Issuu on Google+

OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.NET

MARCH 21, 2014

SERVING NORTHERN WORCESTER COUNTY

PREVIEW

Page 43 FREE

Tourism study goes to Sumek Architect of resort’s strategic planning to lead assignment

IRISH FESTIVAL

STEWART DOBSON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Hundreds of people gather in the 45th Street Village parking lot for the annual Irish Festival celebration Saturday afternoon following Ocean City’s St. Patrick’s Day parade. This year’s edition of the annual event was its largest ever, coming within a whisker of exceeding Baltimore for the title of the state’s biggest St. Patrick’s Day parade.

Schools seek snow day waiver Elementary math: three days set aside, less nine used, leaves six days to make up

By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) Icy roads and seemingly innumerable snowstorms this winter have done their worst to the Worcester County public school calendar, going so far as to prompt jokes about hoping students can leave school early enough on July 4 to see the fireworks. It isn’t that bad, of course, but with just three days allotted this year for weather-related closures and nine school closings so far, it’s bad enough. “Polar vortex is a dirty word in my house,” said Superintendent of Schools Dr. Jerry Wilson. Even so, students, faculty and staff could see an earlier start to summer than expected, thanks to calendar mod-

ifications and pending approval of a waiver request to the state superintendent of schools approved at Tuesday’s meeting of the Worcester County Board of Education. To get students out the door before Friday, June 20 — a far cry from the original last day of school of Thursday, June 12 — the board altered the school calendar this week. It added a half-day on March 28, the Friday originally marked as a professional workday that students had off. After agreeing last month to make Thursday, April 17 — the first day of student’s spring break — a half-day, too, and considering the three snow days built in to the original school calendar, officials still had four more weather-related closings delaying the start of summer. The board hopes to make them up via a waiver request to be submitted to the state superintendent of schools. See SCHOOLS page 4

2999

$

NANCY POWELL/OCEAN CITY TODAY

More snow on Monday meant more woe for the Worcester County public schools calendar.

HEATING SYSTEM BROKE DOWN? NEED IMMEDIATE SERVICE? STARTING AT

Residential & Commercial 24/7 Emergency Service

Our Techs Are Standing By Right Now – COMPLETE HVAC SYSTEMS 24/7 Ready to Help! 410A 13-15 SEER PACKAGE: • Air Handler or Furnace, Coil & Condenser Get The Service You Need – When You Need It Most! or Heat Pump GHVAC Insurance Claims Experts • Programmable Thermostat • 2 Year Labor & 10 Years Parts Warranty Don’t Wait For the Other Guy ….. • 1 Year Elite Maintenance Plan Call Now For IMMEDIATE Service WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! Financing Available • All Major • Credit Cards Accepted

Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (March, 21, 2014) After reviewing proposals for the resort’s much-anticipated strategic tourism plan, the city has decided to scrap the bid process and instead solicit the same consultant used for the city-wide strategic plan that was done this time last year. “Not that price was the only factor in this, but Lyle’s cost for facilitating this was half of the lowest bidder on the RFP [request for proposals] we issued,” City Manager David Recor said of Lyle Sumek, the Florida‘All of the based conbidders had sultant who different worked with the city last approaches year. …and their “All of the prices were bidders had different ap- all over the proaches… place as and their well.’ prices were all over the place as well,” said city Tourism Director Donna Abbott. “[Sumek] has come back with a very competitive price, and he would not be starting from square one.” The city has earmarked its $40,000 annual market research allocation toward the strategic tourism planning process. Over the winter of 20122013, Sumek held extensive sessions with elected offiSee TOURISM page 3 We Service All HVAC Brands

443-783-1591 855-484-8221 www.GVHVAC.com

MD HVAC #4450 – MD MHIC #130427 – DE HVAC/R # HM-0000865 LICENSED & INSURED


Ocean City Today

PAGE 2

Hemingway ’s at the

MARCH 21, 2014

Featuring: Mango BBQ Ri , Jerk Painted Salmon,

Rasta Pasta, Scao Saint Croix, Ribeye Steak & me...

CORAL REEF

Local favorites as well as innovative interpretations of Floridian and island cuisine, inspired by traditional and modern tastes.

Fine Dining Nightly at 5pm. Join us Daily in our 4-story atrium for Breakfast, Lunch or a casual Dinner

17TH STREET & BOARDWALK IN THE HOLIDAY INN SUITES • 410.289.2612 • OCMDHOTELS.COM/HEMINGWAYS

WWW.

OCMDHOTELS .COM

Happy Spring Everybody! Balance has returned with a warm weekend ahead of us. March on over to our website for some great, sunrise catching, empty beach walking, getaway specials.

$16 top sirloin steak

$9 1/2lb burger

$7 fresh, local oysters

U N E M H C N U R B R E T S EA ‘14 ed m • Reservations Recommend Sunday, April 20th • 10am - 3p 5-12 $14.95 • Under 5 FREE! adults $27.95 • children ages

Carving Station Roasted Leg of Lamb with rosemary & garlic Rib Roast au jus & horseradish cream Honey Baked Ham with dijon marmalade

Hot Station 3 cheese lasagna, seafood thermidor chicken milano, garlic mashed red potatoes, applewood smoked bacon, sausage, potatoes o’brian & fresh vegetable medley

Omelet Station w/eggs to order

shredded cheese, shrimp, spinach, mushroom, ham, peppers, onions, sausage & bacon

RAW BAR CRAFT BREWS • OPEN EVERYDAY•

:)

FRESH EATS

KID FRIENDLY!

HERSHE Y’S ICE CREAM & ROOT BEER ON TAP

!!! MARCH MADN&ESS FLAT 12 BREWS ON TAP SCREENS ON EVERY WALL

also offering: Waffle Station, Dessert Station, Salad & Seafood Station, Yogurt Parfait Station & Bread Station

Happy

Easter OCEANCITYHILTON.COM/DINING

67TH ST OCEANFRONT IN THE HOLIDAY INN BRICKHOUSEPUBOC.COM 410-524-5252 OPEN FOR BREAKFAST & DINNER EVERYDAY, LUNCH SAT & SUN

32ND ST. OCEANSIDE IN THE HILTON 410-289-2525 OPEN DAILY FOR BREAKFAST LUNCH & DINNER


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today Business ..................................33 Calendar ..................................65 Commentary..............................77 Classifieds ................................30 Entertainment ..........................47 Insight Plus ..............................43 Obituaries ................................28 Public notices ..........................67 Sports ......................................35 Editor: Phil Jacobs Managing Editor: Lisa Capitelli Staff Writers: Nancy Powell, Zack Hoopes, Clara Vaughn, Sheila Cherry Assistant Publisher: Elaine Brady Account Managers: Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea Classified/Legals: Terry Burrier Digital Media Sales: Jacob Cohen Senior Designer: Susan Parks Graphic Artists: Kelly Brown, Kaitlin Sowa, Debbie Haas. Comptroller Christine Brown Administrative Assistant: Gini Tufts Publisher: Stewart Dobson News: editor@oceancitytoday.net Sales: sales@oceancitytoday.net Classifieds: classifieds@oceancitytoday.net Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net. and at Facebook/Ocean City Today

P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 Published Fridays by FLAG Publications, Inc. 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Available by subscription at $150 a year.

PAGE 3

Tourism study to same consultant Continued from Page 1 cials, government employees, business leaders, and citizens to hammer out a five-year strategic vision for the resort. Despite the long, arduous sessions, the most lasting product of the exercise has been the final two-page action summary that is consulted for most every policy decision. Even if it has not created total political consent on City Council, it has achieved some level of cohesion. “When we went back at the end of the year and went through everything we had done to address the items on the plan, I was really impressed with what we had done,” said Council Secretary and Tourism Commission Chair Mary Knight. “It has been very satisfying.” Sumek will be taking a similar approach this time around to a tourismcentric plan. “This is going to be very performance-based and outcome-based,” Recor said. “You’re going to be able to go back and see results after the first year.” The city had cast a fairly wide net in its bid document for the tourism plan, specifying that the process “will encompass interviewing key Ocean City tourism stakeholders, evaluating Ocean City tourism assets and conducting a market analysis to incorporate into a strategic plan that will

serve as the blueprint for Ocean City’s tourism marketing, identifying target and niche markets and priorities for FY 2015-2020.” When the proposals came back, Knight said, “nothing we saw as really that specific to what we were asking for.” Most importantly, officials felt that Sumek’s existing knowledge of the resort would enable him to put together a better market study – knowing who

‘When we went back at the end of the year and went through everything we had done to address the items on the plan, I was really impressed with what we had done. It has been very satisfying.’ Council Secretary and Tourism Commission Chair Mary Knight the city’s visitors are, why they come, and how to get more of them. “We have desperately needed that information anyway, regardless of a bigger five-year plan,” Abbott said. “Lyle has also suggested a profile of our competitors as well…who they are and what they offer,” Recor said. One of the most difficult – but most influential – parts of any plan-

ning process is selecting the group involved. As before, the effort will center on the core group of officials who make the day-to-day decisions on the matter - in this case, the city’s Tourism Commission. But the process will also solicit feedback from other select stakeholders as well as taking input from the community at large. “We’re going to be handing out a worksheet, hopefully by next meeting, to collect preliminary data,” Knight told the commission. “Then, Lyle will meet with us all individually and as a group to go over it.” Discussion, review and revision of the plan will likely take several months, but the goal is to have a working document by the fall. “The final meeting will be a fourhour summit where anyone at all can come and give input,” Knight said. Maryland completed a statewide tourism study early last year, which was part of the impetus for the city’s own study. Hard data as well as anecdotal reports from the 2013 tourist season were mixed, with the city’s tax revenues up but several other indicators staying flat. Room rates and revenueper-room from large hotels continued to climb, with some voicing concern that the city was making more money off less people and marginalizing some smaller businesses.

WELCOME BACK Celebrating 30 years of dock to table fresh seafood

& the best view and raw bar in Ocean City, Maryland Spring Hours: Thursday - Sunday open at 11:30am

the

$1 BAY OYSTERS atllime! $1 TOP NECK CLAMS

1 9 8 4

P R I C E S

MARCH & APRIL

BOARDWALK SOUTH OVERLOOKING THE INLET • GREAT SELECTION OF FRESH SEAFOOD

410-289-5121 • WWW.HARBORWATCHRESTAURANT.COM


Ocean City Today

PAGE 4

MARCH 21, 2014

Schools seeking modifications to calendar Continued from Page 1 Days the Maryland State Police and State Highway Administration declare states of emergency or snow emergencies are eligible for such waivers, said Coordinator of Public Relations and Special Programs for Worcester schools Barbara Witherow. “That waiver would be based on the fact that Jan. 29, March 3 and then yesterday (March 17) the Maryland State Police, in conjunction with the State Highway Association, declared a snow emergency day, which means that vehicles on the roads are supposed to be limited to those that have snow tires or chains,” she said. “The last day of school, if in fact the state superintendent did approve that, would be the 13th” of June. If the state superintendent grants

50

%

SAVE UP TO # #

#

#

the waiver for all three days, Wednesday, June 11, will be Worcester students’ last full day of school with the June 12 and 13 both half-days before the official start of summer. “We’ve had a very difficult winter,” said Chief Operating Officer Louis Taylor at Tuesday’s meeting. “It was hard, I’m not going to lie,” mother of two Deserie Lawrence said last month, when her daughters Mackenzie, 9, and Madison, 10, stayed home several days almost immediately after Christmas break due to the slurry of snow. At first, her girls were excited for the free days, but as the reality of a shortened summer set in, “they were petrified,” Lawrence said. “We live at the beach, so for them, the minute it starts warming up, they immediately start thinking about how

Innovia Carpet delivers a luxuriously soft carpet with Permanent Stain & Soil Protection that NEVER Washes or Wears Off!

• Built in lifetime stain & soil resistance, not topically applied. • High-performance yarn that’s designed to retain its beautiful appearance # • #Simple # maintenance; # # # cleans # ( with water or mild #detergent # # # # • Complete #collection # of 42 # # # # Innovia Carpets on Sale

#

On Innovia and # Innovia # Touch# Carpets# # #

#

#

'

'

% %

Fairgrounds

Hometown • Tweed Textured Saxony 1 • Heavy 52 oz Weight 1 • Incl. Healthy Living Installation 1

$ 73

3

$ 99

sq. ft. Completely installed with premium cushion

1

#

30%

'

1 1 1 1

HOMEWORKS

'

4

#

(

%

%

%

Seasons

'

sq. ft. Completely installed with premium cushion

# #

#

#

( #

#

# # ( #

#

Laminate SAVE

40%

# •#Fox Point -# 5 Colors

1 1 1

85th & Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 • (410) 524-5454 Open 7 Days a Week • Mon. thru Thur. 9 til 5 • Fri. & Sat. 9 til 6 • Sun. 10 til 4

Flooring Only: Hickman’s Beach Plaza Est, Rt. 1 Bethany Beach, DE 19930 (302) 537-5300 • Open 7 Days a Week • Mon. thru Sat 9 til 5 • Sun 10 til 4

%

$ 25 1

1

$ 59

*On purchases of $500 or more with your GE card during promotion period.Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the promotional balance, including optional changes, is not paid in full within 18 months, or if you make a late payment. Minimum Monthly Payments Required. If promo and debt cancellation are not paid in full within 18 months, interest at 29.99% APR will be assessed from purchase date. If account goes 60 days past due, promo may be terminated early and accrued interest will be billed. Minimum interest $2. Subject to credit approval. **See warranty guide for complete details.

1

sq. ft.

1

Reg $2.79

• Hypo-allergenic and 100% 1 1 1 1 1 recyclable antimicrobial 1 1 1 1 1 premium carpet1 cushion. 1 1 1 1 1 • Provides genuine 1 1 1 1 benefits for Allergy Sufferers. 1 1 1 1

1 1 Home 1 1 ' The prescription For a Healthier

'

%

• Solids & Flecks 1 •1 Super Soft Finish •1 Incl.1 Healthy Living Installation

1

1 1 Deferred Interest Financing

Reg $6.19

• Offers a superior level of care & health benefits. • Minimizes allergens, dust, mold, and odors. • Encourages better air quality in your home.

'

1 1 1

18 Month

$ 29 sq. ft.

#

# #

%

% Between

*

• Armstrong - 50 Year Warranty

4

#

1

%

Special financing Available # # # on Innovia and Innovia Touch Carpet

Hardwood SAVE

1

sq. ft. Completely1installed1 with premium cushion

% %

% %

%

• Solid Casual Texture • SmartStrand Fiber • Incl. Healthy Living Installation

3

our days are going to be filled with sand,” she said. “It makes it kind of difficult.” The snow caused so many closing across the region that the State Department of Education extended the window for Maryland School Assessment (MSA) testing earlier this month. Snow had already delayed end-ofsemester exams for Worcester County high school students, who were scheduled to take the tests Jan. 23-24, both days the schools closed for snow. “It makes it challenging all the way around. We want our kids to be in school and we want them to be learning. Unfortunately these inclement weather days interrupt our instruction,” Witherow said. “We wish we didn’t have them, but we can’t be

1

1

1

We do Windows too !"#$%"&%' (&)&*+,&)-' ./)0%"1!2/3,#' 4%"0&5#,' 6&,72/%00% 67/00%"' !"#$%&'()*+,-*#,'$"./0+1*$ %#'2300'."4*'&"#$%&.'

For FREE Measure and Financing Pre-Approval Visit www.homeworkscarpetone.com • No Sales Tax on Installations in Delaware $

$

$

$

$

bringing kids in to school when the roads aren’t safe.” Without the modifications, students in the county would lose six days of summer vacation, even after using the three snow days built in to the original 2013-2014-school calendar.

Spring non-profit networking after hours event set

(March 21, 2014) The Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore (CFES) announced an after hours networking opportunity for local nonprofit staff and CEOs. The event will be held Wednesday, March 26 from 4 – 6 p.m. at the Foundation’s Eastern Shore Nonprofit Support Center in Salisbury. This is an opportunity for Lower Shore non-profits to connect and learn from Community Foundation staff, who will be sharing information about the wide range of Community Foundation programs. The event is free and registration is requested. This event is part of the Community Foundation’s Non-profit Support Program. The program is focused on providing services and resources to enhance the capacity of non-profit organizations in the region through technical assistance, professional development, and continuing education. More information about this and additional training opportunities are available by visiting the home page of the foundation’s web site at www.cfes.org, or contact Erica Joseph, Vice President, Community Investment or Heather Towers, Program Officer, at 410-742-9911. CFES has been serving Wicomico, Worcester and Somerset counties granting more than $50 million over 30 years. Through the generosity and vision of our donors, CFES awarded grants totaling more than $5.4 million in fiscal year 2013. CFES brings together donors and builds on community assets through scholarships, grants, advocacy and leadership development. By focusing on people, organizations, neighborhoods and non-profit capacity building, the foundation addresses community needs in the areas of health, education, arts and culture, community development and the environment. For more information, visit www.cfes.org or call 410-7429911. Follow us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/cfeasternshore and Twitter at http://twitter.com/cfesnonprofit.

www.oceancitytoday.net updated every friday


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 5

Shoaling of harbor remains persistent issue County Commissioners seeking assistance from Army Corps of Engineers By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) Shoaling of the channel leading to the West Ocean City harbor is a persistent problem. The recurring issue is a hindrance to navigation in the federal channel and many, including the Worcester County Commissioners, would like a solution to be found and implemented. They have sought the assistance of the Army Corps of Engineers again. In a March 5 letter to Bud Church, president of the Worcester County Commissioners, Col. J. Richard Jordan III of the Army Corps of Engineers, wrote that the Corps is aware of

three problems in the harbor’s vicinity that might be interrelated. Those issues are rapid shoaling, shoreline erosion south of the harbor and a scour hole that has developed and deepened adjacent to the Harbor Lights condominiums north of the commercial harbor. The Corps conducted a preliminary assessment, which is under review by the North Atlantic Division of the Army Corps of Engineers. If approved, Jordan wrote, the Corps would begin negotiations with Worcester County officials for a feasibility study aimed at finding and implementing a solution to the scour problem. In other words, according to Ed Tudor, director of the Department of Development Review and Permitting, “We’re on the hook for a portion of it.”

…Jules… local fare with a global flair

The Corps dredged the channel in October 2013, but the sandbar returned. Because it keeps returning, Church wants a permanent, long-term solution. John Martin, general manager of Martin Fish Company at the harbor, told the commissioners of his concerns during their Jan. 7 meeting. Shoaling in front of that harbor limits access to the commercial fishing fleet, which must travel through the inlet to reach the ocean. At times, the shoaling prevents Martin’s vessels and other vessels from entering the harbor to unload their catch. The vessels must wait until high tide to avoid running aground while trying to reach the harbor. “Given that the sale of seafood up and down the eastern seaboard is a time-sensitive operation and this sit-

uation poses safety issues during bad weather when vessels must wait outside the inlet for high tide and during rough seas, this shoaling has become a serious problem,” Church wrote to Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md,) in early January seeking her assistance. In response, Mikulski wrote to Jordan on the county’s behalf. During the commissioners’ meeting Tuesday, Tudor said the Corps would be getting back in touch with them. Commissioner Virgil Shockley said he believes that until a better solution is found, the Corps will just keep dredging every 90 days. The important thing is to keep the harbor navigable. Commissioner Louise Gulyas said she wants the dredged sand to be put on Assateague Island, “but people say it’s the wrong size sand.”

“Your friends at the beach since 1973”

True Food ... from our Earth to Your Palate Monday – Thursday ALL ENTREES $19

Friday, Saturday and Sunday 3 Course $30 Early Bird 5 pm – 6 pm Complimentary Glass of Wine

We Do Elegance For Less. Specializing in FLOORS, KITCHENS & BATHS Tile • Hardwood • Laminate • Bamboo • Vinyl Tile that looks like Hardwood!

Open 7 Days a Week • Dinner 5:00 - 10:00pm 120th St. & Coastal Hwy, Ocean City • (410)524-3396

www.julesoc.com

Best SmartStrand® Prices in Town! • Custom-Made Area Rugs Decks • Plantation Shutters • Upholstery Cleaning Carpet Cleaning, Restoration & Restretching • Water Restoration

410.524.RUGS (7847) • 302.537.5500 • TOLL FREE: 866.302.RUGS (7847) View Our Gallery of Photos: RenovationsByTheOcean.com • CarpetsByTheOcean.com Rt. 54, Walgreen’s Shopping Center, Tax-Free Fenwick Island, DE 19944 (Mon-Fri 9-5, Sat 10-4)


Ocean City Today

PAGE 6

MARCH 21, 2014

Poll eyed for post Labor Day start

5799 Lighthouse Cove Rt. 54, Fenwick Island, DE

302-537-6971

Highstakesbarandgrill.com Live Entertainment

B

BINGO EVERY SUNDAY

G

N

8

Fun starts @ 12 First game called @ 1 Free to play Lots of winners Lots of prizes

3

Eat In o r Carry Out

Open Year Ro 11 am – 1 und am Specializin g in everything Cheese steak!!

Daily H appy H our

11am - 7pm

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) Although the issue is on the back burner in Annapolis, tourism industry leaders are looking into a public opinion poll as a way to sway the state the next time the issue of a post-Labor Day start date arises. “One of the big questions in this is what the general population, particularly the parents of students, actually want,” said David Reel of the Maryland Hotel & Lodging Association. “There was a reader poll in the Baltimore Sun that showed 60 percent were in favor of starting after Labor Day, which kind of piqued my interest.” That poll, Reel noted, was obviously self-selecting. To have any weight in Annapolis, a scientifically designed opinion study would need to be funded. “I’ve been reaching out to people to see if there would be interest in funding it,” Reel said. “It’s just being discussed at this point.” Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Melanie Pursel pitched the idea to the city’s Tourism Commission last week. “I’m going to be presenting it to my board as well,” Pursel said. “The thought was to see how much money would be out there to fund this, and

get some good solid data to support any decision the task force might make.” Roughly a year ago, State Senator Jim Mathias (D-38) submitted legislation authorizing a task force to study a post-Labor Day start. Currently, each of the Maryland’s countylevel school districts are free to set their own calendar. The General Assembly, if it so wished, could legislate a state-wide school start date. The task force is required to submit a final recommendation this June. Earlier, it was thought that the group may finish early enough to have its recommendation acted upon during the current legislative session, before the state’s lawmakers break for the summer, but that process was bogged down with a number of concerns. While business groups have lobbied hard to compact the school year into a shorter time span, the state’s superintendents have resisted any mandate on school calendars, one of the few things they still control in an environment of increased state and national school standardization. The core issue is what has been described as an “arms race” in school start dates, driven by competitive state testing schedules, competitive fall-season athletics, and increased days off through the year often mandated by in-service training agree-

ments with teachers’ unions. Interestingly enough, Worcester County will be starting the 2014-2015 school year after Labor Day. “It was interesting that Worcester ended up doing that on their own,” Reel said. “We have gotten resistance from a lot of schools who say that stopping the start date creep will take years, or is impossible. “I’m not privy to the discussions that went into [Worcester’s decision], but I think it shows that you can push back the start date if you make it a priority.” An opinion poll would only give the task force, and the state legislature, more ammunition to support a mandated post-Labor Day start if they were to do so. But it could also backfire. “We feel confident that it would come out with a favorable view of our position, but you never know,” Pursel said. “You have to be prepared for it to come out not the way you wanted it to.”

In sickness and health with more than one spouse

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) A Pocomoke City man who had one wife too many pleaded guilty to bigamy March 5 and was sentenced to 30 days in jail. When Michael Wayne Settle, then 32, applied for a marriage license at a courthouse on Jan. 16, 2013, he made an oath that he was single. It was an oath that just wasn’t true. Nevertheless, on Jan. 23 at the courthouse, he married the woman named on that marriage license. On May 13, he posted online that he loved her, but love didn’t last. On May 28, he wrote that he was single again and planned to stay that way. His marital troubles, however, were far from over. Previously, on April 11, 2011, Settle had married a woman at Chincoteague Island, Va. A boat captain who is also a marriage celebrant performed the ceremony. On Oct. 14, 2013, wife No. 2 found papers about Settle’s divorce from wife No. 1. Those papers verified the divorce was granted July 29, 2013 and had been filed in a civil court in Accomack County, Va., while Settle was married to wife No. 2. One week after finding her husband’s divorce papers, wife No. 2 met with Snow Hill Police Chief Kirk Daugherty at the police department. Settle was served with a warrant Oct. 26, 2013, charging him with bigamy, a felony punishable by up to nine years, and perjury, a misdemeanor punishable by up to 10 years. In exchange for his guilty plea to bigamy, the State’s Attorney’s Office did not prosecute the charge of perjury.


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 7

NPS head still seeking ways to stop parking lot erosion Bayside picnic spot would remain in current location, but will be reconstructed (March 21, 2014) Superintendent Debbie Darden recently announced the next step toward completing the bayside picnic and south ocean beach parking areas removal and relocation environmental assessment: a Finding Of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the preferred alternative has been signed by NPS Regional Director, Mike Caldwell and is now posted online. The NPS received comments from many members of the public and state and federal agencies. Based on concerns expressed in public comments and the analysis presented in the environmental assessment, the National Park Service has re-examined the alternatives presented in the environmental assessment. As a result of the public comments, the National Park Service has selected alternative B (the preferred alternative) for the south ocean beach parking area and selected elements of both the no action and alternative B for the bayside picnic parking area for implementation. The bayside picnic parking area will stay in its current location, but will be reconstructed with a clay base and clamshell surface to help ensure that in future storm events asphalt is not washed into the bay. “We listened to the public’s com-

ments very carefully, and have tried to craft a solution that both protects the bay environment and safeguards bird habitat,” Darden said. “We plan to begin a new process to find a permanent solution to the gradual erosion of the existing bayside parking lot in the next few months. We hope to work carefully with the public to look at a broad range of alternatives that can ensure public access while protecting habitat.” The environmental assessment examined two alternatives in detail, addressed the environmental impacts of each alternative, and identified a preferred alternative. The FONSI explains why the selected alternative (Alternative B) will have no significant effects on the human environment. It is based on the environmental assessment and the comments received from the public, agencies, and staff during the public review period, which concluded Sept. 25, 2013. The FONSI summarizes the public comments received, lists the responses to those comments, and identifies the changes to the text as a result of the public and agency comments. The FONSI for the preferred alternative is posted on NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment Web site, http://parkplanning.nps.gov/ and on the National Seashore Web site, www.nps.gov/asis/parkplanning.html. Hard copies are available for viewing at both the Maryland and Virginia visitor centers.

Worcester County offering free 8-session CERT training (March 21, 2014) Worcester County Emergency Services invites the public to participate in a free, eight-session Community Emergency Response Team course. The training takes place at the Fire Training Center, located on Central Site Lane in Newark, on Wednesdays from 6:30-9:30 p.m., April 9 through May 21, with CPR training to take place during class on April 23. CERT is an informative, hands-on, educational program packed with information to equip residents, who have no prior emergency medical training, to support their families and communities during a disaster. Participants will gain the decision-making and practical skills necessary to offer immediate assistance to those in need following an emergency until further help can arrive. “CERT helps you prepare yourself, your family, your community to face a wide variety of emergencies,” WCES Emergency Planner Tom Kane said. “CERT just makes you safer.” Participants will learn basic lifesaving skills, such as CPR/AED, First Aid and fire suppression. They will

also learn to recognize both natural and man-made hazards. Upon completion of this program, students will be able to create disaster plans and supply kits and aid in responding to hazardous material emergencies. Those who successfully complete the training will receive CPR and First Aid certification thorough the American Heart Association. During the course, instructors will provide information on hazards typical to Worcester County, hazardous materials in the home and the National Incident Management System. Instruction is geared to help residents better prepare and survive during the first 36 to 72 hours after a catastrophic event when local first responder resources are stretched to their limits. CERT is made possible through a grant from Atlantic General Hospital, thereby allowing WCES to offer this valuable training at no cost to all interested residents. Space is limited to 20 individuals and is available on a first come, first served basis. For more info or to register, contact Tom Kane at 410-632-3080 or visit tkane@co.worcester.md.us.

-Sat Open Mon 9am - 5pm

PALM BEACHTM SHUTTERS with Bypass Track System

Free In-Home/Condo Estimates • Palm Beach™ Custom Shutters • EverWood® • Silhouette® Window Shading • Bedspreads & Top Treatments • Somner® Custom Vertical Blinds • Custom Draperies • Duette® Honeycomb Shades

82nd St. • Oceanside • The Yellow Cottage 410-524-8909 • 800-645-4647

Stop by our cozy cottage to see our In-store Displays and meet the Designing Women of Ocean City!


Ocean City Today

PAGE 8

MARCH 21, 2014

City wants top arts center talent The PAC is a two-story, 1,200-seat mel and Jack Hennen, the Ocean auditorium with a stage wide and tall City-based promoters who have enough to host any number of high- backed many of Delmarva’s biggest C Fr to Su: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00; Mo: 4:00, 7:00; ! Tu: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00; We & Th: 4:00, 7:00 end productions. concerts. C # #7 To build it, the city and state first “We’re looking at a number of difFr to Su: 1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 9:40; Mo: 4:15, 7:10; Tu: 1:15, 4:15, 7:10; We & Th: 4:15, 7:10 By Zack Hoopes conducted a “phase 1” renovation that ferent options for the venue,” RotherB Fr to Su: 1:30, 4:30, 6:45, # Staff Writer enclosed the rear deck of the conven- mel said. “We have some dates on 8:50; Mo: 4:30, 6:45; Tu: 1:30, 4:30, 6:45; We: 4:30, 6:45; Th: 4:30 PM (March, 21, 2014) Although com- tion center into a bayfront ballroom hold, but we’re going to have to see a ! B Fr to Su: 1:30, 4:00; Mo: 4:00 PM; Tu: 1:30, 4:00; We & Th: 4:00 PM pletion of the city’s performing arts space. Once finished, a wall was built good indicator of when it’s actually # ! E Fr to Su: 6:35, 9:20; Mo to Th: 6:35 PM facility at the convention center is still to divide the western portion of the going to be open before we commit.” C Th: 7:00 PM roughly nine months out, city officials ballroom, which will stay intact, from A few big names have been thrown and event promoters are already the interior portion. out there – Tony Bennett, Amy Grant, grappling with getting the optimum There, in what is and Johnny Mathis C Fr & Sa: 1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 8:00, ! 10:00, 11:00; Su: 1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 8:00, 10:00; Mo: 4:00, 5:00, lineup for the new amenity – and al- being called “phase ‘There are plenty of 1,200-seat are just a few. But 7:00, 8:00, 10:00; Tu: 1:00, 2:00, 4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 8:00, 10:00; ready feeling the need for another ex- 2,”the floor is curbig question with We & Th: 4:00, 5:00, 7:00, 8:00, 10:00 venues that are successful, it’s the pansion. rently being rebooking such acts is B Fr to Su: 1:00, 2:10, 3:45, " 4:45, 6:45, 9:20; Mo: 3:45, 4:45, 6:45, 9:20; Tu: 1:00, 2:10, 3:45, 4:45, 6:45, “The clients who are with us now moved to connect just a matter of finding the right how they will work 9:20; We & Th: 3:45, 4:45, 6:45, 9:20 mix of programming,’ get first shot,” said Convention Center with the downstairs in the relatively C Fr to Su: 1:30, 4:15, 7:00; Mo: 4:15, 7:00; Tu: 1:30, 4:15, 7:00; We & Th: 4:15, 7:00 Director Larry Noccolino. “Show pro- hall “C” and create Promoter Bob Rothermel small size of the C Fr to Su: 9:40 PM; moters get second shot, and then the a two-story open venue, which stands Mo to Th: 9:40 PM town gets a handful of shows that space. Once this to be the PAC’s E Fr to Su: 12:45, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30; Mo: 5:15, 7:30; Tu: 12:45, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30; We & Th: 5:15, 7:30 we’re doing ourselves. That’s how it’s structural work is done, the build-out biggest strength and biggest weakE Fr to Th: 9:45 PM being prioritized.” of the stage and seating will be much ness. B Fr to Su: 12:45, 2:55, 5:05, # 7:15, 9:25; Mo: 5:05, 7:15, 9:25; Tu: 12:45, 2:55, 5:05, 7:15, 9:25; The theater and performance space easier and the city will have a better “There are plenty of 1,200-seat We: 5:05, 7:15, 9:25; Th: 5:05 PM – dubbed the Performing Arts Center idea of a timeline. venues that are successful, it’s just a C Fr to Su: 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:35; Mo: 4:30, 7:10, – is scheduled for completion in late “Once the floor comes out, it’s re- matter of finding the right mix of pro9:35; Tu: 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:35; We & Th: 4:30, 7:10, 9:35 E Fr to We: 7:20, 9:55 # November or December of this year, ally much smoother sailing,” Noccol- gramming,” Rothermel said. C Th: 7:00, 9:55 Noccolino said. The center plans to ino said. On one hand, a smaller venue E Th: 8:00 PM open with a city-sponsored event feaHowever, dates are already on hold means a better concert for everyone. turing the Mid-Atlantic Symphony for a number of promoters – local, re- But it also means ticket prices will be $3)/- 5'.32 $3 /6 4. 41( Orchestra, tentatively scheduled for gional, and national, including the much higher since the cost of the per$ /)'-' *5' 0Jan. 17, 2015. producers for the Kennedy Center’s formance is shared by less people. $ /)'-' .&/1' 0“There’s nothing really concrete Christmas programs. Noccolino is al“The price points may be a little '3'1 $%1*', $&+ 3/ 1/.3 0yet,” Noccolino said. “I’m not going to ready looking at a December 2015 run high, so we’ll have to be careful about issue contracts until we get the floor of “The Nutcracker.” that,” Noccolino said at last week’s & work done.” The list also includes Bob Rother- Tourism Commission meeting. “But even the cheap seats are still going to be good seats because you’re just not that far away.” For an act like Tony Bennett, the cheap seats would run around $100, and the good ones $150. With such a Accepting high price, and a small base of resiNew Patients dents to afford it, the city is banking Thee Gina Renee Piazza • 12308 Ocean Gateway, Suite 6 on the PAC being a destination venue. Ocean City, Maryland, 21842 “We have to be thinking about Lawrence Michnick, DDS those non-resident property owners who would come down here from Baltimore or the D.C. area,” said Council Secretary and Tourism Commission Chair Mary Knight. “I wouldn’t worry about the price just yet.” In reality, the PAC will have relatively few dates needing to be filled, since most of the convention center’s existing clients will be able to use the Christopher Takacs, DMD space for their programs. Even without the PAC, Noccolino is booked • Teeth Whitening solid from July 1 to Dec. 20 this year. • Missing Tooth Replacement However, the economic impetus for • Cosmetic Makeover the PAC project - $3.2 to $3.9 million per year in economic impact, according to a study done by Crossroads Consulting Services – is based on an estimate of between 61 and 73 new performances annually, with cumulative attenCorey Smith, DDS dance between 45,700 and 55,050. This means the convention center as a whole will likely have to be packed tight with performances, a tall order if the city wishes to attract bigname performers – who have their own tight schedules – while still giving priority to longstanding events. But this stands to be aided by the • Invisalign® • Implant Restorations • Full Mouth Restoration addition of another 30,000 square feet Geoffrey • Cosmetic • Whitening • Smile Enhancements • LVI Attended Robbins, DDS of exhibit space; a potential “phase 3” Retired, Founder that is only in its preliminary stages. See CITY Page 9 410-213-7575 • www.atlanticdental.com • Third Party Financing Available • !%$

# !"

"

Officials, promoters already grappling to attract major headliners for new facility

ATLANTIC DENTAL

COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY

Spring Is For Smiling

Atlantic Dental Will Make You Shine

CALL TODAY CALL TODAY Start Smiling Start SmilingAgain! Again!

Family Dentistry & Emergency Services Available


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

CFES encouraging local nonprofits to send inquiries

410-208-9200 • 800-337-7368 • 11065 Cathell Road • Ocean Pines Licensed in MD, DE • 8202 Coastal Highway • Ocean City www.hilemanrealestate.com • e-mail: hilemanre@aol.com

Small grants program gives support to address wide range of communal needs (March 21, 2014) The Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore (CFES) is encouraging local nonprofits to submit Letters of Inquiry for programs or projects that may qualify for grants from the Foundation’s Small Grants Program. The Community Foundation’s Small Grants Program provides support to address a wide range of needs including pilot projects, emergencies, organizational improvement and capacity building/technical assistance. Grants range on average from $200 $2,000 with larger requests invited after consultation with staff. A letter of inquiry in the CFES’ requested format is required for all requests. Unsolicited applications to the Small Grants Program will not be considered. Following an initial review by the CFES staff, requests to the Small Grants Program will be referred to the appropriate CFES Fund that may have additional application requirements. There is no deadline for submission. Letters of inquiry are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Contact Erica Joseph, CFES vice president, Community Investment, at ejoseph@cfes.org or call 410-7429911.

City, promoters hope to attract PAC headliners Continued from Page 8 “’Phase 3’ would add an additional 30,000 to the north end of the building, off of hall ‘A’ and hall ‘B,’” Noccolino said. “It’s been discussed, but it’s very preliminary. Obviously, we would have to get it through the state.” The city, via the Maryland Stadium Authority, shares a 50-50 partnership with the state in the convention center’s operations. The MSA also pays for some of the capital work, shouldering $5.7 million of the $14.2 million PAC cost and overseeing the construction itself. No price has been attached to ‘phase 3,’ which Noccolino said would likely not begin until 2017 if it happens at all. But the potential benefit of allowing bigger conventions after the PAC has, hopefully, developed its own clientele is large. “You can’t drive by the place between September and December and not see the parking lot full,” Noccolino said. “What’s to say if we didn’t get another 30,000 square feet, we wouldn’t have that much more?”

PAGE 9

SALES

Sonia ZAFFIRIS

Associate Broker GRI, CRS 410-251-6217

Licensed in MD, DE soniasez@aol.com

RENOVATED RANCHER ON CUL DE SAC

$169,900

John SNIDER

REALTOR® 443-614-0303 Cell

Snideratthebeach @hotmail.com

Cindy CROCKETT

REALTOR®, GRI 410-430-0587 Cell Cindy@ HilemanReal Estate.com Licensed in MD

2012 C.A.R. Realtor® of the Year

Sharon CURTISS

Associate Broker ABR, PMN,GRI

410-726-4260 Cell Licensed in MD Virtual Tours available at

www.sharoncurtiss .com

$336,900

3 BR & 2 bath home with carport in like new condition! New carpet & tile, freshly painted. New kitchen, baths & much more. Private rear screened porch to enjoy. 6301 KNOLL HILL DR 3BR/2BA. Main living space located on second floor.Gas fp. Loft. Beautiful views from enclosed porch & wrap around deck. New roof 2012 & W/D, Fridge 2011. Furniture available for sale. Come see Southpoint at its best!

2013 TOP PRODUCERS OVER $15 MILLION IN SALES!

Impeccably maintained includes 20+ acres. Explore the possibilities! Custom crafted home shows like a model! Top-Notch 8stall barn, 5 fenced pastures, private scenic pond & in-ground salt water pool w/pool house. Price Reduced!

W NE

! ING T LIS

Offered at $649,847

This conveniently located 1st floor, end unit condo is close to the beach, restaurants and shopping. Unit features include ceramic tile floor and dual vanities in bathroom. Building has been renovated.

REALTOR®, GRI

$129,900

STEPS FROM THE BEACH

REALTOR®, GRI

This 1 bedroom 2 baths condo offers open kitchen/dining/living room area. The unit is well maintained and comes fully furnished. Great location that is close to shopping and restaurants.

Licensed in MD, DE

RENTALS

NOW ACCEPTING 2014 RENTAL LISTINGS!

$204,900

Hileman Real Estate Professional Services Include:

• Personal Property Inspections After Each Rental • Security Deposits On All Rentals • 24 Hour On-Call Staff

• • • •

Saltbox w/ Great Sunsets & River views on a cul-de-sac! Walk to Swim & Racquet Club! Under Home triple carport, front covered porch, wrap-around deck, balcony, sun room, storage shed. Interior includes 3 BRs, 2.5 baths, fireplace, lots of closets, wet bar, attic storage & a 20x10 den! Private 40' boat dock w/ new bulkheading in 2012. New Roof, skylights, WD, water heater all in 2013!

TERN’S LANDING Waterfront home features 3 BR, 3.5 BA, Family rm w/ wet bar, Living Rm, Dining , Kitchen w/ Island & Breakfast Nook, 3 decks. Master bath w/ double vanities, jetted tub, separate shower. Master suite has sun room attached. Two attic storage areas & two-car garage. 3,000 +/- sq. ft. Encapsulated crawlspace w/ dehumidifier & sump pump. Text H11363 to 85377 for more photos, then Call Sharon Curtiss 410-726-4260 for your private showing

No Hidden Add-On Fees User Friendly Website Trusted Maintenance Staff No Required Vendors

Scan for Video

BRAND NEW SUBDIVISION, 3 LOTS in the quaint town of Bishopville. Each lot is 5+ Acres. No restrictions - Mobile Homes allowed. Owner Financing Available with 20% Down. Priced from $129,900 to $149,900.

INVESTOR ALERT! Guaranteed rent of $900/mo. until Nov. of 2018! Great Location! Walk to Shopping, Dining, Recreation, Pool etc. Open floor plan with 3 BR, 2 Baths, private balcony, attached storage & large master suite.

Bethany DREW

Bethany: 410-430-2602 Bethany@PO2team.com Terri: 410-430-6875 Terri@PO2team.com www.PO2team.com

$369,000

YOUR NEW BEACH RETREAT!!

Terri BRADFORD

4BR/3BA split foyer. Sleeps a large number of guests. Den could be 5th BR. Vaulted ceilings, floor-to-ceiling wood FP. Screened porch, deck, patio & boat dock. Furnishings negotiable.

Only $399,900

GENTLEMAN'S EQUESTRIAN FARM

Only $153,000

Licensed in MD, DE

WATERFRONT

SPACIOUS WATERFRONT

Debora E. HILEMAN

OWNER/BROKER GRI & CRS 443-235-5982 Cell Debbie@Hileman RealEstate.com

$158,900

OCEAN PINES MODIFIED A-FRAME on private wooded lot. 2nd floor master bedroom has full bath, walk in closet & own walk out balcony. Large sundeck. Bright & open great room has brick hearth & chimney only. Newer heat pump, range & dishwasher.

OCEANFRONT GEM

$445,000

2 bedroom/ 2 bath condo is beautifully decorated and move in ready! Kitchen offers newer cabinets, corian countertops and ceramic tile flooring. Spacious master suite has access to the balcony. Separate laundry area with newer washer and dryer.

$117,500

TOTALLY RENOVATED

Totally renovated unit in Caine Woods. New kitchen, appliances, flooring, bathroom & completely furnished! Large balcony. Convenient to restaurants, fishing, boating and so much more! This is a must see at this price!!

Stop in at one of our two locations! 82 St. Oceanside 410-723-9450 Toll Free 855-337-7368

Neighbors Serving Neighbors, One Home at a Time.

11065 Cathell Rd. Ocean Pines 410-208-9200 Toll Free 800-337-7368


Ocean City Today

PAGE 10

!3(5ĆŤ.!(!/! ĆŤ

Indulge in in Ocean Ocean C Indulge City ity lluxury. uxury. Enjoy the the beautiful beautiful vistas vistas o he A t l a n t ic O cean a nd ssurrounding u r ro u n d i n g Enjoy off tthe Atlantic Ocean and bay at at The The Penthouses P e n t h o u s es o he G ateway G rand. T hese lluxurious uxurious bay off T The Gateway Grand. These and elegantly elegantly appointed appointed h omes ffeature: eature: and homes Ä‘ĆŤĆŤ1/0+)ĆŤ%*0!.%+. 1/0+)ĆŤ%*0!.%+. Ä‘ĆŤĆŤ ,!*0$+1/!ĆŤ$((35/ ,!*0$+1/!ĆŤ$((35/ Ä‘Ä‘ĆŤ3+ÄĄ/0+.5ĆŤ!%(%*#/ ĆŤ3+ÄĄ/0+.5ĆŤ!%(%*#/ Ä‘ĆŤ1/0+)ĆŤ)%((3+.' Ä‘ĆŤ1/0+)ĆŤ)%((3+.'

Ä‘ĆŤ * Ä‘ĆŤ * ++.ĆŤ* ++.ĆŤ* ĆŤĆŤ+10 +10 ++.ĆŤ,++(/ ++.ĆŤ,++(/ Ä‘ĆŤĆŤ Ä‘ĆŤĆŤ%0*!//ĆŤ!*0!.ĆŤ3%0$ĆŤ0$! %0*!//ĆŤ!*0!.ĆŤ3%0$ĆŤ0$! (0!/0ĆŤ!-1%,)!*0ÄŒ (0!/0ĆŤ!-1%,)!*0ÄŒ +2!.(++'%*#ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ+!* + 2!.(++'%*#ĆŤ0$!ĆŤ+!*

Ä‘ĆŤ,#. Ä‘ĆŤ,#. ! ĆŤ,,(%*!/ ĆŤ,,(%*!/

Ä‘ĆŤÄ‚Ä…ÄĄ$+1.ĆŤ".+*0ĆŤ Ä‘ĆŤÄ‚Ä…ÄĄ$+1.ĆŤ".+*0ĆŤ !/' !/'

+./ Ä‘Ä‘ĆŤ(%)0!ÄĄ+*0.+((! ĆŤ(%)0!ÄĄ+*0.+((! ĆŤ+..% ĆŤ+..% +./

*ÄĄ/%0!ĆŤ,.+,!.05 Ä‘Ä‘ĆŤĆŤ ÄĄ/%0!ĆŤ,.+,!.05 ĆŤĆŤ* )*#!)!*0ĆŤ/0Ăť )*#!)!*0ĆŤ/0Ăť

Ä‘ĆŤ.* Ä‘ĆŤ.* ĆŤ(+5ĆŤ* ĆŤ(+5ĆŤ* ĆŤ(+1*#!/ ĆŤ(+1*#!/

Three-bedroom penthouse residences T hree-bedroom p enthouse residences $1,050,000. ffrom rom $ 1,050,000. C Call all 8 877.675.6173 77.675.6173 tto o sschedule chedule y your our p private rivate ttour our ttoday. oday. Sales Sales office office open open daily daily ffrom rom 10a 10am–5pm. m–5pm.

GrandValueOC.com GrandValueOC.com T wo 4 8th S treet, O cean C ity, M D2 1842 Two 48th Street, Ocean City, MD 21842

MARCH 21, 2014


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

Judge upholds alcoholic beverage permit suspension By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) The alcoholic beverage license at the Castle in the Sand will be suspended for three days this summer. Circuit Court Judge D. William Simpson on March 11 upheld the findings and penalties levied Aug. 21, 2013 against the 37th Street oceanfront establishment by the Board of License Commissioners. On that day, the board found that the Castle in the Sand violated state alcoholic beverage laws by selling to a minor and not cooperating with police. In addition to suspending the alcoholic beverage license, the board levied fines totaling $4,000. Almost immediately after the Board of License Commissioners’ decision, attorney James Almand, representing Castle in the Sand owner Adam Showell, sought a judicial review and the license suspension was stayed. The administrative agency appeal questioned whether the board’s decision was against the public interest and whether the board abused its discretion “in rendering a decision which was not honestly and fairly exercised and was arbitrary, unsupported by any substantial evidence, unreasonable, beyond the powers of the Board and illegal?� according to the opinion filed in Circuit Court in Snow Hill. In his opinion, Judge Simpson wrote that the board had a reasonable basis for its findings. “The testimony reflects that the Board found that the Petitioners not only sold to an underage cadet, but Petitioners’ behavior towards the police officer issuing the citation was particularly egregious.�’ During the appeal heard in Circuit Court in Snow Hill on March 6, Almand said the board’s decision was arbitrary and capricious because it differed substantially from the penalty the board meted out the same day to the Lazy Lizard for what he said was a violation “essentially the same.� De Lazy Lizard, Almand said, was in its fourth season of operation in 2013, whereas the Castle in the Sand’s Coconuts Bar and Grill was in its 15th sum-

mer. It was the third violation for both, but the Castle had passed five recent compliance checks, including two in 2013. Representing the Board of License Commissioners, attorney David Gaskill said the Harbor Inn, a bar on Somerset Street that has been licensed for 75 years, had its first alcoholic beverage offense in 2009 and its license was suspended for 60 days. A Harbor Inn employee not only failed to cooperate with law enforcement, she refused to open the door for 10 to 15 minutes to allow them to enter the bar. That license suspension for the Harbor Inn started the day after the Dec. 21 hearing. “Every suspension issued by the board starts the day after the hearing,� Gaskill said. In the Lazy Lizard case, a bartender served a beer to an underage police cadet without asking for any identification. Quickly realizing what he had done, he tried to get the beer back and then asked the police officer accompanying the cadet if it was really a violation. There was no arguing, however, only a conversation between the bartender and the officer. In the Castle in the Sand case, an employee served an alcoholic beverage to an underage cadet on May 27, 2013. On June 26, 2013, an employee served a beverage without alcohol to a cadet, but allowed the cadet to remain in the bar area. In both incidents, employees became argumentative and on June 26, a manager told the doorman not to cooperate with police. Showell was also uncooperative with police, who told the board he was adversarial and told them he would call the board’s attorney, Thomas Coates, to complain. During that hearing, Showell said he and his staff would have “quality, positive relationships going forward.� “It was certainly distinguishable from de Lazy Lizard,� Gaskill told the judge of the incidents at Castle in the Sand. “No explanation was given as to why the licensee has an attitude of un-cooperation with police. The issues are not similar.� Judge Simpson agreed.

PAGE 11

&HOHEUDWLQJD&HQWXU\RI6HDIRRG

7UDGLWLRQDO'LQLQJÄ &DUU\-2XW 927('2&ÂśV%(67%8))(7 3UHPLXP6HDIRRG 3ULPH5LE%XIIHW $OO-<RX-&DQ-(DW¡)H HDWXULQJRYHULWHPV 6QRZ&UDE/HJVÄ 0DU\ODQG%OXH&UDE VHDVRQDO

&UDE,PSHULDOÄ +DQGPDGH&UDE&DNHV VRPXFKPRUH

23(1,1*6221 )ULGD\V 6DWXUGD\V 6WDUWLQJ)ULGD\0DUFK

&UDE+RXVH VW6WUHHW    SKLOOLSVVHDIRRGFRP DFHERRNFRPSKLOOLSVVHDIRRG


PAGE 12

Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

Performances will highlight work of SDHS playwrights Five students win awards in annual writing competition

By Sheila R. Cherry Associate Editor/Bayside Gazette (March 21, 2014)The Stephen Decatur High School Theatre Department on Thursday, will present three performances of its spring production “Flights of Fancy,” from Wednesday, March 19, to Friday, March 21 at 7 p.m. The performances are a compendium of five awardwinning student-written plays that will be performed in the school’s auditorium, located at Route 50 and Seahawk Road. The awards were provided by the Cabaret Club of The Parke in Ocean Pines during its Sixth Annual Student Playwrights Competition and the oneact scripts have been compiled into a publication, along with 20 photographs taken by the student participants. The winning entries were contemporarythemed dramas and the two scripts that received honorable mentions were period pieces, according to the production’s director Gwen Lehman. High school senior Alex Cooley won the $300 first prize with “Lights. Camera. ROBBERY!” The play is about a young man’s desire to become a screenwriter and how his ambitions are thwarted by an untimely robbery. “I think it is very important that the

PHOTO COURTESY GWEN LEHMAN

Student awardees of the Sixth Annual Student Playwrights Competition hosted by the Cabaret Club of The Parke in Ocean Pines include Caitlyn Nilo (Honorable Mention), Alex Cooley (First Prize), Sammi Schachter (Third Prize), Scott Devenny (Honorable Mention), and Megan Mitchell (Second Prize). The Stephen Decatur High School Theatre Department will present three of the plays in its spring production “Flights of Fancy,” from March 19-21 at 7 p.m.

students’ work is being shown off because usually student work doesn’t go past the classroom despite large amounts of effort being placed into it,” Cooley wrote about the production. Lehman said the winning scripts had been compiled and published as “Flights of Fancy” through the online self-publishing Web site Blurb.com and may be

previewed at the Blurb Store, under the listing “MamaDrama” and under the genres education and theatre. Megan Mitchell, a junior, won the $200 second prize with “Our Little Boy Blue;” a two character play depicting what two young parents go through after losing their child, according to Lehman. Mitchell wrote, “I am so excited that all

the hard work and effort put into this project will be published in a book.” Sophomore Sammi Schachter won the $100 third prize with “The Letter,” which Lehman said deals with a family conflict over a girl’s desire and effort to get into an Ivy League school that her family cannot afford. See STUDENT Page 13


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

Classrooms get reassigned after damaging fire

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Marh 21, 2014) A few classrooms at Snow Hill High School were reassigned March 11 because of a fire in a small storage room that damaged approximately 30 laptop computers. The fire was reported at 12:22 a.m. A police officer saw smoke in the building and firefighters found heavy smoke in the computer lab. A sprinkler system extinguished the fire, which was contained to the storage room. “It displaced five classrooms due to smoke and water,” Fire Marshal Jeff McMahon told the Worcester County Commissioners during their budget work session later that morning. “The sprinkler had controlled the fire.” McMahon said during the meeting that he did not yet know the cause of the fire. The fire appeared to have started around the battery of one of the computers, he said. The computers are charged on carts after students have finished working on them each day. McMahon said his office would determine whether the carts might be on a recall list. Later, the cause of the fire was listed as accidental and blamed on a faulty laptop battery charging unit. Commissioner Virgil Shockley said the specialized carts are used in each county public school. In addition to firefighters from the Snow Hill Fire Department and McMahon, school system administrators went to the school because of the fire.

Student writers come away with contest awards Continued from Page 12 Two honorable mention awards of $50 each were also presented. They went to juniors Scott Devenny, for “Over Newbury Street” and Caitlyn Nilo for “Triangulation,” both of which were set in the 19th century. “Over Newbury Street” deals with the self-absorption of a mother which leads to the neglect of her daughter, and “Triangulation” deals with an old enmity caused by a love triangle, according to Lehman. In addition, the students took portraits of each other, based on the theme “flights of fancy,” and those photographs are included in the publication, Lehman added. An exhibit of the student photographs are also on display in the library prior to the performance and will be shown in the auditorium lobby during the evening performances, she said. For more information about the performances of the publication, contact the school at 410-641-2171.

PAGE 13

HOME HO OME OM M

$4 $ 4.00per person

ADMISSION DM with Coupon. Good od ffor or Everyone in YYour our Party

OCT CT

CONDO 287'225 287'225 R.E. POWELL CONVENTION CENTER 40th Street Ocean City y,, MD

SHOW SH HO OW OW and Art & Craft Craft Fair Fair

0$5&+‡‡ 0$5 0 $5 5&+ &+  ‡ ‡  ))5,'$<²‡6$785'$<²‡681'$<² 5,'$<²‡6$785'$<²‡681'$<²

ENJOY THE SHOW SPECIALS & SEE THESE PROS %XLOGHUV‡5HPRGHOHUV‡&RQWUDFWRUV‡/DQGVFDSHUV‡3DLQWHUV‡3OXPEHUV‡&DUSHQWHUV (OHFWULFLDQV‡3RROV 6SDV‡6WRQH3URGXFWV‡6HFXULW\6\VWHPV‡'RRUV :LQGRZV‡5RRÀQJ 6LGLQJ *XWWHUV‡)ORRULQJ :DOO&RYHULQJV‡$SSOLDQFHV‡:DWHUSURRÀQJ‡6N\OLJKWV 6RODU(QHUJ\‡&DUSHWV‡+HDWLQJ &RROLQJ6\VWHPV‡.LWFKHQ %DWK‡,QWHULRU'HFRUDWRUV &XVWRP:RRGZRUNV‡&RRNZDUH‡:DWHU7UHDWPHQWV‡,QVXUDQFH6HUYLFHV &DELQHWV &RXQWHUV‡0DUEOH‡)ORRULQJ‡0ROG6ROXWLRQV‡&ORVHW *DUDJH2UJDQL]DWLRQ

www.OceanPromotions.info www w.OceanPromotions .OceanPro .info

events events@oceanpromotions oceanpromotions.info .info


Ocean City Today

PAGE 14

MARCH 21, 2014

Weather, power lines delay SHHS renovation project Still, completion on pace to end by 2016 school year

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Oak Contracting workers dig up the sewer system at Snow Hill High School Wednesday, part of the multi-year renovation and expansion of the school.

Stop By the tour of homes Saturday 3/22 from 11-2 before you go to the Home & Condo Show to see the MANY OPTIONS available when you build your new home with RH!

Open House HOMES ON THE 3/22 TOUR: Warrens Park

Resort Homes

(Off of 52nd Street)

22 Bay Overlook

Montego Bay

is hosting an

OPEN HOUSE TOUR

(Off of 130th St Bayside)

129 S Ocean Dr 116 Yawl Dr 511 Sandy Hill Dr 511 Nautical Lane 607 Oyster Lane 193 Pine Tree Rd

of homes we built in

Warren Park, Montego Bay & Swann Keys

SATURDAY 3/22 from 11-2

Swann Keys

We have eleven homes you can tour in Warrens Park, Montego Bay & Swann Keys on Saturday from 11-2.The homes are NOT For Sale but we are using them to showcase the many different options available when you build with Resort Homes.

(Off Rt 54 West Fenwick)

37038 Blue Teal Rd 36983 Canvasback Rd 36918 Mallard Dr 36989 Pintail Dr 37855 Swann Dr

Call Darryl Greer or our office for more information on the tour or to discuss your building project. 410-726-8528 or 410-213-7721

Additional homes may be added to the tour so please call our office at 410-726-8528 or 410-213-7721 or stop by one of the homes listed above for a complete list of addresses.

RH can build on your lot anywhere in the Delmarva area. These homes are just a sample of the options available

Resort Homes, Inc. 11718 Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City, MD 410-213-7721 or 410-726-8528 www.resorthousinggroup.com

Follow us on Facebook

By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) A month after the groundbreaking for the Snow Hill High School renovation and addition project Feb. 18, the facilities manager for Worcester’s public schools announced project delays to the Board of Education at its Tuesday meeting. Rogue weather and unexpected power lines running through the construction field stymied progress over the past month, but the project should still be on track to end before the start of the 2016-2017 school year, Joe Price said. Workers with Oak Contracting found the first mis-mapped power line in early February, when they were digging the storm water management pond, he said. “The line went right through that,” Price said, but the crews stopped work before “learning the hard way,” running through the lines. Within a week, workers found their second unexpected line running under the soon-to-be foundation of the new gymnasium. Delmarva Power workers set to work splicing the lines in a L-shape, allowing them to circumnavigate construction while keeping power flowing to the school, Price said. In all, the project set construction back about five or six weeks — a relatively lucky break, he said. “Its not just a matter of picking up a line and moving it,” he said. “It probably could have been a fourmonth process to get all this stuff done, but they got it done very quickly. Their engineers have been fantastic.” Such holdups are not unusual when it comes to large-scale construction, Price said, and “if we’re going to have a five or six week delay, we want it now,” early in the process. The Snow Hill project has been on the books since 2002, when planning got underway for the fourphase endeavor. So far, construction crews have completed demolition to make way for the new additions. Where passersby now see a dirt field, there will eventually be a gymnasium, student entrance and parking lot, mechanical room, locker rooms and band and chorus rooms. The project will double the size of the school to 121,000 square feet, eliminating the need for portable classrooms. It will also add state-ofthe-art classrooms, a new media center, computer labs, a science wing, a cafeteria and a kitchen. The storm water management pond on the construction site is alSee ROUGE Page 15


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 15

Rogue weather, power lines delay renovations to SHHS Continued from Page 14 ready finished and workers are digging approximately 300 geothermal wells out back, which will contribute to Snow Hill’s energy-saving design. The school will have motion-activated lights, thermally insulated glass and low-flow plumbing fixtures. With so much time left before the start of the 2016-2017 school year — the goal end date of the project — Price believes crews can compensate for the five-week loss. “We still have phase two, three and four all the way through summer of 2016 to pick up more time,” he said. “I’m expecting with the contractors that we have on this job, they’re going to get ahead of what

we’ve given them on this schedule.” The second power line splice should be complete on March 28, making way for foundations on the now empty field, he said. “After that, you’ll start to see the walls come up and people will start to say, ‘Hey, this is progress,’” he said. Given the upset at the school, which remains functioning alongside the construction, Price and others at Oak Contracting plan to attend Snow Hill High School’s faculty meeting in June to express their appreciation to school staff. “They have been very cooperative, very flexible — the teachers, the staff and the students,” Price said. “They’ve taken everything in stride.”

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Poor weather, power line issues cause Snow Hill High School renovation delays. Still, builders are confident the projects will be done in time for the 2016 school year opening.

Property owners to benefit from site review guide Engineering Dept. develops step-by-step publication

(March 21, 2014)The Town of Ocean City’s Engineering Department has recently developed a User’s Guide to Environmental Site Review which explains the site review process, step by step. According to the town’s engineering department, the manual is intended to help individual property owners and design professionals navigate the requirements and better prepare when submitting projects for approval. “Over the years the state and federal government have passed various laws that require Ocean City to meet certain performance standards for water quality protection and habitat enhancement,” said Gail Blazer, environmental engineer for the Town of Ocean City. “The process can be very daunting and this document is meant to clarify the steps by walking the user through the process and helping them locate the pertinent information.” The user’s guide has topics that include storm water management, critical area, landscaping, and erosion and sediment control. Hard copies will be available, however, the manual is designed to work on line. There are hyperlinks to the code references and the worksheets. The worksheets, when used online, are active worksheets and will calculate automatically when specific information is filled in. The user’s guide can be found at: http://oceancitymd.gov/Engineering/environment.html. For more information, contact Blazer at 410289-8825 or gblazer@oceancitymd.gov.

OVER A MILLION SOLD!

Dinner Specials

Starting at 5pm Monday: 1/2 Price Entrees

$2.00 surcharge for entrees with steak, crab & crab legs

WATER FRONT WI-FI

Tuesday: $5 Burger & Chicken Breast Sandwiches Wednesday: Pasta Night-Entrees starting at $9.99 Thursday: All You Can Eat Ribs & Steamed Shrimp Friday: Fried Oyster Friday - All Day/Night $2.00 surcharge for entrees with steak, crab & crab legs

Specials are not to be combined with any other offer, discount or coupons. Some restrictions apply. No substitutions, dine in only. Excludes Holidays & Holiday Weekends

HAPPY HOUR www.weocharborside.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY 4-7PM with Awesome Food & Drink Specials!

21st Anniversary Celebration March 30th

Ladies Night

Every Friday, 7PM-til $2 16 oz. Coors Light & Miller Lite Drafts $3 Shooters $4 Glass Wine $5.50 Original Orange Crush Bar and Pub Area Only — Some Restrictions

Harborside Bar & Grill . . . Where You Always Get Your Money’s Worth! (in bar and pub areas only)


Ocean City Today

PAGE 16

MARCH 21, 2014

County tackles general fund FY2015 budget

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) The Worcester County Commissioners have begun their work on the requested fiscal year 2015 budget. General fund revenues based on current tax rates are estimated to be $176.3 million and requested general fund operating expenses total $184.7 million, leaving a shortfall of $8.37 million. The commissioners must reconcile that shortfall with reductions in expenses, additional revenues or a combination of the two. Estimated revenues for fiscal year 2015 total $176.39 million, an increase of $7.75 million, or 4.6 percent more than the current fiscal year. There could be additional monetary burdens because the state budget is not finalized. State cuts, additional unfunded

mandates or the transfer of some state responsibilities to the county could add to Worcester’s financial woes. Net property tax revenues increased by $252,584 and income tax revenues are expected to increase by $500,000. State grants increased $265,860, primarily due to additional funds for the Waterway Improvement Grants, and licenses and permits increased $33,000 due to increased estimates for building permits. There is also a $499,213 increase for the planned use of local impact grant funds from casino revenues for the debt payment for the Worcester Career and Technical High School in fiscal year 2015. Requested expenditures for fiscal year 2015 total $184.7 million, an increase of $16.1 million or 9.6 percent more than the current year. The Worcester County Sheriff’s Of-

CONTAINER LOAD SALE!

TEAK 100% GRADE A INDONESIAN PLANTATION

PATIO FURNITURE IMPORTER DIRECT - SAVINGS UP TO 60%

T EAK …L ASTS A L IFETIME !

Check Out Our Incredible Package Specials* *Package Special Pricing available when purchased w/chairs…see store for details.

$1250 Teak 35” Sq. Folding Table . . . . . Only $495 $1250 Teak 39“ Folding Bar Table . . . . . Only $495 $1400 Teak 60” Folding Round Table . . Only $595 $1350 Teak 47” Folding Round Table . . Only $495 $1400 Teak 71” Rect. Dining Table . . . . . Only $495 $1400 Teak 59” Rect. Folding Table . . . . Only $495 $2070 Teak 66” Oval Extension Table . . Only $795 $2400 Teak 83” Extension Table . . . . . . Only $895 $2550 Teak 95” Extension Table . . . . . . Only $895 $3700 Teak 118” Extension Table . . . . . Only $1095 OCEAN BAY PLAZA 1300 COASTAL HWY.FENWICK ISLAND, DE

1-877-323-TEAK

Retail - Wholesale

T FR A X EE !

fice increased its request by $752,041. That increase includes $189,535 for salaries for additional deputies, parttime employees and increased hours for the school safety deputies and $431,157 for new vehicles. The Roads Division’s requested budget increased by $92,346. Its $500,000 increase for blacktop overlay materials was offset by $435,390 because two bridges were replaced in fiscal year 2014. The Health Department’s requested budget increased $1 million. State health benefit costs for contractual employees account for $744,274 of that increase and data network charges from Network Maryland account for $106,488. The county library increased its budget request by $130,488. That increase is due to requests for $60,000 for library books and audio-video materials and $73,200 to replace 61 outdated computers. The four municipalities and the Ocean Pines Association increased their requests by $1 million. The OPA accounted for $491,500 of that increase. The category of salaries, insurance and benefits has a requested increase of $3 million. That includes $845,482

for a 3.2 percent increase for county employees and it includes longevity bonuses for eligible employees. It also includes $717,138 for retirement contributions because of increased state rates. The Board of Education has requested $79.4 million, an increase of $3.38 million over the current-year adopted budget. The board’s operating budget request of $79.4 million plus school construction debt of $11.7 million totals $91.2 million or 51 percent of the county’s total estimated revenue. The commissioners held a budget review session with several department heads March 11 and a second budget review session with more department heads is scheduled for April 8. The public hearing on the requested operating budget is scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 6, at Snow Hill Middle School. Additional budget work sessions are scheduled for May 13 and May 21. If needed, a budget session may be held May 27. The commissioners will adopt the fiscal year 2015 general fund operating budget June 3. The Worcester County Commissioners provided the budget information during their March 18 meeting.

CFES encouraging requests of new Women’s Fund grants

(March 21, 2014) The Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore is encouraging organizations to submit funding requests for programs or projects that may qualify for grants from The Women’s Fund. The Women’s Fund provides grants to address the unmet needs of women and/or girls on Maryland’s Lower Eastern Shore. Through this grant program, the Foundation will identify requests that identify a specific need in this targeted demographic and include a direct and measurable benefit to this highly targeted population in Wicomico, Worcester, and/or Somerset County. Grants will be in the $500-

$5,000 range. Applicants must be a 501c (3) nonprofit organization, a governmental entity or faith-based program providing non-sectarian programs. The grant application deadline for 2014 is April 1 at 4 p.m. and grants will be announced in early June. For additional information and a copy of the grant application, visit www.womensfundeasternshore.org or call Erica Joseph, CFES vice president, Community Investment, at 410-7429911. For more information on other grant opportunities through the Community Foundation, visit www.cfes.org.


MARCH 21, 2014

Man sentenced to 30 years for shots fired at two men Mendez-Espada commits crime in Ocean City last June, wounding one victim By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) The 22-year-old Reading, Pa., man who hid for hours in the bay beneath a private boat dock in Ocean City in June after shooting at two men, wounding one, was sentenced March 11 to 30 years in prison. Elvin Jovany Mendez-Espada was in a 20th Street motel’s swimming pool when he became angry at a group of six people E. Mendez-Espada walking on the sidewalk nearby. After exchanging comments with them, Mendez-Espada left the pool to follow them. Additional comments were made and Mendez-Espada showed the group the handgun tucked into his shirt. He then pulled out the gun and aimed it at one of the pedestrians. In return, one of those six people struck him in the face, causing him to fall into a fence along the sidewalk between 18th and 17th streets. Mendez-Espada then fired two shots at a man. His companion, Carwin Duarte, 19, of Reading, hit a man in the face and Mendez-Espada fired two additional shots. One of the shots grazed a man’s calf and another passed through another man’s thigh. Then he ran to Dolphin Street and between two houses to a canal where he remained for several hours. Police saw him once daylight was sufficient. He told police the group of six people in the pool had disrespected him so he took his gun and chased them down. The gun, a .435 caliber Smith and Wesson, fell into the canal. Two dive teams searched for it, but were unsuccessful. In Circuit Court in Snow Hill on Jan. 7, Mendez-Esapada entered Alford pleas to charges of attempted seconddegree murder, two counts of first-degree assault and use of a firearm by a felon during the commission of a violent crime. In an Alford plea, the defendant does not admit guilt, but acknowledges that the prosecution has sufficient evidence for a conviction. In exchange for the Alford pleas, the State’s Attorney’s Office did not prosecute numerous other charges. On Tuesday, Judge Thomas C. Groton III sentenced Mendez-Espada to 30 years in prison, with 10 years suspended, for attempted second-degree murder; 20 years for the firearm charge and 25 years, with five years suspended, on each first-degree assault charge. After his release from prison, Mendez-Espada will be on supervised probation for three years. Duarte pleaded guilty Jan. 13 to second-degree assault and was sentenced to three years in prison, with two years suspended.

Ocean City Today

PAGE 17


Ocean City Today

PAGE 18

MARCH 21, 2014

Coastal Bays pulls out of plan to plant trees Foundation withdraws offer after commissioners ask to see written proposals By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) Just hours after offering to plant trees at the Northern Worcester Athletic Complex near Berlin, the Maryland Coastal Bays Foundation withdrew its offer Tuesday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not pursuing tree planting with the county,â&#x20AC;? said Dave Wilson, executive director, that afternoon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We felt we were doing something good, but if some county commissioners donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want more trees in the county, then we wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it.â&#x20AC;? Some Worcester County Commissioners were in favor of the project to plant trees, but three, Commissioners Virgil Shockley, Louise Gulyas and Madison Bunting, asked to see a plan before approving the project. The plan, according to Paige Hurley, director of the Department of Recreation and Parks, would involve planting trees on one acre, currently managed as a naturalized area. The Maryland Coastal Bays Foundation sought the assistance of that county department with Gov. Martin Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Malleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stream Restoration Challenge, a competitive grant program open to local governments and non-

government organizations to establish 1,000 acres of streamside forests by 2015. The foundation wanted help identifying suitable potential areas in county parks. Together, they selected one acre in the Northern Worcester County Athletic Complex. Hurley said the site would provide an opportunity for students and others to participate in educational outreach programs. In addition, the site is not suitable for typical recreational use. The planting of trees there would reduce the cost of mowing, and the county would benefit by getting nutrient reduction credits toward meeting load reductions specified in the new Total Maximum Daily Load for the coastal bays. Those TMDLs are the measurement used for implementing state water quality standards and are based on the relationship between pollution sources and the quality of water in streams. The stream for this site would be the nearest ditch. Commissioner Bunting said the county might be able to use the acre later for reforestation if the park expands and if the state required such reforestation and Commissioner Virgil Shockley said the county has a master plan for the parks. That plan should be reviewed before the decision is made about the request, he said.

A motion to approve the request was deadlocked at 3-3. Then a motion to deny the request tied at 3-3. The discussion concluded with Bud Church, president of the Worcester County Commissioners, telling Hurley to return during the next meeting with additional information. After the meeting, however, Wilson contacted Ocean City Today to say the Maryland Coastal Bays Foundation would not be pursuing the issue further. Wilson also said they would not be returning to discuss another issue during the next meeting, as requested by Church. That second issue involved the group taking over the development of Greys Creek Nature Park, a waterfront park near Williamsville, Del., as a passive park supporting environmental education. Wilson said the organization wanted to develop trails and a kayak launch, restore wetlands and pursue and use grants to pay for rain gardens, tree planting, pervious pavers and obtaining an area for ingress and egress. They are also interested in establishing long-term monitoring stations to record the propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water quality, sea level rise and changes in vegetation. They would reach out to colleagues at Salisbury University, the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science and the

University of Maryland Eastern Shore to recruit summer or yearround researchers. Its staff, volunteers, interns and summer employees would work to control invasive species. County attorney Sonny Bloxom said the county had not been managing the property and this was â&#x20AC;&#x153;a great opportunity for the Maryland Coastal Bays Foundation to do it for us.â&#x20AC;? Commissioner Judy Boggs said if the group managed the park, â&#x20AC;&#x153;it makes the property more useful to us.â&#x20AC;? Church agreed, saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see any downside to this at all. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very worthwhile.â&#x20AC;? Commissioners Merrill Lockfaw and Bunting said they wanted to see a plan before approving the memorandum of understanding between the MCBF and the county about the organization taking over the management of the nature park. Church asked Wilson to return to the next meeting with a plan. Wilson later told Ocean City Today that he does not intend to go to the next meeting with a plan for the park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will get back to the county on Greyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creek in the summer,â&#x20AC;? Wilson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no big rush to us. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not critical for us to do something immediately.â&#x20AC;? Eunice Q. Sorin Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diagnostic Center at Atlantic General Hospital

ÂŽ Sandpiper Dunes Unit 512, OC

Georgetown by the Sea Unit 104, OC

r2BR/2BA Fully Furnished rOceanfront Building rGreat Views of Beach rLarge Pool rSecurity & Assigned Parking rUpdated Appliances & Tile (MLS 488112)

$295,000

Bayview Estates

REDUCED

$209,000 Old Ocean City Rd., Berlin (MLS 482925)

UNDER CONTRACT r3BR/2.5BA Waterfront

r 1.98 Wooded Lot r Near Beaches r Minutes to Town of Berlin r Soil Evaluation Complete r No Conservation Easement r Can Clear 20,000 Sq ft.

r Oversized rip-rapped lot r Owner Suite r Sunroom r 2.5 Car Garage r 2 Large Sunrooms r Pool & Boat Ramp (MLS 488157)

r DIRECT BAYFRONT r Panoramic Waterview r Complete remodel (2005) r Beautifully Furnished rLarge Bayfront Balcony rBoat Slips Available

$455,695

(MLS 460146)

$54,900

FEATURING DELAWARE COMMUNITIES ON ROUTE 54 THE HAMLET AT DIRICKSON POND

LAKEFRONT

r 5BR/4.5BA r Private Beach r Gourmet Kitchen r 1st Fl Owner Suite r Screened Porch r Custom Patio (MLS 610021)

Our advanced diagnostic procedures include: Ăź'LJLWDOPDPPRJUDSK\ Ăź6WHUHRWDFWLFEUHDVWELRSV\

r BAY VIEWS!! r 2 Master Suites r Gourmet Kitchen r Hardwood/Tile Flooring r Trex Deck r 2 Large Sunrooms (MLS 598131)

Ăź%UHDVWXOWUDVRXQG For more information about the services we provide, call 410-641-9215. Or, to schedule an appointment, call 410-641-9714.

SWANN KEYS

SWANN COVE

NEW LISTING

Advanced diagnostic services, administered by the experienced medical staff at Atlantic Generalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Diagnostic Center, a national Breast Imaging Center of Excellence: Now, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true convenience, comfort and caring!

Ăź%RQHGHQVLWRPHWU\

1111 BAYVILLE SHORES

JUST REDUCED!!

Digital Clarity with Local Convenience

r 3BR/2.5 Courtyard Model UNLIMITED VIEWS r Surrounded by Water! r 70 ft. Dock r Screened Porch r Great Amenities r Waterview Lot r 3BR/2BA r Duel Zone HVAC r OKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d for Boat Lift r 1st Flr. Owner Suite r Priced to Sell! r Home Warranty (MLS 610569)

(MLS 610647)

rXXX3FTPSU2VFTU0$DPNr-JPO%S 4VJUF 4FMCZWJMMF%& Cindy Spieczny Ext. 8896

Dayna Feher Ext. 8787

Linda Quasney Ext. 8892

Karla Morgan Ext. 8895

Skip Valliant Ext. 8891

%JTDPWFS3FTPSU2VFTU3FOUBMT

Carter Howell Ext. 5815

atlanticgeneral.org/sorin Š2014 Atlantic General Hospital. All rights reserved.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 19

Burglar, already in jail, gets conviction for second crime By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) A 33-year-old Dagsboro, Del., woman was sentenced March 6 to three years in prison for a burglary she committed in north Ocean City in October. Michele Lee Smith was already in jail serving a sentence for a burglary she committed in GlenRiddle last spring. In the GlenRiddle case, Smith burglarized a house where her sister was the owner’s cleaning lady. Smith had helped her clean the house and knew the key code combination to enter the house. The owner noticed several pieces of jewelry and a pair of UGG boots missing in early April and contacted police. She estimated the value of the stolen items at $17,845. The cleaning lady told police that Smith, her sister, had lost her job and had been caught stealing checks from her boyfriend. Smith pawned numerous items of jewelry in March and early April. She pawned some of those items at a West Ocean City jewelry store. She also pawned jewelry in Millsboro, Del. Smith was charged with first-, thirdand fourth-degree burglary and theft from $10,000 to $100,000. In exchange for her guilty plea to first-degree theft in November, other charges

against her were dropped. She was sentenced to five years in prison, with all but 18 suspended. In the case heard in Circuit Court in Snow Hill on March 6, Smith had burglarized a house on 142nd Street. The owner, who does not live there year round, noticed a broken window and various items not belonging to him scattered throughout the house. Among those items were letters, which led police to Smith, who said she thought she had permission to stay there because she had been there before. Smith’s defense attorney, Peter O’Neill, told the court that Smith and her husband were homeless and her sister suggested that all three of them stay at the north Ocean City residence. Smith pleaded guilty to fourth-degree burglary and was sentenced to three years in prison, with all but one year suspended. The sentence will be served concurrently with the sentence she is serving in the GlenRiddle burglary. After her release from incarceration, Smith will be on supervised probation for two years. In the north Ocean City case, she must make restitution of $523.05. In the GlenRiddle case, she was ordered to make restitution of $13,825 to an insurance company and restitution of $2,100 to the victim.

JIM & LESLIE WHITE,

SALES & SERVICE PROFESSIONALS

CERTIFICATE OF APPRECIATION Claude Lewis, co-owner of Home Instead, receives a Certificate of Appreciation for his presentation on elderly home care options from Chris Norris, president of OC AARP 1917 during the group’s March meeting.

REALTORS®

www.RelaxedLiving.net • JL@RelaxedLiving.net

410-726-9026 (JIM) • 410-726-5060 (LES) 7501 Coastal Hwy., Ocean City, MD 21842 410-524-7000 (Office)

DIRECT BAY AND OC SKYLINE VIEWS

SPECTACULAR OCEAN PINES BAYFRONT TOWNHOME

Osprey Point– Ocean Pines

Marina Village – Ocean Pines

5 STARFISH LANE

• 3BR/3BA + Deeded Boat Slip • Planned Space for Elevator • Corner Unit with Panoramic Views – 2500 Sq. Ft. • Oversized 1-Car Garage • Gated Community • Beautiful Oak, Ceramic Tile & Berber Flooring

$525,000

EXCELLENT VIEWS OF BAY & OC SKYLINE

488590

484331

WALK TO YACHT CLUB, POOLS & MARINA

SHOW THIS WEEKEND

• • • • • •

903 YACHT CLUB DRIVE

3BR/2.5BA - 1876 Sq. Ft. Large Bay Front Deck + Upper Deck off Master Suite Beautiful Oak HW, Ceramic Tile & Carpet Floors 2-Sided Gas FP between Master BR & Bath Sun Room w/Triple Sliders Conditioned Crawl Space & 19+ Seer HVAC • 1 Year Home Warranty

$398,350

©BRER Affiliates Inc. An independently owned and operated broker member of BRER Affiliates Inc. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are registered service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license with no other affiliation with Prudential. Equal Housing Opportunity. Prudential PenFed Realty is independently owned and operated member of BRER Affiliates Inc. Pen Fed membership is not required to conduct business with Prudential PenFed Realty.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 20

MARCH 21, 2014

COUNTY BRIEFS By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) The Worcester County Commissioners discussed the following topics and took the following actions during their Tuesday, March 18, meeting. Commissioner James Purnell was unable to attend.

Transportation priorities The commissioners voted unanimously to send a letter to the Maryland Department of Transportation stating their priority transportation project continues to be the dualization of Route 113. Commissioner Judy Boggs wanted to add improvements to Route 589 to the short list of one, but she did not get a second to her motion, so it failed. The letter will include the desire for work on Route 589 and the Route 90 bridge plus a lower speed limit and marked crosswalks at the Route 113 intersection with Bay Street in Berlin, although that is not a capital project. Those items not be listed in order of priority, but will be mentioned.

specting food service facilities in the county. The cost of the lease is $12,500, the same as during 2013.

Memorandum gets OK The commissioners approved a memorandum of understanding between the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office and the Princess Anne Police Department. That police department wants to be able to use the services of the Worcester County STAR Team when emergencies or unusual occurrences warrant it.

Automatic door gets nod The commissioners approved funds for the installation of an automatic operating door system for the Ocean City Senior Center. The system will be installed for one of the front doors at a cost of $2,127. The improvement will help the more frail elderly enter safely.

SHA info meeting

Lease approved The commissioners approved a lease with the owner of a condominium at 112th Street for use by the Department of Environmental Health. That department needs the use of the condo to house sanitarians that come from across the state to help during the busy tourist season in Ocean City. They work for a week at a time in-

The State Highway Administration will hold a public information meeting 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 26, in the Snow Hill Middle School cafeteria to discuss updates on the improvements in Phase 3 and Phase 4 of the Route 113 dualization project. If county public schools are closed, or if the county’s snow emergency plan is in effect, the meeting will be held Wednes-

Resort Homes, Inc. Resort Real Estate, Inc. Resort Rentals, LLC Call Tony Matrona for more info on these properties. 410-641-1671 or 800-628-6758

Lot # 377 Nice 2 Bedroom. Recently Replaced Roof. Tile Floors in Kitchen & Bath. Large Living Room & Master Bedroom. Courtyard & Shed Call Tony Matrona 1-800-628-6758

$132,900 Lot# 328 Beautiful 2 Bedroom on a Gorgeous Pond Lot with Privacy. Fresh Paint in 2014. Large Living Room & Master Bedroom. Fully Equipped. Washer/Dryer, Disposal, Microwave, Courtyard & Shed.

$160,000

Call Tony Matrona 1-800-628-6758 410-641-1671 • 800-628-6758 • assateaguepointesales.com

day, April 2. No formal presentation will be given, but SHA representatives will be available to address questions and project-related concerns. Interested citizens may arrive at any time during the meeting hours and walk through at their own pace. The completion of Phases 1, 2A and 2B dualized about half of the 16.3-mile portion of Route 113 between Snow Hill and Berlin. Phases 3 and 4 will dualize the remaining eight-mile section, while Phase 5 will focus on improvements on the intersection at Route 113 and Route

12 in Snow Hill. Phase 5 has been placed on hold

GIS request The commissioners approved the request of the League of Women Voters of Maryland to waive the fees for acquiring Geographical Information System (GIS) data layers for Worcester County for the upcoming election in preparation of their Voters Guide. Commissioner Judy Boggs voted against granting the request.

Drug, alcohol abuse council seeks prevention nominees (March 21, 2014) The Worcester County Drug and Alcohol Abuse Council is seeking nominations of individual adults, youth, or groups who have made outstanding community contributions to drug and alcohol prevention or treatment. The awardees will be honored by Worcester County residents, elected officials, and Council members at the 23rd annual Drug and Alcohol Awards Reception. The reception will be held at the Worcester Career and Technology High School on Tuesday, April 22, at 6 p.m. and will celebrate the 31st year of the Council’s existence.

Nominations of individuals or groups who have performed commendably and beyond the call of duty are currently being accepted at the Worcester County Health Department. Criteria for selection of honorees include: program impact on community, appropriateness of approach, and personal contribution to the program. Anyone who received an award in the past three years is not eligible. The deadline for nominations is April 1. Call 410-632-0056 or e-mail marty.pusey@maryland.gov to request a nomination form or to make a reservation.


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

Prison sentence for stealing jewelry valued at $500,000 Victim tells judge items held irreplaceable, personal priceless meanings for her By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) A local woman whose jewelry and gold coins valued at approximately $500,000 were stolen from her home in May told a judge that although the monetary value was important, what they meant to her was priceless. “It’s what each piece represents,” the victim told Judge William Simpson in Circuit Court in Snow Hill on March 6. One was a brooch she designed for three gemstones her mothers gave her after she gave birth to a child in 1963. Another was a three and one-quarter carat diamond ring appraised in 1978 for $15,925. Today, she said, it would be worth $91,000. Another stolen item was the gold pocket watch of her father-in-law who died in 1956. Another stolen item was a diamond and platinum bracelet given to her mother. In 1978, it was appraised at $10,000. Today, she said, it would be worth $57,500. In her family, she said, special occasions were marked by gifts of jewelry. There were many such occasions because 131 items, mostly jewelry, were stolen. That number could grow. “It’s an ongoing list,” she said. Also ongoing is her task to find current values of items she discovers to be missing. She checks eBay prices and takes into account the inflation index since the items were originally appraised. So far, she has identified 83 stolen items as having a value of $508,000. “It’s a slow time-consuming process,” she said of remembering and calculating the worth of each item. “They were collected over generations by many family members,” she said. “Many were one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable.” She also said she had held those jewelry items and gold coins in trust for future generations.

“I am overwhelmed with guilt that they were lost in my keeping,” she said. The thief, Maurice Anthony Holden, 32, of Melfa, Va., had little to say in Circuit Court in Snow Hill last Thursday. “I’m sorry for her loss,” said Holden, who entered an Alford plea to the charge of first-degree burglary. In an Alford plea, the defendant does not admit guilt but acknowledges that the prosecution has sufficient evidence for a guilty verdict. In exchange for that plea, the State’s Attorney’s Office did not prosecute a charge of theft over $100,000. Holden and another man broke into the woman’s house off Route 611 on May 6 while she and her husband were away for a few hours. They traveled in a van with telephone directories as a ruse so they could pretend they were delivering them to get access to properties. Inside the victim’s house, they removed an entire safe, which contained valuable jewelry and gold coins. The safe was later found in a wooded area. Assistant State’s Attorney Steve Rakow said “only a handful” of items were recovered. Many had been melted down. Some of the jewelry was pawned in this area, but telephone records revealed Holden and his partner in crime traveled to New Jersey to pawn other pieces of the jewelry. 18-carat gold St. Christopher’s medal was sold to a pawn shop in Virginia for $100. Judge William Simpson sentenced Holden to 15 years in prison, with all but five years suspended, for stealing the woman’s valuable jewelry and other items. Judge William Simpson also said Holden is liable for $200,000 in restitution. After his release from prison, Holden will be on supervised probation for four years. The trial of Holden’s alleged conspirator in the burglary, Kente Wilcox, 30, of Westover, is scheduled for May 1. Wilcox is also scheduled for trial that day in a burglary that occurred not far from this victim’s residence in which the occupant shot him.

PAGE 21


Ocean City Today

PAGE 22

MARCH 21, 2014

City most likely to use different bid process Convention center success, Caroline Street debacle prompt outlook changes

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) One of the hallmarks of personal effectiveness – according to most every motivational speaker and reality TV judge – is knowing your own limitations. In that case, the Town of Ocean City will likely be more effective this spring in bowing out of the responsibility of selecting contractors for the upcoming Ocean City Beach Patrol Headquarters project, and instead going through a construction management firm. “It’s actually a totally different way to build the project itself,” said City Engineer Terry McGean, who told the city’s Recreation and Parks Commission last week that he would recommend the new approach for the OCBP project. The long-awaited and sorelyneeded deal on construction of a new beach patrol building is expected to be sealed next week, when City Council takes a final vote on a land-swap and financing deal with the Ocean City Development Corporation. OCDC currently owns the land on Talbot Street where the new building will sit, and will be paying 35 percent of the project’s cost. Instead of simply designing the

building and then contracting the phase.” construction out to the lowest bidder, The management firm, in assisting McGean said, the city could instead with the final designs for the OCBP hire a construction management firm building, would be aware of any debased on its qualifications and pro- sign changes that would adversely afjected overhead costs. That firm, not fect the cost or quality of the city, would then be responsible for construction. bidding out the construction work “I try to do that, but having the and completing the project person who actually builds it laying “They would work with you from eyes on it and doing the cost estithe beginning, with both myself and mates during design is a big help,” the architects, and once you’re far McGean said. enough along they would actually bid This process – or the lack thereof the project out to the sub-contrac- – has proven to be a major issue for tors,” McGean said. the city over the “Based on the prices past year with the they get back from ‘It’s actually a totally different Caroline Street restthe subs, and their way to build the project itself.’ room and stage faown provisions… City Engineer Terry McGean cility. they would bring all The project, those numbers back which began conand we would negotiate a final price struction in the fall of 2012, was exwith them.” pected to be completed before the Despite the extra steps involved, 2013 summer season. Instead, a myrusing a construction management iad of delays saw the facility open the firm means the city is not the one re- week after Christmas, seven months sponsible for the selection and coor- behind schedule. dination of other contractors. Conversely, the city has seen rela“The management firm would be tive success with construction at the what we call the ‘at-risk’ party,” convention center. Because the state McGean said. has paid the majority of capital costs “It actually does two important for those renovations, the Maryland things,” he explained. “One, it brings Stadium Authority is in charge of conqualifications into the contract side of struction, and used the construction it, so it’s not just the city making the manager method for the project. decision based on a low bid from a “It’s a combination of the experigeneral contractor. Two, it brings the ence we’ve had at Caroline Street, person who is responsible for the ac- which hasn’t been as good, and the tual building in during the design experience the Stadium Authority has had at the convention center, which has been very good,” McGean said about the new methodology. “Plus, we know this is going to be a very tight budget.”

Outer Banks, NC Vacation Homes! Over 500 Vacation Homes, from Duck to Corolla, rindley Oceanfront to Soundfront, each Private Pools, Hot Tubs, VA CAT I O N S

&

S A L E S

Pets and More…

Book Online at www.brindleybeach.com

1-877-642-3224

“ S E R V I C E F I R S T … F U N A LWAY S ! ”

Y Yo You Your uur rN New ew B Beach each H Home! ome! ome Visit Fairway Fairway Village by L LC CH Homes omes O Ocean cean V View, iew w, Delaware Delaware

Luxury L uxury To Townhomes Townhomes with First First Floor Floor Owner’s Owner’s Su Suit Suite e Affordably A ffor ff ordably pr priced iced fr from om $229,900* #FESPPNTt #FESPPNTt  Bathrooms Community Pool, Clubhouse & Tennis Courts 0OMZ.JMFTGSPN#FUIBOZ#FBDIBOE#PBSEXBML 0OMZ.JMFTGSPN#FUIBOZ#FBDIBOE#PBSEXBML Restaurants, Tax-Free Shopping and much more!

Call C all Today T To oday 302.541.8434 302.541.84 434

The city has borrowed $2 million for the OCBP facility. The current layout of the building shows 9,477 square feet, a roughly 3,000 square foot reduction from what was originally planned. However, in the first design revision, an increase in estimated costs ate up the 15 percent contingency the city had built into the price before construction even begins. “I’m not anticipating anything out of the ordinary, but it’s still got a way to go before it’s actually built,” McGean said. Although weather was initially blamed for the Caroline Street delay, it became evident that the complexity of the architecture – particularly the concrete molding - was far beyond the scope of Black Diamond Builders, the general contractor hired by the city after bidding the project at $938,750, well below the $1 million estimate. Despite levying hundreds of thousands of dollars in late fees to Black Diamond, and bringing on other subcontractors, the city is still dealing with frozen pipes, roof leaks, and questionable concrete quality at the facility. McGean said that none of the design issues with the restroom project should be an issue for the OCBP building – but a construction management firm would be able to advise the city if certain design elements were to increase cost or difficulty of construction. “[The OCBP building] doesn’t appear to be particularly difficult, but I didn’t think Caroline Street appeared to be either,” McGean said. “Which is why it’s good to have someone on board to say that.”

Tax Preparation Services Howard Wimbrow, CPA Certified Public Accountant

Oyster Bay Shopping Plaza Ocean City, MD By Appointment: 302.539.0829 Trusted advisor providing accurate reliable services for individuals, businesses, trusts and estates on the Eastern Shore since 1994. Delaware License Number CA-0000947 Maryland License Number 2119

ABSOLUTE LAND AUCTION 713± Acres (7 Tracts) Frederick County 6KRFNH\VYLOOH5G‡Winchester, VA

This land is ideal for hunting, hiking, and other recreational activities. Creeks, ponds, an extensive trail system, managed timberlands, and managed deer & turkey resources, ¼ mile from Sleepy Creek Wildlife Management Area, breathtaking views of the surrounding mountains Property Previews: March 8th & 15th (10am-12pm), March 9th & 16th (12pm-2pm)

Saturday, March 29th at 10am On-Site Terms: 10% buyers premium. Closing to occur in 30 days. Full terms online. VAAF93

www www..L LCHomesDE CHomesDE.com .com

*I *Information nformation subjec subjectt tto o change without notic notice. e. See See a community community sales associate associate for for full details details..

The Counts Realty & Auction Group

www.countsauction.com

800-780-2991


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

Deadline near for farmers to suggest grant nominees (March 21, 2014)The deadline is approaching for farmers to nominate rural public school districts to compete for a grant of up to $25,000, through Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmers Grow Rural Education, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund. Nominations will be accepted until April 6. Eligible farmers can nominate their school district by visiting www.GrowRuralEducation.com or by calling 1-877-267-3332. Grants are awarded based on merit, need and community support. The more farmers who nominate a school district, the more it demonstrates community support and can strengthen the school districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s application. This year, the program has expanded to 18 new counties, for a total of 1,289 eligible counties across 39 states. School administrators in nominated districts will have until April 21 to submit their applications online. The application Website is also equipped to help answer specific questions about the Grow Rural Education program overall and assist with the grant writing process. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As we work to grow our next generation of farmers, building a strong math and science foundation is vital,â&#x20AC;? said Linda Arnold, Monsanto customer advocacy lead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Working together with farmers and rural

school districts, we are building relationships that benefit the community, with the ultimate goal of improving education.â&#x20AC;? The Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmers Grow Rural Education Advisory Council, a group of approximately 30 farmers from across the country, will review and select the winning grant applications. Advisory Council members were selected based on their passion for farming and education, as well as experience in rural school districts. Last year, more than 73,000 farmers nominated 4,024 school districts, resulting in $2.3 million in grants to improve math and science education in 181 districts across the country. The Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to strengthen farming communities. Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012, after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois, and has since awarded nearly $5 million to school districts across the county. For more information about the Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, visit www.GrowRuralEducation.com.

Â&#x2021;.LGGLHSRRO    Â&#x2021;:RUNRXWURRP    Â&#x2021;6DXQD  Â&#x2021;RXWGRRUSRROV    Â&#x2021;LQGRRUSRRO    Â&#x2021;+DUWUXWHQQLV    FRXUWV

Where Luxury & Casual Living Go Hand In Hand

2 23(1 3(1+ +286( 286(6$ 6$ $785'$< 78 85' 5'$< $<0 0$5&+ $5&+  Â&#x2021;1 1221 221 30 30 23(1+286(6$785'$<0$5&+Â&#x2021;122130

  



   

  

 







  

 





                                                             

           

                 

.DWKHULQH:ULJKW3D\QH   *5,7RS3URGXFHU   Your Heron Harbour Isle Specialist!    NDWKHULQHJZULJKW#DROFRP ZZZNDWKHULQHZULJKWSD\QHUHDOHVWDWHFRP

      

BARRETT IN BERLIN

PAGE 23

MARCH IS THE FINAL NONTH FOR FACTORY INCENTIVES ON NEW 2013 MODELS NOW IS THE TIME FOR MAXIMUM SAVINGS

SUPER DEALS 2013 DODGE DART Stk. #2344 MSRP $22,990

- $1,140 Discount - $2,500 Rebate

SALE $19,350

2013 CHRYSLER 300 Stk. #2398 MSRP $30,990

- $1,740 Demo Discount - $4,000 Rebate - $1,000 Chrys Cap Finance

SALE $24,250

OUR REMAINING 2013 INVENTORY STK#

MAKE/MODEL

SALE

3173

CHRYSLER 200

$18,990

2399

CHRYSLER 300

$28,990

2423

DODGE CHARGER

$28,220

3148

CHRYSLER 300

$28,250

2433

DODGE CHARGER

$26,826

3162

CHRYSLER 300

$29,670

3224

DODGE DURANGO

$31,580

3214

CHRYSLER 300

$31,140

2476

DODGE JOURNEY

$25,464

3149

DODGE JOURNEY

$22,892

3137

JEEP WRANGLER

$27,121

3212

CHRYSLER T&C

$29,670

ALL OF THE ABOVE SALE PRICES REQUIRE A CHRYSLER CAPITAL FINANCE DEAL EXCEPT THE DODGE DART Please go to WWW.MYBARRETT.COM for details on any of these cars

410-641-0444 â&#x20AC;˘ 888-641-0444

SALE ENDS MARCH 31, 2014

RT. 50 & OLD OCEAN CITY BLVD â&#x20AC;˘ BERLIN, MD


Ocean City Today

PAGE 24

PRE-SEASON SALE On All New 2014

e Orig. Pric lothing

% ANllo2w0w13/xCtra discount

75

off

Notice!

In the Spring of 2014, we will consolidate both of our stores at our seaside location.

Coastal Hwy. & Dagsboro St. | Fenwick Island Open Daily | 302.537.1414

LAUREN BUNTING REALTOR®

Cell: 410.422.9899 Lwbunting@comcast.net

OPEN HOUSE Saturday 1-3pm

218 BARBARY COAST DR

3BR/3BA features HW floors, cathedral ceilings, master suite w/ large walk-in closet, jacuzzi-brand soaking tub, ceramic tiled shower. Lg sunroom & rear deck. Spacious loft. Addl. office or use as 4th BR. Community offers outdoor pool & clubhouse w/ well-equipped gym. Directions: Rt. 113 to Tripoli, Left on Dueling Way, Left on Barbary Coast.

$259,900 SEARCH LOCAL LISTINGS ONLINE

www.LaurenBunting.com VIEW AREA FORECLOSURES AND 3 ( / 2 4 3 ! , % 3 s - / 2 4 ' ! ' % # ! , # 5 , !4 / 2 3 & 2 % % ( / - % 6! , 5 !4 ) / .

24 Broad St., Berlin, MD 21811 Office: 410.641.3313

MARCH 21, 2014

Flood mapping appeal time begins Cropper says city should take lead in requesting higher NFIP designation

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) With the appeals period for proposed new federal flood maps formally beginning this week, city and private-sector officials are voicing a strong difference of opinion in how the town should approach its surprisingly reduced flood insurance requirements. “I just think the city should be prudent enough to say to FEMA ‘we can’t have uninsured property on the beach,’” said Reese Cropper, President of Insurance Management Group. For many years, Cropper has been an agent for government-backed flood insurance policies via the National Flood Insurance Program. Despite his position, Cropper said he has little to lose if enrollment in the area plummets. “If everyone goes without flood insurance, I’ll still be just fine,” he said. “But I have seen what happens when people ignore the problem. Most property owners don’t live here and don’t worry about it until it’s too late.” Because of that, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has historically required all properties inside a 100-year flood plain – i.e. those with a one percent or greater chance of flooding above base flood elevation – to have insurance through the NFIP. Enforcement of this is done through mortgage qualifications, however, meaning that those who do not owe any money on their property have been able to go uninsured if they so choose. Most of Ocean City’s oceanfront properties have been in a “V” zone, indicating a risk of high velocity debris and wind, along with flooding. These

zones have higher NFIP premiums than “A” zones, which are within the 100-year flood risk area but not at risk of velocity impact. Most of Ocean City behind the beach has, historically, been an “A” zone. For years, the town has lobbied to have the “V” designation removed on the grounds that the dunes and artificially widened beach offer significant protection. “That’s what we’ve always wanted,” Cropper said. “I have been one of the biggest proponents of going from the highest rated zone to a lower-rated zone.”

‘I just think the city should be prudent enough to say to FEMA “we can’t have uninsured property on the beach.”’ Reese Cropper, President of Insurance Management Group What Cropper and others did not want, however, is for FEMA to take parts of the city out of the 100-year plain entirely – which is what FEMA is proposing to do under the new maps being devised as part of nationwide flood insurance reform under the Biggert-Waters Act. Most of Ocean City would now be an “X” zone, where flood insurance is not required and where no base flood elevation is specified. According to Cropper, property owners are getting the wrong impression that the “X” zone is not a flood zone, which it is, albeit one with reduced risk. “FEMA still ‘strongly recommends’ that people in an ‘X’ zone get flood insurance,” Cropper said. “But we all know you can highly recommend a lot of different coverage, but people don’t buy them.” The city is recommending the same.

“I would certainly suggest that everyone in an ‘X’ zone still have coverage, especially if they used to be in a ‘V’ zone,” said city Planning and Community Development Director Matt Margotta, noting that the average annual premium for “X” zone homeowners is $460, versus the thousands they would pay in the “V” zone. From a planning perspective, Margotta noted, the city would prefer to have every property covered to ease the rebuilding process if a catastrophic storm were to occur. “If they’re not insured and they’re not getting an insurance payout, they won’t rebuild,” he said. “There would be an exponential growth of blight [in that scenario].” But if the city shares his concern, Cropper said, it should be lobbying FEMA to have the town’s “X” zones re-upped to “A” zones. “No one is saving that much money because of an ‘X’ zone versus an ‘A’ zone,” Cropper said. “They’re very close in premium, it’s just that one requires insurance and the other doesn’t. The big jump in premiums only comes with the ‘V’ zone.” “The city wants to be able to tell its constituents ‘we saved you a bunch of money on flood insurance,’” Cropper charged. “So they’re not inclined to talk to FEMA because, right now, they’re telling everyone that they got them out of a flood zone, which isn’t true.” Even if the town was inclined to press for a stricter zone, it would be an uphill battle. “Yes, it is possible that the city could lobby for that,” Margotta said. “What we get from FEMA is ‘if you want to make an argument about these findings, then you have to show us the technical reasons why we were wrong.” Essentially, the city would have to conduct its own hydrologic study – an See FLOOD Page 25


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

Flood mapping appeal time brings difference in opinion Continued from Page 24 undertaking that virtually no government body except FEMA has the capacity to do. In fact, FEMA publishes a “Criteria for Appeals” guide for those wishing to do so, in which the agency universally requires the appellant to submit data of broader scope and better quality than the federal government used. Cropper contends that FEMA’s data is skewed, counting storm events that did not legitimately hit Ocean City and thus making the average impact seem low. “Half of those were storms that hit the upper Chesapeake Bay and got thrown in to the data simply because they were classified as being on the Eastern Shore,” Cropper said Being reclassified as a “X” zone would also loosen up the building restrictions placed on the city by FEMA. “There’s a whole lot of building requirements that wouldn’t have to be met,” Margotta said. “We’ve adopted certain codes to date that are common throughout the country, and beyond that there are a set of building codes that are local to us. You can go more restrictive than what’s forced on you by the feds or the state, you just can’t go less.” Whether the city would opt to loosen its codes in response to the

new flood maps is a policy decision that would have to be made. But the tendency is to go more restrictive than less, especially since keeping the code strict gives properties within the jurisdiction a discount on their flood insurance. The city currently has enough flood-mitigation codes in place to obtain the maximum 15 percent discount rating. “You start relaxing those, and you’re quickly going to lose that percentage,” Margotta said. “I would support the town going forward using the old maps in terms of building code. By having a higher standard, it would increase our rating for the NFIP and therefore we would have a higher percentage discount.” “I would not support arbitrarily saying that the town is another zone without actually knowing ourselves,” he added. Cropper said he was concerned with what he views as the contradictory desire to mandate physical protection, but not financial. “If you’re saying that it’s prudent to enforce a higher building code, how is it not prudent to allow these properties to go without flood insurance?” he posited. “The bottom line is, where is the city going to get the money to rebuild if we have another storm like 1933?”

Funds requested to better market, develop Worcester By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) Citing a need for additional personnel and funds to market the county to promote business, Economic Development Director Bill Badger asked the Worcester County Commissioners for a 23 percent increase over the amended fiscal year budget of $312,778 during their March 11 budget session. Badger also cited the need for funds for consulting and the inclusion of the services of the Small Business and Technology Development Center in Salisbury in the department’s budget. The requested budget increase to $385,526 would include increasing the category of personnel services from $144,528 to $170,376. The additional funds would be used to hire a part-time administrative assistant and to increase the salary of Deputy Director Meredith Mears. The category of maintenance and services would increase from $49,000 to $93,000 and the category of supplies and materials would drop from $108,250 to $105,650. The category of other charges would increase from $11,000 to $16,000. Badger said he wants to produce a video, “Best Places to Work in

Worcester County,” to showcase businesses offering good careers with good salaries so college graduates would return to the county to work. “We have some dynamic employment opportunities in this county,” he said. Increasing employment opportunities is part of the mission of the Economic Development Department. Its mission also includes expansion of the tax base, protecting the county’s environmental assets and creating full-time, family supporting jobs. The Economic Development Office encourages new businesses to come and existing businesses to remain in the county. It assists with expansion plans and the permitting process. It also coordinates with local real estate and businesses to hold an annual real estate tour to attract new businesses. Badger and Mears also market the Video Lottery Terminal (VOLT) loan program, which uses funds generated by casinos to help business owners connect to municipal, county and state resources or to help in starting or expanding a business. “Go out and sell Worcester County for us,” Bud Church, president of the Worcester County Commissioners, told Badger at the conclusion of the presentation.

PAGE 25

Home is where your

Stbeory gins...

Kari Story

Cell: 443-614-6286 Direct: 443-664-2490 kstory@gofirsthome.com www.KariStory.com

Mike’s

CARPET CONNECTION

“We Measure Each Job With A Golden Rule”

HONESTY, DEPENDABILITY, PROFESSIONALISM, PRIDE, QUALITY All too often business will use words like these in order to gain the trust of their customers. We would like to elaborate...

PHILOSOPHY

We believe that strong ethical and moral principals are essential for the success and growth of any organization. You will realize this the minute you walk through our door.

GOAL

Our Goal is to provide you with the personalized service you deserve at a fair price. We will listen to your needs and tailor our services to meet them.

INVITATION

If you desire moral and ethical customer service, coupled with professionalism and quality, we encourage you to call on us!

WINDOW TREATMENTS HUNTER DOUGLAS CUSTOM DRAPERIES WOVEN WOODS FAUX WOOD VERTICALS

HONEYCOMB ROLLER SHADES VERTIGLIDES ROMAN SHADES PLANTATION SHUTTERS

MANNINGTON BRUCE BR - 111 MERCIER

MULLICAN QUICKSTEP LAUZON ANDERSON

PERGO MOHAWK SOMERSET BALTERIO

WUNDAWEVE BLISS ALADDIN QUEEN

STAINMASTER DIXIE BEAULIEU SOUTHWIND

WOOD & LAMINATES

CARPET SHAW MOHAWK SMARTSTRAND KRAUSE

VINYL/VCT MOHAWK BURKE

MANNINGTON CONGOLEUM

ARMSTRONG ADURA

CERAMIC TILE FLORIDA INTERCERAMIC MOHAWK

SILHOUETTES TOP TREATMENTS PINDLER ROBERT ALLEN KRAVET FABRICS

CHESAPEAKE MARAZZI AMERICAN OLEAN CONESTOGA

CENTIVA ADORE TOUCH

ATLAS SHAW LAUFEN

Mike’s Carpet Connection Ocean Bay Plaza • Fenwick Island, DE

1-800-298-9470 • 302-537-1899 • www.mikescarpetconnection.com


PAGE 26

Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 27

City looking forward to visit by two tall ships Dredging must happen in time to facilitate galleon, sister vessel for month

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) If the necessary dredging can be accomplished in time, the city has secured two tall ships for a month-long stay in the resort this summer. The National Air, Sea, and Space Foundation, the non-profit group run by OC Air Show promoter Bryan Lilley, plans to bring back last year’s attraction as well as its sister vessel.

Dagsboro man given sentence for home burglary

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) One of the two men charged with burglarizing a house off Route 611 toward Assateague Island last June was sentenced Tuesday to 20 years in prison. Ten years of that sentence for Kemayne Shabazz Smith, 36, of Dagsboro, Del., was suspended. During the June 1 burglary, the homeowner fired a shot through a door in his house, wounding Smith’s partner in crime. He had been in his second-floor office when he heard the doorbell ring. As he looked out and saw a white van parked in his driveway, he heard the door to his house being broken as the burglars gained entry. The homeowner ran to the third floor where he retrieved and loaded his handgun and locked himself in a room. From behind the locked door, he heard a person walking up the stairs and then pushing on the door. As the door started to break open, he fired a shot through it. Then he heard someone stumbling down the stairs. He opened the door, looked out and saw a man on the stairs. As he pointed his gun at the man, he left. That man on the stairs was Smith, who left the house and entered the van, where his accomplice, who had been shot, was waiting for him. A state trooper spotted the van on Route 50 near Route 113 and tried to stop it, but the driver, later identified as Kente William Wilcox, 30, of Westover, sped away. Wilcox stopped the van near Selbyville, Del., and both men were arrested. In Circuit Court in Snow Hill on Jan. 9, a jury found Smith guilty of first- and fourth-degree burglary. Judge Brian Shockley ordered a presentence investigation and sentenced Smith this week. Wilcox is scheduled to have a jury trial May 1.

“The NASSF has put in an application to bring back the galleon and its sister ship,” said city Special Events Director Frank Miller. “The goal is to have the in town at the same time. Right now we’re looking at August 1 through September 1, with some piggyback events as well - possibly a pirate festival on one of the weekends.” The visit would depend in depth conditions in the channel running beneath the Route 50 Bridge, which provides access for ships berthing at the city’s bayside boardwalk on Chicago Avenue between Second and Fourth Streets. Although one vessel cleared the

sandbars last year, conditions may change, Miller said. The preference would be to have contractors from the Army Corps of Engineers, who are already doing dredging in the area, clear a path. “It’s an ongoing conversation,” Miller said. This past August, the resort welcomed El Galeon Andalucia, a fullyfunctional replica of a 16th-century galleon owned and operated by the Spanish non-profit Nao Victoria Foundation. Such vessels from the golden age of sail are often referred to as “tall ships,” and are major tourist attractions wherever they dock.

Not only would the galleon return this summer, but it would also be accompanied by the foundation’s namesake vessel. The ship is named after the original Victoria, the carrack used by Ferdinand Magellan’s expedition to circumnavigate the globe in 1521, and is a perfect replica of it. Critically, unlike the Andalucia, the Nao Victoria is an exact copy of the original’s wooden hull, without any fiberglass or modern materials. This means that, despite being physically smaller than the galleon, the Nao Victoria sits just as deep in the water due to the added hull weight.

Spend Less... Get More! Quality Value & Service that can’t be beat! New items from~ Telescope Casual • Seaside Casual Cushions and More!

Hit the Deck Rt. 54 • West Fenwick Island • DE • 302-436-9271 www.hitthedeckpatio.com Open Friday, Saturday, Sunday & Monday 11-4


PAGE 28

OBITUARIES GAIL MARIE PINNEY FARRELL Lansdale Gail Marie Pinney Farrell, 77, of Lansdale and formerly of Ocean Pines, died Saturday, March 1, 2014 at Brittany Pointe Estates. She was the beloved wife of Michael J. Farrell, Jr. Born May 11, 1936 in Bridgeport, Conn., she was a daughter of the late George H. and Josephine M. (Hicks) Goddu. Mrs. Farrell graduated Phi Betta Kappa from the University of Connecticut. She was employed as a teacher in Pennsylvania, Florida and Connecticut for 32 years, retiring in 1993 from the Colonial School District in Plymouth Meeting, Pa. She was awarded “Teacher of the Year” for her efforts. Gail was a former member of Trinity Lutheran Church, Lansdale, and was very active in the Ocean Pines community. She was an avid reader and an accomplished swimmer who was a national qualifier for the Senior Olympics. In addition to her husband, she is survived by her children, Karen E. Gardoski, and her husband, Ron of Kingsley, Pa.; Michael S. Pinney and his wife, Susan of Zieglerville, Pa.; Linda Pinney Sapp and her husband, Garrett of Fort Pierce, Fla.; Michael J. Farrell and his wife, Carole of Lansdale, Pa.; Linda A. Brobst and her husband, Curtis of North Wales, Pa. and Trish E. Baker of Harleysville, Pa.; 19 grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren and her sister, Sandy Schick and her husband, Robert of Liverpool, N.Y. Relatives and friends may call after 1 p.m., Saturday, March 29, 2014 at the Auditorium of Brittany Pointe Estates, 1001 S. Valley Forge Rd., Lansdale, followed by the Memorial Service at 2 p.m. Interment will be private. Arrangements are by the Huff & Lakjer Funeral Home, Lansdale. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that contributions be made in Gail’s memory to the Special Olympics of Montgomery County, Suite 203, 980 Harvest Drive, Blue Bell, Pa. 19422. JACK W. WALKER Ocean Pines Jack W. Walker, age 87, of Ocean Pines and formerly of Silver Spring, Md. died Monday, March 10, 2014 at Harrison House in Snow Hill. He was born in Gaithersburg, Md. and was the son of the late Franklin C. and Marjorie S. (Plummer) Walker. He served in the U.S. Navy during WWII and later graduated from University of Maryland. Jack had been a human resources manager for many years before retirement and was a member of the American Legion Post 166 in Ocean City. He is survived by his wife, Jean A. Walker of Ocean Pines; a granddaughter, Susan J. Kaiser; three great-grandchildren, Shelby Kaiser, Elizabeth Greenlee and Rachel Kaiser, and a greatgreat grandson, Wyatt Greenlee and four nieces. Services and burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Wounded Warriors Project, P.O. Box 758517, Topeka, Kan., 66675. Condolences may be sent by visiting

Ocean City Today www.hastingsfuneralhome.net. PAUL K. “PUDGE” RUPPERT Ocean City Paul K. “Pudge” Ruppert, Jr., 64, of Ocean City died Sunday, March 9, 2014 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. He was born in Washington, D.C. and was the son of the late Paul K. and Ethel Ruppert Sr. Pudge dedicated many years to the food and beverage industry, most notably serving as the restaurant manager for the Ocean Pines Yacht Club. He will be remembered for his friendly demeanor, great sense of humor and generous nature. He is survived by five brothers, Michael T. Ruppert of Selbyville; Stephen R. Ruppert and his wife, Sheilah of Kent Island; Gregory L. Ruppert and his wife, Gail of Lake Placid, N.Y.; William E. Ruppert of Ocean City and James R. Ruppert of Ocean City; two sisters, Theresa Pruitt and her husband, Ted of Frankford and Patricia Janson and her husband, Steve of Ocean City and several nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian burial was held Wednesday, March 19, 2014 at St. Luke Catholic Church, 9903 Coastal Hwy. in Ocean City. LESTER JOSEPH STRUBLE, SR. Berlin Lester Joseph Struble, Sr., 80, died Saturday, March 8, 2014 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in West Milford, N.J., he was the son of the late Lester Aloysius Struble and Cecelia Tintle Struble. He is survived by his beloved wife, Ann Mackin Struble and children, Carol Lebedz and her husband, Glenn of Georgetown, Del.; Anne Marie Kielty of Sparta, N.J.; Lester J. Struble, Jr. and his wife, Jeanine of Sparta, N.J.; Michael Struble and his wife, Kasha of Flanders, N.J. and Cindy Mills and her husband, Ronnie of Georgetown, Del. There are 13 grandchildren including: Courtney, Nicole and Kelly Lebedz; Kyle and Justin Kielty; Allison, Matthew and Kevin Struble; Michael, Ryan and Nicholas Struble; Anthony and Marissa Mills. Also surviving is a brother, Paul Struble and his wife, Joan of Port St. Lucie, Fla., and several nieces and nephews. Mr. Struble had worked in the automotive industry at the Ford Motor Company in Mahwah and Butler N.J. He was a U.S. Army veteran, member of St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Berlin and the Knights of Columbus in New Jersey. A funeral service was held on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 at the Burbage Funeral Home, 108 William St. in Berlin. Interment was at St. Joseph’s Cemetery in West Milford, N.J. In lieu of flowers, a donation in his memory may be made to: Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21801. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. REGINA ELENA MORAN Berlin Regina Elena Moran, 54, died Thursday, March 13, 2014 at her home in Berlin.

Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of the late Adolph Smallwood and Joan Tomarchis Smallwood. She is survived by her husband, Steven Michael Moran and her two children, Christina Marie Truitt and her husband, Dell of Berlin, and Christopher Lee Moran and his wife, Jessica of Delmar, Md. She was an adored grandmother to Evan Truitt, Hayden Truitt, Ryot Moran and Lennox Moran. Also surviving are numerous nieces and nephews. Regina was a graduate of Woodlawn High School in Baltimore. She worked in the insurance business most of her career with Smith, Cropper and Deeley. She loved to travel, having seen 37 out of the 50 states. She also enjoyed the beach. A funeral service was held on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at the Burbage Funeral Home, 108 William St. in Berlin. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her memory to: Women Supporting Women, 12216 Ocean Gateway, Unit 1500, Ocean City, Md. or Elks Lodge # 2173, P.O. Box 983, Selbyville, Del. 19975. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. WOODROW JOSEPH KLEIN,JR. Ocean City Woodrow Joseph Klein,Jr., 65, died on Friday March 14, 2014 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Woodrow Joseph Klein, Sr., and Naomi Bell Klein. He is survived by his wife, Linda Lee Klein, daughters, Jennifer Klein Nichols, Rachelle Hurd and her husband, Jeremy and son, Colin Klein and his wife, Maria, as well as a sister, Phyllis LaPierre and her husband Gary and one grandchild, Luca Klein. Woody had a great love for his family and a passion for spending time on the water with his family and friends. He had been a former police officer for the Baltimore County Police Department. A Mass of Christian burial was held on Tuesday March 18, at St. Mary Star of the Sea in Ocean City. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Ocean City Reef Foundation, P.O. Box 1072, Ocean City, Md. 21843 or to Coastal Hospice, 351 Deers Head Hospital Road, Salisbury, Md. 21801. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home. Expressions of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. LENA MILDRED POWELL Berlin Lena Mildred Powell, 92, died peacefully with her daughter by her side, on Sunday March 9, 2014 at their home in Salisbury. Born in Gilmer County, W.Va., she was the daughter of the late Roy Burl Martin and Comellow L. Post Martin. She was preceded in death by her husband, Charles H. Powell, Jr. in 1997. She is survived by her beloved daughter, Peggy Lynn Powell of Salisbury, and special niece, Linda Bishop Nicholson, and several nieces and nephews. Also preceding her in death was her son, Richard

MARCH 21, 2014 Wayne Powell, her brother, Burl Roy Martin, and her sister, Lucy Ruth Bishop. Mrs. Powell and her family moved from West Virginia to a farm in Libertytown when she was 5. She was a homemaker and poultry grower, who loved to garden and paint ceramics. She was a wonderful mother who loved God. She also leaves behind her devoted cat, “Hambone Sammy”. A funeral service was held on Saturday, March 15, 2014 at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Pastor Greg Morris officiated. Interment followed at Riverside Cemetery in Libertytown. A donation in her memory may be made to; Parkway Church of God, 600 Edison St. Salisbury, Md. 21801. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. STEPHEN WILLIAM DLUBALA, JR. Berlin Stephen William Dlubala, Jr., 66, died on Saturday, March 8, 2014 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Stephen William Dlubala, Sr., and Theresa Hohman Dlubala. He is survived by his beloved wife, Sharon Ensley Dlubala. Stephen was a graduate of Towson State College. He had worked as a systems analyst at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. A funeral service was held on March 13, 2014 at the Burbage Funeral Home, 108 William Street in Berlin. Rev. Ed Agner officiated. Cremation followed. Donations may be made to the National Kidney Foundation, 1301 York Road #404, Lutherville-Timonium, Md. 21093. Expressions of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. JOHN CHESTER RAYNE Powellville John Chester Rayne, 62, died Wednesday, March 12, 2014 at his home. Born in Salisbury, he was the son of the late Chester West Rayne and Hazel Powell Rayne. He is survived by his brother, David Powell Rayne and his girlfriend, Terry Koshi. Also surviving is a niece, Megan Rayne Flick of Harrisonburg, Va. and a special aunt, Evelyn Moore and several cousins. He was preceded in death by a niece, Amber Rayne. Mr. Rayne had worked as a livestock handler, maintenance worker and cowboy actor at Frontier Town, and as a carpenter/builder with Wayne Jones. He was a supporter of the Powellville Volunteer Fire Company and its ladies auxiliary. A celebration of life will be held on Sunday, March 30, 2014 at 3 p.m. at the Powellville Volunteer Fire Hall in Powellville, Md. Interment will be private for the family at Powellville Cemetery. A donation in his memory may be made to: Powellville Volunteer Fire Company, 5085 Powellville Rd, Powellville, Md. 21850. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

OBITUARIES GEORGE ROYCE WHITE Willards George Royce White, age 74, of Willards died Friday, March 14, 2014 at home. He was born in Willards and was the son of the late Olen Lee and Esther Mae (Wilkins) White. Royce’s career of 39-plus years at Perdue took him from the hatchery to feed mill superintendent to assistant general production manager where he was in charge of feed mills and grain departments as well as assisting in special projects. In 1978 he was appointed director of Grain Receiving and Storage where he remained until retirement. Through the years he received many awards, one of which he received in 2012 for 50 years of service from the Grain Elevator and Processing Society (GEAPS). He was responsible for starting the Mid-Atlantic Chapter of the GEAPS organization and was awarded “Lifetime Member.” Royce loved playing for “Jacks Fast Pitch Softball,” singing gospel music and playing the steel for “Crusaders Quartette.” He enjoyed drawing and painting as a hobby as well as gardening and playing

with his grandchildren. He was a friend to all, full of wit and a giver of good advice. He will be missed by many friends and his family. He is survived by his wife, Eloise White of Willards; three sons, Randy White and his wife, Kim of Willards; G. Royce White Jr. and his wife, Robin of Gumboro and Rodney Snyder and his wife, Lynne of Ocean Pines; a daughter, Bernice Scott and her husband, Andrew of Berlin; a brother, Sheldon White and his wife, Isabelle of Salisbury; a brotherin-law, James Palmer of Florida; eight grandchildren, Brandon, Matt, Ethan and Emma White, Kelsey, Karley and Adrianne Snyder and Avery Scott and four great-grandchildren. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by a sister, Margie Esther Palmer. A memorial service was held on Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at Faith Baptist Church in Berlin with Pastor John Abent officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to Faith Baptist Church, 519 S. Main St., Berlin, Md. 21811. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.hastingsfuneralhome.net.

OC REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT, INC.

DCMA®

MARY ELLEN JONES Berlin Mary Ellen Jones, age 72, died on Monday, March 17, 2014 at the Berlin Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Berlin. Born in Berlin, she was the daughter of the late George Kendall Jarvis and Eva Hudson Jarvis. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert L. Jones in 2005. She is survived by her son, Kenneth Braniecki and his wife, Kim of Stevensville, Md., and two grandchildren, Sara Braniecki and Gunner Braniecki and his wife, Alyssa and a great-grandson Carter Braniecki. Mary Ellen had been employed for

many years as a records clerk with the Worcester County Jail and the Worcester County Sheriff’s Department. She was a member of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Berlin. A funeral service will be held on Monday, March 24 at 11 a.m. at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Rev. Michael Moyer will officiate. Friends may call one hour prior to the service. Interment will be in Evergreen Cemetery in Berlin. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 1315 Mt. Hermon Rd., Salisbury, Md. 21804. Expressions of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

Spaghetti Dinner to benefit

LENTEN CONFESSIONS ONFESSIONS LENTEN

Saturday, March 22 ~ 5-8pm

No waiting No reeservvations vation No cost or tax

410-524-5781

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church Community Life Center

Managing Properties Since 1983

1301 Coastal Hwy • Ocean City, MD

BONUS: God’s ffor orrgiveness and unconditional love

$10 for Adults $5 for Children 12 & under

Wednesda ednesday Everry W Night in Lent: 4-7 pm

• Financial Management • On-Site Personnel Services • Contract Review/Administration • Community Inspection/Analysis • Preventive Maintenance Prgrms COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONS INSTITUTE

PAGE 29

• Board of Directors Reports • Volume Discount Purchasing Pwr • Full or Limited Service • Emergency Service • On Call 24 Hours

NO CONFLICT OF INTEREST www.oc-rem.com • info@oc-rem.com

CMCA® AMS® PCAM®

5901 Coastal Hwy Suite C • Ocean City, MD 21842 Serving: MD & DE

In addition to the dinner, there will be a Chinese Auction & Raffle

For more information and a list of the auction items check out www.SpaghettiForPossibilities.com To Order Tickets or for any Questions Contact: Katie at 410-251-4793 or Corey at 410-251-0626

St. Luke Catholic Church 100th Streeet & Coastal Hwy

Ocean Cityy,, MD M


MARCH 21, 2014

30

Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

Accepting Applications for the following positions:

Full-Time Maintenance Position: Requirements: 2 years minimum hotel maintenance exp., valid Drivers License, Computer Skills, Certified Pool Operators License preferred but will train & is required. Must be available to work all shifts AM/PM including weekends. Health & Vacation Benefits after 1 year of employment.

HELP WANTED

Brass Balls Saloon is looking for AM/PM Line Cooks, Prep, Salad and Biscuit Cooks. Experience preferred, but not mandatory. Please feel free to stop by Fri.-Sun. between 11-4 or email andy.brassballs@gmail.com.

PT Property Manager Wanted - Management & Computer skills preferred. Frankford, DE. Please call for interview. 302-524-8102

Seasonal Groundskeeper: Must posses a valid drivers license. John Deere and Landscaping exp. preferred. This requires physical outdoor activity and moderate to heavy lifting throughout shift. Full-time seasonal position. April-October Applications available at the Front Office 12806 Ocean Gateway Ocean City MD 21842 Email resume to hbrunning@fskfamily.com No phone calls please.

HELP WANTED

Rosenfeld’s Jewish Deli is looking to hire experienced Wait Staff, Counter Help, Meat Slicers, Line Cooks, Dishwashers and Hostesses to begin part time in April and then full time going into May and beyond. Please apply in person between 3-5 p.m., MF at our location, 63rd Street & Coastal Highway in Ocean City. If you cannot apply in person, call us to email you an application.

Come Join Our Winning Team!

Now accepting applications for seasonal positions!

Bistro Attendants/Cashier Banquet Housepersons Servers AM/PM Bartenders

Looking for experienced personnel with customer service skills. Must be flexible with hours. Email resume to jobs@carouselhotel.com or stop by and complete an application at the Front Desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check.

Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

Ocean Pines Police Department

POLICE OFFICER VACANCY

The Ocean Pines Police Department is accepting applications for the position of Full time Police Officer. Applicants must be at least 21 years of age, be a U.S. Citizen, possess a high school diploma or GED, and have vision correctable to 20/20. Applicants must also have a valid driver’s license with a satisfactory driving record and have no felony convictions or misdemeanor convictions involving perjury, false statement, moral turpitude or domestic violence. Candidates must successfully complete a written exam, physical abilities test, background investigation, polygraph exam, medical exam and psychological exam. Starting salary is $38,500 for non-certified applicants, but may be adjusted for applicants who are currently certified or who have been certified as police officers in the State of Maryland. There is an excellent fringe benefit package, including night differential pay, health insurance, 401K plan, plus personal and sick leave. Application deadline is March 30, 2014. Visit www.oceanpinespolice.org, call 410-641-7747 or email resume to dmassey@oceanpines.org. Applications may be delivered to OPPD 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD 21811.

Somerset Jewelers - FT, Upbeat Salesperson - April to Oct. Flexible schedule, exp. preferred. Apply in person 412 S. Boardwalk Sat & Sun, 11-4. LOCAL CRAB BOAT Berlin, Snow Hill area Help Wanted 410-641-4709

Afternoon Production Supervisor ($13-$15)

Apply online at: dunkindonutjobs@gmail.com

HELP WANTED

HVAC Tech/Installer - Please call 410-213-2437.

PT Laborer Wanted-Must be reliable and have good refs. Frankford, DE. Please call for interview. 302-524-8102 PGN Crabhouse, 29th Street & Coastal Hwy. Help Wanted. Waitresses & Waiters. Apply Within.

Best candidates must be available to work April thru Oct.

Now hiring Line Cooks and Dishwashers, competitive wages, great work environment. Apply in person at Macky’s, Sat./Sun. 11-2

Part-Time, Seasonal Servers & Room Attendants Please apply in person at 2800 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, MD 410-289-1100

HOTEL FRONT DESK & NIGHT AUDIT

We are looking for experienced hotel front desk clerks and night auditors. Ability to manage multiple properties a must. Must be able to work weekends and holidays. Email resume to: jobs@carouselhotel.com or come in and complete an application at the front desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check.

Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

NOW HIRING!!

CHEF/KITCHEN MANAGER The Cottage Cafe is looking for a high energy, experienced person to lead the current kitchen management and staff of their high-volume restaurant. Job duties include overall direction of the kitchen. This person will be responsible for food and labor costs, hiring and training of staff, strict recipe adherence and food presentation, menu development, and maintaining high standards in sanitation and cleanliness. Must have prior management experience. Competitive Salary, Vacation, Bonus Opportunities, Health Benefits available.

Please send resume and cover letter to: Tom Neville c/o The Cottage Cafe Restaurant 33034 Coastal Hwy., Bethany Beach, DE 19930 or email to: tom@cottagecafe.com

---Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities:

Year Round, Full/Part Time: Security Guard, Reservation Agents, Hostess/Host, Servers, Busser/Room Service, Bartender, Grill Cooks, Banquet Housestaff, Banquet Servers, PM Lobby Attendant, Overnight Cleaners

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

Come Join Our Winning Team!

Year-Round Recreation Supervisor

Supervisor will assist Director of Recreation in personnel supervision and oversight of all departmental activities. Must have customer service and communication skills and be a team player. Recreation experience preferred. CPO certificate and pool maintenance experience a plus.

Competitive salary with full medical & benefit package. Email resume to jobs@carouselhotel.com or stop by and complete an application at the front desk. We require satisfactory preemployment drug testing and background check.

Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

HELP WANTED

Come Join Our Winning Team!

Now hiring Hosts/Hostesses, Security Staff and Experienced Servers for the 2014 season. Apply in person 11am-1:30pm Sat. & Sun.

NOW HIRING!!

Now Accepting Applications for FT or PT Kitchen Staff, Front House Staff & Delivery Drivers Top pay, meal play & paid weekly. Come in for Interview on Wednesday @ 11:00 am 5601 Coastal Hwy. (Bayside)

HELP WANTED

Local Franchise is Now Hiring for an

OFFICE HELPER

Starting at $8.00 hr General Purpose: Provides administrative, secretarial and clerical support to others in the office to maintain an efficient office environment. Main Job Tasks and Responsibilities: - Answer phones and transfer to the appropriate staff member - Take and distribute accurate messages - Greet public and clients and direct them to the correct staff member - Coordinate messenger and courier service - Receive, sort and distribute incoming mail - Monitor incoming emails and answer or forward as required - Prepare outgoing mail for distribution - Fax, scan and copy documents - Maintain office filing and storage systems - Update and maintain databases such as mailing lists, contact lists and client information - Retrieve information when requested - Update and maintain internal staff contact lists - Type documents, reports and correspondence - Co-ordinate and organize appointments and meetings - Monitor and maintain office supplies - Ensure office equipment is properly maintained and serviced - Perform work related errands as requested such as going to the post office and bank - Keep office area clean and tidy Education and Experience: - High School Diploma or Equivalent - Previous office experience may be requested but this can also be entry level position - Competent computer skills including MS Office or equivalent - Internet skills including use of e-mails, group messaging and data collection - Numeracy and literacy skills Key Competencies: - Organization and planning skills - Work management and prioritizing skills - Verbal and written communication skills - Problem solving ability - Attention to detail - Accuracy - Flexibility - Reliability - Teamwork Email Resume to: fmsdunkindonuts@gmail.com With Subject Line: Office Assistant or Drop off your Resume at: Franchise Management Services Inc. 9919 Golf Course Rd Ocean City Md 21842

Now you can order your classifieds online


MARCH 21, 2014

HELP WANTED

Hiring F/T & P/T Professional Sales Reps Motivated individuals wanted for rapidly expanding business. Training available, paid travel, with a high income earning potential. Manager positions available for experienced individuals. Please call 443-291-7651.

HELP WANTED

Lawn Maintenance, Experienced, valid MD drivers license & own transportation. Call 443-365-5195. Leave name and contact info, call will be returned. Hiring Year Round Experienced Cook for Italian/American Restaurant. Apply in person Alex’s Italian Restaurant, Rt. 50, West Ocean City.

Ocean City Today

RENTALS

Summer Seasonal - May 1st through Sept. 2nd. 2BR furnished. 28th St., bayside. Water view. $10,500/season + electric, + security. 410430-5316

YR, WOC-3BR/3BA, 2-Story home, newly renov., unfurn. Central HVAC, W/D, DW, lge. garage. No Smoking/Pets. $1650/mo. + utils. & Security. 410-289-6626

NOW HIRING!!

Overnight Production Crew ($8.00-$9.00) & Box Truck Driver ($13.00-$14.00) Apply online at: delmarvadd.com

Summer Membership Front Desk Clerk

Must have upbeat attitude and superb front desk skills. Duties include processing memberships for the various Ocean Pines amenities, assessment payments, issuing swim coupon cards and weekly memberships, filing, and other duties. Knowledge of basic office machines necessary. Front desk and computer experience preferred. Busy office atmosphere. Weekdays and Saturdays A MUST!! If you are outgoing and enjoy working with people, please contact the Membership/Assessment office at 410-641-7717 extension 3031 or e-mail resume to RMeyer@oceanpines.org.

Excellent Opportunity for the Right Person.

Now Hiring Full-Time, Year Round

Banquet Supervisor

Benefits include 2 weeks paid vacation, 7-paid holidays, medical, dental, life & disability insurances & 401k plan. Please apply in person at 2800 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, MD 410-289-1100

Join the largest and fastest growing Dunkin Donuts franchisee organization in MD/ DE with developments scheduled throughout Baltimore and the Eastern shores of MD/DE . We are aggressively building a best-in-class Construction / Maintenance team and currently seeking exceptional full-time crew members. Starting Rate: $10.00 p/h Benefits Include: Health Insurance 401K Vacation & Sick Time Experience in the Maintenance / Construction Field industry is not required but preferred. Please apply online only at: http://www.delmarvadd.net/ DunkinDonuts/ Construction.aspx

Candy Kitchen Shoppes now hiring

“Team Members”

Must be available nights and weekends. Apply in person at 53rd Street bayside office Monday and Tuesday noon-4:00 p.m.

Now Hiring

Year Round - Experienced

~ Servers ~ ~ Line Cooks ~ ~ Bartenders ~ ~ P/T Bar Back ~

Apply within at Smitty McGee’s or submit application online www.smittymcgees.com

RENTALS RENTALS

Summer Housing & Job Opportunity-housing typically filled with college students. Contact Thomas shoreopportunity@gmail.com

Summer Seasonal-1BR/1BACanalfront, 28th St, Sleeps 4. $7500. No Smoking or Pets. Compass Resort 410-7235200.

Y/R Rentals-Berlin & Newark Rentals Avail. Now. Bunting Realty, Inc. 410-641-3313

WINTER RENTAL $200 $150/week Sleeps 4, Pool, Internet

Rambler Motel 9942 Elm St., right behind Starbucks

Manager On Site or Call 443-614-4007

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-524-7700 www.holidayoc.com

Summer Rental

Available May 8-Sept. 10. 312 Sunset Dr. 2BR/1.5BA, newly remodeled, big kitchen/ living area. Sleeps up to 8. $12,500/season, you pay utilities. Security deposit $2,000. Call 410-428-7333. www.SunsetTerraceRentals.com

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE

YR Park - 2BR/2BA Mobile 10 min. to the beach. $29,900/CASH. Ground rent$400/mo. includes water, sewer, trash & taxes. Call Howard Martin Realty 410352-5555. READY TO BUILD - Cleared 1/2 acre lot, 10 minutes from OC. No city taxes. Perked. $75,000 Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

FOR SALE FOR SALE BY BYOWNER OWNER

Open House Weekends Fantastic 3BR/2BA Condo FSBO Move in Ready, 65th Street, Ocean block. THINK SUMMER! Private showings 443-465-0554

REAL ESTATE LICENSE ED SMITH REAL ESTATE SCHOOL

Pre-Licensing Real Estate Classes

Pt. 1. April 1st, 2nd & 3rd Pt. 2. April 14th, 15th & 16th, 2014 8:00 am-5:30 pm Limited Space Web site/Registration www.edsmithschool.com 410-213-2700

Classifieds 410-723-6397

www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.net

By Monday, 5 p.m.

Single Family Homes Starting at $1000 Apartments Starting at $995

Office Space w/immediate availability, reception area & private office w/view. Plenty of customer parking in a great Ocean Pines location! Rent includes all CAM, trash removal, water & sewer. $700/mo.

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

Open 7 Days A Week for property viewing in: * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

SERVICES

Bishopville Movers Inc. Fast, reliable service. 410-352-5555.

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

WOC Office Space Great for professional i.e. Real Estate, Law Firm, Medical Herring Creek Prof. Ctr. 1000 Sq. Ft. $1,000/mo. negotiable 443497-0514 Units Available Rt. 50 in West Ocean City 1800 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 1728 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 1574 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 2211 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space Call 443-497-4200

Ocean Pines Office - Lease Purchase or Rent. Approx. 900 sq. ft. Ideal location for business exposure. Call for details 410-603-7373.

Ocean Pines Office Space for Sale - Ideal location with good traffic flow. PPF Realty. Call John 410-208-3500.

FOR SALE

Used Hot Tubs for Sale$500 each. Buy as is. No restitution. Contact Club Ocean Villas II for more details 410-524-0880

MOVING SALE MOVING SALE

Moving Sale - Sat. & Sun. 102pm, Antiques-Table, Victorian Couch, Rocking Chairs, Lamps. 4 24” wrought/iron barstools. All Household contents must go! Williamsville Industrial Park, Rt. 54, Unit No. 9, entrance to Good Samaritan Thrift Shop. 410-251-1793

BOATS/PWC BOATS/PWC

2001 Keywest Boat - 2020 dual console, 21 ft., Bimini Top, 04 Johnson, 150/hp, Outboard Engine, GPS & Depth Finder. VHF Radio, w/Trailer. Kept on Lift. $11,900. 443-610-3422 or 410-208-1678

COMMERCIAL, BUILDER, DEVELOPMENT & INVESTMENT PROPERTY If you are looking to buy or sell visit OceanCityCommercialProperty.com Or call Ed Wehnert Commercial Realtor Condominium Realty at 410-726-2022 (cell) 410-524-6400 (O)

Upscale Mid-town Office Space in O.C. for Lease.

Flexible floor plan. From 650 to 5,150 sq. ft. Call Brian 443-880-2225 www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.net

Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

MARYLAND STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

FURNITURE

PAGE 31

BOAT SLIP RENTALS

White Marlin Marina - closest to Inlet, one block from beach & boards. Use of pool. $3500/season. Will accommodate 12 ft. beam. 443-895-8955

AUCTIONS

The contents of mini storage units will be sold at public auction. Units to be auctioned: O-13, O-16, O19, O-27, O-43, O-44, O60, O-80, O-92, O-122, O-164, O-174, S-31, S-47, S-51, S-103, S-117, S-166, S-181, S-209, S-222, S413, S-415, B-4, B-6, B-11, B-31, B-32, B-55, B-70, B72, B-73, B-95. Units being sold due to non-payment of rent. Common items in units are, household items, furniture, tools, fishing equipment, antique and vintage items. Date: SATURDAY, March 29th, 2014 Time: 9AM #1 Starting @ Berlin Mini Storage (Rt. 346) #2 Continues at OC Mini Storage (Rt. 50) #3 Finishes at OC Mini Storage (Rt. 611) Terms: CASH ONLY! Auctioneer: Tom Janasek

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000

146th Street, Ocean City

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

EDUCATIONAL TRAINING VETERANS! Take full advantage of your Educational training benefits! GI Bill covers COMPUTER & MEDICAL TRAINING! Call CTI for Free Benefit Analysis today! 1-888407-7173

MISCELLANEOUS AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance training. Housing and Financial Aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-481-8974

Wanted To Purchase Antiques & Fine Art, 1 item Or Entire Estate Or Collection, Gold, Silver, Coins, Jewelry, Toys, Oriental Glass, China, Lamps, Textiles, Paintings, Prints almost anything old Evergreen Auctions 973-8181100. Email evergreenauc- MISCELLANEOUS:TRAINING NURSING CAREERS begin tion@hotmail.com here - Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no BUSINESS SERVICES waiting list. Financial aid for Drive traffic to your business qualified students. Apply now and reach 4.1 million readers at Centura College Richmond with just one phone call & one 877-205-2052 bill. See your business ad in LOTS & ACREAGE 104 newspapers in Maryland, Delaware and the District of LAND BARGAIN. Columbia for just $495.00 per PUBLIC WATER STATE RD ad placement. The value of FRONTAGE 8.16 AC newspapers advertising HAS $37,215 NEVER BEEN STRONGER ... Prime hardwood setting with call 1-855-721-6332 x 6 today pristine mountain & valley to place your ad before 4.1 views. Ready to build, camp million readers. Email Wanda or relax. This parcel has everySmith @ wsmith@mddc- thing you need: utilities, PUBpress.com or visit our website LIC WATER, general warranty at www.mddcpress.com. deed, all mineral rights convey, new perc & easy access. HELP WANTED:PART-TIME Close to charming country town like Mayberry! Terrific fiIndividuals with good commu- nancing with little down. nity/school contacts wanted CALL OWNER 1-800-888to place and supervise 15 stu- 1262, 7 days dents from Spain for short VACATION RENTALS term program in July or August in your own community. OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Good additional income. Best selection of affordable Email resume or letter of in- rentals. Full/partial weeks. Call terest to: GLOBAL FRIEND- for FREE brochure. Open SHIPS, INC. FAX- 410-861- daily. Holiday Real Estate. 18144 EMAIL - jtarlow@global- 800-638-2102. Online reservafriendships.com tions: www.holidayoc.com

HELP WANTED: DRIVERS

CDL-A Drivers: Looking for Higher Pay? New Century is Hiring Exp.Drivers, both Solo and Team Operations. Competitive Pay Package. Sign-On Incentive. Pets Welcome! Call (888) 903-8863 or apply online at www.drivenctrans.com AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS

DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your donation helps local families with food, clothing, shelter, counseling. Tax deductible. MVA License #W1044. 410-636-0123 or www.LutheranMissionSociety.org RESORT/BEACH PROPERTY

Discover Delaware's Resort Living without Resort Pricing! Milder winters & Low Taxes! Gated Community with amazing amenities! New homes mid $40's. Brochures available 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com SERVICES-MISCELLANEOUS

Want a larger footprint in the marketplace consider advertising in the MDDC Display 2x2 or 2x4 Advertising Network. Reach 3.6 million readers every week by placing your ad in 82 newspapers in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia. With just one phone call, your business and/or product will be seen by 3.6 million readers HURRY ... space is limited, CALL TODAY!! Call 1-855-721-6332 x 6 or email wsmith@mddcpress.com or visit our website at www.mddcpress.com

Advertise in MDDC 410-723-6397


PAGE 32

Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014


Business

Ocean City Today Mar. 21, 2014

Page 33

PHOTOS COURTESY THE OCEAN CITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

This property at 10 Eighth Street is one of 147 Ocean City buildings to get a major makeover thanks to the Ocean City Development Corporation’s Façade Improvement Project, which started in 2002. The project earned a $50,000 Community Legacy grant from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development this year to renovate even more downtown properties.

Historic building reinvestment grants given Ocean City Development Corporation wins funds for downtown improvements

By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) Ocean City and other Worcester County localities will receive several grants totaling $300,000 from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development’s Community Legacy program, an initiative to reinvest in historic buildings and areas throughout the state. The Ocean City Development Corporation won three grants totaling $175,000 for projects aimed at improving downtown Ocean City this year. One $75,000 grant will go toward installing ornamental streetlights on St. Louis Avenue, part of the city’s larger improvement project on the street from 17th Street to North Division Street. Two grants of $50,000 each will go to the OCDC Business Assistance Program and Façade Improvement Program to help businesses upgrade their interiors and improve the exteriors of older downtown buildings and improve their energy efficiency.

“It’s a great program. It gives local governments a lot of leverage to do what they think is best for the town,” said Glenn Irwin, OCDC executive director. “Each year, we’ve been pretty fortunate to get grant funds from the state.” The Façade Improvement Project started in 2002, for example, and has helped 147 businesses upgrade their exteriors since. By Irwin’s estimates, that generated about $5 million in private investment and more than 500 jobs, mostly in construction. To get a grant, business owners must match each public dollar with $2 of their own, he explained. “So if someone wants to get $5,000 of assistance, they have to complete a project of $15,000 of more,” Irwin said, although the projects average around $35,000. “You start multiplying that by 147, and it starts adding up.” The OCDC Business Assistance Program started last year with its first $25,000 grant from the Department of Housing and Community Development. The money helps new businesses or those looking to expand make interior improvements. The Greenhouse deli, downtown Dunkin’ Donuts and De Lazy Lizard Brew Pub took advantage of the

funds last year. Like the façade grants, Business Assistance Program grant recipients must match each state dollar with $2, though the 2013 projects contributed much more private funding, Irwin said. “Between all three of those businesses, there were a couple hundred thousand dollars generated.” With the $50,000 grant this year, between five and 10 new businesses should carry out similar projects, he said. The St. Louis Avenue project is in its second year, working its way from 17th Street south to North Division Street in three phases. In 2014, the area from 10th Street to Fourth Street is up for repairs and the $75,000 Community Legacy grant will help replace streetlamps, giving the street “a much better pedestrian appearance,” Irwin said. The goal of the Community Legacy initiative is to provide local governments and community development organizations with funding for projects that strengthen communities, helping to draw new business and encouraging commercial revitalization. “By supporting dedicated organizations and advocates who are improving their communities in responsible, sus-

tainable ways, we will create jobs, expand opportunities for businesses, enrich local culture, and provide a better quality of life for more Maryland families,” said Lt. Governor Anthony Brown when he announced the Community Legacy awards in Baltimore last week. Other Worcester County grants this year include $50,000 to the Town of Berlin to continue its Façade & Interior Renovation Program. To date the town has leveraged $175,000 into approximately $450,000 in improvements. Berlin also received a $20,000 grant to replace its flat visitor center roof with a sloped, energy efficient cover. Pocomoke received a $45,000 grant to install a new digital movie projection system in the MarVa Theater, and the Town of Snow Hill received a $30,000 grant for its Façade Improvement Program. In all, Maryland gave out $5.5 million in awards going to 64 projects across the state in 2014. Only businesses in Ocean City’s historic downtown — the area between the Inlet and 17th Street — are eligible for grants. Now that the 2014 funds are announced, business owners will start applying for assistance, Irwin said.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 34

BUSINESS BRIEFS

MARCH 21, 2014

REAL ESTATE REPORT

Promotions Becker Morgan Group recently announced several promotions. Jason R. Pearce, AIA, CDT, LEED AP, architect in the Salisbury office, was named senior associate. With a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of TenJason R. Pearce nessee, Knoxville, Pearce started as an intern in 1995 and has been with the firm for the past 19 years. Brenden D. Frederick, AIA, LEED AP, architect in the Salisbury office was named senior associate. Frederick joined Becker Morgan Group 10 years ago after B. Frederick earning his Master of Architecture at Tulane University. He is president elect of American Institute of Architects Chesapeake Bay Chapter and serves on the AIA Maryland Board of Directors. Garth E. Jones, P.E., LEED AP, civil engineer in the Dover office was named associate. He has been with the firm for 10 years and has more than 20 years of engineering Garth E. Jones experience. Jones earned his Bachelor of Civil Engineering at the University of Delaware and is a licensed engineer in Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia. He is chairman of the Sussex County

Partnering Committee for American Council of Engineering Companies of Delaware Jonathan S. Falkowski, E.I.T., civil designer in the Dover office, was named associate. Falkowski earned his Bachelor of Applied Sciences at the University of J. Falkowski Delaware and Associate of Applied Science in Civil Engineering Technology at Delaware Technical Community College. He has been with the firm for nine years.

Hyatt joins Hileman Hileman Real Estate, Inc. has announced that Craig E. Hyatt, REALTOR® has joined the firm’s Ocean Pines office. Hyatt started his real estate career in Los Angeles in the 1980’s. After returning to his native Baltimore, he spent a year in commercial real estate, Craig E. Hyatt and then decided to pursue his passion for residential real estate. With more than 12 years experience working for several builders in new home sales and marketing, as well as general brokerage, he earned numerous top sales awards and held an Associate Broker’s license. Hyatt recognized a largely untapped market of first-time buyers with much needed attention. His passion for working with firsttime, often credit-challenged home buyers, further led to his five-year career in the mortgage and finance in-

dustry. As a senior loan officer he soon became his company’s top producer. His current affiliations include: The National Association of REALTORS, Maryland Association of REALTORS® and Coastal Association of REALTORS®. Hyatt moved to the beach 10 years ago with his wife and children.

Passed exam Kerry Runkles, personal lines insurance advisor, at Insurance Management Group, Inc. located in Ocean City, has passed the Maryland Agent’s licensing examination and is now a licensed property and casualty insurance agent. Runkles joined the agency in 2013 and resides Kerry Runkles in Berlin. Insurance Management Group, Inc. primarily insures condominiums, hotels and restaurants along the coastal regions.

Martelo top producer Atlantic/Smith, Cropper & Deeley congratulates Rick Martelo as Top Producer for January. Martelo has been with the agency since 1979, specializing in commercial insurance with an emphasis on condominiums and contractors. He has earned three designations: Rick Martelo Certified Insurance Counselor, Associate in Risk Management and Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriter.

RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT AUCTION WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2 @ 9 AM To Be Held: HARLEY DAVIDSON BUILDING 10716 Ocean Gateway (Rt 50) Berlin, Md LIQUIDATING ENTIRE BAKERY SMITH ISLAND CAKES WEST OCEAN CITY. EQUIPMENT NEW & LIKE NEW CONDITION LIVE BIDDING BEGINS @ 9:00 AM-SMALLS , UTENSILS, ETC LIVE & ONLINE BIDDING BEGINS @ 10:00 AM

Preview: Tuesday April 1 from 10:00 am-2:00 pm Partial List: From Smith Island Cakes West OC To Be Sold @ 1:00 pm: /ƐƵnjƵϭϰ͛ Refrigerated Box Trk, Hobart 60 qt Mixer Mdll H600T SN 11 284 822 3 ph w/ bowl & whip, Hobart 60 qt Mixer Mdl H600 FS1 SN 31 1112117 3 ph w/ bowl & whip, 8 Sheet Tray Racks Casters, Dunnage Racks alum, Bunn Tea Maker Model CWTF15APS, ϲϬ͟^ƚĂŝŶůĞƐƐ^ƚĞĞůEquip Table, Berkel 20 qt Mixer Mdl FMS20 SN 31 1411795, Victory Stainless Steel Dbl Door Refrigerator Casters Model VR2, Victory Stainless Steel Dbl Door Freezer Casters Mdl VF2, LA Cimbali M1 Coffee Cappicino Mach, Federal Refrig 2 Tier Display Casters Mdl SSRC5952, True Single Door Merchandiser Glass Doors Mdl GDM 23, Cleveland Tilt Kettle Mdl KET 6 T, Stainless Steel Work Tables Various Szs, Lg Lot Utensils, Lg Lot Dry Storage Containers, Chest Freezers, Victory Undercounter Refrigerator Casters Mdl UR 27 SST From Other Consignors: Stainless Steel Sinks Various Szs, New Imperial Deep Fryers, New Imperial 6 Burner, Bar Sinks, Ice Maker Heads, New Chaffing Dishes, Pannini Grills, 8, 9 & 10 Ft Hoods

www.prauctions.com 410 546 2425 Terms: 15% BP. 5% discount for cash or local ck. Visa, MC, Approved Ck & Cash Accepted. 6% Sales Tax.

Looking for a eck Ch new home? out the

BID ONLINE

PROXIBID.COM

UIDE G E T A T S E L A E R L A T COAS

On newsstands and online at Oceancitytoday.net

Alternative mortgage loans made available

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (March 21, 2014) Many buyers are aware of both FHA 3.5 percent down loan and the USDA 100 percent financing loan. Both of these loans require upfront mortgage insurance fees as well as monthly insurance premiums that can really push up the monthly cost of their loan, which reduces purchase power. An alternative loan available in our area is through PNC Mortgage, and it is called the PNC Community Loan. This loan offers: • Low down payment: 3 percent down, and only 1 percent or $500 (whichever is lower) must come from the borrower • Flexible criteria to qualify • Options for multi-family properties • Fixed rate only PNC Community Mortgages help buyers in certain area purchase a home that may not qualify with a traditional program, and it is ideal for firsttime homebuyers. There are income limits, as well as some limitations on where the property can be located. “PNC Mortgage is excited to be able to offer this valuable and unique product to our local market. We hope that it will help boost the local economy by helping new buyers achieve home ownership,” said Pam Rocco, mortgage loan officer at the 34th Street Ocean City branch of PNC. Another positive advantage with the PNC Community Loan is the availability of receiving a PNC Grant. If buyers qualify, they may receive up to $1,200 towards closing costs or other prepaid costs. Buyers are asked to take an online homeownership education course before receiving the funds. Buyers may qualify for this credit if their income is under a certain amount or the home is located in a qualified community. Interested buyers can contact their local PNC branch mortgage loan officer to find out more. — Lauren Bunting is a licensed REALTOR®with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.


Sports & Recreation

Mar. 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

Page 35

www.oceancitytoday.net

STEPHEN DECATUR SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

SPRING SPORTS SCHEDULES TRACK AND FIELD: Home meets: March 21, April 2, 16 and 29 at 4 p.m.; Away meets: March 26 (North Caroline), April 8 (Parkside) and April 22 (North Caroline), 4 p.m.; April 25 Delmarva Relays (Kent Island), 3 p.m. BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ TENNIS: March 21: Pocomoke, 4 p.m. (A) March 27: Washington, 4 p.m. (H) March 31: Snow Hill, 4 p.m. (H) April 1 Parkside, 4 p.m. (A) April 3: Bennett, 4 p.m. (H) April 7: Wicomico, 4 p.m. (A) April 9:Pocomoke, 4 p.m. (H) April 11:Worcester Prep, 4 p.m. (H) April 22:Snow Hill, 4 p.m. (H) April 23:Parkside, 4 p.m. (H) April 24:Bennett, 4 p.m. (A) April 28: Wicomico, 4 p.m. (H) May 1:Washington, 4 p.m. (A)

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur juniors, Shane Moore, Conor May and goalie Will Hastings run a drill during Tuesday's practice inside the Berlin school's gym.

Decatur squad junior dominated Lathroum’s 23-player roster includes 16 11th graders, many of whom are veterans

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 21, 2014) The 2014 Stephen Decatur boys’ lacrosse team has good size, speed and athleticism, as well as talent, according to Coach Scott Lathroum. “They’ve played together since they were kids so they know each other well,” said Lathroum, who has been with the lacrosse program for 10 seasons. This is his third year as head coach. “Their chemistry is good.” Lathroum has 23 players on his roster. Sixteen of them are juniors. There are also five seniors, one sophomore and one freshman. Eighteen Seahawks are veterans, competing last year when the squad went 12-4. Decatur was named coBayside Conference champions with Kent Island. (Title game was rained out.) The Seahawks want the award all to themselves this year. The Berlin squad’s 2013 season came to an end with a 14-8 loss to Kent Island in the semifinal round of the 3A2A East Regional tournament. Eleven

GIRLS’ LACROSSE: March 24:Kent Island, 5:30 p.m. (H) March 26:Bennett, 4 p.m. (A) March 28: Wicomico, 4 p.m. (H) April 1: Parkside, 5:30 p.m. (H) April 4: Cambridge, 6 p.m. (A) April 9: North Caroline, 5:30 p.m. (A) April 11: Kent County, 4 p.m. (A) April 12: Decatur Invitational Tournament, TBA (H) April 15: Easton, 5:30 p.m. (H) April 23: Queen Anne’s, 5:30 p.m. (H) April 25: Wicomico, 4 p.m. (A) April 30: Bennett, 5:30 p.m. (H) May 2: Parkside, 4 p.m. (A) BOYS’ LACROSSE: March 26: Bennett, 5:30 p.m. (H) March 28: Wicomico, 4 p.m. (A) April 2: Parkside, 4 p.m. (A) April 4: Cambridge, 5:30 p.m. (H) April 7:Kent Island, 5:30 p.m. (A) April 9: North Caroline, 5:30 p.m. (H) April 11:Kent County, 4 p.m. (H) April 16: Easton, 5:30 p.m. (A) April 19: South River Invitational, TBA (A) April 23:Queen Anne’s, 5:30 p.m. (A) April 25:Wicomico, 5:30 p.m. (H) April 30:Bennett, 4 p.m. (A) May 2: Parkside, 5:30 p.m. (H)

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Juniors Jackson Mumford and Riley Phillips go head-to-head during practice.

seniors graduated for last year’s team, eight of whom were major contributors. The biggest hit for Decatur was in the defensive end and in the goal. “Defense is a work in progress. We have some holes to fill,” Lathroum said. “We’re a junior-dominated

team, especially on offense. Offensively, they understand the system and they know what we like to run.” Returning on the attack are juniors Corey Gwin, Shane Moore and Jake Lathroum. See DECATUR Page 36

BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL: March 21: Pocomoke, 4 p.m. (H) March 24: Mardela, 4 p.m. (A) March 26: Crisfield, 4 p.m. (H) March 27: Washington, 4 p.m. (A) March 31: Snow Hill, 4 p.m. (H) April 1: Parkside, 4 p.m. (H) See SCHEDULES Page 37


Ocean City Today

PAGE 36

MARCH 21, 2014

STEPHEN DECATUR SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

Patnode takes over as head softball coach Excited to use knowledge and abilities to take Lady Seahawks to next level

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 21, 2014) Heather Patnode has taken over as head coach of the Stephen Decatur varsity softball team this year. This will be Patnodeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eighth season with the program. She helped run the JV team for three years before becoming an assistant varsity coach under Don Howard. Coach Patnode He has stepped down as head coach after 35 years leading the program. Patnode, who was the catcher for the University of Maryland Eastern Shore from 2002-06, jumped at the opportunity when she was offered the head coach position. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was excited they (the administration) asked me,â&#x20AC;? Patnode said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m excited to use my knowledge and abilities to take the girls to [the next level].â&#x20AC;? So far, everything is going â&#x20AC;&#x153;fantastic,â&#x20AC;? she said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love the girls Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m working with,â&#x20AC;? Patnode said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re intelligent, they work hard and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re knowledgeable of the game. The girls are as excited as we are to be up and running.â&#x20AC;? Jennifer Hall will assist Patnode. She has been with the program for five seasons. Former Nandua (Onley, Va.) High School Coach, Cheryl Harte, and Lindsay Brown, who played for Salisbury University, will lead the JV. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are tough, but fun. We are going to work them hard and make them in shape,â&#x20AC;? Patnode said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are disciplined, but we know there will be times to have fun.â&#x20AC;? Since Patnode has worked with the program for several years, the transition from assistant to head coach was smooth. Patnode said Howard had been showing her the ropes and easing her into taking over the team for the past few years. Fourteen Lady Seahawks are on Patnodeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roster. Eight girls who competed last year, when the team went 14-5, are back this season. Decatur lost 3-0 to Reservoir in the quarterfinal round of the 3A East Regional tournament last year. The squad graduated five starters from the 2013 team. See EACH Page 38

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Preparatory School

Senior captain Beth Laque will start on the mound for Decatur this season.

6RXWK0DLQ6WUHHWÂ&#x2021;%HUOLQ0DU\ODQGÂ&#x2021;ZRUFHVWHUSUHSRUJ       

Decatur team has potential and talent, Nick Moses says

DIANE BROWN PHOTOGRAPHY

Invest Now in Your Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Future

O PEN H OU USE OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, April 8, 2014 y 9:00 a.m. 1HZ7XLWLRQ6FKHGXOHIRU    Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten 2014-2015 a ara B C Contact ontact T Tara Becker, eckerr, D Director irector of Admissions Admissions 410-641-3575 or tb tbecker@worcesterprep.org ecker@worcesterprep.org

Continued from Page 35 Senior James Hillyer and junior Colton Lohnas, who is new to the team, will also take the field on attack. Gwin said the addition of Coach Steve Romano, an All-American at Lycoming College in Pennsylvania, who graduated in 2013, has benefited the Seahawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offense. Juniors Matt LeCompte, Jackson Mumford and Evan Coach Lathroum Heim are back in the midfield. Also playing in the midfield will be seniors Nick Moses (long pole), Danny Beck and Jared King. RJ Hayman, a junior, freshman Steve Alther and sophomore Dryden Brous (face-offs) are newcomers who will contribute in the midfield. Juniors Dalton Warren and TJ Scafone (face-offs) competed for the JV squad last season and this year they have moved up to the varsity level. Junior Will Hastings has earned the starting spot in the goal. In front of him on the defensive line will be juniors Conor May and Craig Snyder. Junior Josiah Oswald, last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s JV goalie, will

see some time in the cage for Decatur. Also playing on the defensive line will be veteran, Chase Sams, a senior long pole, and junior newcomers, Matt Krall and Riley Phillips (long pole). Lathroum will rely on several players, including Gwin, LeCompte, Moore, Moses, King and Hastings, for leadership. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a lot of experience, so if anyone is ever confused on any play I can definitely help them out,â&#x20AC;? said Moses, a three-year player. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I definitely think we have a lot of potential this year and talentâ&#x20AC;ŚItâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of sad because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be my last time playing with all my buddies, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be a hell of a year.â&#x20AC;? Added Gwin, a three-year member of the team, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have more of a leadership role this year. Last year I scored the most goals (46) and I was offensive MVP. Hopefully I can do it again this year.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking good,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll definitely be strong this year.â&#x20AC;? Lathroum said the Seahawks have done well overall in their scrimmages, and the goal is to improve as the season goes on.


MARCH 21, 2014

SPRING SPORTS SCHEDULES Continued from Page 35 April 4: Bennett, 4 p.m. (A) April 7: Wicomico, 4 p.m. (H) April 10: Pocomoke, 4 p.m. (A) April 11: North Caroline, 4 p.m. (H) April 14: Mardela, 4 p.m. (H) April 15: Crisfield, 4 p.m. (A) April 22: Snow Hill, 4 p.m. (A) April 23:Parkside, 4 p.m. (A) April 24: Bennett, 4 p.m. (H) April 28: Wicomico, 4 p.m. (A) May 1: Washington, 4 p.m. (H) May 2: Indian River, 6 p.m. (A) (baseball)

Ocean City Today

PAGE 37

Squad has solid defense, pitching By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 21, 2014) The Stephen Decatur baseball team had a stellar 2013 season, and the Seahawks hope to build off that success with 11 players back to compete. Last year, the Decatur squad went 16-6 and captured the program’s first regional title. The Seahawks’ 2013 season ended with a 5-4 loss to LaPlata in the 3A state semifinals. “To get back to where we finished takes a lot of work,” said Decatur Coach Rich Ferro, now in his seventh

season at the helm. “Good pitching and defense, and timely hitting, everything fell into place last year.” Added junior shortstop Justin Meekins, a three-year team member, “We can’t think that because we went to states last year we’ll automatically get Coach Ferro back there this year. We have to work as hard as we did last year if we want to get further and if we want to win a

state championship.” The team lost only three players to graduation. Ferro’s 16-player veteran-dominated squad should be solid. “I feel like we have good pitching and defense. Once we start hitting the ball we’re going to be tough to beat,” Meekins said. Ferro agreed. Pitching and defense are the team’s strengths, while its offensive power has yet to be seen, he said. “Offense always goes up and down, See DONAHUE Page 38


PAGE 38

Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

STEPHEN DECATUR SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

Each player brings something different to table, coach says Continued from Page 36 “We’re very optimistic about this year, but we’re also realistic,” Patnode said. In past years, the players had softball backgrounds, with experience competing on club/travel teams. Not as many players have that experience this year. “The girls have the motivation and passion to be as good as the team has been in previous years.” Senior captain Beth Laque will start on the mound for Decatur. Taylor Black, a senior captain, returns to shortstop. Patnode said Black is a more vocal leader, while Laque leads by example on the field. “They’ve done a fabulous job so far,” she said. “They’re a strong duo.” “I can help lead the squad by keeping them focused and making sure we stay doing what we need to be doing,” said Black, a four-year player. “It’s different (with Patnode as coach), but I really like it. We’re definitely going to be in better shape. We’ve spent a lot more time doing conditioning then we have in past years. I think we’re coming along. It’s definitely a young team, but we’re getting there.” This is Laque’s third year on varsity. She saw some time on the mound last season, but this year she will be the team’s starting pitcher. Laque has about 10 years experience pitching, so she is up for the challenge. “[Pitching is] different because you’re always in the play. Everyone’s always moving, but you’re always active and always throwing the ball,” she said. “I’m very excited. I’m looking forward to the season and growing closer to the girls…I like having [Patnode] as our coach. She knows us all really well.” Also returning to the field is junior Marina Jones (center) and sophomores Hillary Jarman (left field) and Lauren Laque (second base). Junior Savannah Maddox, who was home schooled before enrolling at Decatur, joins the varsity. She will catch for the Seahawks. “She has great chemistry with Beth,” Patnode said. The two have played travel ball together. “It will be fun to see them grow together.” The Seahawks also welcome German exchange student, junior Elisabeth Hanssen, whom Patnode said has made vast improvements. She will play in the outfield. Patnode said all of the players get along really well. “All of the girls bring something different to the table,” she said. “Team unity is definitely going to be our strength.” Patnode added that the goal is for the Seahawks to improve each day and for the team to have at least a .500 record. “We might not win every game, but we’ll look good doing it,” she said.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Junior Justin Meekins, a three-year member of the squad, will take the field at shortstop again.

Donahue to lead team on mound Continued from Page 37 but you’ve got to have defense and pitching on point. That will keep us in games,” Ferro said. Many of the Seahawks have also been playing together for a number of years, from Little League, to club and all-star ball to the Decatur varsity team. “They play well together. They know each other,” Ferro said. Added junior pitcher/third baseman Grant Donahue, a member of the team since his freshman year, “We’re all good friends. Everybody gets along. Everybody works together.” Some of the other veterans returning to the field with Meekins and Donahue are seniors Chase Coursey (second base), Andrew Borradaile (outfield) and Jacob Hickman (first base), junior Sean Colgan (pitcher/first base) and sophomore Zach Adams (catcher). “We have a lot of returners that are still young,” Ferro said. “Those guys have been around for a while. A lot of them have been playing on the team since they were freshmen and sophomores.” Joining the Seahawks this season is senior Nick Bennett, who transferred from Sussex Tech at the beginning of the school year. Bennett will contribute on the mound and in the outfield. Ferro said Borradaile and Meekins have stepped up as leaders early in the season. They are vocal and they lead by example, he said. “I feel like I had a role of leadership last year playing shortstop. I was more comfortable playing there my sophomore year. My freshman year I

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Junior Grant Donahue will be instrumental on the mound for the Seahawks this season.

was more quiet because I was playing with seniors and kids a lot bigger than me,” Meekins said. “Last year I opened up and this year I feel like I can lead the whole team.” Donahue, who has already committed to pitch for the University of Virginia, will be instrumental on the mound. “I’ll definitely lead the team

through pitching…and I’ll try to use my experience to help everybody out,” he said. Ferro said the goal for the season is to “compete on a daily basis and not play the game selfishly.” He doesn’t want his players to get caught up in their batting averages. “We’ve got to be able to play together,” he said.


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 39

STEPHEN DECATUR SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

SD tennis players working hard during ‘14 pre-season

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 21, 2014) Seven of the 12 Lady Seahawks on Stephen Decatur tennis Coach Jamie Greenwood’s roster competed last year when the team went 11-3, but he also lost four of his top five singles players to graduation. The returning players will have to step up into new roles and newcomers to the team will have the opportunity to fill open spots. Coach Greenwood Veteran senior Ashley DePaul is one of those players. “It’s definitely going to be a lot different than it was last year,” DePaul said. “A lot of the girls we lost played tennis for a long time and some of the new girls haven’t played tennis before so it will be a work in progress.” DePaul, a four-year member of the squad, has always played doubles. This year, she will compete in one of the singles spots. “It’s a bit different because I haven’t really had the experience playing singles…It was fun playing (doubles) with my friend Charlotte [Petsche],” DePaul said. “But I saw the older girls playing singles last year and it was more of a competition and you didn’t really have anyone to say it was their fault that we lost. I’m excited to play singles this year.” One of four seniors on the team and with three years of varsity experience under her belt, DePaul said she will help lead the Seahawks by “taking what I learned from the seniors in the previous years and just have really good sportsmanship and bring everyone up when they’re not doing so well.” “I’m very excited for the season,” she said. “Tennis is my favorite sport.” Greenwood, now in his sixth season as head coach, said the Seahawks are hard workers, and a number of players took lessons during the off-season, which “will benefit us.” Last week, the Seahawks scrim-

maged the Indian River Indians and, despite a limited number of practice days because of snow, Greenwood thought the girls performed well. “We have a lot of potential,” he said. Greenwood said DePaul, veterans, Petsche, a senior, and junior Delaney Iacona will play in the top three singles spots. “They’re all equally strong,” he said. Greenwood hopes the new players will take what they learn Coach Berquist and continue to grow. Some of them will contribute this year, while others will be instrumental once they have a year of experience under their belts, he said. Greenwood will look to his seniors for leadership. They have all played for him since they were freshman. “They’re very capable of leading,” he said. “Some are quiet leaders and some are vocal leaders. We have a good mix.” Greenwood said the No. 1 goal is to have a winning season. Parkside and James M. Bennett will be tough opponents, but Greenwood thinks the Seahawks have the ability to beat them. Greenwood also hopes the seniors will help pave the way for the program’s future. Sixth-year Coach Steve Berquist also lost five starters from last year’s squad to graduation. Four players out of 10 on Berquist’s 2014 roster competed in 2013, when the team went 9-4. Senior captains John Niedfeldt and Zach Elmer and sophomore Logan Romberger will play in the top three singles spots. “I’m impressed with the improvements of the top three seeds,” Berquist said. “They put in a lot of time in the off-season.” Of his two captains, Berquist said, “they’re good leaders who will help the younger guys learn the game and improve their skills.” Niedfeldt, a four-year player, said he will lead the team with his experience.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Senior Ashley DePaul returns a hit during last Friday's practice at the Berlin school. DePaul played doubles last year. This year she will compete in one of the singles spots.

“I’ll be able to show them the technique of how to hit the shots. They can see how I hit and try to learn from that,” he said. “We lost five seniors so that was a large hit, but I think we may be better than I expected.” Niedfeldt played in the fourth-singles position last season and this year he will most likely compete in the No. 1 spot. Niedfeldt said that will be a challenge, but it is one he is up for. Veteran sophomore Christian Beres will most likely play in the No. 4 spot. With a number of newcomers, Berquist describes the team as “inexperienced,” but he was pleasantly surprised by the team’s performance during a scrimmage against Indian River last week. “As young as we are, it bodes will for the future, but we’ll definitely have some growing pains this year,” Berquist said. Bennett and Parkside will again be strong opponents and Berquist hopes to get at least one win against them. Berquist said the Seahawks should be competitive with everyone else. Each player is working hard, Berquist said, and he sees “the possibility of us improving a ton from the beginning to the end of the season.” “All of the new players are excited at practice. They’re working hard and they have great attitudes,” Berquist said. One newcomer to the team who has stood out during the pre-season is junior Jacob Moore. He will play singles and/or doubles this year.

Coach Stigler will rely on veterans early in season

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 21, 2014) Approximately 40 boys and 40 girls are participating in outdoor track this spring. Some Stephen Decatur athletes competed in indoor track this winter, while a number of Seahawks are new to the sport. “It will be a rebuilding year. We definitely have a lot of holes to Coach Stigler fill,” said Decatur Coach Jody Stigler, now in his third season at the helm. “We need some people to step up. We have a lot of younger kids and we need them to gain experience. Hopefully we’ll find our way as the season goes on.” Getting practice time in has been difficult because of snow and school cancellations. The Seahawks were limited this week as several inches of snow fell on the area Sunday into Monday so they didn’t have much time to prepare for today’s, Friday’s, meet. Stigler will have to count on the veterans, especially early in the season. He will look to senior Rebecca LedSee STIGLER Page 40

$5 BLOODY MARY’S AT Sunday Jazz Brunch

WITH EVERETT SPELLS • 11 A.M.-3 P.M.

60th St. In The Bay 410-524-5500

www.fagers.com


Ocean City Today

PAGE 40

MARCH 21, 2014

STEPHEN DECATUR SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

Stigler hopes vets will share knowledge with newcomers

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur junior Hannah Wilson practices her pole vaulting technique last Friday at the Berlin school.

Continued from Page 39 erman (sprints, relays), juniors Emily Kolarik (hurdles) and Hannah Wilson (pole vault, jumps) and sophomores Katie Hofman (sprints, relays), Alison Alvarado (distance) and Emily Cook (hurdles) to lead the girls’ squad. Newcomer, freshman Bethany Williams, (high jump) will contribute as well. Stigler said several other freshmen will help the team in distance events. “I’ll help the team by getting some points in the sprints…and encouraging the girls and pushing them to go further and by always doing my best so they do their best,” Lederman said. “It’s only been a week or so, so there’s

SAVE UP TO

$10

L

DELMAR

VA P O W E

IG H T IN G R D IS C O U N Get an in TS nstant in-s t re d isco to ENERGY unt on ea STAR ® ce ch select rttified CF L or LED bulb.*

WE’LL HELP SHED LIGHT

ON THE SAVINGS. SAVE SA AVE V NOW NOW

SAVE SA AVE LATER LATER

Q

Get big savings at the checkout on each select ENERGY STAR certified CFL or LED bulb at participating retailers*

Q

A CFL bulb uses 75% less energy than a standard bulb, can last 10 times longer and can save you up to $40 over its lifetime**

Q

Save time and money when you use our interactive store locator at delmarva.com/saveenergy to quickly find the store closest to you

Q

An LED bulb uses 75% less energyy, too, can last more than 22 years and can save you up to $135 over its lifetime**

PARTICIP ART TICIP PATING RET TAILERS AILE INCLUDE: • Big Lots

• Sam’s Club***

• Dollar Tree

• Walgreens

• The Home Depot

• Walmart

• Lowe’s

• And More

Call 1-866-353-5799 or visit delmarva.com/saveenergy to find participating retailers.

This program supports the EmPOWER Maryland Ener Energy Efficiency Act. *Limit 25 CFL or LED bulbs and 6 light fixtures per purchase. **Source: ENERGY STAR ***Sam’s Club is a membership club.

ADDITIONAL

WAYS TO TO SAVE SA AVE V : VE WAYS

Save up to $350 when you pur purchase chase select ENERGY STAR STAR® certified appliances. Learn more more at delmarva.com/saveenergy. delmarva.com/saveenergy.

still lot of improvement we need to do. A lot of the people have heart this year. They really want it. I can tell by the way they’re working hard.” Lederman is excited for her final outdoor track season and she wants to go out with a bang. “I’m putting a lot of pressure on myself to do well since it’s my last year,” she said. “You kind of want to leave a legacy when you [graduate].” Stigler will rely on veterans, seniors Kevin Herbert (distance), JJ Purnell (sprints, relays) and juniors Tripp Ortega (sprints, relays, hurdles) and Jakhai Woodard (sprints, jumps) to lead the boys’ team. Joining the squad is sophomore newcomer Brett Kim, who will play a key role as a pole vaulter. Stigler said there is also a strong group of throwers who should score points for the team. “I hurdle so I think I’ll be able to score some points in that and help out with the relays and maybe the 400(meter race),” said Ortega, a three-year member of the team. He has been looking forward to outdoor track since the 2013 season ended, he said. “Track is a lot of leading by example, by showing kids when you work out you have to go all the way through the line and you’ve got to sprint full speed and not slack off at all,” Ortega said. “We have a lot of new kids, which is good because we lost a lot of seniors. The new kids are working hard and they look like they’re getting the hang of it.” Stigler expects some struggles early, but the goal is for the athletes to improve. He also hopes the older athletes will share what they’ve learned over the years with their young teammates.

Thirteen Seahawks back to compete for lacrosse team

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 21, 2014) A number of underclassmen were on Coach Bob Musitano’s 2013 roster and now they have returned with a year of experience under their belts. Twenty Lady Seahawks have made the varsity team this season. Thirteen of them competed last year, when the squad went 11-3. Decatur and Queen Anne’s were named co-Bayside Conference champions. (Title game was rained out). The Seahawks’ season ended in the 3A-2A East Regional tournament semifinals with a 15-11 loss to Queen Anne’s. The team graduated seven players, but Musitano said the 2014 squad has “a lot of potential.” “The nucleus of the team will be young, but we have a good mix of senSee LADY Page 41


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 41

STEPHEN DECATUR SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

Lady Seahawks have speed and players are motivated Continued from Page 40 iors (eight) and juniors (seven), a few sophomores (two) and freshmen (three),” said Musitano, who has coached the Seahawks for 11 seasons. “The girls are all in shape and they seem to be motivated. We’re not a big team, but we’ll be faster than anybody.” Musitano said the Coach Musitano squad will be strong on defense. Junior Jillian Petito will again play in the goal and Jenna Leitgeb, a junior, also returns in the backfield. Seniors Erin Florek, who was sidelined in 2013 because of a torn ACL she suffered during the basketball season, and Layla Fowler have been named team captains. They will play in the home/midfield positions. “I’ll lead the team by just being positive and helping all the underclassmen as much as I can,” said Fowler, a fouryear varsity player. “I think we’re doing really good so far. We have some things we need to clean up, but with time it will come…We’ve been playing together since we were really young and it’s going

to be weird not being with them next year and having a whole new group of people to get acclimated to (at college).” Veterans who will also contribute are seniors Cassidy Remmell (attack/midfield) and Sammi Quilter (home/attack), juniors Ally Beck (defense/midfield), Blair Yesko (attack) and Payton VanKirk (center/face-offs) and sophomore Elle Bargar (attack). Remmell, a four-year player, said she will help lead the team by “staying positive and making sure everyone’s happy…and just trying to keep things organized.” Senior Hannah Proctor (midfield/defense) injured her ankle midway through the 2013 season, and was unable to continue, but she is back this year. Senior Katie Collins (defense) participated in outdoor track in 2013 and was a star pole vaulter. This year she is playing lacrosse. Brigitte Ardis and Lexie VanKirk are freshmen newcomers who will play attack. Rachel Florek and Sara Mitrecic, both freshmen goalies, will go back and forth between varsity and JV. Musitano said the girls are used to “run and gun” offense, but he wants them to weigh their options. If they have

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Seniors Sammi Quilter, left, and Cassidy Remmell participate in a drill during Tuesday's practice in Decatur's gym.

the fast break, the Seahawks should go with it. If not, he wants them to look for first and second waves of attack and run their plays. Musitano will count on Florek, Fowler and Remmell, who are vocal leaders, to run the offense, while P. VanKirk controls the midfield and Beck and Petito direct the defense. Remmell said the team has improved with each scrimmage, which “shows our season is going to be better than last

year.” “I’m really excited for the season. Senior year is going to be the [most fun] year,” she said. Musitano said he expects the usual teams–Parkside, Easton and Queen Anne’s–will challenge Decatur. “If we can get by them it will be a feather in our cap,” he said. Musitano feels the team has a good shot to win its section of the regional bracket and advance in the tournament.

WO RC E S T E R C O U N T Y C H A P T E R O F D U C K S U N L I M I T E D Annual Dinner & Auction Harrison’s Harbor Watch at the Inlet, Ocean City, MD

FRIDAY, March 21st Doors open at 6:30pm Dinner 7:30pm

Raffles, Games, Prizes, Live & Silent Auctions $60 per Ticket, $100 per couple

Ticket price includes dinner and open bar and a DU Membership

Come and join your friends for a business casual night out with DU!

For tickets, please call 410-726-6934 or visit worcesterdu.com

Your membership contribution may be tax deductible except for a $3 value for each Ducks Unlimited magazine subscription and $3 value of other membership fulfillment items for each membership to the amount allowed by law. See your tax advisor for actual deductibility.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 42

MARCH 21, 2014

A/C & HEAT PUMPS

BLINDS & SHADES

BLINDS & SHADES

CLEANING

CONSTRUCTION

COSMETICS

JLT Cleaning

Residential / Commercial Cleaning Services for the Delaware and Maryland resort areas Call 302-537-2460 www.jltcleaning.com Licensed, Insured & Bonded

To Order More Product, Visit My Website

Vacation Rental Changeovers, Spring/Fall Cleaning, Window & Power Washing, Bldg. Grounds and Parking Lot Cleaning

www.christinesbeautyshop.com

FLOORING

10% SAVINGS

Mention this ad for an additional

ON FLOORING

S CARPEOTNS TI RENOVA

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

CEAN O E H T BY E OCEAN BY TH Design Center

38993 Beacon Drive Fenwick Island, DE 19944 1-866-302-RUGS (7847) 410-524-RUGS (7847) Fax: 302-537-8309 www.bytheocean.com

Call Terry or Mike Burrier, Sales Associates

410-419-2353 â&#x20AC;¢ 302-537-5500 â&#x20AC;¢ mike@bytheocean.net

HOME IMPROVEMENT

PAINTING

INTERIOR PAINTING

STARTING @ $ 99 PER ROOM

LANDSCAPING

FALL CLEAN-UP Â&#x2021;/â&#x20AC;¢$ $: :1 : 10 0$ $,17 7( (1$1&( â&#x20AC;¢ LANDSCAPE Â&#x2021;/ /$ $1'6&DESIGN $3,1* & INSTALLATION Â&#x2021;,55 5 5,*$7 7,,215(3$,56 â&#x20AC;¢ IRRIGATION REPAIR & 5$ $,1$*( (:25. Â&#x2021;'5 MAINTENANCE Â&#x2021; 3 $ 7, 7 , 2 : $/. .: :$<   â&#x20AC;¢ FIRE PITS, WALKWAYS ,1& 67PATIOS $//$7 7,,21 0+,&   0'$

)5(((67,0$7(6 ) 5(((67,0$7(6 4410-677-4748 10-677-4748 PORTABLE STORAGE

1-866-49-CUBES â&#x20AC;¢ www.cubestogo.com

Zimmerman & Son

PAINTING

â&#x20AC;¢ CUSTOM PAINTING â&#x20AC;¢ DRYWALL REPAIRS â&#x20AC;¢ WALLPAPER REMOVED Painting & â&#x20AC;¢ DECK & HOUSE Powerwashing STAINING Serving Delmarva for Over 35 Years â&#x20AC;¢ HOTEL & CONDO PAINTING Interior & Exterior

Free Estimates 10% Discount with this ad.

Licensed & Insured

Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get thru the hard times together. Where quailty and service is our guarantee.

Bill Zimmerman 410-213-1134

ROOFING


Calendar Community Entertainment Events

Insight plus

Ocean City Today Mar. 21, 2014

Page 43 Spaghetti dinner in OC to benefit Camp Possibilities

Nearly 200 vendors attended the 29th annual Ocean City Home, Condo, and Outdoor Show, last year at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on 40th Street. The 30th annual show is scheduled for this weekend.

Event celebrates 30th anniversary More than 225 exhibitors participating in Home, Condo and Outdoor Show

By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) Ocean City’s Home, Condo and Outdoor Show is celebrating its 30th year by bringing more than 225 exhibitors to the Roland E. Powell Convention Center today through Sunday, March 2123. Exhibits at the show run the gamut of home improvements, with vendors bringing everything from kitchenware and countertops to sunrooms, screened porches, railing, roofing, landscaping and cleaning services to the 40th Street center. “It’s all about your home sweet home and your home away from home,” said show organizer and promoter Mike Wicklein. “That’s what this show is about — better living in your space.” Debbie Priestley, owner of Designing Windows on 82nd Street, will be at the show for her 14th year, bring-

ing new custom window treatments and new colors and fabrics for customers to browse. “Spring is a great time to freshen up your home and your condo,” Priestley said. “The show itself just gets people excited to make some home improvements.” Mark Frostrom, owner of Landscapes Unlimited in Pocomoke, agreed spring is the “perfect time of year” for the home show. He will be at the convention center for the first time in more than five years, bringing Landscape Unlimited’s “anything outdoors” products to the show, including outdoor fireplaces, custom-cut lumber for outdoor flooring and exterior bar countertops. More than one vendor will offer many individual products featured at this year’s show, giving customers the chance to shop for the best deal, Wicklein said. Visitors will also find discounted prices at some booths. “There’s a lot of bargains going on — a lot of specials going on — and we want people to leave feeling they got a good value,” he said. “We want

them to walk out the door and say, ‘That was a great show. I learned a lot. I talked to some new business people and I got a good quote.’” Last year, around 8,500 attended the city’s Home, Condo and Outdoor Show and with 30 new vendors this year, Wicklein expects even more to browse the 2014 event. Following tradition, the show will also include an arts and crafts show with about 40 vendors from as far as Texas and Michigan selling everything from handmade jewelry to scarves and handbags. It’s a great time to go Mother’s Day shopping, Wicklein said. There will be drawings and door prizes for restaurant gift cards, Tshirts, handmade jewelry and small cash prizes, but the big announcement comes Sunday, when announcers call the Temple Bat Yam raffle prize winner. Raffle tickets sell year-round for the 50/50 pot, which has topped more than $20,000 in past years, Wicklein said. Attendees can purchase one up to the drawing, which is See MANY Page 45

By Donald Putnam Intern (March 21, 2014) St. Peter’s Lutheran Community Church has partnered with Camp Possibilities for the third annual spaghetti dinner to raise money for the camp that focuses on children with diabetic needs. The fundraiser will start at 5 p.m., Saturday, March 22, at St. Peter’s Lutheran Community Church on 103rd Street in Ocean City. Tickets cost $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 year of age and younger. All proceeds will go toward sending children to Camp Possibilities at the end of July. “The program is a great experience, but is sometimes out of the financial reach of some of these families. That’s what we are here for,” said event organizer Katie Rimel, a parent of a child with Type One diabetes. Her child is one of several Camp Possibilities attendees who will be attending the Spaghetti Dinner. “The one thing I really love about this town is how everyone pulls together to help out. No matter what the issue may be, everyone comes together to help in any way they can,” Rimel said. The camp is just like every other summer camp, filled with outdoor activities and everyone’s favorite campfire song, however it has a mission to provide children with diabetes a fun and safe summer camp experience that they wouldn’t be able to receive anywhere else. Children with diabetes, especially more severe cases, need constant attention to maintain their health. Camp Possibilities, located in Darlington, Md., gives each child his or her own team of medical professionals that carefully monitor insulin and activity levels. With this special service, parents of diabetic children can feel at ease while their child is on the five-day adventure. “Normally whenever my child goes on a field trip, or anywhere, I always worry that something will happen. At Camp Possibilities, I have much more peace of mind and can relax because I know he’s in good hands,” said Corey Rimel. The spaghetti dinner has raised more than $5,000 in past years. Organizers hope to exceed that amount this year. Along with the spaghetti meal, there will also be a Chinese auction where participants can drop tickets into a bin next to a selection of more than 70 packages. Gift certificates and other prizes donated by local businesses will be up for grabs. For more information, call Corey Rimel at 410-251-0626 or visit the fundraiser’s Web site at www.spaghettiforpossibilities.com.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 44

MARCH 21, 2014

NOW OPEN! TUESDAY- SUNDAY AT 11 AM

LUNCH & DINNER OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

MEXICAN

LUNCH & DINNER

COUNTRY LUNCH COOKN’

ALL SANDWICHES SERVED WITH FRENCH FRIES

Representatives from Susan G. Komen Ocean City Race for the Cure take part in the 33rd annual St. Patrick’s Day parade in the resort last Saturday.

CATFISH PO’ BOY -11 OYSTER PO’BOY -11 RAINBOW TROUT -11 FRIED GREEN PO’BOY -8 PORK BBQ -8 BURGER -9 THE PORKER -11 BBQUED BRISKET -10

DROWNED BRISKET -10 TEXAS RUEBEN -11 CHICKEN TORTA -8 PORK TORTA -9 STEAK TORTA -11 CUBANO -11 FRIED GREEN BLT -8

SHRIMP N GRITS -18 PAN FRIED RAINBOW TROUT -18 SMOKED MOJO PORK -16 BUTTERMILK FRIED CHICKEN -14 PRETZEL CRUSTED CATFISH -16 TEXAS STYLE BRISKET -18

GRILLED RIBEYE -22 BARBECUED CHICKEN -14 PINEAPPLE BARBEQUED SALMON -18 SMOTHERED COUNTRY RIBS -16 ST LOUIS RIBS -18 ALL DINNERS COME WITH 2 SIDES

TACOS

ENCHILADAS

FELIZ -11 ANGRY CHICKEN -11 BEEF BARBACOA -12 BAJA TACO -13 CARNITAS -12

CHICKEN -13 BEEF -13 CHEESE -11 VEGGIE -11 SEAFOOD ENCHILADA -16

BURRITOS

QUESADILLAS

CHICKEN -12 BEEF -13 CHILI N CHEESE -11 TEXAS STAR BURRITOS -14

CHICKEN -10 BEEF -11 CHEESE -8 CHORIZO -9 TREE HUGGIN’ QUESADILLA -7 SHOREBILLY QUESADILLA -8

FAJITAS CHICKEN -14 BEEF -15 VEGGIE -11 SHRIMP -16

BEEF OR CHICKEN CHIMMICHANGA -14 FRIED GREEN ENTOMATADAS -10 PORK AND CHORIZO ENMOLADAS -13 SMOKED CHICKEN TOSTADAS -10 ENFRIJOLADA -9OYSTER BLT -11

KIDS MENU • HOMEMADE DESSERTS

410-629-1010 119 N. Main Street • Historic Berlin

Find us on

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Members of the Stephen Decatur High School band march in the Ocean City St. Patrick’s Day parade on March 15.

Winners of 33rd St. Patrick’s Day parade in OC announced (March 21, 2014) More than 130 entries participated in Ocean City’s 33rd annual St. Patrick’s Day parade last Saturday. The winners of the 2014 parade, sponsored by the Delmarva IrishAmerican Club were: • Best Marching Unit: Relay for Life of Northern Worcester County • Honorable Mention: Stephen Decatur High School Marching Band • Best Motorized Unit: Pepper’s Tavern • Honorable Mention: All About Sound and Video • Best Commercial Float: Beach Bum Motel • Honorable Mention: Jimmy’s Kitchen

• Best Adult Group: Atlantic Stonewall and Patio • Honorable Mention: Murphy’s Bar and Grill

• Best Non-Commercial Float: Downtown Association of Ocean City • Honorable Mention: The Frat

Boys

• Best Youth Group: Paula’s School of Baton • Honorable Mention: Chesapeake Martial Arts • Special Committee Award: Paws and Claws

• Judges’ Choice Award: Maryland Coast Dispatch • Best Overall: Ocean 98.1 Seacrets Radio/Celtic Nations

• Basket of Cheer winners: Bill VanAlan, Ocean City; Sharon Fracasse, Pasadena, Md.; Will Craley, Red Lion, Pa. and Igor Conev, Ocean City.

The parade will be broadcast at 11 a.m. on WRDE, Channel 9 in Ocean City, Salisbury and Rehoboth Beach, Del. and Channel 99 in Ocean Pines, Saturday and Sunday, March 22-23 and March 29-30. It will also be shown at 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. on BTV, Channel 8 in Ocean City and Rehoboth and Channel 2 in Ocean Pines, starting Wednesday or Thursday through April 1.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 45

Many vendors will offer special deals during wknd. show

SENIOR SLANT

Kemp has ‘best seat’ for St. Pat’s parade, in her car

PHOTO COURTESY IRISH KEMP

Lucky and his ladies, Ruth and Carol, visit High Stakes on Route 54 in Fenwick Island, Del.

Restaurant & Pub

+// $" #" +)

By Irish Kemp Contributing Writer (March 21, 2014) Let it go! Let it go! Let it go! The weather outside is frightful and the wintry scenes are so delightful, but trust me folks this nutty, old broad has had it with this crazy, discombobulating winter. Sur'n as you're born, I'm in denial. I'm not the same young lass who made angels in the snow to amuse my 16thfloor neighbors, the Eckerts thirty-some years ago. So what if I claim to have seen many a unicorn. Would I lie or were they psychological, optical confusional delusions? Tis' the luck of the Irish. After being caught up in traffic for two hours on that beautiful weather parade day, unwittingly I hung a left and ended up with the best seat in town for the parade, behind the wheel of my Olds facing the highway, o'course. Unlike Santa, St. Patrick doesn't have to peek in windows to check out the good and bad. His job is cut out for him. He has an inside source. There's a large contingent of giving folks from Delmarva checking in these days. I also found a place that served my favorite ham and cabbage for the second year in a row. Thanks to Delmarva's own version of "Cheers," where every body knows your name, High Stakes restaurant on Route 54 in Fenwick Island, Del. Parading, charading, contemplating, or just out congregating around town I found Ray and Carlee Archer, Helen O'Subkowiak, Charlie and Maureen O'Brien, Joe and Ann O'Hagan, Duke and Mary O'Pantos, Ron and Peg O'Baunchalk, Joan DeMarco, Georgia O 'Wieseniski, Joanne O'Fenzel, the O'Briens, Sara O'Gray, Pat O'Wosk, Jim and Helen O'Geslois, the O'Wands, Jack and Lorraine O'Taylor, Joe and Jane Mulholland, Carroll and Toni O'Wagner and a boat load of O'Reilleys, O'Smiths and O'Jonses. Oops, I almost forgot the floatload of McCormicks, Joan DeMarc'o and cousins,Veronica and Joyce, McGees, O'Malleys, O'Neills and O'Connors. This bodaciously, humongously group is totally into finding the bloke who snowed us in on St. Patrick's Day. The reward will be the pot 'o gold at the end of the rainbow. Coming up a variety of happenings going on, the likes of the fourth annual St. Joseph's festival on March 22, from noon to 7 p.m. at St. Andrews Center at 144th and Sinepuxent Avenue. The Italians are throwing this one. A great chance to spread your green for a good cause while having a great time. There will be something for every one from tots to teens to in-betweens, baby boomers and members of the great generation. Yet another fun and food event is schedSee MARDI Page 51

Continued from Page 43 around 3:15 p.m. Sunday at the show. Admission for the whole weekend at the Home, Condo and Outdoor Show costs $6 for adults, $5 for seniors age 55 and older and students age 14-22, and is free for children under 14 and military, police and fire department members with an ID. The show runs from 12-6 p.m. today, Friday, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday. Parking is free at the convention center on 40th Street. Visit www.oceanpromotions. info/march.php for a list of exhibitors and more information about the 30th annual Home, Condo and Outdoor Show.

$3$/4 12$0# 4 0

2&/%

-/3 -&1&

,)

0),

$3$/4 %/(# 4 ,,3 +0-

2&/%

0),

$",+# $ 0,+ " %& '$ *

$ %% !

" "!'& && $ $ *%& $% " " !! $ #

*

$

&'

$ #

!

% "$ "$&

$ $

!

"+ "+ ' #! %

--4 ,2/

$* * % $* , " "$ "'! $ %&" $ #

)

,%%$+ 2/&$/

%

"" )&

/2+"'

/0-! 3

%

!

,)

&

!

-,/10

&% $ ! " %& $ % & $ $ & #

$ #.2 /1$/0

0*! 3 4

%

)

#

,)

"'% . '$ $ & ) * *"' & $( ! '& $ % " % )

()4

% *"'$

/ -$"( )

$& ! $ ) & ) -$ % $( !

,,/0 (&'1 ())$/ (1$ / %10 ,20$

(+$0

//4 21 3 () !)$ 5 -$+ 40 2+1() * 5 0(( )"*0 / +// $" #" +) 4 / "/% *3 " % -+.. #-+) " +(+*3 &'" 0. +*

" ++'


Ocean City Today

PAGE 46

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

HOROSCOPE

Use pork butt for barbecue dish By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (March 21, 2014) Darkness is prevailing, but hues of dawn will gradually be opening their sleepy eyes. Silence is golden, but is there true silence? That being said, I enjoyed the flavor of solitude; it should grace menus more often. Time with myself is abruptly interrupted as I am inundated with kisses. Bonnie, our West Highland white terrier, demands my utmost attention. The smell of bacon slowly permeates the structure of this old southern home. Temptation overwhelms my senses and I cannot resist the crunchy bites of smoked pork. The pitter-patter behind me assures me Bonnie is right on my heels; the kitchen is our next destination. The flames of the fireplace are dancing and showing off their glistening pageantry. The empty rocking chair is a reminder Nanny is no

longer with us. Good morning greetings are exchanged; a few days off gives me the opportunity to visit with my parents. One should cherish these moments; for fate does not disclose the future. Options embellish any meal; I opt for simplicity. Plain white bread, mayonnaise, and crispy bacon with lots of pepper tickle my morning fancy. Breakfast is to go; for there is much to do today. Bonnie and I are the center of attention as we head to the barn. The magnificent Clydesdale’s know it’s feeding time. Speaking of feeding time, our church has a monthly potluck dinner, and I am going to prepare pulled pork barbecue. I do not have a smoker and decide a slow cooker is my best option. I have two challenges: tenderness and flavor. My train of thought is briefly broken; I must make sure each horse gets the proper ratio of food and vitamin supplements. Carrots and peppermints are the finale to a mouth-watering breakfast. I have to stay with the horses to make sure the fast eaters do not intimidate the older ones. Everything is meant for a reason; now I have time to think about the

On the Water

SI

E 1979

75th St. & The Bay, Ocean City, MD 21842 • (410) 524-7575

Friday, March 21st • 9pm No Cover

TRANZFUSION Saturday, March 22nd • 9pm No Cover

JOE SMOOTH & 2 MUCH STUFF Wednesday, March 26th Happy Hour • Deck Party 4pm-8pm

THIN ICE

Still The Same After 34 Years But Different Serving the Entire Menu Daily, Year Round 11 am - 1:30 am

SPRING 2014 DAILY HALF-PRICE SPECIALS

AN OCEAN CITY TRADITION

HAPPY HOUR

Sunday thru Thursday 10pm-2am

LATE NIGHT

Monday thru Friday 4-7pm

HAPPY HOUR

www.bjsonthewater.com

essence of pulled pork barbecue. My choice of meat is going to be a pork butt. It has ample fat content and a good uniform shape, which is ideal for barbecue. Pork has an abundance of connective tissue, which generates a tough cut of meat. However, connective tissue is composed of collagen, which will break down into soft gelatin if cooked slowly over a low heat for a long period of time. One associates “falling off the bone” with tenderness. This is a great misconception. When meat separates from the bone, this does not always constitute a soft, succulent texture. Two hundred and twenty degrees is the desired internal temperature when preparing pulled pork barbecue. The pork butt reaches a plateau of 150 to 170 degrees for several hours. One must be patient and continue cooking until the preferred temperature is reached. This is why it is imperative to use a meat thermometer. Flavor is the next subject at hand. The array of aromas is a versified as the methods of cooking. Liquid Smoke, chicken stock, and smoked paprika is just a sampling of components that make up the cornucopia of See SLICING Page 49

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Putting yourself in someone else’s shoes isn’t easy for you. But if you do it, you’ll gain a better perspective of what you need to do to achieve your goals. Be open to new ideas.

TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) There are still some problems you might have to deal with before moving on to your next project. It’s a good idea to accept help from those who share your objectives. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) It’s

time to recognize the difference between those who are truly concerned for you and those who simply plan to use your good nature to their advantage. New ideas become increasingly attractive.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Depending on a promise made becoming a promise kept could be more than a mite unwise at this time. It’s best to proceed on your own rather than wait for aid that might never arrive.

LEO (July 23 to August 22) A recently revitalized relationship might not be quite what the Big Cat expected. But give yourself more time to deal with the changes. A little flexibility can go a long way. Good luck. A major change could prompt more adjustments. Some of them might be difficult to deal with at first. But hang in there, and before you know it, you’ll be coasting to your next goal.

VIRGO (August 23 to September 22)

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Your sense of justice prompts you

E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Without smoker? Slow cooker best option; flavor and tenderness discussed

NC

MARCH 21, 2014

11am til...closing SUNDAY Twin Crab Cakes Dinner Served w/ 2 sides ... $21.99 ......$$11.00 MONDAY Crab Imperial Dinner Served w/ 2 sides ........$18.99 ........$$9.50 TUESDAY Twin Crab Cakes Dinner Served w/ 2 sides ... $21.99 ......$$11.00 WEDNESDAY Stuffed Flounder Dinner Served w/ 2 sides.... $20.99 ......$$10.50 THURSDAY Fried Shrimp Dinner Served w/ 2 sides ..........$17.99 ....... $9.00

to speak out against an unfair situation, even if you seem to be the only one who feels that way. But you soon learn that many others agree with you.

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Creating a fuss is not usually your

style. But that doesn’t mean you should tolerate an ill-mannered attitude. Speak up for yourself, and you’ll earn the respect of others.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You might have a few

loose ends to tie up before you can stamp your project as complete. But once that’s done, you might want to celebrate with someone special in your life.

CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Disappointment darkens the

Goat’s mood. But close friends rally to pull you through with words of encouragement. Use their confidence in you to rebuild your own self-esteem.

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) An upcoming decision might be

more difficult with inaccurate information. Best to recheck the data you have at hand right now to be sure it won’t mislead you later. An offer you previously turned down might no longer be available. But if you do some checking around, you could find something else that would suit you just fine.

PISCES (February 19 to March 20)

BORN THIS WEEK: You believe in helping those who cannot help themselves. Although it embarrasses you, the fact is, people like you and tell you so.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 47

NOW PLAYING 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILL

HARPOON HANNA’S

OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB

9636 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 410-213-9204 March 21-22: Aaron Howell, 7-10 p.m.

Route 54 and the bay Fenwick Island, Del. 800-227-0525 302-539-3095 Every Friday: Dave Hawkins, 6-10 p.m. Every Saturday: Dave Sherman, 6-10 p.m. Every Thursday: Dave Sherman Aaron Howell, 6 p.m.

In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. March 21-22: First Class

BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 March 21: Tranzfusion, 9 p.m. March 22: Joe Smooth & 2 Much Stuff, 9 p.m. March 26: Thin Ice 5-8 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com March 21-22: Phil Perdue FAGER’S ISLAND 60th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-5500 March 21: DJ RobCee, 9 p.m.; Tripwire, 10 p.m. March 22: DJ Groove, 9 p.m.; Scott’s New Band, 10 p.m. March 23: Jazz Brunch w/Everett Spells, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. GALAXY 66

HIGH STAKES Route 54 Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 March 21: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; Lowercase Blues, 9 p.m. March 22: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; DJ Rupe, 9 p.m.

SCHOONER’S RESTAURANT In the Princess Royale 91st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-7777 Every Friday and Saturday: Harry O, 7-11 p.m. SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay Ocean City

HOOTERS Rt. 50 & Keyser Point Rd. West Ocean City 410-213-1841 March 21: Uprizing, 8 p.m. to midnight March 22: Monkee Paw, 8 p.m. to midnight J/R’s

66th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-6762 March 21: Philly George

131st Street Ocean City 410-250-3100 March 21: Bob Hughes March 22: Howard on the Piano

HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL

JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB

12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 March 21: Ladies Night w/DJ Bill T March 22: Simple Truth, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. March 23: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m. March 24: DJ Jeremy March 27: Opposite Directions, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

56th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-524-7499 March 21: Opposite Directions March 22: Rob Fahey

MONKEE PAW Hooters: Saturday, March 22, 8 p.m. to midnight

MARYLAND WINE BAR 103 N. Main St. Berlin 410-629-1022 March 21: Troy Mawyer

OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS Johnny’s Pizza & Pub: Friday, March 21 Harborside Bar & Grill: Sunday, March 23, 2-6 p.m. and Thursday, March 27, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Seacrets: Thursday, March 27, 5-8 p.m.

ROB FAHEY Johnny’s Pizza & Pub: Saturday, March 22

410-524-4900 March 21: Steal The Sky, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 22: Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; Big Bang Baby, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 27: Opposite Directions, 5-8 p.m. SMITTY MCGEE’S Route 54 West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-436-4716 March 21-22: Rick Artz, 8 p.m. March 27: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 8 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 443-365-2576 March 21: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey


PAGE 48

Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

OUT & ABOUT

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Nikki Wagner and Matt Pavlick, from Lancaster, Pa., celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at BJ’s on the Water on 75th Street Saturday. OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Kevin Killian, left, Gabriela Diehl and Sal Fasano of Ocean City, take part in the St. Patrick's Day festivities in the 45th Street Village last Saturday.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Brittany and Freddie Cassilly, from Annapolis, who got married in Ocean City last summer, return to the resort to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at BJ’s on the Water on 75th Street, March 15.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Baltimore friends, from left, Jane Dalton, Eleanor Hoffman and Debbie Crossney enjoy dinner at BJ’s on the Water on 75th Street after walking in Ocean City’s St. Patrick’s Day parade.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Annapolis crew, from left, Shannon Rose, Lee Ann Henicke, Don Stittle and Eva Doyle enjoy the bar at BJ’s on the Water on 75th Street Saturday after Ocean City’s St. Patrick’s Day parade.

Friends, from left, Will and Lauren Freng, Bill Ward and Cayce Iacono, from Elkton, Pa., have a drink at Galaxy 66 Bar & Grille on 66th Street during Ocean City’s St. Patrick’s Day celebration Saturday.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Friends from Bloxom, Va., from left, Steven and Erika Key, Tommy and Stephanie Bagwell and Richard and Betty Taylor celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at Seacrets on 49th Street Saturday.

Friends from Newark, Del., from left, Britney Ramsey and Mandy and Jessica Young don festive attire at Seacrets’ St. Patrick’s Day party on 49th Street Saturday.


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

Slicing or shredding pork choice of individual chef Continued from Page 46 ingredients. Slicing or shredding the pork is up to the individual chef. I find if one slices the meat initially, some of the pork will break down from mixing. There is a nice contrast in texture, which is always welcomed. Do not forget to allow the pork to rest for at least 20 minutes before cutting. The beauty of barbecue is that it is yummy year-round. Do not feel you have to be married to a particular recipe; improvisation is the secret of a creative chef. The horses have finished their morning meal and Bonnie and I race to the house. Time to put my chef’s jacket and pretend I am competing on “Chopped.” Ingredients: 8 pounds pork butt 4 cups chicken stock ¾ cup white vinegar 10 dashes hot sauce 1/3 cup Italian dressing 1 teaspoon bacon drippings 1-½ tablespoons Liquid Smoke 1 cup each barbecue and wing sauce 2/3 cup white vinegar ¼ cup molasses 1 rounded teaspoon dry mustard

1 ½ teaspoons each garlic and onion powder 1 ½ teaspoons black pepper ¾ teaspoon each allspice, ground coriander, ground cumin 1 ½ teaspoons smoked paprika 1 teaspoon chili powder ½ cup light brown sugar

1. Trim pork butt of any excess fat and cut into quarters. 2. Combine all ingredients (except for pork) and heat over low temperature in a large crockpot. 3. Mix broth thoroughly, add meat, cover, and cook for approximately 11 hours or until the meat reaches 225 degrees. Occasionally stir. 4. Remove meat and allow to rest. 5. In the meantime, strain the broth, place in a medium pot and reduce by one-third. 6. Slice meat and mix with reduced sauce in a medium saute pan over medium heat. Mix thoroughly and allow meat to absorb juices. Taste and adjust for any seasoning. 7. Remove from heat and serve on toasted bun with coleslaw. Secret Ingredient: Honor “Rather fail with honor than succeed with fraud. Sophocles

PAGE 49

(-*+ #' #'' *

."+! &+ )+ "&% &+ 0

-% -%% ' (*& *%/ ( (&) '/

!'+' 0 ' $ $'+#"&

* " )& ) * ) *+(' $'' ') & ) % ! *

*#%%

+, (-*+ ,()-+

%

)"* (" #$ *! $$'+* ("& &,+* )',+'&* $'' ') & -"& " ) ++ ) +! & )0 " *$"&

' (-*+ (' #, (#' ( -'

0 ))'+* ( )$ ) '&"'& *. + ( (,) "+),* 0' ,)+ !"$" ** & ) +! & ! ) '&& 0

* &($ /

(-*+ ( +, %&('

."$ %,*!)''%* +* ('% ) & + ('((0 *$ . ("&'+ )"11$ $ & + ) '& "&'+ '")

," (-*+ % " $ (,

Chicago-based entertainer Denny Diamond will bring the Neil Diamond Tribute Show to The OC Jamboree in West Ocean City, Saturday, March 22.

Neil Diamond Tribute Show takes WOC stage March 22 (March 21, 2014) Chicago-based entertainer Denny Diamond has announced that he will bring the Neil Diamond Tribute Show to West Ocean City as part of its 2014 national tour. Diamond has played in venues all over the U.S. as a family act with his two sons. Fans can expect to hear all their favorite Neil Diamond hits in this 90-minute performance including “Song Sung Blue,” “Cherry, Cherry,” “Coming To America” and “Forever In

Blue Jeans,” to name just a few. Denny Diamond and The Family Jewels will perform its Neil Diamond Tribute Show at The OC Jamboree in West Ocean City for one show only at 2 p.m., Saturday, March 22. Ticket cost is $30 and are on sale now and may be obtained by calling The OC Jamboree box office at 410-213-7581 or by going online at www.ocjam.com. All seating is reserved, theater style and strictly limited on a first- come basis.

( +,

0 ('+ +' * +,)&"(* "('$$"&" '&"'&* (" #$ ))'+* %,*+ ) * -" ) )'.& ,++ ) *',) ', ! )'*+"&" $ / & ) $$ 0 "& 0 ) * )& +

," (-*+ ))% " .*

#!

"$$*+'&

$$ )*

*#

*,% ,+ "

)

%% 0 0 (* * + *. ,#('+

2

2

' *+ $ " !. 0 & "+0 '( & "$0 ') ,& !

"&& )


PAGE 50

Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILLE, 9936 Stephen Decatur Highway, West Ocean City 410-213-9204 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual and family-friendly, featuring great American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner at affordable prices. Open seven days a week, year-round. Happy hour daily, 3-7 p.m. Entertainment Friday through Sunday. ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.oceancityhilton.com/dining / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717 / www.ocitalianfood.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room with fireplace. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ BILLY’S SUB SHOP, 140th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-1778; Route 54, Fenwick Shoals, Fenwick Island, Del., 302-4365661 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Dine in, carry out, free Delivery. Open 7 days 11 a.m. – 3 a.m. Ocean City’s most famous sub and pizza shop since 1959. An OC tradition where a sandwich is a meal, serving fresh dough pizza, subs, burgers, cones, shakes and sundaes with beach delivery available. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. Open Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. Open 7 days a week, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. ■ CRABCAKE FACTORY, 120th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-4900 / www.crabcakefactoryusa.com / $-$$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family restaurant serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Open Friday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to midnight; Sunday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Monday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Menu selections are Eastern Shore favorites: creamed chipped beef, omlettes and daily breakfast special crab dishes. World famous Crabcakes served all day starting at 8 a.m. Other menu selections include Chicken Chesapeake, prime rib, steamed shrimp, Philly cheesesteaks, burg-

ers and homemade soups. www.crabcakefactoryusa.com ships Crabcakes year-round. ■ THE DOUGH ROLLER, South Division & Boardwalk 410-289-3501, 3rd Street & Boardwalk 410-289-2599, 41st Street & Coastal Hwy 410-524-9254, 70th Street & Coastal Hwy 410-524-7981 / www.DoughRollerRestaurants.com / $ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Ocean City’s Favorite Family Restaurant for 35 years! Breakfast, lunch and dinner. Dayton’s Boardwalk Famous Fried Chicken served at S. Division and 70th Street locations. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410524-5500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar / Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside. ■ GALAXY 66 BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / $$$$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Contemporary restaurant offering light fare and full entrees. Award- winning wine list, signature drinks and cocktails. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846 / www.ocharborside.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and all-you-caneat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdhotels.com/hemingways / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Seafood, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE, 31st Street, Ocean City, 410-289-2581; 128th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-2403 / $-$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open 7 days a week. We have proudly served Ocean City, Maryland for over 40 years. Known for All You Can Eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HIGH STAKES BAR & GRILL, Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 / $-$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Carry-out available / Full bar / Casual dining, daily happy hour and daily food specials. Live entertainment. ■ HOOTERS, Fifth Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-2690 and Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-1841 / www.hootersofoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS. Things are always getting better at Hooters! Fresh menu offering a number of ground chuck burgers, green salads, world famous chicken wings with 11 flavorful sauces and a fun children’s menu. Relax in the beach atmosphere or enjoy the outdoor seating. Happy hour every day, 3-7 p.m. Full bar available. Authentic Hooters merchan-

MARCH 21, 2014

Get a Direct Link to Your Business

Add a QR Code to your Dining Guide listing and give your patrons a direct link to your Web site, Facebook page, App, etc. Cost is $15 for current advertisers ~ $25 for new listings Contact a Sales Representative at 410-723-6397

dise in kids and adult sizes. Enjoy all the sports packages on large, flat screen TVs and great service by the delightful Hooters girls. Live entertainment. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Find out why we say, “Hooters makes you happy!” ■ HOOTERS, 123rd Street, Bayside, Ocean City 410-250-7081 / www.hootersofoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full Bar / Casual dining. Newly remodeled and open for the season. Our More Than A Mouthful Burger speaks for itself. We have everything from soups and salads, great sandwiches, and a variety of seafood choices. We look forward to seeing you and don't forget to stop in our gift shop and check out all the great merchandise. Seasonally open every Thursday through Sunday. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Proud to have Chef Shawn Reese creating beach-inspired dishes in both oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breaker’s Pub. New all-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., features many favorites, as well as exciting new creations with a local flare. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open yearround and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB, 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600 / www.johnnyspizzapub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Ocean City’s official pizzeria and pub featuring homemade pizzas, serving 18 different gourmet pizzas including local favorites - Johnny’s Special, Neptune’s Seafood Feast Pizza, and MD Blue Crab. Huge variety of calzones, subs, burgers and sandwiches to choose from. Ocean City’s place for jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Coldest draft beer in town served in a chilled mug. Voted best sound system for live music. Carry out or delivery til 4 a.m. ■ J/R’S, 131st Street, Ocean City 410250-3100 / www.jrsribs.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s Menu / Full bar / Carry-out / Early bird specials daily. This is the PLACE for ribs, steaks, chicken, seafood and steamed crabs. Try our Ribs in our family oriented spacious dining room or cheer on your favorite team in our new enlarged sports bar. You’ve tried the Rest- Now try the Best. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ MERMAID COVE PUB, 33195 Lighthouse Road, Williamsville, West Fenwick, Del. 302-436-0122 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Full bar / Get shipwrecked at the Mermaid Cove with pub, drink and food specials daily. Lump crab cakes, rock and mahi tacos, fried oyster sandwiches and platters are among the items to choose from. Breakfast served weekends. Open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. Take-out available. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days,

year-round. Every Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ REFLECTIONS RESTAURANT, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdhotelscom/reflections / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Tableside flambé dining. Casually elegant, cuisine prepared tableside in the European tradition. Private dining rooms. Eclectic chef’s specials accompanied by an award-winning wine list. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SEASONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-5241000 / www.carouselhotel.com / $-$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., featuring a wide variety of entrees, seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ SIMMER TIME, Rt. 54, Fenwick Island, next to Mio Fratello 302-436-2266 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Fondue and more in an intimate atmosphere; small and large parties. ■ SMITTY McGEE’S, 37234 Lighthouse Road, West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-4364716 / www.smittymcgees.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / No children’s menu / Full bar / Casual. Big menu, including hot wings and drinks. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE BRICK HOUSE PUB, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410524-5252 / www.ocmdhotels.com/brickhousepub / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Relax and enjoy the laid back atmosphere of this casual brew pub. Enjoy a lite bite, or watch the game on one of our huge flat-screen TV's. Dine on the freshest raw bar specialties, or try one of the local favorites, including fresh rockfish, shrimp, crab cakes, spicy hummus, juicy burgers and steaks, piping hot made-toorder pizzas, flavorful sandwiches and gourmet salads. Extensive micro-brew list and beers on tap. Happy hour specials daily. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Old World saloon-type feel, Whisker’s is famous for its Certified Angus® burgers and delicious casual fare, as well as its entertaining atmosphere and photo lined walls of famous and infamous “whiskers.” Enjoy flat screen TVs to watch your favorite sports. Open year-round, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m., serving lunch and dinner daily. Happy hour every day 4-7 p.m. Nightly food specials.


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 51

Mardi Gras, Italian festival planned at resort churches Continued from Page 45 uled for Tuesday, April 29, when St. Lukes Catholic parish presents its second annual Mardi Gras. Socializing is what it's all about. Better late than never. Come join your neighbors or invite them to this feast and fun, dinner and dance event at the unbelievable price of $15 per person. Music ail be provided by Old School. The public is welcome. Call 410250-0300 for tickets and more information. Keep in mind, the Tuesday Lenten meals, soup and salad, Tuesday, March 25 at 6 p.m. and Tuesday, April 1 at 6 p.m. The cost is $8, $4 for children or $20 for the family. Limited availability so reserve ahead. Call 410-250-0300. C U IN OC TODAY

Annual St. Joseph Festival, Saturday

(March 21, 2014) Stop by St. Andrew’s Hall, 144th Street at Sinepuxent Street in Ocean City, Saturday, March 22, from noon to 7 p.m. for the fourth annual St. Joseph Festival, jointly sponsored by the Sons of Italy Lodge of Ocean City Lodge 2474 and St. Luke’s Catholic Church. Admission is free. The event will be an Italian Style festival with food prepared and served by Lodge members. It will be a day of food, music and games, patterned after the festivals that are so common in Italy to celebrate a saint’s feast day. The Sons of Italy Lodge 2474 will hold the festival indoors at St. Andrew’s Hall to raise money for the church and for the many charities the Lodge supports. The Lodge will also continue to sponsor one college scholarship to Stephen Decatur High School in Berlin, Indian River High School and Sussex Central High School, both in Delaware; as well as award a $1,000 endowment each year to Wicomico County Community College; and to participate with the Sons of Italy National Organization raising funds for Alzheimer’s disease and Cooley’s anemia. Attendees can purchase traditional ravioli and meatballs or sausage, meatball and sausage subs, salad and minestrone soup, cannoli and Zeppole (St. Joseph Day Cake) along with fresh home-baked goods. Music will be provided by Baltimore’s Mario Monaldi’s Band. In addition, there will be games for children and adults, religious articles pertaining to St. Joseph for sale and many prizes raffled off during the festival. For more information, contact Al DiOrio, 302-430-1004; Sal Castorina 302-436-2146 or Tom Pergola, 302-5414737, e-mail ocsonsofitalypubcommittee@yahoo.com or visit http://sonsofitalyoceancity.com/Events .html.

PHOTO COURTESY IRISH KEMP

Girls just wanna have fun. This group of ladies enjoy the St. Patrick’s Day festivities in Ocean City last Saturday.


PAGE 52

‘Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day,’ March 29

(March 21, 2014) The past two years, American Legion Synepuxent Post #166 in Ocean City has hosted a “Welcome Home Vietnam Veterans Day” at its 24th Street facility. This event is to officially “welcome home” those veterans who served in the Vietnam War. The 2014 celebration will be held on Saturday, March 29, from 1-4 p.m. This year, March 29 was named a National Date by a presidential proclamation. Throughout the country this will be a special day for the Vietnamera veterans, their families and the families of those who did not have the chance to be welcomed home. The past two years the welcome home day has been a huge success. Last year, more than 60 local Vietnam vets and family members attended the affair. Chapter #1091, the newly formed Vietnam Veterans of America in Ocean City will team up with Post #166 to host the event. For more information, contact Sarge Garlitz, adjutant Post #166 at 443-723-1942 or e-mail firstsgt166@msn.com, or Bill Wolf, secretary of Chapter #1091 at 443366-2994 or e-mail wthwolf@mchsi.com.

Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

‘Fiber Arts Month’ at OC center Monika Lilley, April’s artist in residence, will teach series of classes at 94th St. facility (March 21, 2014) April is “Fiber Arts Month” at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street. Featured in the galleria will be an exhibit by artists from the Fiber Arts Center of the Eastern Shore. Local artist, Monika Lilley, will be the artist in residence during April. In conjunction with the fiber art exhibit in the galleria, Lilley will be teaching a series of fiber art classes at the Center throughout the month. “Fiber art” is a broad term for plant and animal fibers used to create objects, either useful or decorative, traditional or avant-garde. The seven fiber artists from FACES contributing will exhibit a wide range of artistic talents and show the many ways in which fibers can be created into a piece of art. The contributing artists are Elissa Crouch (rug hooking), Margo Koehler (spinning and felting), Heidi Wetzel (basketry), Bunny Zaremba (needlepoint), Joanne Gelles (children’s art), Lisa Martin (batik) and Monica Agapagalou (quilting). Crouch is an awarding-winning artist known for her colorful rugs. As a certified McGown teacher (25 years) and a member in good standing of the McGown Guild, she has been teaching the art of rug hooking to people all over

Monika Lilley will be the artist in residence at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street during April. In conjunction with the fiber art exhibit in the galleria, Lilley will be teaching a series of fiber art classes at the center throughout the month.

the Eastern Shore. Koehler has been a fiber artist for more than 50 years and specializes in spinning, felting, and knitting. She studied fine arts at Moore College in Philadelphia before starting her career as a farmer and shepherd. Over the years, she has built a reputation among the Mid-Atlantic region’s fiber art community as a faithful enthusiast of the craft. Wetzel is an award-winning local fiber and basketry artist. Using unique materials she likes to mix textures and patterns. The finished results materialize as wall hangings, wrapped vases, ceramic bowls enshrouded by fiber, and interpretive abstract pieces inspired by nature. Zaremba has taken the art of needlepoint to a new level. She has degrees in serigraphy from The Corcoran School of Art and the Leeds School in England. Her art has been on display around the Mid-Atlantic area in exhibitions and competitions and has won several prizes. She specializes in creating patterns from photos, that have a dimension and palette all their own. Gelles is an artistic nomad that works in several mediums including the fiber arts. Currently, Gelles teaches art part-time to children at the elementary and middle school level where she passes on her own art odyssey that

began in childhood. Martin’s art teaching career includes 27 years in several Caroline County Public Schools, working with all age levels of children. Her interest in fiber arts, batik, macramé, quilting, and painting extends back to learning to sew at age 9. Lilley has been working in the fiber arts for more than 11 years and  has been teaching for more than seven. What started out as a small school project quickly grew into something larger than she could ever have imagined. Lilley’s work includes felting and knitted items, both wearable and decorative.   For five years she ran Upper Room Studio to supply the shore with quality fiber art equipment and fun classes. Recently she has collaborated in a family business called Grateful Living Homestead, inspiring others in artful living.  “Through everything, my goal is for children and adults to enjoy an amazing art while taking part in continuing a legacy,” Lilley said. “It’s more than just creating something beautiful and unique.  It’s a way to continue our world’s traditions.” For more information on Lilley’s April classes being offered at the OC Center for the Arts call the ALOC 410524-9433 or visit www.artleagueofoceancity.org The galleries at the OC Center for the Arts are open daily 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Join Us For Easter Buffet

DAILY FISH SPECIALS OR YOUR CHOICE OF PREPARATION

PHIL PERDUE ON PIANO FRI AND SAT

BREAKFAST: Mon.-Fri. 7 am - 11 pm Sat. & Sun. 7 am – 1 pm LUNCH: 11:30 am - 1 pm Sat. & Sun. DINNER/LITE FARE: 5:00 pm daily

THE FINEST SEAFOOD S T E A K S A N D P O U LT RY

EARLY BIRD SUN – THURS ALL NIGHT FRI. & SAT. 5 pm – 6pm

LOCALS’ FAVORITE FOR 57 YEARS

BAR OPEN 9:00am HAPPY HOUR DAILY 5 -7 PM.

The Courtyard by Marriott Hotel Parking 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City, Maryland 410.289.7192 for Reservations www.captainstableoc.com

SATURDAY AND SUNDAY $2 BLOODY MARYS AND MIMOSAS

$10 OFF $15 OFF Any $50 Check Any $75 Check Cannot be combined with other Coupon/EB/Discount. Exp 3/31/14


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PHOTOS COURTESY JUDD SANDS

SNOW IGLOO The Sands family of Whaleyville create a snow igloo on Monday. Pictured, from left, are Asher, 11, Samuel, 14, Emma, 10, and Kathryn, 9.

Dad, Judd Sands, said "It was the best time we've ever had in the snowâ&#x20AC;Ś"

View from inside the igloo.

PAGE 53


Ocean City Today

PAGE 54

MARCH 21, 2014

Health department to offer smoking cessation classes

The Executive Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Golf Association Eastern Shore Chapter will begin its 2014 season with an annual kick-off event at Bayside Resort Golf Course on Sunday, March 30.

n i 4 5 . Rt

Dine In | Carry Out | Delivery Homemade Pasta & More! Great New Lunch Special Every Day 11am-4pm

$5.99~1/2 Hoagie

and choice of a cup of soup or lunch salad

DAILY CHEF SPECIALS

EWGA local chapter to kick off 2014 season March 30

(March 21, 2014) The Executive Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Golf Association Eastern Shore Chapter will begin its 2014 season with the annual kick-off event at Bayside Resort Golf Course on Sunday, March 30. Registration and a continental breakfast will begin at 9 a.m. followed by a nine-hole scramble at 10 a.m. A buffet luncheon with a shopping fair and prizes will follow play. A local PGA pro will also conduct a clinic at 11 a.m. for those new to the game or just looking for a refresher. The event is open to members, guests and any woman interested in learning more about the game. The cost is $55 per person for breakfast, golf and lunch (choice of carved top round or crab cake and soup, salad and assorted desserts);

Monday Buy One Pasta Dinner, Get One Half Price

LUNCH LU L UNCH NCH C S SPECIAL PECIAL PE PEC PECIAL ECI CIAL IA AL

DINN DI DIN DINNER IN NN NNE NE ER S SPECIAL PECIAL PE PEC PECIAL EC CIA IAL IA IAL





021'$<)5,'$<

(dine in only)

Tuesday Half Price Pizza Night (dine in only)

Wednesday Ladies Night 1/2 Price Bottle of Wine Thursday $10.00 Parm Night

DAILY HAPPY HOUR 11am-7pm $5 Orange Crush $2 domestic drafts â&#x20AC;˘ $3 rails $4 house wine Rt.54, Harris Teeter Shopping Center Selbyville â&#x20AC;˘ 302.436.FOXS

$40 for the clinic and lunch and $30 for lunch only. The Eastern Shore Chapter of the EGAD is a womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s golfing and networking organization working to bring new and experienced golfers together to learn about golf while making new connections in the community in a fun and nurturing environment. Events planned for the 2014 season are geared to all levels of play. Monthly socials, â&#x20AC;&#x153;9 & Dines,â&#x20AC;? member-guests and nine leagues in the Ocean City, Salisbury and lower Delaware are available to more than 300 members. Visit www.ewgaeasternshore.com to register for the tournament. For information, contact Rosemarie Pomilla at 302-519-3641 or e-mail rpomilla@comcast.net.

$7$&26

021'$<7+856'$<

EVER EVERY EVE EV VERY ER RY TUESDAY RY T TUE UE UES ES SDAY DAY A )$-,7$6)257:2

021 7+8 0217+85 30  3  30 3 %$52 21/< 1/< /<

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS 0RQGD\WKUX7KXUVGD\SPSP

 

(March 21, 2014) The Worcester County Health Department is committed to helping smokers make changes that lead to tobacco-free lifestyles. Join one of the free smoking cessation group classes available throughout Worcester County starting in April. Classes will be held at: Berlin Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin, Tuesdays, 5-6 p.m., April 8-June 24. Pocomoke Health Center, 400-A Walnut Street, Pocomoke, Thursdays, 5-6 p.m., April 10-June 26. A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Motivation to Quitâ&#x20AC;? class will kick off the course April 8 from 5-6 p.m. at the Berlin Health Center and on April 10 from 5-6 p.m. at the Pocomoke Health Center. People can register for the program at these sessions or by calling the Worcester County Health Department at 410-632-0056. Professionally trained instructors helpparticipantscreateasupportiveenvironment to break the smoking addiction. Each individual learns how to develop a customized plan for quitting. Smoking cessation aids such as CHANTIX, gum, patches and lozenges are availablethroughavoucherprogramoffered to participants. Vouchers are also available to help offset the cost of CHANTIX for individuals meeting specific program requirements. The smoking cessation course consists of seven sessions covering topics suchas stress management,weight control, assertive communication, how to develop a quit plan, relapse prevention, and physical activity. Instructors teach a step-by-step method for changing behavior and quitting smoking. A registered dietitian teaches participants how to reduce weight gainwhenquittingsmoking.The group approach uses positive thinking, alternative behaviors, and group support to help participants stop smoking.

&RURQD([WUD&RURQD/LJKW 7HFDWH

  

R]'RPHVWLF'UDIWV

$  R] R] 0 0DDUJDDULWD ULW

 

0LOOHU&RRUV <XHQJOLQJ'UDIWV

3HQQLQJWRQ&RPPRQVÂ&#x2021;0DQNOLQ&UHHN5G2FHDQ3LQHV0' 3 HQQLQJWRQ&RPPRQVÂ&#x2021;0DQNOLQ&UHHN5G2FHDQ3LQHV0'  Â&#x2021;ZZZSOD]DWDSDWLDFRP Â&#x2021;ZZZSOD]DWDSDWLDFRP

Authentic Auth then en nttic tic Mexican M Mexi exiican Cuisine C Cuisin uisin ne

0RQ)ULDPSPÂ&#x2021;6DWSPÂ&#x2021;6XQSP 0 RQ)ULDPSPÂ&#x2021;6DWSPÂ&#x2021;6XQSP


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 55

Annual Delmarva Birding Weekend in April Event celebrates spring migration of shorebirds, warblers, waterfowl, raptors (March 21, 2014) Registration is open for the 19th annual Delmarva Birding Weekend, April 24-27. The event celebrates the spring migration of warblers, shorebirds, waterfowl and raptors, and the birds that reside on the Peninsula year-round. Combining boat trips, paddling treks, and expeditions by foot, the Weekend takes place in the wild lands and waters that feed into the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays and the Atlantic Coastal Bays. The Delmarva Peninsula is one of the country’s premier birding areas, thanks to an extensive variety of habitat protected by our parks, refuges and wildlife management areas. On tours led by expert guides, birders will observe hundreds of species on Delmarva’s barrier islands, in tidal salt marshes, cypress swamps, upland fields and primeval forests. More than 400 bird species have been recorded in the region. In 2009, 204 species were tallied during Delmarva Birding Weekend. “It’s our vast shallow bays and large tracts of protected marshes and bald cypress forests that make the Delmarva Peninsula one of the finest birding re-

The Delmarva Peninsula is one of the country's premier birding areas, thanks to an extensive variety of habitat protected by our parks, refuges and wildlife management areas. Registration is now open for the 19th annual Delmarva Birding Weekend, April 24-27.

gions in the nation,” said Jim Rapp, Weekend organizer and guide. “During the Weekend, our guests will hike on private farmland and woodland that is normally off-limits to birders, and our

waterborne trips go where the birds are. In late April, we will see waterfowl that winter here just before they migrate north, and early-arriving warblers and shorebirds that have just flown in from

the Caribbean and South America.” He continued, “You can start your morning with Prothonotary Warblers and Barred Owls in the bald cypress swamp, spend your afternoon with Common Loons and Piping Plovers along our coastal shores, and end your day with Clapper Rails and Chuckwill’s-widows by the twilight marsh. None of the trips is physically taxing, but this is an opportunity to tally 100 species in a day in places that are normally inaccessible to birders.” Participating birders will be helping birds by promoting birding and habitat conservation. Birders, both novice and experienced, can make an important statement about the economic value of birds and their habitats through the money they spend in local hotels, restaurants, and shops. Birders are encouraged to remind local businesses that they are here to enjoy Delmarva’s natural areas and the birds that inhabit them. Registration information, field trip descriptions and resources for Delmarva birding are available at www.DelmarvaBirding.org. The Delmarva Birding Weekend is organized by Worcester County Tourism/The Beach & Beyond and is sponsored by the Towns of Berlin and Snow Hill. For more information, call 410-6323110 or 800-852-0335 or e-mail tourism@co.worcester.md.us.

WELCOME HOME, CONDO & OUTDOOR SHOW Weekend Specials

SURF & TURF

6-oz. Lobster Tail And 6-oz. Filet Mignon With 2 Sides

$27.99

www.higginscrabhouse.com

Family Friendly

CHINESE | JAPANESE | THAI

410-524-3983 WWW.BLUEFISHOC.COM

OPEN 6 DAYS NOON - CLOSE CLOSED TUESDAYS DINE IN | TAKE OUT ENJOY AUTHENTIC CHINESE & JAPANESE CUISINE AND SUSHI BAR FEATURING A FULL COCKTAIL BAR & LOUNGE

BRING IN THIS AD TO RECEIVE 10% OFF UNTIL 3/31/14

$23.99

Plus Free Hush Puppies With Every Meal

Call For Crab Prices And Availability

2 FOR $1 RAW BOAT SPECIAL Kids’ Menu Availble

94TH ST + COASTAL HWY. BAYSIDE

AUCE STEAMED SHRIMP & RIBS

OYSTERS ON THE HALF-SHELL

CLAMS ON THE HALF-SHELL LARGE CHILLED SHRIMP

CHESAPEAKE BAY OYSTERS SERVED EXCLUSIVELY HERE!

HIGGINS SOUTH HIGGINS NORTH 31st St. & Coastal Hwy. • 410-289-2581 FRI. 2:30 P.M., SAT.-SUN. NOON JUST A FEW BLOCKS SOUTH OF THE CONVENTION CENTER

128th St. & Coastal Hwy. • 410-250-2403 FRI. 2:30 P.M., SAT. NOON FULL-SERVICE LIQUOR STORE OPEN FRI., SAT. & SUN.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 56

MARCH 21, 2014

Wilson forms Volkswagen and Kit Cars Club Dune Buggy enthusiasts invited to participate; first meeting set for April 13 By Donald Putnam Intern (March 21, 2014) For many years, Art Wilson dreamed of fixing up his 1970 Volkswagen Dune Buggy that he purchased in 2008. While he began the project as something to fill his time and cross off his “bucket list,” it turned into something much more. Wilson became dedicated to getting the old kit car up and running again. Since then, he has spent many hours working on the car and done countless numbers of repairs including the installment of an electronic ignition and a new wire harness. However, as he moved further into his endeavor, he realized the area was not too friendly when it came to Dune Buggy enthusiasts. Parts for cars like his are difficult to find in this area, he said. Also, finding other knowledgeable repairmen can be just as big of a hassle. “When I bought the car and started fixing it up, I discovered how almost impossible it was to find parts. I didn’t know where to go to ask for help,” Wilson said. To eliminate this struggle, Wilson came up with the “Volkswagen and Kit

PHOTO COURTESY ESCUDERO PHOTOGRAPHY

Art Wilson has founded the "Volkswagen and Kit Cars Club," a venue for all car enthusiasts to come together.

Cars Club,” a venue for all car enthusiasts to come together and form a network, making it easier for cars like the 1970 Dune Buggy to be restored. “This is meant to be a fun environment for people like me to fix those cars they’ve never known how to fix and get them on the road and have some fun in the process. There are so many people

who have been in this situation before, and I’m here to help,” Wilson said. The club is based in Dover, Del. and hopes to serve all struggling car fans in the tri-state area and motivate the individuals to fix the vintage cars that may be simply collecting dust in their garage. As the club expands, Wilson hopes to

Tuesday WEST Only OCEAN

99¢ 2 Pcs Leg & Thigh

CITY

Plus Tax, Offer Good Only at 12533 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD Exp. 3/31/14 OCT Coupon

12533 Ocean Gateway Ocean City, MD 21842

Free 3 Piece Tender Mild or Spicy with Purchase of 3 Piece Tender Combo

$6.99

Plus Tax, Offer Good Only at 12533 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD Exp. 3/31/14 OCT Coupon

Family Meal $10.99

Free Chicken Plus Tax, Offer Good Only at 12533 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD Exp. 3/31/14 OCT Coupon

Jayne’s Reliable furniture & sundries

Plus Tax, Offer Good Only at 12533 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD Exp. 3/31/14 OCT Coupon

(Rt. 50 1/4 Mile West of White Marlin Mall) • (443)664-2105

Buy 11 Piece Mixed Chicken for $19.99 & Get 11 Piece Mixed Chicken Free

5PC, 2 Sides & 2 Biscuits Mixed, Mild or Spicy

$2.99

Plus Tax, Offer Good Only at 12533 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD Exp. 3/31/14 OCT Coupon

Two Can Dine ONLY $7.99

2 Pcs w/Biscuit

host cruises of Volkswagens, as well as participate in parades and charity work. Wilson will host the first meeting of the “Volkswagen and Kit Cars Club” Sunday, April 13. Those who have a historic Volkswagen or kit car and live in the surrounding areas are asked to contact Wilson at 302-632-5336 or e-mail artsgreenbarn@gmail.com.

8 Piece Chicken

It’s Back!

Mixed Spicy or Mild w/Lg Side & 4 Biscuits Plus Tax, Offer Good Only at 12533 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD Exp. 3/31/14 OCT Coupon

Party Special

FREE 1 Gallon Sweet Tea w/ 14 Piece Special

You are invited to sign up for a Paint Demonstration at Jayne’s Reliable! David will be sharing his techniques using

CeCe Caldwells Paints & Wax. Saturday, March 22nd at 6pm Refreshments will be served $35 per person To reserve your spot, call 302.927.0049 or jaynesreliable@gmail.com

14PC Mixed Chicken w/ 2 LG. Sides & 7 Biscuits

$19.99

Spicy or Mild Plus Tax, Offer Good Only at 12533 Ocean Gateway, OC, MD Exp. 3/31/14 OCT Coupon

302.927.0049


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 57

Next Lunch-n-Learn event, April 1 Educational and social program offers monthly presentations around area By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (March 21, 2014) A popular local educational and social program, Lunch-n-Learn, has openings for its April 1 presentation. Now in its 11th year, Lunch-nLearn has monthly presentations, on the first Tuesday of each month, by area experts on a variety of interesting topics. Participants hear the presentations while enjoying lunch at various restaurants. The next program, “Growing Seasons in our Region,” will be held April 1 at the Clarion Fontainebleau on 101st Street in Ocean City. Lunch at 12:30 p.m. will be followed by a presentation by Dr. Darren Parnell of Salisbury University. His research includes climate impacts on agriculture, hazardous weather and climate change. The March program, “Hydraulic Fracturing; Description and Concerns,” was rescheduled and will be 3

4

5

6

7

8

held April 15 at The Cove at Bayside on Route 54, Fenwick Island. Dr. Tom Cawthern of Salisbury University’s Department of Geography and Geosciences will present this lecture about the process known as fracking, a process involved in shale gas extraction that has yielded much controversy. On Feb. 4, participants gathered at Dirty Harry’s in Fenwick Island, for lunch and to hear a presentation. by Tom Ryan, a local historian and writer who talked about “Leading Ladies of the Civil War: the wives of Ulysses S. Grant (Julia) and Robert E. Lee (Mary). In January, participants met at Siculi Italian Restaurant in Berlin to hear a presentation by Dr. Kate Brown, chairwoman of the University of Maryland Eastern Shore Business Department. Her topic was “Musings on the Markets: Lessons from the financial crisis and recovery.” In December, the Lunch-n-Learn topic was “Geologic History of Maryland,” presented by Dr. Brent Zaprowski at The Captain’s Table in Ocean City. Upcoming topics will include “The

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 1

Looking for a Local Event?

Check out

Great Gatsby,” and “Robot Caregivers.” Advance registration and payment of $22 per person, which includes lunch, is required. To register for an April session or other upcoming monthly sessions, call Gretchen Boggs, 302-436-0254 or e-mail apllc@hotmail.com. A full brochure is available on-line as a PDF download at the Web site, apllc.org. Gretchen Boggs and her husband, Chet, founded Academic Partnerships in 2006 from their residence in Selbyville. They had first supplied their services to local elder hostels, schools and community charity organizations. Their early success led them to offer new programs and conference venues. Their online business now provides services throughout the East Coast, using the Internet for 90 percent of their incoming inquiries. The couple researches extensively before providing design and publication materials for meetings and conferences. They also negotiate with hotels, vendors and other suppliers while arranging those meetings and conferences. 2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 10 11 12 13 14 5

s Our Calendar Page

In the OCToday and Bayside Gazette

ALOC presents annual Plein Air Paint Out in Aug.

(March 21, 2014) The Art League of Ocean City will present its annual Plein Air Paint Out, Aug. 7-10, during the heart of the resort’s tourist season. Artists will be painting at the beach, on the Boardwalk, bayside and in the Ocean City and West Ocean City harbors from dawn to dusk. An opening reception will be held for the artists at the Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th Street, Ocean City on Thursday evening where noted artist, Kevin Fitzgerald, will present a plein air discussion during the light Eastern Shore dinner. On Saturday evening, Aug. 10, the judging, awarding of cash prizes and a wet paint sale open to the public will also be held at the Art Center. A downtown quick draw competition is scheduled for Sunday morning. More than $2,300 in total cash prizes will be awarded during the event. Additionally, art created in the plein air event will be featured during the remainder of the month of August at the OC Center for the Arts. Artists interested in participating may register online at www.artleagueofoceancity.org or by contacting the Art League of Ocean City at 410-5249433 or info@artleagueofoceancity.org.


PAGE 58

Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

AIA presents Dr. Kirkpatrick, Sat. Scientist partnered with ASIS to control wild horse population on Assateague (March 21, 2014) Assateague Island Alliance, the nonprofit friends group of Assateague Island National Seashore, will host Dr. Jay F. Kirkpatrick, Saturday, March 22 at 11 a.m. in the ASIS Environmental Education Center (old visitor center). Dr. Kirkpatrick is the scientist and researcher who partnered with ASIS and spent 27 years making the humane control of the wild horse population on Assateague Island (Maryland district) come to life. Did you know Assateague Island National Seashore and the fertility control program used to manage the

population of the wild horses in the Maryland district has been pioneering? Beginning in 1986, fertility control measures developed on, and used by ASIS are the first to show that fertility control could be applied to free-ranging wildlife remotely and the entire reproductive cycle could be monitored without capturing animals. ASIS was the first to use a completely new approach for monitoring genetics that doesn’t even require blood samples. And ASIS was the first agency to develop an effective pro-active public education program which has been phenomenally successful. All of the techniques described above are now used extensively, worldwide, but they started here on ASIS.

Join Dr. Kirkpatrick, of The Science and Conservation Center in Billings, Mont., to discover how all of this and more started here, on the sand and marshes of Assateague Island National Seashore. The ASIS Environmental Education Center GPS address is 7206 National Seashore Lane, Berlin, Md. 21811. Assateague Island Alliance (AIA), a 501-c3 organization, was created to benefit Assateague Island National Seashore by supporting interpretive, educational and scientific programs and assuring stewardship, restoration and preservation of our land, water, living resources and historical sites while balancing high quality resource-compatible recreation. Donations and purchases are tax-deductible.

More than 3,200 vehicles expected during Cruisin’ OC

(March 21, 2014) The 24th annual Cruisin’ Ocean City, returns to the resort this spring, May 15-18. This nationally-recognized event attracts more than 3,200 customs, hot rods, street machines, classics and more from more than 20 states and Canada. The 24th annual Cruisin’ will have more than 10,000 event participants taking part in various car shows at the convention center on 40th Street, the downtown inlet parking lot and various citywide locations. Scheduled to appear at this year’s Cruisin’, from the hit TV show “Counting Cars,” “Horny Mike,” appropriately nicknamed for wanting to See CRUISIN’ Page 59

CROSSWORD

Answers on page 67


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 59

Cruisin’ returns to OC, May 15-18 Continued from Page 58 add horns to everything he builds. He will be at Cruisin’ Friday and Saturday signing autographs, posing for pictures and talking about “Counting Cars.” Also joining in on the excitement, to help celebrate the 40th anniversary of “American Graffiti,” stars from the classic movie, Mackenzie Phillips and Paul Le Mat. They will be at the event all four days posing for pictures and signing autographs. Additional entertainment includes live music, games, celebrity Stars Deejay, Cruisin’ Gold Deejay and more. Another activity held as part of Cruisin’ is the Express Auctioneer’s Hot Rod and Custom Car Auction. Auctions will be taking place on both Thursday, May 15, and Friday, May 16, inside the convention center. The preview will begin at 9 a.m. and the live auction begins at 11 a.m. both days. For more information on the auction, or if you are interested in being a seller or a buyer, visit www.occollectorcars.com or call 443-807-8883. Some of the country’s top national names will be showcasing their products in the manufacturers midway at the Inlet parking lot all four days of Cruisin’ including Accel Performance, Billet Specialties, Classic Underwriters, Demon Carburetors,

The annual Cruisin’ Ocean City, returns to the resort, May 15-18. This event attracts more than 3,200 customs, hot rods, street machines and classic cars.

Flaming River, Flowmaster Exhaust, Gold Key Resorts, Hagerty Insurance, Holley Performance, Lucas Oil, Meguiar’s Car Care, Miller Electric, Optima Batteries, The Right Stuff, Slide-Lok, Summit Racing and more to be announced soon. At the convention center one will find Kwik-Lift plus many other vendors selling au-

tomotive merchandise along with arts, crafts, jewelry, T-shirts plus other specialty items both inside and outside. For additional information, to register your vehicle or to purchase advanced discounted spectator tickets, visit www.cruisinoceancity.com or call 410-798-6304.

OC Easter event set for April 19

(March, 21, 2014) On Saturday, April 19, from 1-3 p.m., the Easter Bunny will again visit with children at Northside Park on 125th Street in Ocean City. He will hide eggs and entertain children, as part of Ocean City Recreation and Park’s annual Easter Bunny Fun Shop. This annual holiday program is sponsored by Ocean City Recreation Boosters. Children are offered the opportunity to participate in an egg hunt, egg dyeing, arts and crafts and games. They may also enjoy refreshments, face-painting and entertainment by Paul Hadfield, in addition to visiting with the Easter Bunny. The annual Easter Bunny Fun Shop is open to all children, ages 2 to 10 years old and their families. The cost for Ocean City residents is $6 and non-residents will be charged an $8 entry fee. Only child participants pay the fee. Pre-registration is mandatory and limited to the first 225 people to sign up. Registration may be done online at www.oceancitymd.gov or in person at the Northside Park Recreation Complex. No phone-in registration can be accepted. Mail-in registrations will not be accepted after Monday, April 14. Registration will be taken until April 19, if the program is not full. For more information, visit www.oceancitymd.gov or contact Ocean City Recreation and Parks at 410-2500125.

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE ESTATE MARKETPLACE DON’T HESITATE, CALL NOW!

Why rent when you can own a place in Ocean City at an affordable price. Located in the heart of a fabulous resort community with 3-pools, 2-tennis courts and you can walk to the beach. This 3-bedroom, 2.5bath vacation getaway features a spacious living room, comfortably sized bedrooms and an eat-in kitchen. This will be a home you won’t want to leave for just $194,500 sold partially furnished. Call and make every day a vacation. WE ARE OFTEN IMITATED BUT NEVER DUPLICATED! THE ORIGINAL Montego Bay Specialists since 1971.

13320 CONSTITUTIONAL AVE.

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc© 13901 Coastal Hwy., Ocean City, MD

PRICED TO SELL QUICK!!

You will love the location of this 3 bedroom 2 full bath home that is walking distance to the beach. Has a eat-in kitchen and a nice size living room. Large master bedroom with a garden tub and a separate stand up shower. Located in North Ocean City in a nice, family neighborhood that has 3 pools and 2 tennis courts. All this for $209,900. Call 1-800-252-2223 for more information to check it out today! THE ORIGINAL Montego Bay Specialists since 1971.

13334 OCEAN DRIVE

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc© 13901 Coastal Hwy., Ocean City, MD

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

OCEAN CITY WATERFRONT

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME!

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: holdren@intercom.net

This waterfront home is located in the Montego Bay community in North Ocean City. The location is just 2 blocks from the beach. The lot is zoned for mobile, modular and stick-built construction up to 2-stories. The home features a front eat-in kitchen, a newer gas furnace, central air and insulated windows. Outside there is a cement patio and a 2-car parking pad. The HOA fee is only $199/year. Listed at $205,000. $227,000.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes 800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: holdren@intercom.net

110 PEACH TREE ROAD

This residential lot is located in North Ocean City in the Montego Bay community. The lot is zoned for mobile, modular or stick-built construction up to 1.5 stories. It is one of the largest lots in the neighborhood and offers a view of the bay. Community amenities include pools, tennis, shuffleboard, min. golf and a bayfront boardwalk. The HOA fee is just $199 a year.

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

305 NAUTICAL LANE

Montego Bay Realty montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com


Ocean City Today

PAGE 60

MARCH 21, 2014

Worcester Green Awards nominations sought (March 21, 2014) Worcester County Tourism is accepting nominations through April 11 for the third annual Worcester Green Awards. Worcester Green celebrates excellence in promoting environmentally friendly practices, strategies and products. Awards will be granted to Worcester County businesses that demonstrate extraordinary performance related to sustainable environmental practices, such as water conservation, wastewater management, the promotion of alternative transportation and transit, recycling, energy conservation, on-site renewable energy production, use of local products

and food sources and the purchase of renewable energy. Nominations are being accepted in the following five categories: Community Leader- Business Person or Organization - This award will recognize a long term contribution to the environment by an individual, volunteer or an organization. Efforts should engage community building or conservation. Business - This award will recognize a positive ecological footprint in some or all of these areas: storm water, recycling, sedimentation and erosion controls, construction debris reuse, and energy innovation. Lodging - This award will recognize a lodging partner who includes some or all

of these practices: recycles, use of organic cleaning supplies, reduction of water consumption and use of alternative energy sources. Restaurant - This award will recognize a restaurant that has made a concerted effort to buy local, recycle, reduce waste and energy consumption and involve staff and community. Teacher - The recipient of this award will have demonstrated leadership in teaching others about the environment. Applicants will be judged on their overall level of commitment, measurable environmental benefits or progress, cost savings, and customer outreach and en-

Women-owned businesses receive loans (March 21, 2014) The new MCE Women-Owned Business Loan Fund has loaned more than $500,000 to businesses owned by women on The Eastern Shore and in the AnnapolisBaltimore area since its founding. Launched last August by Salisburybased Maryland Capital Enterprises, Inc., the fund makes small business loans $5,000 to $150,000 to businesses owned by women in the target area and provided them technical assistance through the MCE Women’s Business Center with offices in Salisbury and Baltimore. The WOBL Fund and WBC are a part

DAY/TIME

of MCE’s effort to assist the fastest growing segment of business owners – women. The advisory boards are co-chaired by two prominent women entrepreneurs. They are Dr. Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, principal of Global Policy Solutions and wife of US Congressman Elijah Cummings (D, MD) and Mitzi Perdue, Perdue family matriarch. The Fund was started with a $500,000 allocation from MCE which has increased to $750,000. With the success of the effort, more funding is being sought. “We saw a need from the number of women that were approaching MCE,”

ADDRESS

BR/BA

STYLE

PRICE

1BR/2/BR3BR/4/BR+

Condo, Towns & SF

3BR/3BA

Townhome

Saturdays 11-4pm

Heron Harbour Sales Office, 120th St., Bayside

Daily

Assateague Point, Berlin

Daily 10-5

Gateway Grand – 48th Street

3 & 4BR, 3BA

Marigot Beach, 100th St.

Sundays 11-4pm Sat & Sun 11-2 Mon-Fri 11-3

Sat & Sun 10-4 Saturdays 12-3

Heron Harbour Sales Office, 120th St., Bayside

Captain’s Quarters 627A

Villas, OC Inlet Isle

Sundays 12-3

Marigot Beach, 100th St.

Saturday 1-3

218 Barbara Coast Dr., Berlin

Saturday 12-3 Sat & Sun 10-4

319 N. Heron Ct., Heron Harbour Isle

1111 Edgewater Ave

said MCE President/CEO Joe Morse. “We decided to focus a part of our operation on addressing this need and were able to secure some funding from the Treasury Department and the Small Business Administration.” Businesses assisted by the Fund include beauty salons, day care centers, retail stores, professional consultants, insurance agencies and health care professionals. Jennifer Currie is the project director of the MCE Women’s Business Center. Contact Currie at 410-546-1900 or email jcurrie@marylandcapital.org.

1BR/2/BR/3BR/4/BR+ 1BR/2BR/3BR

Condo, Towns & SF

gagement. To qualify, applicants must reside or operate businesses in Worcester County. Awards will be announced during the Ocean City Hotel-MotelRestaurant Association dinner meeting on April 24 in Ocean City. “We’re really pleased to see more and more nominations each year,” Worcester County Tourism Director Lisa Challenger said. “With the growing demand for green travel, there will be an increased number of businesses fostering green initiatives. I’m really proud of this program and of all the nominees and winners. We’re looking forward to some great nominations this year.” Last year’s award recipients include Community Organization winner Ocean City Development Center (OCDC), Business winner Superfun Eco Tours, Lodging winner Park Place Hotel, Restaurant winner Fish Tales, and Teacher winner Emily Taylor of Snow Hill Middle School. Worcester Green is sponsored by Worcester County Tourism, Comcast, OceanCity.com, OC Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association, and Maryland Green Travel. The purpose of the program is to encourage Worcester County businesses and community leaders to engage in environmentally sustainable practices, learn more about such practices and grow their businesses at the same time.  For more information about the Worcester Green Awards, visit www.visitworcester.org.

Mobile

From $100,000

3BR/4BR

Condo

Condo

From $904,900

1BR/2BR/3BR

Condos

1BR/2BR/3BR 6BR/3BA

3BR/3BA

3BR/2.5BA

ERA Holiday/Nanette Pavier

Resort Homes/Tony Matrona

Condominium Realty/Fritschle Group

$795,000

Condominium Realty/Fritschle Group

From $295,000

CBRB/Kathy Panco

$1,595,000

Fritschle Group/Katherine Wright Payne

From $595,000

Fritschle Group

From $295,000

Single Family

$259,900

Condo

ERA Holiday/Nanette Pavier

$659,000

Condos

Single Family

AGENCY/AGENT

Condominium Realty/Fritschle Group

CBRB/Kathy Panco

Bunting Realty/Lauren Bunting


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 61

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

OC ST. PATRICK’S DAY (Top) Members of the Donovan family, the 2014 Ocean City St. Patrick’s Day parade grand marshals, wave to the crowd last Saturday. (Above) The Footsteps Irish Dancers perform in the 45th Street Village.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/SUSAN PARKS

IRISH SNOWMAN Abby Short, 7, of Berlin built this snowman and topped it off with a shamrock hat in celebration of the holiday after a winter storm hit the coast on St. Patrick’s Day, Monday.

Needed: Part-Time Dishwasher 9-3 p.m. Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Call 410-213-4700.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 62

MARCH 21, 2014

OUT & ABOUT WPS PRESENTS ‘GREASE’ The Worcester Preparatory School production of the musical, “Grease” was recently presented. The cast includes: row 1 from left, Lily Zechiel, Lauren Gosnear, Elena LaPlante, Lauren Meoli, Hayley Larsen, Laura Issel, Chandler Dennis and Victoria Middleton; row 2, Mattie Maull, Carolyn Dorey, Claire Dorey, Greg LaMotte, Nik Moondra, Josh Willey, Isabel Dashiell, Fiona Reid and Emmi Shockley; row 3, Sophia Tomaselli, Jarad Godwin, Cecily Sass, Razaak Eniola, Ariella Anthony, Jordan Kilgore, Devin Hammond, Mark Gee, Caroline Lewis and Daniel Rosa and row 4, Raphael De Jesus, Biola Eniola, Zach Oltman, Sambina Anthony, Lydia Pritchard, Davis Taylor, Megan Kuczma and Lorenzo De Jesus.

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

RICE INDUCTED During the weekly meeting of the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines–Ocean City on March 12, Ocean Pines resident Jennie Rice became the newest member of the club. Pictured with Rice, from left, are Club President, Dick Clagett; Kiwanian, Tom Southwell, who sponsored Rice, and Membership Chair Mike Morton.

SDHS ACADEMIC TEAM Stephen Decatur High School juniors Ashley Dear and Teri Adelhardt and seniors Jacob Eisenman and Gary Qian compete in round one of the Stephen Decatur High School Academic Team Invitational at Wor-Wic Community College, March 7. SDHS hosted eight teams and came in third place in the double-elimination tournament.

PHOTO COURTESY DONNA MAIN

LUCK OF THE IRISH

WORKSHOP

Students in Julie Vorsteg’s Kindergarten Class at Ocean City Elementary School recently wrote about reasons why they are lucky. Pictured, from left, are Charlotte Haskell, Marely Cabello-Vargas, Jack Brady, Mary Short and Samantha Ruppert.

The attendees of the Suddenly Single workshop are pictured with presenter, Dr. Jennifer Leggour, left, clinical director of the Worcester County Youth and Family Counseling Services during the “Spring into Goal Setting–Make a Fresh Start” workshop, March 8, at the Snow Hill Library.


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 63

OUT & ABOUT

PIS FUNDRAISER Nearly 100 golfers came out to Old Pro Golf on 136th Street for the March Madness Mini Golf Tournament, March 10, to benefit the 2014 Play It Safe Project, which will celebrate its 25th year in June. The mission of Play It Safe is to create a safe environment for recent high school graduates, to encourage them to make good healthy choices, and to have responsible fun without the use of alcohol or other drugs while in Ocean City.

PARADE PARTICIPANTS Paul and Trish Neal are ready to march with Ocean City Ravens Roost #44 in the resort’s 33rd annual St. Patrick’s Day parade last Saturday.

OGLE WINS ‘PRIDE’ AWARD TECH FEST Students at Stephen Decatur Middle School were recently awarded a total of 29 medals in the Worcester County Tech Fest. Contest categories included web design, multimedia presentations, computer programming, CAD design, poster and banner creation and photography. Winners, from left, front row: Spencer Carbaugh, Malea Saunders, Piper Connors, Katherine Kotsifakis and Media Specialist Yvonne Babcock; second row: Emily Hurley, Rachel Prengaman, Zoe Watson, Jessica Bennett and Joanna Abuarqoub, third row: Laila Mirza, Hannah Burns, Danasia Wright, Eric Rimel and Colby Figgs and in back row: Shane Cioccio, Zach Davis, Marissa Wheaton, Samantha Short and Malone Dampier.

Delmarva businessman Ben Ogle, financial advisor at Edward Jones in Ocean Pines, has received the Ocean City Lions highest and most prestigious community service award, “The Pride” award. The award is presented to individuals who make contributions to the OC Lions Club, who take interest in the club and who help the Lions make the community a better place to live. Winners inspire us to live up to our motto, “We Serve.” Ogle made contributions of greens fees during the Lions annual golf tournament on Oct. 16 at the Ocean City Golf Club. The Ocean City Lions raised more than $25,000 to help support its U.S. Forces Overseas Casualty Assistance Program of the Ocean City Lions Charities Inc., which supports wounded troops from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Ogle, left, is pictured with Ocean City Lion, Ben Dawson.

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

HAMMOND DISCUSSES ATLANTIC PHYSICAL THERAPY NEW DIRECTOR Seaside Christian Academy welcomes new Administrator, Terry Davis, who is pictured with some of his students.

The guest speaker during the March 12 weekly meeting of the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines–Ocean City was Robert Hammond III, PT, DPT of Atlantic Physical Therapy. Atlantic Physical Therapy is located in the Ocean Pines Plaza at 11070 Cathell Road and offers a variety of services including an anti-gravity treadmill, aqua therapy, specialized hand therapy, occupational therapy and a health and fitness center. Pictured, from left, are Kiwanis Programs and Speakers Chair, J. Graham Caldwell; Hammond and President, Dick Clagett.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 64



LZa^kZ=:G:# LZGVXZ=:G:# LZhVkZa^kZh=:G:# IKD:7O"7FH?B')"(&'* EY[Wd9_jo"CWhobWdZ G:<>HI:GCDL 

)hZ7ddkWb AEC;DC7HOB7D: E9;7D9?JO H79;<EHJ>;9KH; *'&#*))#H79;-(()qmmm$aec[dcZ$eh]%E9

MARCH 21, 2014


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 65

Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

FRI. March 21 30TH ANNUAL HOME, CONDO & OUTDOOR SHOW — Ocean City convention center,

4001 Coastal Highway, noon to 6 p.m. More than 185 exhibitors, featuring kitchens, baths, furnishings, accessories, energy conservation, water treatment, security, financial services, outdoor living, and more. Get ideas from the Pros with decorating, remodeling, accessorizing, renovating, landscaping and even building a home. Show also features show “specials” and bargains, free drawings, door prizes and the Art and Craft Fair. Admission costs $6 for adults and $5 for seniors 55 and older and students ages 14-22. Free to children 13 and younger and for military, police and fire with ID. Info: www.oceanpromotions.info or events@oceanpromotions.info.

ART AND CRAFT FAIR — Ocean City con-

vention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, noon to 6 p.m. Artists and crafters will compliment the “Home Show” with creative gifts for you, your home and your outdoor living space. Admission included in Home, Condo & Outdoor Show admission. Info: 410-213-8090.

BINGO — Knights of Columbus, 9901

Coastal Highway (rear of St. Luke’s Church) in Ocean City. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games begin at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments for sale. Info: 410-524-7994.

THRIFT SHOP GRAND REOPENING — Atlantic United Methodist Church Thrift Shop, 105 Fourth St., Ocean City, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. New spring and summer merchandise. Info: 410-289-7430. KIWANIS WINE TASTING PARTY AND CHINESE AUCTION FUNDRAISER — Ocean

security, financial services, outdoor living, and more. Get ideas from the Pros with decorating, remodeling, accessorizing, renovating, landscaping and even building a home. Show also features show “specials” and bargains, free drawings, door prizes and the Art and Craft Fair. Admission costs $6 for adults and $5 for seniors 55 and older and students ages 14-22. Free to children 13 and younger and for military, police and fire with ID. Info: www.oceanpromotions.info or events@oceanpromotions.info.

ART AND CRAFT FAIR — Ocean City con-

vention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Artists and crafters will compliment the “Home Show” with creative gifts for you, your home and your outdoor living space. Admission included in Home, Condo & Outdoor Show admission. Info: 410-213-8090.

SPAGHETTI DINNER AND GOSPEL CONCERT — Powellville United Methodist

Church, 35606 Mt. Hermon Road, Pittsville, 4:30 p.m. Spaghetti with various sauces, garden salad, breadsticks and beverage. Cost is $8 for adults and free to those 9 and younger. The Island Boys will perform beginning at 6:15 p.m. A love offering will be taken to support their ministry. Dessert following the concert. Info: Kevin, 410-835-3388.

A MAGICAL EVENING — Captain’s Table

Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott Hotel, 2 15th Street, Ocean City. Featuring World Champion Magician Will Fern and Sculptor David Turner. Cost is $70 and inlcudes two drink tickets and an elegant buffet. Proceeds benefit installation of the Dolphin Statue at the foot of Route 90. Cocktail attire requested.

Pines Community Center, Assageatue Room, 235 Ocean Parkway, 4-7 p.m. Donation of $15 includes unlimited samples of wine, hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, desserts, soft drinks, coffee and water. No one under age 21 permitted. Proceeds benefit the Kiwanis Scholarship Foundation. Info: Charlie Warner, 410-641-7712 or cwarner4411@verizon.net.

ANTIQUE AVENUE APPRAISAL SHOW —

SAT. March 22

NEW YORK CITY DAY TRIP ‘ON YOUR OWN’ — The group will meet at the Commu-

30TH ANNUAL HOME, CONDO & OUTDOOR SHOW — Ocean City convention center,

4001 Coastal Highway, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. More than 185 exhibitors, featuring kitchens, baths, furnishings, accessories, energy conservation, water treatment,

Ocean Pines Community Center, Assateague Room, 235 Ocean Parkway, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Charlene Upham and Steve Blumenauer of Charlene Upham Antiques will appraise portable treasures. They specialize in jewelry, coins, clocks and glassware, but will access any small antiques. Food and drink available. Appraisals cost $6 for one item and $10 for two. Sponsored by the Republican Women of Worcester County. nity Church at Ocean Pines, 11227 Racetrack Road, Saturday, March 22 at 6 a.m. Motorcoach to arrive in New York City near Time Square at approximately 10:15 a.m. Return trip leaves at 7 p.m. Cost is $55 and includes bus driver tip.

Sign up: Beverly Meadows, 443-2351019 or lubbyday@yahoo.com. A portion of the price will benefit the Relay for Life Team of Little Lambs and Community Church.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST — VFW, Post 8296, 104 66th St., bayside in Ocean City, 8-11 a.m. A $5 donation for all-you-can-eat pancakes or 2-2-2, two eggs, two pancakes and two bacon slices, includes coffee and juice. Bloody Marys cost $3. Info: 410-524-8196.

FARMERS MARKET — White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway in Ocean Pines, 8 a.m. to noon. Produce, farm fresh eggs, organic goods, herbs, fresh cut flowers, soaps, jelly, homemade baked goods, honey and more. SPAGHETTI DINNER — St. Peter’s

Lutheran Church Community Life Center, 10301 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, 5-8 p.m. Also featuring a Chinese auction and raffle. Cost is $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and younger. Proceeds benefit Camp Possibilities. Tickets: Katie, 410-251-4793 or Corey, 410-251-0626. Check out auction items: www.SpaghettiForPossibilities.com.

IL QUARTO ANNUALE FESTA DI SAN GUISEPPE 2014 (4TH ANNUAL ST. JOSEPH’S DAY FESTIVAL 2014) — St. An-

drew’s Hall, Sinepuxent Avenue at 144th Street, Ocean City, noon to 7 p.m. Free admission. Italian specialities include meatball and italian sausage subs, minestrone soup, ravioli and meatballs, cannoli, zeppole, homemade desserts, wine, beer, soda and coffee. Other attractions include free childrens activities, basket raffles, Italian speciality items for sale, St. Joseph religious articles for sale and music all day by Baltimore’s Mario Monaldi Band. Info: www.sonsofitalyoceancity.com.

GUEST BARTENDING FUNDRAISER — Sisters Gifts, Wine and Gourmet, 113 N. Main St., Berlin, 6 p.m. Wino Heroes Relay for Life Team will be guest bartending. Sisters will donate 20 percent of the sales to American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life of North Worcester County. Contact: Dj Thompson, 443366-5440 or Susan Hutchinson, 443880-0208.

featuring kitchens, baths, furnishings, accessories, energy conservation, water treatment, security, financial services, outdoor living, and more. Get ideas from the Pros with decorating, remodeling, accessorizing, renovating, landscaping and even building a home. Show also features show “specials” and bargains, free drawings, door prizes and the Art and Craft Fair. Admission costs $6 for adults and $5 for seniors 55 and older and students ages 14-22. Free to children 13 and younger and for military, police and fire with ID. Info: www.oceanpromotions.info or events@oceanpromotions.info. Sunday will also feature the Temple Bat Yam raffle winner drawing.

ART AND CRAFT FAIR — Ocean City con-

vention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Artists and crafters will compliment the “Home Show” with creative gifts for you, your home and your outdoor living space. Admission included in Home, Condo & Outdoor Show admission. Info: 410-2138090.

BUFFET BREAKFAST — Knights of Columbus, 9901 Coastal Highway (rear of St. Luke’s Church) in Ocean City, every second and fourth Sunday of each month, 8:30-noon. Menu includes scrambled eggs, sausage, bacon, pancakes, French toast, cream chip beef, orange juice and coffee. Cost is $8 for adults and $4 for children 9 and younger. Info: 410-5247994. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS — Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, 2:303:30 p.m. Help for those struggling with a compulsive eating problem, whether it is weight gain, bulimia, anorexia, or those who are a parent of a child with one of these problems. Meeting contribution is $1 weekly. Info: Bett, 410-2029078. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS SUPPORT GROUP — Atlantic General Hospital,

Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, noon to 1 p.m. Fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope that they may help each other to recover from alcoholism. Open to the community. Info: Rob, 443-783-3529.

OPEN GYM FUNDRAISER — Mid-Coast Gymnastics, 15 Duke St., Selbyville, Del. Ages 6 and younger from 3-4 p.m. and ages 7 and older and team, 4-6 p.m. Open gym is a supervised playtime. Cost is $10. Benefiting the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life of North Worcester County. Info: 302-436-6007.

11227 Racetrack Road, 3 p.m. Area wide multi-chorus participation featuring Jean Anne Shafferman, conducting and David Leahey, accompanist. A free will offering will be taken.

SUN. March 23

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT SPAGHETTI AND GARLIC BREAD DINNER — Whisker’s Bar and

30TH ANNUAL HOME, CONDO & OUTDOOR SHOW — Ocean City convention center,

4001 Coastal Highway, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. More than 185 exhibitors,

WORCESTER COUNTY CHORAL CONCERT — Community Church at Ocean Pines,

Grill, 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 13, Ocean Pines, 5-8 p.m. Fundraiser for Maryland House of Delegates candidate Mike Hindi. Cost is $8.

Continued on Page 67


PAGE 66

Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

Worcester County Arts Council hosts April juried exhibit

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

FESTIVE RUN Before the 33rd annual St. Patrick’s Day parade and festivities began last Saturday, hundreds of people participate in the fourth annual St. Patty’s Day Boardwalk 5K run, presented by OC Tri-Running Sports Inc.

(March 21, 2014) The Worcester County Arts Council invites all interested artists to participate in a juried art show to be exhibited during the month of April at the WCAC Gallery, located at 6 Jefferson Street in Berlin. Artwork must be delivered to the Arts Council’s Gallery, March 24-28, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., to be accepted. The selected theme is “Earth – Through the Artist’s Eye,” and entries should reflect artist’s representation of nature, the environment, green health and lifestyle, recycling and sustainable practices. Artists are encouraged to use recycled materials including, but not limited to: wood, metal, stone, used glass, paper, fabric, pottery or plastic. The exhibition is open to all artists, 18 years and older, professional or amateur with work in all media. All work must be original, completed within the last three years, and not previously shown at the arts council. Artwork will be juried in by Kate Patton, executive director of the Lower Shore Land Trust. Monetary prizes will be awarded for first, second and third places during the Second Friday Arts Stroll reception on April 11 from 5-8 p.m. For additional information on entry guidelines, call 410-641-0809 or visit www.worcestercountyartscouncil.org.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 67

CALENDAR Continued from Page 65 PRIZE BASKET BINGO — Snow Hill Vol-

unteer Fire Department, 4718 Snow Hill Road. Doors open at 1 p.m., bingo begins at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20 in advance or $25 at the door. Food and drinks available. Hosted by Relay for Life teams Marvel’s Marvels and Angels United to Fight. Info: Jean Holloway, 410-422-4337 or Barbara Ogurcak, 443614-9601. St. Andrew Orthodox Church, 33384 Mackenzie Way, Lewes, Del., 9:30 a.m. The third Sunday in the Great Fast, the Eastern Orthodox community of Saint Andrew commemorates the Cross of Christ and the Lord’s invitation to take up the cross and follow Him. The cross, decorated with flowers, is brought forth into the congregation with the call of humility and fasting. All services are in English. Info: 302-645-5791 or www.orthodoxdelmar.org.

CROSS VENERATION AT ST. ANDREW’S —

MON. March 24

T.O.P.S. OF BERLIN MEETING — Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, 5-6:30 p.m. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. The group meets weekly. Info: Edna Berkey, 410-251-2083. DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS MEETS WEEKLY — The Delmarva Cho-

rus, Sweet Adeline’s, under the direction of Carol Ludwig, meets each Monday from 7-9 p.m., at the Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, White Horse Park. Women interested in learning the craft of a cappella singing welcome. Info: 410-2084171.

HAND DANCING — House of Welsh, 1106

Coastal Highway, Fenwick, Del. Free lessons from 6-7 p.m., open dancing 7-10 p.m. No cover charge. Info: DC Hand Dance Club, 302-541-0728.

TUES. March 25 STEPPING ON, FALL PREVENTION WORKSHOP — Delaney Hall, St. Ann’s Catholic

Church, 691 Garfield Parkway, Bethany Beach, Del., 1-3 p.m. A well-researched falls prevention program. The group is free and meets weekly from Feb. 25 through April 8. Register: Dawn Denton, 410-641-9268.

YOGA — James G. Barrett Medical Office

Building, Rotunda, 10231 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, 5:30-6:45 p.m. All levels welcome. Cost is $72 for eight sessions or $10 drop-in fee for first time. Info: Georgette Rhoads, 410-641-9734 ir grgiads@atlanticgeneral.org.

WED. March 26

BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP — At-

lantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, 7-8 p.m. The group gathers the fourth Wednesday of each month. Pre-registration is not necessary. Info: Pastoral Care Services, 410-641-9725 or gmansell@atlanticgeneral.org.

SIMPLE SUPPER — Knights of Columbus,

9901 Coastal Highway (rear of St. Luke’s Church) in Ocean City, last Wednesday of each month, 5-7 p.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $2 for children 11 and younger. Reservations: 410-524-7994.

BINGO — Every Wednesday at Ocean

City Elks Lodge 2645, 138th Street and Sinepuxent Avenue, rear of the Fenwick Inn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start 6:30 p.m. Food is available. Open to the public. No one allowed in the hall under 18 years of age during bingo. Info: 410-250-2645. Meets every Wednesday at Peaky’s Rooftop Restaurant & Bar, located in the Fenwick Inn, 13801 Coastal Highway, Ocean City. Beginner and intermediate lessons, 5:30-6:30 p.m., followed by

DELMARVA HAND DANCING CLUB —

dancing 6:30-9 p.m. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ’50s, ’60s and Carolina beach music. All are welcome. Discounted food and drink prices. Info: 302-337-3638. Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Wednesdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: 302-436-3682.

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING —

SPAGHETTI DINNER — Community

Church at Ocean Pines, 11227 Racetrack Road, 5-6:30 p.m. Food prepared by Decatur Diner. Cost is $8 for adults and $5 for children ages 3-12. Carryouts available. Benefits Relay For Life. Info: Joanne, 410-641-5434.

THURS. March 27 ‘SUSAN BRANIECKI FOR CLERK’ FUNDRAISER — Raw Bar at Seacrets,

49th Street and the bay, 5-7:30 p.m. Info: 443-783-9028 or susanbraniecki4clerk@gmail.com.

BEACH SINGLES — Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour at Harpoon Hanna’s, Route 54 and the Bay, Fenwick Island, Del., 4 p.m. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577; Kate, 410-524-0649; or Dianne, 302-5414642. BINGO — American Legion Post 166,

CHAIR AEROBICS — St. Peter’s Lutheran Church Community Life Center, 10301 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, 1-2 p.m. Free will offering appreciated. Sponsored by St. Peter’s Senior Adult Ministry. Info: 410-524-7474. REPUBLICAN WOMEN OF WORCESTER COUNTY GENERAL MEETING AND LUNCHEON — The Restaurant at Lighthouse

Sound,12723 St. Martins Neck Road, Bishopville. Doors open at 10:30 a.m., meeting begins at 11 a.m. Phyllis Mitchell, CFP, an Investment Advisor Representative and a Registered Investment Advisor, will discuss “Ten Things You Need To Know To Keep Your Financial Life In Order.” Cost of the luncheon is $17. Reservations: Ann Lutz, 410-2089767 or annlutz@verizon.net by March 24.

TICKET DEADLINE WORCESTER COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY SPRING DINNER MEETING —

Pocomoke Fire House, 1410 Market Street , April 5, 6 p.m. Eastern Shore buffet of chicken ’n dumplin’s, mashed potatoes and gravy, turnip greens, beets, corn pudding, corn bread, desserts, coffee and iced tea. Moody K. Miles III, will share information about the descendants of the early settlers of the Eastern Shore counties. Cost is $20. Advance tickets only: 410-632-1264 by March 27.

Crossword answers from page 58

2308 Philadelphia Ave., in Ocean City, every Thursday, year round. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to the public. Info: 410289-3166.

NAACP MEETING — Germantown School Community Heritage Center, 10223 Trappe Road, Berlin, 7 p.m. Rochelle Corbin, one of Hospice’s registered nurses, will discuss how African-Americans culturally take care of one another rather than calling in hospice. Info: 443944-6701.

PUBLIC NOTICES BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 1 FOUNTAIN DR. EAST, UNIT #3E OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated January 30, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4021, Folio 78 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $322,500.00 and an original interest rate of 6.00000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the

Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 8, 2014 AT 4:03 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Unit LUG-I-3E, in Phase 1, pursuant to a Condominium Regime established by and shown on a condominium plat entitled “Condominium Plat Phase 1 The Garden Condominium 1 at Sunset Island” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and

with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $35,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are

payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any


Ocean City Today

PAGE 68

MARCH 21, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICES such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 10115 GERMANTOWN RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 2, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4908, Folio 65 and re-recorded in Liber 5911, Folio 56 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $153,000.00 and an original interest rate of 6.85% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 8, 2014 AT 4:09 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit

Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 550 OCEAN PKWY. OCEAN PINES A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 20, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4471, Folio 320 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of

$200,000.00 and an original interest rate of 5.87500% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 8, 2014 AT 4:12 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such

surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 1552 TEAL DR. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated December 15, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4844, Folio 239 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $2,550,000.00 and an original interest rate of 2.000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 8, 2014 AT 4:15 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $199,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 69

PUBLIC NOTICES paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES' SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 41 SUNDIAL CIR. OCEAN PINES A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated December 3, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5033, Folio 753 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $417,000.00 and an original interest rate of 6.75% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 8, 2014 AT 4:06 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as follows: All that lot or

parcel of land lying and being situate in the Third Election District, Worchester County, Maryland, in the Section called "Teal Bay" in the Subdivision known as "Ocean Pines", which is more particularly described as Lot No. W-04-614, as designated and distinguished on the plat entitled "Ocean Pines-Section 4", made by B. Calvin Burnes, Registered Professional Engineer No. 2583 of the State of Maryland, and recorded among the Land Records of Worchester County, Maryland, in Plat Book No. FWH No. 11, Folio 54, et seq. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $52,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements

to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 205 125TH STREET, UNIT 228-D AND BOAT SLIP NO. 390 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Steven J. Parrott and Kathryn A. Parrott, dated July 10, 2001 and recorded in Liber 3088, Folio 524 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $200,000.00, and an original interest rate of 7.500%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on April 1, 2014 AT 4:03 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.  The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $5,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA assessments or private utility charges, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all

documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available legal remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction.  In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit. The sale is subject to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.  In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Randall J. Rolls, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 14105 SAILING RD. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated July 24, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4977, Folio 159 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $484,500.00 and an original interest rate of 1.19% default having occurred under


Ocean City Today

PAGE 70

MARCH 21, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICES the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 1, 2014 AT 4:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are un-

able to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________ Covahey, Boozer, Devan, & Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, E xecutive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 2 DORCHESTER STREET, UNIT 203 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-13-001443 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Talbot Watkins, III recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 5086, folio 32, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Erin Gloth, Christine Drexel, and Brian McNair as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 5086, folio 32, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 5086, folio 26. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. The purchaser assumes all risks of loss for the property as of the date of sale. Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE: A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $50,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale. Any amount tendered at sale in excess of the required deposit will be refunded and not applied to the purchase price. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within ten (10) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence. The purchaser, other

than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.50000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement. Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest. If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited. The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor. Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Erin Gloth, Christine Drexel, and Brian McNair, Substituted Trustees OCD-3/6/3t _________________________________ Weinstock, Friedman & Friedman, P.A. 4 Reservoir Circle Baltimore, MD 21208 410-559-9000

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE 2-STORY HOME LOCATED AT 300 BELT ST. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Purchase Money Deed of Trust from James C. Washington, dated July 14, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4752, folio 544 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD (Case No. 23-C-13-0923) default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 31, 2014 AT 12:10 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, if any, situated

in Worcester County, MD, known as Tax ID No. 02-022958 and described as follows: All that lot of ground situate at the corner of Purnell Street and Belt Street in the Town of Snow Hill, in the Second Tax District of Worcester County, State of Maryland, more particularly described on plat entitled, “BOUNDARTY SURVEY WITH LOCATION OF IMPROVEMENTS, HOUSE NO. 300, LANDS OF RONALD H. HAMBLIN and JOSEPHINE B. HAMBLIN,” dated July 23, 1997, made by Madison J. Bunting, Jr., Surveyor, Inc. and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber R.H.O. No. 2416, folio 25, et seq.; AND BEING ALL AND THE SAME property which was conveyed unto James C. Washington by deed from Katherine C. Washington, Foreign Personal Representative of the Estate of Susan B. Main of even date herewith and intended to be recorded among the aforesaid Land Records immediately prior hereto. The property is believed to be improved by a 2-story home containing 5 rooms (3 bedrooms) and one bath. The property and improvements, if any, will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, existing building, zoning, and/or environmental violations, agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty either expressed or implied as to the description of the condition of the property or improvements. The property will be sold subject to any violation notices and subject to all conditions, restrictions, covenants, encumbrances, right of ways, agreements and other matters of record affecting the same, if any. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $5,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order, at the time of sale will be required of all purchasers other than the holder of the Deed of Trust or an affiliate. The deposit(s) must be increased to 10% of the purchase price within 2 business days at the office of the auctioneer. The balance of the purchase price is to be paid in immediately available funds, within ten (10) business days after the final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. If payment of the balance does not take place within ten (10) business days after ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. In the event the property is purchased by someone other than the note holder or an affiliate, interest shall be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the note from date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees. In the event the settlement is delayed for any reason and the property is purchased by someone other than the note holder or an affiliate, there shall be no abatement of interest caused by the delay. Any and all fees in connection with the property incurred prior to or after the sale including, but not limited to,


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 71

PUBLIC NOTICES taxes, water, sewer, ground rent, condominium fees, and/or homeowners association dues, and any and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and all documentary stamps, recordation taxes and transfer taxes shall be borne by the purchaser. The property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and without any recourse, representations or warranties, either express or implied, as to its nature, condition or description. Neither the Substitute Trustees, the secured party, the note holder nor any other party makes any warranty or representation of any kind or nature regarding the physical condition of, the description of, or title to the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey the property as described above, by reason of any defect in the title or otherwise, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. Upon refund of the deposit to purchaser, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claims against the property, Substitute Trustees or the secured party. The conveyance of the property by the Substitute Trustees to the purchaser at settlement shall be by Trustees’ Deed without covenant or warranty. The purchaser is responsible for, and the property is sold subject to, any environmental matter or condition, whether latent or observable, if any, that may exist at or affect or relate to the property and to any governmental requirements affecting the same. The contract of sale between the Substitute Trustees, as sellers, and the purchaser (the “Contract of Sale”) shall include, by reference, all the terms and conditions contained herein, specifically including, but not limited to, the following provisions: “Purchaser agrees and represents that the purchaser is purchasing the property subject to all matters known and unknown, in “AS IS, WHERE IS” condition. In executing and delivering the Contract of Sale, purchaser has not relied upon nor been induced by any statements or representations of any person, including the Substitute Trustees, the secured party, the note holder or an affiliate or their respective servicers, heirs, personal and legal representatives, agents, employees, successors and assigns (collectively, “Released Parties”), in respect to the condition of the property, including the environmental condition of the property, unless such representations or statements are specifically set forth in the Contract of Sale. Purchaser has not relied on anything in the foreclosure advertisement, but rather has relied solely on such investigations, examinations or inspections of the property as purchaser has made. Purchaser waives and releases the Released Parties from any and all claims the purchaser or its successors and assigns may have now or in

the future may have relating to the condition of the property. Purchaser acknowledges and agrees that this provision was a negotiated part of the Contract of Sale and serves as an essential component of consideration for the same. The parties specifically acknowledge and agree that this clause bars all claims by purchaser against Released Parties, arising from the condition of or releases from the property pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, and all other actions pursuant to federal, state or local laws, ordinances or regulations for any environmental condition of or releases from the property. Further, purchaser agrees to indemnify Substitute Trustees for any liability they may have to any third party for an environmental condition of the property. Notwithstanding the parties’ intent that this clause bars all such claims, should a court of competent jurisdiction deem otherwise, purchaser agrees that the presence of this clause should serve as the overwhelming, primary factor in any equitable apportionment of response costs under applicable federal, state or local laws, ordinances, or regulations.” As a part of any sale, the Substitute Trustees, as agents for PNC Bank, National Association, as successor in interest to Mercantile Peninsula Bank (“PNC”), are required, by law, to confirm that each prospective purchaser or refinancing source and each equity holder of each such entity is not or shall not be: (i) a person with whom PNC is restricted from doing business under any Anti-Terrorism Law (as hereinafter defined) or Anti-Money Laundering statutes, (ii) engaged in any business involved in making or receiving any contribution of funds, goods or services to or for the benefit of such a person or in any transaction that evades or avoids, or has the purpose of evading or avoiding, the prohibitions set forth in any AntiTerrorism Law or any Anti-Money Laundering statutes, or (iii) otherwise in violation of any Anti-Terrorism Law or Anti-Money Laundering Statutes. For the purposes herein, “Anti-Terrorism Law” shall mean any laws relating to terrorism or money laundering, including Executive Order No. 13224, effective September 24, 2001, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001, Public Law 107-56, the laws comprising or implementing the Bank Secrecy Act, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, as jointly enforced by the United States Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the laws administered by the United States Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (as any of the foregoing orders or laws may from time to time be amended, renewed, extended, or replaced). Any third party conducting any such sale shall be required to cooperate fully with the Substitute Trustees and PNC in connection with such confirmation. Purchaser shall be required to cooperate fully with, and provide any in-

formation requested by, the Substitute Trustees and PNC in connection with such confirmation. Note: The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The Auctioneer, the Substitute Trustees, the note holder and the secured party do not make any representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of the information contained herein. Prospective purchasers are urged to make their own inspection. Sidney S. Friedman, William H. Thrush, Jr., Rebecca Teale Balint Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________ Ayres, Jenkins, Gordy, & Almand, P.A. 6200 Coastal Hwy., Suite 200 Ocean City, MD 21842

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF CONDOMINIUM UNIT The Trustee named below will sell at public auction to the highest bidder on Monday, March 24, 2014, at 4:00 P.M., at the Condominium, 109 Somerset Street, Ocean City, Md., all that property designated as Unit No. 6 in the Nowalk To The Boardwalk Condominium together with an undivided percentage interest in the common elements as established by Declaration recorded among the land records of Worcester County in Liber 3500, folio 208, et seq., as amended, and as further described in a deed recorded at Liber 4877, folio 613, et seq., in “AS IS” condition, SUBJECT to all the liens, covenants, agreements, conditions, easements and restrictions as may appear among the land records of Worcester County, Maryland. A deposit of $10,000.00 in cash or certified check will be required of the Purchaser at the time and place of sale. (A deposit will not be required if the successful bidder is the secured party in this foreclosure action.) The balance in cash or certified check will be due within 20 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, said balance to bear interest at the rate of ten percent (10%) per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. All real estate taxes, wastewater, water charges, and condominium assessments shall be adjusted as of the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the Purchaser. The cost of title documents, settlement costs, recordation taxes, transfer taxes and recording fees shall be paid by the Purchaser. Possession will be given upon payment in full of the purchase price. If Purchaser fails to pay the balance of the purchase price following ratification of sale, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting Purchaser. For further information, you may contact Kevin P. Gregory, Trustee,

410-723-1400. OCD-3/6/3t _________________________________ Weinstock, Friedman & Friedman, P.A. 4 Reservoir Circle Baltimore, MD 21208 410-559-9000

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE 1-STORY HOME LOCATED AT 313 W. MARTIN ST. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Purchase Money Deed of Trust from James C. Washington, dated January 30, 2006, recorded in Liber 4632, folio 458 and a Purchase Money Deed of Trust dated July 14, 2006, recorded in Liber 4752, folio 544 both among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD (Case No. 23C-13-0922) default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 31, 2014 AT 12:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON, if any, situated in Worcester County, MD, known as Tax ID No. 02-020270 and described as follows: All that property lying and being in Worcester County, Maryland, and being more fully described as Lot numbered Three (3) in a subdivision known as “SUBDIVISION THE LANDS OF HARRY C. WILLIAMS & AUDREY WILLIAMS, CREATING LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5” as per thereof recorded in Plat Book S.V.H. No. 159 at Plat No. 11, among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland; AND BEING ALL AND THE SAME property which was conveyed unto the Grantor herein by deed from Kathy J. Gordon, dated January 31, 2006 and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber S.V.H. No.4632, folio 453, et seq. The property is believed to be improved by a 1-story home containing 6 rooms (3 bedrooms) and one bath. FWA electric heat and central air conditioning. The property and improvements, if any, will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, existing building, zoning, and/or environmental violations, agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty either expressed or implied as to the description of the condition of the property or improvements. The property will be sold subject to any violation notices and subject to all conditions, restrictions, covenants, encumbrances, right of ways, agreements and other matters of record affecting the same, if any. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $7,500 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order, at


Ocean City Today

PAGE 72

MARCH 21, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICES the time of sale will be required of all purchasers other than the holder of the Deed of Trust or an affiliate. The deposit(s) must be increased to 10% of the purchase price within 2 business days at the office of the auctioneer. The balance of the purchase price is to be paid in immediately available funds, within ten (10) business days after the final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. If payment of the balance does not take place within ten (10) business days after ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. In the event the property is purchased by someone other than the note holder or an affiliate, interest shall be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the note from date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees. In the event the settlement is delayed for any reason and the property is purchased by someone other than the note holder or an affiliate, there shall be no abatement of interest caused by the delay. Any and all fees in connection with the property incurred prior to or after the sale including, but not limited to, taxes, water, sewer, ground rent, condominium fees, and/or homeowners association dues, and any and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and all documentary stamps, recordation taxes and transfer taxes shall be borne by the purchaser. The property will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and without any recourse, representations or warranties, either express or implied, as to its nature, condition or description. Neither the Substitute Trustees, the secured party, the note holder nor any other party makes any warranty or representation of any kind or nature regarding the physical condition of, the description of, or title to the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey the property as described above, by reason of any defect in the title or otherwise, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit. Upon refund of the deposit to purchaser, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claims against the property, Substitute Trustees or the secured party. The conveyance of the property by the Substitute Trustees to the purchaser at settlement shall be by Trustees’ Deed without covenant or warranty. The purchaser is responsible for, and the property is sold subject to, any environmental matter or condition, whether latent or observable, if any, that may exist at or affect or relate to the property and to any governmental requirements affecting the same.

The contract of sale between the Substitute Trustees, as sellers, and the purchaser (the “Contract of Sale”) shall include, by reference, all the terms and conditions contained herein, specifically including, but not limited to, the following provisions: “Purchaser agrees and represents that the purchaser is purchasing the property subject to all matters known and unknown, in “AS IS, WHERE IS” condition. In executing and delivering the Contract of Sale, purchaser has not relied upon nor been induced by any statements or representations of any person, including the Substitute Trustees, the secured party, the note holder or an affiliate or their respective servicers, heirs, personal and legal representatives, agents, employees, successors and assigns (collectively, “Released Parties”), in respect to the condition of the property, including the environmental condition of the property, unless such representations or statements are specifically set forth in the Contract of Sale. Purchaser has not relied on anything in the foreclosure advertisement, but rather has relied solely on such investigations, examinations or inspections of the property as purchaser has made. Purchaser waives and releases the Released Parties from any and all claims the purchaser or its successors and assigns may have now or in the future may have relating to the condition of the property. Purchaser acknowledges and agrees that this provision was a negotiated part of the Contract of Sale and serves as an essential component of consideration for the same. The parties specifically acknowledge and agree that this clause bars all claims by purchaser against Released Parties, arising from the condition of or releases from the property pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, and all other actions pursuant to federal, state or local laws, ordinances or regulations for any environmental condition of or releases from the property. Further, purchaser agrees to indemnify Substitute Trustees for any liability they may have to any third party for an environmental condition of the property. Notwithstanding the parties’ intent that this clause bars all such claims, should a court of competent jurisdiction deem otherwise, purchaser agrees that the presence of this clause should serve as the overwhelming, primary factor in any equitable apportionment of response costs under applicable federal, state or local laws, ordinances, or regulations.” As a part of any sale, the Substitute Trustees, as agents for PNC Bank, National Association, as successor in interest to Mercantile Peninsula Bank (“PNC”), are required, by law, to confirm that each prospective purchaser or refinancing source and each equity holder of each such entity is not or shall not be: (i) a person with whom PNC is restricted from doing business under any Anti-Terrorism Law (as hereinafter defined) or Anti-Money Laundering statutes, (ii) engaged in any business involved in making or receiving any contribution of funds,

goods or services to or for the benefit of such a person or in any transaction that evades or avoids, or has the purpose of evading or avoiding, the prohibitions set forth in any AntiTerrorism Law or any Anti-Money Laundering statutes, or (iii) otherwise in violation of any Anti-Terrorism Law or Anti-Money Laundering Statutes. For the purposes herein, “Anti-Terrorism Law” shall mean any laws relating to terrorism or money laundering, including Executive Order No. 13224, effective September 24, 2001, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001, Public Law 107-56, the laws comprising or implementing the Bank Secrecy Act, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, as jointly enforced by the United States Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the laws administered by the United States Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (as any of the foregoing orders or laws may from time to time be amended, renewed, extended, or replaced). Any third party conducting any such sale shall be required to cooperate fully with the Substitute Trustees and PNC in connection with such confirmation. Purchaser shall be required to cooperate fully with, and provide any information requested by, the Substitute Trustees and PNC in connection with such confirmation. Note: The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable, but is offered for information purposes only. The Auctioneer, the Substitute Trustees, the note holder and the secured party do not make any representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of the information contained herein. Prospective purchasers are urged to make their own inspection. Sidney S. Friedman, William H. Thrush, Jr., Rebecca Teale Balint Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 9029 PITTS RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Richard L. Dize, dated September 26, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4543, folio 462 and re-recorded in Liber 5031, folio 590 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will

offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 24, 2014 AT 2:15 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $19,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8.392% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2011-18525) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 73

PUBLIC NOTICES OCD-3/6/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10 14TH ST. POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Paula F. Robertson, dated April 17, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4699, folio 487 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 24, 2014 AT 2:16 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $12,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for

the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2013-35142) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-3/6/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 115 ELIZABETH ST. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated December 17, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5044, Folio 458 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $176,242.00 and an original interest rate of 4.75000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 25, 2014 AT 4:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $19,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be

no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-3/6/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15482 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE W. FEEHLEY Notice is given that Geoffrey Harold Robbins, 1559 Teal Drive, Ocean City, MD 21842, was on February 25, 2014 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of George W. Feehley who died on February 21, 2014, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection

to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 25th day of August, 2014. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Geoffrey Harold Robbins Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 06, 2014 OCD-3/6/3t _________________________________

PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110, Zoning, of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be conducted by the Planning and Zoning Commission in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2014 At 7:00 pm To consider amending the Zoning Code, Division 23 DOWNTOWN DESIGN OVERLAY ZONE DISTRICT, specifically Sections 110831.1 – 861.6, for all the incorporated zoning districts (B-1 boardwalk, I-1 Inlet, DMX downtown mixed use, DM downtown marine, DR downtown residential, and M-1 manufacturing). APPLICANT: PLANNING & ZONING COMMISSION (FILE #14-14100001) **Please go to http://oceancitymd.gov/publichearings.html to ac-


Ocean City Today

PAGE 74

MARCH 21, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICES cess the full text of the proposed code amendments. No oral or written testimony will be accepted after the close of the public hearing. Public hearings that are not completed at one meeting may be continued without additional advertised notice provided the Commission Chairman announces that the hearing will be continued and gives persons in attendance an opportunity to sign up for written notice of the additional hearing dates. For further information concerning this public hearing, please contact the Department of Planning and Community Development, Room 242, City Hall, 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD 21842. Phone 410-289-8855. PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION PAM GREER BUCKLEY, CHAIRPERSON WILLIAM E. ESHAM, III, ATTORNEY OCD-2/27/5t _________________________________

PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110, Zoning, of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be conducted by the Planning and Zoning Commission in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2014 At 7:00 pm Pursuant to the provisions of Article II, Section 5, Conditional Uses, a request has been filed under the provisions of Section 110-861.3(5), Uses permitted by Conditional Use in the I-1 Inlet District, to permit water-related parasail and waverunner recreational activity for a period of five (5) years. The site of the request is described as Block 21S of the Sinepuxent Beach Company Plat of 1891, further described as located on the west side of Philadelphia Avenue, the south side of Sunset Park, and on Sinepuxent Bay near the Inlet, and known locally as 700 S. Philadelphia Avenue, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: GRAHAM BOSTIC (FILE #14-12100001) No oral or written testimony will be accepted after the close of the public hearing. Public hearings that are not completed at one meeting may be continued without additional advertised notice provided the Commission Chairman announces that the hearing will be continued and gives persons in attendance an opportunity to sign up for written notice of the additional hearing dates. For further information concern-

ing this public hearing, please contact the Department of Planning and Community Development, Room 242, City Hall, 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD 21842. Phone 410-289-8855. PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION PAM GREER BUCKLEY, CHAIRPERSON WILLIAM E. ESHAM, III, ATTORNEY OCD-3/13/2t _________________________________ Law Offices of Jeffrey Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, Maryland 20705 240-473-5000 Jeffrey Nadel Scott Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, MD 20705 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff v. Armand Golden Bruce Kevin Raab 106 Payne Avenue Pocomoke City, MD 21851-1324 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23-C-12-001538

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 25th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 31st day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 24th day of March, 2014. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $69,650.00. The property sold herein is known as 106 Payne Avenue, Pocomoke City, MD 218511324. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/6/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 301-490-3361 Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. Bruce E. Franklin and Diana J. Franklin aka Diana L.J. Franklin Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C13001409

NOTICE ORDERED, this 24th day of February, 2014 by the Circuit Court of WORCESTER COUNTY, Maryland,

that the sale of the property at 9836 Hotel Road, Bishopville, Maryland 21813 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et. al, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 31st day of March, 2014 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 24th day of March, 2014, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $211,379.68. Stephen V. Hales CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/6/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15492 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF KENNETH LEON HETTENHOUSER Notice is given that Lynn Marie Poknis, 210 Poplar Avenue, Edgewater, MD 21037, was on March 05, 2014 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Kenneth Leon Hettenhouser who died on January 6, 2014, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 5th day of September, 2014. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. LYNN MARIE POKNIS Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County

Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 13, 2014 OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 Diane S. Rosenberg Mark D. Meyer John A. Ansell, III Kenneth Savitz 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff(s) v. Sharon P. Teagle 254 Ocean Parkway Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001248

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 4th day of March, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of 254 Ocean Parkway, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th day of April, 2014, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 31st day of March, 2014. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $134,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________ Williams, Moore, Shockley & Harrison LLP 3509 Coastal Highway Ocean City, MD 21842 JOSEPH E. MOORE, Assignee CHRISTOPHER T. WOODLEY, Assignee Plaintiffs v. DAVID LEE STURGILL and SAGE K. STURGILL Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO.: 23-C-13-1392

NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, this 5th day of March, 2014, by the Circuit Court for the COUNTY OF WORCESTER, Maryland, and by the authority thereof, that the sale made by Joseph E. Moore and Christopher T. Woodley, Assignees of the real property designated as 24


Ocean City Today

MARCH 21, 2014

PAGE 75

PUBLIC NOTICES Burley Street, Berlin, Maryland 21811, and reported in the above entitled cause, will finally be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause th to contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th day of April, 2014; provided, a copy of this Order be inserted in a weekly newspaper published in Worcester County, Maryland, once in each of three successive weeks, before the 31st day of March, 2014. The Report states the amount of the Assignees’ Sale to be $195,000.00. Stephen V. Hales CLERK True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________ James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842 SUNSET POINTE CONDOMINIUM COUNCIL OF UNIT OWNERS c/o Mana-Jit, Inc. 18 41st Street, Suite 104 Ocean City, Maryland 21842 Plaintiff vs. JOSEPH A. FLICOP NORMA FLICOP 401 Pacific Avenue Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. 23-C-13-0960

NOTICE ORDERED, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County this 6th day of March, 2014, that the foreclosure sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 105 63rd Street, Unit No. 103 Sunset Point Condominium, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported by James E. Clubb, Jr., Substitute Trustee, be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 7th day of April, 2014 provided a copy of this order be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in Worcester County, once in each of three successive weeks, before the 31st day of March, 2014. The Report states the amount of the sale to be $1,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15490 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MARY DAHL SUPLEE Notice is given that Paul G. Suplee, 4 Candytuft Lane, Berlin, MD 21811, was on February 28, 2014 appointed Personal Representative of

the estate of Mary Dahl Suplee who died on February 19, 2014, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 28th day of August, 2014. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. PAUL G. SUPLEE Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 13, 2014 OCD-3/13/3t _________________________________ WORCESTER COUNTY SHORELINE COMMISSION

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Pursuant to the provisions of Sections 3-101 and 3-102 of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be conducted by the Worcester County Shoreline Commission in the meeting room at the Ocean Pines Branch of the Worcester County Library, 11107 Cathell Road, Berlin, Maryland on Thursday, April 3, 2014. The Board members will convene at 1:30 p.m. to discuss administrative matters and may perform on-site viewing of all or some of the following cases. Thereafter, the members will reconvene at 2:00 p.m. at the library to hear the scheduled cases. MAJOR CONSTRUCTION MAJOR 1 Permit Ink, LLC for Ocean City Boatlifts and Marine Construction on behalf of Joseph and Anne

Lignelli - Request No. 2014-19 –Request to install one boatlift with associated pilings not to exceed 20 feet channelward. This request also includes a 6’ x 8’ extension to the existing 6’ x 25’ parallel dock. The project is located at 31 Driftwood Lane, also known as Tax Map 16, Parcel 38, Section 1, Lot 476, Ocean Pines Community, Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 2 Permit Ink, LLC for Ocean City Boatlifts and Marine Construction on behalf of Barry and Mary Barber - Request No. 2014-20 – Request to install one boatlift with associated pilings not to exceed 18 feet channelward. The project is located at 13032 Wilson Avenue, also known as Tax Map 5, Parcel 16, Boat Slip 25, Townes of Nantucket Condominium, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 3 J. Stacey Hart and Associates, Inc. on behalf of Kevin and Kimberly McCabe- Request No. 2014-21 – Request to install one boatlift on existing pilings not to exceed 40 feet channelward. This project is located at 13032 North Shore Road, also known as Tax Map 22, Parcel 367, Section 1, Lot 21, Captains Hill, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 4 J. Stacey Hart and Associates, Inc. on behalf of Frank and Carol Brown - Request No. 2014-22 –Request to install a 6’ x 33’ perpendicular pier with two finger piers not to exceed 33 feet channelward. This request also includes the installation of two boatlifts with associated pilings. This project is located on a vacant lot at 2 Alton Point, also known as Tax Map 16, Parcel 96, Section 14B, Lot 1, Ocean Pines Community, Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 5 Hidden Oak Farms, LLC for R. G. Murphy Marine Construction on behalf of William and Elisa Lawson – Request No. 2014-23– Request to install one boatlift and one PWC lift with associated pilings not to exceed 15 feet channelward. This request also includes the installation of approximately 80’ of replacement wooden bulkhead. This project is located on a vacant lot on Madison Avenue, also known as Tax Map 5, Parcel 1, Lot 16, Glenn Acres Subdivision, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 6 Hidden Oak Farms, LLC for R. G. Murphy Marine Construction on behalf of 13451 Madison Avenue LLC – Request No. 2014-24 – Request to repair and/or replace approximately 55’ of stone revetment not to exceed 16 feet channelward. This project is located at 13451 Madison Avenue, also known as Tax Map 5, Parcel 1, Lot 24, Glenn Acres Subdivision, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 7 Hidden Oak Farms, LLC for R. G. Murphy Marine Construction on behalf of Andrew and Jeannine Rogers – Request No. 2014-25 – Request to repair and/or replace approximately 50’ of stone revetment not to exceed

16 feet channelward. This project is located at 13449 Madison Avenue, also known as Tax Map 5, Parcel 1, Lot 23, Glenn Acres Subdivision, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. OCD-3/20/2t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 301-490-3361 Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. Timothy M. Kane Defendant IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C13001536

NOTICE ORDERED, this 11th day of March, 2014 by the Circuit Court of WORCESTER COUNTY, Maryland, that the sale of the property at 21 White Crane Drive, Berlin, Maryland 21811 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et. al, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 14th day of April, 2014 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 7th day of April, 2014, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $116,500.00. Stephen V. Hales CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 Diane S. Rosenberg Mark D. Meyer John A. Ansell, III Kenneth Savitz 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff(s) v. Joseph W. Constantino a/k/a Joseph W. Constantino Jr. 10730 Cathell Road Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001283

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 13th day of March, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of 10730 Cathell Road, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary


Ocean City Today

PAGE 76

MARCH 21, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICES thereof be shown on or before the 14th day of April, 2014, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 7th day of April, 2014. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $318,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ Aaron D. Neal, Esq. McNamee, Hosea, Jernigan, Kim, Greenan & Lynch, P.A. 6411 Ivy Lane, Suite 200 Greenbelt, Maryland 20770 301-441-2420 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff v. John Scarlett, et al. Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-13-001725

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 13th day of March, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County that the sale of the property being described in the above-mentioned proceeding, known as 301 Piedmont Court, Ocean Pines, Maryland 21811, made and reported by Brent M. Ahalt, Trustee, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 14th day of April, 2014, provided that a copy of this Notice be inserted in the Ocean City Digest in Worcester County once in each of three successive weeks on or before the 7th day of April, 2014. The report of sale states the amount of the sale price to be $10,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ CHRISTOPHER T. WOODLEY ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY, P.O. BOX 739 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15505 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF ROBERT L. TAYLOR Notice is given that Raymond C. Shockley, 3509 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842, was on March 13, 2014 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Robert L. Taylor who died on February 19, 2014, without a will. Further information can be ob-

tained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 13th day of September, 2014. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Raymond C. Shockley Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 20, 2014 OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________ Town of Berlin

HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION April 2, 2014 – 5:30 PM Berlin Town Hall – Council Chambers 1. Call to Order 2. Agenda Adoption 3. Approval of Minutes: January 8, 2014 & January 15, 2014 4. William Outten-Case # 4-2-14-3, 11 South Main Street, Signage 5. Michael Day-Case # 4-2-14-4, 14 South Main Street, Replacement Windows/ Repair 6. Comments from the Public 7. Comments from Staff 8. Comments from the Commissioners 9. Comments from the Chairman 10. Adjournment Any persons having questions about the above-referenced meeting or any persons needing special accommodations should contact Dave Engelhart at 410-641-4143. Written materials in alternate formats for persons with disabilities are made available upon request. TTY users dial 7-1-1 in the State of Maryland or 1-800-735-2258 outside Maryland.

OCD-3/20/1t _________________________________ Allison L. Lee, Esquire Paley Rothman Goldstein Rosenberg Eig & Cooper Chtd 4800 Hampden Lane, 7th Floor Bethesda, MD 20814

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 15501 NOTICE IS GIVEN that the Orphan’s Court Division, Court of Common Pleas court of Luzerne County, Pennsylvania appointed Marie Perlis, 16 Summit Street, Hunlock Creek, PA 18621 as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Ronald A. Perlis who died on October 29, 2012 domiciled in Pennsylvania, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Allison L. Lee, Esquire whose address is Paley Rothman, 4800 Hampden Lane, 7th Floor, Bethesda, MD 20814. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Marie Perlis Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills for Worcester County Courthouse 1 West Market Street - Room 102 Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 Name of Newspaper: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: March 20, 2014 OCD-3/20/3t _________________________________

NOTICE is hereby given by the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City that the following ordinances will be introduced for first reading at the Council meeting of March 24, 2014 . A complete text of this ordinance is available for review in the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland 21842.

Ordinance 2014-6, amending Chapter 39, entitled Franchises of the Town Code, by adding Subsections 39-23(8), 39-53(5) and 39504(9), which requires Franchisees to swear and affirm, under the penalties of perjury, that all federal, state, county and municipal taxes, for years prior to and through the current tax reporting period, or due date, have been paid. ORDINANCE 2014-7, amending CHAPTER 106, entitled WATERWAYS, to add Sec. 106-94 “Prohibited Acts” related to the use of standup paddleboards. The full text of the ordinance lists, in general, time, date and manner restrictions. OCD-3/20/2t _________________________________

NOTICE is hereby given by the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City that the following ordinances will be introduced for first reading at the Council meeting of March 24, 2014 . A complete text of this ordinance is available for review in the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. ORDINANCE 2014-8, this ordinance authorizes the purchase of real property lying and being situate with Corporate Limits of Ocean City and being known as 312 Baltimore Avenue and being Lots 58, 71 and part of Lots 57,72 being Tax Parcel No. 2564 and 106 Somerset Street, and, being part of Lots 83, 84 being Tax Parcel No. 2563 for the purchase price of $816,000,00 payable as follows: $216,000.00 at settlement with Seller providing financing of $600,000 amortized annually for 6 years at 2% interest. Also, this ordinance authorizes the Mayor and City Council to enter into an agreement with Joseph Theodore Hall for such purchase and financing. ORDINANCE 2014-9, authorizing the Mayor and City Council to enter into a Memorandum of Understanding to exchange certain properties with the Ocean City Development Corporation (OCDC) to exchange certain properties.. The Mayor and City Council of Ocean City, desires to construct a facility for usage of the Ocean City Beach Patrol on property currently owned by the Ocean City Development Corporation (OCDC). The Mayor and City Council and OCDC have agreed to exchange certain properties to facilitate the construction of the Ocean City Beach Patrol building and also support the mutual goal of future development of the area. This Ordinance authorizes the exchange, by transfer to the OCDC, Tax Parcel Nos. 2544,2545, 2546, 2547, 2548, 2549, 2560 and 2561 in the Dorchester Street/Somerset Street Block Area; and, to receive from the OCDC, Tax Parcel Nos. 2576, 2577 and 2587 in the Dorchester Street/Talbot Street Block. OCD-3/20/4t _________________________________


Commentary

Ocean City Today

Page 77 Please don’t fry sardines

OUR OPINION

Good move by school’s Dr. Wilson

Sometime earlier this winter, we started seeing news articles and hearing reports that the snow we’d been experiencing might threaten to extend the school year into the summer. That was in January. Spring started yesterday, March 20. Yet last Sunday night into Monday, a snowstorm caused dangerous travel even along main thoroughfares in Worcester County, dangerous enough to close schools for the ninth day. So here we are on the cusp of spring, and snow is an unlikely part of our conversation. On Tuesday, with the recommendation from the Superintendent of Schools, the County School Board voted unanimously to turn March 28 into a half day for students. Superintendent Dr. Jerry Wilson said that without schedule modifications, the school year could “extend” well into the third week of June. If the State Superintendent of Schools oks Worcester’s request to waive three days from the 180-day school requirement, the school system would only extend one day to June 13. But, all of this depends of course on two main factors. One, the State Superintendent approves Worcester’s threeday waiver request. And perhaps the most important, that it shouldn’t snow hard enough to close schools for the rest of this school year. So, while we all know that some of our children pray for snow and days off; some wear their pajamas inside out thinking that induces snow, but now it’s time to hope for warm weather without snow. Because that is going to get us done at an appropriate time in June. And we say “good job” to the School Board and Superintendent Wilson for putting the modifications in motion. Oh, and to put things in perspective a little bit. Fauquier County Public Schools in Northern Virginia has 17 days to be made up due to snow cancellations. That’s a lot of schedule modifications to do.

Mar. 21, 2014

THE PUBLIC EYE

Chief looking ahead to season EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

By Phil Jacobs

He’s vacationed here most of his life. Since last July, his relaxation place became also his work place. Ocean City Police Department’s Chief of Police Ross C. Buzzuro is having something he really didn’t have last year this time. That would be time to get prepared for the summer. Indeed, Buzzuro’s first day on the job in 2013 was July 3, perhaps one of the high water marks for the resort in terms of seasonal visitors and activity. He didn’t have time to get acclimated per se. Instead, he hit the ground running. It did help, though, that the Chief has spent years vacationing here. He and his wife owned a home here already. On a cold late winter Tuesday morning, Buzzuro talked about how the off-season not only helps him, but the entire department of 100 full-time officers and another 100 seasonal officers and 20 civilian staffers, prepare for the summer. While many of us are still talking about what seems like a never-ending torrent of snowstorms, the Chief and his staff have been looking ahead to warmer, busier days. Certainly, working here in Ocean City has perhaps a different work description than Baltimore, where he served for nearly 30 years reaching the important rank of Lieutenant Colonel. “I have a summer under my belt,” he said. “Fall and winter allows us to prepare for the upcoming season. I have people in the department who have been doing this for a long time. I learn a lot from them.” He said the department studies its data from past years to help it determine the scheduling of officers and any trends in crime. “All of the training is conducted in late winter,” he said. For Buzzuro, though, his new position didn’t take the same sort of adjustment period if he

had moved to a less-familiar city. He’d been vacationing here for over 40 years. “I was familiar,” he said. “I spent many an hour running and jogging on the Board-

walk.” He will be experiencing his first Senior Week, and he talked about how he’s all for trying to educate the high school students ahead of time “for them to be responsible before coming to Ocean City.” “We want people to have a good time,” he said. “But we also want them to conduct themselves in an orderly manner, and not to get carried away.” So the question asked was does it take an adjustment to work in the very town that brings you relaxation. “The responsibilities of police chief is something I take seriously,” he said. “It’s a 24-7 responsibility. But that doesn’t mean when it’s appropriate, I can’t get away for a period of relaxation. But I enjoy what I do, at this place.” Ocean City’s community support of the police department is not only there, but it exists at a higher level. Perhaps a lot higher than in Baltimore. “What’s challenging, though for policing,” he continued, “is the transient nature of our population. Our success here is relying on the public. They are our eyes and our ears.” Crime, he added is down 13 percent from last year. He hopes that downward trend continues. So he doesn’t come to Ocean City to get away, he lives here now. Looking ahead, while most of us are still complaining about ice and snowstorms with Greek names, the Chief is getting ready for Memorial Day and beyond. Now he can look west over the Rte. 50 Bridge and even west of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and say “when you come here, just because your are on vacation, be aware and be responsible.”

Reflections is gone. Long live Touch of Italy. Or it will be Touch of Italy in the Holiday Inn at 66th Street when the Rehoboth/Lewes-based deli and restaurant business takes up residence in Reflections’ former space. The deal has been the subject of rumors since late last year, but the fact is Touch of Italy owner Bob Ciprietti and representatives of the Harrison Group, which owns the hotel, didn’t finalize the lease until just recently. Touch of Italy, as a matter of fact, was the source of an indispensable cooking lesson for me and I pass it along to anyone who wishes to remain in, as opposed to being run out of, the house. Let’s just say, if baking bread makes your house smell good, frying Sicilian saltpacked sardines in a small kitchen is not something you really want to do, unless Amazon.com has a supply of replacement noses in stock. Price is not a factor. “Yum,” I said, to my marital associate. “See this can of sardines? I’m going to make Mario Batali weep with envy. Yep, I’m going to rinse these babies and mix them with pasta. “But – and here’s my own special culinary twist – I’m going to dust them with a little flour and just crisp them up in the frying pan.” Fifteen minutes later, a voice came from the backyard, even though the temperature outside was hovering between numb below zero and lost appendages. “Hey, in there!” she said. “What are you doing, rendering Moby Dick?” I’m not going to say that frying canned sardines, rather than fresh sardines, which is a much different affair, makes a big stink, but the dogs did spend the next several hours trying to roll on me. Oh, and the real cooking lesson was this, “You know that food show ‘Chopped?’” she asked. “If you ever do that again, I’ll show you what ‘chopped’ really means.”


Letters Historical Society welcomes genealogist

Editor, For those folks who have lived on Delmarva’s shores for generations, we’ve come to respect, preserve and appreciate the vast culture and history that surrounds our individual endeavors. Now just imagine the initial curiosity and excitement if your family’s name can be professionally traced back to the early 1600’s. Better yet … suppose someone discovered your family’s surname linking them to Charlemagne’s Reign (768-814). Moody K. Miles III noted genealogist and creator of “Miles Files,” an ancestral chart and slide show featuring the first six generations of descent from the first families of Virginia during the Jamestown era. These families settled in the following Eastern Shore counties: Northampton, Accomack, Somerset, Wicomico, Worcester and Sussex. This collection contains 100’s of families with over 70,000 names … some going back nearly 1,300 years up to the early 1900’s. The Worcester County Historical Society will be hosting Mr. Miles as its special presenter during its general meeting and spring dinner, which will be open to the public. This event will be held on Saturday, April 5 at 6 p.m. in the new Pocomoke City Fire House meeting hall and cafeteria. The Eastern Shore style buffet dinner will be prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary. For those interested in attending, the cost is $20 per person. Checks can be made out to “WCHS” care of Robert Fisher, Treasurer, 230 South Washington St., Snow Hill, Md. 21803. C. Newton Weaver, Jr. Ocean City

Watch your butts

Editor, Last week's article concerning cigarette butt tossing, I thoroughly enjoyed reading. Some of the statistics and facts that were mentioned regarding the number estimated butts that are carelessly thrown/tossed onto our streets, neighborhoods and beaches is sad and results merely because of carelessness. One idea for thought: In an effort to generate the thought onto others that Ocean City now frowns on "butt tossing," consider placing lighted messages at entrance ways near both bridges. Perhaps an appropriate message could have a photo of a cigarette butt with a red slash through it. Above the illustration could read: "Watch your butts." Whatever is decided, the issue will be challenging to muster for sure. Additionally, I would like to thank Councilman Brent Ashley for his efforts thus far and any future continued pressing to help make a difference with this. Doug Antos Ocean City

Difficult geese issue in Ocean Pines

Ocean City Today Mar. 21, 2014

to the editor

Editor, I have been living in the Pines for over 15 years and continue to love the area, the people and the environment (recent cold notwithstanding). Seeing the local fauna – the squirrels, rabbits, deer, occasional fox, and the various birds – are part of this enjoyment. However, when the animals/birds become a problem to our way of life, actions are needed. I am here specifically talking about our resident Canada geese population; not the migratory geese or the domestic white geese that have resided here for years – the latter of which were mistakenly sighted by a local paper as a target for removal. Reading recent letters to the editor in the papers, I see a lot of misunderstanding by some Pines residents about Canada geese in general and potential control options in particular. These readers have let their love for nature’s animals affect logical thinking. First, let’s consider the realities. Canada geese (CG) normally are migratory – flying south in winter and returning to their homes in summer. But many (some knowledgeable sources – e.g. Internet Center for Wildlife Damage) -- say 60 percent decide to stay south when they find food and non-threatening environments there. These same sources say that a wellfed CG will excrete between one and two pounds a day of feces. Taking the middle of the spread, a CG will defecate 1.5 times 365, or over 500 pounds of poop a year. Estimates vary, but my observations say about 300 resident CGs stay at the south and north ponds, golf course and other open areas – which adds up to around 80 tons of poop per year. One can adjust the numbers of birds down, but it’s still a lot of stuff that contains chemicals (nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium), diseases (parasites, bacteria, viruses, fungus, etc.), and other noxious slippery things. These outputs eventually run off into our local ponds and bays, supporting algae growth that in turn causes oxygen depletion and fish kills. Speaking of slippery noxious things, I help run two kids events for the OP Anglers club that involve the grounds near the veterans memorial. I can personally attest that the walkways and grass areas are littered with large amounts of goose poop. The effect is disgust and concern about possible contact of kids and feces. Recent letters to the local papers have spread inaccurate or highly opinionated information. Examples – The OPA Board of Directors have decided to euthanize the geese (wrong, they have only agreed to look into the problem); the geese have more right here than

people who have moved in on their territory (wrong, the geese stop and stay at the pines because we have built a perfect place for them – ponds, open grassy areas, safety from predators – that would not have existed have the OPA not been developed. Remember the area was once forested.); and others. I attended the OPA Board meeting dealing with this issue and heard even more disheartening things, such as physical threats to board members. The meeting’s bottom line was that the OPA is still fact finding about the CG problem, particularly looking into humane ways to control the population. No decisions have been made. However, in my mind the resident CG are a significant nuisance, are polluting the waters, and are a potential health hazard; and our community needs to act in their control. The web sites identify a number of humane goose control mechanisms, and I support the OPA board for taking the actions needed to find an appropriate solution to the CG overpopulation. Walt Boge Ocean Pines

Coach gives thanks for support of team Editor, The following is an open letter to the Berlin / Ocean City community. Dear Community members of Stephen Decatur High School, As another basketball season comes to an end, I wanted to take a moment, on behalf of the girls and boys’ basketball teams, to thank the Stephen Decatur High School staff, students and community for their enthusiasm this season. In many ways this season has been epic, with the boys winning the first Bayside South championship in the school’s history and the girls having back-to-back 20plus win seasons. What has made it even more special, however, has been the passionate fan support. As a coach, we place more emphasis on harvesting great people than winning games. Our focus has always been a “TEAM FIRST,” and an “ALL IN,” mentality that I believe translated into winning games this season. But a coach can only be effective if the players buy into the program and put the team ahead of themselves. I believe that both teams did that exceptionally well this season, and their humility and unselfish play made the game more exciting to watch. They represented Stephen Decatur with passion, competitiveness, and class. I am so proud of them all; they are first class representatives of our community. An exciting element to our games this season was the “Decatur Nation.” The student section, especially during our home games, was amazing.

Page 78 Chants of “DE-FENSE” and “YOU CAN’T DO THAT,” roared throughout the entire gym and helped to inspire the players to play their hardest. The electricity in the school was palpable and there were a lot of good people in the building that took pride in our success. All of their positive comments and actions helped support and develop these young people. Finally, the community support. Our parent support has always been devoted, even at away games as far as Kent Island where we out-numbered their fans. The support of their children is unparalleled and is crucial to the effectiveness of our coaching. Thank you. But this season, the outpouring of the entire community was moving. One example is our Regional Championship game. On Saturday, March 8, my girls traveled to Waldorf to play Westlake High School. Since the boys played there the night before, we doubted that many people would choose to make the 3.5-hour trip two nights in a row. As we walked into the school, three grandfatherly gentlemen greeted my players with hand clapping and positive comments. While not related to anyone on the team, they came to support my girls as we took on a formidable opponent. While the outcome was not what we wanted, I was so proud of my girls’ effort and so honored to have the support of the community. As a community member, I hope you realize how crucial you are in the development of our young people. Thank you. In closing, thank you for choosing to be involved with the young people in our community. Your support is a rock being thrown in a pond. The resulting ripples are immeasurable. Amy Fenzel-Mergott Mathematics Teacher Varsity Basketball Coach Stephen Decatur High School

Donations instead of gifts

Editor, Recently my son, John Holloway, retired from Ocean City Fire/EMS after 28 years of service. He is very deserving and proud of this accomplishment. There was a party held in his honor and in lieu of gifts he asked everyone to bring donations for my new venture, “Kenille’s Kupboard Pet Pantry and Rescue.” We received over 500 pounds of food, which will help families in need take care of their pets and be able to keep them at home. Thanks to all those that attended his party and contributed to the Kupboard. Your support is so appreciated. Congratulations, John. Be proud of all your hard work and may all good things come your way. Kenille Davies Kenille’s Kupboard Pet Pantry And Rescue


MARCH 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 79


Ocean City Today

PAGE 80

MARCH 21, 2014

OCEANFRONT DINING 

 





:38)( :38)(

34)2(%-0= 

 

*VMHE] 7EXYVHE]TQTQ     FRIDAY, FRID DAY, Y, MARCH MARC 21st & SA SATURDAY, ATURD TURD DAYY,, MARCH MAR 22nd

FIRST CLASS POWER PO OWER W PLA PLAY LA AY Y FRIDAY, FRID DAYY,, MARCH MARC 28th & SATURDAY, SA ATURD TURD DAY, Y, MARCH MAR 29th

&,&756;`(4+&#;5#674&#;Ĺ&#x201C;9pm - 1am

2 2); );

( (60)22=´7 6   0 ) 2 2 = ´ 7 +098)2*6))1)29 + 098)2*6))1)29

792(%=XLVY 792(%= 8,967(%=

;)(2)7(%= $9.95 & $12.95 Dinner Specials 5-8pm

Halff OFF

Di Dinner Me Menu

Entrees Entrrees 5-8pm 5-8 +ROLGD\VV 6SHFLDOV([FOXGHG

TQXSTQ

Half OFF

Steak Stea k Night g New N wY York ork k SStrip ip,, Delmonico or Filet Mignon

Famous

ALL YOU-CAN-EAT

4VMQI6MF'VEF0IKW 7IEJSSH&YJJIX       $GXOWVÂ&#x2021;&KLOGUHQÂ&#x2021; 8QGHU)5((        

AT Taste Tast astte ooff C California aliffornia SSpring W ine P Pair airing D inne Wine Pairing Dinner Thursday, Thursday, April April 10th 77pm $85 pper er pperson erson Reservvaations Required

8,967(%=

Lobster Lunac Lunacyy SPOE/REVWHU

$17.95

*6-(%=

7%896(%=

20%OFF

Dinner Menu Entr Entrees rees 5-7 5-7pm +ROLGD\V 6SHFLDOV([FOXGHG

7%896(%= Br Breakfast eakfast Buffet

Deluxe Delux xe Breakfast Brreakfast e eakfast Buffet

7am-10:30am, $GXOWVÂ&#x2021;&KLOGUHQÂ&#x2021; 8QGHU)5((

7am-1pm, $GXOWVÂ&#x2021;&KLOGGUHQÂ&#x2021; 8QGHU)5((

HAPPY HOUR

SPECIALS DAILY 4-7PM (%-0=EQTQ

792(%=

20% OFF BO OTTLED WINES WI BOTTLED with the pur purchase chase of an aappetizer ppetizer or entreĂŠ entreĂŠ

Enjoy the Best From Enjoy From Our Awar wa d Winning Wine List! Award

Award of Excellence The Best of Excellence Award

(VEJJXW (SQIWXMG&IIVW 6EMP(VMROW 1EVKEVMXEWW

CLARION RESORT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FONTAINEBLEAU HOTEL

THE FINEST BUFFETS IN OCEAN CITY MD


3/21/14 Ocean City Today