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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.NET

MARCH 17, 2017

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Room tax increase coming?

New trams will require new money

Tourism commission broaches subject with industry reps

Replacing aging fleet would cost between $2 million-$4 million

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Raising Ocean City’s room tax is apparently on the minds of some Ocean City officials, as they started a long discussion on raising it, but industry members cautioned that doing so could alienate its customer base and resort hotels. During Monday’s Tourism Commission, Councilwoman Mary Knight sought the opinions of the Hotel- ‘We feel that it M o t e l - wouldn’t hurt Restaurant competitively.’ Association —Councilwoman and the Mary Knight Ocean City Chamber of Commence on raising the room tax from 4.5 percent to 5 percent by summer 2018. Wildwood and Myrtle Beach have 13 percent room tax, she said, while Atlantic City has the same tax plus a $5 per night charge and Virginia Beach has a 14 percent tax and a $2 per night charge. “We feel that it wouldn’t hurt competitively,” Knight said. She added that the city’s staffing levels remain significantly less than they were when the room tax took effect in 2009, while the city’s revenues also declined despite the need to maintain the same levels of service. It wasn’t until last year that the city’s budget apSee FOCUS Page 4

JOSH DAVIS/OCEAN CITY TODAY

ALMOST THERE Several painters, braving both hydraulic and analogue ladders, put the finishing touches on Boardwalk lampposts, near the inlet, last Tuesday.

Bay terrapins spared from old crab pots Volunteers collect 55 traps abandoned or forgotten

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Watermen and volunteers removed 55 abandoned crab pots from area bays last month as part of a Maryland Coastal Bays Program effort to clear the waters of hazards to terrapins. Commercial crabber Skip Maisel along with first mate Charlie Travers and a couple Assateague Conservation Corps volunteers spent two days in the bays See OYSTERS Page 5

First Mate Charlie Travers holds an oyster toadfish caught during the crab pot recovery effort recently.

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Only one thing is in the way of resort government’s desire to replace eight aging Boardwalk trams that have toiled on the board for the past 13 years. Make that two to four million things, actually, as the $2 million-$4 million cost of new replacements isn’t in the budget. The Boardwalk trams are past their life expectancy, Transit Manager Mark Rickards told Ocean City’s Transportation Commission Tuesday, and the first issue is to decide which type to get: gas, diesel or electric engines. Gas engine re‘It will look a placements would cost little more roughly $1.8 modern and million, he have leg room.’ said, while —Transit Manager the price of Mark Rickards diesel engine trams would be $2 million and electric engines would come in at $4 million. All projected prices came from Trams International, the same company that sold Ocean City its current fleet. Although the purchase price differences are obvious, Rickards said the operating costs are a different matter. “I really like electric [trams] at the moment since there’s no operating costs and no gas emissions,” he said. “We’re looking at a similar design, but it will look a little See CITY Page 5


Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

(March 17, 2017) The Ocean City Fire Marshal’s Office this week alerted property owners that new state requirements for carbon monoxide (CO) alarms in rental units that have fuelburning appliances go into effect next month. Although the passage of Senate Bill 182 during the Maryland General Assembly’s 2016 session does not mandate carbon monoxide alarms in areas not previously required by Ocean City, there are a few minor changes for qualifying new or existing rental units. Deputy Fire Marshal Joe Sexauer said the issue was previously addressed by the city through legislation 10 years ago. “The protection should already be there,” he said. “If we didn’t have this in place since 2007, this would be a bigger issue.” Under the new legislation, as is already the case in Ocean City, CO alarms must be installed outside of each sleeping area, and on every building level including the basement, if the structure contains any fuel burning equipment, wood burning appliance or includes an enclosed garage. There are no CO alarm requirements for dwelling units powered solely by electrical appliances and without an attached garage. The changes found in SB 182 relate to power supply requirements. Under the new rules, CO alarms must be powered by one of the following: hardwired to the electric with a battery backup, sealed, tamper-resistant 10-year batteries or a monitored fire alarm system. “The majority of the hotels went with hard wired alarms,” Sexauer said. “We don’t foresee it to be a huge issue.” There are two deadlines for compliance based on two category distinctions. Hotels, dormitories and rooming houses have to meet the requirements by April 1, 2017. All other rental units have until April 1, 2018 to comply. For questions regarding these changes, please contact the Ocean City Fire Department, Office of the Fire Marshal at 410-289-8780.

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National Park Service starts to sand deposition and encroachfrom the adjacent dune sysplanning strategy for rec. ment tem. The NPS believes that the areas; comment period set proposed project is needed in order (March 17, 2017) The National Park Service is preparing an Environmental Assessment in support of a new flexible design strategy for relocating campsites at its oceanside campground that are lost or repeatedly damaged by coastal storm events. Several new locations within the developed area on Assateague Island will be considered. The purpose of the proposed project is to develop an on-island relocation strategy for campsites that are becoming increasingly unusable due

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public to submit written suggestions, comments and concerns regarding the project to the online NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment (PEPC) website at: http://parkplanning.nps.gov/ OceansideCamping before March 31. A public open house will also be held to answer stakeholder questions and solicit additional public comments on Thursday, March 30 from 4-7 p.m. at Assateague Island National Seashore Environmental Education Center, 7206 National Seashore Lane, Berlin, Maryland 21811. A second public comment period will also be made available following the release of the EA later this spring.

to continue to provide high quality and sustainable camping opportunities for park visitors to Assateague Island. The environmental assessment will address any potential impacts to natural or cultural resources that may result from the proposed project. Input will also be gathered from other agencies and the public to consider the potential effects of the proposed project. There will be two opportunities to comment on the project. The NPS is currently in the scoping phase of the proposed project and invites the

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Focus on weekday business, industry reps say Continued from Page 1 proached what it had been in 2009, when total spending was $80.4 million versus $79.7 million last year. If the room tax is reconsidered, it would also give city officials a chance to recalibrate how it is spent. Currently, half of the 4.5 percent is designated to tourism marketing. Knight suggested that if the tax is raised, the city could designate some of those funds to special events or other costs. Budget Manager Jennie Knapp pointed out that if the room tax was increased to 5 percent there would be $1.4 million generated in the first year. Increases for subsequent years should be about what they are now. “There are other costs that you might not realize assigned to tourism, like the Beach Patrol,

keeping the beach clean with the tractor and maintaining the Boardwalk. It’s time to start thinking about replacing the boards,” Knapp said. From the hotel standpoint, HMRA Executive Director Susan Jones said although Ocean City might have the lowest room tax rates, the resort also has the highest average daily room rate as compared to its competing markets. The resort’s average daily rate in 2016 was $131.05. The year before, it was $128.11. “When you add on other tax, it’ll cost more every time you visit, which will push our [average daily rate] even higher,” Jones said. She added that if room tax is raised, the commission might need to focus on how marketing funds could be used to address the resort

hotel industry’s biggest problem: weekday occupancy. “If we’re [filling them] successfully, the room tax is automatically going to go up,” Jones said. “In two years, there’s 700 new rooms slated to come online. There’s half a million in revenue there, but the hotels are mostly franchises and need to stay open all year. How can we best totally fill rooms?” Convention center Director Larry Noccolino told the commission that high hotel rates in some instances have led event and convention guests to rent condominiums. “I’ve been told, ‘Don’t get me business in July; get me business the rest of the year.’ I want business all year, but it’s difficult with the rates we charge,” Noccolino said. “My biggest fear is that we’re going to price out of our market and these

events will go to Virginia Beach.” Councilman John Gehrig agreed that the part of the problem was the high hotel room costs on weekends, but argued that adjustments needed to be made in how the room tax money is spent. “We don’t need to keep advertising; we need a more targeted approach and fill in holes ... We need to get ideas on how to make [hotel] rates more stable so we’re not at risk of being the most expensive,” he said. “From a town perspective, our job is to create demand. It’s the hotel’s job to service it.” “The hotels need to understand that is if property taxes go up, the demand for real estate will go down, which mean property taxes must go up. That impacts them directly. So, we’re all partners in this,” Gehrig said.

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MARCH 17, 2017

City considers varying costs with diesel, electric engines Continued from Page 1 more modern and have more leg room. There’ll be a protector board so people can get on and off on one side.” The second and greater issue, however, is how Ocean City will pay for the new tram fleet, since the budget offers little flexibility. The best Budget Manager Jennie Knapp could offer would be to take $200,000 out of the fund balance (rainy day account) and use it for the first year on a $2 million lease purchase. “I don’t have all the figures yet, but if we go with electric, we’re going to have to get creative,” Knapp said. “One possibility to offset the cost of the trams is to increase the tram fare.” Early recommendations aside, Public Works Director Hal Adkins said that the trams would line up with whatever makes the most fiscal sense. “Realistically, if we went to electric, how much does it diminish daily? Numerically, does it make sense versus the feel-good green technology?” he asked. The Transportation Commission also discussed other possibilities, such as purchasing half the tram fleet now

and the rest later, or asking Trams International to buy back the old tram fleet. The trams would be ready eight months after the order was placed. Knapp added that not all trams were not quite end-of-life yet, under the procurement department’s criteria. “Depreciation starts more than 12 years, and under the life cycle criteria, not all have reached 100 percent use yet,” she said. Rickards will meet next month with a tram sub-committee he formed with the aim of returning with a recommendation in time to be considered in budget talks for next year. In addition to impending budget meetings, Adkins pointed out that the proposed tram facility on Second Street and St. Louis Avenue was also dependent on when the new trams are ordered. “This ties into it on whether we need a gasoline station above ground or underground storage tanks or an electric charge station,” Adkins said. “The plan is to get bids by March 24, start construction in the fall and finish construction by April 2018.”

Oysters and fish caught in traps Continued from Page 1 retrieving ghost crab pots, Feb 21-22. “No terrapins were found, but research shows turtles rapidly decompose,” said Sandi Smith, development and marketing coordinator for the Maryland Coastal Bays Program. “A few had by-catch reduction devices and a number of live and dead creatures were found inside such as oysters, various fish species and blue crabs.” These reduction devices are a simple piece of metal or plastic that blocks the entrance for terrapins because of their

shells. The majority of crab pots collected and removed were of the commercial type, which can be lost when boaters fail to yield to the floats that mark their location. If the floats are cut free, crabbers can’t retrieve the pots. “Looking for ghost crab pots is very weather-driven and limited to when the crabbing season is not going on,” Smith said. “We did not receive funding until January and plan to continue the program next year.” See LARGE Page 7

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Ocean City Today

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Resort sewer main repairs to get underway March 20 (March 17, 2017) Residents in Ocean City should expect disruptions to the sewer service beginning next week, as contractors from Am-Liner East Inc. begin the Cured-In-Place-Pipe (CIPP) method of trenchless pipe relining on the sanitary sewer main. The rehabilitation work is scheduled to start on March 20. A “door hanger” will be placed by contractors at homes that will be affected by the maintenance work, indicating the exact date of their sewer main section rehabilitation. Work will begin as early as 8 a.m. During this time, the sewer service must be discontinued for a period of approximately 10 hours. Property owners should draw the amount of water they will need for cooking and personal needs prior to 8 a.m. Residents are requested not to discharge (flush or drain) into the system until the work is completed. Access to residences will not be required and it is not necessary for anyone to be home during the reconstruction process. If residents have a SUMP PUMP that discharges directly to the sanitary sewer it must be disconnected. Also, due to the potential strong odor that is emitted during the chemical reaction process when the liner is curing, Am-Liner East Inc. recommends that residents pour a cup of water in all sink

traps (laundry tubs, basement sinks, etc.) which may not have been used lately to prevent this odor from entering in the residence. Should a problem arise restoring service within the time indicated, a representative from AM-Liner East Inc. will personally contact residents at their property to explain the resolution. It is imperative that no water be used during this work. Residents are also urged to cooperative with contractors and park at least 60 feet away from any manholes in front of their homes. The following representatives can be contacted at the numbers provided with any questions. If there are questions on the day, AM Liner is working in front of a residence, feel free and contact the crew directly. Steffen Sommerfeld/ PM, 540-3362204 or 540-955-9671, or Eric Simpson/superintendent at 540-486-6747 or 540-955-9671. The contract vehicles are generally white, and will all be marked with AMLiner East Inc. on the side for identification purposes. The Town of Ocean City thanks residents for their cooperation during this short inconvenience. For further question or concerns, contact Town of Ocean City Public Works at 410-5247716.

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Large-scale pot recovery planned Continued from Page 5 Crabbing season in the Maryland coastal bays takes place from March to October. The diamondback terrapin, the official state reptile of Maryland, has the same food source as crabs and once one goes inside the abandoned crab pots, more are likely to follow shortly after. These turtles become trapped inside and eventually drown. The decline of terrapin habitats is the main reason the Maryland House and Senate decided to ban commercial harvesting of terrapins in April 2007. Turtles take a long time to reproduce, which makes it harder to increase

population numbers quickly. Females need soft, sandy beaches for nesting. Many shorelines are too hard to serve as good nesting grounds and others are protected from erosion by bulkheads and riprap. Last June, an Ocean City resident discovered an abandoned crab pot on Assawoman Bay with more than 30 dead terrapins in various stages of decay trapped inside. “We plan to do this on a larger scale next year,” Smith said. “We ran out of time. It is a very important program. This spring, we will continue to promote turtle excluder devices in crab pots.”

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By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Instead of approving a measure that would increase tow rates in Ocean City, the City Council on Tuesday agreed to consider getting out of the towing business altogether. In October, towing companies appealed to the Police Commission to raise service rates, as the resort is the only one who regulates them in Worcester County. Under an ordinance passed in 2008, the cost of a standard tow of a gross vehicle mass of 26,000 kilograms is $150. Storage at the city’s impound lot starts at $10 for the first day and $15 an additional day. In comparison, police tow fees for the sheriff’s department, state police and other areas such as Ocean Pines, Berlin and Snow Hill $325, with a $30 impound fee. Pocomoke tows are set at $200. The Police Commission recommended months ago to raise Ocean City’s rate for a standard “snatch and go” to $250. Other suggestions included bumping fees for accidents and callouts to DWI incident scenes to $325

and $285, respectively. But the discussion on the increase was sidetracked, when City Solicitor Guy Ayres reported on preliminary results of a request that he compare Ocean City’s tow regulations with state law. “This [the city’s involvement in the towing industry] was done in the 1970s, and there wasn’t a state law at the time,” Ayres told the council. “People were parking cars on private properties and we’d get complaints about being gouged by tow companies on fees and storage. Because other municipalities have similar problems, but not to the magnitude as Ocean City, over the years, there was a state law passed.” Ayres had not finished the comparison between the local and state laws, but told the council that it was a separate matter from raising the tow rates. Councilmen Tony DeLuca and John Gehrig disagreed. “If the information comes back and we support the state law, then we’d let them price freely. It’s an option rather than voting for something halfway,” DeLuca said. Councilman John Gehrig said that he thought Ocean City shouldn’t be involved in the towing industry altogether. “Quite frankly, I’m in favor of repealing the ordinance, but I’m willing to wait on review,” he said. “I

don’t want to keep hopes alive if it’s something we should kill altogether.” Councilman Wayne Hartman also supported repealing the ordinance, but cautioned the council to consider the timing. The city issues right-to-tow stickers by June. Signs on countless private lots would also need to be replaced with language in concordance with the state law. Hartman also pointed out that the financial impact needed to be looked at. “We have in labor at the impound lot $147,000, we pay tow companies $217,000, we collect in stickers $27,000. There’s a lot of information to digest,” he said. Council Secretary Mary Knight argued that if the city waits too long to address the towing ordinance, companies would continue to be undercut by lower rates. “We owe it to the industry that’s been our partners,” she said, acknowledging the back row of tow truck drivers in the chambers. Council President Lloyd Martin agreed with both parties, and recommended that the matter be brought to a follow-up discussion as soon as possible. The council agreed to table the discussion until the March 28 work session.

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PAGE 10

Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

OC officials differ on trailer, smoking ban enforcement

was proper for him to second it, the motion died because Hartman was on the other side of the argument. “The biggest complaint I hear from people is that we pass so many ordiBy Katie Tabeling nances, but you don’t enforce them,” Staff Writer he said. (March 17, 2017) Any changes in The opposite seemed to be the the enforcement policy of the Board- issue with the trailer parking ordiwalk smoking ban and the trailer nance passed in 2015. Its intent was parking ordinance will have to wait to get “oversized vehicles” without a for another day, as the Ocean City Po- permit off public streets or parking lice Commission on Monday could lots from May 1 to Oct. 31. That timenot agree on a recommendation to frame focuses on popular events like the full City Council in either case. Crusin’ Ocean City, OC BikeFest and Police Chief Ross Buzzuro told Endless Summer Crusin’. No overcommission members he preferred sized vehicles, including those with having officers to use discretion on trailers, are allowed to park on Baltiwhen to issue a warning or a ticket. more Avenue throughout the year. He pointed to the OCPD’s approach OCPD heavily enforced the trailer to the smoking ban an example, as of- ban in its first year, resulting in 368 ficers educate smokers on the local citations, each costing $250. An unlaw before issuing the $100 citation. intended side-effect was that drivers “The big picture is that 90 percent would park momentarily in the city of the noncompliance is from visi- while picking up permits at the contors,” he said during Monday’s meet- vention center and would find a ticket ing. “Our policy is that when when they returned. someone is smok“We’d rather ing or vaping, and look at each viola‘We’d rather look at each [is] unfamiliar to an tion incident. We violation incident. We think officer, to advise think it should be them not to do it.” looked at a case-byit should be looked at a The smoking ban case basis,” Buzzuro case-by-case basis.’ was enacted in said. “We believe 2015, and the Police Police Chief Ross Buzzuro Baltimore Avenue Commission orshould be prohibdered the department to get tougher ited, but on the side streets, we see if about it last year. That resulted in 79 we can ascertain a reasonable explacitations last summer. nation.” As part of the “education first” polHartman again advised the comicy, city staff also suggested putting mission against police discretion and the message on the electronic sign on wanted to keep the current system in the Boardwalk and to including the place to see if it truly works. advisory on signs on the back of life“This is a good test to see if enguard stands. forcement or education is the right All councilmembers agreed to the way to go,” he said. e-sign message, but Councilman Dare argued for a more considered Wayne Hartman thought the time for approach. particularly in uptown respolice warnings was over. idential areas, as he saw people park“Discretion, I think, is so abused. ing their trailers on front lawns in There’s a point where the message Montego Bay to avoid the citation. He comes from learning the hard way. added that the objective is to achieve, The message is someone says, ‘Ocean not to encourage people to find loopCity is trying to clean up its act. I was holes. on the Boardwalk and I got a smoking “It’s one thing to get a ticket, it’s citation,’” Hartman said. another to get the ticket and take it to Buzzuro responded that the goal is court and have the judge say the fine compliance and that if someone is was ridiculous and get it reduced to warned and stops smoking, then the $25,” Dare said. “I’d like to see it remission has been accomplished. If duced to $100 or have a warning.” the smoker resists or is seen again, Buzzuro also said that when it there would be automatic enforce- came to enforcement last year, police ment. issued citations on their own discreCouncil Secretary Mary Knight tion when it came to side streets. agreed, but said that she wanted Those cases depended if the trailer fewer year-round residents to flout was on the sidewalk or affected anythe law. one’s peace. “I’ve seen a friend smoke on the Knight again made a motion to Boardwalk and they said they could recommend OCPD keep track of unbecause they’re local. That’s the per- permitted oversized vehicles that son I’d like to see get the ticket,” she park for a few hours before issuing a said. $100 citation. The motion died, as Knight made a motion to recom- Hartman was adamant about keeping mend signage and continue citing of- enforcement at its same strength. fenders at the officer’s discretion. But “This is black and white,” Hartman since Commission Chairman Coun- said. “I don’t see anything discrecilman Dennis Dare did not think it tionary about parking.”

Police Commission unable to make recommendation, council to discuss next wk.


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

PAGE 11

‘Light Up OC’ sub-committee forms to bring holiday spirit

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Ocean City will be considering Christmas early this year, as the resort’s Recreation and Parks Commission committed to help the Downtown Association with its “Light Up OC” initiative. In January, Kevin Gibbs, chair of the association’s “Light Up Downtown” program informed the council that he had raised $25,000 to buy six light displays and put them up downtown. The idea, he told the commission on Tuesday, was to revive a past tradition of drive-thru light displays at the inlet parking lot, where families could enjoy a free show while inside their car. The objective would be to make Christmas a viable tourist attraction in Ocean City. “We are behind other municipalities on celebrating it,” he said to the Recreation and Parks Commission. “Winterfest is too big an asset not to. In my opinion, we need to be lighting up the town north to south. Downtown is a small part of it, but we’d like to make this a destination and have people go to restaurants on weekends. Hopefully, we can start a precedent by putting lights on the far side of the inlet.” Gibbs asked for the city’s assistance in three ways: providing storage for the association’s current and future light displays, installation from the Public Works staff and repurposing a handful Winterfest of Lights displays that are near the end of their usefulness. The Recreation and Parks Commission agreed that there was space in a trailer, so storage would be no issue. But Special Events Superintendent Frank Miller said that lending some of the 400 Winterfest displays would be out of the question. “We don’t discard any. We get them refurbished by the manufacturer. There was a time with the budget we could slowly add to them, but we can’t add any more in 2017,” Miller said. The commission also was told that when light displays were on the beach

and the inlet lot, storms would batter them and increase their need for maintenance. The old archways were subject to water damage during rainstorms and inlet lot flooding. The commission presented an option for Light Up OC: starting a private partnership to decorate downtown businesses with a theme. That way, it would be complementary to Winterfest of Lights instead of becoming its competition. “Some displays make sense, not a lot,” Miller said. “My hope is that we look at the big picture that includes the downtown having a classic Christmas theme with outlining the buildings in lights, garland and candles.” Commission members also proposed having a decorating contest, with a cash prize and getting to the point where walking tours are encouraged. Miller added that the overall theme could include attractions such as the Life-saving Museum, the Art League, ice skating at the Carousel on 117th Street, restaurants that are open and other businesses to fully encompass what the town offers. Gibbs was reluctant to let go of bringing back the drive-thru light displays. “Winterfest is celebrating its 25th anniversary. We haven’t had inlet lights for five years, so [Winterfest] grew fine when there were inlet lights,” Gibbs said. “I don’t think you’re going to have any effect other than people happy they have a free show after they get done freezing for an hour.” But he did come on board with lighting downtown businesses with a ‘white Christmas’ theme, and the lighting midtown buildings with different colors. “We can just white it out,” Gibbs said. “We should just avoid the inlet lot since it’s a hot-button issue. I get more excuses than answers.” To explore all options and to establish a three-year Christmas tourism plan, a Light Up OC subcommittee will be established. Councilman Wayne Hartman will serve as council liaison.

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Fatal fall determined suicide By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) A woman apparently jumped to her death from a balcony of a Boardwalk hotel on March 9, Ocean City Police said. Around 2:30 p.m., police responded to an Emergency Medical Services assist call after a woman leaped from a 10th floor balcony of the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites on 17th Street into an empty swimming pool. The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner ruled that the death was a suicide, Police Public Affairs Specialist Lindsay Richard said.

This is the first fatal from a balcony in Ocean City this year. Last year, there was one fall, including a fatality. On May 21, 2016 Jordan M. Hess, 29, of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania fell from an eighth-floor balcony on the south side of the Stowaway Grand Hotel on 21st Street. In February, a construction worker fell two stories from a building around 141st Street. The victim was up and walking when Ocean City EMS arrived on the scene. The construction worker was taken to Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury for non-life threatening injuries.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 12

MARCH 17, 2017

Carozza pushes numerous bills this session

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Maryland State Delegate Mary Beth Carozza (R-38C) has had an active couple of weeks in Annapolis, with three bills going into their initial hearings and another piece earning unanimous House approval last month, while three more measures had initial hearings this month. On its way to the Maryland Senate is House Bill 256, which addresses adult protective services investigations. It looks to double the time local social service departments have to conduct non-emergency inquiries from 30 to 60 days. The legislation passed the house by a 138-0 vote on Feb. 23. “I believe many of our best ideas for increasing public safety come from those on the front lines who work with our elderly on a daily basis,” Carozza said in a press release. “This change to increase the investigative time for these cases would result in more findings of abuse and neglect, and more protections for our most vulnerable elderly.” Prohibiting bow riding is the aim of HB 1609, an emergency boat safety cosponsored by Delegate Charles Otto (R38A), which had an initial house hearing on Feb. 23. The legislation is cross-filed with SB1147, sponsored by Maryland Senator Jim Mathias (D-38), which had a first senate reading on Feb. 24. The narrowly crafted legislation

would exempt vessels propelled by sail, oars or paddles, Carozza said. “This bill is aimed to protect life and prevent injuries by making clear that dangerous bow riding is prohibited,” she said. Current regulations prohibit the operation of a motorboat in a reckless or dangerous manner that could endanger lives or property. Under the proposed bill those prohibitions would be extended to riding the bow of a motorboat so that limbs of the body extend outside the hull of the vessel or in a generally dangerous manner. An initial hearing in the House Ways and Means Committee for HB 413, otherwise known as the Pathways in Technology Early College High (PTECH) School Act of 2017, was held on Feb. 21. “One of my top priorities since I was elected has been to support and strengthen career technical education so our young people have the opportunity to prepare for careers in the technical and trades fields,” she said. Carozza is among 40 delegates cosponsoring the legislation that would require the State Department of Education to consult with the Maryland Higher Education Commission to develop and administer a P-TECH school program. Carozza is also working with Department of Labor Secretary Kelly Schulz and local schools to examine ex-

panding apprenticeship programs on the shore and said the construction industry continues to be challenged by a shortage in skilled workforce labor. Carozza is among a slew of delegates supporting HB 1420, which would create a new category of statewide brewery licenses. The house held an initial hearing on this bill on Feb. 20. “The legislation establishes a Class 10 modern brewery license in the state and authorizes the license to be issued for use in any jurisdiction,” she said. The effort is reminiscent of past legislation Carozza promoted. “During the 2015 session, I introduced HB 689, which established a limited distillery license for Worcester County and allowed Seacrets in Ocean City to bring jobs and revenue to Maryland rather than having to go to Delaware’s distillery operations.” Under the proposed bill, instances where licenses are issued for use on farms, the beer manufacturer in question must use at least one ingredient grown on the property. It also establishes a size limit of no more than 4 ounces for samples provided on site. Another education initiative Carozza is co-sponsoring is HB 878, the Public Charter School Act of 2017, which would establish the Maryland Public Charter School Authority to provide oversight and strengthen charter school programs in the state. The fate of this bill is uncertain following an un-

favorable report by the House Ways and Means Committee last Thursday. Addressing the devastating impacts of opioids on the Eastern Shore is another priority for Carozza, who as a member of the House Health and Human Resources Appropriations Subcommittee is supporting Gov. Hogan’s 2018 budget, which includes approximately $4 million in expanded funding for heroin opioid addiction treatment. Also Carozza is co-sponsoring HB 687, which would hold defendants accused of peddling heroin, or comparable opioids that proved lethal, responsible even without direct contact with the decedent. This bill also had an initial house hearing on Feb. 28. Turning her attention to softer drugs, Carozza is also backing HB 1043, which is the latest legislative effort to temper wider pubic approval and legal permission to consume cannabis with safety-inspired prohibitions. “I am a cosponsor of HB 1043 and similar bills from past sessions to prohibit smoking pot in public and vehicles,” she said. During the 2015 legislative session, Carozza authored a House floor amendment to ban smoking marijuana in public. The bill, which in the past has faced Senate challenges, was scheduled for a first reading in the house on Feb. 28.

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PAGE 14

Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

County agencies pivot to reduce opioid use Gov. Hogan declares state of emergency beginning of month to address epidemic

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (March 17, 2017) After a couple of weeks, the Worcester County Health and Emergency Services departments are still reorganizing and integrating efforts to fight the opioid emergency in the state by coordinating existing and emerging committees, nonprofits and programs. “It’s still very much a work in progress,� Fred Webster, county emergency services director, said. The emergency declaration put Webster at the forefront of this fight, along with the health department, and he is taking over where the Department of Health and Mental Hy-

giene had jurisdiction previously. Webster participated in a conference call with Maryland Emergency Management Agency chief, and Ocean City Emergency Services alumnus, Clay Stamp on Wednesday that would further clarify his new responsibilities. He said he’s participated in toplevel meetings with department heads at the health department to familiarize himself with the existing structure, and would be meeting with the standing committees devoted to the issue soon. According to Travis Brown, health department public information officer, at the county level there are two: the Worcester County Drug and Alcohol Council and its subset committee Opioid Awareness Task Force. “At a strictly Health Department level, we have an in-house Opioid Re-

sponse Team and an Overdose Fatality Review Team,� Brown said. These join the myriad public and private interests combating the problem in the state. “Obviously there’s a problem — opioid overdose is now the fourth leading cause of death in the state,� Debbie Goeller, Worcester Health Officer, said. “There’s no denying it’s an emergency.� Goeller said the emergency declaration, made by Gov. Hogan on March 1, allows additional powers and authorities between agencies to allow rapid information sharing. “All of the things we’ve been doing will continue as-is or enhanced. The governor is talking about more funding, and it would be a welcome addition,� she said. Goeller’s funding priorities related to the opioid emergency are to pur-

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Worcester County government has issued a letter opposing proposed alterations to Maryland’s Forest Conservation Act. Bob Mitchell, county environmental programs director, said the Maryland General Assembly held hearings last month for Senate Bill 365 and House Bill 599, which would make three changes to state reforestation regulations. The legislation would increase the minimum reforestation rate requirements from a quarter-acre for every acre removed to one acre for each acre cleared. Secondly, the bills would limit FCA exemptions for clearing of public utility right of ways to one acre. The bills would also give the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, or local jurisdictions, the ability to raise fee-in-lieu rates, which are fees paid when reforestation requirements are difficult to meet. “This is a solution in search of a problem in our opinion,� Mitchell said.

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Local enforcement of the current FCA regulations is already challenging, Mitchell said. “You’re not making any friends when you have to tell people what they have to do and now they have to quadruple (those efforts),â€? he said. In 2013, Maryland established a “No Net Loss of Forestâ€? policy that mandates at least 40 percent tree canopy cover is maintained statewide. “Looking at the cover across the state, we’re at 49 percent ‌ and Worcester is at 52 percent,â€? he said. “It doesn’t seem like there’s a need.â€? The Maryland Association of Counties also opposes the legislation, arguing the revisions would raise costs for local governments, businesses and residents, without a demonstrable need for more stringent requirements. “That’s what the Maryland Association of Counties argued, ‘Hey check into what your state agency is doing because they’re not letting anybody off,â€? Mitchell said. Although the revisions wouldn’t generally apply to Ocean City, which Mitchell said is located largely in critical watershed areas that have separate FCA requirements, the changes might affect growth in the county. “It’s not the easiest thing to tell people to do, but everybody’s been doing it,â€? he said. “If they want to make it harder on people, in our opinion you’re going to drive sprawl.â€? Mitchell said the original intent of the CFA was quite the opposite. “I think this was an anti-sprawl thing and we wanted people to grow in the right places,â€? he said. “That’s why we have the comprehensive plan, that’s why we have the corridor plan and the other stuff for long-term planning.â€? Increasing the cost of regulations related to forestlands may have an impact on future projects by land developers across the state, Mitchell said. “It could drive people to go where they have the least amount of cost and it might not be the best place to grow, that’s where the sprawl comes in,â€? he said. “This is almost forcing you to sprawl in some counties.â€? Increasing already challenging FCA regulations could be problematic, Mitchell said. “We have rules that are hard to enforce and it’s hard to get compliance from the development community sometimes,â€? he said. “Then you have things you want to make it even more difficult, so you’re just asking for conflict.â€? While MACo has taken the lead in opposing the legislation, Mitchell said Worcester is unlikely to be the only county involved in fighting the changes. “I don’t think were the only county that is going to weigh in with anecdotal evidence,â€? he said. “We’re just trying to lend our voices to the fight but it doesn’t always work because we’re not the biggest county.â€?


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

Council solidifies Chamber partnership by funding sign Although initial proposals had city-only payment, vote was for $10K in five years

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) The Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce will get $10,000 a year for five years from Ocean City government to pay for its new electronic sign on Route 50. Chamber Executive Director Melanie Pursel went before the council Tuesday to seek financial help, after the business organization had agreed to lease a $41,000 sign for five years. Pursel presented two payment options to the council a one-time investment of $20,000 or an annual advertising agreement of $10,000. “We feel that we’re the gateway of Ocean City. We have 40,000 cars passing our center daily in the summer,” she said. “The intent is to promote events like Springfest and car events. We welcomed people for other events like St. Patrick’s Day Parade and people like that. It makes them feel like we’re welcoming them into town.” She added that if the city were interested, control of the reader could be given to officials to get the word out on emergency situations like the Route 50 bridge closings, Amber Alerts and other weather conditions. Pursel said that she was also seeking funding from the Worcester County Chamber, something that piqued Councilman Wayne Hartman’s interest. “There’s businesses represented by the chamber that aren’t represented by municipality [chambers], so I think the county has an obligation,” Hartman said. “You have West Ocean City – that room and property tax goes to the county.” He made a motion to pay $10,000 as a one-time investment, contending that the business community had an obligation to pay for the chamber.

Pursel clarified that no business gets paid advertising outside the ads placed in the chamber publications. When a business appears on the reader, it’s promoting a venue of an event. Mayor Rick Meehan and Council Secretary Mary Knight both supported paying the $20,000, because of the chamber’s amicable relationship with the resort. Hartman then withdrew the motion and made a second one to fund the sign at $12,000 – 60 percent of the $20,000, representing the 60 percent of Ocean City businesses the chamber represents. “There’s an issue everyone’s aware of between the city and the county – tax differential,” he said. “You’re anticipating funding from the county. If you look at it this way, the community pays for half and the government pays for half.” Councilman Dennis Dare said that he would like to see additional funding, but argued for the $10,000 annual agreement. “We have dedicated 2 percent out of room tax for marketing advertising that would basically benefit the sign,” Dare said. “$10,000 a year out of a funding source would compensate what we receive from ongoing benefits from our partnership with the chamber.” Pursel said that sign maintenance and a payment on the five-year loan would cost $13,000 a year. Hartman was swayed by this fact and Dare’s argument and withdrew his second motion. He made a third motion to pay for a $10,000 annual contribution for five years providing that the city’s funding would come from the advertising budget that was generated by room tax. “I hope that the county offers its support and recognizes what you contribute,” Hartman said to Pursel. The motion passed 6-0. Councilman John Gehrig abstained from the vote, as he serves as the Chamber of Commerce’s President.

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Trash cans with a print wrap in Cocoa Beach, Florida through the “Creative Cans in the Sand” initiative inspired Ocean City to see if it can have a similar program here.

Green Team moves forward with trash can art initiative Business sponsorship and grants sought with beach beautification as end goal

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Ocean City officials hope to beautify the beach with local art, one trash can at time. That’s what City Councilman Tony DeLuca declared at last week’s Coastal Resources Legislative Committee “Green Team” meeting, using trash cans to remind beachgoers that their trash belongs inside the receptacles and not in the sand. “We’re not going to paint all 800 of them,” DeLuca said. “Rather than putting one can out on 48th Street, we’re going to do them in clusters of three or five by spring.” The idea for the local program came from the “Creative Cans in the Sand” initiative in Cocoa Beach, Florida, where business people, artists, volunteers and local government agreed two years ago to get behind an anti-litter campaign. Following that lead, DeLuca has involved other city staff and local enterprises such as the Ocean City Art League and Ocean City Development Corporation in determining how to decorate the bins. After meeting with Public Works Director Hal Adkins, the advocates decided on putting artistic wraps around the container rather than paint. “We’re worried that the [trash truck] will scratch it, since that was a problem in Cocoa Beach, so we’re going to test out wraps. Public Works

would do the first one free. Wraps last a year or two,” DeLuca said. The plan is that painting the trash cans would come at no cost to the taxpayers, and the Green Team would seek business sponsors for the program. Two sign companies in Ocean City are conducting bids on the wrap to see what that cost would be. “Once we get a cost, we can reach out to businesses. If you look at the wraps [in Cocoa Beach] they have a tastefully done logo of who did it in the upper corner,” DeLuca said. Ryan James of Mother’s Cantina of 28th Street, who attended the meeting, was already sold on the idea. “There’s an immediate return on the investment for the businesses, even to get your website around the top of the can,” James said. “The possibilities are immense.” Painting the cans could also involve students at the Art League, as the organization’s executive director, Rina Thaler, was given the reigns on the project. In addition to supporting the community arts, businesses could receive some financial benefits. “Once a business were to pay her for the can [through the Art League], it’d be a tax deduction since it’s a 501c(3),” DeLuca said. In the meantime, the Green Team will explore possible grant funding and business sponsorships. To say that advocates are confident that this campaign will work might be an understatement. “The biggest problem will be people calling, ‘Why doesn’t my street have one?’” city Environmental Engineer Gail Blazer said.


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

Council weighs deed transfer for pedestrian safety initiative Officials reject proposed space for utility cabinet integral to fence project

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Ocean City government has endorsed a deed agreement to install a street lighting control box to help expedite the median fence project, but want the State Highway Administration to reconsider where it would be placed. In January, the SHA received one bid of $6.48 million to install a sanddune style fence from the Route 90 bridge to Convention Center Drive to discourage pedestrians from jaywalking. The project would also include LED lights to illuminate the sidewalks and to reduce pedestrian-involved collisions. Since the anticipated cost was $4.5 million, the project was shelved while the SHA reviewed similar projects across the state. During the Feb. 28 session, Public Works Director Hal Adkins proposed a deed conveyance for a 450 square-foot parcel on 41st Street to place the stainless-steel control box that would control the LED lights, believing the measure would expedite the process. The City Council agreed to proceed with a first reading, and asked for a clear rendering of where the box would be placed. But after a rendering was supplied, Councilman Dennis Dare voiced several concerns about its location. “When you’re southbound on Coastal Highway, this is the first sight you have of the convention center. I know having equipment blocking the view of the convention center isn’t the best thing,” Dare said during the first reading on March 6. He added that turning that area would also give the SHA authority

over the appearance of that area, including the underground irrigation system used to maintain the landscape or a monument-style sign that the city planned to put there. “They don’t maintain that landscaping, we do. The landscaping they maintain out by Route 50 gets mowed three times a year,” Dare said. “This corner is an ideal sign location, so either now or in the future, we’d be giving that up.” Dare proposed tabling the matter so that city staff and SHA might find alternative locations for the control box. Councilman Wayne Hartman agreed with Dare, but argued that there was still time for the SHA to find a new location in the weeks before the ordinance’s second reading. Adkins told the council that this matter was not time-sensitive to the median project. “They were trying to wrap up a few loose ends. They intend to re-bid this project in the next 60 to 90 days,” Adkins said. The SHA had wanted to start construction in January so it could wrap up in time for Memorial Day 2017. But when the overpriced bid came in, the SHA started reviewing similar projects across the state to compare what was done in the procurement process. Now, the median project is coupled with a resurfacing and mill project for 62nd Street to 26th Street, which could entice more bidders. A notice to proceed is expected to be issued in October. Adkins added that he proposed a 42nd Street spot for the control box, as the city already had utilities in place near the Makai Condominiums. “I haven’t gotten an answer out of them yet about what caused them to change locations. There may be flexibility in this,” he said. Although the council agreed to table the ordinance, Hartman continued to push to pass it until a better See PUBLIC Page 20

Joe Wilson brought on board to city planning commission

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) The Ocean City Planning and Zoning Commission welcomed a new member this week, Joe Wilson. Wilson was brought before the City Council during Tuesday’s closed session, at Mayor Rick Meehan’s suggestion. “We have a vacancy due to the retirement of John Staley, who served 30 plus years,” Meehan said during Tuesday’s work session. “We certainly will have Mr. Staley come in to honor his service.” In the meantime, the council voted unanimously to appoint Wilson to the

Planning and Zoning Commission. He was sworn in shortly afterwards. Wilson is an Ocean City native and graduated from Worcester Preparatory School in 2008. He was also graduated with a bachelor’s degree in political science from Charleston College. Wilson is familiar with Ocean City properties; his parents were realtors and he followed in their footsteps. He became a Maryland sales associate Realtor in 2009, Maryland Associate broker Realtor and Delaware sales associate Realtor in 2013. Wilson is a Realtor at Condominium Realty, LTD and serves as a director on the Coastal Association of Realtors.

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Ocean City Today

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NASA rejoins Worcester jobs pipeline after four-year lull STEM program offered to three age groups through summer camps, internships By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (March 17, 2017) In 2013 the Federal governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;fiscal cliffâ&#x20AC;? sequestration forced NASA to scale back its involvement in educational programs like internships for Worcester students, but this year has returned along with a host of other local businesses to involve students in science, technology, engineering and math. The STEM summer program is composed of three parts, separated by age. Certain portions of the program are competitive, and all can be applied to via www.chooseworcester.org/STEM. Applications are being accepted until the end of the month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve set up a kind of pipeline so local students can find opportunities,â&#x20AC;? Merry Mears, director of economic development, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more here in this field than I realized when I joined the department.â&#x20AC;? The Reach for the Stars STEM Camp is an eight-day computer science and engineering summer camp offering instruction by engineers from NASA and the private sector, in conjunction with a team of qualified educators. Offered at The Red Doors Community Center on Third Street in Ocean City, it is open to students enrolled in grades 6-8 in the 2016/2017  school year. There is no cost to participate in the camp,  and transportation from centralized points in the county is provided. Space is limited to 20 students. Camp runs July 17-20 and July 24-27. Mears said the students would participate in robotics programs, among others and would take a field trip to NASAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters at Wallops Island to immerse themselves in the work the administration does, along with the aerospace industry as a whole. The Worcester STEM Leadership Cohort is designed for students en-

rolled in grades 9-11 in the 2016-17 school year. Participants meet on Thursdays in July for professional development sessions on a variety of career readiness topics, including resume writing, interview skills, workplace communication, conflict resolution, leadership and entrepreneurship. Students will receive mentorship from several STEM workforce partners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is the bridge between the camp and the internship,â&#x20AC;? Mears said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for students looking toward the internship and are investigating their college and county options.â&#x20AC;? The cohort will also tour the NASA facility. The STEP UP Internship Program provides high school seniors, college students and graduate students with opportunities to gain hands-on work experience in STEM related career fields. The 2017 interns will be given opportunities to work in healthcare settings, tech companies, engineering firms, environmental science agencies and digital media production companies. A strength of the program is that it allows the businesses to interview its potential interns at the camp so the best fit can be found, Mears said. Interns in the previous years of the program exercised their new skills at Hardwire LLC, NASA Wallops Flight Facility, Martin Physical Therapy, Atlantic General Hospital, Peninsula Cardiology, West Ocean City Injury and Illness Center, Bel-Art, TR Group, Studio Codeworks, D3Corp, Full City Media, Sprout Creatives, Maryland Coastal Bays Program, State Ventures, LLC, Habitat for Humanity, EA Science Technology and Engineering and Eastern Shore Physical Therapy, among others. Interns work 100 hours total from June 1 to July 27 and earn $11/hour.  The application process for each program is competitive. Applications can be submitted online through March 31. For more information, call Fawn Mete at 410-289-5576.

Public Works to request new location for cabinet on hwy. Continued from Page 19 option is presented. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I agree, [but] a first reading doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost the town anything,â&#x20AC;? Hartman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we want to get it right the first time instead of sending something away and having to work on it some more?â&#x20AC;? Councilman Matt James asked. The motion failed with a 2-5 vote, with Dare, James, Councilman John Gehrig, Council Secretary Mary Knight and Council President Lloyd Martin voting in opposition.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;You got some work to do,â&#x20AC;? Martin told Adkins. Ultimately, the council wants to expand the lighting and fence from the beginning to the end of the resortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main artery. Â The initial phase focuses on 62nd Street and the convention center because it has some of the resortâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most popular bars. Tentatively, the second phase would be from 26th Street to the convention center. The third phase would move further downtown to Ninth Street. After that, the plan is to change directions and move north.


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

St. Peter’s Lutheran works for immigrant rights in OC Congregations defy political culture of demonization, ostracization of newcomers

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Sign, sign, can’t you read the sign. The marquee in front of St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 10301 Coastal Hwy., which translates to “We are in solidarity with immigrants,” is a response to the recent spike in arrests and detentions by Immigration Control and Enforcement officials, said Pastor Gregg Knepp. Concerned that families are being torn apart, Knepp consulted with Bishop Bill Gohl Jr., who oversees more than 170 Lutheran Churches in Delaware and Maryland. “Before I knew it, I had agreed to coordinate a response on the Eastern Shore,” he said. “I’m not sure if I volunteered or if I was assigned this responsibility.” Knepp contacted pastoral colleagues in Baltimore and Washington D.C. to inquire how their communities were responding to the crisis. “Plans by the new presidential administration to increase deportations and limit refugees entering … has united faith leaders across the country,” he said. “The faith community has really galvanized around this issue.” After speaking to a number of his peers, Knepp discovered some congregations focused on assisting families to establish contingency plans if separated over immigration matters, while others were offering training regarding legal rights for the undocumented residents. “For the most part, pastors and congregations felt ill-equipped to handle this new reality,” he said. “One community service organization reported handling over 200 requests for legal documents related to parental rights and guardianship.”

Most troubling for Knepp were stories of parents fearful to leave their children while they go to work, or children afraid their parents will be deported while they are in school. “Basically, people immigrate today for the same reasons my ancestors emigrated from Germany one hundred years ago,” Knepp said. “They are seeking a better life for their families. They hope for a brighter future for their children and a safe place to live.” Offering welcome to immigrants and refugees became a priority for the Lutheran Church following World War I, Knepp said. “Historically we have been a church of immigrants, originally from Germany and Scandinavia, but more recently from countries in western Africa and Central America,” he said. “So caring for the stranger is in our DNA.” U.S. history has been rife with negative stereotypes as subsequent ethnic groups began moving into society and now immigrants are once again being demonized, Knepp said. “The current social and political climate in our country is toxic,” he said. “As a pastor, my role is to offer an alternative worldview based upon mutual respect, rather than fear.” Knepp noted that the Bible guides adherents to offer hospitality to strangers. “As people of faith, we can’t turn our backs on our sisters and brothers just because it’s politically popular or expedient,” he said. Knepp plans to contact faith leaders, community organizations, as well as employee and social service groups across the region to examine potential next steps. “The strategy for each community may be different, depending upon the partners involved,” Knepp said. “But the common goal will be to stand in solidarity with our immigrant neighbors and to offer our support in their time of need.”

Picnic table case reaches settlement between parties By Josh Davis Associate Editor (March 17, 2017) The Town of Berlin has settled an alleged equal protection claim, according to Luke Rommel, a Salisbury attorney representing complainant Ronshell Shockley. Shockley contended she was forced to leave a public park – under threat of arrest – after an officer with the Berlin Police Department found her sitting on top of a picnic table at Dr. William Henry Park on June 30. Shockley is African-American and the officer was white.

“The Shockleys and the Town of Berlin have reached a settlement agreement,” Rommel said in a statement emailed on Tuesday. “The terms of the settlement are confidential. Both sides are satisfied with the outcome.” Also on Tuesday, Berlin Mayor Gee Williams confirmed the resolution. “The suit was settled,” he said. “The claim was settled to the satisfaction of all parties to the case, and the specific terms of the agreement are confidential. I’m pleased that it’s behind us.”


MARCH 17, 2017

Zoning appeals bd. approves four county variances

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (March 17, 2017) The Worcester County Board of Zoning Appeals approved four variances at its meeting last Wednesday, one in Bishopville, one in Ocean Pines, one in West Ocean City and one in Whaleyville. First on the agenda was an afterthe-fact variance requested by Daniel “DJ” Shirk, who was rehabilitating his father-in-law’s grandparent’s house in Bishopville. During the course of the renovations, Shirk replaced the front porch of the structure, because it had rotted through. Part of those renovations included extending the porch significantly, from 13 feet to 30 feet in length, and that ran afoul of the setback. Shirk said he received a stop work order, and had to wait for the meeting to plead his case. Shirk had photos of the site, signed letters from his neighbors who approved of the change and proof that other neighbors had also received similar variances beforehand, but no photos of the porch as it had existed before work began. This was viewed as a detriment to his case, but the board ended up granting his variance. Next, the board considered the case of Kevin Johnson, who wanted to install a six-foot tall security and privacy fence along what he considers to be his back yard on Course Road. Since foot traffic in the area is increasing, Johnson said his situation was deteriorating without the fence. Because of his property’s configuration, however, the county doesn’t see it as a front yard/back yard situation, but considers his property as having two front yards, which are subject to different rules. One is that only four-foot fences are allowed on front yards, and another requires lots to be 50 feet wide for the taller fence. Johnson’s second front yard is 40 feet wide. His request was granted. Louis Waldhauser of Ocean Pines hired attorney Mark Cropper to plead his case for a variance on a 5,000-square foot lot to do some home improvements. Of the more than 700 lots in the subdivision, only about 50 were the same size as Waldhausers, and most of those, Cropper showed, had already received the same variance he requested. The granted variances of his neighbors ranged from encroachments between two and five and a half feet, while Waldhauser was requesting five feet. Based on the evidence, the board granted the request. Finally, on an application from Beracah homes to build a single-family home with a detached garage in the Resource Protection district, a previously forested section of the larger parcel was overlooked as a viable housing site, resulting in the variance being granted.

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Updated chicken house rules pass planning commission

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Public hearing on newer version of regulations set for April 4 meeting in SH

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (March 17, 2017) About this time last year, a proposal to strengthen the county’s regulation of poultry farms — and restricting mega-growing operations known as Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) — began making its way through county government. But even though the county planning commission recommended these revised regulations to the county commissioners last October, the proposed zoning amendment that would have enacted them never got far beyond the launch pad. County Commissioner Jim Bunting, the commissioners board president, said none of the elected officials felt comfortable enough then to put their name on the proposal, thus leaving the amendment in governmental limbo. Last Thursday, however, the planning commission returned to the issue, and passed it unanimously, once again putting the ball into the commissioners’ court. The following Tuesday, the commissioners scheduled a public hearing on the amendment on April 4. One member of the board will need to sponsor the legislation before it can be debated in public. “Generally, the new draft expands and clarifies the language with regard to vegetative buffers, eliminates the sliding density scale for poultry houses allowed on a particular parcel from 12 to 8, and contains extensive new provisions with regard to modifications, expansions and addition of new uses on existing poultry farms,” Phyllis Wimbrow, deputy director of planning review and permitting, wrote in a memo to planning commission members. To determine the level of buffering required, three sizes of poultry farms are considered in the legislation: small, medium and large. The designations are based upon the number of poultry houses with a gross floor area of

44,000 square feet or less. Small operations are defined as containing not more than one, medium from two to four and large from four to eight poultry houses on a parcel. Small operations would require no buffer, medium operations require a buffer where tunnel ventilation — the large exhaust fans seen on the houses — is employed, but only where ventilation fans emit its waste, and large operations require buffers to surround the poultry house. Vegetative buffers are not intended to block all sight lines through to the farming operation — the zoning term for that type of barrier is a vegetative screen. As for the density requirements, the original proposal would have allowed for up to 12 poultry houses on a lot size of at least 91 acres. The new proposal removes this sliding scale in favor of a limit of eight poultry houses per parcel. Owners of existing farms looking to modify its uses or to expand or remodel poultry houses could be subject to several new provisions meant to bridge the gap between what had existed and what is intended by the new regulations. This legislation was produced to address issues like the sliding density scale and increased buffer standards where the previous iteration failed, Wimbrow said. She said among others, Delmarva Poultry Inc. was consulted. While denying direct involvement in the composition of the new requirements, DPI Executive Director Bill Satterfield said, in a prepared statement, that the nonprofit trade association shared some information with the county prior to the proposal of the new rules. “Delmarva Poultry Industry Inc. has shared information with Worcester County officials about the chicken industry, how it operates, and our program that encourages chicken growers to install vegetative environmental buffers on their farms for air, water quality, and neighbor relations improvements,” the statement reads. “Also, we have shared our set of voluntary ‘Best Management Practices for Good Neighbor Relations.’”

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MARCH 17, 2017

Court acquits former teacher, Martin, for inappropriate texts Exchanged suggestive pics and messages with student but no evidence of contact By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (March 17, 2017) Because former Stephen Decatur High School teacher Austin Martin, 27, had no supervisory responsibilities over a 17-year-old student at the time a flurry of suggestive text messages and provocative photos were shared between the two, Circuit Court Judge D. William Simpson granted the defense’s motion for acquittal last Tuesday. “The court believes the child was a victim, and the acts were reprehensible, but not within the statute,” Simpson said before granting the motion. “Text messages that were exchanged and conduct that occurred during summer break, weekends, and on school nights cannot form the factual basis of sexual abuse of a minor because, at the time, the defendant was not a person who … had temporary responsibility for [the student’s] supervision,” John Phoebus, attorney for the defense, wrote in his motion for acquittal. Supervisory responsibility, according to the judge, had reverted back to the student’s parents. Assistant State’s Attorney Diane Karsnitz unsuccessfully argued that Martin’s behavior constituted “grooming” for later exploitation that did occur during school and class times. A few messages did occur during school hours but were deemed inappropriate rather than criminal. According to testimony, Martin sent messages to his accuser calling her “a hottie” or “cute” during school hours. According to testimony, the relationship between Martin and the student began in April or May 2016 — the student’s junior year of high school.

EDIE BRENNAN

Ocean City Today

Both sides conceded the association began as conversations between a student and a guidance counselor, or a patient with a therapist. Martin and the student met for lunch in his classroom that day, and many days afterward. The student was tapped to be Martin’s aide at the beginning of the following school year, requiring the two to work closely together. Many of their later shared messages referred back to this situation, often with a sense of excitement. It began as the student had some difficulty with a previous boyfriend that eventually resulted in a protection order, and, fearing the gossip of her peers, approached Martin to talk about the matter. She testified she was absent from school that day to get the order, and Martin found her public Instagram account and sent her a private message asking how she was doing following the proceeding. The two conversed on Instagram private messages fairly regularly until they switched to text messaging, but both parties agree nothing untoward occurred during the Instagram chats. On the last day of school in 2016, Martin, the student and another friend posed for a photo taken at school. Martin’s accuser said he asked her to send him the photo, and included his cell phone number. It was the first of 144 text messages between the two that day, according to testimony. The state had evidence, pursuant to the eventual investigation, of more than 3,500 text messages between the pair between the last day of school in 2016 until the incident was reported to authorities in November 2016. However, there is a blank spot in the record, between Aug. 2 and Sept. 21, 2016. Both parties had apparently deleted those messages from their phones, and investigators were able to determine there had been texting between the two, but were unable to discern the content See JUDGE Page 26

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MARCH 17, 2017

Council discusses special event application fee prices By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) What would have been a routine private event approval request Monday night turned into a discussion of special event application fees by members of the Ocean City Council, who wondered if the fee calculations were based on good math. During the March 6 session, Special Events Coordinator Lisa Mitchell presented an application for the Beach Havoc volleyball fest. The event would be held on June 3-4 and would have courts on the beach from Talbot Street to Fifth Street. Originally, the applicant We Build You Play sought to host soccer and field hockey tournaments but organizer Rich Comly had to reduce its scope due to a personal matter. On paper, the event looks like an ideal addition to Ocean City’s summer scene with a projected 2,100 attendees and $307,482 in spending at local businesses, according to the return-of-investment calculation. But Councilman Dennis Dare wasn’t buying that number or that the event fee would be just $288. “That’s to use six blocks of the beach in June,” Dare said. “I like having these constructive athletic events in lieu of other events in June, but I don’t think it’s fair compensation to the town for a commercial enterprise.” Comly requested that an electric and water hook-up be made available during the event as well as a parking spot for a trailer. Public Works informed city officials that organizers would need to keep the area clean, as workers could not come and pick up trash during the event. Mitchell pointed out that We Build You Play is a nonprofit organization with offices in Worcester County, and therefore is entitled to a 75 percent discount. That would bring the application fee down from $100 to $25. Space usage costs per block were lowered from $750 to $188. An additional cost for the Caroline Street stage, which We Build You Play will use as an event headquarters, has yet to be determined or added onto the fees. Dare was not satisfied with that answer. “What do we even know about this

nonprofit?” he asked. “We don’t question a nonprofit,” Councilman Tony DeLuca said. In a later interview, Mitchell confirmed that the proceeds to this event would go to scholarship funds for local students. Several councilmembers agreed with Dare that there seemed to be a disconnect with the fee costs and the demand for locations, but said private event approval procedure was not the place to discuss it. “This brings up a discussion we can have at budget time with Recreation and Parks on the concept of the 75 percent discount. Maybe instead of being given, it needs to be evaluated,” Councilman Wayne Hartman said. “I don’t know how we can start critiquing this form now that we’ve been using it for the past year.” With that said, the council approved the event 6-1, with Dare dissenting. Mitchell and Special Events Superintendent Frank Miller started compiling a report on the history of the 75 percent discount after the council session, at the request of the city manager’s office. According to preliminary report findings, Miller said event fees charged to nonprofits had steadily increased from 2009 to 2015. The council then passed a resolution determining that local nonprofits could receive up to a 75 percent discount. Miller said he is looking into when it became a flat fee. When Miller first revamped the special event forms to include a return-of-investment calculation, there was a flat fee for space usage and applications, whether the organization was non-profit or not. But the council was against that and suggested a discounted rate. “If the mayor and City Council wants to review this, I’d be happy to,” Miller said. “But before we do, we need to see the full history behind this.” As to Dare’s concerns about premium space during peak times, Miller said that the Special Events Department does not discriminate on where an event is located. “The use of our beach has a value attached to it, but we have a non-biased perspective across the board for profit and non-profit events,” he said.

Judge says Martin’s actions reprehensible, yet not illegal Continued from Page 25 of those messages. Days might pass without any messages at all, Martin’s accuser testified, and no accounting for the blank spot was guessed at — even so, during the 137-day period examined by the case, an average of 23.5 messages still passed between the two each day. She also shared about 40 photographs with him, usually at his request, she said. Some of the photos eventu-

ally made their way onto her public Instagram account, though the majority did not. date never materialized. The relationship was discovered when an ex-boyfriend of the student — whether or not it was the same individual the student had initially approached Martin about is unclear — went through her phone and discovered the text messages. Investigators met with both Martin and the student for the first time on Nov. 7, 2016.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

Second graders offer insight at third Invention Convention Buckingham Elementary students spend one month developing ideas for show

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (March 17, 2017) Capping off a month’s worth of effort for the second graders of Buckingham Elementary School, last Wednesday’s third annual “Invention Convention” was attended by hundreds of parents, well wishers and fellow students. Led by teachers Donna Socha and Jessica Fry, the students spent weeks either researching a famous inventor and developing a presentation on him or her, or developing their own inventions to solve a problem — prototypes included. Consider the Brush Paste — a toothbrush with a squeezable handle that dispenses exactly the right amount of toothpaste every time, or the Quad-oculars — branching binoculars built for two for the express purpose of “not having to share everything with my twin brother” written right on the product description. Also, the Easy Scooper, which is built like the shovels used to fill sandbags, with a plastic liner built into the back of the scoop portion, but is intended for litter boxes. Or, the Armand-Leg mosquito nets perfectly sized to fit around t-shirts and shorts, just right for after-hours play during summer. The students, generally between the ages of 7 and 9, tackled problems consistent with the challenges they faced each day. Too small to flip on the light switch by yourself? Try the Switch Extender, which brings the function

a little closer to the ground. Freeze pops too cold to handle? There’s now a kind of Koozie for that. Some of the children’s projects were intended for the adults in their lives. Imagine the Wakenator, which is supposed to ease the process of stirring a sleeping child by integrating an alarm clock with a spray bottle. Or the Knot Blaster for hair, which forgoes the alarm clock, but adds a variety of combs and brushes to a spray bottle. A board game, Number Run, had players performing randomized math operations to move about the game board, ultimately constructing a tower in order to win the game. A pet-hair roller was designed like a broom or mop, but with a paint roller on the end sporting Velcro to pull up shed hair. Another device, the Mail Retriever, is a four-wheeled robotic drone designed to roll out to the mailbox, retrieve what’s inside, and return the packages to the house. As for the inventors, Fry said the children all chose their own inventors to focus on, which led to a couple of repeats like physicist Albert Einstein, aviators the Wright Brothers and James Naismith, the inventor of basketball. However, other names surfaced like Garrett Morgan, the AfricanAmerican inventor of the three-stage traffic signal and a safety hood to protect early firefighters from smoke inhalation. Also highlighted was Hedy Lamarr. While primarily known for her acting, she also helped develop a jam-proof radio guidance system for torpedoes that persists today in modern WiFi and Bluetooth technologies.

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Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

POLICE/COURTS

Punching holes

Crack discovered

Candace B. Bolinder, 25, of Grasonville, Maryland was arrested and charged with disorderly conduct on March 11. Ocean City Police went to a hotel on Atlantic Avenue around 11 p.m. for a report of an intoxicated woman who allegedly punched holes in the hallway, according to the police report. Police found Bolinder passed out in the hallway of the hotel’s fifth floor, but were able to wake her, although he speech was unintelligible, the report said.

Officers arrested Meagan Daugherty, 27, for possession of crack and drug paraphernalia after her father reported her to police. Daugherty’s father met with officers that the Public Safety building on March 12 around 4:45 p.m. and told them that three days earlier he picked up his daughter from Baltimore. On March 10, he found a smoking device in the bathroom trash can after Daugherty had taken a shower, police said. He told police that the pipe was not there before and that Daugherty had a drug problem. Police said an examination of the pipe revealed the presence of crack.

Taking all comers Ocean City Police arrested a Delaware man for repeatedly screaming and threatening people at a 49th Street bar on March 12. Officers were called to the bar around 12:28 p.m. after three security guards were attempting to restrain Travis A. Mummert, 31, of Seaford. When police arrived Mummert was screaming at the bar staff and patrons that he wanted to fight everyone, according to the police report. Mummert was charged with disorderly conduct.

St. Patrick’s Parade DUI Police arrested a man for driving under the influence of alcohol after he drove over a sidewalk while people were watching St. Patrick’s Day Festivities. Police said they saw Robert John Fisher, 60, of Milton, Delaware driving a black truck over the curb on 130th Street around 4:38 p.m. on March 11. A large group of people were celebrating St. Patrick’s Day around that time, according to the report. After seeing the truck fail to stop

on stop lines and stay within the lanes, an officer pulled Fisher over. Police noticed a strong odor of alcohol and Fisher admitted that he had been drinking, reports said.

Roommate disagreement An argument over rent ended with one man charged with second-degree assault after he punched his roommate in the face. Ocean City Police were called to the 139th Street 7-Eleven on March 14 around 3:39 p.m. by the victim. The victim told police he had been discussing upcoming rent with his roommate Suraj Joshi, 29, of Ocean City at their residence, when Joshi punched him in the face, according to reports. The victim had left the residence and went to the convenience store to call police. Officers later found Joshi in the 142nd Street area, and arrested him.

Suspected dealer Following an investigation of a heroin overdose, Ocean City Police arrested a man for possession and distribution of heroin on March 14. One week earlier, police were

called to a residence on Old Landing Road for a heroin overdose. The victim was resuscitated by Ocean City Emergency Medical Services, and was later taken to Atlantic General Hospital. After he was treated, he was taken to the Worcester County Jail. The victim’s wife later told police that before the overdose, there was a man in the room with him. Through investigation, OCPD identified this man as Alexandre Dejournette, 29, of Georgetown, Delaware. After a search warrant was issued, police uncovered text messages and phone calls that set up a heroin sale. On March 14, around 11:38 p.m., Dejournette was spotted driving on Coastal Highway and arrested.

Handgun, drugs A Sheriff’s deputy and an officer of the Snow Hill Police Department found Joshua Levin King, 21, of Snow Hill along with a handgun, cocaine and more than 10 grams of marijuana last Thursday. Police responded to the scene after an initial report of an unconscious person in a vehicle. King was arrested and charged with having a gun on his person and in a vehicle as well as possession of both cocaine and marijuana. A district court commissioner released King on his own recognizance pending a June 6 trial in District Court in Snow Hill.

OC speeding stop leads to DUI plus handgun charges

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By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Maryland State Police arrested a Delaware man for driving under the influence driving and having a gun in the vehicle after an officer caught him speeding while driving into Ocean City last Saturday. Jay R. Rider, 47, of Laurel, Delaware was stopped by a state trooper conducting radar enforcement on the Route 50 bridge around 6:28 p.m. on March 11. After the car was stopped at the intersection of Talbot Street and St. Louis Avenue, the trooper noticed the odor of alcohol coming from Rider, according to press releases. Rider was asked to complete a field sobriety test and was arrested for driving under the influence. While the trooper was searching him, Rider told him that he had a handgun tucked in his boot. State police found a .380 caliber semi-automatic Kel-Tec pistol in his boot, according to press statements. Rider did provide police with his handgun carry permit, but as it was registered in Delaware, it was not valid in Maryland. In addition to DUI, Rider was charged with handgun in vehicle, handgun on person, driving while impaired by alcohol and speeding.


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

OBITUARIES WILLIAM H. (BILLY) REEVES, JR. Selbyville William H. (Billy) Reeves, Jr., age 72, of Selbyville, Delaware, died peacefully Tuesday, March 7, 2017, in the comfort of his home. He was born in Washington, D.C., and was the son of the late William H. and Rose (Panella) Reeves. He is survived by his beloved wife, Billy Reeves, Jr. Kathryn (Kitty) A. Reeves of Selbyville; a son, Matthew W. Reeves, of Gaithersburg, Maryland; a sister, Anne L. Springmann, of Fort Washington, Maryland; his devoted nephews, Mark and Paul Springmann, along with their wives and his four great nephews, and many loving friends and neighbors who referred to him as “Mr. Bill.” He was preceded in death by a son, Michael A. Reeves. Bill had been a sheet metal worker for James Myers Co. before retiring and moving to Selbyville in 2002. He was a genius working with his hands. He helped many neighbors and friends when something needed to be fixed and eventually the phrase, “If Mr. Bill can’t fix it, throw it away!” was born.

Bill never offered a “nickels’ worth of free advice” but was worth his weight in gold when you needed his guidance. To friends and neighbors, and most certainly when only asked, he would say, “Well, that’s not how I would do it,” which we all knew translated meant “For the love of God, please STOP!!!” and in his calm, laid back style he would happily show you the right way to take on the situation at hand. Bill was an avid boater and loved traveling extensively with his wife. Whether by RV, plane, or ship, Bill and Kitty lived their lives to the fullest. Bill was a caring and gentle man who never had an unkind word to say about anything or anyone. He will be sadly missed by everyone who was blessed to know him. A mass of Christian burial will be held at St. Luke’s Catholic Church, in Ocean City, Maryland, at 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 18, 2017. In lieu of flowers, Bill’s family is requesting donations be made to: Atlantic General Hospital, Campaign for the Future in support of the John H. “Jack” Burbage Jr. Regional Cancer Care Center. Checks payable/sent to: AGH Foundation, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, Maryland 21811. (Memo note: In memory of William Reeves). Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com.

GUY H. BUTLER Berlin The Rev. Guy Harry Butler, age 83, passed away peacefully on March 8, 2017 at his home. Born in Reading, Pennsylvania, he was the son of the late Bruce Butler, Sr. and Elizabeth Truitt Butler. He is survived by his beloved wife of 56 years, Joanna Butler, and children, CW4 Rev. Guy Butler Guy Harry Butler, Jr. and his wife, Amy, of Ft. Knox, Kentucky, Mary Ellen Stallard and her husband, Timothy, of Hilton Head Island, South Carolina, and John Edward Butler and his wife, Jennifer, of Cumming, Georgia. There are six grandchildren, Arlina Betancur (Jensen), Mary Butler, Joanna and Samantha Stallard, Sydney and Mollie Butler, and a greatgranddaughter that will be born in May. Also preceding him in death was a brother, Dr. Bruce Butler, Jr. The Rev. Butler received his B.A from Franklin Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsyivaina, and his M. DIV. at Philadelphia Divinity School. He began his service as an Episcopal priest at St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Harrisburg, Pennsylvaina, then St. Alban’s Church in Salisbury, Mary-

land, St. Joseph’s In Grand Prairie, Texas, St. Mary’s in Erie, Pennsylvaina, Christ Church in Meadville, Pennsylvaina and was a stewardship officer of the Dioceses of Rupert’s Land, Keewatin and Brandon, Canada. He retired from Trinity Church in Jacksonville, Texas, to Berlin after 57 years of faithful service. He was a member of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. In retirement, he enjoyed golf and fishing, but most of all he loved being with his family. A memorial service was held on March 12, 2017 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Berlin. The Rev. Michael Moyer officiated. A donation in his memory may be made to: St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 429, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

OBITUARY NOTICES Obituary Notices are published free each week in the Ocean City Today and Bayside Gazette. E-mail: editor@oceancitytoday.net Mail: Ocean City Today, P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Obituary Notices are published as space allows. Every effort is made to publish all that are received.


Sports & Recreation

Mar. 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

Page 31

www.oceancitytoday.net

STEPHEN DECATUR SPRING SPORTS PREVIEW

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

(Left) Stephen Decatur senior pitcher Will Sass warms up during Tuesday’s indoor practice at the Mid-Atlantic Shockers Baseball Club’s facility in Berlin. (Right) Junior Tristan McDonough (2016 Bayside South Pitcher of the Year) will also step on the mound again this year.

Pitching, defense solid for Decatur

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 17, 2017) When asked what are the team’s strengths this year, Stephen Decatur baseball Coach Rich Ferro was quick to say pitching and defense as a number of veterans return to the mound and in the infield. “It seems like we always return pitchers. We’re returning three varsity pitchers from last year and that’s good,” he said. “We’re returning half the infield so we should pitch and play Rich Ferro defense pretty well.” Junior Tristan McDonough will step on the mound again this year. He was not only named to the Bayside South Conference First Team for his performance during the 2016 season, but McDonough also received Pitcher of the Year honors. “I’m really excited. We’ve got a good group of guys and our pitching staff, I think, is one of the best around here,” said McDonough, a member of the team for three years. “Me, [seniors] Will Sass, Jake Shockley [2016 Second Team Bayside South] and [junior] Ryan Duncan are our four main guys. That’s a good staff right there.” Ferro said McDonough will also play in the middle infield, and when Sass and Duncan are not pitching they will be in the outfield. “Be dominant on the mound and be efficient with my pitches, that’s

how I’ll help lead the team [and] being a positive leader and leading my guys in the right direction,” McDonough said. “I know my guys are going to play good ‘D’ behind me so I just need to throw strikes.” Senior Wyatt Church, who earned Bayside South Honorable Mention accolades in 2016, moves to the infield/second base after playing left field last year. “I moved to middle infield and I feel like I can control things more,” said Church, a two-year team member. “I think I’ll be able to help the team by working the middle infield really [well], be very vocal and try and lead the guys.” Both Sass and Church plan to play baseball for Division III colleges. Sass will be attending Salisbury University and Church is headed to McDaniel near Baltimore. “I think we’re doing good. We’re really young this year,” Church said. “I hope to lead the young guys. Coming [from] JV, they don’t really know as much as the varsity guys. We’ll just try to teach them as much as we can. “I think we’re going to do very well and [be] one of the best teams in the Bayside,” Church added. Ferro, now in his 10th season leading the Decatur squad, will count on several new players to contribute, including juniors Stephen Bontempo (first base/corner infield), Mitchell Orf (outfield) and Zachary Pilarski (catcher). “A lot of people thought our

catcher situation was iffy – and it was,” McDonough said, noting that the team graduated four-year starting catcher Zach Adams. “I didn’t know who would play catcher, but Zach Pilarski is behind the plate and he’s doing very well right now.” Of the 14 players on Ferro’s roster, seven competed last year when the team went 16-4. The Seahawks were 14-0 before recording their first loss. Decatur’s season ended in the 3A East Region sectional finals when the team lost 7-2 to Chesapeake. While Ferro knows where some players will be on the field, there are still spots to be filled. He is trying to put together the best lineup from the five seniors, eight juniors and one sophomore that make up the squad. “This year’s team is a little bit different than the past. We have seven returners to varsity so we’re trying to figure out who does what and the best fit. It’s going to take some time,” he said. “We’re progressing…They’ve known each other for years, they played Little League together, they’re all comfortable with each other, it’s just figuring out who is going to go where.” Ferro said the No. 1 goal is to get better every day. Then, try to win as many games as possible, have a good seed for the state playoffs and make a run there. “We just want to have good chemistry and I feel that will get us to where we want to go,” McDonough added.

Stephen Decatur senior Bethany Williams works on her jumps during Monday’s practice. She is a two-time Bayside Conference champion in the triple jump.

Many new athletes join Decatur track teams this season

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 17, 2017) About 45 boys and 30 girls will be competing for Stephen Decatur during the outdoor track and field spring season. Approximately half of them have participated in cross country, indoor and/or outdoor track, while the other athletes are new to the sport. “There’s a lot of new faces on both teams, but in particular the Jody Stigler girls’ team. It’s the least amount of girls we’ve had since I started,” said sixth-year Coach Jody Stigler. “There are a few [female] returners who will help us. For the boys, there’s more returning and they know what to expect.” Stigler said the coaching staff is trying to teach the new outdoor track participants the field events. “There’s some girls we can count on like we have the last few years. Hopefully we can score a bunch of points in the field events. We’ll see after the first meet,” Stigler said. “The boys are more well-rounded. I think they can score points in almost every event – distance, sprints and field events.” With only a couple weeks of practices and despite the weather hampering training, Stigler said he has seen progress. See NEW Page 32


Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

Coach Braniecki: We’re pretty deep with talent By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 17, 2017) The Stephen Decatur girls’ lacrosse team made it to the 3A/2A state championship game in 2015 and the semifinal round last year. This season, the Lady Seahawks are hungry for a state title and they have the talent to win it. “It’s definitely the deepest team we’ve Sara Braniecki had in a long time,” said Coach Sara Braniecki, now in her second season at the helm. “We have a ton of talent, from the freshmen to the juniors and seniors. The girls are working hard because they want to be on the field. It’s another level of work ethic and desire.” Sixteen of the 23 players on Braniecki’s roster are returners from last season when the team went 15-2. The Seahawks captured their third consecutive 3A/2A East Regional championship and second straight Bayside Conference title. They lost 11-10 to Oakdale in the state semifinals. While the Decatur attack and midfield is solid as usual, Braniecki said the “defense looks stronger than it has in the past.” “I also think a strength is that we have even more talent on the bench. We’re pretty deep with talent,” she said. The team is led by nine experienced seniors. Six of them have signed a National Letter of Intent to play either Division I or Division II lacrosse for their respective colleges. “They’re totally committed to Stephen Decatur lacrosse,” Braniecki said. “We have a lot of leadership. They have big plans and they lead with that in mind.” Returning on the attack are seniors Claire Porter, Logan Figgs and Brigitte Ardis. Senior Victoria Kerkovich recently had foot surgery and hopes to be back in

action at the end of the month. Porter led the Seahawks last year with 108 points (48 goals and 60 assists) and she hopes to do the same in 2017. Porter, who will play for Div. I Old Dominion University next year, received All-Bayside South First Team LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY accolades for her per- Stephen Decatur senior Claire Porter is defended by junior Hallie formance during the Edmunds during Monday’s practice. 2016 season. Freshman midfielder Sarah Engle is “I’ve been playing with most of the starters my whole life since club a newcomer who will “add something lacrosse so we’re all very experienced big to the team,” Braniecki said. Juniors Chloe Sass (Second Team) together and we all work very well together. I think that will help take us and Lily Belle Baker, who is new to the pretty far this year,” said Porter, a four- squad, will play defense and in the midyear Decatur lacrosse player. “We have field. Senior Jillian Mitrecic (First Team) a few new girls and I think we’re all will help lead the defense along with her clicking well. “It’s my last year and I’m going to twin sister, Sara (Second Team), who miss playing with all these girls,” she will play in the goal. The have both comcontinued. “We definitely want to make mitted to Div. II Queens University of it to states. We made it sophomore year Charlotte. “I’ve been a goalie almost my whole and last year we made it to the semis. I think we want a little bit of redemption life,” said Mitrecic, a four-year member of the team. “As a goalie, you see pretty this year.” Kerkovich (Div. II, Indiana Univer- much the whole field. I talk to [the desity of Pennsylvania) and Ardis also fense], communicate what we did right, earned Bayside South First Team hon- what we did wrong, what changes to ors last year. Figgs was named to the make, slides, and stuff in that aspect to help my defense out. Second Team. “Even in practice if there’s an attacker Senior midfielder Lexie VanKirk hopes to start playing in a few weeks. She who drives to goal and maybe they don’t has been sidelined with a broken hand, make it or I save it, I try to pull them which happened during the basketball aside and [give them some advice],” she season. VanKirk (Bayside First Team) added. “We have some new girls and led the team in goal with 52 last year. She they’re getting used to everything.” had 28 assists as well. She has commitBraniecki said the Seahawks have the ted to Div. I James Madison University. potential to get back to the state chamSenior Christina Romano (First pionship game. “It’s a big goal, but I don’t think it’s Team) would also like to return to the field soon as she is battling a hip injury. out of reach,” she said. “I’m excited. We She is headed to Div. I George Mason have high expectations and we’ll see where it goes.” University to play lacrosse.

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur senior Gavin Payne throws the shot put during Monday’s practice at the Berlin school.

New outdoor track athletes learning about field events Continued from Page 31 “For many kids it’s a blank slate,” he said. Top returners for the girls’ squad include seniors Bethany Williams (triple/long jump, sprints, relays), Peyton Dunham (distance) and Claire Billings (mid-distance, relays). Williams, a four-year member of the team, won the triple jump Bayside Conference title the last two years. “I’m excited for my last year of high school track. I’m hoping to go to states for long and triple jump,” Williams said. “There’s a lot of newcomers. We just need to get them more into the mindset of making sure to sprint if they’re doing a field event, and just working hard. Like I did during indoor, I’ll just try to lead by example and teach them different things they can improve on.” After high school, she plans to compete in track for Salisbury University. Veterans Stigler will count on to lead the boys’ team are seniors Wyatt Davy (relays, pole vault, high jump), who advanced to the state indoor track championship meet for the high jump last month, Cameron James (distance) and Avonte Purnell (sprints, relays). “I think I’m a good role model for the boys on and off the track [and] in school as well,” James said. “I think we’re doing well. The weather hasn’t been the best and it’s been bitterly cold, but we’re making big improvements since the first day of practice. “I’m really excited to see what our team has to offer,” he continued. “I’m working pretty hard and I’m ready to see what times I get.” Stigler said he is looking for some newcomers to step up and do well in field events. If they can learn the events and be successful it will not only be beneficial this year, but in the future as well. The goal is to improve each day and the results will take care of themselves, Stigler said. “We’re looking for individual success, which will lead to team success,” he added.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

PAGE 33

Seahawks excited for start of softball season

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 17, 2017) With three seniors, two juniors, four sophomores and four freshmen, the Stephen Decatur softball team is young in age overall, but the Lady Seahawks have experience. “We have four girls that play travel ball together and the rest of the girls have been playing for years,” said Heather Patnode, now in her fourth season as head coach. “We’ll just need a little time to get use to each other, how we work together, and putting the right people in the best positions.”

Of the 13 players on Patnode’s roster, five are returning from last year when the team went 4-15. Decatur lost 6-5 to James M. Bennett in the first round of playoffs. “The girls seem to be very excited to start the season and to make our team successful,” Patnode said. Heather Patnode “The girls seem knowledgeable of the game. Our goal is to make the best team possible with the girls that we have.”

Sophomore Alexis Black returns to the mound. She will also be the cleanup batter. Patnode said Black, who earned All-Bayside South Second Team honors for her performance during the 2016 season – her first as a Seahawk – improved during the offseason and looks “fresh and fast.” With 10 years of pitching experience, Black said she feels comfortable on the mound. “I hope to be able to lead the team more when I’m pitching and make sure we get ground balls and fly balls,

and just help my defense better,” Black said. “You have the ball every play and you’re kind of the leader on the field, so you have to be able to help lead the team along.” Sophomore Alex Richwalski is back behind the plate as the team’s catcher. Patnode said she has strengthened her blocking and throwing skills during the offseason. Junior Emma Hamilton-Blackford and senior Sam Kefauver are returning as infielders and will help with Decatur’s offensive lineup, Patnode said. See GIRLS Page 34

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 34

MARCH 17, 2017

Girls full of energy, ready to compete

k c i w n e F LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur sophomore Alexis Black returns to the mound this year. “We’re starting to mold together as a team. I think we’ll have a pretty good season,” Black said.

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Continued from Page 33 “Hopefully we’ll be able to keep our heads up this year because we’ve had trouble with that in the past,” said Blackford, a member of the team for three years. “I think this year we have a solid team and everyone’s cooperating. “We have a lot new girls who are showing a lot of talent,” she continued. “Everyone has energy and they are glad to be out here.” “We have not chosen captains yet [as of Tuesday], but Emma has really stepped up and taken the lead on and off the field,” Patnode said. Patnode will rely on several newcomers to contribute. She is looking forward to seeing what the “young spirit and experience our freshmen will bring to the table.” “They’re very excited to play and bring a new level of optimism and competition among the girls,” Patnode said. Freshman Amber Whittaker will be starting in centerfield. Freshman Kinsley Doebler will be in the outfield. Freshman Sierra Eisemann will be a utility player, who Patnode said she can use anywhere. She might start in the infield, Patnode added. Kylie Whitaker, a freshman, will play in the infield as well. “We’re starting to mold together as a team. I think we’ll have a pretty good season,” Black said. “We hope to have a .500 season or better, work together and be the best we can. I’m happy softball season is here and I’m excited for the year.” Earlier this week the girls made individual goals as well as set team goals. “We want to be competitive in all of our games to prepare for playoffs,” Patnode said. “Each game and practice we will learn from our mistakes and take pride in ourselves and our successes. We value teamwork as much as being a family. We will make mistakes, learn, win/lose and grow together as one.”

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

“I hope to orchestrate some offense and contribute with both goals and passes” this season, said Stephen Decatur senior Tucker Cordial, who is being covered by teammate Quinn Ebaugh, a junior, during Monday’s practice.

‘Seasoned varsity players’ make up Decatur lax squad By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 17, 2017) After graduating 15 players, many of whom were key contributors, the Stephen Decatur boys’ lacrosse team struggled a bit last year as only seven of the 24 players on Coach Scott Lathroum’s roster were varsity veterans – and just three of them had been full-time starters in 2015. This year, 15 players out of the 23 on Scott Lathroum the Decatur team are veterans. “We have seasoned varsity players this year. They have at least one year of experience under their belt,” said Lathroum, who has led the team for 13 seasons. “They have a much better un-

derstanding of what is expected of them and what they need to do to win. They have more size and strength. They grew and got stronger.” Throwing new lacrosse material and concepts at them, Lathroum said the Seahawks are picking things up much quicker. “It’s a totally different team from day one last year,” he said. “By leaps and bounds they’re better. A handful of kids played this summer and that helped them.” Senior Tucker Cordial echoed his sentiments. “I think the group is coming along pretty well,” he said. “Last year at this time we were a lot further behind, but now we’re doing pretty well.” Cordial, who will play left attack, has been on the team for three years. See IT Page 35


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

PAGE 35

‘It will take a group effort to win,’ coach says Continued from Page 34 He received Bayside South Honorable Mention accolades for his performance during the 2016 season. “As many of my teammates can tell you, I am loud – sometimes a little too loud – but I can definitely portray what needs to be done from talking [and

help] direct people on the field,” he said. “I hope to orchestrate some offense and contribute with both goals and passes.” Lathroum said he expects big things from Cordial as well as junior attackmen Parker Wheeler and Charlie Coates (Bayside Second Team). “They need to take care of the ball,

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur tennis coaches will count on veteran singles players, senior Brennan Holloway and junior Laila Mirza, to help lead their respective squads this season.

SD tennis teams adjusting to new format this season

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 17, 2017) To cater to some of the smaller schools in the Bayside Conference that have fewer athletes, the format for high school tennis has changed this year. Stephen Decatur is one of the larger schools with plenty of athletes to fill a lineup, so the coaches are not quite sure if the format will benefit or hamper them. In past years, there were five singles matches and two doubles during a competition. Each player competed in their one match, so nine athletes took to the court for their team. Now, there will be four singles and three doubles matches. Singles players will be allowed to compete in doubles matches as well. So instead of nine ath-

letes playing, a team only needs six players. One reason for the change, Decatur coaches Steve Berquist and Jamie Greenwood explained, was so that smaller schools would not have to forfeit matches. There have been a number of times over the years where Decatur faced a school that didn’t have enough players for five singles and two doubles matches. Those smaller school would typically forfeit one or both singles matches. The new format allows singles players to compete in doubles matches, therefore, no forfeits. Matches will still be an eight-game pro set. “I’m curious to see if the top four can play both singles and doubles,” Berquist said. “It kind of gyps some of the kids See EXPERIENCE Page 36

be very good ball handlers, make good decisions and play hard,” Lathroum said. Junior Collin Eichelberger (Bayside HM) returns in the midfield along with seniors Robbie Duke and Spencer Sharp. Newcomer Kevin Beck, a sophomore, will join them in the midfield. Senior Tyler Keiser (Bayside First Team) and junior Hayden Zaiser (Second Team) are back to lead the defense. Senior Zac Cioccio will return to the goal, hopefully in the next few weeks as he is currently sidelined with a broken collarbone. “I feel like we have a big connection on this team [and] chemistry,” said Zaiser, a three-year varsity player. “A lot of us have grown up together and play a couple different sports together.” With captain and face-off specialist Dryden Brous graduating, Lathroum said there was a huge question mark as to who would take over that position this year. Brous, who plays for Division II Lynn University in Florida, was the only player the team lost to graduation. By winning a majority of the face-offs he took, Brous was key in generating the Decatur offense last season. The burning question may be answered as Lathroum said he was impressed with newcomer, sophomore Collin Eitel’s face-off performance

during a recent Play Day. Battling some injuries, Lathroum said he can’t wait until everyone is healthy so he can get the entire team out on the field. Despite only having 14 players for last Saturday’s Play Day in Queen Anne’s, Lathroum said he saw some good things. “I’m excited with what I’ve seen so far. The offense is moving the ball well, we’re playing good defense, winning face-offs and getting ground balls,” he said. “We don’t have any superstars, so it will take a group effort to win. We need to play good team defense, good team offense, work the ball, be patient and be intelligent in what we do and I think we’ll be successful. We have to work together.” Lathroum said the goals are for the Seahawks to improve every day, for them to play hard and get healthy. Decatur finished 2016 with a 4-9 record. The season ended in the 3A/2A East Regional tournament first round with an 8-7 overtime loss to Parkside. Lathroum said the Seahawks want redemption this year when they battle Parkside. He would also like to win the Bayside South and compete for a conference title this year. Zaiser said returning to the Bayside game is a big goal for the Seahawks. “We need to put in a lot of work. It’s going to be tough,” Zaiser said.

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PAGE 36

Sophomore Jonathan Petito and seniors Brennan Holloway and Egor Reznikov are all varsity veterans that will round out the singles spots. “They worked during the offseason and they’ve all really improved,” Berquist said. Domingo and Holloway have been named team captains. “They’ve done a good job leading the team,” Berquist said. “They’ve been here, they know what to expect,

Experience on tennis squads Continued from Page 35 because if you want to win a [competition against another school as a team] you’re going to play your best players. So where nine kids were playing, now you only need six.” “With the new format I had a different mentality when I was picking the team,” Greenwood said. “I think we’ll do OK. The new format could be a problem.” The top concern is endurance, Greenwood said. If the singles players expend all their energy in their individual matches will they have enough for doubles competition, he wonders. Greenwood, now in his ninth season as head coach, has 13 Lady Seahawks on his roster this year. Nine are returners from last season when the team went 6-6. “We’ve got some experience and we’ve got some new talent. We definitely still have work to do, but we’re making progress,” he said. “We have some good individual talent that will benefit us in both singles and doubles matches.” Leading the girls will be senior Katrina Harrell, a four-year member of the team, and junior Laila Mirza, a threeyear player. “Hopefully I can give some insight to my teammates and help them. I’m excited for the season. It’s going to be fun,” Harrell said. “Everyone pretty much knows what they’re doing, now we just have to sharpen our skills.” “We want to be competitive,” Green-

wood said. “I would like for the girls to work hard and continue to grow.” Berquist, also in his ninth season coaching the boys, has 12 players on his roster, seven of whom are veterans. Last year the team finished with a 6-6 record. “I’ve definitely seen improvement in a short amount of time, especially from the veterans,” Berquist said. “You can tell the kids who put in the time, which will be beneficial Jamie Greenwood in close matches.” This year, sporting new uniforms, the Seahawks hope to be better than .500. “We have some kids with good experience. Three of our top four are seniors,” Berquist Steve Berquist said. “The kids are ready to get going. Most of the new kids are younger so it’s good for the future.” Leading the team at first singles will be senior Josh Domingo, a four-year player. “I’ve been excited since last year. I’ve been practicing over the summer and hopefully that will benefit me in really tough matches,” Domingo said. “A lot of the guys on the team need help with technique and serving so I’ll help show them the ropes.”

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 17, 2017) The Stephen Decatur boys’ basketball team’s ultimate goal was to win a 3A state championship, but unfortunately, the Seahawks’ season came to an end with a 74-44 loss to Baltimore Polytechnic Institute in the tournament semifinals, last Thursday at University of Maryland College Park Xfinity Center. “We just ran into a really good team. They were just a tough matchup for us,” said Decatur Coach BJ Johnson. “They hit us in the mouth and we never recovered.” Polytechnic went on to win the 3A state championship, 64-63, over Potomac. Decatur senior captain Keve Aluma led his team with 19 points and 11 rebounds. The 6-foot 8-inch Aluma has signed to play Division I basketball for Wofford College in South Carolina.

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they know the drills.” Returners, junior Frankie Nanna and senior Drayton Hoffman will play doubles. Newcomers, sophomore Trevor Hayes and freshman Nick Angelo may take the court at doubles. Parkside, James M. Bennett and Worcester Prep are always tough opponents. Berquist said the goal for his team is to get a win against at least one of those squads.

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“Keve proved he was a Division I player,” Johnson said. “He played very well.” Despite not accomplishing their goal of winning a state championship title this season, the Seahawks have no reason to hang their heads. Decatur won 25 games this year and only lost two. “I credit that to these kids. They worked very hard,” Johnson said. The Seahawks went 24-3 last season and 25-2 this year, for a combined record of 49-5. “They accomplished a lot the last two years,” Johnson said. The Seahawks have also gone undefeated on their home court the last two years. The Berlin squad has a 25home game win streak going. The last time Decatur lost a home game was Feb. 28, 2015, when the Seahawks fell to Huntingtown, 65-54, in the first round of playoffs. They finished the 2014-15 season with an 8-15 record. “I’m very happy with the season. The ultimate goal was to win a state championship, but that doesn’t define our season,” Johnson said. “These kids have a lot to be proud of. They made history this year.” Decatur won 71-43 over Kent County to capture the program’s first Bayside Conference championship title. The Seahawks earned their second consecutive regional title with a 65-55 victory over Wilde Lake. Aluma was named Bayside South Player of the Year. He led Decatur with 434 points and 320 rebounds this season. Captains, junior Kevon Voyles and senior Gary Briddell Jr. received First Team accolades. Voyles finished the season with 430 points and Briddell tallied 402. Juniors Ja’Ron Johnson, Tah’Jeem Woodland and Hayden Frazier, and freshman Churchill Bounds were presented Bayside Honorable Mention distinction. Decatur will lose five players to graduation. “Anytime you lose experience it’s tough,” Johnson said. Despite graduating talented players, Johnson thinks the team will be strong next season. “I’m looking forward to next year. Basketball in my opinion, you get better in the offseason – March to November. That’s why we’ve had success,” he said. “We have a good JV program and we’ll count on some of those kids next year. And, we have a good core returning. If they work as hard as they did in the offseason this year, we will be successful next year.”


Mar. 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

Business

Page 37 REAL ESTATE REPORT

Roles of real estate agents in Maryland

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Billye Massey, left, and Massage Envy Owner Joann Hess show off the new location on Manklin Creek Road in Ocean Pines last week.

New Massage Envy in Pines provides wellness services

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Therapeutic massages, facials, skin care treatments and a few unique add-ons are offered at Massage Envy on Manklin Creek Road in Ocean Pines, which opened on Feb. 16. “People need to take care of their bodies to participate in life. We are very wellness-based,” said Joann Hess, owner of the Massage Envy Ocean City. “It is a different way for people to receive massage and facial services. It is very easy, gender-neutral and our membership program is discounted.” There are many benefits to receiving a massage regularly, including relieving stress and sore muscles, increasing circulation and boosting the immune system. It’s also a great recovery method to use after having surgery, she said. “Membership services are a win-win because it helps the client to get regular massages for maintenance, which teaches the muscles and body to lower stress and life becomes scheduled around your massage,” Hess said. “Your body tells you how often to get a massage. Most people average about once a month.” Before receiving a facial at Massage Envy, an esthetician will perform a skin analysis with a magnifying lamp and select products specific to the clients’ skin condition needs. “The skin is the largest organ in the human body and we must take care of it,” Hess said. A typical facial includes the skin consultation, steaming, cleansing, toning, ex-

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Therapeutic massages, facials, skin care treatments and a few unique add-ons are offered at Massage Envy on Manklin Creek Road in Ocean Pines, which opened on Feb. 16.

tractions, treat and repair products, moisturizing the face and around the eyes. In addition, customers receive a hand, arm, facial, neck and décolleté massage. Facials offer a range of therapeutic benefits such as reducing blemishes and breakouts, moisturizes and deeply cleanses, improves skin tone and texture, reduces fine lines and wrinkles and helps repair damaged cells while preventing further skin damage. There are also a number of add-ons to enhance the experience including anti-aging eye treatments, back facials, hand and foot treatments, hot stone massages and aromatherapy. “We sell Dr. Murad’s line of skin care products and use them in our facials,” Hess said. “They are very effective and created by a dermatologist.” Massage Envy also carries essential oils, bath salts to relieve pain, body lotions and candles.

“Anything to extend that relaxation experience,” Hess said. The monthly membership program gives clients a $30 discount on normallypriced facials and massages. “We find a lot of people book in advance this way and therapists have regular clientele,” Hess said. “The beauty of the membership is it can be used anywhere in the country.” Massage Envy has more than 1,200 locations across the United States and employees give about 1.5 million massages a month. At least 300 facilities are currently in development and the brand is looking to go international by bringing services to Sydney, Australia, she added. “We focus on giving the highest level of customer service, making it easy to book with a discount to make it affordable, but still providing that over-the-top experience,” Hess said. See NEW Page 38

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (March 17, 2017) The Maryland Association of Realtors has issued a new brochure for the public entitled “Get to Know the Role of Real Estate Agents.” The brochure covers the role of agents and agency relationships and is a useful tool for the public as significant changes occurred to Agency Law in Maryland real estate as of Oct. 1, 2016. There are three kinds of agency relationships in Maryland: Seller Agency, Buyer Agency and Dual Agency. The brochure explains that the role of an agent has been defined over the years by law and by custom and until 1999 real estate agents generally worked for sellers. Thus, buyers were typically considered “customers” and the real estate agent was obligated to get the best deal for the seller. As the industry changed, more and more homebuyers wanted to have an agent working for them, so buyer representation became the norm. The brochure explains the following differences: • A Client is a buyer or seller who has entered into a written agency agreement and is represented by an Agent. The Agent provides advice and also owes the Client duties of reasonable care, loyalty, disclosure, confidentiality, diligence and accounting. • A Customer is a buyer or seller who has not entered into a written agency agreement and is not represented by an Agent. A Customer must be treated honestly and fairly and Agents must disclose material adverse facts known to the Agent. Seller Agency is the “traditional” Agency relationship where the listing agent represents the seller under a written Listing Agreement and owes the Seller duties of reasonable care, loyalty, disclosure, confidentiality, diligence and accounting. Subagency is another type of Seller Agency where the seller authorizes the listing company to extend the Agency relationship outside the company and its Agents. Subagency allows real estate Agents See SELLER Page 38


Ocean City Today

PAGE 38

Katie J. Wear, SHRM-CP, recently became a certified professional through the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM-CP). To obtain this certification, an individual must fulfill a combination of education and work experience criteria and pass the SHRM-CP exam, which tests knowledge of behavioral Katie J. Wear and technical competencies. Earning this distinction signifies expertise and leadership in the HR field. Wear joined Becker Morgan Group as the human resources manager in January 2016. She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Business Management Finance from East Stroudsburg University in 2005 and was previously a human resources manager at a Pennsylvania-based company. Becker Morgan Group provides architecture and engineering services with offices in Delaware, Maryland and North Carolina. For more information, visit www.beckermorgan.com.

IMG ribbon cutting Insurance Management Group will be joined by the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, Berlin Chamber of Commerce and Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce, in hosting a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Monday, March, 20 at 3 p.m. for its branch office located 11718

Ocean Gateway in West Ocean City. Insurance Management Group is owned by Reese Cropper, III, a third generation insurance agent with roots firmly planted in the Eastern Shore. IMG’s mission is to provide the best insurance products to clients, enabling them to recover from unexpected losses as quickly and effortlessly as possible. Insurance Management Group has a dedicated team of commercial lines agents and personal lines agents that have been trained for coastal community needs. IMG has an in-house claims support team to help in the event of a loss. Members of the community who are interested in learning more about Insurance Management Group are invited. Refreshments and appetizers will be served. For more information, contact Insurance Management Group at 410-524-5700.

Bank ribbon cutting The Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce will host a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Bank of Ocean City, Ocean Pines Branch, on Thursday, March 23 at 5 p.m. A remodeling party is also scheduled for that day from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Hot and cold refreshments will be served. The Bank of Ocean City, Ocean Pines Branch, is located at 11001 Nicholas Lane, Ocean Pines. All Worcester County business people (employers and employees) are invited to attend and take part in the ribbon cutting. For more information, contact the Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce at 410-641-5306.

Seller, buyer and dual agencies Continued from Page 37 from other companies to show the home to buyer Customers, meaning, buyers who have not entered into a written Buyer Agency agreement. Simply put, if you are a buyer and you do not enter into a written Buyer Agency agreement with your real estate agent, your real estate agent is working as a Subagent. In this scenario, the listing Agent and Subagent both represent the seller while the buyer remains unrepresented. As specified above, Buyer Agency is created through a written Buyer Repre-

sentation Agreement. The Buyer Agent owes the buyer the duties of reasonable care, loyalty, disclosure, confidentiality, diligence and accounting. Additionally, the Buyer Agent should disclose any material facts or information about the property, which are reasonably known to the Buyer Agent. Dual agency is also covered in the brochure in detail. The brochure is available for download by visiting MAR’s website at www.mdrealtor.org. — Lauren Bunting is a licensed Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.

New location hiring employees Continued from Page 37 Hess had been looking to expand Massage Envy to Ocean City for a couple years. Manklin Creek Road in Ocean Pines stood out because of the landlord, shopping center, ease of access, traffic flow and most importantly, it is near residents. “We want to cater to the local population and people who spend a good chunk of their lives here,” Hess said. “We figured locals are in this area on a regular basis and it would be a convenient spot for them.” Massage Envy is hiring for all positions with “meeting the demand” as the biggest obstacle when opening a new lo-

cation, she said. “It is a nice place to work and a family-environment,” Hess said. “We are healers and focus on our clients and craft. We have parties, provide insurance, have a 401K option and pay for license renewals.” Massage Envy Ocean City on Manklin Creek Road in Ocean Pines is open every day. Appointments can be made Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 9 p.m., 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Sunday. Check out www.massageenvy.com or call 410-387-2698 for more information or to book a service.

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MARCH 17, 2017

Hotel completes many renovations

(March 17, 2017) The Commander Hotel & Suites, which is ranked eighth in TripAdvisor’s customer reviews of 102 hotels in Ocean City, has completed a $5 million renovation of its rooms and lobby/public areas. The project was developed by locally owned Blue Water Development in conjunction with The Design Group, which specializes in environmentally sensitive and energy efficient architectural services. The Commander Hotel & Suites on 14th Street and the Boardwalk is owned by Will Lynch and Todd Burbage. The structural, functional and ergonomic enhancements throughout the property include: Installation of a new high speed WiFi network, environmentally friendly LED lighting, new bath fixtures, furniture, Simmons Beautyrest mattresses and General Electric stainless steel appliances in all of the hotel’s 109 guest suites (24 with full kitchens) and dispensers of Olive Branch Natural Body Care products in all guest suites. Other enhancements include expansion and renovation of the hotel’s lobby and exterior porch, construction of a new side porch, new design elements in the lobby and porches including products by such upscale brands as Jaipur Living rugs, Jofran furniture, Klaussner furnishings, D&W Silks interior foliage, Bassett mirrors and Casual Comfort outdoor poly furniture and the addition of a free morning beverage station.

Ocean City Today

PAGE 39

AGH Women’s Health Center in WOC offers new services (March 17, 2017) Atlantic General Hospital and Health System announces that the Atlantic General Women’s Health Center in West Ocean City now offers 3D mammography, ultrasound and bone density screening, conveniently located in the same complex as lab services, minor surgical procedures and routine gynecologic services. Now women can save time and trouble by scheduling all of their well woman exams at once. The new offices of Christine Neto, MD; Kevin J. Lee, MD, MSPH, FACOG; Lisa Bayles, DNP, CRNP; and Nicki Akstinas, CRNP, are located in Suite 8 of Atlantic General Medical Center located at 12308 Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City. The women’s imaging services are provided in Suite 5. Neto is maintaining office hours in Pocomoke as well to ensure continued ease of patient access in the southern part of Worcester County. In addition, women’s health specialist Brandi Musselman, MD, is providing care at the West Ocean City location, while maintaining her primary practice in Selbyville, Delaware. Gynecology appointments can be made by calling 443-728-1050. Appointments for 3D mammograms or other imaging services can be made by calling 443-728-1090.

An open house is scheduled for Tuesday, March 28 from 4-6 p.m. with a ribbon cutting at 4:30 p.m. The community is invited for tours and refreshments and to meet the providers. For more information and to RSVP by March 21, contact Ashley Godwin at 410-641-9644 or agodwin@atlanticgeneral.org. Atlantic General Hospital has been providing quality health care to the residents of Worcester, Wicomico and Somerset counties in Maryland, and Sussex County in Delaware, since May 1993. Built by the commitment and generosity of a dedicated community, the hospital’s state-of-the-art facility in Berlin combines old-fashioned personal attention with the latest in technology and services. It provides quality specialty care such as weight loss surgery, orthopedics, outpatient infusion and chemotherapy for individuals with cancer or blood/autoimmune disorders, and a comprehensive women’s diagnostic center. Atlantic General Health System, its network of more than 40 primary care providers and specialists, care for residents and visitors throughout the region. For more information about Atlantic General Hospital, visit www.atlanticgeneral.org.

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REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE Ocean City Today

PAGE 40

SO CLOSE TO THE OCEAN

Located in a terrific neighborhood with a pool and is only one block from the ocean. This furnished 2 bedroom vacation getaway will be your favorite spot away from home or stay all year long. Go for a walk on the beach while you have your morning coffee or tea. The nice yard is perfect for those summer cookouts and creating JUST LISTED memories. A home you’ll love for an EZ price 123 MARINE CIRCLE, OCEAN CITY only $86,500. Now for a L@@K today.

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MARCH 17, 2017

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Stunning sunsets over the bay from this 2nd floor, 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath condo located in the heart of Ocean City. This Carefree Bay home overlooks the canal and the deeded boat slip and lift from the private deck. Features include an eat-in kitchen, breakfast bar, open floor-plan, and impeccable water views. The living areas open to the kitchen and back deck. Recent improvements including new roof & downspouts, renovated shed. Just steps from the beach. Enjoy this move-in ready beach home or use as an investment property for Just $179,000!! The sooner you act, the sooner your vacation begins!

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This well maintained 3BR/2BA home is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City. The home is situated on a corner lot and features a porch, cathedral ceilings, a gas fireplace and cen. air. Recent upgrades include new floor coverings, new light fixtures, new refrigerator and a freshly painted interior. HOA fees are only $225 a year. Listed at $237,000.

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Lifestyle

Mar. 17, 2017

Ocean City Today Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertaiment, Events, Features, Music

Page 41

Inside Going Out Taylor Sloan appy St. Patrick’s Day everyone!

H

Hundreds of customers browsed more than 200 exhibits of products and services during the annual Home, Condo and Outdoor Show at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street last year. The 2017 event takes place this weekend.

Home, Condo and Outdoor Show in OC this weekend

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Thousands of products and ideas await homeowners this weekend during the 33rd annual Home, Condo and Outdoor Show at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street. “Almost everyone lives in a home or condominium and after 33 years, it’s a proven success,” said show creator, Mike Wicklein. “Everything is under one roof, weather-controlled and there is free parking.” Attendees can browse 170 vendors who will set up in 218 booths, offering products and services for kitchens and baths, as well as furnishing, spas, sunrooms, energy conservation, water treatment, security, appliances, financial services, roofs, gutters, fireplaces, waterproofing, solar products, accessories, pools and outdoor living. It is the largest home show in the area and many products can be compared between different vendors to find the best fit for the customer at a reasonable price, Wicklein said. “There are lots of deals and specials going on,” he said. “A variety of vendors to choose from and no pressure browsing.” There will be hundreds of experts on hand to give tips, advice and ideas on decorating, remodeling, accessorizing, renovating, landscaping or building a home. A number of favorites are returning in addition to more than 30 new

Kristie Layton and Austin Scorpio from Solar City discuss the environmental positives of installing solar panels on homes during the 2016 Home, Condo and Outdoor Show at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street.

vendors, Wicklein said. Don and Ashley Furbay will debut Edgemoor Vinyl and Roll-a-way of Delmarva for the first time. “We have never done the show before and it seemed like a good way to reach out and let people know we are still here,” Don Furbay said. “There is still a heavy rumor going around that we are not in business. This will give us as much exposure to the community as we can to keep the tradition going.” Roll-a-way of Delmarva has a wide selection of storm and security shutters while Edgemoor provides services specializing in the sales and installation of aluminum and vinyl products including railings, decks, fences and specialty products for condominiums, commercial and residential homes. “Talking with people under one roof is a great opportunity to reach out and I am excited,” Furbay said.

Displays from the manufacture will be showcased this weekend and attendees can press a button to make a shutter go up and down. In addition, anyone who signs up for a measurement to purchase a shutter set will receive a $100 coupon at the show. Ocean City Kitchen and Bath has participated in the Home, Condo and Outdoor Show for more than a decade. “We have been a part of Ocean City for 20 years and receive a number of contacts from the show,” said owner Brian Flurer. New trends in cabinetry and countertops will be on display. Interested customers can pick up literature on Ocean City Kitchen and Bath at the booth as well. The show partners with the art and craft fair, which offers a variety of See HOME Page 42

Today is an extra special day because it’s my grandmother’s 70th birthday! Everyone who has had their hair cut or done by her at the barbershop downtown knows she doesn’t act a day over 21. She is also my favorite person, and I wouldn’t be as confident, sassy and strong as I am without her. If you’re in town for the holiday weekend or simply looking for great places to celebrate, check out all of the bars and restaurants listed below. The Big Easy on 60, 60th Street, offers happy hour daily including $5 frozen drinks, crushes and import beers, $3.50 rails/ house wines, $3 domestic beer and $2 off specialty cocktails. Food specials include $6 appetizers. The inaugural “Shave for the Brave” event will take place at the Big Easy on 60, tonight, Friday, from 5-9 p.m. It is a fundraiser for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising funds for childhood cancer cures. All are welcome to sign up and get their head shaved. There will be free admission with a 50/50 raffle and Chinese auction. For more, visit www.TheBigEasyon60.com. BJ’s on The Water, 75th Street, has happy hour 4-7 p.m. at the bar only. Drink specials include $2.25 Miller Lite, Coors Light and Natural Light cans, $1.75 domestic mug and $3 pint drafts, $3.25 domestic bottles, $3.50 premium beer and rail beverages, $4.25 house wine and $4.50 import beer. Happy hour food includes pork barbecue sliders, $7.99, and hot fingers with fries, $5.99. Entertainment this weekend kicks off Friday, March 17, with Over Time at 9 p.m., and Saturday, catch Bird Dog and the Road Kings. Wednesday, March 22, listen to Two Guys and a Mama at 5 pm. during the happy hour party. To hear more specials, call BJ’s at 410-524-7575. Bourbon Street on the Beach, 116th Street, offers happy hour 3-7 p.m. daily, which includes $2 Natural Light, $2.50 drafts, $3.50 rail drinks, See INSIDE Page 42


Ocean City Today

PAGE 42

MARCH 17, 2017

Inside going out Taylor Sloan Continued from Page 41

Fresh, Local Chesapeake Bay Oysters Served Exclusively Here! Fried, Steamed, On The Half-Shell, Baked

We Have Crabs!

Call For Prices And Availability

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HIGGINS NORTH

128TH ST. & COASTAL HWY. 410-250-2403 OPEN FRIDAY @ 2:30 P.M. SATURDAY @ NOON Liquor Store Open Friday - Sunday 11AM

$5 house wine and margaritas and $6 hurricanes and crushes. Food specials include $1 oysters, $8 char grilled oysters, $9 wings and $8 halfpound burgers. Friday, March 17, hear live entertainment at 7 p.m. Saturday, March 18, catch 33 RPM at 8 p.m. To make a reservation, call 443664-2896. Captain’s Table, 15th Street, is open daily for breakfast and dinner. Monday through Saturday breakfast is served 7-11:30 a.m. Sunday, breakfast is offered 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., with lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, indulge in $3 Bloody Mary’s and mimosas. Dinner and lite fare starts at 5 p.m. daily. Happy hour is 5-7 p.m. Drink specials include $1.50 Miller Lite drafts, $1 off house wines and premium rail cocktails. Enjoy music by Phil Perdue on the piano this Friday and Saturday, 5:30-9:30 p.m. To make reservations, call 410289-7192. Clarion, 101st Street, offers several dining and nightlife options. At Horizon’s Oceanfront Restaurant receive 50 percent off dinner menu entrées, 5-8 p.m. Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday, and 30 percent off from 5-7 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Saturday, enjoy a breakfast buffet from 7-10:30 a.m. The cost is $11.95 for adults, $8.95 for children ages 4-12, and 3 and younger are free. Sunday, indulge in a deluxe breakfast buffet from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. The cost is $14.95 for adults and $9.95 for children. Breakers Pub offers happy hour daily from 4-7 p.m. Drink specials include $2.30 select drafts, $2.90 domestic beers, rail drinks and house wines and $3.85 margaritas. Friday, March 17, enjoy St. Patrick’s Day specials featuring a $6.95 lunch of Irish cabbage or barley soup with hot or cold corned beef sandwich on rye. Dinner specials will be available at Breakers Pub and Horizons from 510 p.m., and include a corned beef,

cabbage and potato dinner for $12.95. Happy hour beer prices will be available all day and night. Live entertainment this weekend will be provided by On The Edge, Friday, March 17 and Saturday, March 18 at 9:30 p.m. DJ Dusty will spin at 9 p.m. and between band sets until 1:30 a.m. To make reservations, call 410524-3535. Coins Restaurant and Pub, 28th Street, offers happy hour daily, 3-6 p.m. Drink specials include domestic drafts, $2; domestic bottles, $2.75; and rail drinks/chardonnay/cabernet for $3.50. Food specials include a quarter pound hot dog, $2; 12 steamed clams/wings, $6; and mussels, $7. Enjoy half-price entrées Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday, 5-9 p.m. For a full menu visit, www.coinspuboc.com. The Cove at Ocean Pines, 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, is closed Monday and Tuesday and reopens at 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday, 10 a.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. Sunday. Brunch begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. on Sunday. Try the Cove’s new plated menu featuring traditional favorites. Friday, March 17, hear Tranzfusion at 8 p.m. Drink specials include $3 Guinness and $5 car bombs. Wednesday, March 22, don’t miss karaoke at 7 p.m. with DJ Donnie. Thursday, trivia night begins at 6 p.m., with signups starting at 5:30 p.m. For more, visit www.oceanpines.org. Crab Bag, 130th Street, opens at 11 a.m. year-round. It offers all day super happy hour with drink specials that include $1.50 domestic drafts, $2 rails and domestic bottles, $3.50 wines by the glass, $3.95 32-ounce mini pitchers, $4.95 Bloody Mary’s and $5.95 orange crushes. Food specials include $6.95 cracklin kielbasa; $7.95 smokehouse chili dog, chicken sandwich, one-third rack baby back ribs, or smoke house cheese fries; and $8.95 half-pound cheeseburger. Crab Bag will also continue its St. Patrick’s Day specials through

Home, Condo and Outdoor Show includes art, craft fair Continued from Page 41 unique and creative gifts made by the artists. Last year, approximately 6,500 people attended the annual event, and weather is a factor in the numbers. It is always a guess as to how many people show up, Wicklein said. The first show brought in about 2,500 and their largest turnout was 17,000. In addition, the show will feature free drawings and door prizes including a 50/50 raffle hosted by Temple Bat Yam where the winner could take home up to $50,000 on Sunday.

The show will take place today, Friday, from 12-6 p.m.; Saturday, March 18, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, March 19, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. There is a $7 admission fee for adults; seniors (55 and older) and students (14-22) get in for $6. Also, military, police, fire personnel with their ID and children 13 and under get in free. For more information and a list of vendors, visit www.oceanpromotions.info/events/spring-homecondo-and-outdoor-show.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

Inside going out Taylor Sloan Sunday, March 19. Food specials include $1 shuck-abuck raw oysters, and $12.95 charbroiled lobster tail appetizer. Drink specials include a green tea shooter for $3.95, Grasshopper Martine and Irish car bomb, $4.95, Misty Mint on the Rocks, $2.95, as well as Irish Hammer Shooter, Irish flag and Irish crush for $5.95. Also get Bud/Bud Light 16-ounce bottles for $3. For more specials, call 410-2503337. Duffy’s Bar and Grill, 130th Street, will host its all day and night party Friday, March 17. Enjoy drink specials that include $3.17 domestic drafts, Smithwicks and Harp bottles and 16-ounce Miller Lite cans, $4 Jameson and $5 Guinness. Food specials include Duffy’s “famous” corned beef and cabbage “best brisket,” $10.99, $9.99 Shepherd’s pie/bangers and mash, $8.99 Reubens and Rachels, and $7.99 Irish lamb stew/famous fish and chips. Hear live entertainment kicking off Friday with Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m., and DJ Lefty, 7 p.m. to midnight. Saturday, March 18, catch DJ Chuck D at 5 p.m. If you want to know more, call 410-250-1449. Dunes Manor, 28th Street, will offer “sham rockin” specials on Friday, March 17. Drink specials include $2 green Coors Light drafts and $5 Guinness. Corned beef and cabbage will be available all day. For more, visit www.dunesmanor.com. Fager’s Island, 60th Street, offers daily lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. Enjoy “Island Time,” Tuesday through Sunday, 3-6 p.m. Drink specials include $5 crushes, martinis and Fager’s Island wines, two-for-one rail drinks, domestic beers and Coronas. Friday, March 17 catch local band Colossal Fossil Sauce on the deck at 5 p.m., followed by DJ Hook spinning at 9 p.m. Listen to Speakers Of The House on stage at 9:30 p.m. Saturday, March 18, hang out with DJ Louie T spinning on the deck at 9:30 p.m. Hear What’s Next on stage at 9:30 p.m. To view everything going on at Fager’s, visit www.Fagers.com. Fish Tales, 22nd Street, bayside, will be open for St. Patrick’s Day at 11 a.m. Drink specials include $3 green beer, $4 Guinness pints, $5 Jameson shots and Irish coffee. To catch up on all things happening at Fish Tales for 2017, visit www.ocfishtales.com. Frog Bar and Grill, Inlet Village, will be open Friday at 11 a.m. and 8 a.m. Saturday/Sunday. Drink specials include $2.75 Bud Light all day and 16ounce PBR cans. Food specials include corned beef and cabbage and ham and cabbage, $9.99 each. Try a Reuben sandwich for $7.99. To hear what else is new, call 410289-3764. Fox’s Pizza Den, located in the Harris Teeter Shopping Plaza, Route 54, offers locals’ dine-in only specials.

Monday starting at 4 p.m., enjoy a prime rib dinner for $13. Tuesday, stop in for half-price pizza, and Wednesday, get your taste buds ready for $10 parmesan night. Thursday is “Lucky Burger” night for $7.77, which includes a half-pound Angus burger. Friday, have fish and chips for $10. Come in for happy hour with drink specials until 6 p.m. that include $3 domestic drafts and rails, $4 house wines and $5 orange crushes. For more, call 302-436-FOXS (3697). Guido’s Burritos, 33rd Street, is open Thursday through Sunday. Every Thursday night enjoy drink specials including $2 select beers, bombs and tequila during its “Bombs Away” party with DJ Papi Roisterous at 9 p.m. To view the menu and other specials, visit www.guidosburritos.com. Harborside Bar & Grill, 12841 S. Harbor Rd. West Ocean City, offers happy hour from 4-7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Drink specials include $2 rails and domestic beer bottle/drafts and $5.50 orange crushes. Food specials include $5.99 buffalo wings/pound of steamed shrimp, $7.99 bowl of garlic mussels and two dozen steamed clams for $12.99. Friday, March 17, Billy T will provide tunes beginning at 4 p.m. Friday is also ladies night starting at 7 p.m. Enjoy $2 16-ounce Miller and Coors Light drafts, $3 shooters and $4 house wines, and of course, happy hour prices on orange crushes. On Saturday, March 18, hear Simple Truth or Side Project, 2-6 p.m., followed by DJ Jeremy at 9 p.m. On Sunday, listen to Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m. then DJ Billy T, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 21, enjoy a prime rib dinner for $15.99. Every Wednesday, hang out with DJ Jeremy during karaoke starting at 10 p.m. For all things from the home of the Original Orange Crush, visit www.weocharborside.com. Harrison’s Harbor Watch, located in the Inlet Village, is now open for the 2017 season. Every Thursday enjoy $12.99 entrée specials including cajun shrimp and sausage pasta, hickory BBQ shrimp brochette, jerk chicken, baked Chesapeake Bay catfish, seared ahi tuna salad and coconut shrimp. To hear more, call 410-289-5121. At Higgins, 31st and Coastal Highway, enjoy its all-you-can eat crab and corn for $29.99. Customers can select all-you-can-eat shrimp and ribs for $25.99 per person. While at Higgins try a couple popular appetizers including the scallops and oyster casino with minced garlic and cheddar cheese atop steamed oysters. For more specials, call 410289-2581. Hooters, West Ocean City on Route 50, offers happy hour every day from 3-6 p.m. with drink specials including $2.50 domestic drafts/botSee INSIDE Page 44

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Open Every Day

On The Bay 82nd St & Coastal Hwy 410-524-1009

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

1/2 Price Steam Pots

Crabs Cake Specials

FRIDAY

Prime Rib Night

SATURDAY

Buy 1 Get 1 Free Dessert Night

SUNDAY

1/2 Price Entrees

F E NWI CK OYSTER HOU SE 7 0 0 C o a s t a l H w y. Fe n w i c k I s l a n d , D E 3 0 2 -5 8 1 - 0 15 3

O p e n T h u r s & Fr i 4 : 3 0 p m Sat & Sun 11:30am


Ocean City Today

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Inside going out Taylor Sloan Continued from Page 43

tles, $3 wells, $3.50 house wine and $4 calls. If you’re in the service, enjoy Military Mondays with 10 percent off for active or retired military. Celebrate wingfest Tuesdays from 6-8 p.m. with 50-cent traditional or boneless wings. For more, call 410-213-1841. KY West, 54th Street, offers fine dining and casual fare, open daily at 4 p.m. Take advantage of a two-for$25 and two-for-$45 dinner menu. The kitchen is open until 10 p.m. To make a reservation, call 443-6642836. Happy hour is 4-7 p.m. daily. Food specials include $8 steamed shrimp and wings, $9 calamari and $10 burgers with hand-cut fries. Drink specials include $3 domestic bottles and Miller Lite drafts, $4 rail drinks and $5 house wine. To view the menu, visit www.kywestoceancity.com. Longboard, 67th Street, will have St. Patrick’s Day specials Friday, March 17. Have an $8.95 Reuben sandwich with fries, available all day. Drink specials include $2.50 “baby beers,” $4.95 Irish coffee and $5.95 Irish car bomb. Dinner specials available at 5 p.m. include Reuben meatloaf with green beans and roasted red potatoes, $12.95. For reservations, call 443-6645639. Nick’s House of Ribs, 145th Street, is open Monday through Friday, 3 p.m. to midnight, and noon to midnight Saturday and Sunday. Enjoy happy hour from 3-5:30 p.m. at the bar only. Tuesday, order a single crab cake or flounder almondine with two sides and dinner rolls for $13.99. Wednesday, have a half-rack of ribs with two sides and dinner rolls for $13.99, and Thursday, eat half a BBQ chicken with two sides and rolls for $13.99. For more, visit

www.nickshouseofribs.com. Pizza Tugos, Route 50 in West Ocean City, has happy hour Monday through Friday, 3-6 p.m. Drink specials include $1.75 Miller Lite and Yuengling drafts, $2.99 craft beer drafts and $1.99 rail drinks. Get $1 cheese pizza slices during happy hour. Order your pizza online at www.pizzatugos.com. Ropewalk, 82nd Street, is open Wednesday through Sunday. Happy hour is available all day and all night. Drink specials include $2 off drafts as well as $2.50 select domestics, $4 Slushies, wines and rails and $5.50 crushes. Happy hour food specials include half-priced bada bada bing shrimp and wings. Nightly dinner specials include half-price steam pots on Wednesday, crab cake on Thursday, prime rib on Friday, buy-one-get-one-free dessert on Saturday, and half-price entrées on Sunday. Enjoy weekend brunch at Ropewalk, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more, call 410524-1009. Seacrets, 49th Street, is open Thursday at 4 p.m. and 11 a.m. Friday through Sunday. Enjoy happy hour specials including half-price jerk chicken, Jamaican fries and onion rings, and $5 off wings/raw bar prices, 4-7 p.m. Don’t miss happy hour drink prices including $2.50 Natural Lights, $3 domestic can beers, $4 Seacrets TropicAle and import beers, $4.50 craft drafts and $5 Seacrets spirits. Half-price entrées start at 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Sunday. Friday, celebrate St. Patrick’s Day all day and night! Catch Rew Smith from 1-5 p.m. on the Tiki Bar stage. An appearance by Ocean City Pipes and Drums will happen at 3:30 p.m. Hear Brett Andrew and Company at 5 p.m. on the tiki stage. Later on, listen to Split Decision at 10 p.m. in Morley Hall nite club. Food specials

MARCH 17, 2017

include corned beef and cabbage with potatoes for $8.99. Saturday, March 18, Finnegan’s Wake will take place in Morley Hall. A $20 donation will be collected at the door, and proceeds benefit the Worcester County Developmental Center in Newark, which provides employment opportunities for adults with intellectual disabilities. Catch Full Circle at 5 p.m. on the tiki stage, and later on, hear Steal The Sky in Morley Hall at 10 p.m. Saturday is rock and rib night; have a half-rack of ribs with a starch and vegetable for $14.99, or full rack/whole rock fish/half rack and half-piece of rockfish for $18.99 served with a starch and vegetable. Seacrets Distillery tours are avaialbe every Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. Tours cost $10 and can be booked online. Participants must be at least 21 years of age to go on a tour. Enjoy a few tastings with your choice of lemon, orange and grapefruit vodka, gin, white, spiced and coconut rum, bourbon-whiskey or light-whiskey. Visit, www.seacrets.com for more specials. Skye Bar, 66th Street, is open Friday through Sunday. Friday, March 17, drink specials include $5 orange crushes and $6 Jameson crushes and Irish trash cans. Food specials include corned beef and cabbage and Mulligan stew. Happy hour is 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials. Have $1 oysters and quarter pound lobsters for $15. Drink specials include $1 off drafts, $3.50 rails, $4 house wines and $5 orange crushes. Catch live entertainment 4-8 p.m. Friday with Ziggy Issacs and Saturday, Match 18, with Monkee Paw at 4 p.m. To hear more, call 410-723-6762. Shenanigan’s, Fourth Street, will open at 9 a.m. Friday, March 17. Check out James Gallagher & Off the Boat from 11:30 a.m. to close, with special appearances by The Chesapeake Caledonia Pipe Band and The Ocean City Pipe Band.

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20

You may find yourself teetering between responsibilities to work, friends and even family. It’s possible you will need to set aside some time to play catch-up in the coming days.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21

Listen before you make assumptions, Taurus. Resist any temptation to wildly post or chat about personal information. You might regret it later on.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21

Finances are your main priority this week, Gemini. Whether you have a lot in savings or are floundering paycheck to paycheck, it is time to reassess your financial situation.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, if things are stressful at home, it may be necessary to step away for some breathing room. Book a vacation so everyone can unwind and recharge.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23

Take a deep breath and try to relax, Leo. You have been operating on overdrive for some time now and you’re just about out of gas. Book that vacation, pronto.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22

A promising collaboration may be on the horizon, Virgo. This could prove interesting and also propel a hobby or your career a bit further than you had anticipated.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23

Libra, newfound success earns you the recognition you deserve. It could mean a promotion to a corner office or even the opportunity to enjoy a new, more lucrative job elsewhere.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22

A dream or a passion project you have been working on for several months may finally come to fruition, Scorpio. Make changes gradually and success will follow.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21

Over a Million Sold!

Lunch Special Mon-Thurs 11-4 $6.99

Dinner Specials Starting at 5pm

Monday: 1/2 Price Entrees

H a pp y St . P a t r i c k ’ s D a y Irish Fare March 17

$3.00 surcharge for entrees with steak, crab & crab legs

Tuesday: Prime Rib $15.99 Wednesday: $5 Burger & Chicken Breast Sandwiches ALL DAY Thursday: All You Can Eat Ribs & Steamed Shrimp $16.99 Friday: Fried Oyster & Soft Shell Friday ALL DAY/NIGHT Sunday: 1/2 Price Entrées All Day & Night

WATER FRONT WI-FI

$3.00 surcharge for entrees with steak, crab & crab legs Specials are not to be combined with any other offer, discount or coupons. Some restrictions apply. No substitutions, dine in only. Excludes Holidays & Holiday Weekends

HAPPY HOUR with Awesome Food & Drink Specials! MONDAY – FRIDAY 4-7PM

www.weocharborside.com

Entertainment

WEDNESDAY - SUNDAY

WEDNESDAY: KARAOKE WITH DJ JEREMY

Live Entertainment & Drink Specials

FRIDAY NIGHT LITES $2 Miller Lite & Coors Light Draft 1.50 Natural Light Can $3 Shots Bartender’s Choice

$

LAST FRIDAY EVERY MONTH Throwback Friday with DJ Billy T

Where You Always Get Your Money’s Worth

Sagittarius, there’s no wiggle room left for apprehension or ambivalence. Take action this week and it could be a turning point in your life. Seal the deal however you choose.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20

Capricorn, the key to landing on your feet is to always expect the curveballs that will be thrown your way. This way you are always on your toes and can adapt quickly.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18

Now is a good time to declutter your life, Aquarius. Start sorting through your belongings, then move on to any emotional baggage you’ve been carrying.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20

This week is ripe for love, Pisces. A romantic connection may finally bloom or you may get news that someone is expecting a baby.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

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Inside going out Taylor Sloan Continued from Page 44

Drink specials include $3.75 domestic drafts and cans, $5.25 import and craft drafts, $4.75 16-ounce Bud and Bud Light green aluminum bottles, and $4.50 import cans. A limited food menu will be available including hot corned beef and Swiss with fries, $7.50, grilled reuben and fries, $8, and Off The Boat fish and chips, $10.50. For more, call 410-289-7181. Sunset Grille, 12933 Sunset Ave., West Ocean City, offers happy hour every day from 3-7 p.m. with two-forone drinks including select beer, wine, crushes and rail beverages, and half-price appetizers. Enjoy daily lunch specials every day starting at 11 a.m. Tuesday is Italian night and every Wednesday is date night. Indulge in a seafood feast on Thursday night. To make a reservation, call 410213-8110. Touch of Italy, 67th Street, offers a New York-style deli and Italian marketplace with specialties straight from the Bronx. Walk around and you are in a quaint Italian restaurant with bar and fire brick oven. Touch of Italy offers specials Sunday through Thursday. Sunday, buy one pizza, get one half off, and indulge in Nonna’s $39 dinner special (feeds two to four people). Monday, try the manicotti for only $10 and save on wine with select bottles half-price. Ladies, Tuesday is for you. With the purchase of one entrée, take half

off another. Savor your palate in seasonal ravioli for $11, while enjoying beverages offered at happy hour prices all day and night. Wednesday, have chicken parmigiana for $12, and Thursday, eat classic spaghetti and meatballs for $11. Happy hour is available every day at the bar and bar tables from 3-6 p.m. Drink specials include $3 domestic beer and $5 rail drinks/house wine. Food specials include $7 Italian nachos and sausage and pepper sliders (yum), and $8 meatball lollipops and chicken parmesan fingers. For more information or reservations, call 410-524-5252. Whisker’s Bar and Grill, located in the Ocean Pines Plaza, has karaoke with DJ Donnie Berkey at 9 p.m., Friday, March, 17. Whisker’s offers food specials weekly including half-price burgers with purchase of beverage on Monday. Get fried chicken or meatloaf with mashed potatoes and vegetables on Tuesday for $9.99. Wednesday, have a half-price hot dog with purchase of beverage. Thursday, try a chicken sandwich for $5.99 all day and night. Friday, enjoy an assortment of seafood specials. To hear more, call 410-208-3922. If you have an event coming up you would like me to highlight in Inside Going Out, please send me an email at Taylor@OceanCityToday.net. Don’t forget you can also check out this column online at www.oceancitytoday.net.

First ‘Shave for the Brave’ fundraiser for St. Baldrick’s

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Anyone interested in helping raise money to eliminate childhood cancer should attend the inaugural “Shave for the Brave” event, taking place on 60th Street at the Big Easy on 60, tonight, Friday, from 5-9 p.m. As of Monday afternoon, four people had committed to getting their heads shaved. The event is a fundraiser for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising funds for childhood cancer cures. All are welcome to sign up at the event or to check out the action in person. Parents are encouraged to bring their children along, and organizers hope to raise at least $5,000. “Every single person has been touched by cancer in some form,” said DeAnna Briddell, a manager at Big Easy on 60 and organizer of Shave for the Brave. “No child or parent should have to go through this, and the financial burden is unbelievable.” There will be free admission with a 50/50 raffle and Chinese auction, which will include restaurant gift cards, baskets, a stay at the Hilton, four rounds of golf at Jonathan’s Landing in Magnolia,

Delaware, and a day with professional bass fisherman Fabian Rodriguez for two people, which is valued at $800. Dirty Deal is slated to play blues music, apparel will be available for purchase and the shave starts around 7 p.m. Each shavee who collects at least $50 will take home a T-shirt, and the person who garners the most money will receive a medal. Big Easy on 60 owner Mark Hall is participating in the shave and will be matching the donations he receives up to $1,000 for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation. Jennifer Snyder, from Oh My Hair Salon in Berlin, is “graciously donating her time” by shaving all participants’ heads. St. Patrick’s Day food and drink specials will be available during the event, including a four-course, $45 select menu for two and $9 bangers and mash or corned beef and cabbage. There is no cost to attend the event. “Come celebrate St. Patrick’s Day with a generous heart,” Briddell said. “Have a good time. We plan on having this event for years to come.” For more information, call the Big Easy on 60 at 410-524-2305.

OPEN THIS WEEKEND THURSDA AY Y-SUNDA AY Y

Serving Breakfast Sat & Sun • • • PICK UP YOUR ST P PA ADDY’S T-SHIRT ((N Neeew N w Desig Deessiiggnn FFor or 201 20 011777))

$3 Frog Shooters $5 Orange Crushes AL A LL THE TIME!

HAPP PY Y HOUR 3pm-6pm $2.50 Bud Light Bottle & Rolling Rock ALL THE TIME!

Home of the Famous Porrttabella Mushroom & Swiss Burger! At the Inlet Village 806 S. A Attlantic Ave. Ocean City, MD 21842

410-289-FROG Free Parrk king for Cu usstomers a att the Frog Bar

OPEN E EV VER RY Y WEEKEND


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Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

OUT & ABOUT

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Emerald Society members, from left, Bob Childs, David Pearl, Mike Williams, Ron Taylor and Fran Robitaille pose for a photo before playing the bagpipes during the St. Patrick’s Day celebration on March 9 at Shenanigan’s, on Fourth Street and the Boardwalk.

Josh Kirstein, left, Nicki Kenefick and Kevin Peretta, of Ocean City, attend The Eastern Shore Emerald Police Society fundraiser at Shenanigan’s Irish Pub, located on Fourth Street and the Boardwalk, March 9.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Friends, from left, Lori Krakowiak, Colin Pilgerten and Caitlin Smith, all of Baltimore, stop by Guidos Burritos on 33rd Street, March 10.

Enjoying a few drinks at Guidos Burritos on 33rd Street, last Friday, from left, are Beth Rich, Sharon Schmitt and Joanne Pilkerton, of Baltimore.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Delmarva Irish-American Club’s 2016 St. Patrick’s Day Parade Grand Marshals Mike and Kathy Higgins, left, and 2017 Grand Marshals Nancy and Bob McCarthy are joined by Sam Flannery, center, at Fager’s Island, 60th Street, last Friday.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan, left, and Katy Durham, right, welcome Martina and Joe Gavin of the Irish Embassy to the resort as they visit Fager’s Island on 60th Street, March 10.


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City FOOLS members, Steve Lamoru, Jerry Huntz, Mike Creech, coordinator Jason Bloom, Danielle Postello and Scott Shuster get together for a photo during “Sham Jam,” held last Friday at Cowboy Coast on 17th Street.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Attending “Sham Jam” at Cowboy Coast, 17th Street, on March 10, are Lisa Altobelli of College Park, Craig Lokin of Annapolis, Donna Clem of Easton, Paul and Tracey Redding of Ocean City, Karin Lokin of Annapolis and Mark Altobelli of College Park.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Members of Ocean City FOOLS Alpha Chapter, Dave Williams, left, and Dave Carr, have a fun time during “Sham Jam” at Cowboy Coast, 17th Street, March 10. The event benefited the Ocean City FOOLS, a local firefighter organization, and the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation.

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Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

NOW PLAYING BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com March 17: Over Time, 9 p.m. March 18: Bird Dog And the Road Kings, 9 p.m. March 22: 2 Guys & A Mama, 5 p.m. BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium Ocean City 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com March 17: TBA, 7-10 p.m. March 18: 33 RPM, 8-11 p.m. March 19: TBA, 6-9 p.m. March 22: Open Mic, 8-11 p.m. March 23: Chris Button, 7-10 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. CASINO AT OCEAN DOWNS 10218 Racetrack Road Berlin 410-641-0600 www.oceandowns.com March 18: Aaron Howell, 4:30-8:30 p.m.; Tear the Roof Off, 9:30 p.m to 1:30 a.m. DUFFY’S TAVERN 130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com

March 17: Bob Hughes, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Lefty DUNES MANOR 28th Street, Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-289-1100 www.dunesmanor.com March 17: Irish Sing Alongs FAGER’S ISLAND 60th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-5500 www.fagers.com March 17: Colossal Fossil Sauce, 5 p.m.; DJ Hook, 9 p.m.; Speakers of the House, 9:30 p.m. March 18: DJ Louie T, 9 p.m.; What’s Next, 9:30 p.m. March 20: Bryan Clarke, 6 p.m. HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com March 17: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. March 18: Side Project/Simple Truth, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. March 19: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 6:30 p.m. March 22: Karaoke w/DJ Jeremy March 23: Opposite Directions, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. HARVEST MOON TAVERN 208 W. Green St. Snow Hill 410-632-9890 harvestmoontavern@gmail.com March 17: The Stims, 7-10 p.m. JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB 56th Street, bayside

Ocean City 410-524-7499 www.johnnyspizzapub.com March 17: Kevin Poole & Joe Mama, 8-11 p.m. March 18: Randy Lee Ashcraft and the Saltwater Cowboys, 8-11 p.m. MUMFORD’S LANDING OCEAN PINES 1 Mumford’s Landing Road Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 www.oceanpines.org March 17: Tranzfusion, 8 p.m. to midnight March 18: Smooth & Remy, 8 p.m. to midnight March 22: Karaoke, 7 p.m. OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB

BRYAN CLARK Fager’s Island: Monday, March 20, 6 p.m. Ocean Club Nightclub: Wednesday, March 22, 6-9 p.m.

p.m. to 2 a.m.; Steal The Sky, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. March 23: Full Circle Duo,5-9 p.m. SHENANIGAN’S

In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com March 17-18: On the Edge March 22: Bryan Clark, 6-9 p.m.

Fourth Street and the Boardwalk in the Shoreham Hotel 410-289-7181 www.ocshenanigans.com March 17: James Gallagher & Off the Boat, 11:30 a.m. to close with special appearances by The Chesapeake Caledonia Pipe Band and The Ocean City Pipe Band

SEACRETS

SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE

49th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com March 17: The “Real” St. Patrick’s Day Party, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.: Rew Smith, 1-5 p.m.; Ocean City Pipes & Drums, 3:30-4 p.m.; Brett Andrew and Company, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Split Decision, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. March 18: Finnegan’s Wake, 5-9 p.m.; Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Cruz, 9

66th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-6762 www.skyebaroc.com March 17: Ziggy Isaacs, 4-8 p.m. March 18: Monkee Paw, 4-8 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 www.whiskersbar.com March 17: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey

Fifth annual Finnegan’s Wake this Saturday Fundraising party benefits Wor. County Developmental Center’s programs, services By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Ocean City’s fifth annual Finnegan’s Wake will be held Saturday, March 18, from 5-9 p.m. in Seacrets’ Morley Hall. The mock Irish funeral includes happy hour drink prices, live Irish music and food, in addition to a wailing and joke contest. The St. Patrick’s Day celebration is a fundraiser for the Friends of the Worcester County Developmental Center. “The event is based off an old Irish custom and story,” said Cathy Gallagher, president of the Friends of the Worcester County Developmental Center, which sponsors Finnegan’s Wake. “We are trying to raise awareness of the programs the Worcester County Developmental Center provides. Proceeds go toward a great

cause and it is a fun night for everybody.” The Ocean City Pipe and Drum Band will lead the mock funeral procession of Tim Finnegan at 5:15 p.m., along with “a lot of characters” including clergy members, mourners, pallbearers, leprechauns and St. Patrick himself. Once the procession concludes, Finnegan’s casket will be placed at its viewing site in the 49th Street venue, where mourners will have the chance to tell him a funny story or joke for $1. The goal is to raise Finnegan from the dead by making him laugh. If the jokester succeeds, he or she will win a free drink. Following the Irish tradition of hiring professional keeners to cry or wail for the departed, a contest will take place with the most enthusiastic 10-second wailer taking home $50 in cash. Folk Heroes will headline Finnegan’s Wake this year, with Celtic and folk songs both acoustic

and electric. They are known for their classic Irish sound and the use of multiple instruments on stage. The group is comprised of Robin Cocky, Charlie Stedman, Mike O’Loughlin and Mickey Justice. In addition, the Ocean City Pipe and Drum Band is slated to perform throughout the event. There will be a silent auction with restaurant gift cards, artwork and paintings, Irish Belleek china, and fine jewelry, including a diamond necklace worth $200. Around 150 people attended Finnegan’s Wake in 2016, which raised a little more than $4,000 for the Worcester County Developmental Center in Newark, Maryland. It provides employment opportunities, day habilitation training, residential services and community-based support for adults with intellectual disabilities in Worcester, Somerset and Wicomico counties. “We hope more people come out this year,” Gallagher said.

Money raised during last year’s event went to client services and support such as recreational activities, supplies for the programs, adaptive equipment and outings to a Shorebirds game and to the theatre, she said. Traditional Irish wakes last several days with crying, drinking, conversation and jokes to mourn the passing of a loved one, in addition to celebrating their life with a lively party. Ocean City’s Finnegan’s Wake came from a similar event in Pennsylvania and is loosely based on the Irish song of the same name. Cheers Beer, Wine and Spirits of Berlin, Realtor Steve Cohen and Fins Ale House and Raw Bar in Berlin were major sponsors of the event this year. Finnegan’s Wake admission cost is $20. Visit www.wcdcservices.org to learn more about the WCDC or call 410-632-2383 for more information about Finnegan’s Wake.


MARCH 17, 2017

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Believe in Tomorrow’s gala slated for April 1

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Dinner from Touch of Italy with complementary beer and wine all evening and supporting a good cause are just a few of the reasons why the annual Gala by the Sea at the Holiday Inn Oceanfront on 67th Street will most likely sell out, as it does every year. “It is a beautiful evening to spend with your family and nice to see what we do,” said Wayne Littleton, coordinator for the Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Respite Housing Program. “When you see families return every year, it feels like we must have had an impact.” The 16th annual event benefits the Believe in Tomorrow Children’s House by the Sea on 66th Street. The facility is open year-round to provide a free getaway to the beach for critically ill children and their families whenever they may need to escape the stresses of their child’s illness. A recently acquired location on 65th Street will serve military pediatric families, larger families that may require the assistance of medical support or extended family support because of their child’s illness and end-of-life circumstances with the inclusion of grandpar-

ents, aunts, uncles and special friends, in the near future. Doors will open at 5:30 p.m. in the second floor ballroom of the hotel with a cocktail hour kicking off gala festivities as well as antipasti and pizza appetizers and music by Joe Smooth until 7 p.m. A combination dinner from Touch of Italy will include a filet, crab cake, potatoes, salad, vegetable, starch and bread. Sweet Disposition will provide desserts, including a cake. DJ Wax takes over at 7 p.m., attendees can get their photo taken in front of a Believe in Tomorrow backdrop and other surprises will take place throughout the night, Littleton said. Tickets to the black-tie optional event generally cover gala expenses, which makes the activities and auction vital to generating funds. This year, guests can purchase mystery boxes or a diamond in the cupcake sponsored by Park Place Jewelers. For $10, participants will receive a gift card or jewelry inside the mystery box. In addition, they could take home a diamond necklace while enjoying a delicious cupcake for $10 as well. There will also be a wine wall and silent auction with sports and “Karate

Kid” memorabilia, jewelry, restaurant gift cards, baskets and sports tickets. Joann Phillips, who visited Ocean City many times through the Believe in Tomorrow program with her daughter, Erin, will be the guest speaker. “She will talk about how Believe in Tomorrow has had a lasting impact on their family,” Littleton said. “They’ve become a part of us and that is what’s great about our program. They become a part of our family.” Each year, Believe in Tomorrow gives out its Hero by the Sea award. Lee Gerachis, owner of Malibu’s Surf Shop on Eight Street in Ocean City, will be honored at the gala this year. “He is a humble man and good soul,” Littleton said. “We send kids down for surfing lessons every week and there is never a limit. We can send as many people as we want and adults are always included. He treats the kids like royalty, the whole staff is wonderful and the kids come back dressed head to toe in Malibu apparel.” In celebration of Gerachis, many aspects of the night will have surf themes including the mystery boxes. “He donates all the time and I usually don’t have to ask,” Littleton said. “We are very excited about giving him the

award.” The Believe in Tomorrow Foundation will also be recognizing Laurie Chetelat, a teacher and advisor for the Connections Club at Stephen Decatur High School, and Mary Berquist, a teacher and coordinator of the National Honor Society at Stephen Decatur High School, with awards. “They do so much for the children,” Littleton said. To end the evening, Littleton will announce the raffle winner, which costs $50 a chance. If 100 tickets are sold, someone will take home $2,500 and if 200 are purchased, someone walks out with $5,000. The Believe in Tomorrow gala will take place Saturday, April 1, from 5:3010 p.m. at the Holiday Inn Oceanfront on 67th Street. “You get to dress up and celebrate special people like, Lee [Gerachis],” Littleton said. “I feel very blessed to give him the award.” Only 200 tickets will be sold and the cost is $75 per person or $150 per couple. Currently, plenty of tickets still remain, but the event does sell out every year. For more information or to buy tickets, call Littleton at 410-723-2842.

Commission to honor Thaler, Showell, Worcester students

The Sons of Italy Ocean City Lodge 2474 will present its annual St. Joseph’s Festival on Saturday, March 18 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., on 144th Street and Sinepuxent Avenue in Ocean City. Pictured are some of the kitchen staff during a recent event.

Annual OC Italian festival, Sat. (March 17, 2017) For the past six years, the Sons of Italy Ocean City Lodge 2474 has brought the community together for good food, fun and music. However, the real benefactors of the festival are charities and scholarship recipients from the local area. “In the past we have highlighted the food, fun, music and children’s activities that make up the festival,” said Sal Castorina, former president of the Lodge and brainchild of the festival. “However, we have been remiss in not mentioning the $15,300 we donate to local charities and the $20,750 we award three seniors from local high schools over the last six years.” According to Castorina, the Lodge has donated to such charities as Worcester County G.O.L.D, The Justin

House of Bethany Beach, Diakonia and the House of the Brave. In addition, some of the proceeds from the festival go toward the mission of St Luke’s Catholic Church in Ocean City. This year, three $1,500 will be awarded to three seniors of Italian decent from Indian River, Stephen Decatur and Sussex Central high schools. It is a competitive scholarship that goes to the best of the best. This year’s St Joseph’s Festival will be held on Saturday, March 18 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The venue is the same, 144th Street and Sinepuxent Avenue in Ocean City. Admission is free. “Along with our traditional Italian specialties of ravioli, meatballs, sausage and meatball subs, minestrone soup, zeppole, cannoli and

(March 17, 2017) The Worcester County Commission for Women will be celebrating Women’s History Month at a luncheon to be held on Wednesday, March 22 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Clarion Resort Hotel on 101st Street in Ocean City. The theme “Honoring Trailblazing Women in Labor and Business” will recognize Worcester County women whose lives exemplify exceptional vision and leadership. Six Worcester County students will be honored as Women of Tomorrow. The award categories are Grades 7-8, Grades 9-10 and Grades 11-12, with each category recognizing an awardee for first place or honorable mention. The 2017 Women of Tomorrow are: Emma Elizabeth Johnson (Stephen Decatur Middle School), Jasmyn Monique Price (Snow Hill Middle School), Jessica Nicole Wynne (Snow Hill High School), Michaela Redden (Pocomoke High School), Lindsay Jones (Stephen Decatur High School) and Gabrielle Wilkins (Stephen Decatur High School). These outstanding young women will be recognized for their leadership abili-

ties, academic achievements and for making a significant positive impact on their community. In addition, Ann Lockhart Showell (1924-2010) will be honored as the 2017 Woman in History for her extraordinary life, worthy of celebration and remembrance, and Rina Thaler will be honored as the 2017 Woman of the Year. The event will feature exhibitors, awards, a silent auction and raffles. The cost to attend is $37 per person, which includes a choice of two entrées: chicken filled with a spinach and mushroom roulade and roasted top sirloin of beef with a sherry mushroom sauce, or a vegetarian, gluten-free choice. Tables of eight may be reserved. A cash bar will be available. For reservations, call 410-208-6798, email hfgowl@mediacombb.net or mail a check to FWCCW, P.O. Box 1712, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Designate on check “vegetarian” if this is the choice of entree. Proceeds from this event benefit the McGuffey Literacy program that provides summer reading books and book bags to Worcester County students in grades 1-3.

homemade desserts, we are offering gelato and fried dough,” Castorina said. Besides the food, big hits at the festival include free children’s games, basket raffles, silent auctions, games and music by the Mario Monaldi Band. This time of year, St Joseph’s festi-

vals are held across the country in honor of the patron saint of workers. He is also the patron saint of Sicily where he prevented a famine during the Middle Ages. For more information, contact Castorina at 302-436-2146 or Al DiOrio at 302-430-1004.


Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

COMMUNITY/SCHOOL

CRAFTER OF THE MONTH

HEAVENLY HATS Showell Elementary School held a Heavenly Hats Spirit Day on Feb. 8. For just a $1 donation, students had the privilege of wearing a favorite hat to school to raise money for the Heavenly Hats Foundation, an organization who has donated more than 3.2 million new hats to cancer patients at hospitals and clinics around the United States. Showell Elementary School’s Heavenly Hats event, organized by Stephen Decatur High School senior Lexie Van Kirk and principal Diane Shorts, raised $545.22 for the Heavenly Hats Foundation. Van Kirk celebrates Heavenly Hats Day with some Showell Elementary School students.

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

CHILLY RUN About 975 runners and walkers brave the cold and wind to participate in the seventh annual St. Patrick’s Day 5K last Saturday, sponsored by OC Tri-Running. The race took place on the Boardwalk.

The Pine’eer Craft Club of Ocean Pines is recognizing Ginger McGovern as its March Crafter of the Month. She has lived in Ocean Pines since 2003 and has been active in the Pine’eer Craft Club for about five years. Her specialties in the Artisan and Craft Shop are painted brick doorstops and lighted bottles. McGovern, who said crafting is therapeutic, also enjoys golfing and traveling. The Pine’eer Artisan and Gift Shop at White Horse Park in Ocean Pines is open Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SNACKS TO CELEBRATE Christine Lieb's Kindergarten class at Ocean City Elementary celebrated the 100th Day of School by creating a 100th Day snack. Students counted out 10 pieces of each treat for a total of 100 tasty items in their cups. Pictured are Jayson Jones, Peyton Bateman and Issac Vazquez.

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

STAYING WARM Chestnut, a 10-year-old mini-chocolate pinscher, doesn’t appear to appreciate being photographed, but likely enjoyed a warm sweater while strolling the Boardwalk on a windy afternoon recently.

GIFTS FOR CAROZZA Artist Paul Treadway, his wife, Janet, and author Diana Woltereck present Del. Mary Beth Carozza, second from left, with a children’s book titled, “Frisbee Goes to the Beach,” and a portrait titled, “Great Blue Crane.” Paul Treadway’s artwork “Dusk,” on loan from the Ocean City Art League, is on display outside Del. Carozza’s office as a part of her Brushes of the Eastern Shore exhibition.


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Roasted eggplant caponata crostini recipe

By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (March 17, 2017) Europe, Africa and Asia share one thing in common; if you guessed the Mediterranean Sea, you are correct. This breathtaking ocean and all of its magical wonder has been a vital contributor to the evolution and heart of the Mediterranean cuisine. The coherence of the Mediterranean world has meant that the people inhabiting its shores encompass a peasant quality that puts emphasis on the purity of ingredients and the simplicity of conception. The different countries have much in common despite their manifold differences in language and religion. Exposure to comparable geographic environments preconditioned the regions for trade which influenced provincial interpretations. Spicy nutmeg, pungent cumin, sweet cinnamon, colorful turmeric, spiced olives, salty capers, luscious eggplant, juicy tomatoes, crunchy chickpeas, preserved lemons, decadent figs, fresh melons and flavored couscous are just a sampling of the many embellishments that enhance the comprehensive Mediterranean menu. The prominence of the sea is reinforced by the paucity of pastureland that tends to make beef a rarity. That being said, sheep farming is not as dependent on lush pastures making lamb and mutton much more prominent. Before we cross the Mediterranean

Sea and head back to the Atlantic Ocean, let us take a few moments to refresh ourselves with two ingredients not commonly used in American cooking, capers and eggplant. Does one know what a caper is? The world of food is fascinating if you are willing to delve into the book of knowledge. Capers are the unopened flower buds of a thorny shrub that is indicative of the Mediterranean. According to Cook’s Illustrated, they are difficult to cultivate, and prefer dry, stony places. Believe it or not, but capers are never used fresh. Contrary to popular belief, the quality of the caper is inversely related to their size; the smaller, the better. Eggplant fundamentals are the next topic for discussion. Eggplant comes in a range of shapes and sizes. Globe eggplants (purple) are the largest and most common. The flesh of an eggplant should give a bit when gently pressed. The skin should be shiny and smooth, avoid those with brown or soft spots. Globe eggplants can have a bitter taste. One must prep globe eggplants before using. Simply salt the entire surface of the flesh for at least 30 minutes; the bitter moisture will “sweat” out of the flesh. Rinse the eggplant thoroughly and dry with paper towels. The eggplant is then ready to cook according to instructions. Whole eggplant will keep up to a few days in a cool place. Avoid storing them in the refrigerator, as it will damage the eggplants texture. Caponata is a dish of eggplant, olives and capers and seasoned with herbs that is typically served as an appetizer. Because eggplant absorbs flavors easily, it makes a great topping

for bruschetta. Eggplant is delicious but the flesh is not the most attractive ingredient. Keeping this in mind, ingredients must be chosen not only for their flavor but also for their beautification purposes. Unsweetened cocoa powder is included in the following recipe. This may seem a bit unusual but it compliments the earthiness of the eggplant and adds depth of flavor. Roasted eggplant capanata crostini accompanied with a glass of wine is a wonderful pairing. Just remember you will need to choose a wine that can stand up to the acidity of the caponata and at the same time showcase the flavors of the vegetables. A Riesling is a perfect choice for roasted eggplant caponata crostini. Buon Appetito! Roasted Eggplant Caponata Crostini Ingredients 1 large eggplant (1 ½ pounds) good quality olive oil 1 large yellow onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 celery ribs, chopped 3 tablespoons golden raisins 2 tablespoons capers 2 tablespoons black salt cured olives, pitted and coarsely chopped 1 tablespoon dried crushed red pepper flakes 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon fresh basil, chopped finely 1 teaspoon fresh thyme, plus extra for garnishing 3 tablespoons toasted pine nuts

¼ cup favorite tomato sauce 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 1 baguette, sliced diagonally 1. Slice eggplant lengthwise into 4 layers. Heavily salt and allow to sit for 30 minutes. Rinse eggplant slices thoroughly and pat dry with paper towels. 2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a sheet pan with aluminum foil. 3. Rub eggplant with olive oil and roast until soft, about 30 minutes. When eggplant has cooled, coarsely chop. 4. Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees. Brush each slice of baguette with olive oil. Place slices of baguettes on a sheet pan and bake until golden brown. Set aside. 5. In a large sauté pan, heat 3 tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Add eggplant, onions, garlic and celery and cook until softened, about 5 minutes. 6. Add raisins, capers, olives, red pepper flakes, sugar, cinnamon, cocoa powder and cook for another 5 minutes. 7. Add the basil, thyme, pine nuts, tomato sauce, red wine vinegar, salt, pepper, and bring to a boil. Then reduce to a simmer and constantly stir until the ingredients are thoroughly combined and the dish comes together, about 5 minutes. 8. Allow caponata to cool completely and serve with crostini. Garnish with fresh thyme. Secret Ingredient - Progress. “Coming together is a beginning; Keeping together is progress; Working together is success.” — Henry Ford

‘Touchdown for Eli’ fundraiser held March 24

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Ocean City Fish Company and Stephen Decatur High School staff invite community members and visitors to the “Touchdown for Eli” fundraiser at the West Ocean City establishment on March 24, from 4-9 p.m. Eli, a 3-year-old battling a rare and aggressive brain tumor called Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor (AT/RT), is the grandson of Bob Knox, a history teacher and the head football coach at Stephen Decatur High School. Knox led the team for three decades, but decided to take a leave of absence from coaching this past fall season to be with his family after Eli’s diagnosis in August. “I would like to thank the many people, groups, businesses and local community for their uplifting support in my grandson’s fight against brain cancer,” Knox said. Eli’s mother and Stephen Decatur

High School alumni, Jennifer Knox, has taken a leave of absence as a teacher at Spring Ridge Elementary School in Frederick, Maryland, to be with him, and his father, Youness Tadli, is also missing work. Currently, Eli is in Boston for intense cerebral radiation after recently finishing up chemotherapy treatments. The free event at Ocean City Fish Company will have popular Ocean City deejays, DJ Wax and DJ Batman, spinning the tunes in addition to several guest bartenders, next Friday. Billy Wilkins from the Cork Bar, Realtor Kevin Decker and Ocean City Fish Company co-owner J.L. Cropper will join Stephen Decatur High School employees, Tommy Hinkle, a math teacher; Todd Martinek, the head wrestling coach; Marcea Redden, a guidance counselor; Misty Bunting, a gym teacher; and Stan Griffin, who is standing in as head football coach, guest bartending during the event. At

least eight or nine additional people will also be making guest bartending appearances throughout the evening. “Come out and support a man and his family who has supported children in Worcester County his entire career,” said Cropper, who owns Ocean City Fish Company along with her husband, Hugh, Ken and Michelle Church and Dr. Jeff and Gail Greenwood. “It is a great opportunity to give back.” Happy hour specials will be offered throughout the event and include $2 domestic bottles and rails, $1.50 drafts, $4.25 house wines and $4 calls. Crab dip, steamed shrimp, wings, crab balls, a prime rib entrée and a crab meat cocktail will be available to order off a special food menu along with a crab cake or fish of the day meal and prime rib, fried fish and crab cake sandwiches. A portion of bartender tips and 15 percent of all proceeds from food and

drink sales will be donated to the Knox family. Attendees can participate in a 50/50 raffle or silent auction, which includes sports memorabilia, jewelry, gift cards from restaurants, businesses and retail stores, baskets, rounds of golf, a paddleboarding excursion and a night of deejaying courtesy of DJ Wax. More than 100 bottles of wine are up for grabs in the $20 wine wall and mystery boxes can be purchased for $10. The “Touchdown for Eli” event was created in the last month when Melissa Bunting, general manager of Ocean City Fish Company, wanted to host a fundraiser. She mentioned the idea to bartender Jessie Shue, who works at Stephen Decatur High School, and everything came to fruition with help from Kim Hudson and Wayne Littleton. “It is a great way to help a beautiful See EVENT Page 52


Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

Event to benefit young boy, family

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The OC Pipes and Drums participate in the 38th annual Ocean City St. Patrick’s Day parade, held last Saturday.

OC St. Patrick’s parade winners

(March 17, 2017) Coastal Highway was glowing in green last Saturday, during the 38th annual Ocean City St. Patrick’s Day parade and festival, hosted by the Delmarva Irish-American Club. Judges reviewed the participating units and presented awards in several categories. The winners are : •Best Marching Unit: Believe in Tomorrow Children’s House by the Sea Honorable Mention: Surfrider Foundation •Best Commercial Float: Mann Properties Honorable Mention: Belly Busters Seafood and Deli •Best Non-Commercial Float: Relay for Life of Northern Worcester County Honorable Mention: Ocean City Downtown Association •Best Motorized Unit: Friends of

the Worcester County Developmental Center Honorable Mention: Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce •Best Adult Group: The Frat Boys Honorable Mention: Matteo’s Salsa Loco •Best Youth Group: Sussex Central High School Marching Band Honorable Mention: Paula’s School of Baton •Special Committee Award: Ocean City Surf Club •Judges’ Choice Award: Float of Hope •Best Overall: Seacrets/Ocean 98/Seacrets Distillery The parade will be rebroadcast on Friday, March 17, from 9 a.m. until midnight on Cozi-TV, Channel 204 on Comcast and Channel 99 on Mediacom.

Eli, a 3-year-old battling a rare and aggressive brain tumor called Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor (AT/RT), is the grandson of Bob Knox, a history teacher and the head football coach at Stephen Decatur High School. A “Touchdown for Eli” fundraiser will take place at Ocean City Fish Company in West Ocean City on March 24, from 4-9 p.m., to benefit the family.

Continued from Page 51 child and local family,” Littleton said. Those who are unable to make the event on March 24 from 4-9 p.m., but are interested in donating, can stop by Ocean City Fish Company and drop money off in a jar sitting on the bar until March 26. “The generosity from the community is unbelievable,” Shue said. “We want everyone to come out, have a good time and raise money for a good cause.” In addition, a Go Fund Me page has been set up to help the family with medical bills and travel. To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/foreli.

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Ocean City Today

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) The Ocean City convention center on 40th Street will be ringing on Saturday evening during the Handbell Musicians of America Area 3 performance, taking place inside the second floor ballroom beginning at 5 p.m. The annual Ocean City festival will consist of sacred and secular handbell compositions rung by 400 ringers during the 30-minute concert. Doors open at 4:45 p.m. for the free performance. “The energy in the room is amazing,” said Lauren Cataldi, co-chair for the Handbell Musicians of America Area 3 Ocean City concert. “You can see a wide

OC indoor soccer series concludes

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (March 17, 2017) Soccer fans have one weekend left to catch a game at Northside Park on 125th Street during the 29th annual St. Patrick’s indoor soccer tournament. Play begins at 6 p.m. today, Friday, and continues until 9 p.m., with two pool-play games, followed by a singleelimination tournament. There are 26 girls’ and boys’ teams competing in two divisions: under 10 and under 14. On Saturday, the tournament starts at 9 a.m. with playoff games beginning in the afternoon and finishing up at 8 p.m. Games will take place on Sunday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. “We are having the under 10- and under 14-year-olds this weekend and the under 10’s are always very excited to play,” Kim Kinsey, tournament director, said. “A lot of them are playing in their first tournament with us and there is a lot of energy with them. The kids love to come to play soccer and have fun in Ocean City.” The first tournament took place Feb. 24-26, with under 18 girls’ and boys’ divisions in addition to an adult tournament. March 3-5, 39 boys’ and girls’ teams competed in two divisions: under 12 and under 16. Last weekend, 48 adult mens’ and womens’ teams played for top honors. The Original Greene Turtle (Turtleettes) from Ocean City was named the champion of the adult womens’ division, while Makai Clothing Co. from Grove City, Pennsylvania, won the adult mens’ division. “Adults always have a good time celebrating St. Paddy’s Day with the town,” Kinsey said. “These tournaments are a tradition for many people and I’m glad we have been able to keep them going all these years.” There is no fee for spectators to check out the competitions at Northside Park this weekend. For more information, call 410-2500125.

variety of ringers and different bell styles. Since many groups have different octaves, you can see tiny bells and really big bells.” Stephanie Rhoades, Jerry Hill and Michael Helman will be guest conductors at this year’s event. On Friday, musicians can participate in percussion basics and line dancing classes after registration. “Not only do ringers have to know their music, they need to watch the conductor, who may do things a little different than their own conductor,” Cataldi said. “They spend time with their handbell choir while learning and having fellowship.” The handbell musicians are traveling from Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and Pennsylvania to perform in Ocean City. The Ocean City Festival has been held for at least 25 years. “If people are interested in starting a bell choir or ringing a bell choir, this is a great place to ask questions,” Cataldi said. Each spring, Area 3 holds a trio of festivals, which will be held in Ocean City and Chesapeake, Virginia this year. The Clemmons, North Carolina concert was cancelled. For more information, contact Cataldi at 302-379-3775 or email lcataldimay@yahoo.com.

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Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.oceancityhilton.com/dining / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717 / www.ocitalianfood.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room with fireplace. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ THE BIG EASY ON 60, 5909 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-2305 / www.thebigeasyon60.com / $-$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full Bar / An Ocean City restaurant with a New Orleans flair. Amazing atmosphere with beautiful outside patio seating. Open Monday, Thursday and Friday at 11 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday at 9 a.m. for breakfast. Happy Hour is noon to 6 p.m. for the entire restaurant. Come try some Ocean City favorites as well as our take on traditional Louisiana cajun dishes. Everything from outstanding starters, unique entrees, to awesome desserts along with extraordinary hospitality. ■ BILLY’S SUB SHOP, 120th Street, Food Lion Shopping Center, 410-723-2500; 140th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-1778; Route 54, Fenwick Shoals, Fenwick Island, Del., 302-436-5661 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Dine in, carry out. Fast delivery. Open 7 days 11 a.m. – 3 a.m. Serving fresh dough pizza, subs, burgers, cones, shakes and sundaes with beach delivery available. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishocmd.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH, 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896 / www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com / $$-$$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations recommended for large parties / Children’s menu/ Full bar / Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, Steaks & Pasta dishes— Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS, 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100 / www.coinspub.com / $-$$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar/ Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. Ca-

sual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m., 6 days a week and early bird 4-6 p.m., daily specials. Closed Mondays. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE COVE AT OCEAN PINES, 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410641-7501 / www.oceanpines.org/ $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS/No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Coastal cuisine. Serving lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. Open Thursday at 4 p.m. for dinner. Open Friday-Sunday at 11 a.m. for lunch and dinner. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. for brunch buffet. Friday and/or Saturday, live entertainment. Sunday brunch buffet, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Happy Hour Thursday-Sunday, 4-7 p.m. ■ THE CRAB BAG, 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-250-3337 / www.thecrabbag.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Full bar / Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carry-out and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DOUGH ROLLER, 41st Street & Coastal Hwy, 410-524-9254; 70th Street & Coastal Hwy, 410-524-7981 / www.DoughRollerRestaurants.com / $ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Ocean City’s favorite family restaurant for more than 35 years. Great kid’s menu. Dayton’s Fried Chicken available at South Division, 41st and 70th streets. Breakfast served daily at 3rd, 41st and 70th streets. Order online for carryout at both Coastal Highway locations. ■ DUFFYS, 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449 / www.duffysoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second Season & Daily Dinner Specials. Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m., serving breakfast, lunch and dinner; Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Dine In, Carry Out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410524-5500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar / Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside. ■ FLYING FISH CAFE & SUSHI BAR, The Village of Fenwick, 300 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-581-0217 / www.flyingfishfenwick.com / $-$$ /V-MCDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Featuring the freshest and most innovative sushi, sashimi, and rolls plus creative and delicious small plates. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN, 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436-FOXS / www.foxspizzade.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery. ■ THE GREENHOUSE CAFÉ, 1503

MARCH 17, 2017

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Add a QR Code to your Dining Guide listing and give your patrons a direct link to your Web site, Facebook page, App, etc. Cost is $15 for current advertisers ~ $25 for new listings Contact a Sales Representative at 410-723-6397

Philadelphia Ave. Ocean City 443-6645671 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / The Greenhouse offers huge fresh salads, fresh homemade soups, which some are vegetarian or vegan. The "original" and best "Green Juice" in Ocean City. Tofu and gluten free options as well. Open 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thursday-Tuesday. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846 / www.weocharborside.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and allyou-can-eat Alaskan crab legs. Open yearround. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdhotels.com/hemingways / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Seafood, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE, 31st Street, Ocean City, 410-289-2581 / $-$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-5243535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Serving beach-inspired dishes in both our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ KY WEST BAR & RESTAURANT, 5401 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 443-6642836 / www.kywestoceancity.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Our experienced chefs deliver the finest in cuisine nightly. OC’s best veal chop, the freshest seafood and great pasta dishes. Ky West offers fine dining and a beautiful bar described as New York funky chic. Providing excellent food and drink for a great dining adventure. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ, 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443-664-5639 / www.longboardcafe.net / $$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MY THAI OC, 138th Street, Bayside Plaza, 13727 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-9918 /

www.mythaioc.webs.com / $ / V-MC-Dis / Authentic Thai food served Thursday-Sunday. Free parking for customers. Eat in or take out. Vegetarian options also. ■ NICK’S HOUSE OF RIBS, 144th Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-2501984 / www.nickshouseofribs.com / $$/ V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual, family friendly with upscale atmosphere. Extensive menu from our famous baby back ribs, fresh seafood, black angus steaks. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, twopiece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ ROPEWALK, 82nd Street on the bay, Ocean City 410-524-1109 / www.ropewalkoc.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full Bar / OC’s best spot to watch the sunsets. Indoor dining and bar, deck dining and tiki bar. Serving lunch and dinner in casual atmosphere. Happy hour specials all day and all night every day available at tables and bar. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SICULI RUSTIC ITALIAN KITCHEN, 104 N. Main St., Berlin 410-629-0550 / FB-Siculi Italian Kitchen / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full Bar / Family friendly. Open for lunch and dinner, 11 a.m.; Sunday brunch, 10:30 a.m. Locally sourced, freshly prepared. Brick oven pizza, steaks, seafood, chicken and veal selections. Daily lunch, happy hour and dinner specials. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / www.skyebaroc.com / $$-$$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 36 p.m. with food and drink specials. ■ TOUCH OF ITALY, 67th Street and Coastal Highway, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 302-703-3090 / www.TouchofItaly.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full bar / Full Italian style restaurant with Italian style deli and pasticceria/bakery too. Just stop in for a look and a taste of some fresh prosciutto fresh loaves of Italian bread. Large circular bar with Happy Hour and check our Web site with our daily specials from our great menu including pasta, wood fired pizzas, delicious heros and catering. Daily lunch special $6.95 plus take out service. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT, Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410289-1100 / www.dunesmanor.com / $$ $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations not required but recommended / Full Bar / Children’s menu / Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Certified Angus® burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.


Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

Thursdays* Senior Citizens

10% Off

Wine

Liquor

Not Valid with Discounted Items ID Required

CLEARANCE SALE

De Banana (L)

DEEP EDDY Lemon Vodka (L) BAYOU

White or Spiced Rum (200ml)

OCEAN CITY DISTILLERY Flavored Vodkas (750ml)

RUM JUMBIE FIREFLY

Sweet Tea Vodka (750ml)

2.50

FIREBALL

Cinnamon Whiskey (L)

ANTICA MASTI Sambuca (L)

7

$ .50

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American Honey (L)

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Bourbon (1.75L)

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BOWMANS Rum (1.75L) ABSOLUT

Ruby Red Vodka (1.75L)

SKYY

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RUSSKAYA MALIBU

Tropical Banana Rum (1.75ml)

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Citron (1.75L)

99 BLACK

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Blanco Tequila (750ml)

Please Drink Responsibly

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BOSTON

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Passionfruit (750ml)

Pocomoke 122 Newtowne Blvd., Pocomoke, MD 21851 410-957-3912

JIM BEAM

$

$

10% Off

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WILD TURKEY

HURRY IN BEFORE IT’S GONE!

BOSTON CRÈME

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Active & Military Veterans

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North Worcester: Verizon Plaza East bound – Rt. 50, 10818 Ocean Gateway, Berlin, MD 21811 410-641-0680

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Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

FRI, MAR. 17 Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., Pocomoke City, MD, All Day By appointment only. Call 410-957-0878.

AARP FREE TAX SERVICES

33RD ANNUAL HOME, CONDO & OUTDOOR SHOW

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 12 to 6 p.m. Hundreds of pros offering thousands of ideas … decorating, remodeling, accessorizing and more. Admission cost is $7 for adults; $6 for seniors 55 years and older and students ages 14-22 years; free to children 13 years and younger; and free to military, police and fire with ID. events@oceanpromotions.info, 410-2138090, http://www.oceanpromotions.info

ELECTION 2016 REDUX: A LOOK BACK AND FORWARD

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 12 p.m. Three-part series presented by Dr. Samuel B. Hoff. Dr. Hoff is George Washington Distinguished Professor of History and Political Science and La Studies Director at Delaware State University. Part II: Probes the general election campaign between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Weigh the impact of events, debates and other factors on the election outcome. The popular and electoral vote distinction in the election result is evaluated. 410-208-4014

Columbus Hall (behind St. Luke’s Church), 9901 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 6:30 p.m. Held each Friday night. Doors open at 5 p.m., games begin at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments for sale. 410-524-7994

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BINGO

SAT, MAR. 18 ST. PATRICK’S INDOOR SOCCER TOURNAMENT

Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, All Day U10 and U14 Boys and Girls. Featuring more than 170 teams competing over four weekends. Tournament play begins on Friday at 5 p.m. Kim Kinsey or Kim Allison, 410-250-0125 White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Held every Saturday. Locally grown vegetables and fruits, eggs, honey, kettle korn, flowers, artisan breads, seafood, meats and more. New vendors welcome. 410641-7717, Ext. 3006

FARMERS MARKET

Ocean City Senior Center, 104 41st St., Ocean City, MD, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Open to walk-ins.

AARP FREE TAX SERVICES

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 1 p.m. The book of the month is “Delirium” by Lauren Oliver. Copies of books are available in advance at the Berlin branch. 410-641-0650

Ocean City Municipal Airport, Terminal Building, 12724 Airport Road, Berlin, MD, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Serving pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, etc., and coffee. Suggested donation is $7. An OCAA fundraiser to support the Huey Veteran’s Memorial Display. Info: Airport Ops, 410-213-2471 or Coleman Bunting, 410-726-7207

ST. PATRICK’S INDOOR SOCCER TOURNAMENT

CRAFTY SATURDAY MAKE & TAKE ‘BE CREATIVE’

BERLIN BOOK OF THE MONTH

Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, 5 p.m. U10 and U14 Boys and Girls. Featuring more than 170 teams competing over four weekends. Tournament play begins on Friday at 5 p.m. Kim Kinsey or Kim Allison, 410-250-0125

THE LUCK OF THE OTTERS: HIDDEN TREASURERS OF DELMARVA

Delmarva Discovery Center & Museum, 2 Market St., Pocomoke City, MD, 6 to 9 p.m. Kids will enjoy dinner, games, a leprechaun scavenger hunt & specialty green foods. Watch the otters slurp shamrock smoothies. Cost for members is $15 for one child and $7 per sibling. Cost for nonmembers is $20 for one child and $15 per sibling. Parents may stay at no additional charge. Pre-registration is required: Contact@DelmarvaDiscoveryCenter.org or 410-957-9933. http://www.DelmarvaDiscoveryCenter.org

PANCAKE BREAKFAST

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Use your imagination to create something wonderful with fun supplies provided by the library. Every Saturday in March. For all ages. 410-208-4014

33RD ANNUAL HOME, CONDO & OUTDOOR SHOW

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Hundreds of pros offering thousands of ideas … decorating, remodeling, accessorizing and more. Admission cost is $7 for adults; $6 for seniors 55 years and older and students ages 14-22 years; free to children 13 years and younger; and free to military, police and fire with ID. events@oceanpromotions.info, 410-2138090, http://www.oceanpromotions.info

OC AVIATION ADVISORS & EDUCATORS

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. A “Layperson’s Introduction to Flying” fun, free course. Ideal for PC Flight Simulator and R/C controlled aircraft operators with no actual flight experience. Requires only 8th grade math, simple scientific calculator and interest in how airplanes are flown. Register: Tom Onto, 410-641-6888. 144th Street and Sinepuxent Avenue, Ocean City, MD, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. St Joseph’s Festival includes traditional Italian cuisine, free children’s games, basket raffles, silent auctions, games and music by the Mario Monaldi Band. Admission is free. Proceeds benefit community organizations. Info: Sal Castorina, 302-4362146 or Al DiOrio, 302-430-1004

7TH ANNUAL OC ITALIAN FESTIVAL

New Hope United Methodist Church, 7338 New Hope Road, Willards, MD, 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Menu includes mashed potatoes, greens, string beans, macaroni and cheese, beets, biscuits, dessert and coffee. Cost is $13 for adults. Carry-outs available. 410-543-8244 or 443-235-0251

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT FRIED CHICKEN DINNER

Seacrets, Morley Hall, 117 49th St., Ocean City, MD, 4:45 p.m. Doors open at 4:45 p.m. and the evening starts with the funeral procession at 5:15 p.m. Featuring Celtic and folk songs by Robin Cocky, Charlie Stedman, Mike O’Loughlin, Mickey Justice and The Ocean City Pipes and Drums. Raise Tim Finnegan from his coffin with a joke and win a free drink. Prizes also awarded for the best Keener (mourner). Admission costs $20. There will be traditional Irish dishes as well as the regular menu, happy hour prices at the bar and a silent auction. All money raised goes to benefit the Friends of Worcester County Developmental Center. Cathy Gallagher, 570-956-4721

5TH ANNUAL FINNEGAN’S WAKE

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 5 p.m. Concert of the Handbell Musicians of America, Area III, Ocean City Festival. More than 450 handbell ringers will play en masse under the guest conductor, Michael Helman. Registration required to participate. Free admission. Debbie Henning, debbiehen@gmail.com, http://www.areaiii.org

AMERICAN HANDBELL MUSICIANS

SUN, MAR. 19 ST. PATRICK’S INDOOR SOCCER TOURNAMENT

Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, All Day U10 and U14 Boys and Girls. Featuring more than 170 teams competing over four weekends. Tournament play begins on Friday at 5 p.m. Kim Kinsey or Kim Allison, 410-250-0125 Berlin Fire Hall, 214 N. Main St., Berlin,

ALL-U-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET

MD, 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Menu includes pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, creamed chipped beef, hash browns, waffles, biscuits, coffee, milk and juice. Cost is $9 for adults, $5 for children ages 5-12 years and free to those 4 and younger. Carry-outs cost $7. Ocean City Municipal Airport, Terminal Building, 12724 Airport Road, Berlin, MD, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Serving pancakes, eggs, bacon, sausage, etc., and coffee. Suggested donation is $7. An OCAA fundraiser to support the Huey Veteran’s Memorial Display. Info: Airport Ops, 410-213-2471 or Coleman Bunting, 410-726-7207

PANCAKE BREAKFAST

33RD ANNUAL HOME, CONDO & OUTDOOR SHOW

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Hundreds of pros offering thousands of ideas … decorating, remodeling, accessorizing and more. Admission cost is $7 for adults; $6 for seniors 55 years and older and students ages 14-22 years; free to children 13 years and younger; and free to military, police and fire with ID. events@oceanpromotions.info, 410-213-8090, http://www.oceanpromotions.info Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 2, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 12 to 1 p.m. Group shares experience, strength and hope to help others. Open to the community and to AGH patients. Rob, 443-783-3529

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS

MON, MAR. 20 Atlantic General Hospital Sleep Disorders Diagnostic Center, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, All Day Free, bimonthly mask fitting clinic for patients who are having trouble adjusting to their CPAP equipment. By appointment only: Robin Rohlfing, 410-641-9726

CPAP MASK FITTING

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Open to walk-ins.

AARP FREE TAX SERVICES

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, 10:30 a.m. Children, 1 year and younger, will be introduced to songs, games and finger plays. 410-6323495

LAP TIME

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, 12 p.m. March 20 and 27. Two-part class teaching the use of watercolour techniques. Artist Jan Coulborne will demonstrate the use of value, mediums and brush strokes. All supplies are provided. Register: 410-632-3495.

PAINTING WITH WATERCOLOR

Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., Pocomoke City, MD, 1 to 4 p.m. Explore

ONE-ON-ONE FAMILY HISTORY ASSISTANCE


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CALENDAR your genealogy and ancestry. Appointments must be made in advance by calling Ashley Jones, 410-632-5622. Held the third Monday of each month. Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 2:30 to 4 p.m. Group meets twice a month to discuss both classic and modern reading selections recommended by the Great Books Foundation. Lisa Harrison, 410-632-3970

GREAT BOOKS DISCUSSION

Insurance Management Group, 11718 Ocean Gateway, Ocean City, MD, 3 p.m. Members of the community who are interested in learning more about Insurance Management Group are invited. Refreshments and appetizers served. Insurance Management Group, 410-524-5700

RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 4 p.m. Monthly after school STEAM club has fun experiments, crafts and other hands-on experiences for 9 to 13 year olds. 410-641-0650

CURIOSITY CLUB ‘PAPER CRAFTS’

Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 5 to 6:30 p.m. Berlin group No. 169. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Edna Berkey, 410-251-2083

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

Burley Oak Brewing Company, 10016 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, MD, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Featuring local guest bartenders, music by The Bilenki Experience, auctions, raffles, tasty drinks, bar bites and more. To benefit the Lower Shore Land Trust and Maryland Coastal Bays Program. For more information and to donate to the silent auction, contact Kady Everson, 443-234-5587 or Liz Vanderclute, 410-213-2297, Ext. 110.

SPRING EQUINOX CELEBRATION

Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 7 to 9 p.m. The group meets each Monday. Women interested in learning the craft of a cappella singing welcome. 410-641-6876

DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS

TUE, MAR. 21 MAC Center, 909 Progress Circle, Salisbury, MD, All Day By appointment only. Call 410-742-0505.

AARP FREE TAX SERVICES

All Hallows Church Parish House, 109 W. Market Street, Snow Hill, MD, 7:30 a.m. Contact agibb1@verizon.net or 410546-1978 for more information.

SNOW HILL ROTARY CLUB MEETING

LIVING WELL: CHRONIC DISEASE SELF-MANAGEMENT

Pocomoke Senior Center, 400 Walnut St., Suite B, Pocomoke City, MD, 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Free, six-week program for anyone who has a chronic condition. Topics include better breathing; how to manage pain, stress and discouragement; improving communication with family and health-

care providers; eat and exercise for your health; and more. Dawn, 410-641-9268 Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Proceeds from the sale benefits the Worcester County Library Foundation. 410-208-4014

JEWELRY SHOW & SALE

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. 410-641-0650

STORY TIME ‘EGGS’

Berlin Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 9715 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Support group for caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients. It meets the third Tuesday of each month. Open to the community. Info: Heather Cormack, 410-641-4400, Ext. 6123 or Kenneth Lewis, 410-208-1701 or 410-430-4818

ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 2 p.m. Published author Michael Healy will teach how to self-publish works and sell them on Amazon and other websites. 410-524-1818

LEARN TO SELF PUBLISH

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 5 to 7 p.m. Join this group on the third Tuesday of each month to explore the world of documentary film. Examine clips from leading directors and watch provocative, passionate and vibrant subject matter. Discussions follow. 410-524-1818

THE GOLDEN AGE OF DOCUMENTARIES

AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY UNIT 166 MONTHLY MEETING

American Legion Post #166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, MD, 7 p.m. Social hour begins at 6 p.m. The group meets on the third Tuesday of each month. Current members and those interested in becoming a member are encouraged to attend.

WED, MAR. 22 KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OCEAN PINES/OCEAN CITY

Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 8 a.m. Meets every Wednesday. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org

FOREIGN POLICY KEY ISSUES: DISCUSSION GROUP

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Group meets bi-monthly, second and fourth Wednesdays, to discuss major foreign policy issues. Study guide is provided. Jim Young, 410-208-4014 Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Proceeds from the sale benefits the Worcester County Library Foundation. 410-208-4014

JEWELRY SHOW & SALE

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10:30 a.m. For 2

STORY TIME ‘SPRING’

to 5 year old children. 410-524-1818

perspective. Larry@stpetersoc.com

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel, 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Honoring trailblazing women in labor and business. Ann Lockhart Showell will be honored as the 2017 Woman in History, Rina Thaler will be honored as the 2017 Woman of the Year and six Worcester County students will be honored as Women of Tomorrow. Cost is $37 and includes luncheon, women awards, exhibitors and raffles. Tables of eight may be reserved. hfgowl@mediacombb.net, 410-208-6798

PLAY TIME

WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH LUNCHEON

SCANDAL IN SCULPTURE AT THE BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY, 1894

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 2 p.m. The sculpture of “Bacchante and Infant Faun” was considered “debauched” and removed from the Boston Public Library after a scandal erupted in the late nineteenth-century. The group will take a look at the public reaction to art and a comparison to “Clytie,” a contemporary nude, that was well-received. 410-641-0650 Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., Ocean City, MD, 5:30 to 9 p.m. The group meets every Wednesday. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ‘50s, ‘60s and Carolina Beach music. A $5 donation per person to benefit local Veterans. Elk members and their guests welcome. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 302-200-3262, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB

Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St, Ocean City, MD, 6 p.m. The group meets every Wednesday. cliff0917@aol.com, 410-641-1700

OCEAN CITY/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING

46TH NATIONAL THEOLOGICAL CONFERENCE ON ‘WATER JUSTICE’

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, 10:30 a.m. Children, infant to 5 years old, can make new friends and learn new skills while playing the educational toys. 410-632-3495 Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. 410-208-4014

STORY TIME ‘KANGAROOS’

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 11 a.m. The group meets every Thursday. Free and open to anyone who has lost a loved one, not just Coastal Hospice families. 410-251-8163

COASTAL HOSPICE GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, 2 p.m. Research has shown that writing about stressful experiences is therapeutic and promotes physical and emotional healing. No prior writing experience needed. 410-632-3495

WRITING FOR WELLNESS

Harpoon Hanna’s, 39064 Harpoon Road, Fenwick Island, DE, 4 to 7 p.m. Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Arlene or Kate, 302-436-9577 or 410-524-0649

BEACH SINGLES

REMODELING PARTY AND RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY

Bank of Ocean City, Ocean Pines Branch, 11001 Nicholas Lane, Ocean Pines, MD, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. The Remodeling Party is from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Hot and cold refreshments served. The Ribbon Cutting will be at 5 p.m. All Worcester County business people (employers and employees) are invited. Ocean Pines Chamber of Commerce, 410-641-5306

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 10301 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 7 p.m. The conference will provide guidance for churches and individuals who wish to help rectify the lack of access in some areas to safe, clean drinking water. Attend free and learn about global water issues from a faith perspective. Larry@stpetersoc.com

BINGO

Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 7 to 8 p.m. The group gathers the fourth Wednesday of each month. Preregistration is not necessary. Pastoral Care Services, gmansell@atlanticgeneral.org, 410-641-9725

MAKE & TAKE ‘RUBBER DUCKIES’

BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP

THU, MAR. 23 46TH NATIONAL THEOLOGICAL CONFERENCE ON ‘WATER JUSTICE’

St. Peter’s Lutheran Church, 10301 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The conference will provide guidance for churches and individuals who wish to help rectify the lack of access in some areas to safe, clean drinking water. Attend free and learn about global water issues from a faith

American Legion Post 166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, MD, 6:30 p.m. Doors open at 4:30 p.m., games start at 6:30 p.m. Food and non-alcoholic drinks available at 5:15 p.m. Open to the public. 410-289-3166, http://www.alpost166.org

ONGOING EVENTS Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, all through March. The Make and Take cart will feature supplies to decorate rubber duckies. Cart is located in the teen area. 410-524-1818

Crossword answers from page 52


58

MARCH 17, 2017 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED Barista/Cashier

Yr round, Starbucks Kiosk. Experience preferred; will train someone with a friendly & positive attitude. Flexible hrs a must including weekends & holidays. Please apply in person: 32 Palm Restaurant in the Hilton Suites 32nd St. Ocean City, MD

HELP WANTED

Now Hiring Experienced Painter/Drywall Maintenance Person Full-Time, Year Round Health Benefits Apply in person Tues. thru Thurs., 9-3 p.m. @ Golden Sands 10900 Coastal Highway

Service Technician – Oil/Gas Heat

Cropper Oil & Gas, a Griffith Energy Services Company, has an immediate opportunity for a Service Technician with at least 2 years residential experience with oil heat/gas equipment to join its Team. Griffith offers an exceptional Compensation and Benefits Package including Full 40+ hour weeks, BCBS Health Insurance, Company paid Life and Disability Protection, and a 401(k) Retirement Plan. EOE To join our team, submit your resume to jobs@griffithoil.com or call 443-430-8897 today.

HELP WANTED

Concrete Construction

Hiring Rodmen and Form Carpenters. Delmarva Eastern Shore Work Area. Health, Dental & Vision Benefits. Please call 410-749-3300, M-F, 8-5 for more information.

NOW HIRING!! Production Supervisor

for our WOC kitchen facility Up to $17/hour Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities:

Year Round, Full/Part Time: Line Cook, Server, Banquet Servers, Banquet Housestaff, Bartender, Host/ Hostess, PM Lobby, Room Attendant (Van will pick up in Salisbury), Housekeeping Housestaff, F&B Supervisor, Front Desk Agent, Reservation (Part Time), Coffee Shop Attendant

Free employee meal and excellent benefits.

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

106 32nd St., Ocean City

HELP WANTED

LOCAL CRAB BOAT

Berlin, Snow Hill area Help Wanted 410-641-4709 Restaurant Host/Hostess

Yr.-round. Will train someone with a friendly & positive attitude. Flexible hrs. a must including weekends & holidays. Please apply in person: 32 Palm Restaurant in the Hilton Suites 32nd St. Ocean City, MD

Now Hiring For ALL Positions

Starting At Above Minimum Wage!

Supervisory positions open for people with experience. Openings are for full, part time, seasonal or year round.

Call 410-289-5762 or come in to the hotel to fill out an application Community Manager

Community Manager needed for condominium and homeowner associations in Sussex County. Must have community management experience including budgeting, community inspection and maintenance oversight, and association regulations and enforcement. Applicant must have good organizational skills and be proficient with Microsoft Office and familiar with QuickBooks financial statements. Competitive salary and excellent benefits package. Please send resume to: Wilgus Associates, Inc. Attn: Tim Hill PO Box 309 Bethany Beach, DE 19930

 Director of Food & Beverage Engineer Front Desk Night Audit  Housekeepers

Houseperson Banquet Houseperson Servers Line Cooks Dishwasher

Joi o i n Te T e am Dunes e s ! Noow w Hiri H ri ng:

2 8th & Oceanfront -“For Shore hore … The Best Place to Work”

Hotel & Suit tes

Please apply online aatt www w..rreeal a hossp pittal alittyyygr yggrroou up p.com

HELP WANTED HIRING!

Coral Reef Cafe/ Hemingways located in the Holiday Inn & Suites 17th St. & Boardwalk - PM Hostess/ Busser/Servers - Experienced PM Cooks Join one of Ocean City’s premier properties. Apply within.

COMFORT INN GOLD COAST Housekeeping/ Room Attendant

We are seeking to fill several year-round housekeeping positions. Hotel or condo housekeeping experience preferred. Competitive pay and benefits. Please apply in person at the Comfort Inn Gold Coast at 112th Street, Ocean City. Administrative Assistant Central Reservations has a seasonal position for an Administrative Assistant. Must be dependable, have good computer skills, and be able to provide great customer service. Duties include answering phones, filing and assisting agents. Seasonal employment, 40 hour week, Spring until September. Must work weekends. Please send resume to robbieh@centraloc.com EOE

The Princess Royale Hotel & Conference Center Located at 91st St. Oceanfront, Ocean City, MD

Full Time, Year Round • General Maintenance • Food and Beverage Supervisor • Common Area/Grounds Supervisor PT Now ~ FT after May • Servers • Banquet Servers • Bartender • Bellman

Competitive Pay & Benefits Apply online at www.princessroyale.com or fax to 410-524-7787 or email to employment@princessroyale.com

Now you can order your classifieds online

HELP WANTED

Talbot Inn, 311 Talbot St. Now Hiring Front Desk, Night Auditor & Housekeeping. Please apply in person. 410289-9125

FT Property Manager Wanted

Good Pay w/Full Benefits. OC Real Estate Management Please call 410-524-5781

Five Guys Burgers Ocean City, MD Now Hiring Y/R & P/T for

All Positions

at 64th St. location. Stop in to fill out an application!

FT/PT Landscape, Lawncare and Irrigation Positions Available Only experienced applicants need to apply. Email Bob@pgmsinc.com or call 443-365-5195, leave message and call will be returned

Accepting Applications for the following positions: Front Desk Reservationist: Must have a pleasant, patient & friendly attitude. Strong detail orientation and communication/listening skills. Willingness to work a flexible schedule including weekends and holidays. Roommaster exp. a plus/Hotel knowledge preferred. Housekeeping Room Inspector: Cleans rooms as needed; Inspects rooms cleaned by Housekeepers and reports maintenance issues. Must be dependable; have computer skills and work as a team player. Physical demands require walking, bending and moderate to light lifting. Must have an eye for detail. Shuttle Driver: Positions available Memorial Day Weekend – Labor Day Monday. Part-Time or FullTime hours available. Summer Position Only – Our Shuttles do not required CDL However must have DOT physical with clean Driving Record. Evening Shifts 3pm10:30pm – Must be available to work on the weekends. Applications available at the front desk: 12806 Ocean Gateway Ocean City, MD 21842 or email resume to info@fskfamily.com


MARCH 17, 2017

HELP WANTED

Hiring FT/PT Waitstaff. Must be available weekends. Apply at Pho Char, 11805 Coastal Highway, Suite P.

Somerset Jewelers - Dunes Manor Location. PT Help. Apply at store, 28th St. & Oceanfront. PGN Crabhouse 29th St. & Coastal Hwy. Help Wanted. Waitstaff, Kitchen Staff, Cooks. Apply within after 11am.

HELP WANTED

Busy HVAC Contractor is now hiring Sales/ Maintenance Technician. Start immediately. Good pay. Will train the right candidate. To apply call Marc at 302-682-1777.

F/T Administrative Assistant - Apply in person. Mon thru Fri. 8am-4pm. Good pay w/full benefits. OC Real Estate Management, 5901 Coastal Hwy., Suite C, Ocean City, MD.

Ocean Resorts Golf Club

is now accepting applications for Part Time Seasonal Clubhouse and Facility Maintenance positions. Flexible hours. Computer knowledge is necessary for Clubhouse positions. Golfing privileges included. Applicants must apply in person at Ocean Resorts Golf Club, 10655 Cathell Rd., Berlin, MD. Telephone inquiries will not be accepted.

Coastal Early Learning Center

a Montessori based learning center, is hiring an Infant/Toddler lead teacher and a Primary (3-6 yr. old) Montessori certified teacher. Full-time, year-round w/ paid holidays & vacation, competitive pay.

Fax or email your resume to: 410-973-2718 or Carrie@CoastalEarlyLearning.com

EPA Certified HVAC Technician Needed

Competitive Salary: $22-$26/hr. depending on experience. Delmarva & the Greater Baltimore Area. EPA Certification, Minimum 5 yrs field Experience. Health, 401K, Vacation, Sick Time Email resume to: ddconstructionmanager@gmail.com Fax to 410-520-0199/ Apply online: https://www.delmarvadd.com/DunkinDonuts/construction.html

Maintenance Technician Wanted

(Ocean City, MD) Competitive Salary: $15 - $18/hr. depending on experience. Help build and maintain Delmarva's fastest growing restaurant group. Perform interior and exterior finish work, such as drywall, painting, paneling, ceiling and floor tile, plumbing repairs, heating and air conditioning system repairs. Perform routine and emergency repairs on restaurant equipment, including diagnostics on electrical and refrigeration components. On call on a rotating emergency schedule for weekends and holidays. Basic skill sets must include some Electric, Plumbing, Carpentry, Refrigeration. Health Insurance, 401K, Sick Leave Email resume to: ddconstructionmanager@gmail.com Fax to 410-520-0199/ Apply online: https://www.delmarvadd.com/DunkinDonuts/construction.html

Job Opportunities

Ocean City Today

HELP WANTED

Seasonal Motel Manager Wanted. Competitive Salary. Hotel/Motel experience required. Knowledge of RoomMaster preferred. Send resume to spinn1800@aol.com

Experienced Cleaners needed for Part-time work in Ocean City, Bethany & Rehoboth. Must have vehicle and cell phone and pass background check. Please call 410-202-2887.

CASHIER FT/PT - Liquor store in Selbyville, DE is seeking dependable and friendly person for a cashier position. No experience required. Only 21 years and over can apply. Background check required before hiring process. Tel. 302-436-2040. Experienced Servers needed for Year-Round position. Apply in person @ Alex’s Italian Restaurant, RT. 50, West Ocean City.

This is the exciting world of coffee and you can be part of it. Starbucks of Ocean City (16th St. & Oceanside) is now hiring full and part time positions.

Please stop by and apply in person.

YEAR ROUND ONLY. 3BR/ 2.5BA Townhome downtown Berlin. Unfurnished, no smoking. $1530/mo. incl. water. Howard Martin Realty 410352-5555.

WINTER RENTAL - 2BR Condo. 142nd St. $550/mo. + utilities. Call John 410-7268948.

RAMBLER MOTEL 9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

WEEKLY • SEASONAL

R E N TA L S

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626 VA C AT I O N S

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

is now hiring for the following positions:

DISTILLERY TOUR GUIDES SEASONAL RECEPTIONIST CARPENTER PAINTER

For more details or to apply, please go online to www.seacrets.com/jobs

Open Interviews Saturday & Sunday, March 18 & 19, 11-2pm Hiring Kitchen Staff, Host, Security, Bus Boys & Servers at Macky’s Bayside Bar & Grill, 54th Street, bayside.

Chairside

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE Email Resume:

molarbiz@yahoo.com

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew

for our WOC kitchen facility Starting at $10.50/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

Become a Better You in 2017!

Interesting people, a lively environment, savory aromas & delicious espresso beverages.

RENTALS

To Order Product Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net To Become an Avon Representative Sign Up at www. ChristinesBeautyShop.com

Ocean City Today ~ and ~ Bayside Gazette

Classifieds 410-723-6397

By Monday, 5 p.m.

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com

RENTALS

3 Week Mini Rental. 2 weeks min., 3 week max. Ends 4/7. $175 a week and $175 sep. dep. Blue Turtle Apts., 57th St. Fully furn. 2BR/1BA incl all util. No pets. 2 person max. Adults only. 410-422-4780

Large 4BR, 2BA Apartment. NOC, Bayside. YR or Summer Seasonal. Call 443-8802486. WINTER WEEKLY RENTALS Pool Front Rooms $175. Efficiencies $195. 2BR Apartments $280. Burgundy Inn 1201 Philadelphia Ave. 410-289-8581

Yearly Rental Furnished House

• Second floor entry - steps • 2 bedrooms, 1 bath • Full kitchen, family room w/ sleep sofa • Large deck • Outdoor shower, ground level • Bayside, quiet residential area • Non-smoker, no pets • References & credit check required $1,100/month, summer months $1,500 Call Mark: 443-277-1050

Classifieds 410-723-6397

Summer Rental

Available May 10th-Sept. 10th. 312 Sunset Dr. 2BR/1.5BA, newly remodeled, big kitchen/living area. Sleeps up to 6. $13,500/season, you pay utilities. Security deposit $2,000. Call 410-428-7333. www.SunsetTerraceRentals.com

Single Family Homes Starting at $900 Condos Starting at $1200 Townhouses Starting at $1300 CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

MARYLAND STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK

AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS

DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your donation helps local families with food, clothing, shelter, counseling. Tax deductible. MVA License #W1044. 410-636-0123 or www.LutheranMissionSociety.org AUTOS WANTED

CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2000 and Newer! Nation’s Top Car Buyer! Free Towing from Anywhere Call Now: 1-800864-5952 BUSINESS SERVICES

Bulk advertising at its best: advertise in over 70 newspapers and reach millions of readers with ONE call. Broaden your reach and get results for pennies per reader. Call Wanda at 410-212-0616 or email wsmith@mddcpress.com.

Open 7 Days A Week for property viewing in: * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

PAGE 59

RENTAL WANTED

Family looking for 3-4BR Summer Seasonal Rental in Ocean City. Email info to hockwolf@aol.com.

ROOMMATES ROOMMATES

North OC. Mature Roommate needed to share LRG., furnished Townhouse on bayside. All inclusive. Call for details. Call 410-603-5110. Near Ocean City; Room for Rent. Mature adult, no smokers, no pets. References. First month’s rent + security deposit. Call for additional information 443-523-6666.

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE

3BR/1BA Single Family Home. Large fenced-in backyard. Washer/dryer hook up. Very close to Tanger outlets. Call for details, 410-4301519.

Condo For Sale By Owner. 1BR/1BA Orleans Court. 140th St. & Coastal Hwy. Furnished, second floor, elevators, 2 pools & courtyard. Great rental unit. Priced to sell. $117,500. Call for details 410-598-1194.

2BR/1BA, Furnished Mobile near Bishopville boat ramp. Custom cabinets, granite countertops. $19,000 plus lot rent. Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

2 Bedroom Mobile New carpet/vinyl and freshly painted. On one 1/2 acre with lots of storage. $99,000. Call Howard Martin Realty, 410352-5555.

Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

Place your ad on Facebook; Twitter; LinkedIN and Google Ads Words through MDDC’s Social Media Ad Network; Call today to find out maximize your presence on Social Media; 410-212-0616; or email Wanda Smith @ wsmith@mddcpress.com

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING – Get FAA certification to fix planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military benefits.Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-823-6729

HELP WANTED: SALES EARN $500 A DAY: Insurance Agents Needed * Leads, No Cold Calls * Commission Paid Daily * Lifetime Renewals * Complete Training * Health & Dental Insurance * Life License Required. Call 1-888713-6020

VACATION RENTALS Ocean City, Maryland. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/parital weeks, Call for FREE brochure, Open daily. Holiday Resort Services. 1800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Delaware New Move-In Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. FOUR New Homes from low $100’s. No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com. SERVICES-MISCELLANEOUS

Want a larger footprint in the marketplace consider advertising in the MDDC Small Display 2x2 or 2x4 Advertising Network. Reach 3.6 million readers every week by placing your ad in 71 newspapers in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia. With just one phone call, your business and/or product will be seen by 3.6 million readers HURRY … space is limited, CALL TODAY!! Call 1-855-721-6332 x 6 or 410-212-0616 email wsmith@mddcpress.com or visit our website at www.mddcpress.com

Advertise in MDDC 410-723-6397


PAGE 60

LOTS & ACREAGE

Waterfront Lot Buildable, minutes to North OC/Fenwick. Just Reduced! $89,000. MAKE OFFER NOW! Howard Martin Realty, 410-352-5555.

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

Warehouse/Office. 1000 sq. ft. $650 per month. Rt. 50, West Ocean City. Call 443880-3791.

Berlin, 225 sq. ft. Office Space, $275/mo. includes utils. Two 120 sq. ft. Storage Sheds, each $95/mo. Call 410-726-5471 or 410-6414300. 2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443497-4200.

SERVICES SERVICES

Bishopville Movers Inc. Fast, reliable service. 410-352-5555

www. oceancitytoday.net www. baysideoc.com

LANDSCAPING

LAWN MAINTENANCE Accepting new accounts. Mowing, pruning, clean-ups, planting. Free estimates. Contact Tony 443-513-0271.

DONATIONS DONATIONS

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065.

FOR SALE FOR SALE

Two-Person Old Town Loon Kayak. Great flat water kayak w/fully adjustable foot pedals & seats to fit tall or small. Has been garage kept w/light use. Many extras like transportation system, storage rack, etc. $900. Call 410-7264051.

Pride 4-Wheel Mobility Scooter w/ Electric Lift Mint Condition Call 302-988-8426

Ocean City Today

BOAT SLIP WANTED

MARCH 17, 2017

Looking to Rent Seasonal Boat Slip for a 20’ pontoon. Call 443-562-9392.

AUCTIONS

The contents of mini storage units will be sold at public auction. Units to be auctioned; B7-B11-B47B62-B64-B94-L4-O13O 2 9 - O 11 5 - O 1 6 4 - O 7 5 O125-O135-O142-O137O143-S41-S56-S59-S111S117-S210-S314-S502S509-S719-S185. Units are being sold due to non-payment of rent. Common items in units are, household items, furniture, tools, fishing equipment, paintings, antique and vintage items. Date: SATURDAY, March 25, 2017 Time: 9AM #1 Starts at Berlin Mini Storage: Route 346 #2 Continues at OC Mini Storage: Route 50 #3 Finishes at OC Mini Storage: Route 611 Terms: CASH ONLY! Auctioneer: Tom Janasek Classified Deadline is Monday @ 5pm

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000

146th Street, Ocean City

Print • Web oceancitytoday.net baysideoc.com


Ocean City Today

MARCH 17, 2017

PAGE 61

A/C & HEAT PUMPS

BLINDS & SHADES

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HOME IMPROVEMENT

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Home Improvement and Plumbing

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PUBLIC NOTICES Alba Law Group, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 11613 WINDWARD DRIVE UNIT B OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-15-000402 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Theresa M. Tipton, Troy W. Tipton, recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4424, folio 325, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Mark S. Devan, Thomas P. Dore, Christine Drexel, Brian McNair, and Angela Nasuta as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, 1 West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863 on Tuesday, April 4, 2017 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4424, folio 325, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4424, folio 321. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. The purchaser assumes all risks of loss for the property as of the date of sale.  Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE:   A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $20,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale.  Any amount tendered at sale in excess of the required deposit will be refunded and not applied to the purchase price. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within ten (10) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  Time is of the essence.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.37500% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement.  Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or

private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited.  The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages.  Defaulting purchaser also agrees to pay the Substituted Trustees’ attorney a fee of $250.00 in connection with the filing of a motion to resell. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor.  Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Mark S. Devan, Thomas P. Dore, Christine Drexel, Brian McNair, and Angela Nasuta, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-3/16/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 9 CLUBHOUSE DR. OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 14, 2008 and recorded in Liber 5093, Folio 511 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $498,748.50 and a current interest rate of 1.79%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 28, 2017 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid

Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 199842-1) PLEASE CONSULT

WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/9/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, MD 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10514 WOODLAWN RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from David W. Brow and Sonya D. Brow, dated September 5, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4781, folio 204 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 27, 2017 AT 2:25 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $24,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 6.75% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water


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PUBLIC NOTICES rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #15-615686). Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/9/3t _________________________________

TRUSTEE’S SALE OF CONDOMINIUM UNIT The Trustee named below will sell at public auction to the highest bidder on Monday, March 27, 2017, at 4:00 p.m., at the Diamond Head Condominium, 2 80th Street, Ocean City, MD, all that property designated as Diamond Head Condominium Unit No. 502, together with an undivided interest in the common elements as established by Declaration and Bylaws recorded among the land records of Worcester County in Liber WCL No. 980, folio 78, et seq., as amended, and as further described in a deed recorded at Liber 1613, folio 159, et seq., in “AS IS” condition, SUBJECT to all the liens, covenants, agreements, conditions, easements and restrictions as may appear among the land records of Worcester County, Maryland. A deposit of $10,000.00 in cash or certified check will be required of the Purchaser at the auction. (A deposit will not be required if the successful bidder is the secured party in this foreclosure action.) The balance in cash, cashier’s or certified check shall be paid within 20 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, said balance to bear interest at the rate of

LEGAL ADVERTISING

Call: 410-723-6397 ~ Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net

ten percent (10%) per annum from the date of sale to the date of payment. Time is of the essence for the Purchaser. All real estate taxes, wastewater and water charges, and condominium assessments shall be adjusted as of the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the Purchaser. All settlement costs, including recordation taxes, transfer taxes and recording fees, shall be paid by the Purchaser. Possession will be given upon payment in full of the purchase price. If Purchaser fails to pay the balance of the purchase price when due, the deposit shall be forfeited and the property resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting Purchaser. For further information, you may contact Jon P. Bulkeley, Trustee, 410723-1400. OCD-3/9/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 13008 BOWLINE LA., UNIT #5 & BOATSLIP #66 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated December 28, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5044, Folio 183 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $417,000.00 and a current interest rate of 4.75%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 21, 2017 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit No. 13008-5, lying and being in the Third and Tenth Tax District(s) of said Worcester County, Maryland, as designated on that plat entitled, “Condominium Plat - Phase 6, Units 13008-1 Through 13008-5, 13008 Bowline Lane, The Townhomes Condominium at Seaside Village, Tenth Tax District, Worcester County, Maryland” and Unit No. M-66, located in Seaside Village Marina Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #10-743435 and Tax ID #10429854. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $26,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the pur-

chaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 199662-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________

BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 413 BLUEWATER CT. OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated August 19, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4679, Folio 443 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $597,000.00 and a current interest rate of 3.125%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 21, 2017 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. The property will be sold subject to a prior mortgage, the amount to be announced at the time of sale, if made available to the Substitute Trustees. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $60,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by pur-


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PUBLIC NOTICES chaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 301952-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 4340 East West Highway, Suite 600 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 6 SOMERSET AVE. POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Lisa A. Myers dated June 30, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4833, folio 410 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 17, 2017 AT 12:45 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and

more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #01-025872. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale. Trustees’ file number 58836. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC.

908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS To Purchase the Worcester County Shore Spirits Retail Liquor Store located at 122 Newtowne Boulevard in Pocomoke City, Worcester County, Maryland The Worcester County Commissioners (Commissioners) have adopted an Exit Strategy with respect to the operations of the Worcester County Department of Liquor Control and intend to cease retail liquor operations on or before June 30, 2017. As a result, the Commissioners recently declared the following property as surplus property and are currently accepting proposals from qualified individuals or entities to purchase this property, including specified furniture, fixtures and inventory to be operated as a retail liquor store. The Subject Property is located at 122 Newtowne Boulevard just north of Old Snow Hill Road (MD Route 756) and east of Ocean Highway (US Route 13). The property is identified as Condominium Units 101 and 102 of the Newtowne Plaza Condominiums and comprises a total enclosed area of 2,954 square feet with furniture, fixtures and improvements for the operation of a retail wine and liquor store. The selection of the successful bidder will be based upon a combination of the price offered for purchase of this property and the contents thereof, as well as a demonstrated ability and experience owning and operating a retail liquor store or other similar retail establishment. Bid packages are available from the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. A prebid inspection will be held onsite on Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at 9:00 am at 122 Newtowne Boulevard, Pocomoke City, MD 21851. Interested bidders are encouraged to attend. Sealed proposals will be accepted until 1:00 PM, Friday, March 17, 2017 in the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Proposal to Purchase County Liquor Store in Pocomoke City" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, proposals will be reviewed by staff and a recommendation of award will be made to the County Commissioners at a future meeting. In awarding the proposal, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all proposals, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever proposal they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering highest and/or best proposal, quality of goods and work,

time of delivery or completion, responsibility of bidders being considered, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to Maureen Howarth, County Attorney, at 410-632-1194. OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PASSAGE OF BILL 16-6 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 16-6 (Zoning - Non-Agricultural Events at Wineries in the A-1 and A-2 Agricultural Districts) was passed by the County Commissioners on February 21, 2017. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § ZS 1-201(c)(10)(a). (Adds this new subparagraph to modify the special exception for wineries as part of a producing vineyard in the A-1 Agricultural District to permit as an accessory use the commercial hosting of non-agricultural functions and events including, but not limited to, wedding receptions, family reunions, birthday and anniversary celebrations, and other similar events; to permit an additional accessory building not exceeding three thousand square feet in area for such events; requires compliance with all building, fire, health, zoning, and environmental code requirements which apply to such structures that are not located on a farm; establishes minimum lot requirements for such uses including a minimum lot area of ten acres, lot width of at least two hundred feet, and front, side and rear yard setbacks of at least one hundred feet; and subject to the provisions of Section ZS 1-322 (Landscaping, buffering and screening requirements) and ZS 1-325 (Site plan review).) § ZS 1-202(c)(10)(a). (Adds this new subparagraph to modify the special exception for wineries as part of a producing vineyard in the A-2 Agricultural District to permit as an accessory use the commercial hosting of non-agricultural functions and events including, but not limited to, wedding receptions, family reunions, birthday and anniversary celebrations, and other similar events; to permit an additional accessory building not exceeding three thousand square feet in area for such events; requires compliance with all building, fire, health, zoning, and environmental code requirements which apply to such structures that are not located on a farm; establishes minimum lot requirements for such uses including a minimum lot area of ten acres, lot width of at least two hundred feet, and front, side and rear yard setbacks of at least one hundred feet; and subject to the provisions of Section ZS 1-322 (Landscaping, buffering and screening requirements) and ZS 1-325 (Site plan review).) This bill becomes effective fortyfive (45) days from the date of its passage. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester


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PUBLIC NOTICES County Government Center outside Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at http://www.co.worcester. md.us/commissioners/legsltn.aspx. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PASSAGE OF BILL 16-7 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 16-7 (Zoning - Commercial Non-Agricultural Functions in Agricultural Structures and Lands in the A-1 and A-2 Agricultural Districts) was passed by the County Commissioners on February 21, 2017. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § ZS 1-201(c)(33). (Renumbers the current subsection 33 to subsection 34 and adds this new subsection to permit on a farm, by special exception in the A-1 Agricultural District, the accessory use of a principal agricultural structure or use of land for the commercial hosting of non-agricultural functions and events including, but not limited to, wedding receptions, family reunions, birthday and anniversary celebrations, and other similar events; such uses must be clearly accessory and subordinate to the principal agricultural structure or use of the property; requires that the structure for such use shall comply with all building, fire, health, zoning, and environmental code requirements which apply to such structures that are not located on a farm; establishes minimum lot requirements for such structures and uses including a minimum lot area of twenty-five acres, lot width of at least two hundred feet, and front, side and rear yard setbacks of at least one hundred feet; and subject to the provisions of Section ZS 1-325 - Site plan review; establishes a minimum separation distance of five hundred feet between the commercial event and any residential structure on an adjacent property or public road; and requires that any amplified music associated with the event must end by 11:00 PM) § ZS 1-202(c)(45). (Renumbers the current subsection 45 to subsection 46 and adds this new subsection to permit on a farm, by special exception in the A-2 Agricultural District, the accessory use of a principal agricultural structure or use of land for the commercial hosting of non-agricultural functions and events including, but not limited to, wedding receptions, family reunions, birthday and anniversary celebrations, and other similar events; such uses must be clearly accessory and subordinate to the principal agricultural structure or use of the property; requires that the structure for such use shall

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comply with all building, fire, health, zoning, and environmental code requirements which apply to such structures that are not located on a farm; establishes minimum lot requirements for such structures and uses including a minimum lot area of twenty-five acres, lot width of at least two hundred feet, and front, side and rear yard setbacks of at least one hundred feet; and subject to the provisions of Section ZS 1-325 - Site plan review; establishes a minimum separation distance of five hundred feet between the commercial event and any residential structure on an adjacent property or public road; and requires that any amplified music associated with the event must end by 11:00 PM.) This bill becomes effective fortyfive (45) days from the date of its passage. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester County Government Center outside Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at http://www.co.worcester. md.us/commissioners/legsltn.aspx. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PASSAGE OF BILL 17-1 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 17-1 (Zoning - Separation Distances for Antennas, Towers and Telecommunications Uses) was passed by the County Commissioners on February 21, 2017. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § ZS 1-343(b)(2)B.1. (Repeals and reenacts this subparagraph to add additional siting requirements to the standards for monopoles, freestanding towers and guyed towers under the standards and provisions for antennas, towers and telecommunications uses in the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance to permit the required separation distance for such structures and uses to an existing or permitted residential structure on an adjacent lot to be reduced to not less than five hundred feet as a special exception where the proposed telecommunication site is located within a high demand transportation corridor, which is defined as the area between lines extending one thousand feet parallel to the centerline of a State Highway with an annual average daily traffic volume exceeding ten thousand trips per day as shown on the most recent maps published by the State Highway Administration Data Services Engineering Division for Worcester County.) This bill becomes effective fortyfive (45) days from the date of its passage. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester

County Government Center outside Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at http://www.co.worcester. md.us/commissioners/legsltn.aspx. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF INTRODUCTION OF BILL 17-2 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 17-2 (Zoning - Health Care Planned Unit Development District) was introduced by Commissioners Bertino, Bunting, Church, Elder, Lockfaw, Mitrecic and Purnell on February 21, 2017. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § ZS 1-348. (Creates this new Section of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance with the purpose and intent of encouraging comprehensively planned health care facilities and uses under a unified plan of development, known as Health Care Planned Unit Developments HCPUD, in order to ensure compatibility with and minimum impact upon development in the surrounding area; establishes location and area requirements for a HCPUD to be permitted in the C-1 Neighborhood Commercial District, C-2 General Commercial District and C-3 Highway Commercial District on lots at least ten acres in area; establishes the permitted uses and structures in the HCPUD including outpatient treatment facilities, hospitals, medical laboratories, doctors offices, drug stores and pharmacies, urgent care centers, nursing facilities, day care centers, and limited retail and service establishments to serve the needs of the employees, patients and patient families; establishes area limitations for uses requiring at least ten percent of the total gross lot area to be devoted to open space; establishes a permitted density whereby the total gross square footage limitation of building size for each parcel may be combined in a HCPUD to permit larger buildings, with a maximum increased area of twenty-five percent larger in the C-1 District; establishes that lot and road frontage requirements shall be as approved by the Planning Commission, with certain limitations; requires parking in accordance with Section ZS 1-320; requires landscaping, buffering and screening in accordance with Section ZS 1-322; establish a maximum height requirement for buildings in the HCPUD of four stories or forty-five feet; establishes a review and approval procedure by the Technical Review Committee and the Planning Commission; establishes minium criteria for approval of the HCPUD by the Planning Commission with respect to size, location and design; provides that while the provisions of the HCPUD District shall first apply, other provisions of the Zoning Ordinance shall also apply; establishes site plan review criteria and re-

quired information to be submitted for the proposed development; and provides that no permits shall be issued in a HCPUD until the Planning Commission has reviewed and approved the HCPUD.) A Public Hearing will be held on Bill 17-2 at the Commissioners' Meeting Room, Room 1101 - Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, on Tuesday, March 21, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester County Government Center outside Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at http://www.co.worcester.md.us/commissioners/legsltn.aspx. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________ MARK SPENCER CROPPER ESQ AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, P.A. 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 16838 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF JOYCE W. HAMSTEAD Notice is given that Phyllis T. Towers, 9365 River Vista Drive, Seaford, DE 19973, was on February 14, 2017 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Joyce W. Hamstead who died on January 20, 2017, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 14th day of August, 2017. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills.


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PUBLIC NOTICES Phyllis T. Towers Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 02, 2017 OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________ TIMOTHY FOX ESQ 32 STONERIDGE COURT BALTIMORE, MD 21239

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 16843 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF RICHARD A. BOST Notice is given that Michael A. Bost, 15808 Old Frederick Road, Woodbine, MD 21497, was on February 21, 2017 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Richard A. Bost who died on December 14, 2016, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 21st day of August, 2017. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Michael A. Bost Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 02, 2017 OCD-3/2/3t _________________________________

GUY R. AYRES III ESQ 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY, SUITE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 16857 Notice is given that the Surrogates court of Cumberland County, NJ appointed William Wenz, 427 Carlton Avenue, Millville, NJ 08332 as the Administrator of the Estate of Jeffrey W. Wenz who died on September 13, 2016 domiciled in New Jersey, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Guy R. Ayres III whose address is 6200 Coastal Highway, Suite 200, Ocean City, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. William Wenz Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: March 09, 2017 OCD-3/9/3t _________________________________ DANIELLE CRUTTENDEN, ESQ. 888 BESTGATE ROAD, SUITE 402 ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 16558 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF WALTER T. YATES Notice is given that Carolyn Sue Guthrie-Yates, 940 Astern Way - Apt. 306, Annapolis, MD 21401, was on March 02, 2017 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Walter T. Yates who died on May 25, 2016, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney.

All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 2nd day of September, 2017. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Carolyn Sue Guthrie-Yates Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 09, 2017 OCD-3/9/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110 of the Code of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Zoning Ordinance for Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted by the Board of Zoning Appeals for Ocean City, Maryland in the Council Chambers of City Hall located on Baltimore Avenue and Third Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(5) requesting a special use exception to allow outdoor display of merchandise incidental to the on-premise use. The site of the appeal is described as Lots 13, 14, 15, & 25, Hitchens-Trimper Plat, further de-

scribed as located on the west side of Coastal Highway on the north side of Hitchens Avenue, and locally known as K-Coast Surf Shop, Inc., 3505 Coastal Highway, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: K-COAST INC – (BZA 2478 #17-09400004) Further information concerning the public hearings may be examined in the office of the Department of Planning and Community Development in City Hall. Alfred Harrison, Chairman Heather Stansbury, Attorney OCD-3/9/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR STEP I CONCEPT PLAN APPROVAL OF UTILITY SCALE SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEM IN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND GATEWAY SOLAR PROJECT ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF MD ROUTE 346 (OLD OCEAN CITY ROAD) AND THE NORTH SIDE OF US ROUTE 50 (OCEAN GATEWAY) JUST WEST OF THE INTERSECTION WITH US ROUTE 90 (OCEAN EXPRESSWAY) Pursuant to Sections 1-114 and 1344 of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance, an application has been filed with the Worcester County Commissioners by Community Energy Solar, Inc. to approve the Step I Concept Plan for a utility scale solar energy system on property located on the northerly side of Ocean Gateway (US Route 50) just west of the MD Route 90 off-ramp, and the southerly side of Old Ocean City Road (MD Route 346) across from the intersection with Circle Road. Located in the Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland, the property is designated on Tax Map 19 as Parcel 6. The proposed project consists of approximately 52,000 solar panels anticipated to produce approximately 15.6 megawatts (DC) output on this 425.92 acre site of which 129.48 acres will be improved with panels. The Worcester County Planning Commission has reviewed the Gateway Solar Project application and given a favorable recommendation to the Worcester County Commissioners that the utility scale solar energy system be established subject to certain conditions. Pursuant to Sections 1-114 and 1344 of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance, the County Commissioners will hold a PUBLIC HEARING on TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 2017 at 11:00 A.M. in the COUNTY COMMISSIONERS’ MEETING ROOM Room 1101, Worcester County Government Center One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 At said public hearing, the County Commissioners will consider the


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PUBLIC NOTICES utility scale solar energy system and the recommendation of the Planning Commission, any proposed restrictions, conditions or limitations as may be deemed by them to be appropriate to preserve, improve, or protect the general character and design of the lands and improvements being developed, and the advisability of reserving the power and authority to approve or disapprove the design of the building, construction, landscaping or other improvements, alterations, and changes made or to be made on the subject lands to assure conformity with the intent and purpose of applicable State laws and regulations and the County Zoning Ordinance. A map of the proposed area, the staff file on the utility scale solar energy system application and the Planning Commission's recommendations, which will be entered into record at the public hearing, are on file and available for inspection at the Department of Development, Review and Permitting (DRP), Government Center - Room 1201, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday (except holidays). Interested parties may also call DRP Deputy Director Phyllis H. Wimbrow at 410632-1200. Madison J. Bunting, Jr., President OCD-3/16/1t _________________________________

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Lease/Purchase of Landfill Crawler Tractor with Bulldozer Worcester County, Maryland The Worcester County Commissioners are currently accepting sealed bids for the lease/ purchase of one (1) new Landfill Crawler Tractor with Bulldozer for the Solid Waste Division of the Department of Public Works. Bid specification packages and bid forms are available from the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, obtained online at www.co.worcester.md.us or by calling the Commissioners’ Office at 410-632-1194 to request a package by mail. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1:00 PM, Monday, April 10, 2017 in the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Bid for Landfill Crawler Tractor with Bulldozer" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, bids will be forwarded to the Public Works Department for tabulation, review and recommendation to the County Commissioners for their consideration at a future meeting. In awarding the bid, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever bid they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering low-

est or best bid, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of bidders being considered, previous experience of bidders with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to Mike Mitchell, Solid Waste Superintendent, at 410-632-3177. OCD-3/16/1t _________________________________

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Purchase of Petroleum Products for Worcester County Government Facilities and Equipment Worcester County, Maryland The Worcester County Commissioners are currently accepting bids for the purchase of petroleum products for County Government buildings, generators in various locations throughout the County, and off-road vehicles for the Solid Waste Division of Public Works for a period of two years through April 30, 2019, with an option to extend for up to five years. Bid specification packages and bid forms are available from the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, may be obtained online at www.co.worcester.md.us or by calling the Commissioners’ Office at 410-632-1194 to request a package by mail. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1:00 p.m., Monday, March 27, 2017 in the Office of the County Commissioners at the above address, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "2017 Petroleum Products Bid" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, bids will be forwarded to the Public Works Department for tabulation, review and recommendation to the County Commissioners for their consideration at a future meeting. In awarding the bid, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever bid they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering lowest or best bid, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of bidders being considered, previous experience of bidders with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to Kenneth J. Whited, Maintenance Superintendent, via email at kenwhited@co.worcester.md.us or by phone at 410-632-3766. OCD-3/16/1t _________________________________

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Lewis Road Sewer Extension Project Preliminary Engineering Report Worcester County, Maryland The Worcester County Commissioners are currently accepting pro-

posals from Consulting Engineering Firms for preparation of a Preliminary Engineering Report for an extension of sewage collection and disposal services to the Lewis Road Area of The Landings Sanitary Service Area for the Water and Wastewater Division of the Department of Public Works. Proposal packages and proposal forms are available from the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, obtained online at www.co.worcester.md.us, or by calling the Commissioners’ Office at 410-632-1194 to request a package by mail. Interested firms are encouraged to attend a Pre-Proposal Meeting at 10:00 AM on Friday, April 7, 2017, at the Water and Wastewater Division Administrative Office located at the Ocean Pines WWTP, 1000 Shore Lane, Ocean Pines, Maryland 21811. Sealed proposals will be accepted until 1:00 PM, Monday, April 24, 2017 in the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Proposal for Lewis Road Sewer Extension Project Preliminary Engineering Report" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, proposals will be forwarded to the Public Works Department for tabulation, review and recommendation to the County Commissioners for their consideration at a future meeting. In awarding the proposal, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all proposals, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever proposal they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering lowest or best proposal, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of consultants being considered, previous experience of consultants with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All in-

quiries shall be directed to John S. Ross, P.E., Deputy Director of Public Works, at 410-641-5251, extension 2412, or emailed to jross@co.worcester.md.us . Email correspondence is encouraged. OCD-3/16/1t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 4340 East West Highway, Suite 600 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 Diane S. Rosenberg Mark D. Meyer John A. Ansell, III Kenneth Savitz Jennifer Rochino Sydney Roberson Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 4340 East West Highway, Suite 600 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff(s) v. Estate of Linda L. Borge Estate of Robert B. Borge 313 North Main Street Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C16000700

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 9th day of March, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of 313 North Main Street, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of April, 2017, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 3rd day of April, 2017. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $82,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki


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PUBLIC NOTICES Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-3/16/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. SHELBY A. SHEA-PIVEC 35 Burr Hill Drive Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C16000733

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 9th day of March 2017, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 35 Burr Hill Drive, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of April, 2017, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 3rd day of April, 2017. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $124,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-3/16/3t _________________________________ SMALL ESTATE

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 16858 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MARTHA ANN RAYNE Notice is given that Louiselee Roche, 5704 Glasgow Court, Cambridge, MD 21613, was on March 07, 2017 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Martha Ann Rayne who died on February 26, 2017, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims

on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Louiselee Roche Personal Representative True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Charlotte K. Cathell One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 16, 2017 OCD-3/16/1t _________________________________

Town of Ocean City

BID SOLICITATION Sinepuxent Avenue Bike Route Thermoplastic Services The Town of Ocean City is seeking bids from qualified and experienced vendors to provide Thermoplastic Services for the Sinepuxent Avenue Bike Route and to be in conformity with the specifications detailed in the Bid Documents. Bid Documents for Sinepuxent Avenue Bike Route Thermoplastic Services may be obtained from the Town of Ocean City’s Procurement Department by either e-mailing the Procurement Associate, Leila Milewski, at lmilewski@oceancitymd.gov or by calling 410-723-6643 during normal business hours, or via the Bid tab on the Town’s website. Vendors are responsible for checking this website for addenda prior to submitting their bids. The Town of Ocean City is not responsible for the content of any Bid Document received through any third party bid service. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their Completed Bid Documents. Sealed Bid Documents are due no later than 10 a.m. on Friday, April 07, 2017 at which time they will be opened and read aloud. Bids are to be submitted to the Town of Ocean City, Attn: Procurement Department, 204 65th Street, Bldg. A, Ocean City, MD 21842. Late Bid Documents will not be

accepted. Minority vendors are encouraged to compete for award of the solicitation. OCD-3/16/1t _________________________________

NOTICE Disposal of Surplus Vehicles and Equipment to be Auctioned on GovDeals.com “Disposition of County Personal Property no longer u sed by the County” The following described personal property, including vehicles, furniture and equipment, have been determined to be no longer required for County use by the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland and deemed to be surplus property: SURPLUS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT Surplus vehicles, listed by make and model (with model year), as follows: Chevrolet 3500 Utility Body Truck (1990); Chevrolet 3500 Van (2002); Chevrolet C1500 Truck (2004); Dodge Durango (2006); Chevrolet Lumina (1996); Ford Crown Victoria (2010); Ford Expedition (2005); Ford F-150 Truck (2000); Ford F-350 Utility Body Trucks (1999, 2000); Ford Rangers (2001, 2003); Ford F800 Dump Truck (1991); Ford F800 Rescue Truck (1982); International 1754 Dump Truck (1989); International 4700 Dump Trucks (1990, 1990, 2000); and Jeep Cherokee (1999). Surplus equipment, including: Ford 5030 Tractors (1997, 1997); John Deere 1445 Front Mower (2005); New Holland TS-90 Tractors (2000, 2001); Miller AEAD-200LE Welder; Onan 90-ODYC15R18973K; Rhino DB-150 Side Mount Mower (2001); Toro Z Master Mower 74225 (2002); Vactron Vac Trailer (2002); Winco PS18WH3R/ALP; and Wolf Pac Roller WP 2500. Surplus furniture and miscellaneous equipment, including: 2 Tables (42"x42"x30"); 2 Wooden TV Stands; Wooden Conference Table (18"x54"x29"); 3 Office Chairs; 2

Metal and Wooden Desks; Metal Filing Cabinet; 4 Metal and Wooden Tables; Box of Assorted Ink Cartridges; 5 Lamps; 2 Wooden Benches; Conference Table (10-ft x 43-inch); 2-sided Wooden TV Stand with TVs; Wooden Storage Cabinet (48"x21"83" tall); 3 Wooden Desks; Compact Refrigerator; 12 Ceiling Lights; Metal Truck Box; Pioneer Stripper 1500; 2 Push Mowers; Bannerman Diamond Master B-DM-6 Field Groomer; Lot of Softball Equipment (helmets, bats, softballs, mats); 2 Rhino DB-150 Mowers for Parts Only; and Lot of 56 Bridge Guard Rail Posts ½" thick x 42" tall x 6" deep. TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE AND CONVEYANCE: The County Commissioners propose to solicit competitive bids via an Internet-based auction system operated by GovDeals, Inc. for which the winning bidder pays a buyers premium of twelve and one-half percent (12.5%) of the winning bid for each transaction so that there is no net cost to the County. All of the above referenced surplus property will be offered for sale “AS IS, WHERE IS.” The County Commissioners make no warranty, guaranty or representation of any kind, expressed or implied, as to the merchantability or fitness for any purpose of the property offered for sale. The County Commissioners warrant to the buyer that the property offered for sale will conform to its description. The County Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids as they see fit and to withdraw from sale any of the items listed. Payment in full by successful bidders shall be made to Worcester County Commissioners. OPPORTUNITY FOR OBJECTIONS: Anyone objecting to the proposed conveyance of the above surplus vehicles and equipment shall do so in writing prior to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 30, 2017, or in person at the regularly scheduled meeting of the County Commissioners to be held at 10:00 a.m. on April 4, 2017 in the County Commissioners Meeting Room, Room 1101 - Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/16/3t _________________________________

OCEAN CITY TODAY

Legal Advertising Call NANCY HAWRYLKO 410-723-6397

Fax: 410-723-6511 or

E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net


Commentary

City Council has real money issues

As the Ocean City government begins to wade through its annual budget process, elected officials are finding that the same old routine of cutting a little here and adding a little there isn’t going to work like it once did. The ratio of spending to revenue hasn’t reached critical mass, but it certainly has breached the comfort level, as the many things government wants and needs to do will require more money than what it has been collecting in recent years. That’s one reason the council appears to be leaning toward a half-percent increase in the room tax. The theory is that new income from that source would delay an increase in the property tax rate, which elected officials are always loathe to do. Although the lodging industry has legitimate concerns about that, it remains that City Hall will have to do something somewhere if it is to cover the cost of everything it wants to do along with everything it should do. As has been pointed out numerous times, resort government’s spending is just now nearing what it was in 2009, when the budget was a little over $80 million. Meanwhile, property tax revenue fell from $45 million in 2009 to $40 million last year, as the post-2009 tax base collapsed from a mighty $10 billion to $8 billion all at once. That’s the cause of the budget scramble of the last couple of years, and it probably will go on for a couple more. As nice as it would be to get a budgetary do-over of the boom years from 2005 and 2008, when both property valuations the city budget skyrocketed, the council must play the hand it’s been dealt. It must do so, however, in such a fashion that recognizes that next year isn’t likely to be much different. Although Ocean City’s turn in the reassessment cycle is coming up and will apply to next year, a return to the good old high value days is difficult to imagine, considering that the current median prices of homes sold today haven’t changed much from what they were six years ago. There’s no way around it for the council. It’s either going to have raise new money or find a way to stay in a holding pattern of sorts that could last for another three years.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR/PUBLISHER.......................... Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli ASSOCIATE EDITORS.......... Josh Davis, Brian Gilliland STAFF WRITERS............ Kara Hallissey, Katie Tabeling, .............................................................. Greg Ellison ASSISTANT PUBLISHER.......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS................ Kelly Brown, Kaitlin Sowa .............................................................. Debbie Haas COMPTROLLER.................................. Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net.

Mar. 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

Page 69

Letters to the editor South Point speaks out on campground

The following letter was sent to the Worcester County Commissioners and for publication in Ocean City Today. Dear Commissioner Bunting: Greetings from your South Point neighbors. After careful deliberation, we are writing to inform you of the position of the South Point Association which reflects a consensus of the overwhelming majority of residents represented. The Association stands in opposition to the request for re-zoning of the Pine Shores Golf Course property to any designation that might allow for the development of a campground on the property. The stated Purpose and Intent of E-1 zoning is “to allow for orderly development until the regulations are amended to effect changes in the Comprehensive Plan resulting from the next state-mandated periodic review.” In our view, the premature re-zoning of environmentally sensitive, protected properties south of MD Rt. 376 which permits intense commercial development in a piece-meal fashion prior to a fully state-mandated review

of the Comprehensive Plan falls disturbingly into the definition of Spot Zoning. We feel compelled to raise this issue. The Pine Shores Golf Course is a parcel of ecologically sensitive land adjacent to the intersection of MD Rt. 376 and MD Rt. 611 east of Berlin. It is reasonable to conclude that at the time of the purchase the local investor was fully aware of the restrictions to the development of a commercial campground imposed by the existing E-1 zoning. These restrictions are intended to preserve the ecological integrity of the area lying south of MD Rt. 376. The degree of profitability of the investor’s gamble in this parcel is entirely contingent upon a zoning change from E-1 zoning to A-2, as this would allow the commercial development to proceed and greatly increase the monetary value of the investment. The investor/ developer has moved expeditiously toward this end and requested the zoning change. In this respect, the developer’s application to our County Commissioners for re-zoning to A-2 cannot be viewed in the same light nor approached with the same

sympathy a reasonable person might be tempted to give a bona fide farmer seeking to save the family farm by maximizing its earning potential. Rather, this is a clear case of a real estate investor seeking a change to existing zoning in order to maximize the return on his investment. We contend that this change in zoning runs contrary to the dictates of our Worcester County Comprehensive Development Plan and would undermine the pre-existing rights and uses of adjacent property owners. In short, we consider this request for re-zoning to be a classic example of an attempt at Spot Zoning for individual profit and a detriment to everyone else. Given these circumstances, we cannot fathom any legitimate reason why there exists any urgency which might compel our Worcester County Commissioners to allow this project to go forward prior to the next state-mandated review of the Comprehensive Development Plan. The future of development in this area demands a full, fair and comprehensive review by all stake holders and a halt to piecemeal decision making by a few. An argument that re-zonContinued on Page 70


Ocean City Today

PAGE 70

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from Page 69 ing is justified by a “change in the nature of the area” borders on the ludicrous. Roads that over the years have become increasingly congested and creeks and bays that suffer from greater-than-ever environmental stress are certainly not justification for re-zoning. Allowing development of this campground (an entity that, in reality, is an intensively developed parking lot for seasonal trailers to encroach upon environmentally sensitive land) based on the rational that the area has changed, becomes a selffulfilling prophecy. Any quick Spot Zoning becomes a precedent setting decision supporting future arguments in favor of even greater commercial development along the scenic approach to the Assateague Island National and State Seashores. We find without merit any argument that the existing E-1 zoning was the result of a mistake. After the required public hearings, the issue was fully vetted by competent county officials including, but not limited to, the then Board of County Commissioners. E-1 was approved as the zoning designation which most closely adhered to the letter and the spirit of our Worcester County Comprehensive Plan. The fact that a developer is now attempting to entice our County Commissioners to approve an adverse exception to the intent of the Com-

prehensive Plan is incontrovertible proof that the E-1 zoning was not a mistake but rather a prophetic bulwark against encroachment. The current E-1 zoning was both well conceived and continues working precisely as the county intended — to “protect and preserve the open character of the rural areas and the environmentally sensitive areas of the county.” The membership of the South Point Association, Berlin respectfully request that the application for rezoning be denied. We believe that this area is nature at its best — please keep it that way. Sincerely, Michael A. LeCompte, President Elizabeth Walker, Secretary Marilyn Burr, Treasurer

Public Works campus expansion shortsighted

Editor, The Ocean City Mayor & City Council (M&CC) are embarking on a $25 million expansion plan for the Public Works complex at 65th Street. They have already passed a resolution to borrow up to $11 million dollars via a municipal bond to pay for part of the project. The balance is to be paid by the Maryland Transportation Authority with mostly Federal funds. Within the project, the M&CC intend to build an employee parking

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MARCH 17, 2017

garage at an estimated cost of $8 million. They also want to build a Bus Storage Facility for an estimated $3.4 million. Staff claims that we will be able to keep our buses longer if not exposed to salt air. The federal guidelines that pertain to bus replacement grants say that a bus has reached its useful life in at least 12 years of revenue service. Over 63 percent of our buses that went to auction in the last five years were between 14 and 21 years old. The average life of these buses was 16.7 years old. Most reached the end of their useful life without the need for a storage facility. Most Ocean City property owners do not have a garage for their vehicles, and yet the town needs one for their buses. We also hear that the M&CC want to replace the Public Works administration building built in 1984 at an estimated cost of over $4.8 million. It is said to be needed because the “Public Works family” has out grown the existing building. What is wrong

PUBLIC EYE

with an old fashion addition to the present structure? In the future, federal dollars are going to become scarcer. Ocean City will be looking to the Federal and State governments to help fund a new Route 50 bridge and an expanded Route 90 bridge. We will continue to need Beach Replenishment funds as the years go on. We have streets and underground pipes that need repair and/or replacement. We need to fully fund our pension plans. In short, we must begin to prioritize our financial needs. Ironically, the M&CC cut late night bus service on winter weekdays to save $46,000 in the FY14 budget; and yet, they want to spend millions of dollars on this unnecessary project. We are never going to bring down government debt with this kind of thinking. When will the M&CC budget town funds like each of us do in our own budgets? Vincent dePaul Gisriel, Jr. Ocean City

The Public Eye will return next week.


MARCH 17, 2017

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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MARCH 17, 2017

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3/17/17 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

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