 council session. The Police Commission will then meet the following Monday, April 8, at 9 a.m. The Tourism Commission will meet April 8 at 1 p.m., and the Recreation and Parks Committee April 9 at 4 p.m. The full council will hear reports from the groups at the April 15 session.

The dissolution of the council’s standing committees was the first action taken by the four-member majority that came to be in 2010 after Councilman Joe Mitrecic lost his re-election bid to Councilman Brent Ashley. Mitrecic’s ouster allowed Ashley – along with Joe Hall, Margaret Pillas, and Jim Hall – to create a four-member voting bloc that openly bucked the previous administrative norms. The oft-called “new majority” developed a relationship of mutual antagonism with Dennis Dare, then the city manager and now a council member, and Mayor Rick Meehan. In November 2010, the victors’ first act was to dissolve the council’s commission system, whereby separate sub-committees of three council members heard reports from city staff or interested parties and presented the information back to

the full council for any decision necessary. All reports were to be presented in open session, before the entire body. The so-called new majority, however, said that procedure was not always followed, leaving some members out of the loop. Despite the removal of the dominant faction in the 2012 polls, in which Hall and Hall lost to Dare and a returning Mitrecic, the commission system has continued to be a symbol of political discontent. The surviving members of the 2010 majority submit that the commission system reduces transparency by developing policy in ad-hoc legislative groups, some of whom became quasi-autonomous and politically factionalized, rather than before the empowered body. But proponents of the system’s return argue that the additional input garnered makes for richer legislative action, rather

than forcing even exploratory issues before the whole council for a policy debate. At the beginning of February this year, the council voted 5-2 to return to the pre-2010 legislative system. During recent strategic planning sessions, however, a middle ground seemed to be apparent between both sides over the way information came back up the chain to the full council. “This is about making a system to ensure the information flows as it should,” Recor said at a recent council session. “As you know, I’m a systems kind of guy.” However, there was continued discontent this past week, as the council again voted 5-2 to amend the membership of the town’s Pension Trustees’ Board to include just the mayor and council president, after it had been expanded to the whole council in 2010.

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Ocean City Today

8A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

Emergency Services more about politics, fewer delayed calls ZACK HOOPES ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) The results of recently released inquiry into issues with the city’s emergency dispatch system has left more questions than it has answers, regarding exactly how the local government’s internal politics are steering its ability to address operational issues. The report, which has only now been disseminated to city officials, is the result of a review conducted at the city’s request this past fall by the International City/County Management Association’s Center for Public Safety Management. The report cites, as its impetus, “ongoing complaints about the [emergency services] department’s performance emanating from the agencies it serves.” In Ocean City, the emergency dispatch and 911 call center is a separate entity from both the police and fire departments, and is run under the supervision of the Emergency Services Department, which also coordinates the resort’s disaster planning and recovery functions. Incoming calls are routed by Emergency Services staff to the appropriate response unit. The ICMA inquiry was reportedly ordered in August, in response to concerns that had been building over the summer of 2012 and were subsequently brought before the City Council.

“The council voted unanimously to ask the ICMA to come in and look at our call center,” said Council Secretary Mary Knight. “It was something that was overdue, something that should be done every year or so.” However, the inquiry itself does not make clear what the specific nature of any dispatch failures were. The report does note that the Ocean City Fire Department recorded 10 instances of delays in response times that could have compromised public safety during 2011. “There had been several issues with calls,” Knight said. “A lot of those are day-to-day management issues that aren’t part of the council’s dealings.” Emergency Services Director Joe Theobald is currently attending a conference and was unable to contribute as of press time. “I know there were some concerns,” said former Ocean City Police Department Chief Bernadette DiPino, who was chief at the time but did not take part in the inquiry due to her impending departure for the chief’s post in Sarasota, Fla. “I don’t remember all the specifics relative to it, but one of the things I was concerned about was making sure, when someone calls into communications, the dispatcher gets enough information and enough accurate information to give our officers,” DiPino said. “There were a lot of reasons going into it, but that’s why

the group was convened to ask if communications had all the best practices in place.” But the specifics of these allegedly botched calls themselves do not appear to have been investigated. Instead, the bulk of the report is based upon interviews with OCPD, OCFD, and Emergency Services management staff regarding their working relationship, or lack thereof, with one another. This has led several city officials to wonder privately why the town paid $17,000 for a consultation on personal politics, even though they seemingly pertained little to the core issues outlined by the city at the beginning of the report. According to the ICMA document, city staff participating in the review noted a number of issues centering on funding and training for seasonal emergency dispatch operators, including points such as “summer staff members do not receive sufficient training” and “supervisors become involved in working a console during staffing shortages, interfering with their ability to supervise other personnel.” It also notes a long-lingering conflict between the city and Worcester County’s emergency dispatch system. Under the current setup, all 911 calls identified as originating in the county – including Ocean City – are routed through the public service answering system in Snow

Hill. In the case of Ocean City calls, these are then re-routed to the town’s own dispatch center at 65th Street. The extra step reportedly often causes delays or disconnections. “The director of emergency services has made requests in the past to view the dispatch information from Snow Hill, but has been denied access to this information,” the report said. However, all of the ICMA’s recommendations to improve the city’s dispatch performance focus on another issue – the observation that “communication between the fire departments and the Emergency Services Department was very poor. “This situation appears to have been declining over the past five years,” the report notes, noting the testimony of OCFD officials who “did not trust” Emergency Services leadership and thought they were “unable to handle [their] job responsibilities.” This prickly relationship over the past five years is well recognized within the city’s ranks. In 2007, allegations arose that the city was planning to place Theobald, as the Emergency Services director, over both the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company and an expanded paid fire corps, and whose operational directives would supersede those of the volunteer company. See REPORT on Page 33A

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

NEWS 9A

Local photographer candidate for 2013 LLS ‘Man of theYear’ LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Man and Woman of the Year is a national campaign that has taken place for 23 years. Maryland/Baltimore has participated for 21 years, but this is the first time the Eastern Shore has its own campaign and local photographer Nick Denny is in Nick Denny the running. Each year, in communities across the country, candidates compete to earn The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society’s “Man & Woman of the Year” titles by raising funds for blood cancer research. They garner donations in honor of local children who are blood cancer survivors, the Boy & Girl of the Year. Every dollar counts as one vote and the titles are awarded to the man and woman with the most votes at the end of 10 weeks. The top local fundraisers in the country win the national titles. Jennifer Veil, The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society “Man and Woman of the Year” Eastern Shore campaign coordinator, was familiar with Denny’s photography and since he is well known in the local community, she thought he would be a good candidate. Veil said she didn’t realize he had a personal connection. “I personally have been touched by blood cancer twice. The mother of a very close friend of mine whom we all dearly loved was diagnosed with leukemia and unfortunately lost her brave battle a few years ago,” Denny said on his campaign page www.mwoy.org/pages/md/mdes13/ nickdenny. “It was a devastating loss to so many people. She was a wonderful neighborhood ‘mom’ to so many of us. My grandfather is also a leukemia survivor and we are all so thankful that he was able to benefit from life-saving research.” “Upon learning of all the ways that

blood cancer research funded by LLS is not only advancing the cure for blood cancers by helping patients live longer healthier lives, but also helping other cancers and autoimmune diseases like diabetes and lupus, I knew I wanted to help,” he continued. Four men and four women are vying for the Eastern Shore titles. For more information and to donate to Denny’s campaign, visit www.mwoy.org/ md and click the “Eastern Shore” link. On the left side of that page is the “Meet the Candidates” tab. Click on the tab and Denny is the first candidate listed and the only one from Ocean City. Click on “donate” under his picture to view his page and personal story. His goal is to raise $25,000. “I’m honored they asked me to do it,” the 27-year-old West Ocean City resident said. Denny is not only a photographer, but he also is a sales representative for Coastal Surf Supplies in West Ocean City. “I’m stoked to raise some money for someone who needs it,” he said. Visitors can donate, become a sponsor or purchase tickets to the gala on his page. The competition began March 14 and will conclude May 23. The grand finale celebration gala, where the winner will be announced, will take place May 23, at the Chesapeake Bay Beach Club in Stevensville, from 7-10 p.m. Candidates are asked to take auction items to the event and money raised will benefit their campaign. Denny said he also plans to host an art show and a few other fundraising events in the coming weeks. He will post upcoming event on his Facebook page, “Nick Denny Photography.” The mission of The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society is to cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families, according to www.lls.org. LLS is the world’s largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the world and provides free information and support services.

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Ocean City Today

10A NEWS

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MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

NEWS 11A

Renovations by the Ocean

State bottle fee legislation dies in committee, despite sponsor AKEXANDER PYLES ■ The Daily Record Newswire (March 29, 2013) Legislation that would have imposed a refundable 5-cent fee on bottle and can purchases to encourage recycling was defeated by two House of Delegates committees on Monday. House Bill 1085 received an unfavorable report from the House Environmental Matters Committee and House Economic Matters Committee — to which it was jointly assigned — despite Environmental Matters Chairwoman Maggie McIntosh, a Baltimore Democrat, being the bill’s lead sponsor. “There just wasn’t the support for it to pass this year,” said McIntosh, who joined her committee in voting 23-0 to prevent the legislation from being considered by the full House. The Economic Matters Committee had already voted 20-2 to give the bill an unfavorable report. The legislation faced an uphill battle this year due in part to the opposition of influential beverage and retail industry lobbyists in Annapolis. “The issue was heard and debated, and I think all agree Maryland can do better with recycling,” said Ellen Valentino, executive vice president of the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Beverage Association. “But there is a better way.”

McIntosh said lawmakers would study setting up a bottle deposit program over the summer in preparation for another attempt at passage next year. She also said she was hoping to roll the bottle deposit bill into a broader, no-waste plan being crafted by Gov. Martin O’Malley. McIntosh said she was already working with the governor’s staff on that plan. Opponents of the plan argued that creating a bottle deposit program was not necessary because many jurisdictions offer single-stream recycling, where bottles, cans, cardboard and other recyclables can be consolidated in one bin for pickup. Rather than promoting recycling, opponents said, the program would just enact a tax increase because neither local jurisdictions nor retailers would be willing to take on the burden of setting up a bottle and can redemption center. The bill, introduced in January in a press conference at Baltimore’s often bottle-strewn Inner Harbor, met the same fate that similar bills have in recent years. The bill was backed by the Glass Packing Institute, the Container Recycling Institute and the Chesapeake Bay Foundation. At the time, Recycling Institute President Susan Collins said studies showed financial incentives were effective in increasing recycling rates.

Md. breweries could soon sell beer on site AKEXANDER PYLES ■ The Daily Record Newswire (March 29, 2013) Craft beer drinkers could pull up a stool and have a pint at Maryland production breweries this summer under legislation passed by the House of Delegates on Saturday. House Bill 4, sponsored by Eastern Shore Republican Delegates Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio and Adelaide C. Eckardt, was approved 131-0. The bill would allow holders of a Class 5 brewer license to sell a certain amount of beer for on-site consumption. Presently, such licensees can only offer six 3-ounce samples and sell beer for off-site drinking.

The legislation now goes to the Senate, where a companion bill sponsored by Republican Sen. Richard F. Colburn is stuck in committee. A dozens breweries across Maryland — including Evolution Craft Brewing Co. and Eastern Shore Brewing, both of which operate in areas represented by Haddaway-Riccio and Eckardt — would benefit from the bill. So would state coffers. According to state fiscal analysts — who admittedly take some liberties in guessing how much beer might be sold and at what price — new combined sales and alcohol tax revenue could reach almost $60,000 a year.

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“Karen has a special place in my heart,” Shockley said. “She’s probably one of the most caring, loving individuals that I have ever met.” “We deeply, deeply appreciate everything that you do for Worcester County,” Commission President Bud Church said to all of the teachers in attendance. “Not only do you educate our children, but you make this place safe for our children. You make our commu-

nity proud, you make people want to buy homes, and make people want to live here.” Eure also received formal commendations from the Maryland State Senate and House of Delegates. “You read so many things about the world today, about what’s not right,” said Sen. Jim Mathias. “But I can tell you that I believe in tomorrow, in a brighter day, because of our children, our teachers, and their inspiration.”

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Ocean City Today

12A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

Local delegation wins approval of sponsored bills off site consumption. According to a summary of the bill, there are 22 certified alcohol awareness programs and 394 alcohol awareness instructors in the state. Legislative analysts estimated that businesses in Worcester County that pay for the $70 to $80 alcohol awareness training and which may need to train additional employees might incur a minimal amount of additional expenses as a result of the bill. Mathias also co-sponsored SB 1049, with Sen. John Astle (D-30) of Anne Arundel County, a bill that would exempt Ocean City apartment buildings and condominiums with 10 or more units from requirements that they provide for collection and removal of recyclable materials by Oct. 1, 2014. If the bill fails to be approved and enacted into law, building owners and managers would need to find waste and recycling contractors, which would be an added expense unless offset by tipping fees and revenues from the sale of recyclable materials. A third measure proposed by Mathias, SB 963, which establishes a task force to study a post-Labor Day start date for Maryland public schools, received a favorable final vote in the Senate on March 22. The third reading of the bill, which has been referred to the House Ways and Means Committee, was approved by a vote of 46-1.

SHEILA R. CHERRY ■ Associate Editor/Bayside Gazette (March 29, 2013) Monday marked the 76th day of the Maryland General Assembly’s 2013 session, which is the Opposite Chamber Bill Crossover Date or the deadline on which each chamber must send those bills it intends to pass to the other chamber. A bill proposed by Sen. Jim Mathias (D-38) that would modify the rules for beer, wine and liquor sales in Worcester County was unanimously approved by the Senate on March 22, after the Senate Education, Health, and Environmental Affairs Committee approved it with amendments the day before. The legislation (SB 949) would substantially increase the maximum fine for restaurants and bars that sell beer, wine and liquor during prohibited hours from $1,000 to $4,000, and require that personnel with alcohol awareness certification be on-site during hours when alcohol is sold or served. However, the law gives businesses a two-hour window of leeway from the alcohol awareness requirement when the certified employee must be absent for a bona fide personal or business reason, or for an emergency. The law change would apply to restaurants and bars with Class B or Class D “beer and wine,” or “beer, wine and liquor,” licenses that allow them to sell for on or

won Senate approval for on March 22. It too would modify the rules for beer, wine and liquor sales in Worcester County. McDermott chairs the delegation. It was approved in a final House vote of 137-0. McDermott’s proposed “Alex’s Law” (HB 1382), which generally requires courts to allow victim impact statements during trials where the defendant is found guilty of causing a traffic accident, won overwhelming approval in the House by a 133-0 vote. It was referred to the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee after a first reading in that chamber. In a statement after the House vote, McDermott said, “This bill proposal comes directly from an actual case in Maryland where a victim was severely injured in an automobile accident, but because of the accident, the victim was injured beyond the ability to make a statement to the court. The mother was there to testify with the victim about the incident’s impact, but they were not allowed to give the testimony because the defense objected to it and the judge didn’t find it practical to do so.” He said the bill would provide an opportunity for accident victims to mitigate what they believe has been wrongly done to them and more fully detail the impact of the incident to the trier of fact. The House also approved Delegate

Two bills sponsored by Delegate Norman Conway (D-38B) were approved by the House last week with no opposition. The proposal (HB 408) would expand the state tax law that provides a subtraction modification for conservation tillage equipment purchases. It would extend it to include manure spreading equipment, vertical tillage equipment, global positioning system devices used for management of agricultural nutrient applications, and integrated optical sensing and nutrient application systems, according to a summary of the bill. The House approved the bill March 21 on a third reading by a vote of 138-0. A second bill proposed by Conway, HB 1494, would allow the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services to use funds within its existing budget to accredit its correctional facilities through the American Correctional Association. The third reading for the standards for correctional facilities bill was approved by a vote of 134-0. A first reading occurred in the Senate March 25. Delegate Michael McDermott (R38B) won passage in the House for two bills he sponsored and saw passage of a proposal that he said he originally sponsored that failed only to be reproposed and approved with a Democrat sponsor. The Worcester County Delegation is the listed sponsor of HB 999, similar but not exactly like SB 949, which Mathias’

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

NEWS 13A

Statewide bills will affect Lower Shore SHEILA R. CHERRY ■ Assoc. Editor/Bayside Gazette (March 29, 2013) As members of the General Assembly scrambled to win passage of their respective proposals in time to meet the March 25 crossover deadline — when bills must at least be passed by the chamber where they originate — several proposals were approved that could affect the Lower Eastern Shore, though they were not proposed by local delegation. For example, House bills that were passed by that chamber last week included a medical marijuana proposal, a signage re-

quirement to make restaurant patrons aware of the potential for food allergies, a stricter sanction against driving with handheld communication devices and a protective measure for landlords trying to defend themselves in court from against nuisance actions caused by their tenants.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA The final House vote on a medical marijuana bill (HB 1101) was overwhelmingly approved on a vote of 108-28 on March 25. According to a legislative summary, the proposal would establish a Medical Marijuana Commission tasked with issuing requests for

applications for academic medical centers to operate medical marijuana compassionate use programs, establishing a review process for initial and renewal applications, and monitoring and providing oversight for approved programs. The legislation was sponsored by Delegate Dan Morhaim (D-11) of Baltimore County.

MENU ADVISORIES The House approved by a 1341 vote HB 9, which would require restaurants to post information on food allergies on signage in staff areas and on menus by Jan. 1, See HB9 on Page 22A

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Ocean City Today

14A NEWS

WORCESTER COUNTY BRIEFS NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) The Worcester County Commissioners discussed the following issues and took the following actions during their Tuesday, March 19, meeting.

Public hearing The commissioners scheduled a public hearing on septic tier mapping for April 16. Senate bill 236, known as the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012, seeks to limit the proliferation of major subdivisions in the state that are served by onsite septic systems. The law calls for mapping four tiers of land use categories that will identify where major and minor residential subdivisions may be located and what type of sewerage system will serve them. If septic tier maps are not adopted, no major

subdivisions will be permitted on septic anywhere in the county.

Lease agreement The commissioners approved a lease agreement for an Ocean City condominium on 112th Street for use by registered sanitarians, who will come from across the state to help during the tourist season in the resort. The sanitarians work for a week at a time conducting inspections of food service facilities in the county. The condominium is also available off-season to accommodate visiting physicians or training personnel. The cost of the annual lease is $12,500.

Proposals sought The Worcester County Local Management Board, also known as the county’s Initiative to Preserve Families, is asking for proposals for its fiscal year 2014 programs.

The programs will focus on the top five indicators decided by the community. They are poverty, substance abuse, behavior health, maltreatment and neglect and bullying and harassment. Vendors are to create programs that will positively affect these areas. At least one vendor must be used in each program plan. Funding to the Local Management Board is provided through the Children’s Cabinet and the Governor’s Office for Children.

Bids approved The commissioners awarded the work to replace the metal roofs on two equipment buildings at the Department of Public Works’ roads facility in Snow Hill, to Complete Homeowners Assistance LLC of Paradise, Pa., for the company’s low bid of $66,065. They also awarded the work for the installation of a pole building for equipment storage at the Department of Public Works’ road division facility in Berlin to the same company for its low bid of $47,667.14.

MARCH 29, 2013

The commissioners also approved the lease with Alban Tractor for an off-road truck for the landfill at a final cost to the county of $237,960.

Commendation The commissioners presented a commendation to Stephen Decatur High School sophomore Lucas Duker, who took the 3A Maryland State Championship indoor track high jump title for the 2012-2013 season. Duker cleared a 6-foot-high jump bar to win the title. He also claimed the 2013 Bayside Conference and 3A East Region high jump championship titles.

Wor. County does not want custody of some inmates NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) Worcester County officials will continue to accept all inmates delivered to the jail, space permitting, but it is no longer accepting custody of all of them. “We have no legal authority to hold them,” County Attorney Sonny Bloxom told the Worcester County Commissioners on March 19. Bloxom suggested the commissioners approve a memorandum of understanding with authorized municipal officials that states that the county jail will accept inmates arrested on an out-of-county or out-of-state warrant for temporary housing, but the inmate will continue to be in the custody of the arresting agency. Sometimes, Bloxom said, an officer with the Ocean City Police Department might arrest someone on an out-of-state warrant after doing a computer check on the individual. The officer would then take the person to the Public Safety Building for processing and then to the county jail in Snow Hill. “Ocean City is not set up to hold them,” Bloxom said. The person would remain at the county jail until picked up by an officer of the police department that obtained the warrant. If an inmate in the county’s custody requires medical attention, the county is financially responsible for it. If, however, that inmate is in the county jail, but in the custody of the arresting agency, that arresting agency would have the responsibility of the medical care. The memorandum of understanding was modeled after an existing state law that permits Maryland State Police to drop off an inmate at a county jail, but that agency would be responsible for that inmate. Bloxom said the cost of housing an inmate on a temporary basis is minimal. The jail provides good food for very little cost per inmate. Bloxom estimated the food cost at $2 or $3 per day. “It’s very cheap for us to keep someone there a couple of days,” he said. The commissioners voted unanimously to approve the memorandum of understanding.


MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

NEWS 15A

Department heads seek funds from commissioners for 2014 fiscal year NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) The Worcester County Commissioners heard good news and bad news during its budget session Tuesday with some department heads. “This is the fifth consecutive year I’m giving you a budget with reductions in expenditures,” said Ed Tudor, director of the Department of Development Review and Permitting, whose prime and most obvious function is the issuance of many types of permits. Additional work of the department includes monitoring legislation introduced during the Maryland General Assembly session, working with state agencies on various land use issues, maintaining and updating geographical data, issuing alcoholic beverage licenses, tracking and licensing nearly $2,500 coin-operated vending machines in more than 750 sites and providing damage assessments after storms. The department’s fiscal year 2013 budget is $1.78 million, but its requested budget for fiscal year 2014 is $1.69 million, or about $87,000 less. Part of the savings, Tudor said, has been possible because of the frequent use of e-mail instead of making multiple copies, sending faxes and making telephone calls. “We’re making use of electronic ways of handling things,” Tudor said. “Years ago, we photocopied everything. Now, there are no copies to staff. We just CC on e-mail and over the long haul, it adds up.” Another decrease is in the Parks section of the Recreation and Parks Department, which has its own requested budget of $392,146 for fiscal year 2014. That is 23.4 percent less than the current year’s budget of $511,703 and is due to the completion of a paving project at John Walter Smith Park in Snow Hill, which was paid for with Program Open Space funds awarded to the department by the state. At first glance, it looks as if the Recreation and Parks Department is seeking a huge increase in its Recreation division funds because Director Paige Hurley’s requested budget is $1.52 million, an 81.5

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Ocean City Today

16A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

Sheriff Mason requests central booking to save time and money Population growth in Worcester County leads to more calls for service NANCY POWELL â&#x2013; Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) The deputies of the Worcester County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office could get more work done if they did not have to spend so much time with paperwork after arresting suspects, Sheriff Reggie Mason told the Worcester County Commissioners on Tuesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just takes way, way too long,â&#x20AC;? he said, as he asked them to â&#x20AC;&#x153;consider central booking for us and the towns.â&#x20AC;? When a deputy makes an arrest, the required paperwork and trip to the

Sheriff Reggie Mason

Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office in Snow Hill can mean that he or she cannot do road patrol or respond to incidents for three hours. Although the deputy would still have to drive to Snow Hill if the requested change is made, that deputy â&#x20AC;&#x153;could be back on the road in 20 minutesâ&#x20AC;? be-

cause much of the paperwork would be done by others. The decision to have central booking is not up to the sole discretion of the county commissioners. The county must seek the approval of the state courts and the District Court commissioners, who would most likely be in favor of it because, Mason said, they are concerned about having to open the District Court in Ocean City or in Snow Hill at night when arrestees are brought in. Mason suggested that central booking be instituted at the county jail in Snow Hill. Even though it lacks sufficient space, Mason said, Warden Garry Mumford does have the personnel to do the job. The countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s municipalities also have shown interest in central booking,

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largely because of the time-saving factor, Mason said. Part of the problem, according to Mason, is because of the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth, particularly in the West Ocean City area, where there are increasing calls for service. Several new businesses have located there and a 78-unit hotel will be built. Between West Ocean City and Berlin are the Super WalMart and Home Depot with Ocean Landings II in construction. In addition to new businesses are new events, such as the upcoming Delmarva Chicken Festival in Snow Hill, which requires the use of deputies. Those events sometimes result in the need for overtime pay for deputies, who already have a heavy workload. There is no overtime pay for the 25 part-time deputies, many of whom are retired from the Ocean City Police Department. These part-timers provide security at Circuit Court and at the County Government Center in Snow Hill. Part-time deputies also transport inmates to and from various locales, including those on the other side of the Chesapeake Bay. As many as four Worcester County Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office vehicles have traveled over the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in one day, Mason said. Part-time deputies made 242 transports in 2011 and 289 in 2012. This resulted in 52,243 miles traveled in 2011 and 61,293 miles in 2012. Forty-two percent of those trips were because of arrests in Ocean City. As an example, if a person is jailed in Baltimore, but has charges in Ocean City, the City of Baltimore might drop its charges and release the inmate to face the Ocean City charges. This means deputies must travel to Baltimore to pick up the inmate and transport him to the jail in Snow Hill. Because of officer safety considerations, two part-time deputies are required for the trip. Although Mason did not give exact numbers, he said the number of hours spent providing security in courtrooms at Circuit Court has also increased. The number of jury trials has increased and the length of those jury trials has increased. In years past, court used to conclude at 1 p.m. or 2 p.m., and although it still concludes early on some days, on days when jury trials are held, the courtroom can be in use until 7 p.m. As it is, deputies have assignments that range from law enforcement and government security to process serving and evictions. Altogether, the Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office has 70 sworn personnel, eight clerical workers, one evidence manager, four Animal Control employees and seven crossing guards. In his budget request for fiscal year 2014, Mason is requesting $7.54 million, an increase of 42 percent over the fiscal year 2013 budget of $5.3 million. The largest portion of that increase would be for the 13 deputies to be hired to provide security at county schools.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

Commissioners continue to hear requests Continued from Page 15A

percent increase over the current $839,328 budget. That higher number, however, is due to a hefty infusion of Program Open Space funds. Those funds total $687,829 for the coming fiscal year. Finance Officer Harold Higgins told the commissioners that his news was neither good nor bad, but “neutral news.” Higgins’ department, the Treasury Department, which sends out and collects on more than 100,000 bills annually, as well as doing the county’s accounting and handling property transfers, has a requested budget of $865,138 or $382 less than its

current budget of $865,520. A sizeable increase was requested by Ken Whited, superintendent of the Maintenance Division of the Department of Public Works, which oversees the operations of 63 county-owned or leased properties with a staff of 17. The requested budget of $966,723 is 22 percent higher than the current budget of $794,530. The additional money, Whited told the commissioners, is needed for two additional staffers – a maintenance worker and an electrician – uniforms, equipment and a pole building “so our equipment does not sit out in the weather and get ruined.”

The commissioners will continue hearing budget requests from department heads during their next work session at 9 a.m. Tuesday, April 9. After additional work sessions, they will adopt the budget in June 4. Estimated revenues for fiscal year 2014 total $166.7 million, which is an increase of $853,906, over the current fiscal year. Requested general fund operating expenditures total $174.1 million. As the commissioners continue their work on the fiscal year budget, they must reduce expenditures, find additional revenue or a combination of the two to reconcile the shortfall of $7.37 million.

NEWS 17A


Ocean City Today

18A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

West OC Association plans clean-up for community activity NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) Area residents are invited to participate in the inaugural West Ocean City Clean-up Day on Sunday, April 7. Participants will work to clean up property at Seaside Christian Academy, land surrounding its athletic fields and Elliott’s Pond. Because Elliott’s Pond is known as a prime birdwatching site, Dave Wilson, executive director of the Maryland Coastal Bays Program and an avid birdwatcher, will be present to assist in bird identifications. The clean-up work could be used as service learning hours at schools and students are encouraged to participate. Volunteers are asked to meet in the parking lot at 12637 A Ocean Gateway, just west of the White Marlin Mall, at 12:45 p.m. to sign waivers and to be assigned to work groups. Suggested attire includes long pants, long-sleeved shirts, sturdy shoes and work gloves. Additional volunteers are being sought to provide light refreshments. The clean-up is sponsored by the Maryland Coastal Bays Program and organized by the West Ocean City Association. West Ocean City resident Chris Remmell, an association member, suggested the clean-up as a community activity dur-

PHOTO COURTESY MCBP

On March 22, members of the Maryland Coastal Bays Program, Maryland Conservation Corps and the Ocean City Recreation & Parks removed trash, undesirable vegetation and debris from the Park N Ride’s polishing pond in West Ocean City. Following recommendations from environmental consultant Spencer Rowe, eight bald cypress trees were also planted throughout the pond for shading and filtering purposes. The polishing pond provides all incoming water from the watershed area the opportunity for sediment settling before reaching the wetlands east of the facility.

ing the association’s dinner meeting at Pepper’s Tavern in February. She said it could become an annual event for the group. Youth, Remmell said, need to do service learning projects for school and they also

need to learn to give back to their communities. She has enlisted some children to volunteer in advance of the clean-up day by soliciting donations from local businesses and by helping to organize the event. “A lot of kids would like to do their

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community service projects for school outside,” she said. “This is a feel good project.” Since then, she and others have worked on the project to make it a reality. Remmell said a trailer and vehicles would be needed to take debris to the landfill and as a result, Ocean City resident Sue Vickers donated a trailer and residents Mike Maykrantz and Bud and Ally Church have donated the use of their vehicles to haul trash. For additional information or to sign up, contact Remmell at crmm@comcast.net. Members of the West Ocean City Association, primarily a social group that tackles occasional issues, planned to meet Thursday, March 28, for a social gathering at Sub Marina on Route 611. Its spring meeting to discuss any issues of concern is scheduled for Thursday, April 25, at the fire hall on Keyser Point Road. Prospective members are welcome. Membership to the West Ocean City Association is available to any resident or business in the areas north of Snug Harbor Road to Isle of Wight Bay and east of Holly Grove Road to the Sinepuxent Bay. Dues are $12 per person. Business memberships, at the same fee, are available for either the business manager or owner. For more information about the West Ocean City Association, contact Carolyn Cummins at 410-213-0586.

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

NEWS 19A

Funds eagerly anticipated for economic development in county tion,” Badger said of the partnership. Together, Anne Arundel and Worcester counties applied for $4.1 million. Worcester’s portion would be $500,000 yearly for five years or $2.5 million. Of Worcester’s yearly allotment, $400,000 would be available for loans and $100,000 would be available for equity investments. Badger said the application was strong and he expects it to be successful. “We’re looking hard to encourage entrepreneurship in the county,” Badger told the Local Development Council, which is mandated by the state to review local impact funds derived from gambling proceeds at the Casino

Badger tells council he is ‘optimistic’ application for money will be approved NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) Worcester County officials expect to learn in April whether an application for funds for economic development was successful. “I’m optimistic,” Economic Development Director Bill Badger told the Local Development Council during its meeting last week. “I’m looking forward to some good news.” In February, the Worcester County Commissioners approved the request of Meredith Mears, deputy director of the Department of Economic Development, to work with Anne Arundel County in seeking funds generated by casinos for grants targeting small and minority-owned businesses. All Maryland casinos contribute 1.5 percent of their proceeds to the grant program and Badger said last week that the fund now has about $7 million in it. “The total pot has gotten pretty large,” he said. The Maryland Board of Public Works is expected to approve grants of up to five years beginning July 1. The Anne Arundel Economic Development Corporation, where Badger used to work as its chief executive officer, approached him about the joint application in January. The partnership was advantageous because the Anne Arundel corporation has an in-house revolving loan fund program with staff that has experience working with Minority Business Enterprise contractors. “It only strengthened our applica-

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at Ocean Downs. Badger and Mears could use some assistance in letting people know about the funds that are expected to be available. “Part of the challenge is getting the word out,” Badger said. Badger is especially interested in letting the public know that Maryland’s definition of minority-owned businesses includes those owned by women. “That’s great,” said Jim Rosenberg, vice chairman of the Local Development Council, who was presiding over last week’s meeting in the absence of Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan. “There’s so much need for that money.”

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Ocean City Today

OPINION www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 20A

MARCH 29, 2013

Mayor, council face decision on deficit If they did nothing at all except pay the bills in the fiscal year ahead, Ocean City’s mayor and council at one point were looking at a shortfall of more than $1 million. That would be the cost of maintaining the same level of operations as last year versus the same level of income received in property taxes, fees and other sources. But that was last month. This week, it comes out that the deficit will be more in the vicinity of $4.5 million, presumably because of the yet-to-be announced raises and other considerations in the contracts between the city and the unions representing the police and firefighters. The Ocean City chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police has apparently ratified its contract, although city officials have not made it public, while the International Association of Firefighters local hadn’t decided as of last week whether to accept the city’s offer. In the meantime, it’s obvious that the city can’t give raises to those departments without doing something for general employees, who have been grinding their teeth for some time over the pay disparities between themselves and union members. This also is a preliminary budget figure that may or may not contain money for big projects or expenditures for major equipment upgrades or purchases. The full budget picture should be made public in two weeks or so, when City Manager David Recor presents in detail what kind of spending plan the mayor and council have obligated themselves to so far. Most probably, he also will ask them how they want to pay for it. This should prove to be an interesting exercise, since Recor is a manager who knows it’s not his job to make policy, but to implement the decisions that elected officials make. His role in this is neutral, while it will be up to the mayor and council to determine what happens next. The only certainty at this point is that someone is going to be paying more for something.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

MANAGING EDITOR ...................... Brandi Mellinger ASSISTANT EDITOR ............................ Lisa Capitelli STAFF WRITERS.......... Nancy Powell, Zack Hoopes ACCOUNT MANAGERS ...................... Mary Cooper, ...................................... Sandy Abbott, Julie Schmidt CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER .... Terry Burrier SENIOR DESIGNER .............................. Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ...... Corey Gilmore, Kelly Brown PUBLISHER .................................... Stewart Dobson ASSISTANT PUBLISHER ...................... Elaine Brady COMPTROLLER .............................. Christine Brown ADMIN. ASSISTANT .................................. Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net.

READERS’ FORUM

Writer questions funding request Editor, Recently, a local paper published an article highlighting Worcester County’s Public Schools’ request to the county to request from the state a “onetime non-recurring” additional $400,000 of funding, with more than half being applied to the advance of technology. Specifically, $200,000 of the budget is meant for computer tablets as a means to ready students for the PARCC Test (Partnership for the Assessment and Readiness for College and Careers). While I am generally pleased when funding is allotted for the purpose of education, do we really need to spend $200,000 (we don’t have) for an extraneous item that really seems more of a novelty than a necessity? That aside, the tablets will be used to assist students with passing an assessment that is supposedly designed to measure “common core” knowledge of language arts and mathematics. The Common Core State Standards initiative is a paper tiger to the failed No Child Left Behind program, changing the title certainly did not change the methods or practices of the organization. This program, working in conjunction with the

PARCC, says it is meant “to provide a consistent, clear understanding of what students are expected to learn, so teachers and parents know what they need to do to help them.” Perhaps my perspective is skewed, but if a teacher doesn’t know what his or her students need academically, perhaps he or she shouldn’t be a teacher? An educator needs a government institution to tell them how and what to teach so they can do it effectively? Sounds more like the common core is designed to teach educators how to do their job, since bad educators can’t be fired (thank you, Teacher’s Union). As a means to ensure the students are absorbing a curriculum the Common Core considers to be “robust and relevant to the real world,” the PARCC is tasked with creating an assessment to measure student progress. On the surface, the PARCC doesn’t seem so bad — measuring student progress and perhaps a means to regulate the Common Core itself? Until you learn the program was formed with government stimulus money, $186 million to be precise, and the “assessments” are tracking more than math scores. The tax money given to the PARCC could be spent on schools and students directly for the facilitation of learning, not on a program that allegedly creates a test to determine

if they are learning. As a means to track student progress, PARCC is amassing copious amounts of data on each student, details that prove invasive and unnecessary, especially if the data really is (as they say) meant strictly for monitoring academic progress. The assessments were supposedly designed to track language and mathematical competence, but they are also tracking things like “appreciation for diversity” and “flexibility.” How are either of these imperative to mapping a child’s academic progress? They are not. How can subjective things of this nature be measured objectively? They cannot. Maryland is implementing the Common Core standard in September 2013, and participates with the PARCC-as evident with the aforementioned funding proposal to assist with the assessment. We should be fighting against an educational institution that is a façade for more government control, as well as invading the most basic privacy of school children, that we as adults take for granted. Shakespeare said it best, “A rose by any other name …,” and while the regulation may be under a different guise it will still be as unproductive as the first implementation, and just as costly. Leigh Williams Berlin Continued on Page 21A


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

OPINION 21A

READERS’ FORUM

became, was during the shelter’s annual and biggest fundraiser, Boardwalkin’ For Pets. At this event, dog lovers are given an opportunity to “borrow” a dog from the shelter to walk. As a result, many of our dogs are able to participate. Shawnee was always in demand and never missed a chance to lead a parade. Two years ago, a young couple was awarded the opportunity to escort Shawnee in his main public appearance event. When they returned to the shelter with him afterwards, they spoke in amazement about all of the people along the way who knew Shawnee. Shawnee touched many lives and will continue to do so, thanks to the efforts of the Worcester County Humane Society. He epitomized the joy, love and friendship that the shelter affords to its residents and the people who are fortunate enough to be adopted by one or more of them. He will be missed and always remembered. Worcester County Humane Society Berlin

Continued from Page 20A

A sad loss for Worcester County humane society

By Stewart Dobson According to “The Book of General Ignorance,” which I read regularly in order to maintain the carefree existence that being ignorant provides, the continuing rise of health and lifestyle advisories and regulations are off the mark. Foisted on us by public busybodies, whose lives must be too clean and safe to be interesting, are warning labels, signs and other postings that we’re too heavy, too sedentary, that we shouldn’t drink large sodas, eat big burgers, smoke, consume alcoholic beverages and, most importantly for those of us who actually know what a book of matches looks like, to “Close Cover Before Striking.” The latter, of course, takes the sport out of the entire process. There’s nothing quite like setting yourself on fire to break the monotony. And yet, “The Book of General Ignorance” tells us that the single deadliest thing in the world is not eating, drinking or gradually seeping into the recliner fabric, but something much more treacherous: working. “Around two million people die every year from work-related accidents and diseases,” or so says this invaluable reference resource (which also reports elsewhere that Darwin once ate an owl for no apparent reason. Suffice to say his taste for it did not evolve). The strange thing is, given the heightened fiddling by people who purport to look out of us, is that not one job application form in this country carries the label, “Warning: working can be hazardous to your health.” Instead, we’re busy telling cyclists to wear protective helmets, when we ought to be teaching our kids, beginning at an early age, “Don’t ever get a job; it will kill you.” Aside from the falling, crashing and the slicing and dicing that might occur in some of the more dangerous occupations, the third leading cause of death at work, again according to this unimpeachable source, is being murdered by a co-worker. This is something I can understand, especially when it involves hogging the microwave at lunchtime. I have thought of it myself, in fact, but that would be mostly during budget season and I’ve since learned there are other ways to reduce costs, while also avoiding unbudgeted cleanup expense. The thing is, we seem to have lost our perspective. What, after all, is more important: slowly drowning in a sea of super-sized sodas or going to work and saying, as you’re about to depart from home, “I’ll see you tonight … if my luck holds.” I’m sure many people will contend that my argument is the product of ignorance and that our deteriorating health and rise in size has nothing to do with work. That could be, but all I know is that you can’t

Editor, We lost our mayor this week. Not one of the human mayors of the local towns, but rather the anointed mayor of the Worcester County Humane Society. His name was Shawnee. For the many of us whose lives he touched, it is a very sad day. Shawnee is well known in the area, especially by the many generous volunteers, employees and supporters at the shelter. His antics, fun-loving personality and charisma made him a legend in the dog and human world. The memories and tales of Shawnee are too numerous to recount in this brief memorial. Suffice it to say that he was no normal dog. He loved his home at the

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shelter and despite the director’s (Kenille Davies) best attempts to find a “forever” home, Shawnee refused to leave “his town” in the paws of another. On more than one occasion, he left his forever home in the dark of night and made his way back to the shelter. In fact, Kenille passed him on her drive to the shelter one morning as he made his journey back to the place he loved. Finally, Shawnee got his point across and Kenille capitulated — Shawnee was not going to give up his position in his “town.” Perhaps the most telling example of how popular and well-known Shawnee

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Ocean City Today

22A NEWS

HB9 would require restaurants to post allergy info Continued from Page 13A

2014. The individual designated as the “person in charge” of a food establishment would be required to view a video on food allergies and food preparation approved by the state. The bill would also direct the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to develop food allergy information packets, a program to designate certain restaurants as food-allergy friendly, food allergy-related rules and guidelines, and a report on the bill’s impact to the General Assembly by Sept. 30, 2015. It would also designate the second full week of May as Food Allergy Awareness Week.

LANDLORD PROTECTION HB 1222 would provide certain legal protections for landlords who have notified tenants or the district court of their

intent to evict because of nuisance conditions caused by either their tenants or individuals on the premises with the tenants’ permission. The bill defines nuisance as: maintenance-related conditions that pose a danger to public health or safety; using building or vehicles to administer dangerous substances or contraband; water-based unsanitary conditions involving plumbing or waste material; or property used for prostitution or the distribution or manufacture of controlled substances. A hearing in the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee on the bill has been scheduled for March 28. It was sponsored by Delegate Michael Weir (D-6) from Baltimore County.

CELL PHONES The proposal HB 753, which would

make texting or operating a handheld communication device a primary traffic offense that by itself could trigger an enforcement action, was approved by the House by a vote of 106-29, March 21. Essentially, the bill would replace the current status where violations of the ban on driving while operating handheld cell phones is a secondary action that can trigger police enforcement if the driver is stopped for another reason. Instead, it would make the violation a primary violation that would allow officers to stop a motorist without the need to witness another infraction. A first reading of the bill and referral to the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee occurred in the Senate March 22. The proposal was sponsored by Delegate James Malone (D-12A), who represents Baltimore and Howard counties.

BANK FORECLOSURE AUCTION Substitute Trustees’ Sale TWO RETAIL/OFFICE CONDO UNITS IN OCEAN PINES, MD

MARCH 29, 2013

Murphy bill allows counties to grant propertytax credit Continued from Page 12A

tion tax credit for alternate power sources proposal (HB 817) on third reading by a vote of 134-0 on March 25. That was a far cry from the treatment McDermott’s bill received as HB 188, retail service station, disaster preparedness and generator tax credit, introduced Jan. 21. Like McDermott’s bill, which never made it out of the House Ways and Means Committee, Murphy’s HB 817 would direct counties or municipalities to grant a property tax credit for purchases of generators or wiring and transfer switches by a retail service. Generally, the first difference between the two bills is the amount and manner of providing the tax credit. In Murphy’s bill the amount of the tax credit is equal to the lesser of 100 percent of the value of the alternate power source or $20,000. In McDermott’s it was a maximum $7,000 property tax credit against the property tax imposed on a retail service station in the taxable year in which the generator or wiring and transfer switch is installed. The second difference was that in Murphy’s bill the tax credit gives local governments the discretion to provide the tax credit; in McDermott’s it was mandated. Noting the stark similarities between the two bills, McDermott said after the vote, “I don’t care how they pass it, I’ll still take a victory lap,” because the concept nevertheless made it through the House.

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The Worcester County Sheriff’s Office has received several recent calls from citizens who report an attempt to extort money from them while using the Internet. It is believed that this is part of a widespread scheme to extort money from certain personal computer users. The FBI has reported that this Citadel Malware delivers “Reveton Ransomware” to personal computers. A victim is lured to a drive by download at which time the “Ransomware” is installed on the user’s computer. Once installed, the computer freezes and a screen is displayed warning the user that they have violated United States federal law. The message further states that the user’s IP address was identified by the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section as visiting child pornography or other illegal content. To unlock the computer, the user is instructed to pay a fine using prepaid money card services. In addition to the “Ransomware,” the virus continues to be active on the computer and may be used to commit online banking and credit card fraud. Victims of this type of fraud are advised Continued on Page 33A


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

Rep. Harris talks jobs and regulation on shore SHEILA R. CHERRY ■ Associate Editor/Bayside Gazette (March 29, 2013) In a comprehensive interview, Rep. Andy Harris (R-1st) discussed the impact federal action could have on the Lower Eastern Shore and what he plans to do to protect and promote the interests of this region in Congress. Harris discussed his plans for using his new role as a member of the House Appropriations Committee to ensure oversight of the Environmental Protection Agency, and other federal policies that could negatively affect agriculture, the poultry industry, and tourism. He also offered his views on the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare.” ■ BAYSIDE GAZETTE: What can or should Lower Eastern Shore residents expect from Congress this year? What type of legislation do you think will have a direct impact on this area? ■ REP. ANDY HARRIS: Specifically for Lower Eastern Shore residents, I will work to sustain and expand Wallops Space Flight Facility, defend sportsmen and Second Amendment rights, and work to improve the science at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for fisheries management. Also, the regulations on poultry farms and other agribusiness is something I have

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been following closely. I was concerned by the politically motivated regulations that came out of the Environmental Protection Agency during President Obama’s first term that were not based on sound science. Furthermore, I introduced a bill this past week that would protect farmers and small businesses from an arcane banking law against something called structuring. Current law prevents an individual from making repeated cash deposits under $10,000 to get around the paper work one needs to file if making deposits over $10,000. Recently, there was a family on the Eastern Shore who had no idea this was a law and had their assets seized by the IRS. The Small Business Deposit Relief Act of 2013 (H.R. 1184) would limit any crim-

inal and civil penalties for structuring when there is no other crime being committed. It also includes no jail time for first-time offenders and limits the amount that can be seized to no more than 10 percent of the cash deposits in question. ■ BG: As one of the newest members of the House Appropriations Committee, is there some way to ensure that any job creation targeted for this area could extend beyond tourism or corrections? Is there some way to push for manufacturing opportunities here on the Shore? ■ AH: As a member of the House Committee on Appropriations, I have a role in oversight of how Maryland taxpayer dollars are being spent. One of the things I’m concerned about is how the EPA is using its resources and regulating industry, especially agriculture and poultry. I will keep a watch on them to make sure their actions are based on sound science, not political motivations. With regard to manufacturing opportunities on the Shore, we need to reform the tax code and lower the corporate tax rate to make it more attractive for businesses to come to the United States. Unfortunately, Maryland has some of the highest taxes in the country, causing businesses to close or relocate in neighboring states like Delaware and Virginia. There is not a tax increase that Gov. O’Malley does not like, but, at least at the See HARRIS on Page 26A

NEWS 23A

Waterline flushing begins next month in Worcester Co. (March 29, 2013) The Water and Wastewater Division of Public Works will begin its semi-annual program for flushing waterlines in Ocean Pines, River Run, Pennington Commons and other areas of the county during the months of April and May. The purpose of this program is to remove any accumulated sediment from the lines and to ensure the hydrants are operational. Below are the proposed dates for the flushing of the waterlines. Dates subject to change. OCEAN PINES: Week of April 8: Sections 10, 15A, 15B, 16, 17, Baypoint Plantation; Week of April 15: Sections 9, 11, 13, Village Square, Manklin Creek Area, Pennington Commons, Cathell Road Extension; Week of April 22: Sections 12, 14A, 14B, 14C, 14D, Mumfords Landing; Week of April 29: Sections 1, 4, 5, 6, 8, Harbor Village; Week of May 6: Sections 2, 3, 7, River Run, Showell Elementary On dates that water lines in your section are not being flushed, it is still possible to experience discolored water. Allow water to run for a few minutes until it becomes clear. For more information, call 410-641-5251.


24A NEWS

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013


MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

NEWS 25A


Ocean City Today

26A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

Harris discusses healthcare, gun bill from Shore perspective Continued from Page 23A

federal level, I will push for a more competitive tax system that grows jobs here in the United States. The Lower Shore is a great place to live and work. I regularly meet with local business leaders to listen to what they need to hire more workers. As I have traveled on the Shore, businessmen tell me that two things are hindering them from hiring more workers – burdensome government regulations and Maryland’s high tax environment. I am working at the federal level to hold the Obama administration accountable for burdensome bureaucratic regulations that are killing jobs. As a member of Congress, I cannot stop Gov. O’Malley and the legislators in Annapolis from increasing taxes, which is killing job growth. I have also been actively involved with Wallops, which has

the potential, as it grows, to bring highpaying quality jobs to the Shore. n BG: With your appropriations Committee appointment and Sen. Barbara Mikulski’s (D) appointment as chairwoman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Maryland has two key players in place in the congressional appropriations process. Will this present an opportunity for bicameral proposals that could benefit the Lower Eastern Shore? If so what might those proposals be? n AH: My appointment to the House Committee on Appropriations means that for the first time in over 30 years a member of Congress from the Eastern Shore will have a voice on this powerful committee. I look forward to working with Sen. Mikulski for the good of the Lower Shore on issues affecting agriculture, the poultry industry, and the

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tourism industry. One example is making sure that the EPA does not harm our farmers through over-regulation. n BG: As a medical practitioner, how do you anticipate the full implementation of the Affordable Care Act in 2014 affecting the lower shore? Given the heavy retiree population in Worcester County, do you think the expansion of Medicare participants will affect services (i.e. elder health conditions such as joint replacement and chronic illnesses, cancer, heart and diabetes)? n AH: Medicaid (healthcare for the poor) is expanded, but Medicare (healthcare for the elderly) is actually cut by $716 billion under the Affordable Care Act. I am very worried about the negative impact numerous parts of the Affordable Care Act will have on seniors. The Independent Payment Advisory

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Board, a board of 15 unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats whose sole purpose is cutting Medicare spending will lead to a decrease in access for seniors to the physician of their choice. In addition, it has the power to restrict treatment options and limit medical innovation for diseases like Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s. The Affordable Care Act is bad for Maryland and especially for seniors. In addition, I am worried about how the Affordable Care Act will affect everyone’s, not just seniors’, healthcare on the Eastern Shore. Everywhere I go, I hear about family insurance premiums that are going through the roof. Young adults are having a particularly hard time affording plans, with some seeing premium increases in excess of 20 percent already. Some businesses are already having to drop healthcare coverage, lay off workers, and convert full-time jobs to part-time jobs to avoid penalties because of the dramatic cost increases. n BG: Do you think that Maryland is making the right move in going full steam ahead with its state health exchange? Will we be better off than places like, say, Virginia, which were leaving it up to the federal government? n AH: Whether or not to operate a state health exchange or have the federal government operate it is a decision that rests solely with the governor. I believe the Affordable Care Act is the wrong way to reform our healthcare system. I support a plan that is patient-centered and would implement more free market reforms to the system to allow for greater competition instead of government control. Despite initial claims, we now know that the implementation of the law will now cost more than $2 trillion, something our nation just cannot afford. Healthcare insurance costs will rise under the Maryland exchange and become unaffordable for many. n BG: The undercurrent in the debate over Second Amendment rights/gun violence curbs seems more like an urban versus rural issue, but it is an emotionally charged one, which recently seems to suggest that there must always be a congressional response. What will you do to educate your colleagues, when other emotional issues prompt Congress to propose one-size-fits all types of legislation in response to current or tragic events that what works in the city might not be as practical for rural communities? n AH: I held a town hall in Ocean City recently so I could have a conversation with people in the area about the issue. The turnout was great and I think it was very productive. As I said at the meeting, the issue of gun violence is complicated. I’m a father of five so my heart goes out to the families of Newtown and all the families and friends who know someone who has been a victim of gun violence. During this debate, I worry that the discussion about making our kids safer focuses too much on passing more laws surrounding guns and not enough about dealing with the root of the problem – enforcing the laws already on the books and


MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

Harris: fed cuts similar to lowered take-home pay helping those with mental illness. It is more important that we get this issue right, than try and do it fast or install a one-size-fits-all approach. Our Second Amendment rights are important and need to be protected. n BG: Will you look at appropriations for roads/bridges in our region, such as completion of Route 113, widening of Route 589 and monies for any of the bridges that need repair in our region? n AH: The House and Senate have banned earmarks from bills so money cannot be directly targeted to specific projects by a member of Congress. I agree with that ban on earmarks. When agencies look at how to spend the money we appropriate to them, I will urge them to make projects like those mentioned priorities, but the final decision will be made by the state.

n BG: What will sequestration mean for the Eastern Shore? Will there be any impact on the Coastal Bays Program, Assateague Island or shore replenishment? n AH: From the very beginning, I was against the President’s sequester. I think it’s a bad way to try and get out-of-control spending under control because an across-the-board cut does not force the government to prioritize what’s important or determine what is efficient and what is not. That’s why I initially voted against the sequester and after it was law, I voted for two replacement plans that were smarter cuts of the same size. With regard to the impact on those three programs, the reality is that the sequester cuts less than 2 percent of the budget. At the beginning of this year, hardworking families across the Shore saw their incomes decrease because of

the 2 percent payroll tax hike. I think government can cut at least that much without serious compromise to any federal program including those three. The Washington Post recently confirmed that claims about the sequester cutting vaccines for children was misleading – something I exposed in a discussion with the director of the Centers for Disease Control at an Appropriations Committee hearing. A video of the exchange can be viewed at http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v= cKbMhr-cfh8. n BG: Do you anticipate additional stormwater management proposals this year? n AH: I’m not aware of any additional proposals at the federal level — legislation or otherwise — to deal with stormwater management.

NEWS 27A


Ocean City Today

28A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

‘EF’ license would allow casino two extra hours,with entertainment Continued from Page 1A

as of press time – features some further de-restrictions. Both policies were initially introduced to allow a fine increase, upping the maximum charge from $1,000 to $4,000, for an individual or business that facilitates drinking in public areas or drinking beyond allowed hours. But amendments, added to the bills over the past two weeks, have revealed a much more intensive revision, centering on the desire of Ocean Downs Casino to have the same liquor-serving rights as the state’s other authorized gambling facilities. Under state law, casinos may be open 24 hours per day, and may serve liquor during all the hours they are open. However, Ocean Downs must stop serving at 2 a.m., a rule is in-keeping with the liquor policy for all other license holders in the

Worcester County. Ocean Downs’ proprietors have continually argued that this restriction, which was intended to keep the casino on equal footing with other resort attractions, puts it at a disadvantage relative to other casinos, such as those in Delaware, and detracts from the around-the-clock business model casinos typically rely on. When Ocean Downs began to press the state for a change this year, legislators, local officials, and business representatives reportedly got together to broker a compromise deal. Under HB999, Worcester County’s Board of License Commissioners – the state-appointed board that issues and sets restrictions on liquor licenses – would be allowed to issue a special “entertainment facility” (class EF) license. This license would be available only to

those applicants with capital investments of $45 million or more, de-facto restricting acquisition to Ocean Downs, but would allow the business to serve alcohol from 9 a.m. until 4 a.m. the following day – two hours longer than elsewhere. In exchange for this edge given to the casino, liquor licensees throughout the county would see the sunset date moved up on the state policy that forces them to buy their spirits from the county’s Department of Liquor Control. This policy was scheduled to be eliminated, allowing licensed businesses to purchase liquor from any wholesaler, as of May 1, 2016. But under the proposed legislation, this date will be bumped up to July 1, 2014, ending the county dispensary’s monopoly earlier. “I negotiated in good faith that there was a quid pro quo with the folks in

Ocean City, that they were okay with the 4 a.m. close for the casino if they got out from under the thumb of the county liquor board sooner,” said Delegate Mike McDermott. The Senate bill, in its current iteration, also goes on to specify that an “class EF” liquor license “authorizes the playing of music and dancing,” giving further leniency to the restrictions on Ocean Downs’ entertainment offerings. Although fears of the casino siphoning off Ocean City’s tourist base were rife when the facility was first authorized, they appear to have become less of a threat. “I don’t know that the entertainment was such as huge concern as it was in the beginning,” said Ocean City Hotel-MotelRestaurant Association Executive Director Susan Jones. “Our main concern See WOR. on Page 29A

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

NEWS 29A

Council questions return on investment as public safety costs rise Continued from Page 1A

eight electronic control devices (ECDs), popularly known by the Taser brand name, for his department. “We currently have eight trained officers who do not have a device,” Guiton said. “We have them certified for ECDs, we just didn’t have funds to purchase the devices. Going into the summer season, we would like to have all of our trained officers with a device.” Since the police first piloted their use in October 2011, Tasers have been reported by the OCPD to be highly effective in deterring aggressive or confrontational behavior in suspects, and, when such behavior does occur, being able to subdue suspects with the least amount of physical force. According to a presentation earlier this year, recorded assaults on OCPD officers fell 25 percent in 2012 versus 2011, which the department’s leadership attributes largely to ECD usage. At a recent roundtable discussion on ECD training, Guiton said his officers “talked about how they felt they were not injured because of the use of the device, or how the suspect was not injured any further than by the use of the device itself and the relatively short recovery period involved.” The department has 26 devices and says it needs 22 more to be at an ideal level. The OCPD has enough money left

over in its budget allocations for the current 2013 fiscal year to buy the eight devices it could use immediately, at a cost of $11,400. This would leave 16 to be purchased in FY14, which begins in July. However, Councilwoman Margaret Pillas pointed out that, if the current budget’s savings were rolled over into the next fiscal year, they could be used for other priorities the department may have. “I don’t want to say ‘yes’ to this and then have to say ‘no’ to something else come budget time,” she said. Recor encouraged the council, however, to capitalize on the money available now to get the devices on the street before the summer rush. “If we delay this [until July], we won’t have these on the street during our season,” he said. Councilman Brent Ashley questioned if the philosophy behind the Taser purchases – investing in the devices to reduce officer injury and costly workman’s compensation claims – was effective. “Is it revenue neutral, that we’re saving that much on workman’s compensation because of these?” Ashley asked. “I do understand that we have some significant budget challenges coming up, to the tune of $4.5 million, and some significant employee pay raises.” Recor replied that compensation claims from the OCPD were actually on the rise, although he did not have the

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numbers in front of him. Other factors – such as work volume – influence this besides Taser availability, he said. “What I’m suggesting is that you not delay the decision, but I can provide you with that info,” Recor said. “My hunch is that it’s not cost neutral, but these are monies available now and that’s why we’ve advised the department to move forward as they have.” Ashley continued to object to what he saw as spending the money just because it was a small amount and available. “If you were to postpone the decision, and look at moving forward with the 22 devices at an additional cost next year,” Recor projected, “given the challenge that’s in front of us for FY14, I would say it’s more likely that the entire program [of Taser purchases] would be delayed.” “We wouldn’t be able to carve out just a portion for it. What we’re doing is breaking it into bite-size pieces.” However, on the opposite side of council’s political division, Councilman Doug Cymek immediately jumped on Recor’s suggestion that the Tasers were not cost-neutral. “I’ve been on the Boardwalk several times when our officers have been assaulted,” Cymek said. “This is a perfect example of something that’s pennywise and a pound foolish. You have one big worker’s compensation claim [and it tips the scales].”

Wor. DLC could but from distiller Continued from Page 28A

would be them being able to build a hotel.” Further, in deference to the county, the Senate bill allows the Department of Liquor Control to itself act as a liquor wholesaler, with the ability to buy liquor from the producer and sell it wholesale to other outlets, including its own dispensaries. This clause would allow the county to compete for business from bars and restaurants alongside the state’s other whole liquor wholesalers, given that its state-mandated monopoly will be ending sooner than expected.

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“I’m not disagreeing with you, I’m saying that it’s not something that’s financially quantifiable,” Recor said. Whether or not an allocation was valuable beyond its balance sheet was a policy decision that the council would have to make, he said. The body voted – with Mayor Rick Meehan, Council President Lloyd Martin, and Councilman Joe Mitrecic absent – to move the decision to next week’s meeting pending more information about the OCPD’s compensation claims.



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Ocean City Today

30A NEWS

charged with possession of marijuana. The car was impounded because Ahmed had stopped in a travel lane on Philadelphia Avenue.

POLICE BRIEFS Continued from Page 22A to contact their banking institutions and file a complaint at www.IC3.gov. For more information on e-mail frauds and warnings, concerned citizens can go to the FBI website and look under the tab, Internet Crimes.

Drug at hotel A 22-year-old Berlin man was charged with second-degree assault after allegedly grabbing the hand and wrist of a police officer and not letting go when ordered to do so. Ocean City police went to a downtown hotel room after being contacted by hotel personnel who had been told by a guest that they smelled the odor of marijuana coming from a room. When police went to the room, they smelled the odor and after the guest, Benjamin Michael Kelleher, opened the door, “the odor of burning marijuana that came from within was overwhelming,” according to the charging document. Kelleher, who police said was extremely nervous and visibly shaking, said he was going to get food and started to walk away, but police told him to sit down. He then said he wanted to call his mother and refused to put his phone down. When an officer tried to grab his phone, Kelleher allegedly grabbed his hand and wrist and would not let go.

Marijuana found While searching a vehicle before it was taken to the impound lot March 20, an Ocean City police officer found a bag of suspected marijuana. Police had stopped the vehicle driven by Joseph Iberhim Ahmed, 23, of Ocean City, because of a warrant for his arrest for violation of probation stemming from a conviction for second-degree assault. The original charges also included robbery and theft of less than $100. According to the charging document, Ahmed was driving the same vehicle he had driven when charged with driving under the influence of alcohol and hit and run on Feb. 1. After a police officer stopped his vehicle at Fifth Street and arrested him on the warrant, another police officer searched it and found a bag of suspected marijuana. Ahmed was then

MARCH 29, 2013

Marijuana charge

Disturbance at pub

Edmund Waples, Sr., 57, of Portsmouth, Va. was arrested after his vehicle was stopped for a traffic violation in the area of 9270 Worcester Highway, Berlin. Waples was found to have a suspended driver’s license and police found suspected marijuana during a search of the car. Waples was charged with traffic offenses and possession of marijuana and released on a criminal citation, according to the Berlin Police Department.

The Worcester County Sheriff’s Office is investigating a disturbance involving gunfire on Saturday, March 23, at PJ’s Pub at 2350 Old Snow Hill Road in Pocomoke. At approximately 1 a.m. the Worcester County Emergency Services dispatch center received multiple 911 calls reporting a large fight involving gunfire at that site. Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, Maryland State Police and Pocomoke City Police Officers encountered a large disorderly crowd. In an attempt to restore the safety of the remaining patrons and staff and to identify and treat the victims, several participants were taken into custody and charged with disorderly conduct after failing to obey the officers’ instructions. Order was restored, the victims were identified and the crime scene was secured. Two victims were treated at the hospital. One was treated for several lacerations to their head and the other for a gunshot wound to the foot. Detectives from the Worcester County Bureau of Investigation and crime scene technicians from the Maryland State Police processed the scene. Anyone with information on this incident is asked to contact Detective Cpl. Alex Kagan of the Sheriff’s Office at 410-632-1111.

Marijuana plants Ocean City police arrested a 39-year resort resident after finding approximately 104 marijuana plants in his unit Tuesday evening. Police served a search and seizure warrant at his residence on Sunset Drive in reference to the manufacturing and distribution of controlled dangerous substances. Detectives found the plants during the search and identified Christopher Scott Smith as their primary suspect at the scene. Police also seized equipment used in the growing of marijuana. Smith was charged with manufacturing marijuana, possession of marijuana and possession of marijuana with the intent to distribute it.

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MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

NEWS 31A

OCES RECOGNIZES MARHC STUDENTS OF THE MONTH Ocean City Elementary School honored its March Students of the Month on March 22, with a luncheon and a cake. Each student received a T-shirt, certificate and special pencil sponsored by the Ocean City-Berlin Optimists and the OCES PTA. Receiving awards, in first row from left, are Saylor Amos, Grace Short, Esbeyci Garcia-Ornelas, Sofia Finocchiaro, Mya Williamson and Jamie Consigli; in second row, second-graders Ava Kennell, Audrey Mumford, Bri’onah Davis and Nathan Doerzbach; in third row, third-graders Milena Olerta, Mac Gates, Samuel Woodley, Rudy Engh, Hayden Elsner and and Gabriel Sams-Elirari; and in back row, fourthgraders Samantha Cummings, Seren Egenski, Layla Chrysanthis, Kaden Mault, Ja’bria Lewis and Brittyn Lyra Leonard.

IRISH SING-ALONG Frankie O’Nanna made his annual visit to Ocean City Elementary School to play some Irish tunes for the kindergarten and prekindergarten students. Students enjoyed singing along to tunes such as “The Unicorn Song,” “When Irish Eyes Are Smiling,” “Five Little Leprechauns Jumping on the Bed” and “Old McDonald.”

PET FOOD DRIVE CHECK PRESENTATION Members of the Ocean City/Berlin Rotary Club Interact Club from Stephen Decatur High School, from left, Hunter Ulrich, David L’Osher, Joed Mejber, Paige McWilliam and President Josh Michnick, present a check to Abby Morells of the Worcester County Humane Society. They are pictured with Ocean City/Berlin Rotary Club Past President Arlan Kinney.

The Stephen Decatur High School Kids Against Animal Abuse & Testing Club, in connection with the After School Academy, held a pet food drive, and collected more than 400 pounds of food. It will be donated to local animal shelters. Students pictured with some of the food, from left, are Luis Fermin, Sarah Lank, Rachel Savage, Yina Dong, KAAAT Advisor Kim Patrick, Natalie Marowski, Taylor Pusey and JP Celozzi.

LEUKEMIA AND LYMPHOMA SOCIETY DONATION Stephen Decatur High School Financial Officer Shanna Chatlos, sophomore Delilah Purnell, Principal Tom Zimmer, Student Government Association President Calvin Garrison, sophomore Fiona O’Brien, teacher Jessica Patterson and co-principal Karen White present a $3224.77 check to Leukemia and Lymphoma Society representative Patricia Sturm, center. The money was raised during a month filled with activities organized by the Acts of Kindness club. The donation is the largest presented to the organization by any high school in the state.

‘PI’ EATING CONTEST Stephen Decatur High School juniors Ciara Wright, Charlotte Petsche, Emily Ladd and Ashley DePaul team up to consume four pizzas during the third annual “Pi” Eating Contest sponsored by the Mu Alpha Theta Math Honor Society. The event, which included nearly 100 spectators, featured several teams competing in pizza pie eating and several individuals vying for the fruit pie eating title.


Ocean City Today

32A NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

WOC business offers technical training to students of all ages Belardo hopes to transition from his career at the World Bank to help local youth full time at Digital Youth Experience. “Our focus is on education, but also on development,” Belardo said. “Our goal is to make Digital Youth Experience a globally successful software development company.” That will start by teaching the students “real life implications … so they have a plan of what they want to do, how to do it and how to market it,” Belardo said. “We’re teaching the economics of what software development is.” That happens, he said, by building applications, getting a percentage of the revenues and growing into a software development company. “You start out as an independent contractor,” he said. He said he is concerned about “the brain drain from Worcester County.” Although the county has an excellent school system, many students “can’t wait to get out of Worcester County to go to school elsewhere,” he said. He wants to teach them and mentor them in preparation for careers in this area. They could work at the same place where they learned to do the work. Belardo plans to start small by educating youth, but eventually he wants to “build a major software company here. We are working on building applications

NANCY POWELL ■ Staff Writer (March 29, 2013) The goal of a new business in West Ocean City is to prepare residents for careers in technology. “We recognize the need to educate children, young adults and even senior citizens in technology,” said Eric Belardo, founder of Digital Youth Experience in the Teal Marsh Plaza off Route 611, on Monday. “Everywhere you go, there is technology to interact Eric Belardo with.” His lofty goal is to “take students from zero knowledge of programming to fully functioning application developers.” Belardo, who lives in Berlin, but commutes to his job as the deputy to the chief information security officer at the World Bank in Washington, D.C., wants to prepare youth for the high technology jobs, hopefully in West Ocean City. A scarcity of qualified workers was evident to Belardo during the past year when the World Bank had 10 openings for entry-level positions. After interviewing 300 job applicants, “we found not one qualified candidate,” Belardo said. To fill those openings, the World Bank hired people from overseas.

and software here to build our company and make it a bigger place for them to work.” His goal is to have about 50 students before expanding and he hopes to have a team of 20 developers. Within the next two to five years, he hopes to meet his goal of having “a major corporation in this area.” At Digital Youth Experience, the emphasis will be on individualized training, but every course will begin with information about anti-cyber bullying and Internet safety. Computers will be provided and although he encourages higher education in additional to classes at Digital Youth Experience, no special previous education is required. Students are expected to know the basics of math. Belardo will be teaching classes, but he is seeking additional teachers and his son, Francis Jarman, 15, one of his eight children, will be an instructor. Another son, Alex Belardo, 19, a chemistry major at Salisbury University, will work at Digital Youth Experience during the summer. Mentoring will also be a part of Digital Youth Experience. Belardo mentored 10 youth when he lived in New Jersey and Western Maryland and eight of those are now working in the computer field. He and others will mentor the students in West Ocean City and profes-

sionals in the industry will present occasional lectures. Belardo is hoping that disabled people and those from low-income families will become part of Digital Youth Experience. He wants to target the disadvantaged and open doors to the computer field for them. Classes will include computer programming, mobile application design, game design, computer forensics, computer security and robotics. Students may take classes at 5 p.m., 6 p.m. and 7 p.m. Monday and Wednesday or Tuesday and Thursday. Family fun night will be held on Friday evenings and open classes will be held from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturdays. The cost is $50 per week and he is seeking donations to provide scholarships. Classes are also available for homeschooled students and those with high functioning autism or Asperger’s syndrome. Basic computer usage and Internet security will also be offered to people who are new to the computer age. Classes at Digital Youth Experience begin in mid-April and as of Monday, 11 students, ranging in age from 12 to 42, had pre-registered. A new student orientation will be held from 6-7 p.m. next Friday, April 5, at the company’s site at Suite E-3 in the Teal Marsh Plaza. For additional information, visit www.digitalyouthexp.com.

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

Bayscape Planting Program under way in Ocean City (March 29, 2013) The Town of Ocean City is offering a mini-grant for the Bayscape Planting Program, which offers native plant material to homeowners to build a “Bayscape garden” on their property. Residents and property owners who would like to save time and money on their yard, while improving water quality and habitat for wildlife, are encouraged to plant a Bayscape garden. A Bayscape garden is a landscape planted and maintained to benefit people, the environment and the Maryland Coastal Bays. Bayscapes use native plants to provide habitat for local and migratory animals, improve water quality, and reduce the need for chemical pesticides and herbicides. In addition, Bayscaping is valuable for the gardener or landowner because it offers greater visual interest than lawn, reduces the time and expense of mowing, watering, fertilizing and treating lawn and garden areas. The 2013 Bayscape Planting Program is available to all homeowners or condominium associations located within the corporate limits of the Town of Ocean City. The first 20 applicants to submit a complete grant application will be offered the plants. The deadline for applicants is April 19. Twenty grants, valued at $150 to pay for the plant material, will be offered. The Town will then order the requested plant and have them delivered at a predetermined date and location. Grant recipients will be responsible for the pick-up, installation and maintenance of these plants. This year, the Town of Ocean City offering trees and shrubs and the delivery date may be on a separate day. Residents and property owners who have project ideas and would like an application are encouraged to call Gail Blazer in the Engineering Department at 410-289-8825 or e-mail at gblazer@ococean.com.

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Report recommended change in OCVFC memo Continued from Page 8A

OCFD Chief Chris Larmore, then the OCVFC’s elected chief, said the plan was unsound and open to inconsistency. The OCVFC then declared that it would move its primary operations to West Ocean City due to its inability to operate under the city’ new plan. A compromise was reached under which Larmore would become the interim head of a fully combined fire department in which both volunteer and paid firefighters and EMS personnel would serve under the same administrative structure. Under the Memorandum of Understanding subsequently established with the OCVFC, Larmore had the right to appeal directly to the mayor and City Council on the volunteers’ behalf. Larmore subsequently become the full-time, fully compensated OCFD chief,

creating somewhat of a limbo position relative to the city’s other department heads given that he was, until recently, still a party to the volunteers’ MOU. The ICMA’s recommendation was that “fire services be placed under the direction of the city manager,” a move that was made earlier this year by revising the OCVFC MOU to remove Larmore as a specific party. “That was one recommendation that we wanted to implement immediately,” Knight said. “ICMA recognizes that there is a political component involved in the current management model that has the council oversee the fire services,” the report states. “We believe that this is the primary reason that has caused the problems between the Emergency Services Department and the fire departments.

“If City Council members differ in their opinions about problems, priorities, or how to deal with the inevitable management challenges, finding solutions may be difficult without the strong centralized leadership that the councilmanager for of government offers.” The ICMA also recommended regularly scheduled meetings between fire, police, and emergency services management, something which appears to have been implemented even before the report was issued. “Arrangements have already been made, prior to the release of this report,” Larmore said this week, for quarterly reviews of fire dispatches. “The Director Emergency Services, myself, and the city manager look forward to our first meeting next Wednesday.”


Ocean City Today

34A NEWS

OBITUARIES Allen Douglas Ake OCEAN CITY — Allen Douglas “Doug” Ake, 69, passed away peacefully on Friday, March 22, 2013 at his home. Raised in Gumboro, he was the son of Jean Ake Miles and the late Marshall W. Ake. He is survived by his loving wife of 38 years, Elena Danforth Ake, and daughters, Dr. Jennifer Allen Ake Marie Romanow and her husband, Josh, of Arlington, Va., and Christina Ake Harrison and her husband, G. Hale Harrison, of Berlin. He was adored grandfather to Haven Victoria Harrison. He was preceded in death by his stepfather, Joshua W. Miles II. He also leaves behind his beloved dogs, Trouble and Dirty Harry. Mr. Ake had worked at Wallops Island

prior to earning his degree in ocean engineering from Florida Atlantic University. In 1975, he married Elena Danforth, and together they founded Ake Marine in Ocean City. A memorial service was held Thursday, March 28, at Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. The Rev. Dr Olin Shockley officiated. Interment followed in Pittsville Cemetery. A donation in his memory may be made to the Ocean City Reef Foundation, P.O. Box 1072, Ocean City, Md. 21943, or Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company, P.O. Box 27, Ocean City, Md. 21943. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arthur Richard Felsher OCEAN PINES — Arthur Richard “Dick” Felsher, 81, of Ocean Pines, died Wednesday March 20, 2013, at his home. Born in New Orleans, he was the son of the late Arthur Richard Felsher Sr., and

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2013, at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. Born in Earlysville, Va., she was the daughter of the late Abraham I. Jones and Lou Alice Herdon Jones. She was preceded in death by Lorene Peake her husband, Norman W. Peake, in 2003. She is survived by her son, George B. Peake and his wife, Mary, of Monrovia, Md. She was adored grandmother to George, Willie, Dawn and Michael, and great-grandchildren Kimberly, Kirsten, Brittany, Samantha, Alexandria, Mary, Jacob and Shyann. Mrs. Peake had served in the United States Navy as a lieutenant junior grade nurse during World War II. She later worked as a registered nurse at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring until retiring in 1984. She was a member of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church. A funeral service was held Wednesday, March 27, at Redeemer Lutheran Church in Damascus, Md. The Revs. Ray Scheck and George Winston officiated. Interment followed on Thursday at Parklawn Memorial Park in Rockville, Md. A donation in her memory may be made to Atlantic General Hospital, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, Md. 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

Josephine M. Dubret Felsher. He is survived by his wife, Rita Ann Myers Felsher; a son, Richard Anthony Felsher of Santa Ana, Calif., and ChristoArthur Felsher pher Scott Roman of Arlington, Va.; a daughter, Maria Collette Lynn of Rockville, Md.; a stepson, Matt R. Ballenger of Baltimore; and stepdaughters, Valerie Jo Thacker of Huntington, Md., Wendy Jo Subasic of Ellicott City and Cindy Dukes of Stevensonville, Md. Also surviving is a sister, Patricia Ruth Hardee of New Smyrna Beach, Fla., 11 grandchildren, two greatgrandsons, and several nieces and nephews. Mr. Felsher was a graduate of Louisiana University and a Korean War veteran. He had been a regional manager and vice president with Wells Fargo. A memorial service was held Wednesday, March 27, at the Church of the Resurrection in Ellicott City. A donation in his memory may be made to Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21804. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Lorene J. Peake OCEAN CITY — Lorene Baptist Jones Peake, 92, went to be with her Lord and Savior on Friday, March 22,

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

OBITUARIES Henry A. Markowski SELBYVILLE, Del. — Henry A. Markowski, 89, of Selbyville, Del., and formerly of Forest Hill, Md., died Monday, March 25, 2013, at home. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Theodore and Helen (Lubinska) Markowski. Mr. Markowski had been a quality assurance worker for the federal government and then for General Dynamics Engineering. He was a decorated WWII veteran of the U.S. Army Air Corps. He was awarded a Purple Heart for wounds he received over Germany during a bomber mission flown from Thorpe-Abbotts Field in England. He was a member of St. Luke Catholic Church in Ocean City, the DAV, the Bloody 100th Bomber Group and a life member of VFW Post 8672 in Jarrettsville, Md. He was also an avid outdoorsman and blood donor, and he enjoyed bowling. He is survived by two sons, Thomas H. Markowski and his wife, Frances, and Gary A. Markowski and his wife, Judy; two daughters, Karen A. Denney and her husband, Bob, and Mary A. Mignini and her husband, Anthony; a brother, Thaddeus Markowski; a sister, Theresa Osietski; 13 grandchildren; 22 great grandchildren; and one greatgreat-granddaughter. He was preceded in death by his wife of 63 years, Angela A. Markowski

in 2009; a daughter, Marguerite E. Donovan; and seven adult siblings. A funeral service was held Thursday, March 28, at Hastings Funeral Home in Selbyville. Father Anthony Cardone officiated. Entombment will be at 11 a.m. on Friday, March 29, at Bel Air Memorial Gardens in Bel Air, Md. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.hastingsfuneralhome.net. Caitlyn Diann Lebo OCEAN CITY — Caitlyn Diann Lebo, 19, of Ocean City died Thursday, March 21, 2013. Born in Salisbury, she was the daughter of Robert “Bob” and Darlene “Dee” (Lewis) Lebo of West Ocean City. Miss Lebo graduated from Stephen Decatur High School in 2011 and had worked at the Wawa in West Ocean City for five years. Recently, she was working in the Copy Center at the Staples Store in West Ocean City and at Save-A-Lot in Berlin. A memorial service was held Wednesday, March 27, at First Presbyterian Church in Ocean City. Pastor Alex Ayers officiated. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to First Presbyterian Church, 1301 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, Md. 21842. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.hastingsfuneralhome.net.

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36A NEWS

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 35A

John Douglas Edgar MILLSBORO, Del. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Douglas Edgar, 45, died Tuesday March 26, 2013, at his home. Born in Ft. Lee, Va., he was the son of Paulette Anne Burrier of Ocean City and John Thomas Edgar and his wife, Tamera, of Martinsburg, W. Va. He is survived by his brother, Mark Edgar and his wife, Allison, of Hampstead, Md., and a sister, Katie Edgar and her husband, Michael Sand, of Whaleyville. Also surviving is a halfbrother, Joshua Edgar of Martinsburg, W. Va.; a stepbrother, Tim Burrier of Millsboro; a stepsister, Dawn Ann Croft and her son, Zachary, of Laurel, Md.; and nephews Kaige and Kamden Edgar. Also surviving is a paternal grandmother, Betty Mott of Baltimore.

Mr. Edgar was a graduate of Mount St. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s High School in Baltimore and Wilmington College. He had worked as a special education teacher and he was an avid sports enthusiast. A Mass of Christian burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, April 2, at Holy Savior Catholic Church on 17th Street in Ocean City. Interment will be at a later date. In lieu of flowers memorial, donations may be made in Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Donor Services, P.O. Box 4072, Pittsfield, MA 01202 or to St. Judeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, TN 38105. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Wilson Morris Townsend PARSONSBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wilson Morris Townsend, 80, of Parsonsburg died

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Sunday, March 25, 2013, at Anchorage Nursing Home in Salisbury. He was the son of the late Maurice Townsend and Lola Boston. Mr. Townsend was preceded in death by his wife, T. Lee Townsend; a sister, Patsy Ader; and a brother, Arthur Townsend. He is survived by two sons, Clarke Townsend and his wife, Cindy, and Mark Townsend and his wife, Dottie; one sister, Thelma Lambden and her husband, Bobby; three grandchildren, Joshua Townsend and his wife, Jennifer, and Nathan and Garret Townsend; two great-grandchildren, Wyatt and Layla; a sister-in-law, Elizabeth Townsend; and several nieces and nephews. Mr. Townsend was a loving father and grandfather who enjoyed giving to others and loved his farming and gardening. A funeral service will be held at noon on Friday, March 29, at Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Friends may call one hour prior to the service. Pastor Bruce Bowden will officiate. Interment will be in Forest Grove Cemetery in Parsonsburg, Md. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Thomas Walter Bowden FRANKFORD, Del. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thomas Walter Bowden, 86, of Frankford, Del., died Wednesday March 20, 2013, at Atlantic Shores Nursing Home in Millsboro, Del. Born in Berlin, he was the son of the late William Clifton Bowden and Mamie Smack Bowden. Mr. Bowden was preceded in death by his wife, Lorraine Wainwright Bowden in February 2013, and a daughter, Catherine Hudson in 2012. He is survived by two sons, Thomas C. Bowden and his wife, Maryann, of California and Robert J. Bowden and his wife, Kathy, of Berlin; and daughters, Patsy B. Taylor and her husband, Preston, of Salisbury and Peggy Luzier and her husband, George, of Frankford; a

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brother, Ralph Bowden of Berlin; a sister, Myrtle Pusey of Snow Hill; 10 grandchildren, Nichelle Hudson, Stephen Hudson, Christopher Hudson, Michael T. Bowden, Christy T. Hall, Tiffany T. Simpson, Missy Burbage, Brian Luzier, Andrew Luzier and Branda N. Bowden; and 15 greatgrandchildren. Mr. Bowden served in the United States Army during WWII. He had owned and operated Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grill in Ocean City, and later worked as a truck driver for H&H Poultry. A graveside service was held Wednesday, March 27, at Bowen Cemetery in Newark. The Rev. Sherwood McGrath officiated. In lieu of flowers, a donation in his memory may be made to The National Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Foundation, Gift Processing Center, P.O. Box 5018, Hagerstown, Md. 21741-5018. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Harold D. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Budâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Breidenstein OCEAN PINES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Harold Donald â&#x20AC;&#x153;Budâ&#x20AC;? Breidenstein, 81, of Ocean Pines, passed away Friday, March 22, 2013. Bud was born in Baltimore on March 24, 1931. He graduated from Mount St. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s High School in 1949. He joined the Army in 1951 and H. Breidenstein served for three years. Mr. Breidenstein married Susanne Marker â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sueâ&#x20AC;? Eavey on July 2, 1952. They were married for more than 60 years. He resided in Ellicott City, Md., for 37 years and then relocated to Ocean Pines, where he and Sue lived for the past 16 years. In 1965, he began his career with State Farm Insurance, where he worked until his retirement in 1995. He was a member of the American Legion and Kiwanis. He was also actively involved in Meals on Wheels and volunteered his time with the elderly. In addition to his wife, Mr. Breidenstein is survived by his children, Tim (Fran), Joan Hajek (Mike), Diane Korpa (Mark), Tom (Jale), Brennan, and Kerri. He is also survived by 18 grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He was preceded in death by his parents, Harold D. and Edna E. Breidenstein (nĂŠe Bussard) and his two sisters, Betty and Jane. A celebration of life Mass will be held at noon on Tuesday, April 2, at St. John Neumann Church in Ocean Pines. A celebration will follow the Mass at the American Legion on 24th Street in Ocean City. Interment will be private at Eastern Shore Veterans Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21802 or online at www.coastalhospice.org. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com.


Ocean City Today

SPORTS www.oceancitytoday.net

MARCH 29, 2013

PAGE 37A

WORCESTER PREP SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

SPRING SPORTS SCHEDULES BOYS’ LACROSSE:

Girls’ lax team has depth and experience

April 2: Salesianum, 6 p.m. (A) April 5: Tower Hill, 8 p.m. (A) April 8: Easton, 5:30 p.m. (A) April 10: Salisbury School, 4 p.m. (A) April 12: Archmere, 4 p.m. (H) April 17: Salisbury School, 4 p.m. (H) April 19: Calverton, 5 p.m. (A) April 22: Indian River, 4 p.m. (H) April 26: Gunston, 4 p.m. (H) April 27: Roosevelt, 1 p.m. (H) April 29: Indian River, 4 p.m. (A) May 1: Wilmington Friends, 4 p.m. (H) May 3: St. Andrews, 4 p.m. (A)

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) The Lady Mallards are experienced lacrosse players with noticeable speed. “We have so many kids that are so fast, it’s going to be impossible for teams to marks us. Page Rogers And, we have so much depth,” third-year Coach Page Rogers said. “We’re pretty balanced, with good leadership.” Nineteen of the 21 players on Rogers’ roster have competed at the varsity level. The two newcomers are junior Frankie Willing (attack) and sophomore Maura Smith (defense). Smith will play for both the varsity and JV teams. Junior attacker Kristen Shriver was a member of the varsity squad her freshman year, but missed last season due to a knee injury. “Kristen is the quarterback of the offense. To have her back is a big help,” Rogers said. The junior has verbally committed to play lacrosse at Div. I Winthrop University in South Carolina. A number of other veterans have also committed to compete for their respective colleges including senior captain See PLAYERS on Page 43A

GIRLS’ LACROSSE: March 30: Howard Invitational (A) April 2: Gunston, 4 p.m. (A) April 5: Tower Hill, 6:30 p.m. (A) April 6: St. Mary’s Ryken, noon (H) April 8: Sts. Peter & Paul, 4 p.m. (A) April 10: Salisbury School, 4 p.m. (H) April 17: Salisbury School, 4 p.m. (A) April 19: Calverton, 5 p.m. (H) April 24: Sts. Peter & Paul, 4 p.m. (H) April 30: Cape, 5:30 p.m. (A) May 3: Sussex Tech, 4 p.m. (A)

BOYS’ / GIRLS’ TENNIS: OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep senior captain Harrison Brennan, left, is guarded by freshman Wyatt Richins during Tuesday’s practice at the Berlin school.

MALLARDS IMPROVING Coach Gates: we’re excited about what lies ahead LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) Worcester Prep boys’ lacrosse Coach Kevin Gates noticed continued improvement in the Mallards’ performance throughout pre-season competitions. He called it “a good sign” as

league play began this week. “We lost some good players and we’re kind of building it back up,” said Gates, now in his 11th season. “We’re getting better and better. We went into Spring Break (last week) with a positive vibe. We’re excited about what lies ahead.”

Eight Mallards on Gates’ 20-player rosters are veterans. Leading the team will be senior attackman, captain Harrison Brennan, who received First Team All-Conference honors in 2012, when the team went 9-6 and captured its fourth consecu-

April 2: Gunston, 4 p.m. (H) April 5: Pocomoke, 4 p.m. (A) April 9: Sts. Peter & Paul, 4 p.m. (A) April 11: Salisbury School, 6 p.m. (A) April 12: Parkside, 4 p.m. (H) April 15: Sts. Peter & Paul, 4 p.m. (H) April 17: Salisbury School, 4 p.m. (H) April 19: Bennett, 4 p.m. (A) April 22: Pocomoke, 4 p.m. (H) April 25: Bennett, 4 p.m. (H) April 26: Decatur, 4 p.m. (A) April 29: Gunston, 4 p.m. (A) May 1: Washington, 3:30 p.m.(boys) 4 p.m. (girls) (H) May 2: Parkside, 4 p.m. (A) May 3: Northampton, 4:30 p.m. (A) (girls) May 6: Washington, 3:30 p.m. (A)

See EIGHT on Page 39A

Lady Mallards: young, inexperienced; willing to try new things LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) The Worcester Prep girls’ tennis team went 12-2 in 2012 and won its seventh consecutive Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference title. While the Lady Mallards this year are a much younger, less experienced squad — just six of the 16 players on Coach Cyndee Hudson’s roster are veterans — that hasn’t

stopped them from eying an eighth title. The group consists of three juniors, seven sophomores and five freshmen. “They’ve really been working on improving their skills,” said Hudson, who has led the program for 13 seasons. “They’re enthusiastic and willing to try new things.” Captain Parker Kellam, a four-year player, is the team’s lone senior. She will play doubles with junior captain Lydia

Pritchard, a three-year member of the team. They have good chemistry and, according to Kellam, “we’re really goofy, but it works for the both of us.” The girls said they are up to the challenge of assisting the new players. “I don’t play tennis because I’m the best person out here, by any means, but [because] I enjoy it and I enjoy teaching others how to play,” Kellam said. See NINE on Page 38A

Cyndee Hudson

Keith Coleman


Ocean City Today

38A NEWS

Boys start 2013 season with 18-8 win over Parkside LISA CAPITELLI â&#x2013; Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) The Stephen Decatur boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lacrosse team opened the 2013 season in Salisbury last Friday with a competition against the Parkside Rams. The Seahawks were victorious 18-8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our defense pressured the ball and played very well. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give them room to work,â&#x20AC;? said Coach Scott Lathroum. Sophomore Corey Gwin and senior Riley McCabe scored four goals apiece. McCabe won 14 of the 21 faceoffs he took. Senior captain, goalie Brooks Gilbert, recorded three saves in three quarters. Sophomore Will Hastings stopped one shot in the fourth quarter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overall, I was happy with them. We had a lot of shots. We took 31 shots and scored 18 goals,â&#x20AC;? Lathroum said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just the little mental errors, just getting overly excited, overly aggressive. We had too many penalties (nine). We need to work on that because we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford to make those mistakes.â&#x20AC;? See SEAHAWKS on Page 42A

Nine players return to court for boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; team in â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13 Continued from Page 37A

Added Pritchard, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The team is young and we have a lot of new faces, but I think everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be really good â&#x20AC;Ś I feel pretty confident about this year.â&#x20AC;? The only singles player returning from last year is sophomore Tatjana Kondraschow. She will play in the No. 1 spot. Veterans who will also compete at singles are juniors Hannah Esham and Claire Stickler and sophomore Mattie Maull. Freshman Sonja Walker will play in the No. 5 position. Sophomore Fiona Reid will compete in doubles action as will newcomers Natalie Twilley, a sophomore, and freshman Julia Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Antonio. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With such a new team everything will be a learning experience and we hope to just get better every day,â&#x20AC;? Hudson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for another winning season and to be a strong contender for the ESIAC title. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to take everyone to accomplish that.â&#x20AC;? The boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; team finished 8-7 in 2012 under the direction of first-year Coach Dr.

Keith Coleman. He worked with the boys to develop their fundamentals, correct court positioning and tactics last year so he feels the Mallards are ahead of the game this season as nine of the 11 players on his roster are veterans. Worcesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top three singles players â&#x20AC;&#x201D; senior Tom Thornett, sophomore Quinn Lukas and junior Chase Schmehling â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are back to compete. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I expect a lot from those guys,â&#x20AC;? Coleman said. Added Thornett, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel like we have a good amount of young guys and a couple key freshmen prospects that have some talent.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being one of more skilled players, I can help them with technique and also hopefully be their captain and lead them and give them tips on what they can do better,â&#x20AC;? he continued. Sophomores Kyle Chandler and Erik Zorn will play fourth and fifth singles. Senior London Walker and sophomore Chris Choy will team up for first doubles

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OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep captains, senior Parker Kellam, pictured, and junior Lydia Pritchard will team up for doubles competition this season.

competition. Juniors Lucas Baier and Kyle Zarif and freshmen Jason Cook and Alex Choy will also play doubles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to try our hardest, give it our all every game and see what happens,â&#x20AC;? Lukas said. The teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto this year

is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Striving for Excellence,â&#x20AC;? but having fun is also important. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we put out our best every day, we can always walk off the court with our heads high, whether we win or lose,â&#x20AC;? Coleman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we play up to the level weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re capable of weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be successful. I feel extremely positive about the season.â&#x20AC;?

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MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

SPORTS 39A

Eight veterans back to compete for Worcester Prep boys’ lax Continued from Page 37A

tive Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference title. “Harrison is one of the best face-off guys around, maybe one of the best in the country. We won’t see anyone better,” Gates said. “He gives us a great chance every time he faces off to get the ball and that’s huge.” Senior attackman Gordon Abercrombie (Second Team All-Conference) will assist Brennan with captain duties. “I think I have an understanding of how Coach Gates wants things done. We

have a young team and I feel like I provide good leadership. [In fact,] both of us provide good leadership because we’ve both been around for four years,” Brennan Kevin Gates said. “We have the potential to be really good.” Added Abercrombie, “We’re very young, but we’re very talented, also. I think as some of the younger kids progress during the year they can fill some big gaps.”

Also returning is senior defender Chris Adkins (First Team), junior defensemen Luke Payne (Second Team) and Billy Brittingham, midfielder Jack Marshall and sophomores Jon Adkins (midfield) and Christian Bruder (attack). Newcomers who have stood out are freshmen Wyatt Richins (midfield), Mike Brittingham (long stick/defense) and Ross Dickerson (midfield), sophomore Sam Deeley (midfield), junior Thomas Buas (attack) and senior Seth Wilgus (midfield). Freshman Wade Walter has earned the starting spot in goal.

“Our offense is pretty strong. Defensively, we’re trying to do different things to throw teams off,” Gates said. “We’ve got some unbelievable coaches, so they’re going to be well coached.” The Mallards will compete in the ESIAC again the year, and they have also joined the Metro Independent Lacrosse League’s east division. “It’s going to be a big challenge. There’s a lot of good teams over the bridge we’re going to face and if we can compete with them, we can compete with anybody,” Abercrombie said.


Ocean City Today

40A SPORTS

SPORTS BRIEFS

ment, call Rob Conner 410-430-2002. To receive a player registration or a donor/sponsor form, e-mail sheriandrob@msn.com, subject: SEND ME THE OCES GOLF FORMS.

Boating course The Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12-05 in Ocean City will offer a Maryland Basic Boating Course at the Ocean Pines library from 6-9 p.m., April 16-18. This course meets the requirements of the Maryland Boating Safety Education Act that requires that anyone born after July 1, 1972 must possess a Maryland Basic Boating Safety Certificate to operate a boat in the state of Maryland. To receive this certificate, students must attend all three nights and pass a written exam on the last night. Discussions include basic boating information, local water navigation and piloting, knots, boat terms, trailering and maintenance, among other topics. The cost is $15 for adults and $10 for students ages 16 years or younger. For more information, call 410-629-1016 or e-mail cgaux1205@gmail.com.

Golf tournament The CRICKET Center, Worcester County’s child advocacy center, will sponsor a golf tournament on Friday, May 10, at The Bay Club (East Course) in Berlin. Cost is $75 per player or $300 per team, and includes 18 holes of golf, cart, breakfast and lunch at The Bay Club. Registration will increase to $85 per player after April 10. All proceeds will benefit the abused children of Worcester County. The tournament will begin with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Lunch and awards will immedi-

MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City flag football

TRI-RUNNING EVENT BENEFITS MENDED HEARTS Chris Klebe of OC Tri-Running Sport Inc., left, and Nina Wheeler, director of the Feet for the Little Beat 5K, present a $1,000 check to Kristin Johnson of Mended Little Hearts of Delmarva. The donation represents proceeds from the Feet for the Little Beat 5K, held March 2, at GlenRiddle in Berlin. Visit http://octrirunning.com for race results.

Ocean City is offering spring flag football league for adults. Each game will be four-onfour. The league is open to adults ages 18 and older, and begins April 15, running through June 17. The teams will play on Monday evenings at Northside Park Recreation Complex, 125th Street, between 6-9 p.m. The program is being offered for $350 per team with referee fees included. Teams interested in participating should contact Ron Strickler at Ocean City Recreation and Parks by April 8. Call 410-520-5164 or email at rstrickler@oceancitymd.gov.

Tortoise & the Hare Dare ately follow. Prizes will be awarded for first place team, longest drive (male and female) and closest to pin (male and female). For more information, or to register, contact Wendy Myers 410-641-0097.

OCES golf tourney The Ocean City Elementary School’s PTA will hold its second annual golf tournament on Thursday, April 18, at Ocean City Golf Club. Golfers will tee off at 1 p.m. Entry fee is $100 per player and includes a box lunch, goodie bag and Italian dinner. There will be the chance to win a new driver, a new

putter, a full set of Taylormade golf clubs and, with a hole in one, a new car from Barrett Dodge Chrysler Jeep in Berlin. All money raised will benefit the Ocean City Elementary Technology Fund. The PTA is looking for individuals and businesses that would like to make a monetary donation or would like to donate raffle prizes. The opportunity to sponsor a hole is also available. A $100 sponsor will have a sign posted at one of the holes with their name and graphics. Last year, more than $10,000 was raised, allowing the PTA to purchase 30 tablets for the school. This year, the goal is to buy 30 tablets. For more information about the tourna-

The 16th annual Tortoise & the Hare Dare, a 5K walk/run, will be held 9 a.m. Saturday, April 13, at Pocomoke River State Park-Shad Landing in Snow Hill. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. This is a free event and participants will receive a T-shirt. The walk is co-sponsored by the Worcester County Health Department, Worcester County Department of Recreation & Parks and Pocomoke River State Park.   After the walk, participants are encouraged to visit local health and recreation exhibits from 9:30-11 a.m. Pre-registration is encouraged. For additional information, or to register, call 410-632-0056.  


MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

SPORTS 41A

Seahawks tennis teams top Warriors in first match of yr.

Lady Seahawks hold off late Rams’ run, win 5-4 LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) The Stephen Decatur girls’ lacrosse team held off the Parkside Rams’ charge late in the second half of last Friday’s season opener and pulled out a 5-4 victory in Berlin. The Lady Seahawks got on the board early, when senior Eileen Hayman scored about 20 seconds into the competition. Senior captain Ashley Trice capitalized on a free-position shot 12:24 before halftime. Junior Sami Quilter gave Decatur a 30 advantage with six minutes remaining in the first half. Parkside cut the lead to two goals 1:50 before the break. Senior Alexis Martinek put the Seahawks on top 4-1 in the opening minutes of the second half. Payton VanKirk tallied the Berlin squad’s fifth goal about 10 minutes later. But the Rams didn’t back down. They scored twice then netted a third goal with two minutes left in the game. Decatur contained Parkside in the final minutes to win 5-4. “We’re working on a new [motion] offense and when we ran it right, we were open and we scored,” said Decatur Coach Bob Musitano. “Our defense played well the whole game. They seemed to be able to control what Parkside was doing. We

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) The Stephen Decatur girls’ tennis team shut out the Pocomoke Warriors, 7-0, in the season opener last Friday on the road. The Lady Seahawks who won their first through fifth singles matches were seniors Madison Pope (forfeit), Emmalee Murrell (8-1), Tori Whigham (8-2), Libby Withers (8-3) and Lexi Ashton (8-1). Juniors Ashley DePaul and Charlotte Petsche outscored their first doubles competition 8-0. Sophomore Delaney Iacona and junior Valerie Petsche earned an 8-0 victory at second doubles. “For the few days we’ve been outside and had the ability to hit, I thought the girls played well,” said Coach Jamie Greenwood. The weather has been a factor for teams this spring. Snow, for instance, caused the cancellation of practice the day before the March 22 match. Leading the boys’ team to a 5-2 victory, were seniors Tim VanVonno and Joe Iacona, who topped their second and third singles opponents 8-1 and 8-0, respectively. Logan Simpson, a senior,

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur sophomore Blair Yesko, left, battles for the ball with a Parkside player during last Friday’s season opener in Berlin. Decatur won 5-4.

just had some trouble clearing the ball and we let them get two easy goals at the end.” Senior Skylar Siegfried played in goal the first half and stopped five Parkside shots. Sophomore Jillian Petito took over in the second half and made five saves.

Overall, Musitano was pleased with the team’s first outing as the girls are still getting used to playing with each other, he said. The Seahawks will travel to Salisbury to play the James M. Bennett Clippers on Wednesday.

See COACHES on Page 43A

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Ocean City Today

42A SPORTS

MARCH 29, 2013

Seahawks outscore Bucs 6-2 in 2nd half, lose 10-7 Continued from Page 38A

On Tuesday, the Seahawks hosted the Kent Island Buccaneers. Lathroum said his team was prepared and knew the Bucs’ strategy, but the Berlin squad failed to execute its game plan. Kent Island led 5-0 at the end of the first quarter. Senior captain Andrew Ternahan scored about two minutes into the second quarter, but the visiting team tallied three additional goals to go into the break ahead 8-1. “They killed us on face-offs. We struggle every year with that against them,” Lathroum said. “We were constantly on

defense. We didn’t run our clears the way we were supposed to and they completely took us out of our game.” Lathroum said his players were upset with their performance because they knew they were better than what they showed on the field. During halftime, he told them that they’ve been in this position before and they have as much, if not more, talent then Kent Island. The Seahawks needed to play “our game” and fight to come back. Kent Island scored early in the third quarter, but Decatur never quit. Trailing 9-1, the Seahawks outscored the Bucs 6-1

in the remainder of the half. Kent Island won the game 10-7. “We played lacrosse in the second half. We were more patient and we had the ball in the offensive end,” Lathroum said. “When you go down 9-1, it’s hard to come back, especially against a good team, but we got back into it. They work hard.” Gilbert made seven saves in the goal for Decatur. Gwin, sophomore Shane Moore and senior Henry Hastings each scored twice. The James M. Bennett Clippers will visit Berlin on Wednesday to play the Seahawks at 5:30 p.m.

SD softball squad earns 19-4 win in season opener LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) The Stephen Decatur softball team scored 19 runs in five innings and held the Pocomoke Warriors to four during last Friday’s season opener in Berlin. “We did fine. It was cold, windy and unpleasant at times,” said Decatur Coach Don Howard. “We need to handle the ball better. We’ve got to sure up our defense a bit, but we will.” The Lady Seahawks tallied nine runs in the first inning. Pocomoke scored

three in the top of the third. In the bottom of the inning, Decatur tacked on nine additional runs to pull ahead 183. The Berlin squad notched its 19th run in the fourth. Decatur limited its opponent to one run in the fifth to end the game (10-run slaughter rule). Senior Jessica Iacona took the mound for the first three innings. She struck out five, walked one and allowed four hits. At the plate, Iacona went 2for-3, with three runs scored and one RBI. Junior Beth Laque pitched the final

two innings, striking out two, walking one and giving up three hits. Decatur scored 19 runs on 13 hits. Senior Jessica Bunting went 2-for-4, with two runs scored and three RBIs. Emma Ditzel, a junior, had two hits, including a solo home run in the third inning, and logged three RBIs. Laque (two runs scored, two RBIs) and her sister, Lauren (two runs scored, one RBI), a freshman, also contributed with two hits apiece. The Washington Jaguars will come to Berlin on Tuesday for a 4 p.m. game against Decatur.

Decatur baseball shuts out Pocomoke LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor

!

(March 29, 2013) The Stephen Decatur baseball team kicked off the 2013 season with a 14-0 shutout over the Pocomoke Warriors last Friday on the Seahawks’ home field in Berlin. Pitcher Lane Dillon, a freshman newcomer to the Decatur squad, threw a onehitter for the game’s five innings (10-run slaughter rule). He struck out five and walked three Pocomoke players. Veteran Dallas Harrington, a senior and three-year member of the team, led the Seahawks on offense, going 2-for-2 with a pair of doubles. “Since we lost four great seniors and a

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lot of leadership, I feel like I have a big role to fill leading the younger kids ... show them what they need to do and how to play the game right, the SD baseball way – just fundamentals, always having a good attitude and always respecting the game,” Harrington said after the team’s March 15 practice. Coach Rich Ferro was pleased with the Seahawks’ performance in the season opener. “Overall, Dillon was really good on the mound and we played defense behind him. Offensively, we had good at-bats and were selective,” he said. The Washington Jaguars will travel to Berlin on Tuesday to face the Seahawks at 4 p.m.

SD boys’ track team wins first meet; girls second LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) The Stephen Decatur boys’ outdoor track team won the March 21, five-school season opener in Ridgley, Md. The athletes not only had to battle each other, but also the elements, as snow and strong wind were also participants the event last Thursday. “I was happy with the win, but it wasn’t pretty to watch,” said Decatur Coach Jody Stigler. “It was an OK performance, considering the conditions.” Decatur scored 117 points. Kent Island was second with 103 points. Seahawks who won their individual events were seniors Kyle Kelly (400-meter run, 53.5 seconds) and Patrick Phillips (shot put, 42 feet 9 inches; discus, 123 feet 10 inches) and sophomores Jakhai Woodward (long jump, 17 feet 9 inches) and Lucas Duker (high jump, 5 feet 6 inches). Kelly and seniors Lance Ward, Dan Winters and Sonny Aroh took top honors in the 1,600-meter relay race (3:52.6). The Lady Seahawks scored 117 points, good for second place. Kent Island won the meet with 122 points. “Again, for the conditions and it being the first meet of the season, I thought the girls did OK,” Stigler said. Earning individual first-place honors for Decatur were senior Antonia Green (shot put, 27 feet), junior Rebecca Lederman (100-meter dash, 13 seconds), sophomore Hannah Wilson (high jump, 4 feet 4 inches) and freshman Emily Cook (300-meter hurdles, 59.3 seconds). Lederman, sophomore Amari Harmon, senior Shikerra Collick and junior Katie Collins crossed the finish line first in the 800-meter relay race (2:01.7). The Seahawks will have a few days off for spring break and will return to the track on Thursday, April 4. Decatur will host the meet, which kicks off at 4 p.m.

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

SPORTS 43A

Players are confident, coach says Continued from Page 37A

Molly Marshall (Div. I Furman University), who Rogers said is the “glue” of Worcester Prep’s defense and a good communicator in the backfield, and junior midfielder Lilly DiNardo (Div. I University of Virginia). According to an ESPN poll, DiNardo is the No. 4 recruit in the country among the junior class. Both girls received First Team AllConference honors at the end of the 2012 season, where the Mallards went 13-3. “I think in past years we’ve been a really young team with mostly freshmen and sophomores in starting positions, but now with my class and the class above me we’re really experienced,” said DiNardo, a three-year varsity player. “With my experience, I can help the midfield and offense and the other seniors on defense, their maturity back there will really make us a strong team. “We’ve been pretty much the same team except for a couple people the past two years so we’ve really grown to become close and we have a lot of fun,” she said. Returning in the goal is junior Maddie Pilchard, who has verbally committed to play at Div. I Stanford University. Pilchard had shoulder surgery last winter and missed most of the season. She will split time in goal with sophomore Carolyn Dorey. Also back to compete are seniors, captains Alex Bruder (midfield), who has committed to play at Div. II Queens University of Charlotte, and Div. II Wesleyan University of Connecticut-bound Meredith Smith (attack), Dara Pappas (defense), Ragen Doyle (midfield) and Meredith Soulé (attack) and sophomore Molly Soulé (midfield). Both Bruder and Smith were named to the 2012 All-Conference First Team. “The girls have a lot of confidence. We’re not going to be playing as safe this

Coaches pleased with performance in first tennis match

year because we have so much experience and depth,” Rogers said. “The girls can give 100 percent every second of the game because I can sub and we won’t lose a step. We’ll be running a strong pressure defense this year because we have a lot of athleticism and stamina, and on offense, we picked up right where we left off last year.” The Mallards will face some stronger competition this season, traveling across the bridge for a few games. The squad hopes to take home the Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference title this year. Worcester lost 9-8 to rival Sts. Peter & Paul in the 2012 championship game. “We want to win a banner and we want to have more recognition for our team, for Worcester Prep lacrosse because we don’t really get that much,” Marshall said. “If we beat all these big Baltimore schools and schools over the bridge, it will help a lot.”

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep senior captain Molly Marshall, left, defends junior Kristen Shriver during Tuesday’s practice at the Berlin school.

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logged an 8-0 shutout at fifth singles. First doubles partners, juniors Chase Eslin and Zach Elmer, edged out their competition 8-5. Junior Tyler Angelo and senior Steven Redner, newcomers to the Decatur team, won their second doubles match 8-0. Coach Steve Berquist said the Seahawks played well overall and that it was a good start to the season. “I was really pleased. Pocomoke had a good team,” Berquist said. “Tim and Joe really handled their players and Logan played great at fifth singles. First doubles was a tough match, but they pulled it out, and Tyler and Steven’s teamwork from soccer carried over and they did a great job.” Decatur will travel to Princess Anne and play the Washington Jaguars on Tuesday.

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MARCH 29, 2013


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BUSINESS www.oceancitytoday.net

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PAGE 45A

REAL ESTATE REPORT

BUSINESS BRIEFS

What buyers really want in a new house

Shamrock names top Feb. producers Mary Burgess has been named Shamrock Realty Group’s top Listing agent for February. Burgess joined Shamrock Realty Group in 2010, and has consistently been a top producer. She is licensed to sell real estate in Maryland. Jim Volk was the company’s top sales agent for February. He has been with the company since 2009. He maintains real estate licenses in Maryland and Delaware. Burgess and Volk can be reached at 410-641-3611.

LAUREN BUNTING ■ Contributing Writer (March 29, 2013) For the first time since 2007, the National Association of Realtors conducted its Profile of Buyers’ Home Feature Preferences in 2013. This report features buyer preferences when purchasing a home, and specifically surveyed those who purchased a home between 2010 and 2012. The report highlighted many differences in preferences when it comes to factors such as region, demographics and household composition. A few examples are: ■ Single women and firsttime buyers tend to purchase smaller/older homes, while married and repeat buyers tend to purchase larger homes. ■ Southerners were more likely to want a home less than five years old and in a wooded lot and placed a higher importance on central air conditioning. Among all 33 home features included in the survey, central air conditioning was the most important to the most buyers; 65 percent of buyers considered this feature very important. The next most important feature was a walkin closet in the master bedroom; 39 percent of buyers considered this feature very important. The features on which buyers placed the highest dollar value were waterfront properties and homes that were less than five years old. Thirty-two percent of buyers would be willing to pay a median of $5,420 more for a home on the waterfront, and 40 percent of buyers would be willing to pay a median of $5,020 more for a home that was less than five years old. See HALF on Page 46A

Job seekers meet with local and regional employers, including those from BLU Crab House & Raw Bar, located next to Ember’s Restaurant on 24th Street, about available positions during the 27th annual Ocean City Job Fair at the Ocean City convention center last year. According to Melanie Pursel, executive director of the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, organizers estimated between 4,500 and 4,700 job seekers attended the 2012 event.

ONE-STOPSUMMERSHOP Ocean City Job Fair offers seasonal positions, housing, as well as select year-round opportunities LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) Resort residents and visitors searching for a part-time, summer/seasonal job or full-time, year-round employment will find a number of options to choose from on Saturday, all in one location, during the 28th annual Ocean City Job Fair. The event, sponsored by the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce in partnership with the Town of Ocean City, takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street. There is no cost to attend. Approximately four million people travel to Ocean City between Memorial Day and Labor Day each year. While these visitors make the trip to sunbathe on the beach, shop, walk the Boardwalk and take in all of what the town has to offer, others come to the resort to work. The job fair provides potential employees with a one-stop shop of available

jobs, according to Lisa Dennis, events director of the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce. More than 75 businesses will be represented so job seekers can submit applications to a number of employers all in one place. “They can apply for multiple jobs and they don’t have to drive around to do it,” Dennis said. Many businesses also hire on the spot, so Dennis suggests attendees arrive early, “dress for success” and be prepared. A good first impression is important in such a competitive job market because employers have such a large base to choose from.

Although Laser Tone will provide free onsite photocopy services, it is recommended that job seekers take plenty of copies of their resumé. A generic application is available online at www.oceancity.org, under the “Ocean City Job Fair” link on the events page. Most employers are looking for summer/seasonal employmees, but full-time positions are also available. Businesses that will be on hand include hotels, motels, restaurants/bars, amusements, retail stores, specialty shops, real estate and property management companies and marinas. See FAIR on Page 46A

Antonioli, Kappes join ResortQuest Christina Meiklejohn Antonioli has joined ResortQuest Real Estate’ Marketplace office on Coastal Highway near Bethany Beach, Del. Antonioli received her bachelor’s degree from Elon College in North Carolina and her master’s degree from Salisbury University in Maryland. She passed the Delaware Real Estate Sales Course and recently received her Delaware Real Estate License. She will join the Tammy Hadder/Anna Meiklejohn Team. She is a member of the Sussex County Association of Realtors, the Delaware Association of Realtors and the National Association of Realtors. Michael Kappes has also joined the firm and will work in the Bethany Beach office. A University of Delaware graduate and licensed real estate agent since 1998, Kappes specializes in the listing and sale of resort properties in Delaware and Maryland. He is a member of the Sussex County Association of Realtors, the Delaware Association of Realtors, the Coastal Association of Realtors and the National Association of Realtors.

Ocean City chamber offers free seminar The Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce will present a seminar on human resources policies and social media in the workplace at 4 p.m. on Thursday, April 4. The free seminar will be led by Joe Giordano, owner of Consulting, Training and Development Services. He has more than 35 years experience in the human resources and leadership development arenas. The seminar will be held in the Delaware Room of the carousel Hotel, located on 117th Street in Ocean City. The Business After Hours and Expo will follow at 5 p.m. For more information, contact Lisa Dennis at lisa@oceancity.org or visit www.oceancity.org.


Ocean City Today

46A BUSINESS

REAL ESTATE REPORT

Half of buyers take on home project in first three months

Business expo to offer seminars, networking Annual chamber event set for April 4, at resort hotel LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor

Continued from Page 45A

When it came to rooms that buyers want in a home, 55 percent of buyers thought it was very important to have a living room, although buyers in the Northeast placed more importance on a home with a dining room. Buyers aged 55 and older placed more importance on a bedroom on the main level of the house. Buyers aged 35 to 54 placed more importance on a laundry room, while those with children placed more importance on a family room. The two most common rooms buyers were willing to spend more for were a laundry room and a den/study/home office/library. Within three months of a home purchase, 53 percent of buyers undertook a home improvement project. The typical buyer spent $4,550 on various projects. Remodeling the kitchen was the most common home improvement project and bathrooms were a close second. — Lauren Bunting is a member of the Coastal Association of Realtors and a licensed REALTOR® with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.

MARCH 29, 2013

(March 29, 2013) The sixth annual Greater Ocean City Chamber Business Marketplace Expo, scheduled for April 4, at the Carousel Hotel on 118th Street, is an event for business owners and representatives to interact. “It’s a chance for businesses to come in and see what other businesses in the area have to offer,” said Chamber Events Director Lisa Dennis. “It’s a good opportunity for people in the busi-

ness community to network with each other and do business with each other.” Approximately 35 businesses will be featured. Those interested in exhibiting should contact Dennis at 410-213-0552 to see is space still available. Two professional development seminars will be offered from 4-5 p.m. Mark Luterman, CEO of Small Business Secret Weapon, will present a seminar focusing on “Taming the Silent Business Killer” and how to combat the No. 1 reason small businesses fail. Joe Giordano, owner of Consulting, Training and Development Services, has more than 35 years experience in the human resources and leadership development arenas. His seminar will

highlight, “HR Policies & Social Media.” To register for the seminars, visit the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce Web site, www.oceancity.org. There is no cost to attend the expo, which will run until 7 p.m. This year, the event will be combined with the Chamber’s April Business After Hours, which will take place from 5-7 p.m. During Business After Hours, there will be raffles, 50/50 drawing, complimentary appetizers and happy hour prices. Participants will also have the opportunity to win a Kindle Fire. Carousel Hotel is the expo title sponsor. Other sponsors include D3 Corp, Matice Interactive, Comcast Spotlight, Q105 and Print Shack.

Fair expects75 resort businesses,5k applicants Continued from Page 45A

The Ocean City Beach Patrol, Ocean Pines Recreation & Parks Department, US Army and Montgomery County Police Department will also be represented. A list of employers scheduled to attend is available on the Chamber Web site. “There’s a little bit of everything this year. A few years ago it was basically seasonal jobs, but now there are places hiring for year-round positions,” Dennis

said. “Everybody is encouraged to come. There’s something for everyone.” The job fair has become increasingly popular because of economics. Approximately 5,000 applicants showed up to the 2012 event and Dennis anticipates about the same turnout this year. “Six years ago, about 800 people attended, but with the economy changing, [attendance] has quadrupled,” Dennis said.

Job seekers range from high school students to older adults, all with varying skills. Housing information will also be available at the job fair. Greg Eberts and his staff at One-Stop Job Market, based in Salisbury, will be on hand to assist job seekers. For more information about the Ocean City Job Fair, call 410-213-0552 or visit www.oceancity.org.

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MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

BUSINESS 47A


Ocean City Today

48A BUSINESS

Winner of the Wine Spectatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award of Excellence for 15 Years and The Best of Excellence Award for 2010 & 2011!

MARCH 29, 2013

The Horizons Oceanfront Restaurant and Ocean Club feature Oceanfront Dining at its Finest with American and Continental Cuisine, serving Breakfast 7am - Noon, Lunch 11am - 2pm and Dinner 5pm - 10pm

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CALENDAR 17

SENIOR SLANT PAGE 8B

CROSSWORD 12

DINING GUIDE 10

ENTERTAINMENT 5

Lifestyle

MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

Easter Hoppenings Egg hunts, games and breakfast with Peter Cottontail among activities on tap this weekend in Ocean City and its surrounding areas

LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) Family events and activities are scheduled to take place in Ocean City, Ocean Pines, Berlin and Snow Hill this weekend to celebrate the Easter holiday.

OCEAN CITY:

■ The 14th annual Easter Art & Craft and Kids Fun Fair will begin at 10 a.m. today and Saturday at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street. The festivities will continue until 5 p.m. both days. The Kids Fair will feature Easter egg hunts, carnival games, Cascading Carlos’ juggling lessons and demonstrations, Mr. Jim and his puppets, magic by John Donaldson and Balloonamania. Children can also guess the number of jellybeans in a jar and draw at one of the coloring tables. “It’s fun for kids of any age, particularly the younger kids,” said event Organizer Mike Wicklein of Ocean Promotions. For an additional charge, there will be activities such as sand art, figurine painting, hair wrapping, face painting and temporary tattoos. A moon bounce, obstacle course, swing, shark slide and rock climbing wall will also be available for children. The Easter Bunny will be on hand to take photos

with attendees. Approximately 90 vendors will offer merchandise for children and adults, including jewelry, paintings, candles, glassware, accessories and pet-related items, among others. Admission costs $4 for adults and $3 for senior citizens (60 and older), military, police and fire personnel (with ID) and students 4 and older. Children ages 3 and younger will be admitted free. Approximately 4,500 to 5,000 people attended the two-day show last year, Wicklein said. For more information and to view the entertainment schedule, call 410-2138090 or visit www.oceanpromotions. info. ■ At Northside Park on 125th Street, Peter Cotton Tail will greet children at the Easter Bunny Funshop on Saturday from 1-3 p.m. The cost is $6 for Ocean City residents and $8 for non-residents. Funshop activities for children ages 2-10 will include comedic skits by Paul Hadfield, carnival games, egg dyeing, face painting, arts and crafts and egg hunts. Refreshments will be available. Approximately 200 children, along with their families, participate in the activities annually, according to Recreation Department Supervisor Lynda Brittingham. “It’s a jam-packed two hours, but it’s a lot of fun for everybody,” she said.

Those who would like to attend are asked to register in advance. Register online at www.oceancitymd.gov stop by the Northside Park Recreation Complex. For more information, call the recreation department at 410-250-0125. ■ The Red Door Community Center at St. Paul’s By-The-Sea will present a free Easter egg hunt will in the sand at 10 a.m. on Sunday at Third Street and the beach. For more information, visit http://reddoors.org.

OCEAN PINES:

■ The Spring Celebration and Easter Egg Hunt is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday at White Horse Park. There will be face painting, a moon bounce, pony rides, arts and crafts and egg hunts throughout the day. Wild Willy Woo Woo will wow the crowd with magic tricks. Vendors will also be on hand. Easter bonnet and basket decorating contests will take place at 12:30 p.m. Typically, 500-600 guests participate in the Ocean Pines activity annually, according to Recreation Program Supervisor Debbie Donahue. There is no cost to get in. Refreshments will be provided by the Kiwanis Club. “It’s just a fun atmosphere,” Donahue said. “It’s a big event for us.” Easter candy donations are still being accepted at the Ocean Pines See BREAKFAST on Page 15B

FOOD FOR THOUGHT By Deborah Lee Walker PAGE 4B

www.oceancitytoday.net

PAGE 1B

COMMUNITY BRIEFS

DeHart elected to St. Martin’s board Natalee DeHart was recently elected to the board of directors for The Historic St. Martin’s Foundation, which presides over the management of the circa 1756 preservation project located in Showell. St. Martin’s Natalee DeHart newest board member earned a bachelor’s degree from Towson University and a master’s degree in education from Loyola University. She is the project manager for D3 Corp in West Ocean City and is the creative director for Good Clean Fun Life, an online arts and entertainment magazine, which she and her husband founded. “Natalee’s amazing array of talents adds an element to the board of directors that we were searching for in the community,” said board President Sherrie Beckstead. “We know that she will be an excellent addition to our board.” DeHart is the mother of two children and resides with her family in Berlin.

Poker league kicks off Saturday in OC Beginning this holiday weekend, Resort Poker League will host a weekly free poker event at Peaky’s Restaurant on 138th Street, overlooking the Ocean City skyline. The newly opened restaurant is located on the eighth floor of the Fenwick Inn. The first event will be held Saturday, March 30. “One of our league’s most popular games in the past,” says Resort Poker League’s co-owner Lee Chidester, “was at Jordan’s Rooftop, the old restaurant in the Fenwick Inn. I think Peaky’s, as the new vendor, is primed to surpass all our expectations. It’s got it all.” On Saturday, April 6, Resort Poker League is co-sponsoring with Peaky’s their largest Mega Tournament of the season, where prize giveaways include gift certificates to Continued on Page 11B


Ocean City Today

2B LIFESTYLE

MARCH 29, 2013

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MANST TAGE.ORG • 302-436-3015 FREEMANSTAGE.ORG FREEMANST 53 PERFORMANCE LD AY & LABOR D AY PERFORMANCES S BETWEEN MEMORIAL DAY DAY UST T 4 MILE S WE EST T OF FENWICK K ISLAN ISLAND O JUST MILES WEST ISLAND,, DE & OCEAN CITY CITY,, MD sponsors & gr grantors: antors: The Freeman Stage at Bayside is a program of the Joshua M. Freeman Foundation, which is a 501(c)3 nonprofit fundraising organization. This program is made possible, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency dedicated to nurturing and supporting the arts in Delaware, in partnership with the National Endowment fo or the Arts.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

LIFESTYLE 3B

Food, wine pairing to benefit Coastal Hospice at theOcean LISA CAPITELLI ■ Assistant Editor (March 29, 2013) Guests will have the opportunity to sample bites from more than a dozen Ocean City restaurants on April 4, during the fourth annual “Taste of Finer Things,” a food and wine pairing party to benefit Coastal Hospice at the Ocean. “It’s a great social event,” said “Taste of Finer Things” committee Chairwoman Stephanie Meehan. Other committee members include Pam Buckley, Karen Cramer, Cathy Donovan, Marcia Hirsch, Marsha Howarth, Elaine Jacobs, Donna Leiner, Madalaine How, Macky Stansell and Gayle Widdowson. “I think it’s a great start of our [busy] season in Worcester County and Ocean City.” This year’s event will take place at Harrison’s Harbor Watch, located at the southern end of the Ocean City Boardwalk near the inlet. The reception, which features a variety of food paired with wines, is scheduled to begin at 6:30 p.m. Representatives from local restaurants — including Adolfo’s, Atlantic Hotel, The Bonfire, Crabs to Go, Ember’s, Harrison’s Harbor Watch, Hooked, Jules, Macky’s Bayside, OC Wasabi, The Palette and Seacrets — will be on hand to present and serve the food. Sweet Disposition and Wockenfuss will provide the desserts, and Reliable Churchill the wines. “The selection of food is wonderful. What some of these restaurants are doing is just tremendous,” Meehan said. Musical entertainment will be provided by Louis Wright. Tickets cost $75 and are available online at www.coastalhospice.org or by calling 410-641-5481. Organizers are encouraging those who would like to attend to purchase tickets in advance. A grand raffle will feature Waterford Crystal goblets donated by Kuhn’s Jewelers of Salisbury, accompanied by a variety of wines. There will also be a silent auction. “As always, we are so grateful to those restaurants that participate in this wonderful event,” Coastal Hospice President Alane Capen said. “We also truly appreciate the ‘Taste of Finer Things’ committee for putting together this great fundraiser. They are a wonderful group of volunteers and we could not hold this event without their hard work and dedication.” Approximately 125 guests attended the 2012 event, helping to raise about $12,000 for the organization. Coastal Hospice, founded in 1980, is a private nonprofit community program that provides traditional hospice services, palliative care, bereavement support, education and training to patients and their families in Worcester, Wicomico, Somerset and Dorchester counties. Approximately 100 people are employed by Coastal Hospice and more

than 300 individuals volunteer. Its main office is located in Salisbury. Proceeds from the event will benefit Coastal Hospice at the Ocean, a planned hospice residence to be built in Berlin that will provide medical support to patients in a home-like setting. “We’ve all had family members and friends who’ve used Coastal Hospice. This event is a great way to raise awareness in the community,” Meehan stated in a press release. In December 2011, Coastal Hospice purchased six acres of land in Berlin off Broad Street for a 16,000-square-foot Hospice house. From the permits and land purchase to furnishing and landSee HOSPICE on Page13B

Committee members working to organize the April 4 “Taste of Finer Things” event at Harrison’s Harbor Watch to benefit Coastal Hospice at the Ocean, clockwise from top, are Gayle Widdowson, Elaine Jacobs, Stephanie Meehan, Donna Leiner, Cathy Donovan, Madalaine How, Karen Cramer and Pam Buckley.


Ocean City Today

4B LIFESTYLE

Cooking eggs may seem trivial,but it’s not so easy that affect the cooking of eggs: altitude, the age of the eggs, the size of the pot that the eggs are cooked in, and the protein bonding temperature. In high altitudes, the atmospheric pressure is lower than at sea level. Above 2,000 feet, water boils at a lower temperature (208 degrees Fahrenheit instead of 212 degrees). This means that it also simmers at a lower temperature. For about every 500 feet of ascent, the boiling point is lowered 1 degree. As a result, expect to add a bit of additional cooking time to ensure the eggs reach the desired internal consistency. The age of the egg is another factor. Believe it or not, but fresh farm eggs are good for frying, but not for boiling. The inner membrane of the egg sticks to the white, making them difficult to boil accurately. However, this adherence breaks down after a few days and then the recently hatched eggs are acceptable for cooking in hot water. Choosing the right size pot in which to cook your eggs is probably the most overlooked step in boiling eggs. First, bring the eggs to room temperature; they are much less likely to crack in hot water. The eggs must not be stacked but be placed in one layer. Placing eggs on top

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Altitude, age, temperature and size of pot important DEBORAH LEE WALKER ■ Contributing Writer (March 29, 2013) As one progresses down the path of maturity, the rainbow of colorful memories seems brighter. Our thoughts are nestled in the comforts of yesterday, but surface when the appropriate seasoning is added. Our “basket of goodies” is comprised of many surprises; sorting out our “favorites” is part of the fun. Spring has finally arrived. The azure sky is mirrored with the peeping of emerald green grass. What’s in between is the question of the day. Easter is synonymous with dyed eggs, deviled eggs, and egg hunts. But as we prepare for this holiday, how much do we know about the physical components of an egg? More specifically, what happens chemically to an egg as heat is applied? A brief discussion imparts knowledge, which, in turn, produces confidence. Let us delve into the cookery of the perfect hard-boiled egg. Cooking an impeccable egg may seem trivial, but the task is not as easy as one thinks. There are a number of variables

On the Water

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Rumors of a change in the workplace could make you a mite uneasy about going ahead with implementing your ideas. Best advice: Ignore the talk and proceed as planned. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Everyone has an opinion on how to handle a recent business suggestion. Thank them for their advice. Then go ahead and follow your own fine instincts. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) While home is your main focus this week, new issues in the workplace need your attention as well. Take things step by step. Pressures ease in time for weekend fun. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Be less rigid when handling a relationship problem. You might believe you’re in the right, but try to open your mind to the possibilities of facts you’re currently not aware of. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Leos and Leonas run at a hectic pace throughout much of the week. But by the weekend, the Lions’ Dens become a purrrfect place for you Fine Felines to relax in. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Change is favored early in the week. This should make it easier for you to reassess your plans for handling a troubling professional relationship. Good luck. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A suggestion from a colleague could give your professional project that long-needed boost. Meanwhile, someone close to you still needs your emotional support. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Before complying with a colleague’s request, check to see that the action benefits all, not just one person’s agenda. Continue firming up those travel plans. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your social life is on the upswing, and the only problem is deciding which invitations to accept. Enjoy yourself before settling down for some serious work next week. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) With your creative aspects on high, you might want to restart your work on that novel or painting you put aside. Your efforts will bring a surge in your self-esteem. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) While you’re generous with others, be sure you’re not overlooking your own needs. Take time to assess your situation and make adjustments where necessary. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Being applauded for your achievement is great. But watch out that you don’t start acting like a star. It could lose your valuable support with your next project. BORN THIS WEEK: Your strong belief in justice, along with your leadership qualities, help you protect the rights of others.

of each other can result in uneven cooking. Add enough cold water to cover them completely by 1 inch of water over the top of the eggs. Too much water will take too long for the water to come to a boil, which can throw off the timing and produce rubbery eggs. Protein bonding temperature is important for understanding the transformation of egg whites and yolks. Under 140 degrees, the white’s protein unfurls, but at 150 degrees the protein in egg whites coagulates and the protein in egg yolks congeals at 158 degrees. The longer one heats the proteins, the tighter they will bond with each other. The tightness of these bonds determines whether the eggs are cooked just right or overcooked. This is the key to excellence. Deviled eggs are so diversified and can be served year-round. New Year’s Eve is ideal for a crown of caviar. Smoked salmon (deviled eggs) brightens any brunch menu. Fresh herbs are another way to highlight special occasions. But my favorite is Eastern Shore deviled eggs with a surprise of crabmeat. Piping the egg mixture over the crabmeat makes it easier to eat and keeps the precious hunks of crabmeat intact. Piping the egg mixture also adds to the elegant presentation. Eastern Shore deviled eggs with crabmeat is picture-perfect for an Easter menu. Enjoy! See DEVILED on Page 9B

Friday, March 29th • 9pm No Cover

2 Guys & A Mama Saturday, March 30th • 9pm No Cover

Ginger Wednesday, April 3rd Happy Hour • Deck Party 4pm-8pm

Sir Rod

HAPPY HOUR Monday thru Friday 4-7pm LATE NIGHT HAPPY HOUR 75th St. & The Bay, Ocean City, MD 21842 • (410) 524-7575

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Sunday, April 14 Beginning @ 2pm

Teenage Rust And The Fabulous Rustettes

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MARCH 29, 2013

Sunday thru Thursday 10pm-2am AN OCEAN CITY TRADITION Serving the Entire Menu Daily, Year Round 11 am - 1:30 am

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Ocean City Today

ENTERTAINMENT www.oceancitytoday.net

MARCH 29, 2013

PAGE 5B

APPEARING LIVE 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILL 9636 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 410-213-9204 March 29: Johnny Mojo, 6-10 p.m. March 30: Louis Wright, 6-10 p.m. ADOLFO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 13th Street and the Boardwalk in the Beach Plaza Hotel 410-289-4001 March 29-30: Rhonda Apple and Dale Britt

SIR ROD BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay 410-524-7575 March 29: 2 Guys & A Mama, 9 p.m. March 30: Ginger, 9 p.m. April 3: Sir Rod, 5-8 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Saturday: Phil Perdue on Piano COTTAGE CAFÉ Route 1, Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 Every Friday: DJ Bump, 5-8 p.m. Every Tuesday: Pub Party Trivia w/DJ Bump, 6-9 p.m. FAGER’S ISLAND 60th Street and the bay 410-524-5500 March 29: DJ Hook, 9 p.m.; Mayday Mayday, 10 p.m. March 30: DJ Groove, 9 p.m.; No Green Jelly Beanz, 10 p.m. April 1: Bryan Clark, 5 p.m. GALAXY 66 66th Street, bayside 410-723-6762 March 29: Philly George, 8 p.m. to midnight March 30: DJ Rob Cee, 8 p.m. to midnight HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 March 29: Ladies Night w/DJ Billy T, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. March 30: Simple Truth, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

BJ’s on the Water: Wednesday April 3, 5-8 p.m. March 31: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T/DJ Bigler, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. April 4: Opposite Directions, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

Tony Vega, 6-10 p.m. Every Monday: DJ Norm, 6-9 p.m. Every Wednesday: DJ Norm, 6-9 p.m.

HARPOON HANNA’S Route 54 and the bay Fenwick Island, Del. 800-227-0525 302-539-3095 Every Friday: Dave Hawkins, 7-11 p.m. Every Saturday: Dave Sherman, 7-11 p.m. Every Tuesday: Team Trivia, 7 p.m. Every Thursday: Texas Holdem’ Poker Tournament, 7 p.m.

JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB 56th Street, bayside 410-524-7499 March 29: Open Juke Box, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. March 30: Lauren Glick & the Mood Swingers, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

HIGH STAKES Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 Every Sunday: Bingo, 2 p.m. Every Wednesday: Texas Hold’em Poker, 7 p.m. March 29: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; DJ Zman, 9 p.m. March 30: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; DJ Rupe, 9 p.m. HOOTERS Rt. 50 & Keyser Point Rd. West Ocean City 410-213-1841 March 29: Alex & Shiloh, 8 p.m. to midnight March 30: Loud Love, 8 p.m. to midnight HOUSE OF WELSH 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 888-666-0728 302-541-0728 Every Friday-Sunday: Jam Session, 4-6 p.m.;

LIFESPEED Seacrets: Saturday, March 30, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.

OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean 410-524-3535 March 29-30: Power Play, 9 p.m. SCHOONER’S RESTAURANT In the Princess Royale 91st Street and the ocean 410-524-7777 Every Friday and Saturday: Harry O, 7-11 p.m.

LOUD LOVE Hooters: Saturday, March 30, 8 p.m. to midnight

SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay 410-524-4900 March 29: Blue Label, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 30: Lifespeed, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.; John McNutt Band, 5-9 p.m.; Element K, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. SMITTY MCGEE’S Route 54 West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-436-4716 Every Thursday and Friday: Randy Lee Ashcraft & the Saltwater Cowboys, 8 p.m. March 30: Old School, 8 p.m.

HARRY O

RHONDA APPLE AND DALE BRITT

Schooner’s Restaurant: Every Friday and Saturday, 7-11 p.m.

Adolfo’s Italian Restaurant: Friday and Saturday, March 29-30


Ocean City Today

6B ENTERTAINMENT

MARCH 29, 2013

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Chester River Runoff entertains the crowd.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Olga Lynn and her 16-month-old daughter, Anastasia, dance to the music. (Right) Jeff Kauffman serves Dogfish Head beers.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Several hundred people take part in the festivities.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

ENTERTAINMENT 7B

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Opposite Directions acoustic duo, Bob Wilkinson, left, and Darin Engh enjoy the celebration. (Right) Musician Shawn Owen tunes his guitar before taking the stage.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Dawn Hodge and Marco Hiemenz sample some of the brews.

BREWGRASS 2013 The third annual Brewgrass event took place last Saturday at Fager’s Island on 60th Street. Guests had the opportunity to sample craft beer from Evolution Craft Brewing Company (Salisbury), Flying Dog Brewery (Frederick, Md.), Dogfish Head Craft Brewed Ale (Milton and Rehoboth Beach, Del.), Union Craft Brewery (Baltimore) and Burley Oak Brewery (Berlin), snack on Southern-style barbecue, all while listening to bluegrass music provided Chester River Runoff and Saltwater Stringband. OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Jen McLeod pours Union Craft Brewery beers. (Left) Amy and Chris Unger of Ocean Pines were on hand for the third annual festival.

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Ocean City Today

8B LIFESTYLE

MARCH 29, 2013

Wealth of Feb. holidays makes March confusing for columnist SENIOR SLANT

Kemp didn’t lose days here and there, but a full month IRISH KEMP ■ Contributing Writer

OCEAN PHOTO COURTESY IRISH KEMP

Friends gather at the Knights of Columbus hall in Ocean City.

OCEAN PHOTO COURTESY IRISH KEMP

McKenzie Strieder, left, Lauren Holloway and John Dehm are part of the good looking staff at the Clarion in Ocean City.

(March 29, 2013) Here comes Peter Cottontail, hopping down the St. Patrick’s Day trail. What happened to the month of March? I’ve lost a day here and there, as in thinking it was Monday on a Tuesday, but losing a month is scary. Maybe it was that humongously bodaciously amount of holidays, such as Valentine’s Day, Ash Wednesday and Presidents Day embedded in the same time frame as St. Patrick’s Day and Easter Sunday. I’m writing it off as a wee bit ‘o Irish madness or an 87th birthday brain rattler. Life on our shore is never a bore. New in town and want to be found? Join or volunteer your services at the organizations, such as the absolutely free adultplus Mac Center, adjacent to the convention center, Knights of Columbus, Delmarva Irish-American Club, Sons of Italy, Elks or a local church of choice. Feel free to drop by the Knights’ hall, behind St. Lukes on 100th Street or the Elks

Lodge, bayside at 138th Street, any day of the week. Locals could get the word out about events around town by circulating their church bulletin. A word to the wise wives of the freshly retired: not an idle threat if your guy repeatedly tells you all he wants to do for the rest of his life is lounge in his recliner watching the boob tube. It could happen. Don’t be snowed by that oft-repeated ploy, “You make the best spaghetti sauce, hon. Why go out?” When discussing this issue, if your women’s intuition tells you he’s gonna’ walk away mid-sentence, do a March madness “full press” and hold on his foot. Where there’s fire, there’s smoke. Not to worry, folks, it’s coming from the candles of birthday celebrators Diane Hughes and musican Bob, Dawn McGee, Steve Sullivan, Carlee Archer, Jim Salembene, Patti Burns, Ed and son Mike Holson, Anita Louise, Charlie Close, Kathy O’Connor, Joe Mulholland, Chris Berard, John Vittek and birthday guy, Redskins rooter Jim Halsey and his pretty, Pat. Congratulations to anniversary celebraSee REMEMBER on Page 9B

RACING FOR

______. We all know someone.

REGISTER NOW!

Will we see you at the starting line?

2ND ANNUAL KOMEN MARYLAND OCEAN CITY RACE FOR THE CURE ®

SUNDAY, APRIL 21, 2013 Ocean City, Maryland 410-938-8990 | www.komenmd.org/OC


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

LIFESTYLE 9B

Deviled eggs can be served year-round FOOD FOR THOUGHT Continued from Page 4B

Deviled Eggs: Eastern Shore Style 8 large eggs 1/3 cup Hellmann’s mayonnaise 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon rice vinegar 1 tablespoon shallot, minced 4 rounded tablespoons of crabmeat kosher salt to taste smoked paprika for garnish Old Bay seasoning for garnish piping bag with decorative tip 1. Place eggs in a medium saucepan. Add enough cold water to cover by 1 inch. Bring to a rolling boil. Remove pan from heat, cover, and let stand for 13 minutes.

2. While the eggs are cooking, combine mayonnaise, mustard, vinegar, and shallots in a small bowl and mix thoroughly. 3. When eggs are cooked, rinse in cold water to stop the process of cooking. Peel eggs and slice lengthwise. Remove yolks, transfer them to the mayonnaise mixture, and blend until very smooth. 4. Add 1/2 tablespoon of crab to each half of the egg white. Pipe seasoned yolk mixture on top; keep in mind the art of presentation. Sprinkle Old Bay and paprika on eggs as a garnish. Secret Ingredient: Change. “A rolling stone can gather no moss” … Publilius Syrus.

Remember to brake for bunnies SENIOR SLANT Continued from Page 8B

tors Joe and Margaret Cain, Dennis and Carol Roarty, Joe and Jane Mulholland and to my son, PJ and Melissa Kemp. Breaking up is hard to do. At my age, there’s no wrong side of the bed to get out of, but one has to be cautious about sudden moves. Ya’ just never know which body parts are still asleep. Giving up holiday celebrating, the

likes of St. Patrick’s Day weekend, was a real downer for this old Irish broad. My luv, Skip’s ailing big toe wouldn’t let him go. Home alone was not an option. My puter’s diagnosis: gout. It suggested a berries and bananas diet. Remember that pain cure, it worked. The Kemps are looking forward to their quarter of the way to St. Patrick’s Day celebration in June. Have a great Easter and be sure to brake for bunnies. C U in OC Today!

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10B LIFESTYLE

Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

Get a Direct Link to Your Business

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILLE, 9936 Stephen Decatur Highway, West Ocean City 410-213-9204 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual and family-friendly, featuring great American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner at affordable prices. Open seven days a week, year-round. Happy hour daily, 3-7 p.m. Entertainment Friday through Sunday. ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.ocmdrestaurants. com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ADOLFO’S, 13th Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-4001 / www.ocadolfos.com / $$ / V-MC-AE / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Northern and southern Italian dishes, prepared fresh daily. Quiet, intimate atmosphere for couples, room for large families or choose to enjoy our outside seating with views of the ocean. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. Open Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. Open 7 days a week, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. ■ DUFFY’S TAVERN, 130th Street, Montego Bay Shopping Center, Ocean City 410-250-1449 / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Unique Irish tavern serving the best steaks, seafood and over-stuffed sandwiches. A local’s favorite with authentic Irish specialities, including shepard’s pie and corned beef and cabbage. Outdoor seating available. Open for lunch and dinner. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410524-5500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar / Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and

MARCH 29, 2013

seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside. ■ FRESCO’S, 82nd Street, Ocean City 410-524-8202 / www.ocfrescos.com / $$$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / On the bay, serving seafood, steaks and pasta in an intimate atmosphere. Reservations highly recommended. ■ GALAXY 66 BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / $$-$$$ / V-MAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Contemporary restaurant offering light fare and full entrees. Award- winning wine list, signature drinks and cocktails. ■ GIUSEPPE O’LEARY, Sunset Avenue, West Ocean City 410-213-2868 / www.submarinaoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full bar / Featuring homemade Italian cuisine in a cozy atmosphere. Open year-round. Happy hour food and drink specials Monday-Friday, 4-7 p.m. ■ GREENE TURTLE NORTH, 116th Street, Ocean City 410-723-2120 / www.thegreeneturtle.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / The Turtle, est. 1976, is an Ocean City tradition with a friendly staff, great food and something for everyone! Menu favorites are homemade crab cakes, kids’ menu, salads, burgers, wings and more! Featuring weekday lunch specials and happy hour, 50 high-def flat screen TVs, game room, gift shop, carry out, party trays, nightly drink specials, Keno, MD lottery, DJs with dance floor. Open 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., year-round. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846 / www.ocharborside.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and allyou-can-eat Alaskan crab legs. Open yearround. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Sea-food, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGH STAKES BAR & GRILL, Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 / $-$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Carry-out available / Full bar / Casual dining, daily happy hour and daily food specials. Live entertainment. ■ HOOTERS, three Ocean City locations: 123rd Street, Ocean City 410-250-7081, Fifth Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-2690 and Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-1841 / www.hootersofoc.com

Add a QR Code to your Dining Guide listing and give your patrons a direct link to your Web site, Facebook page, App, etc. Cost is $15 for current advertisers ~ $25 for new listings Contact a Sales Representative at 410-723-6397

/ $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS. Things are always getting better at Hooters! Fresh menu offering a number of ground chuck burgers, green salads, world famous chicken wings with 11 flavorful sauces and a fun children’s menu. Relax in the beach atmosphere or enjoy the outdoor seating. Happy hour every day, 3-7 p.m. Full bar available. Authentic Hooters merchandise in kids and adult sizes. Enjoy all the sports packages on large, flat screen TVs and great service by the delightful Hooters girls. Live entertainment. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Find out why we say, “Hooters makes you happy!” ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-5243535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Proud to have Chef Shawn Reese creating beach-inspired dishes in both oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breaker’s Pub. New all-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., features many favorites, as well as exciting new creations with a local flare. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open yearround and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ HOUSE OF WELSH, 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 1-800-311-2707 / www.houseofwelsh.net / $, $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Specializing in steaks and seafood. Open daily. Happy hour all day and night. Entertainment Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. Casual attire. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB, 56th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7499 / www.johnnys56.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Pizza, subs, wings, salads, beer, live music, high definition TVs, surf, movies, BlueRay. ■ JR’S THE ORIGINAL PLACE FOR RIBS, 61st and 131st streets, Ocean City 410250-3100, 410-524-7427 / www.jrsribs.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / The place for ribs since 1981. Family-friendly dining. Angus steaks, jumbo lump crab cakes, prime rib, seafood, chicken. Early bird. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ OCEAN SIDE SUB SHOP, 205 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island 302-539-5388 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Serving pizza, subs, cheese steaks and munchies to locals and visitors for more than 30 years. Open for lunch and dinner. Take-out available. ■ OSTERIA FRASCHETTI, Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717 / www.ocitalianfood.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room with fireplace. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ PHILLIPS CRAB HOUSE, 20th Street, Ocean City 410-289-6821 / www.phillipsseafood.com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / The original Phillips, serv-

ing the finest seafood since 1956. Complete with all-you-can-eat seafood buffet, a la carte menu and carryout counter. Daily early bird specials and plenty of free parking. ■ PONZETTI’S PIZZA, 144th Street, Ocean City www.ponzettispizza.com / $ / MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Italian dinners, subs and homemade pizza. Happy hour Monday through Friday, 3-6 p.m. Sports bar, live music on weekends. Light fare served till 1 a.m. Carry out available. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ REFLECTIONS RESTAURANT, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Tableside flambé dining. Casually elegant, cuisine prepared tableside in the European tradition. Private dining rooms. Eclectic chef’s specials accompanied by an award-winning wine list. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SMITTY McGEE’S, 37234 Lighthouse Road, West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-4364716 / www.smittymcgees.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / No children’s menu / Full bar / Casual. Big menu, including hot wings and drinks. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE STERLING SEAFOOD GRILL & OYSTER BAR, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Fabulous raw bar serving the freshest raw oysters and clams, steamed shrimp, crab legs, mussels and oyster stew, made to order. “Fresh off the grill” items include rockfish, tuna, mahi mahi and salmon. Happy hour specials daily, 4-6 p.m. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Old World saloon-type feel, Whisker’s is famous for its Certified Angus® burgers and delicious casual fare, as well as its entertaining atmosphere and photo lined walls of famous and infamous “whiskers.” Enjoy flat screen TVs to watch your favorite sports. Open year-round, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m., serving lunch and dinner daily. Happy hour every day 4-7 p.m. Nightly food specials.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

LIFESTYLE 11B

Artists and crafters sought for May 11 NativePlantFestival (Match 29, 2013) Assateague Coastal Trust is celebrating the 14-year anniversary of the ACT Native Plant Festival on Saturday, May 11, and is inviting area artists and craftspeople to exhibit at this year’s event. On the second weekend in May, hundreds of area gardeners will fill their trunks with native flowering plants, tomatoes and herbs, and will be looking for last minute Mother’s Day gifts at this year’s festival. ACT is encouraging local artists and craftspeople who create nature- and garden-related items to participate in the annual event. The festival will be held on the lot adjacent to the ACT office, steps from the corner of Old Ocean City Boulevard and North Main Street in Berlin. The goal is to promote the work of local vendors who make gardening items like pots, trellises, wind chimes, garden sculpture, jewelry or anything that is plant and nature focused. To complement the native plants that will be available, the emphasis is going to be to support the work of local artists and craftspeople as well. There will be no charge to participate as a vendor. Displays, which must be provided by the vendors, will be arranged on the grounds adjacent to the ACT office. The hours of the sale are 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. Artists and craftspeople who wish to participate should contact Kim Fehrer by phone at 410-629-1538 or by e-mail at staff@actfrobays.org.

COMMUNITY BRIEFS Continued from Page 1B the restaurant, a Kindle Fire and a chance to play at Resort Poker League’s Grand Finale at Brew River in Salisbury this June, where players will compete for a paid seat at a $1 million Prize Pool Casino Tournament. It’s open to the public. For additional information, e-mail resortpoker@aol.com or call 484-364-1033.

Art League presents ‘Brushes & Bubbly’ The Art League of Ocean City is sponsoring an evening of painting that requires no prior painting or art experience. Brushes and Bubbly will be held Wednesday, April 10, from 7-9 p.m. at the new Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street. This event is in its second season and will be held monthly. Take friends, a snack and an adult beverage, and enjoy a fun, stress-free evening of painting. The Art League will supply brushes, paints, canvases, music and cups. The artist guide will be Kathi Stevens. All will go home with a personalized, completed work of art. Participants must be at least 21 years of age. The cost is $36 for ALOC members and $40 for non-members. For more information, call the Art League at 410-5429433 or visit www.artleagueofoceancity.org.

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Ocean City Today

12B LIFESTYLE

MARCH 29, 2013

Worcester’s newest Little Free Library opens on Third Street (March 29, 2013) The first Little Free Library in Ocean City opened Sunday, March 24, with a dedication ceremony at its Third Street location. The Little Free Library concept is simple: decorate a waterproof box, fill it with books, place it in a public space, and offer the books to people on the “take a book give a book” principle. Little Free Libraries are located all over the world and promote community, literacy and public art. Ocean City’s Red Doors Community Center at St. Paul’s By-The-Sea is creat-

ing a local network of Red Doors Little Libraries to span northern Worcester County. The first Red Doors Little Library was donated by The Red Doors to the Worcester County Arts Council, decorated by WCAC co-op artist Larry Wisniewski, and is located in front of the Arts Council building at 6 Jefferson St., in Berlin. The Worcester County Arts Council has joined in the project by providing grant funding to help with the construction of the little libraries. With this funding, two additional Red

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Answers on page 21B

Doors Little Libraries are being donated to local schools, so that students may paint and decorate the libraries that will be installed on school grounds. More information about the Little Free Libraries movement is available at http://www.littlefreelibrary.org. For more information about the local program, contact Fawn Mete, director of The Red Doors Community Center, at 410-2895576. The Red Doors Community Center at St. Paul’s By-the-Sea opened in October 2012 and offers a variety of enrichment programs, including dance, crafts, fencing, cooking, Kindermusik and yoga to children and adults of the community. The Red Doors is a non-profit organization and offers scholarships to local children so that they may participate in after-school programs at The Red Doors.

The newest Little Free Library in the studio, before installation on Third Street in Ocean City.


MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

LIFESTYLE 13B

Hospice hopes to break ground on new Berlin facility in summer Continued from Page 3B

scaping, it is expected to cost $5 million to create the Coastal Hospice at the Ocean Residence, according to the Web site, www.coastalhospice.org/hospicecare-capital-campaign. According to Anita Todd, community relations manager for Coastal Hospice & Palliative Care, the plan is to break ground on the residence project this summer. Approximately $1.5 million has been raised so far of the $5 million needed. Worcester County was chosen as the location for the Hospice residence be-

cause of the growing population in the county, but the house will also serve patients from Wicomico, Somerset and Dorchester counties. Individual rooms will offer privacy, but also accommodate family members who want to remain close by. Coastal Hospice at the Ocean will also provide room for bereavement counseling and community education. For more information about Coastal Hospice at the Ocean, visit www.coastalhospice.org.

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Survey looks at state parks, land (March 29, 2013) The Maryland Department of Natural Resources encourages Marylanders to share their thoughts on state parks and lands through an online survey. The survey asks a variety of multiple choice and open-ended questions that will help DNR determine which outdoor recreation facilities, programs and services do and do not meet the needs of the community. Areas include state parks, forests, wildlife areas and trails.

Public input will help guide the update of the Maryland Land Preservation and Recreation Plan, which will serve as a roadmap for future state outdoor recreation facilities and services. The department has hired a nationally-known parks and recreation management consulting firm, GreenPlay, LLC, to oversee the recreation component of this planning process. Visit http://survey.rrcresearch.com/s3/ Maryland to take the online survey.

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Ocean City Today

14B LIFESTYLE

MARCH 29, 2013

CELEBRATING PI DAY AT SDMS Pi Day is celebrated around the world on March 14 each year. The Greek letter Pi is used in mathematics to represent the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. The value of Pi can be rounded to 3.14, thus Pi Day 3/14. Each year, students in Michelle Hrebik’s seventh-grade math class at Stephen Decatur Middle School bake pies on March 13, and then enjoy them on Pi Day. (Above) Peeling and slicing apples for baking, from left, are Alexis Abrams, Emily Hurley, Roxanne Pitcher, Caroline Kurtz and Sierra Parker. (Top left) Neah Purnell, left, and Hattie Brous enjoy their pumpkin and apple pie. (Left) Mixing the filling for an apple pie, from left, are Kyla Taylor, Drew Russell, Jenni Smith and Sidney Mattie.

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

LIFESTYLE 15B

Breakfast with a bunny in Berlin Continued from Page 1B

Recreation and Parks Department located in the Community Center. It is open from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. today (Friday). Smaller pieces of candy that can fit inside Easter eggs are preferred. For more information, call the recreation department at 410-641-7052.

BERLIN:

n The town’s 18th annual Spring Celebration will begin with a pancake breakfast with the Easter Bunny at Rayne’s Reef. Reservations can be made for the three seatings (8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.) by calling 410-641-4775. The cost is $6 for children and $8 for adults. Pony rides, face painting, amusement rides, arts and crafts and vendors will be available throughout the day. Easter egg hunts for children ages 210 will take place beginning at 11 a.m. at the Stephen Decatur Park. Register at the Chamber tent from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. for the inaugural egg drop contest, which will start at 1 p.m. For a list of rules, visit www.berlinchamber.org (Spring Celebration event page). The grand finale Easter bonnet and Mad Hatter parade is set to begin at 3 p.m. Participants should design their hats in advance. Registration costs $2 for children, $3 for adults and can be done on Saturday between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. at the chamber tent. Prizes will be awarded

for Overall Mad Hatter, Best Bonnet, “Berlin Green” (made out of recycled material) Bonnet and top adult hat. Approximately 2,000 to 3,000 people attend the Spring Celebration annually, depending on the weather, according to Aaren Collins, Berlin Chamber executive director. “We start with breakfast at 8:30 a.m. and we have events all day,” she said. For more information, call 410-6414775 or visit www.berlinchamber.org. n The Burbage Funeral Home, at 208 W. Federal St., will host an Easter egg hunt at 11 a.m. on Saturday. It is co-sponsored by the Snow Hill Area Chamber of Commerce. The Easter Bunny will make an appearance. Prizes and treats will be provided. For more information, call 410632-9991. The event is free and for children ages 8 and younger. It will take place rain or shine.

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n The Pocomoke City Police Department’s 11th annual Easter egg hunt is on tap for Saturday, from noon to 2 p.m. at Cypress Park. The activity is for children ages 12 and younger. Refreshments will be available. Prizes and gifts will be given away. For more information, call 410-9571600.

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16B LIFESTYLE

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013


Ocean City Today

OUT&ABOUT www.oceancitytoday.net

MARCH 29, 2013

PAGE 17B

FRIDAY, MARCH 29

SATURDAY, MARCH 30

EASTER ART & CRAFT FAIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exhibitors displaying unique handcrafted items, including wearable art, jewelry, lawn and garden decor, toys, florals, fine art, caricatures and more. Admission costs $4 for adults, $3 for seniors and students and free to children 3 and younger and military. Admission includes Easter Kids Fun Fair. Info: www.oceanpromotions.info or 410-213-8090.

EASTER ART & CRAFT FAIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Exhibitors displaying unique handcrafted items, including wearable art, jewelry, lawn and garden decor, toys, florals, fine art, caricatures and more. Admission costs $4 for adults, $3 for seniors and students and free to children 3 and younger and military. Admission includes Easter Kids Fun Fair. Info: www.oceanpromotions.info or 410-213-8090.

GOOD FRIDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., in Ocean City, 7 p.m. Info: 410-289-7430 or www.atlanticumc.com.

EASTER KIDSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; FAIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Continuous events, activities and entertainment including Beany the Easter Bunny, egg hunts, coloring tables, door prizes, games, contests and several shows. Additional entertainment on a pay-as-you-go basis includes sand art, face painting, photos with the Easter bunny and more. Admission costs $4 for adults, $3 for seniors and students and free to children 3 and younger and military, police and fire with ID. Admission includes Easter Art & Craft Fair. Info: www.oceanpromotions.info, events@oceanpromotions. info or 410-213-8090.

ST. JOSEPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FESTIVAL GOOD FRIDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, 3 Church St., Berlin. Good Friday Liturgy at noon. Evening Prayer/Stations of the Cross at 5 p.m. Info: 410-641-4066. EASTER KIDSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; FAIR â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Continuous events, activities and entertainment including Beany the Easter Bunny, egg hunts, coloring tables, door prizes, games, contests and several shows. Additional entertainment on a pay-as-you-go basis includes sand art, face painting, photos with the Easter bunny

PHOTO COURTESY TED PAGE

Ocean City Sons of Italy Chapter 2474 presented its annual St. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Festival on March 23, at St. Andrewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Catholic Church in Ocean City to a steady stream of visitors throughout the day. The festival featured food, specialty desserts, games, music and items to buy. Pictured in front of a statue of St. Andrew holding offerings to the church and a box for Special Intentions, from left, are Lodge President Sal Castorina, Sue Palamara, Lorraine Gualtieri and Anna Foultz.

and more. Admission costs $4 for adults, $3 for seniors and students and free to children 3 and younger and military, police and fire with ID. Admission includes Easter Art & Craft Fair. Info: www.oceanpromotions.info, events@oceanpro-

motions. info or 410-213-8090. GOOD FRIDAY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lutheran Church, 10301 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Info: 410-524-7474 or www.stpetersoc.com.

BERLIN SPRING CELEBRATION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Main Street, Continued on Page 18B

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Ocean City Today

18B OUT&ABOUT

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MARCH 29, 2013

OUT&ABOUT Continued from Page 17B Berlin. Pancake breakfast and photos with the Easter Bunny at Rayne’s Reef. Seatings are: 8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Cost is $6 for children and $8 for adults. Reservations: 410-641-4775. Easter egg hunt at Stephen Decatur Park at 11 a.m. for children ages 2-10. Throughout the day there will be face painting, pony rides, workshops, vendors, amusement rides, demonstrations and more. Register for the Egg Drop Contest at the chamber tent from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Egg drop starts at 1 p.m. Rules: www.berlinchamber.org. Third annual Grande Finale Easter Bonnet & Mad Hatter Parade at 3 p.m. Register at the chamber tent, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Costs $2 for children and $3 for adults. Schedule of events: www.berlinchamber.org or 410-641-4775. EASTER BUNNY FUN SHOP — Northside Park, 200 125th St., in Ocean City, 1-3 p.m. Easter egg hunts, visit from the Easter Bunny, arts and crafts and entertainment. Take a basket. Registration is limited. Cost is $6 for Ocean City residents and $8 for non-residents. Info: 410-250-0125. 28TH ANNUAL OCEAN CITY JOB FAIR — Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free to all who are seeking employment. Info: Lisa Dennis, lisa@oceancity.org or 410-213-0552. PANCAKE BREAKFAST — VFW, Post 8296, 104 66th St., bayside in Ocean City, 8-11 a.m. A $5 donation for all-you-can-eat pancakes or 2-22, two eggs, two pancakes and two bacon slices, includes coffee and juice. Bloody Marys cost $3. Info: 410-524-8196. SPRING CELEBRATION AND EASTER EGG HUNT — White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway in Ocean Pines, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Featuring roving magician Wild Willy Woo Woo, face painting, pony rides, carriage rides, moon bounces, Easter themed arts and crafts as well as food and goodies for sale. Easter egg hunt times are: ages 0-2, 11:30 a.m.; ages 3-4, noon; ages 5-6, 1 p.m.; and ages 7-9, 1:30 p.m. Easter Bonnet contest begins at 12:30 p.m. Easter candy do-

nations are accepted at the community center. Info: Ocean Pines Recreation & Parks Department, 410-641-7052. ‘WINE THRU TIME’ FUNDRAISING EVENT — Furnace Town Visitor Center, 3816 Old Furnace Road, Snow Hill, 5-7 p.m. Wine tastings and food pairings provided by Bishop’s Stock, JJ & K Caterers, and Miss Patti Cake. Cost is $50 and by reservation only. Benefiting Furnace Town Living Heritage Museum. Ticket reservations: 410-632-2032. VIETNAM VETERANS WELCOME HOME — Ocean City American Legion, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, 1-4 p.m. There will be a POW/MIA Table Presentation at 3 p.m. All Vietnam era veterans are invited to attend this open house for lunch and to greet and meet other Vietnam veterans. There will be information available from the 50th United States of America Vietnam War Commemoration (www.vietnamwar50th.com). Info: Sarge Garlitz, firstsgt166@msn.com, 443-735-1942; Bill Wolf, commander166@comcast.net; 410-289-3166; alpost166@comcast.net; or www.alpost166.org. BUNNYPALOOZA! 5K/10K WALK/RUN — Runners, local businesses, spectators, entertainers and volunteers in Bethany Beach, Del., join forces to raise funds for the Quiet Resorts Charitable Foundation. Race begins at 8 a.m. at Garfield Parkway and Atlantic Avenue, downtown Bethany Beach, Del., and finishes at the Bethany Beach Boardwalk at the Bandstand. Info: www.bunnypaloozarun.com. HOLY SATURDAY — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 3 Church St., Berlin. Great Vigil of Easter at 8 p.m. Incense will be used. Info: 410641-4066.

SUNDAY, MARCH 31 EASTER SUNRISE SERVICE — Ocean City Boardwalk at North Division Street, 6 a.m. Open to all. Sponsored by Ocean City Christian Ministers Association. Info: Norman Poultney, 410289-7430 or beachpastor1@atlanticumc.org. EASTER SERVICES — Stevenson United

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

OUT&ABOUT 19B

OUT&ABOUT Methodist Church, 123 N. Main St., Berlin. Easter Sunrise service at 7 a.m., at Evergreen Cemetery, on Route 376. Easter Service at 9 a.m., at the church. Info: officesumc@verizon.net. EASTER SERVICES — St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 10301 Coastal Highway, Ocean City. Traditional worship at 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. Contemporary worship at 9:30 a.m. Info: 410-5247474 or www.stpetersoc.com. EASTER SERVICES — Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., in Ocean City. Contemporary worship at 8:30 a.m. Traditional worship at 10 a.m. Info: 410-289-7430 or www.atlanticumc.com. EASTER SERVICES — St. Paul’s by-the-Sea, 302 N. Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. All are invited. Info: http://reddoors.org. EASTER DAY — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 3 Church St., Berlin. Holy Eucharist Rite I at 8:30 a.m. (no music). Choral Eucharist Rite I at 10:30 a.m. Info: 410-641-4066. WEEKLY FREE POKER EVENT — Peaky’s Restaurant, in the Fenwick Inn, 13801 Coastal Highway, Ocean City. Free, no limit Texas Hold ’Em. Info: resortpoker@aol.com or 484-3641033. FREE EASTER EGG HUNT — Ocean City beach at Third Street, 10 a.m. Hunt for eggs in the

THE OTHER SIDE OF ST. PATRICK’S DAY St. Patrick’s Day was celebrated in Irish style on March 17, with Roman Catholic Bishop W. Francis Malooly concelebrating Mass at St. Luke’s Church in Ocean City with the Very Rev. Richard Smith, pastor of St. Luke Church, and several other priests from the area. Men and women of the Ancient Order of Hibernians walked down the center aisle of the church with sachets that were the colors of the Irish flag. Following the standing room-only Mass, there was a sold-out luncheon for 200 people at St. Andrews Catholic Center. The guest speaker was Sister Mary Bader, CEO of St. Ann’s Center for Children, Youth and Families in Hyattsville, Md. The luncheon concluded with the AOH presentation of a religious service award to Teresa Baker for her leadership in the area of religious education at St. Luke’s Parish. The AOH Community service award went to Timothy J. Connolly of Salisbury for his work with the Joseph House, the homeless and his support of the homebound. The final award for AOH service was awarded posthumously to the Rev. John Gorman for his tireless efforts to assist the AOH and the Catholic community in the Ocean City area, as well as his valiant fight to curb the international crime of human trafficking of children and young adults, a wordwide disgrace to humanity in its treatment of children and young adults. Pictured, from left, are Bob McCarthy, Terry Baker, Tim Connolly, Mary Connolly and Sr. Mary Bader.

sand. Take a basket and a camera to get pictures of the children on the beach in their Sunday best. Info: http://reddoors.org/community-center-oceancity-md-programs/easter-egg-hunt-on-thebeach/.

Shamrock Shanty Your Irish & Celtic Connection at the Beach

MONDAY, APRIL 1 DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS MEETS WEEKLY — The Delmarva Sweet Adeline Chorus, under the direction of Carol Ludwig, meets each Monday from 7-9 p.m., at the

Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, White Horse Park. Women interested in learning and singing in a barbershop format are welcome. Info: 410-208-4171. Continued on Page 20B

13th & The Boardwalk in The Beach Plaza Hotel! Now Open Wed. - Sat.

Returning Irish Candy Jewelry Irish CDs Finnians

Sweaters Irish Teas Walking Sticks Perfumes

Join us Every Night for Happy Hour in the Cozy Parlor Lounge with Drink Specials & our Bar Bite Menu

Phone: 302-537-2220

Fax: 302-537-2022

Wednesday & Thursday Special 1/2 Price Menu Fri. is our locally famous “Date Night” Menu Sat. Awesome Appetizer & Wine Specials

Email: shamrockshanty@msn.com • www.theshamrockshanty.com Ocean Bay Plaza #3, Fenwick Island, Delaware

March 29th Rhonda Apple & Dale Britt

Every Sat. We have an extra hour of Happy (Beginning at 3pm)

EASTER SUNDAY SUPPER PHIL PERDUE ON PIANO SATURDAY NIGHT

BRYAN CLARK APRIL 19

BREAKFAST SAT. & SUN. 7 A.M. - 1 P.M. LUNCH SAT. & SUN. 11:30 A.M.-DINNER/LITE FARE MON.-THURS. 5 P.M. • FRI., SAT. & SUN. 4 PM. Large Parties Welcome ALL NIGHT SUNDAY - THURSDAY

EASTER BUFFET 2:00 LOCALS’ FAVORITE FOR 57 YEARS The Courtyard by Marriott Hotel Parking 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City, Maryland 410.289.7192 for Reservations www.captainstableoc.com

Carving Station: Roast Top Round, Leg of Lamb, Ham, selected entrees, sides, desert buffet. $24.95 adults, $9.95 5-10, under five complimentary

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

$10 OFF $15 OFF Any $50 Check Any $75 Check Cannot be combined with other coupons/EB/Buffet Exp 04/30/13

Limited regular menu also available Includes one non~alcoholic beverage, our house salad, fresh baked rolls, (choice 0f 6) main entree, two sides & dessert Per Person: Adults 32 Children 15

Main Dish Choices

Two Side Choices

Choice of Dessert

Leg of Lamb • Lobster Mac & Cheese Ham with Pineapple Cherry Glaze Broiled Salmon Twin Crab Cakes, broiled Shrimp & Scallop Pot Pie

Stuffed Potato Parmesan Baked Leeks Glazed Carrots Fresh Asparagus w/Hollandaise Fresh Green Beans Nook’s Potato Salad

Rum Chata Bread Pudding Lemon Meringue Pie Coconut Bunny Cupcake Lemon/Blueberry Cheesecake Chocolate Cake Carrot Cake


Ocean City Today

20B OUT&ABOUT

OUT&ABOUT Continued from Page 19B HAND DANCING — House of Welsh, 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick, Del. Free lessons from 6-7 p.m., open dancing 7-10 p.m. No cover charge. Info: DC Hand Dance Club, 302-5410728. DRAWING, PAINTING, PRINTMAKING — Six sessions held Mondays, April 1 through May 6, 4-6 p.m. For ages 8-13. Cost is $120 for Art League of Ocean City members and $150 for nonmembers. Materials included. Register: 410524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org. POTTERY CLASS — Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th St. Six-session class. Students will learn the basics of ceramics and pottery. Morning, afternoon and evening classes available. Cost is $180 for Art League of Ocean City members and $216 for nonmembers. Materials fee is $35. Register: 410-524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org. GREAT BOOKS DISCUSSION — Ocean Pines library, small meeting room, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:30 p.m. Great Books focuses on works that shape our culture and provide a deeper appreciation for what it means to be human. Info: Don Winslow, 410-208-6613. CPAP MASK FITTING — Atlantic General Hospital Sleep Disorders Diagnostic Center, 9733 Healthway Drive in Berlin. Free, monthly mask fitting clinic for patients who are having trouble adjusting to their CPAP equipment. By appointment only: Robin Rohlfing, 410-641-9726.

HYPERTENSION CLINICS — Sponsored by Atlantic General Hospital and takes place the first Monday of every month at Apple Discount Drugs, 314 Franklin Ave., in Berlin, 10 a.m. to noon and at Walgreens, 11310 Manklin Creek Rd., in Ocean Pines, 1-3 p.m. Free blood pressure screening and health information. Info: Dawn Denton, 410-641-9268. WEIGHT LOSS SURGERY SEMINAR — Atlantic Bariatric Center, Berlin Main Place Complex, 9956 N. Main St., Berlin, 5-6 p.m. Receive information about the lap band and gastric sleeve weight loss procedures. Pre-register: 410-641-3960. DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP — St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, 405 Flower St., Berlin, first Monday of each month, 6-7 p.m. All welcome. Dr. Peter Costantini, of Atlantic General Health System, will discuss “Obstructive Sleep Apnea.” Info: Darlene Jameson, 410-6296877 or AGH Diabetes Outpatient Education Program, 410-641-9703 TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING — Berlin group No. 169, Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive in Berlin, 5-6:30 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: Edna Berkey, 410-251-2083.

TUESDAY, APRIL 2 RESURRECTION LESSON — Stevenson United Methodist Church, 123 N. Main St., Berlin, 6:30 p.m. Info: officesumc@verizon.net.

ST. CLARE’S ANNUAL SPRING CARD PARTY LUNCHEON — St. Paul’s by the Sea Episcopal Church, 302 N. Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Luncheon served at noon. Cost is $15. Reservations: Amanda Cropper, 410-641-5049 or church office, 410-2893453. YOUNG MASTERS SERIES BEGINS — Six sessions held Tuesdays and Thursdays, April 2 through April 18, 4-6 p.m. For ages 8-13. Students may register for individual dates or all six. Materials provided. Cost is $20 for Art League of Ocean City members and $25 for nonmembers. Register: 410-524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org. PLAY TIME — Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 10:30 a.m. Parents and children, ages infant to 5 years old, explore educational toys together in an interactive, free play program. Info: 410-957-0878. STORY TIME — Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., 10:30 a.m. Children, ages 2-5 years old, enjoy stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts. Info: 410-641-0650. SCREEN PAINTING — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 2-5 p.m. Local artist, John Iampieri instructs this class on the art and technique of screen painting. Register: 410-524-1818. HYPERTENSION CLINICS — Sponsored by Atlantic General Hospital and takes place at Rite Aid, Selbyville, Del., 10 a.m. to noon and at Walgreens, Clarksville, Del., 1-3 p.m. Free blood pressure screening and health information.

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YOGA — James G. Barrett Medical Office Building, rotunda, 10231 Old Ocean City Boulevard, Berlin, 5:30-6:45 p.m. All levels welcome. Cost is $72 for eight sessions or $10 drop-in fee for first time. Info: Georgette Rhoads, 410-6419734 or grhoads@atlanticgeneral.org.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3 PUBLIC HEALTH CONFERENCE — Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel, 10100 Coastal Highway in Ocean City, April 3, 8 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Free conference, continental breakfast and buffet lunch. Learn about the latest health initiatives in Worcester County, Maryland’s health insurance exchange and attend the “Preparing Today for Tomorrow’s Emergency,” an interactive session. RSVP: Sue Buhrt, 410-632-110, Ext. 1164 or sue.buhrt@maryland.gov. BINGO — Every Wednesday at Ocean City Elks Lodge 2645, 138th Street across from Fenwick Inn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start 6:30 p.m. A $1,000 jackpot available, food, snacks and non-alcoholic beverages. No one under 18 years allowed in the hall during bingo. Info: 410250-2645. DELMARVA HAND DANCING CLUB — Meets every Wednesday at Peaky’s at The Fenwick

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SALSA DANCE FEVER — Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 6:30 p.m. Learn the art of Salsa dancing. Go alone or take a partner. Info: 410-957-0878.

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MARCH 29, 2013

OUT&ABOUT Inn, 138th Street and Coastal Highway in Ocean City. Beginner and intermediate lessons, 5:30-6:30 p.m., followed by dancing until 9 p.m. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ’50s, ’60s and Carolina beach music. All are welcome. Discounted food and drink prices. Info: 302-337-3638. TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Wednesdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: 302436-3682. CLAY DAYS BEGINS — Six sessions held Wednesdays, April 3 through May 7, 4-6 p.m. For ages 8-13. Learn hand building and use of the wheel. Cost is $180 for Art League of Ocean City members and $216 for nonmembers. Register: 410-524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org. STORY TIME — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 a.m. Children, ages 2-5 years old, enjoy stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts. Info: 410-524-1818. FOREIGN POLICY KEY ISSUES: DISCUSSION GROUP — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10 a.m. to noon. Reading discussion of major foreign policy issues. Study guide provided. Reserve study guide: 410-208-4014. E-READER TECH ZOO — Berlin library, 220 N. Main St. Kindle Connections at 2 p.m. Nook Know-How at 3 p.m. and iPad Info at 4 p.m.

Ocean City Today

Learn how to download ebooks from the public library. Info: 410-641-0650. SMITH ISLAND CAKE BAKING DEMO — Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., 2 p.m. Lisa Evans of Smith Island will prepare a “Smith Island Cake.” Info: 410-957-0878. HYPERTENSION CLINICS — Sponsored by Atlantic General Hospital and takes place at Rite Aid, 11011 Manklin Creek Road in Ocean Pines, 1-3 p.m. Free blood pressure screening and health information. Info: Dawn Denton, 410-641-9268. DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 7-8 p.m. All welcome. Dr. Peter Costantini of Atlantic General Health System, will discuss “Obstructive Sleep Apnea.” Info: Ellen Lurz, 443-814-5450,

Crossword answers from page 12B

OUT&ABOUT 21B

THURSDAY, APRIL 4

BINGO — American Legion Post 166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., in Ocean City, every Thursday, year round. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to the public. Info: 410-289-3166.

COASTAL HOSPICE BEREAVEMENT SERVICES’ SCRAPBOOKING WORKSHOP — Coastal Hospice at the Ocean, 10441 Racetrack Road, Berlin, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Open to the public. RSVP: Lenora Berger, 410-726-6405.

BARISTA AND BOOKS — Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 a.m. Infant to 5 year old children and their caregivers enjoy stories, crafts, cocoa and pastries. Coffee for the parents. Info: 410-208-4014.

BEACH SINGLES — Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour at Harpoon Hanna’s, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del., 4 p.m. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577; Kate, 410-524-0649; or Dianne, 302-541-4642.

YOUNG AND RESTLESS — Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 a.m. Creative science, art and music activities for children aes 35. Info: 410-632-3495. Continued on Page 22B

elurz52@mchsi.com or the AGH Diabetes Outpatient Education program, 410-641-9703.


22B OUT&ABOUT

OUT&ABOUT Continued from Page 21B WOMEN’S CLUB OF OCEAN PINES MEETING — Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 10 a.m. The Ocean Pines Garden Club will present their 2013 events and programs. Members of the Women’s Club will share their personal talents. Info: Pat Addy, 410-208-0171.

ONGOING EVENTS POCOMOKE SPRING OPEN GOLF TOURNEY

Ocean City Today

Winter Quarters Golf Course, Pocomoke, April 20. Registration at 11:30 a.m., shotgun start at 1 p.m. Entry fee is $50 per individual or $200 per team. Cart and lunch included. Silent auction, door prizes and a 50/50 raffle. Support Pocomoke Chamber of Commerce in promoting local businesses. To get involved contact Jennifer at pocomokechamber@gmail.com or 410957-1919. PANCAKE BREAKFAST FUNDRAISER — Ocean City Airport, 12724 Airport Road, Berlin, Saturdays and Sundays, 9 a.m. to noon, April 6 through June 2. Donations support the Ocean City Aviation Association’s Huey Memorial fund.

Display is located within walking distance of Terminal. Info: Airport Operations, 410-213-2471 or Coleman Bunting, 410-641-6888.

MARCH 29, 2013

struction by appointment: 410-524-1818.

PINE’EER CRAFT AND GIFT SHOP OPEN — Pine’eer Craft and Gift Shop, White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines. Shop will be open March 30, April 6, 7, 13, 14, 20, 21, 27, 28, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Shop features handcrafted home decor, jewelry and fashion accessories created by members of the Pine’eer Craft Club.

HORSEBACK RIDING ON THE BEACH — Ocean City now offers horseback riding on the beach from 27th Street extending south to the Inlet jetty between 6 a.m. and 5 p.m., Nov. 1 through March 30. Cost is $20 for a single-day permit and $50 for a seasonal permit. Permit applications: City Clerk’s Office in City Hall, 301 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City or online at www.oceancitymd.gov.

COMPUTER AND E-READER INSTRUCTION — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway. Staff offers individual computer or E-Reader in-

HORSE AND CARRIAGE RIDES IN DOWNTOWN OC — Horse and carriage rides offered 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays and


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

Showell United Methodist Church, 10115 Pitts Road, Showell.

OUT&ABOUT Sundays, through April 14, (depending on weather and ridership). Begin at inlet lot near Thrasherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ride on the Boardwalk and around the pier. Cost is $10 per person for adults, free to children 3 and younger. Info: www.downtownassociation.net, 410-289-1413 or 443-783-1409.

HELP FOR PHARMACEUTICAL DRUG ABUSE Call Narconon for a free brochure on the signs of addiction for all types of drugs. Narconon also offers free assessments and referrals: 877-413-3073 or www.narcononworks.com.

ORDERS FOR HOMEMADE PIES AND CHICKEN SALAD â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Place orders for homemade pies, $9 and chicken salad, $6 per pint by calling Showell Christian Workers, 410-3525163 or 302-436-8942 by April 3. Pick up orders April 6, between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., at

SILENT AUCTION â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A silent auction to benefit the Art League of Ocean Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scholarship fund is being held at the Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th St. Local artist Peter Cosby has donated his original oil painting, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Atlantic Light,â&#x20AC;? valued at $6,000. Minimum bid is $2,500 with

OUT&ABOUT 23B

minimum increments of $100. Auction will close on May 31, at 4 p.m. To place a bid, visit the Center for the Arts, call the Art League of Ocean City at 410-524-9433 or visit www.artleagueofoceancity.org. SOUP FUNDRAISER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean City Airport, 12724 Airport Road, Berlin, Saturdays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., now through March 31. Soup and cake. Donation of $5 benefits the Ocean City Aviation Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Huey Memorial Fund. Info: Airport Operations, 410-2132471 or Coleman Bunting, 410-726-7207. TICKETS FOR â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SISTER ACTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; BUS TRIP â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bus

will depart from the Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, April 7, at 8:30 a.m. to arrive at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia for the 1 p.m. show. Will stop for lunch at 11:30 a.m. Group will return immediately after the show, stopping for dinner in Wilmington. Arrive home at 9 p.m. Cost is $80. Info: 410-6417052. AARP â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean City AARP 1917 meets the second Thursday of each month (except July and August) at the Knights of Columbus Hall, 9901 Coastal Highway (rear of St. Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church). Social begins at 9:30 a.m., meeting at 10 a.m. Info: aarp1917.org.

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Ocean City Today

24B OUT&ABOUT

MARCH 29, 2013

r e v O n Hop O s e m o H f O r u o T e s u o H n e p O r u O o T 2 1 1 m o r F 0 on Sat 3/3 Resorrt Homes can build yyour our neew w home an nywher y ywher e on the lo ow wer shore. We arree not limited mited to building lding in these parrks, ks, w wee arree using g these hese homes as a s sample l off what w wee can a build ffor or you. you. Callll us todaay! We build a better house, ask your neighbor!

HOMES ON THE 3/30 TOUR WARREN’S W ARREN’S PARK PPARK

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4410-726-8528 or 410-213-7721

(off ff ofof f 52nd 52ndStSt trreet Bayside) Ba 16 Launch

MONTEGO BBAY BAY (Bayside off ff off 130th 130t St) 136 Y Yawl awl Drive 640 Gulf Stream Dr 129 South Ocean Dr 607 O yster Lane 511 Nautical Lane 511 Sandy Hill Dr 513 Sandy Hill Dr 193 Pine Tree Rd

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RESORT RESO R ESOR RT HOMES, RT HOME H OME ES S, INC. INC. 11718 Ocean Gate Gateway, waay, West W est Ocean Cit City, tyy, MD 410-213-7721 or 410-726-8528 www.resorthousinggroup.com www w.rresorthousinggroup.com Follow F olllo llllo ow Us Us On n Facebook F Fa aceboo aceboo ceboo book


MARCH 29, 2013

1C Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

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Almost Famous Photography Hiring Photographer/Sales Person. Have Fun, Make Money working in Ocean City’s finest Night Clubs. Call Weso 443-783-1154.

Salon By the Bay in WOC-is looking for an est. cosmetologist, esthetician, nail tech and massage therapist. Booth rental or commission. Large private room, 130 sq.ft. also avail. for rent. 410-507-8390

Responsible, friendly, motivated person-to manage day shift of boardwalk fudge shop. Duties: opening, making fudge, supervising staff, ordering. Will train to make fudge. Seasonal and must work 1 weekend day. Call 302-5317240.

Need an Income or More Income? Avon and a $10 investment can help. Work F/T or P/T, set your own hours, and make up to 50% commission. Call your Avon Representative Christine @ 443-880-8397 Visit www.startavon.com. Use reference code: cbrown2272 to sign up online or email snowhillavon@comcast.net *The gift of beauty is the perfect gift anytime of year!

Y/R Housekeeper-Excellent Benefits & Pay. Exp. pref. Apply in person @ Club Ocean Villas II, 105 120th Street.

Waiters Needed Apply in person Mon.-Thurs. 11-3. PGN Crabhouse, 29th & Coastal Hwy.

Y/R Experienced Restaurant Servers, P/T PM Cook, P/T A.M. Bussers - Please apply in person, Dunes Manor, 2800 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, MD 410-289-1100

ADVANCED MARINA Boat Yard Operations. Moving, locking, docking, painting boats. Clean driver’s license req’d. 410-723-2124

Nite Club Taxi is hiring F/T & P/T Drivers. Call Michael 443373-1319.

Great Pay at a Beautiful Golf Course Location!

Excellent Opportunity for the Right Person.

Dunkin Donuts Now Hiring

Now Hiring

Location: 9919 Golf Course Road, OC, MD

Seasonal Houseman

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Pre-Licensing classes forming NOW! Contact Kelley Bjorkland at at 410-524-6111 410-524-1203 Contact Pete Copenhaver @ cbmove.com or or kelley.bjorkland pcopenhaver@cbmove.com OROR Maryellen Rosenblit atat410-524-6111 Jennifer Cropper-Rines 410-524-1203 or maryellen.rosenblit@cbmove.com or jlcropper@cbmove.com or or visit www.careerscb.com www.careerscb.com Owned and Operated by NRT LLC

for Housekeeping Dept. Please apply in person Dunes Manor 2800 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, Md. 410-289-1100

Kitchen Help Please apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com Applications or resumes will not be accepted thru Email or fax.

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities: Year Round, Full Time: Server, Banquet Houseman, Food Runner, Housekeeping Houseman, Reservationist Seasonal: Security Guard, Grill Cooks, Server, Bartender Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

duran.showell@carouselhotel.com Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

Managers Bartenders Food Runners Kitchen Help Bar Backs Apply within at Smitty McGee’s or submit application online www.smittymcgees.com

Come Join Our Winning Team!

HOTEL FRONT DESK SUPERVISORS HOUSEKEEPING SUPERVISORS We are looking for experienced front desk and housekeeping supervisors. Ability to manage multiple properties a must. Must be able to work all shifts, weekends and holidays. Minimum 2 years hotel experience preferred. Email resume to: duran.showell@carouselhotel.com or come in and complete an application at the front desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check.

Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

Director Of Nursing, Psychiatric

Now accepting applications for seasonal positions!

Looking for experienced personnel with customer service skills. Must be flexible with hours. Email resume or stop by and complete an application at the Front Desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check.

Now Hiring

Do you want to work with a great team? Do you have a commitment to excellence? Do you love helping others? We are hiring the following year round positions: ~ Breakfast Bar Attendant ~ Experienced Night Audit ~ Evening Front Desk Positions Please apply in person Tuesday-Saturday, 9am-2pm at 126th Street

---Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Come Join Our Winning Team! Front Desk/Night Audit Room Attendants Housepersons Line Cook Servers Bartenders Recreation Attendant

Year Round and Seasonal

Are you ready for a change??

• Golf Shop Attendant • Housekeeping • Beverage Cart Attendant • Guest Service Attendant (Bag Drop) • Snack Bar Attendant

Interested in a career in Real Estate?

Somerset Jewelers hiring all shifts at both locations. Y/R & seasonal. Apply in person. 412 S. Boardwalk. Sat & Sun. 11-4.

www.oceancitytoday.net

The Bay Club is now hiring the following positions:

DO YOU LOVE WHAT YOU DO?

Part/Time Lead Generator$9/hr. + Incentives. Interested applicants should fax their resume to 410-641-1437 or call our office at 410-641-1434.

The Haven Hotel & Suites 101 North 1st Street & The Boardwalk, Ocean City, MD

Hiring for the Season: •Housekeepers •Front Desk •F/T Night Audit Experience preferred. Good work ethic, outgoing and friendly A MUST. Applicants may apply in person, Noon-4pm, or send resume to: hr@realhospitalitygroup.com

Eastern Shore Hospital Center Cambridge, Md. Responsible for the overall operation and functioning of the Nursing Department in a 80 bed, fully accredited State operated in-patient psychiatric hospital located on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Responsible for developing, implementing, and evaluating the philosophy, objectives, standards, and policies of nursing practice. Essential skills include knowledge of administrative, supervisory, budgetary, and personnel management principles and practices. The individual must possess strong leadership capabilities, effective multidisciplinary collaboration, superb evaluation skills, strong skills in scheduling and allocation of human resources and knowledge of determining appropriate staffing levels while minimizing the use of overtime. Salary: $80,156 - $98,745 & State Benefits. E.O.E. Educational and licensing requirements along with instructions to apply for this position is located at: www.jobaps.com/MD/jobs/DHMH

Now you can order your classifieds online


Ocean City Today

2C CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE

HELp WANTEd

Dunkin Donuts Now Hiring

assistant Manager and Co-Managers In our Ocean Pines and West Ocean City locations. Please apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

HELp WANTEd

RENTALS

ROOMMATES

COMMERCIAL

LOST

Now hiring sales reps and promo models for weekend work. Paid travel, $100 a day + bonuses. J-1 welcome. Experienced sales managers for travel also needed for PT/FT salaried position. Please call 443-291-7651

Summer Seasonal Rentals2BR/1BA Mobile Home on 136th Street-Sleeps 5, W/D, CAC $7800. 1BR/1BA Condo Sleeps 4, 8th Street $7000. Compass Resort 410-7235200

Roommate Wanted - Room w/half Bath, 7 miles from the beach. Country setting. All inclusive. $450/mo. 443-7279018

1000-2000 sq. ft. space for carry out restaurant. Immediate occupancy. Rt. 611 Assateague Square. Call 410603-4300

Missing Cat Orange & White. Taken from Oasis Parking Lot in Whaleyville on March 24th. Please return her. Her family misses her. 443-880-3389

Share 3bR house-with elderly women in OP. $350/mo. Prefer mature, non-smoking individual. All inclusive. Call 443-365-7244.

Boardwalk Storefront Available-Excellent location. 750 sq. ft. + large patio 443-7831404

ESTATE REAL REAL ESTATE

For Lease - Waterfront Restaurant - Route 54, Fenwick Island, Delaware. 410430-9797

Lost 5lb. Chihuahua-Answers to “Paco.” Missing since March 6th, north gate of OP. If you have seen/have him, please call 443-497-2742. Reward.

Sub Marina Prep/Line Cook Up to $12/hr. Experience req’d. Apply in person. Sunset Ave. West Ocean City.

Pino’s Pizza DRIvERS WantED Starting up weekends March 29th, and then full time May 17th. Need 3 more drivers to round a 6 person driving crew for a very busy summer. 410-422-4780

Johnny’s Pizza & Pub Now Hiring Experienced Kitchen Help, Servers, Delivery Drivers Apply in person Wednesday 11am-1 pm, Resumes & References Appreciated 5600 Coastal Hwy., Bayside

the landing at Sunset Island Bayfront Restaurant & Bar Now Hiring for 2013 Season Servers, Bartenders, Food Runners, Bussers, Exp. Line Cooks, Salad Prep and Expeditors. Applications at Club House, 67th Street and Bayside 410-524-0502 Interviews Sat., March 30th at Club House, 10-3pm

Dunkin Donuts Now Hiring

Kitchen Supervisors in our West Ocean City location 9919 Golf Course Road Salary $14-$15 per hour applications should be emailed to dunkindonutjobs@ gmail.com

Full-time Rental Coordinator Leading Real Estate Company has an opportunity available in its Ocean City Rental Office for a rental coordinator, MD real estate license and resort rental experience required. Position require excellent communication and computer skills. Must be customer service oriented. Base salary with potential bonus and excellent benefit package. Call Dana Flickinger at 800-226-8095 for an application. EOE, MFDV

Principals Only

long & Foster Real Estate, Inc. Your Classifieds Online www.oceancitytoday.net www.baysideoc.com

MARCH 29, 2013

HOtEl nIGHt aUDItOR Full Time, Year Round, Competitive rates Must be able to work flexible hours apply in person

COMFORt Inn GOlD COaSt 112th St. Ocean City, MD next to the Gold Coast Mall

Y/R Wtrfront Townhouse2BR + den, 2.5BA on wide canal w/view of bay. $1250/ mo. No smoking 443-6147927 410-742-0300. Y/R, 2BR/1.5BA TownhomeJamestown Rd. Furn., W/D, DW, off-street parking. No smoking/pets, $950/mo. + utils. dzaled@hotmail.com 410-838-1730 Waterfront 4BR/2BA Home$1,500/mo. plus utilities and security deposit. 11212 Gum Point Road (near Casino), West Ocean City, Maryland. 410-430-9797

Mediacom Communications Corporation is currently the 7th largest cable company in the U.S. We currently have openings for Installers in: Dagsboro, DE Job ID 5375. Must have valid driver’s license with a satisfactory driving record. We offer competitive salary and excellent benefits including 401k, discounted cable service, and much more. If you are looking for a career with a growing and changing company, apply by visiting our career center at www.mediacomcable.com/ careers Mediacom is an Equal Opportunity Employer m/f/v/d

SALES ASSOCIATE Experience preferred. Includes weekends.

New Price - $149,000 - 3BR Home, just outside of OC. Liveable but needs updating. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555

Y/R, 2BR/2.5BA Townhome in Caine Woods-Unfurn. 2 parking spaces, W/D. No smoking/pets. $1200/mo. + utils. Avail. April 1st. 703-9462916 & 703-531-2956

Keenwick Sound home on lake, built 2003, remodeled 2012. Enviably large double Master bedroom w/FP. $399,000. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555

Berlin - 4BR/2BA - Remodeled Rancher, hardwood floors. Large yard, shed. $1300/mo. Call Bunting Realty 410-6413313

RENT W/OpTION RENT W/OpTION TO TO bUy bUy

1BR/2BA Condo, mid-town OC on oceanblock-Unfurn., full kitchen, central A/C, W/D. Available 4/1/13. $795 per month, plus utilities. Resort Rentals, 410-524-0295

Rentals Yearly • Weekly • Seasonal Maryland

800-922-9800 800-442-5626

Need experienced, licensed Rental Agent. Weekends required. Temporary, full-time position for April-September 2013. Submit your resume to: Central Reservations Fax: 410-524-1070 Email: marleneb@centraloc.com Join a Bigger, Better Team We are a growing company with current locations near Bethany Beach, DE, Long Neck, DE & Ocean Pines, MD. We are looking for responsible, energetic people. If you are looking for job security and a great place to work, call us today. We currently have openings for:

automotive

Parts/Service Counterperson ~ technicians Call 302-539-7684 ext. 3014

Nurse Looking To Rent preferably w/option to buy single family home. Prefer WOC on water. Must allow dog. 703-622-5181

REAL ESTATE LICENSE ED SMItH REal EStatE SCHOOl Pre-Licensing Real Estate Classes

Owned & Operated by NRT LLC

cbvacations com

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-524-7700 www.holidayoc.com

Pt. 1. April 30th, May 1st & 2nd, 2013 Pt. 2. May 7th, 8th, 9th, 2013 8:00am-5:30pm Limited Space Web site/Registration www.edsmithschool.com 410-213-2700

Classified Deadline is Monday @ 5pm

Units Available Rt. 50 in West Ocean City 1800 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 1728 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 1574 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 2211 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space Call 443-497-4200 Prime Office Space for Rent - On the corner of Main St. & Broad St., Berlin. 1250 sq.ft. Second floor unit with exclusive deck. Central air conditioning & heat. Recently remodeled. Starting at $995/ mo. for long term lease. Call Russell 443-497-2729.

Upscale Mid-town Office Space in O.C. for lease. Flexible floor plan. From 650 to 5,150 sq. ft. Call Brian 443-880-2225

SERVICES SERVICES Personal Assistant-Many yrs. of business exp. w/organizational skills, appt./setting, handyman services, everyday assistance, etc. Professional, Dependable, Honest & Responsible. Call 443-386-5776. Bishopville Movers Inc. Fast, reliable service. 410-352-5555. HOUSE & CONDO REPAIRS Drywall, painting, rotten wood, tilework, stucco, mildew clean-up, deck repairs, etc. Fast & Reliable. Licensed and Insured. 410-935-8677 Puzzle Place Daycare has immediate openings for ages 19 mos. and older. Structured curriculum in my home. Crafts, story time, lesson time and outside play. Accredited daycare license with 25 years experience. 410-641-1952

FLEA MARKET

Single Family Homes Starting at $675 Condos Starting at $950 Office Space w/immediate availability, reception area & private office w/view. Plenty of customer parking in a great Ocean Pines location! Rent includes all CAM, trash removal, water & sewer. $695/mo.

Apply within: 39597 Jefferson Bridge Rd.; Bethany Beach, DE 19930 Or fax resume to: 302.537.5470

Rental agent Position

Holiday Harbor Waterfront Lot No HOA, No city taxes. $79,000. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

Cute, YR Efficiency, 32nd St., OC-with cable, HBO, W/D. Need good credit or steady job. No smoking/pets. $750/ mo. 443-504-4460

Delaware

Entry level InStallERS!

Large private residential lot on Old Bridge Road. No homeowners fee. Price reduced! Convenient to Wor. County boat ramp, shopping and restaurants. Call 410-6034300

CALL US TOdAy! 410-208-9200

Open 7 Days A Week for property viewing in: * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

It’s not too early to advertise your SUMMER REntalS 410-723-6397 www.oceancitytoday.net www.baysideoc.com

SALE ESTATE ESTATE SALE Estate Sale held Saturday, 94 and Sunday, 10-1. Everything must go. 6 Dockside Court, Mystic Harbour in West Ocean City.

SALE FOR FOR SALE Silver/Topaz Necklace w/receipt-can be exchanged for $133.00 + tax/merchandise from jewelry store. Cocktail ring-18 kt. $2000. Sofa, loveseat, chair & ottoman $500 443-727-9018. Lawnmower 22” Self-Propelled Craftsman, 625 B & S, high wheel. Like new! $150. Call 410-208-9997. iPod Shuffle-P90X full set, Elliptical machine. Call 443-6142620 for more information. AC/Heating-12,000 BTU through the wall, 220 volts for hotel/motel use. Excellent condition. W/remote control. $100-$300. 443-497-3936

SALE yARd yARd SALE Sat., 3-30-13 starts 7am. No earlier please! Lots of Furniture, Antiques, Tools, Lamps, Books, Kitchen Items, Furs, Hummels, Crystal, Home Decor, Coats, Jewelry. 12542 Deer Point Cir., Berlin.

OF ININSEARCH SEARCH OF Wanted Real Estate, Cars and Gold in exchange for Teak Furniture. www.windsorteak.com. Call 1-877-323TEAK.

VEHICLES VEHICLES 2004 Ford-Freestar Mini Van7 passenger, 27,000 mi. Excellent condition! Automatic, electric windows. Must sell. $6,950.00 FIRM. Call 443-4973936

bOAT SLIp bOATRENT SLIp FOR FOR RENT Boat slip for rent Ocean Pines area - $800/Season. Holds max. 23 ft. boat. 410726-8550.

200 59th Street

Flea Market and Craft Expo Saturday, April 6, 2013 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Contact Coconut Malorie, Ext. 6920 to book your space. Sell your goods or services for $30.

SLIp WANTEd bOAT bOAT SLIp WANTEd Boat Slip wanted in OP or WOC 20’ and would prefer a boat lift. Call 410-349-0900 sbielak_99@yahoo.com

Coconut Malorie Resort 200 59th St., Bayside Ocean City, MD 21842 410-723-6100

Classifieds 410-723-6397 By Monday, 5 p.m.

FURNITURE

FURNITURE

(Table included or bring your own and it’s only $25)

JUMpIN’ JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW ANd USEd Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000

146th Street, Ocean City


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

NEWS 3C

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108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

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Ocean City Today

4C NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

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Call 877-206-4290 www.CenturaOnline.com

AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE

Outer Banks, NC Vacation Homes! Over 500 Vacation Homes, from Duck to Kill Devil Hills to rindley Corolla, Outer Banks, Oceanfront each to Soundfront, Private Pools, VA C AT I O N S

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Hot Tubs, Pets and More…

Book Online at www.brindleybeach.com

1-877-642-3224

800-481-8974

“ S E R V I C E F I R S T … F U N A LWAY S ! ”

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Building Quality New Homes in

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

AIR CONDITIONING

BLINDS & SHADES

NEWS 5C

BLINDS & SHADES

436-4400 227-5529 

CARPET CLEANING

C O M P U T E R R E PA I R S

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6C LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

Legal Notices SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 607 OSPREY ROAD, UNIT 2 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-12-001144 Covahey, Boozer, Devan, and Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Cynthia J. Michaud recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4933, folio 239, and re-recorded in Liber 4986, folio 383, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4933, folio 239, and re-recorded in Liber 4986, folio 383, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4933, folio 236. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE: A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $20,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence. The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 10.12500% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement. Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason, there shall be no abatement of interest. If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited. The Substituted Trustees shall resell

the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor. Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com A-4372805 03/28/2013, 04/04/2013, 04/11/2013 OCD-3/28/3t __________________________________

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 5 FRANKLIN SQUARE UNIT A5 BERLIN, MD 21811 CASE NUMBER 23-C-12-001232 Covahey, Boozer, Devan, and Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Branden K. Hall recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 5178, folio 149, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 5178, folio 149, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 2843, folio 369. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE: A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $18,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with avail-

able funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence. The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 5.50000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement. Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason, there shall be no abatement of interest. If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited. The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser`s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor. Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser`s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com A-4372815 03/28/2013, 04/04/2013, 04/11/2013 OCD-3/28/3t __________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 102 MARTINIQUE CIRCLE OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Catherine T. Rinaman, dated December 3, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5038, Folio 336 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $170,536.20, and an original interest rate of 1.120%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on April 5, 2013 AT 1:10 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the

aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $17,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA assessments or private utility charges, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available legal remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction.  In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit. The sale is subject to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.  In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J.


MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

LEGAL NOTICES 7C

Legal Notices Rogers, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 144 WINDJAMMER RD. OCEAN PINES A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Andre J. Kaczynski dated April 18, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4690, Folio 428 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $156,750.00 and an original interest rate of 6.62500% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on APRIL 17, 2013 AT 2:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the

status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, Pratima Lele, Tayyaba C. Monto, Joshua Coleman, David W. Simpson, Substitute Trustees OCD-3/28/3t __________________________________

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 202 32ND STREET, UNIT #201 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-12-000260 Covahey, Boozer, Devan, and Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Livio Cristiani recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4399, folio 634, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, and Erin Gloth as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4399, folio 634, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 3065, folio 104. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE: A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted

Trustee in the amount of $8,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence. The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.00000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement. Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason, there shall be no abatement of interest. If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited. The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor. Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, and Erin Gloth, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com A-4370603 03/21/2013, 03/28/2013, 04/04/2013 OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 233 S. WASHINGTON ST. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Martha J. Clark dated December 26, 2003 and recorded in Liber 3985, Folio 587 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $162,000.00 and an original interest rate of 0.0169% default having occurred under the terms

thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on APRIL 5, 2013 AT 1:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $11,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees


8C LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

Legal Notices OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 11700 COASTAL HWY., UNIT #909 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Richard S. Lynard and Sheila L. Lynard dated November 24, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4310, Folio 384 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $356,000.00 and an original interest rate of 3.500% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on APRIL 5, 2013 AT 1:20 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Unit No. T-909 in the Carousel Center Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $37,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower

entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 12341 SOUTHHAMPTON DR. A/R/T/A LOT 46 SOUTHHAMPTON DR. BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Daniel E. Clayland dated August 2, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4497, Folio 588 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $351,000.00 and an original interest rate of 6.875% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on APRIL 5, 2013 AT 1:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Tax ID #05-020603 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $37,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are re-

ceived by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 8805 W. BISCAYNE DR. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Joseph D. Pizza, dated May 19, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4135, folio 136 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on

APRIL 5, 2013 AT 1:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Tax ID #10-103487 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $16,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees.  There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser.  TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.   Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest.   If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale.  In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit.  The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connec-


MARCH 29, 2013

Ocean City Today

LEGAL NOTICES 9C

Legal Notices tion with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale. Trustees’ file number 27563. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, John A. Ansell, III, Stephanie Montgomery, Kenneth Savitz, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 122 UPSHUR LA. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Marcia M. Woodward and William J. Woodward dated December 16, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4849, Folio 358 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $220,000.00 and an original interest rate of 2.000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on APRIL 5, 2013 AT 1:40 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $25,000 in cash, cashiers check or certified check is required at time of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current real property taxes will be made as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All past due property taxes paid by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All transfer taxes shall be paid by the Purchaser. Purchaser shall pay all applicable agricultural tax, if any.  Purchaser is

responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Jacob Geesing, Carrie M. Ward, David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 90 WINDJAMMER RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Nancy McKenzie and Paulo McKenzie, dated January 4, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4854, folio 638 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on APRIL 8, 2013 AT 2:20 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute

Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $22,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2011-16252) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, Diana C. Theologou, Laura L. Latta, Jonathan Elefant, Laura T. Curry, Benjamin Smith, Chasity Brown, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 16 FOOTBRIDGE TRAIL BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from George F. Vitak and Anna Maria Vitak, dated July 26, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4975, folio 259 among the Land

Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on APRIL 8, 2013 AT 2:22 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $18,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2009-04123) Deborah K. Curran, Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, Substitute Trustees


Ocean City Today

10C LEGAL NOTICES

MARCH 29, 2013

Legal Notices ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LL 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 224 MORGAN’S CT. POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Gary L. Brittingham a/k/a Gary L. Brittingham, Jr. and Jamie L. Brittingham, dated February 1, 2008 and recorded in Liber 5055, folio 469 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, Snow Hill, on APRIL 5, 2013 AT 1:31 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Tax ID #01-043730 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees.  There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser.  TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.   Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date

of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest.   If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale.  In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit.  The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale.  Trustees’ file number 28040. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, John A. Ansell, III, Stephanie Montgomery, Kenneth Savitz, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS TRANSPORTATION DIVISION

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) OCEAN CITY TRANSPORTATION 5 YR. VEHICLE ADVERTISING The Mayor and City Council of Ocean City, Maryland are accepting proposals for a five (5) year Vehicle Advertising contract. Whereas, the Town owns and operates a public transit system known as Ocean City Transportation (OCT) and will make available for use to the awarded Vendor interior and/or exterior forms of advertising space on approximately forty-seven (47) forty-foot (40’) Coastal Highway fixed-route public transit buses, two (2) origin-to-destination Para Transit mobility vans, one (1) Medical Appointment mobility van and twenty-four (24) Boardwalk

Tram roof tops. The awarded Vendor will be responsible for all aspects of vehicle advertising, including but not limited to, inventory management, solicitations, sales, production, installation, maintenance and removals. The awarded Vendor will also be subject to all terms, conditions and provisions set forth in the OCT 5 Yr. Vehicle Advertising RFP and Agreement. OCT 5 Yr. Vehicle Advertising RFP document is available at: Public Works Administration Offices Department of Transportation 204 65th Street, Building E Ocean City, Maryland 21842 Contact person is: Mr. Brian Connor, Assistant Superintendent Ocean City Transportation Email: bconnor@oceancitymd.gov Office: 410-723-2174 Proposals must be submitted to the Office of the City Manager, located at 301 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, Maryland 21842, by no later than 11:00 a.m. on Tuesday, April 9, 2013. Proposals will be opened at the Work Session of the Mayor and City Council at 1:00 p.m. that same day. Respondents are welcome to attend but need not be present. Submission of proposals by certified Disadvantage Businesses Enterprises (DBE’s) are encouraged. OCD-3/14/4t __________________________________

NOTICE Disposal of Personal Property Owned by Worcester County, Maryland In accordance with the provisions of Section CG 4-403 of the County Government Article of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, the County Commissioners have declared the following described personal property as surplus and are considering disposal of same by conveyance to the TriCounty Council for the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland which proposes to use this property for other public purposes by Shore Transit. ONE 2002 MODEL YEAR AND ONE 2003 MODEL YEAR FORD SUPREME BUSES These Ford Supreme Buses, one with 415,173 miles and one with 446,986 miles, were purchased by the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland and have been leased to the Tri-County Council for the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland and used by Shore Transit since this Lower Eastern Shore public transportation system’s inception. Although the County Commissioners have retained title to these vehicles, the vehicle has been operated and maintained by Shore Transit. DETERMINED TO BE USED FOR OTHER PUBLIC PURPOSE: The County Commissioners have determined, by at least five-sevenths

majority vote, that conveyance of this personal property to the Tri-County Council for the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland for use by Shore Transit, or to be retired from service at their discretion, constitutes a valid public purpose. TERMS OF CONVEYANCE: The County Commissioners propose to convey the above described property to the Tri-County Council for the Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland at no cost. Anyone objecting to the proposed conveyance of the above personal property shall do so in writing submitted to the address below prior to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 28, 2013, or in person at the regularly scheduled meeting of the County Commissioners to be held at 10:00 a.m. on April 2, 2013 in the County Commissioners Meeting Room, Room 1101 - Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/14/3t __________________________________

NOTICE Disposal of Surplus Vehicles and Equipment to be Auctioned on GovDeals.com “Disposition of County Personal Property no longer used by the County” The following described personal property, including vehicles, furniture and equipment, have been determined to be no longer required for County use by the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland and deemed to be surplus property: SURPLUS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT Surplus vehicles, listed by make and model (with model year), as follows: Chevrolet Caprice (1989); Dodge Neon (1998); Dodge Ram 2500 Van (1995); Ford Aerostar (1994); Ford Crown Victoria (2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009); Ford E-450 16-2 Bus (2002); Ford Expedition (2006); Ford F-150 Pickup (2000, 2001); Ford Taurus SE (1997, 2000); Ford Windstar (2002); and Jeep Cherokee (2000). Surplus electronic equipment, including: Computers; Monitors; Laptops; Printers; Keyboards; Mouse; Optical Drives; Power Supplies; CPU Fans; Surge Protectors; Battery Backups; Receipt Printers; Power Cords; Box Register Readers; Bar Code Readers; PC Caddies; Calculators; and IBM Typewriter. Surplus furniture, including: 4 Shelf Glass Front Case; 4-Shelf Wooden Cabinet; 5 Shelf Metal Cabinet; 2-Drawer and 4-Drawer Metal Filing Cabinets; Wooden Tables; and Office Chairs. Miscellaneous surplus equipment, including: Register Drawers; Pencil Sharpener; Small Electric Heater; Frigidaire Dehumidifier; 55-gallon Waste Receptacles; 16-foot by 16-foot Manual Metal Roll-Up Door; Roll Up


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

LEGAL NOTICES 11C

Legal Notices Pickup Bed Covers; and Miscellaneous Gradall Parts. TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE AND CONVEYANCE: The County Commissioners propose to solicit competitive bids via an Internetbased auction system operated by GovDeals, Inc. for which the Commissioners will pay GovDeals, Inc. an administrative fee of seven and one-half percent (7.5%) of the winning bid, but not less than five and 00/100 dollars ($5.00), for each transaction. This administrative fee will be charged to the winning bidder so that there is no net cost to the County. All of the above referenced surplus property will be offered for sale “AS IS, WHERE IS.” The County Commissioners make no warranty, guaranty or representation of any kind, expressed or implied, as to the merchantability or fitness for any purpose of the property offered for sale. The County Commissioners warrant to the buyer that the property offered for sale will conform to its description. The County Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids as they see fit and to withdraw from sale any of the items listed. Payment in full by successful bidders shall be made to Worcester County Commissioners. OPPORTUNITY FOR OBJECTIONS: Anyone objecting to the proposed conveyance of the above surplus vehicles and equipment shall do so in writing prior to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 28, 2013, or in person at the regularly scheduled meeting of the County Commissioners to be held at 10:00 a.m. on April 2, 2013 in the County Commissioners Meeting Room, Room 1101 - Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/14/3t __________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING REGARDING AMENDMENT TO COUNTY ROADS INVENTORY WORCESTER COUNTY Notice is hereby given pursuant to Section 1-204 of the Public Works Article of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland that the County Commissioners of Worcester County will hold a Public Hearing on April 16, 2013 at 10:20 a.m. in the County Commissioners’ Meeting Room Room 1101 - Worcester County Government Center One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 The purpose of the hearing is to receive public comment on the following proposed amendments to the Inventory of County Roads: 1. Include Samuel Bowen Boulevard being approximately 0.75 mile in length, located off of Holly Grove Road to the west, and south of U.S. Route 50 (Ocean Gateway), east of Berlin in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland, and 2. Delete Billy Purnell Road being approximately 0.02 mile in length, lo-

cated off of MD Route 611 (Stephen Decatur Highway) to the east, and north of Eagles Nest Road, in West Ocean City in the Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. Copies of the plats for the above referenced roads are filed with the Department of Public Works - Roads Division, 6113 Timmons Road, Snow Hill, Maryland and are available during regular business hours (Monday through Thursday, 6:00 AM - 4:30 PM, except holidays) for inspection. The public is invited to attend the hearing and make comment. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/14/4t __________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 301-490-3361 Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. Maryland Asset Group, Limited Liability Company Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C12001512

NOTICE ORDERED, this 6th day of March, 2013 by the Circuit Court of Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property at 127 Channel Buoy Road, Ocean City, Maryland 21842 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 8th day of April, 2013 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 1st day of April, 2013, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $450,000.00. Stephen V. Hales CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Md. OCD-3/14/3t __________________________________ REGAN J. R. SMITH ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON LLP 10441 RACETRACK ROAD, SUITE 2 BERLIN, MD 21811

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15056 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH H. SHUSTER Notice is given that Mari Louise Shuster, 13 Duke Street Extended, P.O. Box 868, Selbyville, DE 19975, was on March 11, 2013 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of

Elizabeth H. Shuster who died on January 11, 2013, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 11th day of September, 2013. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Mari Louise Shuster Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 14, 2013 OCD-3/14/3t __________________________________ DENNIS C. WEISBERG ESQ WHARTON, LEVIN, ENRMANTRAUT & KLEIN 7477 BALTIMORE - ANNAPOLIS BLVD, SUITE 206 GLEN BURNIE, MD 21061

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15081 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF W JACK TENNANT Notice is given that Pamela Baker, 14201 Inlet Road, Culpepper, VA 22701; and Michael Tennant, 1313 Lee Street East Apt 223, Charleston, WV 25301, were on March 08, 2013 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of W Jack Tennant who died on October 3, 2004, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to

the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 8th day of September, 2013. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Pamela Baker Michael Tennant Personal Representatives True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 14, 2013 OCD-3/14/3t __________________________________ DENNIS C. WEISBERG ESQ WHARTON, LEVIN, ENRMANTRAUT & KLEIN 7477 BALTIMORE - ANNAPOLIS BLVD, SUITE 206 GLEN BURNIE, MD 21061

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15082 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF SUSAN LOWELL BUTLER Notice is given that James Butler, 5375 Duke Street #806, Alexandria, VA 22304, was on March 08, 2013 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Susan Lowell Butler who died on December 18, 2010, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 8th day of September, 2013. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of


12C LEGAL NOTICES

Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

Legal Notices Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. James Butler Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 14, 2013 OCD-3/14/3t __________________________________ H MICHAEL HICKSON ESQ BANKS, NASON & HICKSON 209 E. MARKET ST, SUITE 1 P.O. BOX 44 SALISBURY, MD 21801

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15066 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MARVIN M. SCOTT Notice is given that Marvin M. Scott Jr, 26924 Black Horse Run, Salisbury, MD 21801, was on March 12, 2013 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Marvin M. Scott who died on February 20, 2013, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 12th day of September, 2013. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this

published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Marvin M Scott Jr Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 21, 2013 OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND

***** NOTICE OF CHANGE ***** On October 1, 2012, the State of Maryland enacted a new law with regards to towing of vehicles, MD Transportation Code Ann. §21-10A02. This law affects the person or business that has a vehicle towed as well as the tow company. New tow signs and stickers are available at Town of Ocean City – City Hall, Billing & Collections Dept., 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD 21842, Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm, and reflect some of the changes. The following are other changes you need to know: TOW SIGN OWNERS will be required to: 1) Return their old sign to City Hall. 2) Purchase a new tow sign and municipal tow sticker, which is to be placed on the right corner. Note: There must be at least 1 sign for every 7,500 square feet of parking space in the parking lot. 3) Select ONE tow company who you will call direct to tow vehicles from your lot. Note: New regulation requires the person/business towing the vehicle to arrange to have one particular towing company tow the vehicles from the lot. 4) Affix a sticker you received from the tow company containing their name in left corner, opposite the valid municipal tow sticker on the new sign. 5) The person/business towing the vehicle will call the tow company direct and NO LONGER call the Town of Ocean City Police Department or Town of Ocean City Communications to have a vehicle towed.

TOW COMPANIES will be required to: 1) Have stickers made with their tow company name. Note: The tow company will give these stickers to the person/business that has an agreement with them to tow vehicles from their lot. 2) Will not be allowed to tow from a property that does not display their sticker.

room at the Ocean Pines Branch of the Worcester County Library, 11107 Cathell Road, Berlin, Maryland on Thursday, April 4, 2013. The Board members will convene at 1:00 p.m. to discuss administrative matters and may perform on-site viewing of all or some of the following cases. Thereafter, the members will reconvene at 2:00 p.m. at the library to hear the scheduled cases.

For Questions, Call: Mike Sherman, License Inspector 301 Baltimore Avenue Ocean City, MD 21842 410-289-8861 msherman@oceancitymd. OCD-3/21/2t __________________________________

MAJOR CONSTRUCTION

Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 FILE NUMBER: 34R56 Diane S. Rosenberg Mark D. Meyer John A. Ansell, III Stephanie Montgomery Kenneth Savitz 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff(s) v. Michael Allen Parker 9402 Coastal Highway, Unit 705 Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C12001413

NOTICE Notice is herby given this 18th day of March, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of 9402 Coastal Highway Unit 705, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of April, 2013, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 8th day of April, 2013. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $269,600.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Md. OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________ WORCESTER COUNTY SHORELINE COMMISSION

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Pursuant to the provisions of Sections 3-101 and 3-102 of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be conducted by the Worcester County Shoreline Commission in the meeting

MAJOR 1 Permit Ink, LLC on behalf of Douglas and Sharon Rogers - Request No. 2013-17 –Request to install a 3’ x 15’ walkway and a 4’ x 40’ parallel dock with one boatlift and associated pilings not to exceed 16’ channelward. This request also includes repair of existing stone revetment and installation of a 60’ low profile stone revetment sill. This project is located on an unimproved lot on Norwich Road, also known as Tax Map 21, Parcel 8, Block 17, Lot 14, Cape Isle of Wight, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 2 Brittingham Landscaping on behalf of Charles and Natalie Bloodsworth - Request No. 2013-18 Request to fill, grade and plant marsh vegetation along 240’ of eroding shoreline and install a low profile stone sill not to exceed 28’ feet channelward. The project is located at 12337 Vivian Street, also known as Tax Map 10, Parcel 177, Lot 76, Holiday Harbor, Fifth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 3 Ocean City Boatlifts and Marine Construction, Inc. on behalf of Clair and Sara Sheffer – Request No. 201319 - Request to install one boatlift with an 18’ x 16” catwalk and associated poles not to exceed 30’ channelward. This project is located on Swordfish Drive, also known as Tax Map 27, Parcel 654, Slip 37, Marsh Harbour Condominium, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 4 Permit Ink, LLC on behalf of Jerome and Lisa Farrell - Request No. 2013-20 –Request to install angular shaped parallel dock with one boatlift and one PWC lift with associated pilings not to exceed 24’ channelward. This request also includes the installation of 60’ of replacement vinyl bulkhead. This project is located at 12311 Snug Harbor Road, also known as Tax Map 33, Parcel 346, Section A, Lot 57, Snug Harbor, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 5 Permit Ink, LLC on behalf of Jerome and Lisa Farrell - Request No. 2013-21 –Request to install a 12’ x 16’8” platform and one PWC lift with associated pilings not to exceed 23’ channelward. This request also includes the installation of 40’ of replacement vinyl bulkhead and reconstruction of existing 12’ x 24’ boat ramp with two (2) 24’ vinyl wing walls. This project is located on an unimproved lot on Snug Harbor Road, also known as Tax Map 33, Parcel 346, Section A, Lot 58, Snug Har-


Ocean City Today

MARCH 29, 2013

LEGAL NOTICES 13C

Legal Notices bor, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 6 Hi-Tide Marine Construction on behalf of Island Point House Trust and Christopher Johnson – Request No. 2013-22 – Request to perform various shoreline reconstruction activities including shoreline stabilization, replacement bulkheading, dock and boathouse replacement, and maintenance dredging. This request also includes the installation of three stone groins, a living shoreline, and various parallel docks within basin not to exceed 40’ channelward. This project is located at 5717 Waterside Drive, also known as Tax Map 50, Parcel 51, Lots 12, 13 & 14, South Point Farms, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. OCD-3/21/2t __________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING WORCESTER COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS AGENDA

Thursday, April 11, 2013 Pursuant to the provisions of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held before the Board of Zoning Appeals for Worcester County, in the Board Room (Room 1102) on the first floor of the Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland. 6:30 p.m. Case No. 13-17, on the application of KND Development, LLC., requesting a variance to reduce the Ordinance prescribed lot width from 200 feet to 94.53 feet (a reduction of 105.47 feet) and requesting a variance to reduce the Ordinance prescribed right side yard setback from 20 feet to 16.6 feet (an encroachment of 3.4 feet) associated with a proposed manufactured home in an A-1 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1-116(c)(4), ZS 1201(b)(5), ZS 1-305 and ZS 1-314, located at 9166 Peerless Road, approximately 1,100 feet east of the intersection of Murray Road and Peerless Road, Tax Map 8, Parcel 137, Lot 2, of the Carl Mumford Minor Subdivision, in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. 6:35 p.m. Case No. 13-19, on the application of Michael Hales, requesting a variance to subdivide a parcel of land not having road frontage on a public or approved private road associated with a proposed minor subdivision in an A-1 Agricultural District, pursuant to Zoning Code Sections ZS 1116(c)(4), ZS 1-201(b)(6), ZS 1-305, ZS 1-306(a)(7) and ZS 1-311, located at 7608 Snow Hill Road (MD Route 12), approximately 800 feet north of the intersection of St. Lukes Road and Snow Hill Road, Tax Map 36, Parcel 72, in the Seventh Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS OCD-3/28/2t __________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING POTENTIAL ADOPTION OF GROWTH TIERS/SEPTIC TIER MAPS AS PROVIDED FOR IN THE SUSTAINABLE GROWTH AND AGRICULTURAL PRESERVATION ACT OF 2012 WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND The County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland will conduct a public hearing to receive public comment on the potential adoption of Growth Tiers (Septic Tier Maps) as provided for in the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012 (also known as the Septics Law) adopted by the Maryland Legislature and in accordance with the provisions of Title 1, Subtitle 5 of the State Land Use Article. Said public hearing to be held on TUESDAY, APRIL 16, 2013 at 11:00 AM in the COUNTY COMMISSIONERS’ MEETING ROOM ROOM 1101 - WORCESTER COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER ONE WEST MARKET STREET, SNOW HILL, MARYLAND 21863 Copies of the draft Septic Tier Maps and other relevant information may be obtained from the Department of Development Review & Permitting (DRP), Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Room 1201, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. The map and information may be reviewed at the Department during regular business hours of 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday (except holidays). The map is also available for viewing on the County’s website at: http://www.co.worcester.md.us/drp/se ptictiers/SB-236_CountyMap.pdf All interested citizens are encouraged to attend the hearing and express their views on these matters. Both written and oral testimony will be accepted. Anyone having questions may contact Edward A. Tudor, Director of DRP, at 410-632-1200. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/28/3t __________________________________

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Worcester County Local Management Board Programs for FY 2014 The Worcester County Commissioners are currently seeking proposals for the provision of programs for the Worcester County Local Management Board to carry out the Strategic Planning Initiatives for Fiscal Year 2014 (FY14) for the period July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014. Further information and instructions to bidders are provided in the Request for

Proposals (RFP) package which may be picked up from the Office of the County Commissioners, Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street - Room 1103, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, obtained online at www.co.worcester.md.us or by calling the Commissioners’ Office at 410-632-1194 to request a package by mail. Interested service providers are encouraged to attend a pre-proposal conference at 1:00 PM on Monday, April 1, 2013 to be held at the Worcester County Health Department, Conference Room 150, 6040 Public Landing Road, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. Please contact Jennifer LaMade at 410-632-3648 to RSVP for the pre-proposal conference. Sealed proposals will be accepted until 1:00 PM, Monday, April 29, 2013 in the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Proposal for LMB Services for FY14" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, proposals will be reviewed by an evaluation committee and a recommendation of award will be made to the County Commissioners at a future meeting. In awarding the proposal, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all proposals, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever proposal they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering lowest or best proposal, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of consultants being considered, previous experience of consultants with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to Jennifer LaMade or Brittany Hines at 410-632-3648. OCD-3/28/1t __________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 301-490-3361 Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. Mark Kiefer aka Mark A Kiefer Defendant IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C12001605

NOTICE ORDERED, this 18th day of March, 2013 by the Circuit Court of Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property at 4711 Coastal Highway, Unit 245, Ocean City, Maryland 21842 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et. al, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 22nd day of April, 2013 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 15th day of

April, 2013, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $149,000.00. Stephen H. Hales CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Md. OCD-3/28/3t __________________________________ Morris/Hardwick/Schneider, LLC 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, Maryland 21237 MARK H. WITTSTADT GERARD WM. WITTSTADT, JR. DEBORAH A. HOLLOWAY HILL Substitute Trustees 9409 Philadelphia Road Baltimore, Maryland 21237 V. Cathryn G. Pena 504 Robin Drive, Unit #67 Ocean City, Maryland 21842 Defendant IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY CASE # 23-C-12-000801

NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County this 18th day of March, 2013, that the foreclosure sale of the real property known as 504 Robin Drive, Unit #67, Ocean City, Maryland 21842, being the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Mark H. Wittstadt, Gerard Wm. Wittstadt, Jr., and Deborah A. Holloway Hill, Substitute Trustees, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 15th day of April, 2013. Provided a copy of this Order is inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in Worcester Coiunty, once in each of three successive weeks, before the 8th day of April, 2013. The Report states the amount of the Foreclosure Sale to be $61,500.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court of Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Md. OCD-3/21/3t __________________________________

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 15094 Notice is given that the General Court of Bertie County, N.C. appointed Lisa C. Bulgher, P.O. Box 222, Merry Hill, NC 27957 as the Executrix of the Estate of David E. Bulgher AKA: David Everett Bulgher who died on December 18, 2012 domiciled in North Carolina, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Laura Lepore whose address is 8128 Quarterfields Farm, Severn, MD 21144. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County.


Ocean City Today

14C LEGAL NOTICES

MARCH 29, 2013

Legal Notices All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Lisa C. Bulgher Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: March 28, 2013 OCD-3/28/3t __________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS BOARD OF PORT WARDENS Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 106, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waterways,â&#x20AC;? Article II â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shoreline Developmentâ&#x20AC;? of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Port Wardens Ordinance of Ocean City, Maryland,

notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD Thursday, April 11th , 2013 At 2:00 PM A request has been submitted to install 6 poles & boatlift to include 31â&#x20AC;? x 24â&#x20AC;&#x2122; aluminum catwalk within confines of slip, reset two (2) association mooring poles to proper alignment not to exceed 50â&#x20AC;&#x2122; channelward of community walkway/boardwalk. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 310 13th ST Slip S-5 (on-site â&#x20AC;&#x153;11-Câ&#x20AC;?), Parcel # 3493 -S5-0 -0111-399467 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Ocean City Boatlifts & Marine Construction, Inc. c/o Ginger Gillis Owner: Brian Arni (former owner, Daryl Reinke) PW13-023 A request has been submitted to redeck an existing 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 42â&#x20AC;&#x2122; parallel pier, install a new 19â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; perpendicular pier, relocate an existing boatlift to left side of new pier w/ associated pilings, and install a new boatlift to right side of new pier w/associated pilings. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 605 Gulfstream DR Parcel # 8020A1483B-7A-0 -0117-189802 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Bayshore Marine Construction Owner: Thomas & Barbara Busch PW13-042 A request has been submitted to remove & replace damaged piling for preparation of boatlift installation & install 13,000 lb boatlift on existing piling. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 604 Osprey Road, Unit A, Parcel # 5254 -641A-0 -0112-213010 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: James Gonzalez Owner: James Gonzalez PW13- 043 A request has been submitted to install (2) batter piles, re-construct a 46â&#x20AC;&#x2122; x 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; parallel platform, install a

boatlift and a jet-ski lift all a maximum of 18â&#x20AC;&#x2122; channelward. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 135 Pine Tree RD, Parcel # 8020A-1335B-1-0 -0117196329 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Edward Kerr Owner: Edward Kerr PW13-044 A request has been submitted to install a boatlift into existing slip onto existing poles, no further channelward than 20â&#x20AC;&#x2122; of 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122; ft community walkway/boardwalk. The site of the proposed construction is described as being located at 203 S Heron Drive, Slip 63, Parcel # 6067A-63-0 -0116381789 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Ocean City Boatlifts & Marine Construction, Inc. Owner: Jarrod M. Klunk PW13-045 Board of Port Wardens Blake McGrath, Chairman Valerie Gaskill, Attorney OCD-3/28/2t __________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110 of the Code of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Zoning Ordinance for Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted by the Board of Zoning Appeals for Ocean City, Maryland in the Council Chambers of City Hall located on Baltimore

Avenue and Third Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: THURSDAY, APRIL 11, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(1) and Section 110-393(2) requesting a special use exception to allow indoor/outdoor bicycle rentals in the R-3, General Residential, Zoning District. The site of the appeal is described as Lot 5; Block 55N, Sinepuxent Beach Company Plat, 1891; further described as located on the south side of 14th Street and west side of Atlantic Avenue (Boardwalk), and known locally as Harrison Hall Hotel Inc., 1409 Atlantic Avenue, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: B AND F BIKES LLC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; (BZA 2367 #13-09400004) at 6:10 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(2)(b) requesting a special parking exception to waive 13 parking spaces to convert a retail space to a restaurant with seating. The site of the appeal is described as Lots 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, and 43, Block 18 of the Edward J. Shute Plat, further described as located on the west side of Philadelphia Avenue and the north side of 15th Street, and known locally as 1503 Philadelphia Avenue, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: THE GREENHOUSE, INC. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; (BZA 2368 #13-09400005) Further information concerning the public hearings may be examined in the office of the Department of Planning and Community Development in City Hall. Alfred Harrison, Chairman Heather Stansbury, Attorney OCD-3/28/2t __________________________________



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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

16C NEWS

MARCH 29, 2013

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Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

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