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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.COM

MARCH 15, 2019

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ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE

Ocean City’s 40th annual procession to celebrate everything green will take place Saturday – Page 25

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BEST FOOT FORWARD NJROTC members offer a demonstration during an annual inspection last Thursday at Stephen Decatur High School. The unit was given a preliminary rating of outstanding. A formal report of the inspection is said to take several weeks. See story on page 37.

Firefighters, City Hall have a deal Stewart Dobson Editor (March 15, 2019) When the Ocean City firefighters union ratified its new three-year contract Thursday morning, its arrival 15 days past the March 1 negotiating deadline with city government was of little consequence. The two-week delay was a matter of

detail work and not the bitter recriminations and allegations of unfair labor practices that led the International Association of Firefighters Local 4269 and City Hall into a year-long impasse over the proposed 2016 agreement. The new contract is the product of tough, but civil negotiations that will award firefighters pay increases over its

three-year term and replace a shift schedule union members disliked intensely with a program of four 24-hour and six 12-hour shifts each week. The new schedule, which will become effective later in the spring, represents a compromise between the union-favored 24 hours on and 72 hours off the departSee UNION Page 6

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) After roughly two-dozen members of Ocean City’s newly formed Parking Task Force tossed around ideas for several hours during its initial meeting last week, the group reconvened on Wednesday to continue to find ways to address paid parking inequities, while also examining potential parking revenue increases. The Ocean City Council asked Mayor Rick Meehan to form the task force during a 2018 Strategic Plan meeting on parking issues. City Engineer Terry McGean contacted consultant Dan Kupferman of Walker Parking to facilitate the meetings. Noting the array of perspectives shared during the meeting last Wednesday, Kupferman said not all parties will get what they request. See PARKING Page 20

Senate rejects events law expansion Attempt to add infractions, increase fines shot down in unanimous vote by Judiciary Committee members By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) State legislators rejected Ocean City’s request for an expanded special event

zone law Monday, after all 11 members of the Senate Judiciary Committee voted last week to issue an unfavorable report on the proposed measure. Sponsored in the Senate by Sen. Mary Beth Carozza (R-38), and cross-filed with a bill by Del. Wayne Hartman in the House of Delegates, the bill would have boosted fines and added several traffic offenses to the current law that aims to curb rowdiness and recklessness during certain

car-related events. Mayor Rick Meehan and Ocean City Police Chief Ross Buzzuro testified before the committee last week, but failed to sway the committee’s seven Democrats and four Republicans. In light of the Senate vote, Hartman (R-38C), withdrew his bill and canceled a House Environment and Transportation committee hearing See EVENT Page 10


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MARCH 15, 2019

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Safe schools act heading toward legislature’s OK By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 15, 2019)The Safe Schools Maryland Act of 2019 cleared another hurdle last week as it advanced from the state Senate’s Education, Health and the Environment Committee. “Keeping our students and all personnel safe in schools is the purpose of this legislation, and the tip line is an important tool to increase school safety,” District 38 Sen. Mary Beth Carozza said in a statement. “By following-up on calls made on the tip line, we can respond to and prevent future instances of violence and other abuse from occurring in our schools.” The initiative, sponsored by Gov. Larry Hogan, establishes funding for an anonymous tip line where students, educators or others can report suspicious behavior or possible threats, according to the legislation. The Safe Schools Maryland program would also become part of the Maryland Center for School Safety. Hogan’s administration first See SCHOOL Page 8

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Seismic testing opponents seek action now Resort has been opposed to offshore oil exploration, drilling for four decades By Victor Fernandes Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Steady streams of seismic air gun blasts off the coast of Ocean City could have lasting environmental and economic impacts on the resort area long after any well they find deep within the Atlantic Ocean runs dry of oil or natural gas deposits. That’s the sobering viewpoint Matt Heim, Oceana’s Mid-Atlantic Campaign Organizer, offered March 6 during the Informational Town Hall on Offshore Drilling hosted by the Ocean City and Ocean Pines Chambers of Commerce at Dunes Manor Hotel. The Mid-Atlantic planning area, which includes Ocean City and the rest of the tri-state peninsula, has gained interest from companies seeking permits to conduct seismic testing and offshore drilling, said Heim, a key figure for an environmental group that has played a frontline role in building opposition on a state and local level. The possible dangers associated with these activities, he said, far outweigh the anticipated results. “Most of the oil in the Atlantic is located in the mid-Atlantic area, which is where we are located. Unfortunately, we’re in the crosshairs on this issue,” he said. But seismic testing and offshore drilling in the Atlantic, he said, would provide at best a 16-month supply of oil and three years of natural gas under the United States’ current annual consumption rate, according to the Bureau of Ocean and Energy Management. More likely, Heim said, the total estimated output would be an eightmonth supply of oil and 21 months of natural gas, respectively. “The fact is that amount of oil is actually not a lot of oil,” Heim said, because it amounts to approximately four percent of the total oil and natural gas deposits secured nationally. Estimated totals of 2.42 billion barrels of oil and 23.38 trillion cubic feet of gas from

VICTOR FERNANDES/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Matt Heim, Oceana’s Mid-Atlantic campaign organizer, speaks about the potential risks seismic testing and offshore drilling could have on Ocean City’s economy during the Informational Town Hall on Offshore Drilling hosted by the Ocean City and Ocean Pines Chambers of Commerce on March 6 at Dunes Manor Hotel.

within the mid-Atlantic Ocean, Heim said, aren’t worth what Ocean City could lose economically and environmentally. “Losing a busy summer weekend to a ‘small’ spill in Ocean City, and small is in quotes because any spill is a big spill, that could be devastating to a lot of small businesses,” he said. In contrast, he said, a study conducted by Oceana links 96,000 jobs and $6 million in gross domestic product to “a clean and healthy coast.” Heim pointed to studies indicating as much as an 80 percent reduction in catch rate for fisheries, as well as the potential harm to thousands of whales and dolphins. Melanie Pursel, executive director of the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, spoke during the event about the risk to local tourism, which features eight million visitors a year and $1 billion in spending. “That’s what would be at stake for less than a year’s worth of oil,” Heim said. Early in the nearly two-hour presentation, Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan said, “We know how important this is to our future and the future of the next generations. We’ve remained consis-

tent in our opposition. The town of Ocean City has voiced that and stood up strong in opposition to seismic testing and offshore oil drilling.” Community leaders began facing the debate over seismic testing and offshore drilling at least 45 years ago, Meehan said while holding a resolution signed on Oct. 21, 1974, by then-Ocean City Mayor Harry Kelley. That resolution, Meehan said, was “in opposition to exactly what we’re here to talk about.” More recently, eastern seaboard communities such as Ocean City convinced then-President Barack Obama’s administration to remove the Atlantic Ocean from consideration for blasting and drilling as part of a program finalized in January 2017 that remains in effect. However, that program could be replaced by President Donald Trump’s America First Energy Plan, an executive order made in April 2017 that directs the Department of the Interior to

create a plan that would be in effect from this year through 2024. The debate began intensifying locally in January 2016, with a letter from Ocean City’s Chamber of Commerce to Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan declaring their opposition to seismic blasting and offshore drilling. BOEM proposed in January 2018 to include three locations off Maryland’s coast as part of the National Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program. The Ocean City Council responded a month later with a resolution in opposition. The town hall provided community leaders and the general public the numbers behind the raw emotion over this controversial issue. “It’s fair to say that this is an issue that has everybody’s attention,” Heim said, “and it’s something that we’ve been working on together as a community for quite some time and we’re going to continue to work. We’re going to win this campaign.”

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MARCH 15, 2019

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Union, City Hall have deal, with raises and new shifts Continued from page 1 ment had for years and the system instituted in October 2017 of two 10hour day shifts and two 14-hour night shifts, followed by four days off. The union accepted that arrangement in February 2017, after declaring an impasse a year earlier. But because the city charter prohibits a strike by public safety personnel and without the ability to force the talks into arbitration, union leadership concluded it had no other options. This time around, the possibility of going to binding interest arbitration was in the background of negotiations between the two parties, as voters gave that right to career firefighters last November after the union petitioned it to referendum. “Collective bargaining with binding arbitration is a time consuming, expensive and challenging process,” Mayor Rick Meehan said. “However, I believe we have negotiated a responsible agreement, reached through compromise by both parties that address the principle objectives of both the IAFF and the town. “This agreement recognizes the importance of the career path of our firefighters and paramedics and funds steps in each of the three years of this agreement. It also addresses the safety issues the council has while at the same time allowing some flexibility in the schedule that the IAFF was looking for. “We have a great deal of respect for the members of the IAFF, and the bargaining team that represented the union throughout this process, and look forward to continuing this relationship through the term of this

agreement and beyond.” Union President Ryan Whittington was similarly respectful of the city’s bargaining representatives, saying the talks were on point and free of rancor throughout. “The IAFF is pleased to have reached a deal,” he said shortly after ratification took place. “The negotiations took a tremendous amount of work from both sides over more than six weeks. Both sides put in the time and the energy necessary to work through difficult issues, and the parties communicated better and were more motivated to reach a deal than in past negotiations. “The process worked, in no small part, because the recent binding interest arbitration charter helped moved the parties towards a resolution of their own,” he said. The agreement will take effect on July 1, Whittington said, adding that certain provisions, such as the new shift schedule, will go into effect before the season begins. As for the change in the shift schedule, Whittington said it should result in more stable staffing, particularly for weekends. “The change also better accommodates the staffing flexibility necessary for the town. The change reflects a compromise by the IAFF, which hopes for further improvement in the future,” he said. Also pleased with the conduct of the talks was City Manager Doug Miller, who complimented the “IAFF team's high level of professionalism throughout negotiations.” “A great deal of work went into this process from both sides and we are happy that the town was able to provide a solid offer to the member-

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Mother’s Cantina owner Ryan James, left, and Maryland Del. Brooke Leirman, center, have played frontline roles in support of a statewide bill banning foam containers and cups. James testified in front of state government leaders on Feb. 6 in Annapolis.

State Styrofoam ban: resort was ahead of game anyway By Victor Fernandes Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Ocean City restaurants, like others across the state of Maryland, soon could officially be Styrofoam free. That makes restaurant owner Ryan James smile as wide he did while posing for a photograph Feb. 6 in Annapolis after testifying before state government leaders in support of a bill that reportedly stands a signature from Gov. Larry Hogan away from becoming a law. “I’m ecstatic,” said James, who has joined other local businesses at the forefront of a high-profile bill to ban Styrofoam statewide that has taken two major steps forward in the past two weeks. According to published reports, Maryland’s state senators voted March 5 to ban foam containers and cups in an effort to fight pollution. The House of Delegates followed suit Tuesday by voting in favor of eliminating Styrofoam. If Hogan signs the bill, the ban would take effect early next year, and would carry a $250 fine for violators after the one-year grace period expires. James, who owns Mother’s Cantina, Mother’s Taco Shop and Mother’s Catering Company in Ocean City, has been using environmentally safe products made of compressed sugar cane in his restaurants for the past year. Susan Jones, executive director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association, estimates the majority of local businesses owners already have phased out foam containers and cups. Jones also pointed to compostable plastic cups currently used at Fish Tales. “I think there’s a large amount of overwhelming support for this initiative,” James said. Still, Jones is unsure if businesses owners against the bill will soon join those in favor of it, primarily because of the added cost to purchase biodegradable products and the potential loss in revenue. Jones said businesses could pass the added cost onto their customers. “So many mandated and regulated changes are being put on businesses, that

many politicians are making being a small business owner extremely difficult,” Jones said Wednesday. “There will be some operators who charge more carryout to cover the cost of recyclable containers, as they are expensive. This bill will negatively affect large operators who have (a) high volume of Styrofoam containers, which will most likely be reflected in pricing increases to the consumer.” However, James said, the difference in cost between using take-out containers made of compressed sugar cane and traditional Styrofoam in his restaurants has amounted to an additional six cents per customer. James conducted a study of take-out orders from June through December last year to reach that conclusion, which he shared with government leaders in Annapolis during his recent testimony. “Anytime a front-of-the-house employee hit the to-go button, it would charge (customers) six cents,” James said. “We hit that button 22,552 times. It raised about $1,804 in additional revenue in those six months to compensate for the elevated cost, and we got zero complaints.” Fish Tales owner Shawn Harman said his Ocean City businesses have been heavily involved in using environmentally safe products, such as biodegradable cups made of corn starch, for the past decade. Soon, eliminating the use of foam cups and containers will join the list. “We’ll change immediately,” Harman said. “It’s a good thing. You just have to pass the cost on to your consumer because you’re taking a two-cent item or a five-cent item to 30 cents, and that’s going to pass on (to customers). I think the consumers embrace it entirely.” James is confident more local businesses will support the bill to ban Styrofoam. “The minority of businesses that are not OK with it, we’ll get them educated,” he said. “We’ll get them comfortable with the switch, and I’m sure that they will be fine with everything once they get some more knowledge and are introduced to some more products. They’ll be good to go very shortly.”

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Ocean City Today

School safety act earns support all around or law enforcement. The legislation has 14 cosponsors in the Senate, and 33 co-sponsors in the House of Delegates. In addition to Carozza in the Senate, supporters in the house included District 38A Delegate Charles Otto and District 38C Delegate Wayne Hartman. The cost of the program would be covered by the state’s general fund up to $300,000, according to the legislation. Funding would begin in FY 20 and increase annually. The funds would go towards personnel training, spreading awareness through literature to students and parents, as well as curriculum training. Otto acknowledged cost as a potential hurdle for this bill. “Well, the biggest concern is obviously the cost of implementing something like that,” Otto said. Hartman said the program’s initial cost could pay long-term dividends. “If this eliminates one incident, it’s well worth the investment,” Hartman said. Superintendent Lou Taylor was named School Safety Superintendent of the Year by the Maryland Center for School Safety, according to Carozza’s statement. “Superintendent Taylor and the entire team at WCPS have gone above

and beyond when it comes to keeping our children safe, and the Safe Schools Maryland Act will help us continue our shared mission of keeping our students, school personnel, and all safe in our schools,” Carozza said. Worcester County has had threats made against schools — Pocomoke High School received a threatening call last February, according to Carrie Sterrs, public information officer for the Worcester County Public Schools — but this and others were not acted on. Stephen Decatur High School also received a threatening phone call about an explosive device on its campus in 2016, according to Sterrs. Worcester joined Wicomico and Sussex counties as victims of a hoax that spanned multiple states before a juvenile was arrested. For Otto, he said had to have a realistic outlook on the need to keep students safe. “I’d like to hope we’re immune to the problems, but I’m afraid that we’re not, given the other locations that have had issues,” Otto said. “Especially there in St. Mary’s County last June – that was hitting pretty close to home.” Two people were killed and one hurt in a March 2018 shooting at Great Mills High School in St. Mary’s County. Price emphasized the importance of

the having tip line as a precaution. “It’s certainly beneficial to us,” Price said. “As everything that has happened across our country in the last several years, including [Marjory Stoneman Douglas] High School and the incident at St. Mary’s County as early as last year, has heightened the need for safety and security within our schools. Countless school shootings have occurred over the years across the nation: Columbine, Sandy Hook and Parkland, Florida, are just a few of the many chilling events. Hartman acknowledged that the horrific incidents are all the more reason to take these additiona safety measures. “I just think it makes Maryland one step closer to a higher level of safety than we’ve had before,” Hartman said. “I ... don’t think we can be overly cautious or take anything for granted.” For Price, he feels keeping school students safe is of paramount concern for Worcester County in general and the school system in particular. “It’s just another tool in our toolbox here in Maryland as part of the Maryland Center for School Safety, it provides us the opportunity to once again offer the greatest care and safety and security for our students and staff in our buildings, even here in Worcester County,” Price said.

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Continued from page 3 launched a tip line, 1-833-MD-BSAFE, and mobile app in October 2018. “We must remain ever vigilant when it comes to protecting our kids, and we are counting on our local school communities, our students, teachers, and parents to work together with us in these important efforts,” Hogan said back in October. Steve Price, chief safety officer for Worcester County Public Schools, said the district has received roughly three or four calls concerning the “care and well-being and safety for individual students.” However, Price added the resource could prove invaluable in avoiding a tragedy. “This tip line provides those individuals to have the opportunity to anonymously provide information to us, which may give us the opportunity to prevent a tragedy from occurring in our school system,” Price said. Along with himself, the district’s human resource supervisor and a member of sheriff’s office were trained prior to the launch of the tip line. He said they receive the tips from the Maryland Emergency Management Agency’s line and respond as they deem necessary – whether it’s through notifying the administration

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Legislature nears passage of minimum wage measure By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Although significantly amended, the “Fight for Fifteen minimum wage bill appears headed for approval in the General Assembly, following the Senate Finance Committee’s issuance of a favorable report on the measure last Friday. The House of Delegates passed its version of the legislation a week early by greater than a two-to-one margin. Despite the General Assembly failing to pass comparable minimum wage legislation every year since 2016, the push was renewed again this session by Del. Diana Fennell (D47, Prince George’s) and Sen. Cory McCray (D-45, Baltimore) who sponsored cross-filed HB 166 and SB 280, which originally aimed to raise the minimum wage to $11 per hour later this year, and then add $1 each year until reaching $15 in 2023. SB 280 now awaits a full Senate vote after the Finance Committee decided 8-3 in favor of the measure last Thursday, while cross-filed HB 166 passed the lower chamber by a 96-44 margin on March 1. Among the changes made to the house bill was an amendment to phase-in wage raises starting Jan. 1, 2020 to $11 hourly, and then go up by .75 cents annually through 2024, before reaching the $15 rate on Jan. 1. 2025. Another proposal of particular importance to the restaurant industry, which would have increased wage rates for tip earners to $15 by 2027,

was removed to retain the state’s current tip credit. Exempted under the state’s current minimum wage regulation are: employees earning at least $30 monthly in tips who are paid a $3.63 hourly rate that must combine to equal at least the current $10.10 scale; amusement and recreational businesses employees who are paid the higher sum of either 85 percent of the minimum wage or $7.25; and employees under 20 years of age who must earn at least 85 percent of minimum wage rates during their first six months on the job. The amended house bill also removed a proposal to dump the state’s youth opportunity wage and instead permits employers to compensate staff at 85 percent of the minimum rate if under 18 years of age. The bill language approved by the house also removed proposed annual adjustments to keep pace with costof-living increases once the $15 rate is achieved. Other changes approved by the Senate Finance Committee included a slower phase-in for small businesses with 14 or fewer employees, restricting increases to $0.50 per year before achieving the $15 rate on Jan 1, 2028 and requiring restaurants to show the effective hourly rate on wage statements for tipped staff members. Melvin Thompson, senior vice president of Government Affairs & Public Policy for the Restaurant Association of Maryland, said his organiSee MINIMUM Page 11

Event zone additions rejected Continued from Page 1 scheduled last Friday The current special event zone law, which was sponsored by then-Sen. Jim Mathias (D-38) with cross-filed with legislation sponsored by then Del. Carozza, was passed last year after legislators watered down the original version. Initially, the bill was intended to crack down on reckless driving, drivers burning rubber and making too much noise. It would accomplish that by authorizing the State Highway Administration to designate roads under its purview as special event zones that would function much the same as school zones, where state law permits stiffer penalties. Objections to the harshness of some of the penalties, however, resulted in the passage last year of a law that focused on speeding offenses, rather than other bad behavior by drivers. Apparently, legislator’s reluctance to impose the higher fines called for in this year’s measure

scuttled it for this year. “While I believe we made a strong case at the hearing for the need to expand the violations under the current law, the committee members were not inclined to increase penalties,” Carozza said. “We are disappointed … but we have left the door open to go back next session and push for the increased penalties.” Speaking during a break on the House floor Monday, Hartman said after receiving word of the Senate committee vote last Wednesday night , he conferred the following day with Environment and Transportation committee leadership regarding HB 789. Hartman said although the possibility of reducing the requested maximum fine for the additional driving offenses from $1,000 to $500 was discussed, he decided to retain the bill’s language and withdraw the measure this session. “Looking at the mindset of the Senate, larger fines seemed to be unpalatable,” he said.


MARCH 15, 2019

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Ocean City Today

WE GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Lt. Glen McIntyre displays uniform options which will be streamlined to cut costs, while Sgt. Joe Bushnell listens, during the Police Commission meeting on Monday.

Police to save thousands by standardizing dept. uniforms By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) By limiting color options and finding a new vendor, the Ocean City Police Department could trim thousands of dollars from its annual uniform budget, Lt. Glen McIntyre told the Police Commission meeting on Monday. “I found out we were spending an inordinate amount of money in regard to uniforms because we’re carrying multiple lines,” he said. With varying apparel options for patrol officers on foot or bicycle, McIntyre estimated outfitting each officer costs approximately $4,500. “That was kind of shocking … because I don’t think we ever looked at it in that regard,” he said. “We stepped back for a minute and started to look at how we could synch this stuff up.” McIntyre said the color palate became cluttered years ago when the department switched from gray and white attire to midnight navy blue uniforms. “When we did that … there wasn’t a lot of forethought on our part with regards to the bike uniforms,” he said. “The midnight navy was a good thing, but we were already doing the

royal blue and black bike uniforms.” Over the last few years, officers working the south end of town, either on foot or bike, have been wearing the black pants and a bike shirt, McIntyre said. “We’re going to start to transition to the black on black with the regular patrol uniform so that we can wear the combination with things like the bike shirt or bike jacket,” he said. “That eliminates extra winter jackets.” Additionally, McIntyre said the department found improved pricing with uniform vendor Flying Cross. “Flying Cross has been around for [about] 118 years [and] have been doing military contracts for as long as any of us have been around,” he said. “We’re looking at saving about 70 percent overall cost per bike shirt, which is going to save us a boatload of money.” The clothing transition will use mostly stock already on hand, with the principal purchase limited to pants, which eliminates any associated funding requests, McIntyre said. “Top to bottom, we’re figuring … to save somewhere in the area of 30 percent on our overall uniform budget,” he said. “We’re talking tens of thousands of dollars.”

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Minimum wage bill nears OK Continued from Page 10 zation backed the inclusion of the tipped wage statements to foster transparency and bolster the argument to retain the present $3.63 tip wage. “This will allow tipped employees to easily confirm that they are earning at least the minimum wage per hour, and makes it clear when employers are required by law to make up any shortfalls,” he said. Del. Wayne Hartman (D-38C) said

the house-approved bill also included what amounts to a fail-safe amendment. “If the Board of Public Works said Maryland’s economy is slowing, there’s a provision which allows them to halt the increase for a year to allow the General Assembly to meet and discuss if it needs to take further action,” he said. “Which to me says, if they were confident this was the right thing to do, I don’t know if that would have been there.”

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MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

Firefighter award ceremony honors array of members

On Feb. 28, Melanie Rhodes retired after nearly 23 years of employment with the Ocean City Recreation and Parks Department.

Rhodes retires from OC rec dept. (March 15, 2019) After nearly 23 years of employment with the Ocean City Recreation and Parks Department, Melanie Rhodes has called it a day, officially retiring on Feb. 28. Beginning her career with the town in September 1996, Rhodes has served as the food and beverage manager for Eagles Landing’s Catty Shack restaurant for more than two

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In addition, she was responsible for providing daily meals and menus for golfers and tournaments. Many of her recipes are house favorites, including her award-winning cream of crab soup. “I thank God, town officials and my co-workers for the opportunity to have enjoyed my career,” Rhodes said. “It has never felt like ‘work’ because I have always loved my job and the people I work with each day. I am very thankful for such a wonderful career here.” During retirement, Rhodes expects to spend more time with her family. “I have beautiful grandchildren that I am anxious to spend more time with,” Rhodes added. According to Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan, Rhodes’ retirement is “bittersweet” for the town. “Mel has been the face of Eagles Landing, welcoming thousands of golfers each year with a warm smile,” Meehan said. “She has become a fixture of the golf course, providing fantastic service, great hospitality and the best crab cake, shrimp salad and blood mary I have ever had.”

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(March 15, 2019)The Ocean City Fire Department held its Annual Awards and Recognition Ceremony at Ocean City Fire Department Headquarters, honoring members for their commitment to public safety and protection of the Ocean City community, Feb. 10. The celebration named the Firefighter of the Year, Member of the Year, and Paramedic of the Year, along with handing out several Years of Service Awards, Distinguished Service Awards and Resuscitation Awards. Along with Chief Chris Larmore, Deputy Chief Chris Shaffer, and Deputy Chief Moe Cropper, several dignitaries attended the ceremony, which began with the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company (OCVFC) Ladies Auxiliary Awards. The OCVFC Ladies Auxiliary Member of the Year Award was given to Verla Hammond and the Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Cheryl Nottingham. In addition, the Ladies Auxiliary donated funds they raised to the John Paul Adkins II scholarship fund, the F. Michael Sacca scholarship fund, the OCVFC cadet program and the OCVFC. Following the Ladies Auxiliary, awards were presented for length of service and incident citations. “Most of our members did not devote themselves to the fire service in order to be recognized or awarded for their actions to their community,” Larmore said. “Despite their modesty and humbleness, every member of our organization has contributed to our success and I am thrilled to have been able to honor just a few of those men and women here today.” Also, for the second year, the department recognized successful resuscitations of patients who were in cardiac arrest. These were patients who were successfully resuscitated and discharged from the hospital with no deficit from their quality of life before their cardiac arrest. This comes after the Ocean City Fire Department adopted a High-PerforSee FIRE Page 14

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

OC upgrades OCFD pagers with new digital technology

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) As part of Ocean City’s continuing upgrade of emergency communications, the Ocean City Council on Tuesday approved buying the Ocean City Fire Department new digital pagers that will work with the public safety radio system upgrade anticipated for completion this summer. Emergency Services Director Joe Theobald asked for permission to procure 80 Unication model G4 pagers for the department to coincide with the system’s other improvements. The city in May 2016, entered into a contract with Eastern Communications to revamp its radio system to the P-25 digital standard. “We are still undergoing that upgrade,” Theobald said. He said when the contact was signed three years ago, paging technology had to enter the digital age. “Unfortunately, at the time, the paging component to alert the fire department was not available … it hadn’t been developed,” he said. “In the last 60 days a company has come out with a digital pager which is compatible to our radio system.” Theobald said the equipment had been vetted by Electronics Division Manager Bob Dimaio. “It worked flawlessly,” he said. Originally, the cost of 80 pagers was pegged at about $50,000, Theobald said, but the quotes from a trio of vendors showed that number to be high. “I have them back today and the total comes out to somewhere roughly a little over $43,600,” he said. “They will be the first batch that will go out to the fire department, with the rest of the analog pagers that are existing phased out over the course of budget years.” Councilman Mark Paddack asked about further pager purchases after this

first batch. “How many more do you project in the future?” he said. Theobald said compiling an inventory of existing analog pagers is in the works but he estimated the tally at a few hundred. Paddack also sought clarity regarding the advantages of digital versus analog pagers. Since both elements are operated on the P-25 digital standard, Theobald said anywhere the radio functions the pager would follow suit. “This will actually increase how far the pager will work,” he said. “That’s something that we had an issue with before with dead spots.” Councilman Tony DeLuca asked if the equipment cost would be funded through a Worcester County grant. Budget Manager Jennie Knapp confirmed non-allocated county funds would cover the unbudgeted purchase. “This is actually the grant that they give us in lieu of tax differential and it was more than I had put in the budget,” she said. “I always budget what they gave us the year before and they actually increased it this year.” Councilman John Gehrig inquired about the pagers’ longevity while also noting the manufacturer is offering a 30 percent discount for purchases prior to March 31. Theobald said the equipment comes with a five-year warranty, but that they typically last far longer. “In theory, as long as the radio system is running and the pager isn’t damaged, it should continue to operate,” he said. “That’s why it was time-sensitive that it come before you today [because] we’re saving a fair amount of money by buying them before March 31.” Councilman Matt James’ motion to approve allocating up to $44,000 for pagers was approved unanimously.

Fire awards tap top performers Continued from Page 12 mance CPR program that has increased the survival rate of patients to almost 40 percent, which is well above the national average of 11 percent. Award Recipients: Volunteer Firefighter of the Year: Jason L. Bloom Career Firefighter of the Year: Christopher M. Gee Paramedic of the Year: Ryan L. Cropper Member of the Year: David E. Hedges Training Award: Anthony J. Villani Jr. Chief’s Award: Michael T. Todd President’s Award: Robert D. Korb Incident Citations: Robert E. Magee, Thomas Ryan McCready, Christopher M. Gee, Christopher G. Weber, Christopher M. Barrs,

David H. Pruitt, Keith A. Bennett, Richard T. Koch Sr., Greg C. Dypsky, Michael A. Lecompte, Kyle Tanner, Steven H. Twilley, Mark T. Lloyd, Damian A. Jones, Ethan D. Hitch, Chrsitopher M. Gee, Brian L. Bond, Jeffery R. Aperance Jr., William C. Savage III. Active Years of Service Awards Five Years: Jeffery R. Aperance, Christopher M. Gee, Nicholas L. Kinhart, Eric M. Olson, Yvete M. Rode, Jason A. Williams, Ryan L. Whittington, Ryan C. Womer, David Quilter, Capt. Greg Dypsky, Anthony Sandulli, Jason L. Bloom, Guy Talbot Ten Years: Chief Chris Larmore, Chief Moe Cropper, Asst. Chief Connor Braniff, Scott Shuster, Kevin Knowles Fifteen Years: Joseph Sexauer Twenty Years: Chris Kehne, and Jerry Priestly.


MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

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OC examines dockless ride share By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Hoping to stay ahead of rapidly advancing technology, Ocean City government will investigate potential regulations for dockless bicycles and electric scooters, which have created unwelcome clutter on streets in cities in the U.S. and worldwide. Mayor Rick Meehan requested the topic be added for discussion during the Police Commission meeting on Monday. “I’ve been following this, and Baltimore’s having a big problem with stacks of bikes,” he said. OCPD Capt. Mike Colbert began researching the topic about nine months ago when the first requests for information were received. “It was about scooters as much as bikes,” he said. “That’s how the industry refers to them is bike share and then this new dockless electric scooter share.” Colbert said the District of Columbia, and more recently Baltimore, have become flooded with the newest wave of rentable ride options. “We’re all familiar … where there’s a bunch of docks that bikes are locked into and you can swipe your credit card and use the bike … and drop if off at another dock,” he said. “What happens with dockless bikes is they use wireless and other technology so that you don’t have to dock it.” Colbert said dockless bike/scooter companies typically make an effort to retrieve the two-wheelers that are randomly discarded by users. “Periodically, they have runners that go out and grab the bikes because they’re all on GPS and they can find them,” he said. “They’ll bring them back to a central area where most people pick them up.” Colbert said bike/scooter sharing services are largely marketed to professionals using public transportation to get near their workplace, but face challenges covering the “last mile,” of their commute. “Then you can grab one of these

bikes, ride it that last 10-15 blocks to work and then you just leave it out front,” he said. Colbert said bike/scooter ride sharing companies have developed a negative reputation due to common business practices within the industry. “If 200 bikes are about what’s needed, they’ll dump 300 in there and then another company will dump 300 and then another company will dump 300,” he said. “They quickly overload the area.” Colbert said users have also, often inadvertently, contributed to the growing trend. “People just stop riding them and just throw them up against a tree or a building,” he said. “Then they start to accumulate and there’s a lot of resistance to them because they become clutter.” Councilman Matt James asked if the city had legal recourse to remove abandoned dockless rides. Colbert said rides discarded on public property could be deemed abandoned. Dockless ride sharing companies now have a trade association that has offered clarity for its member businesses in terms of negotiating with local jurisdictions. “They’re whole concept is you have to go in with the municipality … and work … out an arrangement and maybe a contact,” he said. Commenting on James’ question regarding city staff removing rides, Meehan balked at the added responsibility. “That creates another job … that we really don’t’ need,” he said. Meehan also noted dockless electric scooters could cause problems if driven on sidewalks. “I can see where all of a sudden at the beginning of the season you get hundreds of these things dropped off in Ocean City,” he said. “My first question is can we prohibit these type of operations?” Although deferring to City Solicitor Guy Ayres for legal parameters, Colbert said options exist to reign in the activity.

“You can regulate them, and you can regulate them heavily,” he said. “There’s nothing that says they have a right to do that, particularly the electric scooters, there’s not a good definition under Maryland law.” Colbert said electric scooters would be restricted from use on sidewalks or the Boardwalk. “Guy (Ayres) could tell you if we can say, ‘no, we won’t allow them,’ but certainly we can put rules and regulations in place,” he said. Meehan suggested an outright ban on dockless ride share bikes or scooters. “Maybe that will change in the future as these companies develop and become more regulated [but] this could be a real nightmare,” he said. Although municipalities across Maryland are permitted to establish local regulations for dockless bikes/scooters, Colbert cautioned potential changes are brewing, as Uber finalizes negotiations to purchase an established dockless ridesharing business “Remember Uber’s whole idea in attacking the market is they go over and take the authority from local municipalities,” he said. “That would be our biggest fear that the state of Maryland passes something that allows these and restricts how we can regulate them on a local level.” Councilwoman Mary Knight also suggested coordinating efforts with the Worcester County Commissioners after suggesting that numerous dockless bikes could be abandoned in West Ocean City during the peak summer months. The Police Commission voted to send the issue to City Council to consider future action. with Meehan asking City Manager Doug Miller to consult with Ayres to obtain precise legal parameters. “I’m really concerned … that we could become a dumping ground for these bikes,” he said. “I think we would be inundated … right at the beginning of the season.”


MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

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MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

COUNTY COMMISSIONER BRIEFS By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Consulting work to test the central landfill facility’s groundwater for the 2019-20 calendar year was approved last Tuesday during a Worcester County Commissioners meeting. EA Engineering, Science, and Technology Inc., PBC, plans to sample and report on “groundwater, surface water and leachate” at the Newark facility. EA Engineering has a corporate office in Hunt Valley, Maryland, with satellite campuses nationwide, and a location in Ocean Pines, according to the company’s website. The consulting firm proposed conducting groundwater services that would cost $145,621.38, or $72,810.69 per year, according to John Tustin, director of the Worcester County Department of Public Works. The next two years were expected to be more expensive because of a 17 percent increase from the 201718 sampling costs. Commissioner Chip Bertino questioned the 17 percent increase, but Tustin explained it previously cost $175 per sample, and now costs $295 per sample. The Maryland Department of Environment’s refuse disposal permit stipulates the work is needed, according to the proposal. Current and future funding is available via the solid waste operating budgets. Commissioner Jim Bunting made a motion to approve the firm’s proposal, which was seconded by Commissioner Joshua Nordstrom.

In other business:

Replacement vehicles It looks like the Worcester County Department of Public Works will get to have their cake and eat it too – with an extra set of wheels on the side. Last June, the county commissioners approved the department’s current budget, which included replacement of a 1997 dump truck and a 1989 grader with a ‘V’ plow. This year, department officials said they wanted to keep the old vehicles for training purposes, according to a proposal presented last Tuesday. Bunting moved to use the vehicles for training purposes, and Commissioner Bud Church seconded it. The vote was unanimous.

Advertising surplus items

Pump purchase

Nearly 100 types of vehicles and equipment could be finding a new home. The county commissioners last Tuesday unanimously approved advertising the county-owned property for three weeks. After the advertising period concludes, there will be a public hearing where people can voice their concerns. The items will then go to auction, according to a memorandum. The vehicles include Chevrolet Silverados, Ford Crown Victorias and several types of Ford trucks, according to a list. Tractors, garage doors, air compressors, and other equipment will also be advertised. Bertino moved to advertise the surplus vehicles, and Bunting seconded the motion.

The process of purchasing two pumps for a pump station in West Ocean City was expedited after the commissioners unanimously voted to skip bidding requirements. The commissioners allowed the department to purchase the equipment from Sherwood-Logan, a Flygt brand pump supplier, for $37,625, according to the proposal. The 2018-19 water and wastewater budget allotted $40,000 for the pumps. Tustin said these specific pumps are used at stations countywide, and they “have proven themselves to be very reliable, durable and operator friendly.” Bunting made a motion to waive the bidding requirements, which was seconded by Commissioner Ted Elder.

Wor. celebrates women’s history (March 15, 2019) March is National Women’s History Month and The Worcester County Commission for Women and the Friends of the Worcester County Commission for Women will honor and celebrate women from the past, present and future. The theme for 2019 Women’s History Month is “Visionary Women: Champions of Peace and Nonviolence.” The Women’s History Luncheon will be held at the Clarion Resort Fontain-

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2019 Woman of the Year — Wendy Myers, Cricket Center director; 2019 Woman in History — Sheryl Mitrecic; Honorable Mention — Linda Dearing; 2019 Women of Tomorrow: Kaliyah Corbin, Pocomoke Middle School; Daniyah Smith, Stephen Decatur Middle School; Alexis Hudson, Snow Hill Middle School; T’Marah Cannon, Snow Hill Middle School; and Jessica Yankalunas and Sheyanne Aleshire, Snow Hill High School. For more information, call Eloise Henry-Gordy at 443-235-3214 or email Henrygordy1954@yahoo.com.

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MARCH 15, 2019

OCVFC using ride along as recruitment tool for program By Victor Fernandes Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The Ride Along Program has been part of the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company longer than 29-year veteran James L. Jester. Jester, the company’s president and first assistant chief, fondly recalls his first days on the job in Ocean City, when out-of-town firefighters joined him and fellow volunteers on fire calls. Not much has changed with the program these days, except the sheer importance of it. “Actually, we’ve never really pushed it until the past year. It’s always been there, but it’s never really been a focal point,” Jester, 53, said. But the focus has changed in the past year. Anyone expressing interest in becoming a firefighter immediately learns about the Ride Along Program. Anyone requesting information about programs Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company offers gets an earful about the program. The Ride Along Program has a more prominent place on the fire company’s website. “The reason why I wanted to put it on the front burner is because of our retention recruitment efforts,” Jester said. “It was a tool that I envisioned was being underutilized at the time. I wanted to move it up and try to bolster our recruitment efforts.” Jester said no graduates of the Ride Along Program currently belong to the Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company. Still, the program’s popularity has grown since Jester and his colleagues have made a more concerted effort to promote it. “I can tell you we had more people ride along last year than we’ve ever had ride along before,” Jester said of a program that received 85 applications in the final seven months of 2018 and 97 last year overall.

The Ride Along Program caters primarily to firefighters with at least some experience and primarily features visiting firefighters from out-of-town companies looking to sharpen their skills in Ocean City’s busy summer months. The program offers rides roughly every 10 days in the summer before scaling back extensively in the resort’s quieter offseason. Still, Jester said he believes better days for recruiting future firefighters lie ahead, especially if those firefighters share their experiences with family, friends and others. That may pique their interest in joining the program, Jester said, which may one day lead them to join him as a firefighter at Ocean City Volunteer Fire Company. “I don’t think that it’s going to bear fruit immediately,” Jester said, “because most people that are going to come do a ride along are people that live out of town and aren’t going to be able to give us the time that’s necessary to be a volunteer. I’m hoping we get it to aid our recruitment effort on the back end more so than it does on the actual front end.” Participants must have training or qualifications equal to the Maryland Fire I Certification to earn this opportunity, because they can fight fires while out on rides. That aspect of the program is why company officials shy away from having civilians on board. “We don’t let them wear the air packs and go into the interior,” he said. “But those individuals that participate in the program are able to fight exterior fire.” That always has been the case, as far back as Jester can remember. The Ride Along Program, he said, “was already there. We didn’t have to reinvent the wheel. All we had to do was dust it off and put it at the forefront, and that’s what we’re trying to do.”

Crabs to Go to get funding following PFA designation By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The Crabs to Go commercial properties received approval for state funding last Tuesday after the Worcester County Commissioners unanimously approved giving it the priority funding area designation. A priority funding area is an existing place or community that receives funding for growth as deemed by local government, according to a proposal from the Worcester County Department of Environmental Programs. Director Robert Mitchell said the Crabs to Go commercial properties were classified as S-1 (immediate or two years) in the master water and sewer plan. However, he added the properties

PAGE 19

Ocean City Today

“were not included when the areas were established by the county after the 1997 priority funding area law.” The Smart Growth Act of 1997 allows local government officials, like the Worcester County Commissioners, to choose areas they feel could benefit from state funding. Mitchell said he and Planning Director Ed Tudor, “agreed these properties merit [priority funding area] designation.” He added the property’s reclassification would also “help us with [funding for] a utilized bay restoration grant.” Commissioner Chip Bertino moved to approve the priority funding area request for the Crabs to Go commercial area, with a second from Commissioner Jim Bunting.

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PAGE 20

Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

Parking task force advised to pick its goals Continued from Page 1 “The task force is working together to guide the discussion to see what action, if any, should be taken,” he said. Kupferman said paid parking should be considered a tax that is designed for control purposes and a revenue source. Currently, it represents about $4 million annually for the resort. “It’s now counted on,” he said. “It’s budgeted, not found, money.” The percentage of parking revenue derived from tourists needs to be ascertained to quantify data to consider potential changes, Kupferman said. “We need to take care of [tourists] because they take care of us,” he said. McGean said the city has previously examined the revenue potential related to expanding paid parking. “We’ve done a lot of that work and have a decent idea,” he said. “It’s more difficult to figure out who is parking on the street right now.” McGean provided parking data for Ocean City, which has more than 2,500 paid parking spaces, including 569 on-street, 727 in municipal lots, and the inlet lot containing 1,271 spaces. Pricing is $2 per hour for onstreet and municipal lots, with the

inlet lot cost set at $3 presently. “We do have 28,000 living units, and condo owners may opt for street parking at times,” he said. McGean said among the points the task force has to weigh would be balancing on-street paid parking with the potential introduction of a residential permit program. “We need to look at it on a streetby-street level,” he said. McGean said that also would require defining who qualifies as a resident. “Does it extend to renters?” he said. Councilwoman Mary Knight said her initial assumption is the bulk of parking revenue is paid by visitors. “More residents know where free parking is,” she said. G. Hale Harrison, with the Harrison Group, said the scenario varies depending on the street location. “Lots of employees use free street parking,” he said. Kupferman reiterated the importance of data collection. “You need more data to discuss things and consider the impact,” he said. “It would be a knee-jerk reaction to reach a conclusion without data.” If enhanced revenue is obtained, Kupferman recommended the fund-

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ing be reinvested to improve the resort’s overall ambiance. “A safe, well-lit, clean environment makes it more palatable to pay for parking,” he said. To decide if a parking problem exists, the first step is to weigh supply and demand, Kupferman said. “We need to go out and count at the key times and quantify it,” he said, “Do it block by block and look to see if there is a demand issue.” Responding to a question about the number of times the inlet lot is full, McGean said peak car counts during the summer are typically limited to a few hours at night and the bulk of weekend days. “Is there a consensus in the room we don’t have a problem with parking during the week?” he said. “Do we feel on weekends we have a parking problem.” Councilman John Gehrig suggested the issue that needs to be addressed is a revenue shortage, not supply problems. Joe Groves, Delmarva Condo Managers Association, was more direct in his assessment. “We’re sitting here because the city needs revenue,” he said. “We’re $1.7 million short, that’s why we’re here.” Noting the finite number of parking spaces available in Ocean City, Kupferman said the larger question is if charging for parking would enhance revenue or ultimately lose money. “If it’s not a revenue issue, do it with time limits,” he said. “If revenue is the issue do it with paid parking.” Kupferman also said building a parking garage in Ocean City would likely be cost-prohibitive. “Building a paid parking garage is a very expensive proposition,” he said.

Kupferman said a 273-spot garage recently completed in his home state of Massachusetts cost just over $10 million, which equates to roughly $38,000 per space. While annual debt service payments for a 25-year loan at 4 percent interest is around $657,000, Kupferman said the resort would earn roughly $524,000 annually if the facility was rented fully at $2 hour for 8 hours daily over 120 days. “You only have a need for it four months a year and filling it every day for four months is still $100,000 short,” he said. “My company was founded to build parking garages ... but it is costly.” McGean concurred with that assessment, while noting the average earning value per parking space in Ocean City is no more than $20,000 annually. Kupferman also acknowledged that the idea of introducing paid parking can generate bad publicity. “This is what I do for a living, so I know people will come and pay for parking,” he said. “If the supply and demand is right, people will pay.” The challenge is balancing free, convenient and available parking options, Kupferman said. “Paid parking was not done for revenue originally, it was done to control,” he said. “How do we make it equitable for everyone?” Looking ahead to the next Parking Task Force meeting in two weeks, Kupferman suggested next steps should include analyzing current paid parking rates to see if they can be altered to improve revenue, consider lowering rates in certain areas and introducing a simplified rate structure for an easier user experience.

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MARCH 15, 2019

PAGE 21

Ocean City Today

sav ve 0.5 5% of you ur loan amount a u to $20,,000 up NEWCTION! U STR N O C

ING! LIST NEW

CT DIRE FRONT AN E C O

! TED T LIS JUS

T RON ERF WAT

9418 LAKEVIEW DRIVE OCEAN CITY

6325 KNOLL L HILL DRIVE, OCEAN CITY

10000 COAST TA AL HIGHWAY Y,, UNIT 803 ENGLISH TOWERS, OCEAN N CUTY

128 WINTER HARBOR DR OCEAN CITY

ANE 309 SCHOONER LA OCEAN CITY

Pre-Construction Pricing! 5BR/4BA Open & Airy Floor Plan, V Va aulted Ceilings, First Floor Masterr Suite and Master Bath, Walk-In Closest, Large Kitchen with Abundant Cabinets, Solid Surface e Counters, Island Bar, Breakfast Nook, Formal Dining Room, Additionally there is Second Firs st Floor Bedroom & Bath Great for the In-Laws, Laundry Room, Screened-In Porch, Rear Deck,, 2 Car Garage. MLS#1008135110 $475,000

Coastal Living at its Best! Open an nd bright floor plan, granite, stainless applia ances, geo thermal heat and cooling, 2 car garage, almost half acre, partially fenced. f Mins. to the beaches, golf courses and boat ramp. Bay views from deck. MLS# MDWO103194 $415,000

Beautiful, direct oceanfront 3 BR/2 BA, with open floor plan, oceanfrront master suite, and large balcony! Hop pe to see you there! MLS# 1007528728 $549,900

Canal Front Ranch style home. Short distance to the beach or just go outside on your waterfront deck.. A fisherman's dream at the beach! MLS# MDWO100408 $525,000

Beautifully maintaine ed townhome in Decatur Farm commu unity. Hardwood flooring, 9’ ceilings, new n hot water heater, garage. This beauty won’t w last long! MLS# MDWO104124 $189,000 $

T! RON ERF WAT

12624 SELSEY Y ROAD OCEAN CITY

203 S. HERON, UNIT 203D, BAYWA AYWA AT TCH III, OCEAN CITY

Unobstructed bay views! Dock your ss. boat out back! Easy bay/ocean acces 3 BR/2.5 BA A home with oversized garage. No HOA A Fees…No City tax. 1 Yr. Home Warranty included. included MLS#1003797418 $575,000

Immaculate 3 BR, 2 BA A unit with lots of upgrades. Never rented! Afforda able condo fees and well managed co ondo association. MLS# MDWO103640 $375,000

O SE T CLO

CH BEA

11 53RD STREET T,, UNIT 306 CONSTELLA AT TION HOUSE NORTH OC C Large 2 BR/2 BA A oceanblock cond do i great condition. in di i Close Cl to beach b h in a great area. MLS# MDWO101418 $239,900

10526 SUSSEX RD OCEAN CITY Amazing Waterfront home with views of the bay and Ocean City. Bring your boat, Deep Water Canal, 10,000 boat lift. Private Heated Pool MLS# 1009547846 $949,000

205 SOMERSET STREET T,, UNIT U 407B WHITE MARLIN, OCEAN CIITY Pristine condo with large deeded d slip, and incredible open bay b views. MLS# 1009636030 $359,90 00

T RON E ANF OCE THOUS N PE

USE N HO PM OPE 12PM-2 • 3/17

210 WORCESTER STREET T,, UN NIT 408 ASSA AT TEAGUE HOUSE, OCEAN N CITY Prime downtown, 3 BR/2 BA A condo o. Walking distance to all downtown OC has to offer! Oversized balcony offers stunning water view and gorgeous s sunsets! Recent updates. Move-in n ready! MLS# MDWO104016 $329,900

T ON FR TER A W

T RON ERF WAT

RATE UL WNDO UTIF BEA ONT CO FR

N! ATIO N! LOC ATIO O LOC

DED DEE SLIP T BOA

8500 COAST TA AL HWY Y,, ANTIQ QUA A #1305 OCEAN CITY Spacious 3 BR/3 BA A top flloor unit e best with arguably some of the views in Ocean City! MLS# 1008354916 $649,90 00 USE 2PM N HO OPE 7 • 11AM - 3/1 3/16

LOT 19 MASON ROAD, BERLIN Great opportunity to build your dream home on this secluded property p with no building restrictions and NO CITY TA T AXES! Minutes to local area attractions: Decatur Parrk, Berlin - OC & Assateague Beaches. Shopping, restaurants MLS# MDWO103388 $65 5,000 DS SAN DEN GOL #1703

10900 COAST TA AL HWY Y,, OCEAN CITY Most desirable high-rise in Ocean City! Beautiful 2BR/1 2BR/1.5 5 5BA A direct oceanfront condo! Non-rental shows owner pride! MLS#MDWO101406 $325,000 K LOC ANB OCE

301 14TH STREET T,, UNIT 108 LAGUNA A VIST TA A, OC CEAN CITY If you love the White e Marlin Open and want to be near the action, a this condo is it! Beautiful bayside e views, endless upgrades, and close e to everything Ocean City, MD has to offer. MLS# MDWO101500 0 $409,000 & IEW ! AT V L GRE GE POO HU

119 OLD LANDING ROAD, UNIT 304A OUR PLACE A AT T TH HE BEACH, OC 2 bed, 2 bath, fully y furnished condo with a huge pool and a close to the beach. MLS#MDWO10272 26 $249,900 K LOC ANB OCE

720 RUSTY ANCHOR ROAD,, UNIT 33C SUNSET COVE, OCEAN CITY

701 RUSTY ANCHOR ROAD D,, UNIT 21 SUNSET COVE, OCEAN CIT TY

13 78TH STREET T,, UNIT T 1W CARIBBEAN, OCEAN CITY

Waterfront townhouse. 1BR/1BA. Great G opportunity for a DIY or contractorr to remodel – as is condition. Recent exterior improvements by Condo Assoc. Canalside deck and upper pp balcony y. Clos se to bay. Quietly tucked away ffrom roa ads and Q traffic. MLS# MDWO103648 $147,900

Perfect beach getaway! Nev ver rented unit. Renovated and loaded with upgrades. 2 bedroom, 2 full bath townhome. MLS#MDWO103782 $229,900 0

Updated and bright ocean block condo with peak

2 BR/2 BA oceanblock co ondo in masonry building

view from balcony. Upgraded kitchen with granite

with elevator. View of oc cean and southern

and stainless, custom tile in bathrooms, large first

exposure. Excellent mid--town location. Close to

floor deck. Steps to beach, entertainment,

beach, enterntainment, shops, restaurants. Plus

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©2019 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC. Berkshire HomesServices and tth he Berkshire Hathaway H HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of the HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equaal Housing Opportunity. 1 On eligible fixed-rate and adjustable rate first mortgages, PenFed will give a promotional credit of .50% of the loan n amount not to exceed $20,000. To receive the maximum amo ount offered of $20,000, the loan amount must be $4 million. The averag promo savings is $1,416 $ as a lender credit. Available when obtaining an eligible mortgage through PenFed, using a network real estate agent and using our affiliated title providers. In states where PenFed does not have an affiliated title company, and in Florida, New Y Yo ork and T Te exas, members can choose their own title company and still be eligible for the promotion. The application of additional loan level pricing adjustment will be determined by various loan attributes to include but not limited to the loan-to-value (LTV) ratio, credit score, transaction type, property type, product type, occupancy, and subordinate financing. Promotion available for the purchase of a primary residence, second home or investment property only. The promotional credit cannot be used for the downpayment. Other restrictions may apply. On eligible fixed rate VA A mortgages, PenFed will give a promotional credit of 0.50% of the total loan amount. Loan amounts available up to Department of Veterans Affairs' (V VA A) 2019 loan limits for the One-Unit Limit. While a veteran may use the prom tion to acquire a property up to 2-units in size, the total loan amount will be based on the One-Unit (single-family residence) limit for the county in which the collateral is located. Veteran may finance the funding fee and still be eligible for the promotion credit even if the addition of the financed funding fee exceeds the county loan limit. Available when obtaining an eligible mortgage through PenFed, using a network real estate agent and using our affiliate title providers. In states where PenFed does not have an affiliated title company, and in Florida, New York and T Te exas, members can choose their own title company and still be eligible for the promotion. Promotion available for the purchase of a primary residence. Applicant is responsible for V VA A funding fee. Lender credit cannot be used for downpayment. Other restrictions may apply.


PAGE 22

MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

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MARCH 15, 2019

COMMISSIONER BID BRIEFS By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The Worcester County Commissioners approved bids for several projects, and allowed the county’s Department of Public Works to solicit bids for a sewer line-cleaning job at their meeting last Tuesday.

County roads project bid The commissioners unanimously approved a bid for paving approximately 15 miles of county roads. The work should be completed by June 14, according to a proposal. John Tustin, director of the Worcester County Public Works Department, said the plan is to resurface roughly 13.59 miles of county roads, 1.02 miles of road for the Roads Division of Public Works and 1.90 miles of road for the Solid Waste Division. Allan Myers, of Dover Delaware, was chosen to do the work. It’s expected to cost $1,020,692.40 to resurface the roads, $55,601 for the paving fabric and $160,908 for the road at the Solid Waste Division, according to a proposal. Of the five submitted bids, Tustin recommended Allan Myers as the low bidder. Commissioner Chip Bertino moved to approve the bid, and Commissioner Jim Bunting seconded it. The commissioners previously voted to allow the department to solicit bids during a Feb. 12 meeting. The projects will be covered by $1 million allocated in the FY19 general fund budget, as well as $500,000 drawn from the county fund balance, according to the proposal. Another $175,000 would come from separate funds to cover the central landfill lane for the Solid Waste Division. Tustin acknowledged the bidders’ common theme: cost. “Due to bids coming in higher than estimated, we will monitor the paving schedule and make [sure] any necessary adjustments reflect in our fall paving schedule as a priority,” he said in a proposal.

Resurfacing project bid The commissioners unanimously approved a bid for a paving project for slurry seal surfacing of nearly 13 miles of county roads. Two bids were submitted for the resurfacing efforts: Asphalt Paving Systems Inc., of Hammonton, New Jersey, for $464,798.34, and Slurry Pavers Inc., of Richmond, Virginia, for $475,998.30, according to the proposal.

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Ocean City Today

Of the two bids submitted, Tustin recommended Asphalt Paving Systems Inc., as the low bidder to complete the 12.73mile job, according to the proposal. There is $1 million allocated for road resurfacing projects as part of the FY19 general fund account, according to the bid proposal. An additional $500,000 is also available in the assigned fund balance. Commissioner Ted Elder made a motion to approve the bid, which Bunting seconded.

Selsey Road project bid The commissioners unanimously approved a bid to help bolster approximately 7.5 acres of marshes, beaches and upland in the Cape Isle of Wight community. Katherine Munson, planner for the county’s Department of Environmental Programs, said five bids were submitted, ranging from $43,603 to $90,000. The county commissioners entered into a $50,000 grant agreement with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources in September 2018 for design and permits, according to Munson’s memo. Munson said the grant was established to create a “shoreline stabilization a marsh restoration project using natural features, adjacent to the Selsey Road.” Of the five bids submitted, Environmental Programs Director Robert Mitchell recommended a low bid of $43,603 from Coastline Design. Commissioner Bud Church made a motion to approve Coastline Design, which Commissioner Joshua Nordstrom seconded.

WOC sewer line cleaning Bids are being solicited to clean and inspect the gravity sewer lines at the West Ocean City Service Area. There was $50,000 included in the 2018-19-budget to monitor the sewer lines, according to the bid proposal. Interested parties can get more information on bids at the Office of the County Commissioners at the Worcester County Government Center on One West Market St., Room 1103, in Snow Hill. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1 p.m. on April 9, and should have “Bid for Contract Number 580-19-01, Sewer Line Cleaning and Internal Inspection – West Ocean City” marked in the lower left hand corner. People should send them to the Office of the County Commissioners. Bunting made a motion to allow the project’s bid solicitation, and Elder seconded it. The vote was unanimous.

UPCOMING EVENTS OCEAN CITY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER:

JOE DIFFIE With Special Guest

JACKSON DEAN May 16th

THE DOO WOP PROJECT October 10th

November 8th

THE TEN TENORS November 29th

OAK RIDGE BOYS December 7th Ticketmaster 1-800-551-SEAT or visit the OC Box Office DELMARVACONCERTS.COM


PAGE 24

Ocean City Today

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MARCH 15, 2019

Trial continues for West OC man By Victor Fernandes Staff Writer (March 15) West Ocean City resident Matthew John Brown’s legal troubles will enter the court phase next week, when the 35-year-old’s trial for misdemeanor charges of second-degree assault and false imprisonment takes place next Friday at 9 a.m. at Worcester County District Court in Snow Hill. Brown faces up to 10 years in prison and $2,500 in fines stemming from a domestic dispute on Feb. 18 in West Ocean City that turned physical, according to the police report filed by a deputy from the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office. Brown is accused of assaulting a woman during what began as an argument. The report accuses him of slamming the woman into a wall and then into a door, slammed the door on her foot “causing her pain,” and squeezed her arms “with all his might causing (the female) to feel pain in her chest and difficulty breathing. The responding officer

arrived on scene moments after the woman called authorities for help. The officer, the report states, “observed that her upper bicep on her left arm was extremely red from where Matthew had taken her hold of her arm and slammed her into the doorway.” Witnesses corroborated the female’s account of the incident to police. Brown waived his right to an attorney at his initial court appearance on Feb. 18. He initially was held without bond before posting $25,000 bond on Feb. 22. Brown already faces drug charges stemming from an arrest made Dec. 18. Felony counts of possession of marijuana with intent to distribute and possession of PCP/LSD/Hallucinogen with intent to distribute headline four counts on which Brown faces trial on May 8. He also faces misdemeanor counts of possessing 10 grams or more of marijuana and possessing a controlled dangerous substance, not marijuana. He was criminally indicted on Jan. 15, and a summons was issued the following day.

Man faces 8 years after verdict By Victor Fernandes Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Cintelle Charles Schoolfield, 39, of Pocomoke City, faces the maximum of eight years in prison after being convicted of handgun possession and reckless endangerment on March 4 in Worcester County Circuit Court. Schoolfield will learn how he will serve April 3. Schoolfield pled guilty to those misdemeanor counts in Judge Beau H. Oglesby’s court. He also faced felony counts of first-degree and second-degree assault and firearm possession as well as a misdemeanor count of second-degree assault. But he wasn’t prosecuted for those charges. His conviction occurred five

months after being arrested on charges stemming from an argument with another man that was witnessed by an off-duty Pocomoke City police officer. The officer saw a handgun tucked into Schoolfield’s waistband as the argument progressed. After being alerted to the officer nearby, the report from the Office of the State’s Attorney for Worcester County states, Schoolfield said “I don’t care. I’ll shoot him too.” The officer left the area to retrieve his weapon when he heard a gunshot, and saw Schoolfield fleeing on foot. Schoolfield escaped arrest at that time, but he was later apprehended. He posted the $10,000 bond on Sept. 26 during his initial court appearance.


Lifestyle

Ocean City Today Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertainment, Events, Features, Music

Mar. 15, 2019

Page 25 Bars, restaurants to host parties for St. Patrick’s Day

Coastal Highway is filled with green as thousands of onlookers watch the 39th annual Ocean City St. Patrick’s Day parade last year. The 2019 parade will take place this Saturday, beginning at noon.

St. Patrick’s Day parade in Ocean City this Saturday By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The 40th annual St. Patrick’s Day parade in Ocean City, which takes place this Saturday, is the second largest in Maryland and will feature over 120 units. The Delmarva Irish-American Club sponsors the event, which will start at noon. Parade participants will line up on 61st Street and continues south along Coastal Highway past the 45th Street shopping center where spectators will find a free Irish festival along with the judges’ stand. “Anyone who knows and understands Ocean City, Maryland, will agree that the town’s energy emanates from the entrepreneurial spirit of its business community,” Dennis Roarty, former president of the Delmarva Irish-American Club, said. “It’s this spirit that gets behind the parade year after year.” The party on 45th Street will begin at 11 a.m. with green Guinness and domestic beers, Macky’s Bayside Irish coffee bar, musical entertainment by Kevin O’Brennan and the Shoreline Band, face painting, Irish apparel, raffles, food provided by Hooked and BJ’s on the Water, and

Believe in Tomorrow National Children’s Foundation float won the Best Overall award during the 39th annual Ocean City St. Patrick’s Day parade and festival, hosted by the Delmarva Irish-American Club, last year.

of course, corned beef sandwiches. “It is the busiest weekend of the year between now and Labor Day,” Buck Mann, current president of the Delmarva Irish-American Club, said. The festival will conclude around 3 p.m., although the festivities will continue all night in restaurants and bars throughout Ocean City.

The parade grows annually with at least 120 entries signed up to participate this year, as of Tuesday morning. They will be traveling from states including Maryland, Delaware and New York, as well as Washington D.C., for the event. Thousands of people view the paSee OCEAN Page 26

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Check out the dozens of St. Patrick’s Day parties at local bars and restaurants happening this weekend. Here are just some of the festivities taking place: • Seacrets, 49th Street, will host its Irie-ish Music Fest after the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade on Saturday. Get into the festivities starting tonight with John McNutt Band from 5-9 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. and Split Decision, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. Musical performances will take place all day, with a party starting at noon with JJ Roth and DJ Magellan from Ocean 98. Then, hear John McNutt and the Keltic Rock Warriors at 1 p.m. Or, at 1:30 p.m., head to the main stage to listen to Flip-n-Mickey’s. Around 4 p.m. the Ocean City Pipes and Drums are slated to make an appearance, followed by the Jim Long Band in the club and Cherry Crush at the tiki at 5 p.m. Lima Bean Rot will take the main stage at 6 p.m. and Shake 3x will rock the house in the tiki at 9:30 p.m. Finally, don’t miss The Benderz in the club at 10 p.m. On Sunday, during the St. Patrick’s Day Local’s “After Party,” from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., listen to Benderz Trio from 1-5 p.m. and DJ Bobby-O, 2 p.m. to midnight. Drink and food specials will be offered. To hear more, call 410-524-4900. • Duffy’s Tavern, 130th Street, will wrap up its 17 days of St. Patrick’s Day specials this Sunday. Tonight, hear Bob Hughes from 5-8 p.m. All weekend, choose from lunch and dinner specials including a Rueben or a Rachel, Shepherd’s pie, Irish lamb stew, bangers and mash, fish and chips or a lamb sandwich. Enjoy domestic drafts, bottles of Smithwicks and Harp and cans of Miller Lite for $3.17. Jameson will be available for $4.17 and Guinness for $5. Don’t miss performances by Chuck D and DJ Dutch on Saturday starting at noon, and Chuck D on Sunday. Brunch will be offered at 9 a.m. and will feature corned beef hash. Small prizes and giveaways will be featured throughout the weekend. For more information, call 410-2501449. • Coins, 28th Street, will feature food and drink specials all afternoon after the See PARTIES Page 27


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Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City St. Patrick’s Day parade celebrates 40 years

Corned Beef & Cabbage he

Continued from Page 25 rade each year along Coastal Highway. Many resort bars, restaurants, businesses and organizations have participated in the parade over the years including Seacrets, Jolly Roger Amusements, Believe in Tomorrow’s House by the Sea, BJ’s on the Water, Fager’s Island and Smitty McGee’s. New to the parade this year are the Bel Air Social Club, Tow Boats USA and New York firefighters. For many years, New Wave embroidery shop in West Ocean City has created the apparel for the parade. There will be sweatshirts and T-shirts available for sale during the event. Pipe and drum bands including the Chesapeake Caledonian Pipe Band, the Camden County Emerald Society Pipes & Drums and the Ocean City Pipe and Drum Band will be performing in the parade along with Stephen Decatur Middle School and Stephen Decatur and Sussex Central high school marching bands. “More than 40 years ago, St. Patrick’s Day was nearly a non-event in Ocean City,” Roarty said. “[Saturday] thousands of families will come to Ocean City to shake off the winter doldrums, dress in their green finery, watch the parade and celebrate the Irish in all of us.” Spectators can watch the parade from bleachers at the 45th Street shopping center or along Coastal Highway. To avoid traffic delays, viewers are urged to arrive before 10:30 a.m. and to view the parade from 57th Street south to 45th Street. For the fourth year, local NBC affiliate WRDE will broadcast the parade live beginning at 11:30 a.m., with hosts Matt Pencek, Madeleine Overturf and Dean Langrall. WBOC will also stream the event live. The best marching band, commercial float, non-commercial float, motorized unit, adult and youth marching unit, special committee award, top overall entry in the parade and judges’ choice award will take home trophies. “At exactly 12 noon, the pipes will swirl, the drums will beat, the flags will be unfurled,” Roarty said. “It’s time for the Delmarva Irish-American Club’s St. Patrick’s Day parade … and another Ocean City memory.” Leading the parade will be Grand Marshals Fran and Michael Patrick Kelly, along with Lillian Farrell, cultural affairs attaché from the Embassy of Ireland. The Kellys have owned property in Ocean City since 1994. They officially became residents of Ocean City in 2003. Fran is a member of the Delmarva Irish-American Club, where she heads the Membership Committee. In addition, she is an appointed

member of the Ethics Commission for the Town of Ocean City. She is also an active member of St. Luke Catholic Church where she enjoys volunteering and community fellowship. In 2003, Michael started his own company, OC Local Construction Services, and loves working with property owners in Ocean City. He is a member of the Delmarva IrishAmerican Club and an active member of St. Luke Catholic Church. “We love the St Patrick’s Day parade. It has been a family tradition for many years,” Fran stated in a press release. “We march together and carry the American and Irish flags proudly. We are humbled and honored to be the 2019 grand marshals.” Proceeds from the parade and festival go to local high school scholarships and charities. This year, donations will be contributed to the Stephen Decatur High School band. Sponsors for this year’s parade are Seacrets, Fager’s Island, Shenanigan’s Irish Pub, Original Greene Turtle, Tap House, Fish Tales and Jolly Roger Amusements. The Delmarva Irish-American Club, founded in 1980, has awarded more than $500,000 in scholarships with money raised during the parade going toward local organizations such as Coastal Hospice, Northside Park, Stephen Decatur High School and Ocean City Elementary School. The club now has about 300 members and is open to anyone who is Irish, Irish at heart or who just appreciates all things Irish. For more information, visit www.delmarvairish.org or contact Buck Mann at 410-289-6156. Traffic delays: In order to offer an ample amount of space for the parade’s participating floats, bands and motorized units, southbound traffic with be reduced to one lane from 63rd Street to 43rd Street on Saturday. Northbound traffic will remain open; however, no left turns or Uturns will be allowed along the parade route from the northbound lane including 62nd Street. Residents and visitors will see traffic delays on southbound Coastal Highway as early as 9 a.m. and should expect congestion until after 2 p.m. To avoid traffic delays, viewers and visitors are urged to arrive before 10:30 a.m. Ocean City Police are recommending motorists entering the Town of Ocean City use Maryland Route 50, as traffic is not expected to be as heavy in the south end of town. In addition, heavy pedestrian traffic is also expected along the parade route and in surrounding areas. Pedestrians are encouraged to use crosswalks and cross with caution.


MARCH 15, 2019

Parties planned at bars and restaurants in Ocean City Continued from Page 25 parade. Choose from corned beef, cabbage and potatoes and cod fish cakes while listening to live Irish music provided by Dave Pendrick from the Craythur brothers from 1-6 p.m. For more information, call 410-2893100. • Whisker’s Pub, 118th Street, will offer happy hour specials from 4-7 p.m. this weekend, as well as corned beef and cabbage, fish and chips, a half-pound of large shrimp for $7.95. Get $4 Guinness and Irish coffee or $2 Rolling Rocks. For more information, call 410-5242609. • Brass Balls, 11th Street Boardwalk, reopens for the season today, Friday, with Shamrockin’ Karaoke at 9:30 p.m. tonight and Saturday. Sing traditional Irish Karaoke and receive a free beer. Also enjoy $5 Irish coffees and drink specials all weekend. For more information, call 410-2890069. • Pickles Pub, Eighth Street, will feature several drink and food specials along with musical acts throughout St. Patrick’s Day weekend. Enjoy drinks including Irish Car Bomb, Dirty Leprechaun, Frosty Irishman, Clover Crush or the Pickleback. Choose Irish food specials like a Reuben, Shepherd’s pie or corned beef sliders. Also available will be Bud or Bud Light for $4, a pint of Guinness for $6 and Miller Lite green beer for $4. Tonight, rock out to Side Project from 6-10 p.m. then Beats by Jeremy, 10 p.m. to close. On Saturday, hear City Painted Green from 1-5 p.m., followed by Beats by Casper from 5:30-9:30 p.m. and end the night with Beats by Dutch from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. On Sunday, March 17, enjoy Beats by Jeremy, 1-6 p.m., and Joey Harkum Band from 8 p.m. to midnight. For more information, call 410-2894891. • Shenanigan’s, Fourth Street Boardwalk, will celebrate its 30th St. Patrick’s Day weekend with various musical acts, as well as drink and food specials. Listen to James Gallagher and Off the Boat, Patrick McAllorum, Tig Tignor and special appearances by the Chesapeake Caledonia and the Ocean City Pipe Bands this weekend. The establishment will open today, Friday, at 11 a.m. for the St. Patrick’s Day Pre-Game Party. Guests are invited to enjoy drinks and food specials on Saturday and Sunday. The restaurant will open at 9 a.m. both days. For more information, visit www.ocshenanigans.com or call 410-289-7181. • Dunes Manor, 28 Street, will have lunch and dinner specials all weekend. Choose from bangers and mash, corn beef and cabbage, Shepherd’s pie and an

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Ocean City Today

Irish coffee for $7.13. Or get a pint of Killian’s Red, a pot of tea with soda bread, a cup of soup or carrot cake for $3.17. On Saturday, March 16, take part in an Irish singalong with Ms. Shirley in the lobby from 1-5 p.m. Guests are invited to sing and/or bring instruments. For more information, call 800-5232888. • Clarion, 101st Street, will offer $1 draft beers all day March 16 and 17. Lunch specials for $6.95 include a bowl of Irish cabbage and barley soup or hot/cold corned beef sandwiches on rye. From 5-10 p.m. get a corned beef, cabbage and potato dinner for $12.95. On the Edge will perform Friday and Saturday, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. DJ Dusty will spin tunes tonight, 9 p.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call 410-5243535. • Crab Bag, 131st Street, will offer corned beef specials and happy hour prices all day Saturday. For more information, call 410-250-3337. • Albertino’s, 131st Street, will offer happy hour specials all weekend. For more information, call 410-250-2000. • Longboard Café, 67th Street, will offer its happy hour two-for-one special from 5-6 p.m. all weekend. On Sunday, March 17, enjoy a Reuben sandwich with fries for $8.95 or Mama Denise’s Reuben meatloaf with green beans and roasted red potatoes for $12.95 from 5 p.m. to close. For more information, call 443-6645639. • Dry 85/Red Red Wine Bar, 48th Street, will shut down 48th Street for its St. Patrick’s Day block party. Dry 85 and Red Red Wine Bar will have beer and food tents as well as an Irish coffee bar set up outside the establishments. Sandwiches and desserts will be available, as well as different beers such as Dogfish, Miller Lite, Flying Dog Pearl Necklace and Redheaded Stepchild. Dry 85 will also serve brunch at 9 a.m. For more information, call 800-5232888. • OC 360, in the Fenwick Inn, 138th Street, will offer $13 lunch and dinner specials from noon to 1 a.m. on Saturday, March 16. Food specials include bangers and mash, corn beef and cabbage, fish and chips, Shepherd’s pie. Entrees come with a non-alcoholic drink and dessert. Drink and craft beer specials also available. For more information, call 410-2501100. • Fish Tales, 22nd Street, reopens for St. Patrick’s Day weekend today, Friday, at 11 a.m. The bayside restaurant will have a parking lot food tent, live bagpipes and limited-edition apparel for sale on Saturday. Enjoy $3 green beer, $4 Guinness pints and $5 Irish coffee and Jameson shots. See FOOD Page 28

BEST HAPPY Y HOUR ON THE E BEACH HAPP PY HOUR 3-6PM M DRINK SPEC CIALS 7 DAYS A WEEK

STARTIING MARCH H 1ST

17 Daays y off St.t Patrick a kss Day FOO OD SPECIALS

• Famous a s Corned Beef & Cabbbage “Best Brisk ket On The Beach” $1 $ 0.99 • Reuben $8.99 • Rachels $8.99 • Shepherds Pie $9.999 9 • Irish Lamb Stew $6.99 9 • Bangers & Mash $9.99 • Famous Fish & Chips $8.99 • Lamb Sammy - Um Um Goood! with Red Potatoes & Gravy $9.99

DRIINK SPECIALS Domestic drafts $3.17 Miller Liight 16 oz.cans $3 3.17 Smithwickss & Harp (bottles) $3.17 J Jameson $ 17 • Guinness $4 $4. G i $5 00 $5.

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• 410.250 130TH ST. BA B YSIDE Y 0.1449


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Ocean City Today

Food and drink specials available Continued from Page 27 For more information, call 410-2890990. • Cowboy Coast, 17th Street, will host the annual OC Fools Sham Jam tonight, Friday. Doors open at 5 p.m. and a $10 donation includes a souvenir pint glass to fill with beer and liquor specials. Get $5 ice Jameson shots, beer and drink specials, and Sham Jam T-shirts for sale, which cost $20 each. Johnny Bling will be providing music from 7 p.m. to midnight. DJ Wax takes over until 2 a.m. On Saturday, Sam Grow will perform from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. Cost is $10. For more information, call 410-2501449. • Carousel, 118th Street, will offer $10 food and $4 drink specials all weekend for St. Patrick’s Day. For more information, call 800-6410011. • Bourbon Street on the Beach, 116th Street, will feature specials on all Irish drinks plus Irish fare including Shepherd’s pie and corned beef and cabbage. Enjoy music by OHO from 3-7 p.m. and Kevin Poole at 7 p.m. on Saturday and Randy Jamz on Sunday at 6 p.m. For more information, call 443-6442896. • Ocean 13, 13th Street Boardwalk, will play Irish music loud and proud all weekend. The Boardwalk establishment will offer Irish food specials, traditional Irish coffee for $6, kegs and eggs all day on both Saturday and Sunday. Choose from $3 Natty Boh cans, $8 Frozen lucky charms and $5 Jameson. For more information, call 410-2896213. • Tailchasers, 122nd Street, will offer drink and food specials throughout the weekend, with happy hour prices 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and allday Sunday. For more information, call 443-6647075. • BJ’s on the Water, 75th Street, will have a live bagpipe performance after the parade at 2 p.m., Saturday. Choose from corned beef, red potatoes and cabbage for $7.99 or Mulligan’s Stew for $6.49 over the weekend from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Enjoy drink specials including a bucket of rocks for $7, Irish Coffee for $5 and Coors Light, Miller Lite and Natural Lite for $2.50. Or grab a mug of green beer for $1.75 or $3 for a pint. Tonight, hear Over Time at 9 p.m. Catch Identity Crisis from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Saturday. For more information, visit www.bjsonthewater.com. • The Frog Bar, Boardwalk in the Inlet Village, reopens for the season with free parking for customers this St. Patrick’s Day weekend. Enjoy $3 frog shooters and $6 orange crushes from open to close. Also find 2019 St. Patrick’s Day apparel.

For more information, call 410-2893764. • Fager’s Island, 60th Street, will have an after-parade party from 2 p.m. Saturday until 2 a.m. Sunday. On Saturday, enjoy music by DJ Greg beginning at 2 p.m. on the deck or Opposite Directions on stage. DJ RobCee will be on the deck at 5 p.m., DJ Groove at 9 p.m., and Animal House at 9:30 p.m. on stage. The restaurant will also be serving corned beef and cabbage, fish and chips and Guinness on tap. For more information, call 410-5245500. • Johnny’s Pizza Pub, 56th Street, will open early for breakfast St. Patrick’s Day weekend. Enjoy Bloody Mary’s, mimosas, Irish coffees, Jameson and Irish Car Bombs. For more information, call 410-7235600. • Captain’s Table, 15th Street, will provide Sunday brunch from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. On Saturday, enjoy corned beef specials at 5 p.m. and $5 drink specials include house wines, rail drinks and beer. Hear Phil Perdue at 5:30 p.m., Friday and Saturday. For more information, call 410-2897192. • Skye Bar, 66th Street, will offer drink specials from 11:30 a.m. until closing this weekend. Get Smirnoff crushes for $6.50, $7 Irish coffees and mules and $2.75 green drafts. Also enjoy food specials including fish and chips, corned beef and cabbage and Reubens. Check out Test Kitchen tonight from 5-8 p.m. and Marcella “Mc” Peters, Saturday, 5-8 p.m. For more information, call 410-7236762. • Hooters, Route 50 in West Ocean City, enjoy corned beef and drink specials all weekend. Also check out the Fifth Street location on the Boardwalk, which reopens for the season. At the West Ocean City location, listen to OC Pipes & Drums and DJ BK, 4 p.m. on Friday, then come back on Sunday to dance to Blake Haley from 3-7 p.m. Choose from $3 Miller Lite and Bud Light, fried pickles and $2.50 pickle shots. For more information, call 410-2131841. Ocean Pines: • Whisker’s Bar and Grill, Ocean Pines shopping center, enjoy live music by John Heinz Fiddle, Fire and Friends from 3-8 p.m. and corned beef and cabbage platters, as well as several drink specials including $1.25 Jell-O shooters, $2.75 16-ounce green beer drafts, $3.17 16-ounce Shamrock Bud Light and Guinness cans and $4.17 Irish coffee. For more information, call 410-2083922 or visit www.whiskersbar.com. West Ocean City:

• Sunset Grille, Sunset Ave., specials will be offered at the Teaser’s bars only from 12-8 p.m., Saturday, for corned beef brisket, corn beef and Swiss sandwiches, Irish Disco fries and a smashed burger. Order $5 green tea shots, $6 Titos, $3 Miller and Coors Lite, $4 Irish stout and $5 Slane whiskey. For more information, call 410-2138110. • Caribbean Joe’s, Route 50, will offer food and drink specials today, Friday, through Sunday. Enjoy Irish specialty drinks and corned beef and cabbage from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. The restaurant will be open five days a week after St. Patrick’s Day weekend, Wednesday through Sunday. For more information, call 443-6648509. Also providing Irish-inspired entertainment this Saturday are four West Ocean City restaurants collaborating together in a HarBar crawl. Participants can take a free shuttle from the West Ocean City Park and Ride to get to all four locations. Guests who visit each spot will receive a prize from Slane Irish Whiskey and Miller Lite. The four restaurants include Mad Fish, Haborside, Crab Alley and Micky Fin’s. Attendees can receive a $5 off Uber code. • Harborside, Harbor Road, will offer drink and food specials all day Saturday, with a DJ Billy T during the day and DJ BK from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. On Friday, get a head start on the festivities with DJ Billy T from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. and end the weekend on Sunday with Opposite Directions from 2-6 p.m. and DJ Billy T from 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. For more information, call 410-2895121. • Mad Fish, Harbor Road, will offer discounted beers such as Tall Tales, Redheaded Stepchild and Miller Lite during the HarBar crawl on Saturday. Other drink offers include green tea shots and Slane Irish Whiskey. The restaurant will hold a cornhole tournament and music provided by DJ Shawn Lewis. For more information, call 410-2132525. • Micky Fin’s, Inlet Isle Lane, will participate in the HarBar crawl event this Saturday will live music from Full Circle from 3-7 p.m. Choose from $10 specials on Sunday from corned beef and cabbage, fish and chips and Shepherd’s pie from 11:30 a.m. until supplies run out. For more information, call 410-2139033. • Crab Alley, Golf Course Road, listen to music by DJ Biggler and enjoy an oyster frenzy from 12-3 p.m. or choose a soup and sandwich combo for $15, as well as several specialty Irish drinks on Saturday. Happy hour prices will be offered from 3-6 p.m. For more information, call 410-2137800.

MARCH 15, 2019

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Your thoughts and actions may be spurred on by your emotions this week, Aries. It may be better to wait a few days to make decisions until things quiet down. TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, you could be in for a roller coaster ride this week, especially as it pertains to spending. Money could fly out of your wallet faster than you can earn it. Exercise caution. GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, as long as you have a solid team in your corner, you can adapt well to the changing environment. However, even a superhero needs a break from time to time. CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Overcome your resistance and listen to another person’s side of the story, Cancer. Embrace letting this person take the lead on something at work or in your home life. LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Friends are lining up to be helpful over the next few days, Leo. Take advantage of their generosity, especially if you find yourself feeling under the weather. VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, the personalized touches you put on any project will showcase your personality and passion. Think about embracing a crafty task to really display your talents. LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, on the surface, it may seem like you have your act all together. But beneath your emotions may be roiling. You may want to let some close people in on your secrets. SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 So many things hinge upon balance, Scorpio. Make a concerted effort to balance things in your life. You may have to make some changes and experiment. SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 Your inclination to meet the needs of others this week is commendable, Sagittarius. Just be sure your generosity does not come at the expense of your own well-being. Capricorn, there is nothing wrong with seeing the world through rose-colored glasses from time to time. Such a positive perspective might change your outlook for good. AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 You are adept at staying on track when you need to, Aquarius. This makes you an ideal fitness guru. Try to inspire others to be regimented as well. PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20 Pisces, do your best to honor requests from friends, associates and family this week. If you pull it off, take some time to recharge.


MARCH 15, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Annual Sham Jam at Cowboy Coast, Friday By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) St. Patrick’s Day weekend festivities kick off tonight, Friday, during the 12th annual Sham Jam, with drink specials, live music by Johnny Bling and a 50/50 raffle at Cowboy Coast on 17th Street. The event benefits the Ocean City FOOLS (Fraternal Order of Leatherheads Society) Chapter and the Na-

tional Fallen Firefighters Foundation. “It’s a gathering of a good bunch of people throughout the town,” FOOLS Chapter President Tim Jerscheid, said. “You don’t have to be a firefighter or police officer to attend [and] it’s open to the public. It’s a good time and it is an event that is fairly cheap for people.” Doors open at 5 p.m. for Sham Jam, where a $10 donation includes a souvenir pint glass to fill with beer and liquor specials offered during the event. Also available will be $5 ice Jameson shots, beer and drink specials, and Sham Jam T-shirts for sale, which will cost $20 each. Johnny Bling will be providing music from 7 p.m. to midnight, before DJ Wax takes over until 2 a.m. In addition, the Camden County

Pipes and Drum Band are scheduled to make an appearance. Attendees can participate in a 50/50 drawing, take a ride on the mechanical bull, or enjoy food specials provided by Cowboy Coast. There will also be Jameson giveaways. Sham Jam has outgrown several local venues since its inception. This is the third year Cowboy Coast has hosted the event with over 1,000 people attending last year. “The majority of people we have actually come back through the years,” Jerscheid said. “They found out what our event is about, and it’s something to lead up to the [St. Patrick’s Day] parade on Saturday.” Last year, around $10,000 was raised for the Ocean City FOOLS and National Fallen Firefighters Foundation, he said.

“Through the years between the event we have on St. Patrick’s Day and during the Firemen’s convention we’ve given almost $50,000 to the Fallen Firefighters Foundation,” Jerscheid said. The National Fallen Firefighters Foundation is a nationwide effort to remember America’s fallen firefighters and provide resources to assist their survivors. “We’re an organization of firefighters who go out to raise money to support the Fallen Firefighters Foundation,” Jerscheid said. “It pays for the transportation and supplies for the families.” For more information on the local FOOLS chapter, visit the Ocean-CityFOOLS-Alpha-Chapter on Facebook or www.ocfools.com. Learn more about the Fallen Firefighters Foundation at www.firehero.org.

SHAKE YOUR SHAMROCKS WITH THE HOOTERS GIRLS

Kurt Leinemann, 16, of Ocean City, will officially become an Eagle Scout after dedicating a World War I statue to the American Legion Synepuxent Post #166, on 24th Street, March 15.

Scout to dedicate restored statue to American Legion By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Kurt Leinemann, Ocean City resident and member of Boy Scout Troop 261, will dedicate a 48-inch World War I statue he restored for his Eagle’s Scout project at the American Legion on 24th Street, today, Friday, at 4:30 p.m. The date of the dedication, March 15, is also the 100th anniversary of the founding of the American Legion, which took place in Paris, France, in 1919. Leinemann’s statue will become a permanent fixture at the American Legion. “We had a statue, a concrete statue, of a World War I figure donated and it was all cement,” Post Commander Tom Wengert said. “This young boy had to physically sand it down. He could use no power tools at all. He physically sanded it all down, power washed it ... and it came out beautiful and he [put] two coats of clear seal on it.” Leinemann, 16, also went down to City Hall, and received two permits; one for a concrete slab to install the statue on, and another to dig for six posts so that he could put a chain link fence around the memorial. See PROJECT Page 31

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Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Enjoying music at Bourbon Street on the Beach on 116th Street, Sunday, are Bill Magargle, of West Ocean City, and Cheryl Middleton of Baltimore.

Scott Wable and Stacey Snyder of Ocean City order some drinks at Bourbon Street on the Beach on 116th Street, Sunday, March 10.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Antionette Nazar, left, celebrates her husband Dan’s birthday with friend, Rachel Peck, all of Ocean City, at Bourbon Street on the Beach on 116th Street, Sunday.

Doug and Veronica Balch, of Salisbury, listen to music at Bourbon Street on the Beach on 116th Street, Sunday.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Steve Horseman and Chrissy Franciotti, of Salisbury, visit Bourbon Street on the Beach on 116th Street, Sunday, March 10.

Film Festival Organizer William Strang-Moya poses for a photo with his fiancé, Kristin Helf, during the Ocean City Film Festival Awards ceremony at Seacrets on 49th Street, Sunday.


MARCH 15, 2019

PAGE 31

Ocean City Today

Project will earn Pine’eer Club recognizes Smith Leinemann rank of Eagle Scout Continued from Page 29 “For my project, I restored the statue and installed a concrete footer at a depth of 18 inches and two feet by two feet, all concrete reinforced with steel, and then [placed] a second layer. I’m mounting the statue on that with tile on top,” Leinemann said. The project took Leinemann three weeks to complete. He finished the last segment of the slab Wednesday morning. After completing this project, Leinemann will earn the rank of Eagle Scout. “It feels fantastic,” Leinemann said. “This has been on my mind for a long time and it’s something I’ve worked seven years to [get] to this point. It’s very exciting. I was a Cub Scout when I was 9. I’ve been in the Boy Scouts since I was 11, so it’s been almost six years. “I wouldn’t be able to do what I did, and I wouldn’t have the same opportunities if it weren’t for the Boy Scouts program,” he continued. “[Also,] I’m very happy that they’ve now included girls into the mix. I think that’s a good step.” After the dedication, the American Legion will hold a spaghetti dinner from 5-8 p.m. with both meat and meatless tomato sauce, garlic bread, salad, and homemade desserts. There

(March 15, 2019) The Pine’eer Craft Club announces the Crafter of the Month for March is Helen Smith. Helen received her BA from the University of Maryland and a MFA from Catholic University. She taught art in Montgomery County Public Schools for 26 years and was county supervisor for art, theater and dance

will be a silent auction, 50/50 raffle, door prizes and several other activities, including the “arrest” of Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan. “The Boy Scouts are putting Mayor Meehan inside of a jail … a make-up jail and they’re getting donations to bail him out of there,” Wengert said. The event is open to the public. “The more the merrier,” Wengert said. Tickets cost $8 per person, $5 for children ages 12 and under. All proceeds from the event will go to Boy Scouts Troop 261 and Girl Scouts Troop 621. On Saturday, March 16, to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, the American Legion will offer a corned beef and cabbage meal for $9. More than 700 pounds of corned beef will be cooked for the event. Beer will also be available. Doors open at noon. For more information, call 410289-3166.

for 10 years. As an artist and photographer she is inspired by the artwork of impressionist such as Monet, Van Gogh and Degas. She identifies with photo-realists such as Estes, Close and Hanson. Their influence can be seen in her seascapes and landscapes of coastal Delmarva, North Carolina and California. Each of her paintings depicts a colorful and personal response to the subject matter. Her paintings have been featured in the Spotlight Gallery at the Art League of Ocean City. Smith’s art can be seen along with the work of other artists and crafters at the Pine’eer Artisan and Gift Shop, in White Horse Park in Ocean Pines. The shop is open every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The Pine'eer Craft Club announces the Crafter of the Month for March is Helen Smith.

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PAGE 32

MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

NOW PLAYING BJ’S ON THE WATER

SALOON AND STEAKHOUSE

75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com March 15: Over Time, 9 pm. March 16: Bagpipers, 2 p.m.; Identity Crisis, 9 p.m. March 20: 2 Guys & A Mama, 6 p.m.

17th Street and Coastal Highway Ocean City 410-289-6331 www.cowboycoastoc.com March 15: OC Fools Sham Jam w/Johnny Bling, 5 p.m. March 16: St. Pat’s Party w/Sam Grow, noon

BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH

DUFFY’S TAVERN

116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium Ocean City 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com March 15: Ricky & Lennon LaRicci, 7 p.m. March 16: OHO, 3-7 p.m.; Kevin Poole, 7 p.m. March 17: Randy Jamz, 6 p.m. March 20: Reform School, 6 p.m.; Open Mic, 9 p.m. March 21: Chris Button, 7-10 p.m.

130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com March 15: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m. March 16: Karaoke w/DJ Chuck D, 8 p.m. to midnight

BRASS BALLS SALOON Boardwalk, between 11th and 12th streets Ocean City 410-289-0069 March 15-16: ShamRockin Karaoke, 9:30 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. COINS 28th Street and Coastal Highway Ocean City 410-289-3100 www.coinspub.com March 16: Dave Pedrick, 1-6 p.m. COWBOY COAST COUNTRY

HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com March 15: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 16: DJ Billy T, all day; DJ BK, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 17: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. March 21: Dust N’ Bones, 6 p.m. HOOTERS 12513 Ocean Gateway West Ocean City 410-213-1841 www.hootersofoc.com March 15: OC Pipes & Drums and DJ BK, 4 p.m. March 17: Blake Haley, 3-7 p.m. OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9

p.m. to 2 a.m. March 15-16: On The Edge, 9:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. PICKLES 706 Philadelphia Ave. Ocean City 410-289-4891 www.picklesoc.com March 15: Side Project, 6-10 p.m.; Beats By Jeremy, 10 p.m. March 16: City Painted Green, 1-5 p.m.; Beats by Casper, 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Beats by Adam Dutch, 10 p.m. March 17: Beats by Jeremy, 1 p.m.; Joey Harkum, 8 p.m. March 18: Beats by Jeremy, 9 p.m. March 21: Beats by Wax, 9 p.m. PURPLE MOOSE SALOON 108 S. Atlantic Ave. Ocean City 410-289-6953 www.purplemoosesaloon.com March 15-16: CK the DJ/VJ, 2 p.m.; CK the VJ/DJ, 9 p.m.; Vertigo Red, 10 p.m. March 17: CK the DJ/VJ, 2 p.m. SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com March 15: John McNutt Band, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Split Decision, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. March 16: Irie-ish Music Fest: St. Patrick’s Day Party, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.; JJ Roth & DJ Magellan, noon to 5 p.m.; John McNutt’s Keltic Rock Warriors, 1-4 p.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 1 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Flip-N-Mickeys, 1:30-5:30 p.m.; Ocean City Pipes & Drums, 4-4:30 p.m.; DJ Davie, 4 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.; Jim Long Band, 5-9 p.m.; Cherry Crush, 5-9 p.m.; Lima Bean Riot, 6-10 p.m.; DJ Tuff, 6 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Shake 3X, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.; The Benderz, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m.

March 17: St. Patrick’s Day Local’s “After Party,” 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.; Benderz Trio, 1-5 p.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 2 p.m. to midnight March 21: Opposite Directions, 5-9 p.m. SHENANIGAN’S IRISH PUB AND GRILLE 309 N. Atlantic Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7181 www.ocshenanigans.com March 15: James Gallagher & Off the Boat plus Tig Tignor, 8 p.m. March 16: Patrick McAllorum, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; James Gallagher & Off the Boat plus Tig Tignor, 2 p.m. to close; Appearances throughout the day by Chesapeake Caledonia, Trenton and Ocean City Pipe & Drum Bands March 17: James Gallagher & Off the Boat plus Tig Tignor, 2 p.m.; Appearances throughout the day by Ocean City Pipe & Drum Band SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-6762 www.skyebaroc.com March 15: Test Kitchen, 5-8 p.m. March 16: Marcella “Mc”Peters, 5-8 p.m. TRADER LEE’S LIVE 9935 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 443-614-4119 March 16: Trader Lee’s House Band, 8 p.m. March 17: Deviation by Design, 5 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 www.whiskersbar.com March 15: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey March 16: John Heinz Fiddle, Fire & Friends, 3-8 p.m.

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The film “End the Silence” wins the People’s Film award during the Ocean City Film Festival Awards ceremony at Seacrets on 49th Street, Sunday, March 10. Pictured, from left, are E.L Myrieckes, of Berlin, Delaware resident Allen Cramer, Javenna Myrieckes, of Berlin, and Kyle Tingle of Delaware.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Enjoying the Ocean City Film Festival Awards ceremony at Seacrets on 49th Street, Sunday, from left, are, Rylie Doyle and Emmi and Alayne Shockley, of Ocean City.

Julian Sadur, left, a judge for the Ocean City Film Festival, poses for a photo with filmmaker Trevor Taylor, both of Salisbury, during the awards ceremony at Seacrets, Sunday.


MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 33

Handbell festival returns to Ocean City this Saturday By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The annual Handbell Musicians of America Area 3 performance will take place on Saturday, inside the second-floor ballroom of the Ocean City convent center on 40th Street, beginning at 5 p.m. The 30-minute concert will consist of nine handbell compositions rung by more than 400 musicians, comprised of 46 choirs. Doors open at 4:45 p.m. for the free performance. “It’s a bell small enough for an individual to ring,” Paul Brill, chair for the Handbell Musicians of America Area 3 Ocean City festival, said. “We hold one in each hand, and [play] the whole scale of music of the diatonic scales … from C, C sharp, D, D sharp and so forth. Think of the hand bell set as being like a big keyboard and each person is responsible for roughly two, maybe four bells. “The idea is like any other big festival. You get people together, whether it’s a choir festival or instrumental or anything else, and you get people together that enjoy the same thing,” he continued. “They work on the music and they have the satisfaction of ringing with a lot of other handbell ringers.” Jason Krug and Kyler Brengle are

The annual Handbell Musicians of America Area 3 performance will take place Saturday inside the second-floor ballroom of the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street, beginning at 5 p.m. The 30-minute concert will consist of sacred and secular handbell compositions rung by more than 46 choirs. Doors open at 4:45 p.m. for the free performance.

slated to be guest conductors during this year’s performances. On Friday, musicians will rehearse from 6:30-9:30 p.m. after registration. “We come back on Saturday morning and have some mass rehearsals and then the group is divided up … part of the group goes to classes while part of the group continues to rehearse and then we flip that over,” Brill said. The Area 3 handbell musicians travel from Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina and Washington D.C. to perform in Ocean City. The Ocean City Festival has been held for at least 25 years. Around 150 people viewed the performance last

year, Brill said. “It’s kind of surprising how many folks from the community will come to hear [the concert],” Brill said. “I think it gives folks the opportunity to hear a unique musical instrument … that they don’t hear frequently.” Another unique factor for the performance is many of the composers for handbell songs are still composing new works, he said. “You have an opportunity to come in and ring under the person who wrote the music that you’re playing,” Brill said. “Most of the clinicians are pretty personable folks and they’re more than happy to talk with someone if they had

a question about, ‘Hey why did you do this’ or, ‘Why did you do that? I have this other piece of yours I worked on. Can you help me think about that?’ So usually folks are very open to chatting and talking about their music but just handbell music in general so it gives you an opportunity to meet someone that you wouldn’t have otherwise with the conditions coming in.” Each spring, Area 3 holds a trio of festivals, which will be held in Ocean City and Tidewater, Virginia this year. For more information, visit www.areaiii.org or contact Co-Coordinator of Events Debbie Henning at debbiehen@gmail.com.


PAGE 34

MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Present Papas Rellenas as appetizer or main course By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (March 15, 2019) Procrastination is the root of indolence and should be reduced if success is to flourish. However, others might argue that savoring the flavors of hesitation produces a structured deferment. In other words, they will get to it on their own time. No matter your point of view, what is important is to recognize that all

procrastination is delay but not all delay is procrastination. There are many types of delay and some are necessary for fruitful progression. For example, talent is a virtue of varying degrees and therefore accomplishment fluctuates with each individual. See SERVE Page 35

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MARCH 15, 2019

PAGE 35

Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

NOW OPEN IN TRADER LEE’S PLAZA, WEST OCEAN CITY

Serve Papas Rellenas plain, with salsa or avocado sauce

Papas Rellenas Mashed Potatoes Cook 4 pounds of Russet potatoes according to your favorite mashed potato recipe, Set aside. Note: The mashed potato consistency should be on the heavier side as opposed to light and fluffy. The lighter mashed potatoes are harder to work with.

Meat Filling 2 pounds ground beef 1 cup olive oil 2 cups yellow onions, coarsely chopped 8 cloves garlic 3 tablespoons pimentos 3 Roma tomatoes, ends removed, seeded, and coarsely chopped 2 stalks celery including the leafy part, coarsely chopped 1 ½ poblano peppers, stems and seeds removed, and coarsely chopped 1 jalapeno, stem removed, seeded, and coarsely chopped

13 green olives 13 salt cured black olives, seeds removed 1/2 cup raisins, plus 2 teaspoons 1 tablespoon each ground cumin, dried oregano, and smoked paprika 2 teaspoons each finely chopped flatleaf parsley, cilantro kosher salt and black pepper to taste 4 eggs 4 teaspoons water 1 cup all-purpose flour 3 cups unseasoned panko breadcrumbs canola oil for frying 1. In a large sauté pan, add ½ cup olive oil and cook beef over mediumhigh heat until well done. Strain fat and set meat aside. 2. Place onions, garlic, pimentos, tomatoes, celery, poblano peppers, jalapeno, olives and raisins into a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. 3. In the same pan that the meat was cooked in, add the remaining oil and sauté vegetable mixture for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and add seasonings, parsley, cilantro and meat. Mix until all the ingredients are fully incorporated. 4. Combine all-purpose flour and panko in a pie plate. In a small bowl, whisk the eggs and water. 5. Place a small amount of mashed potatoes in your hand and form into a little “bowl.” The size depends on whether you are serving the Papas Rellenas as an appetizer or main course. Fill the “bowl” with meat filling and cover with mashed potatoes. The meat filling should be completely encased in the mashed potatoes. Using both hands, roll the Papas Rellena until a perfect “ball” shape and a smooth surface is obtained. 6. Dip the ball into the beaten egg mixture and allow excess to drip off, and then roll in the flour/panko mixture until completely covered. Dip the Papas Rellana again, so it has a double coating of breadcrumb mixture. Repeat this process for the remaining mashed potatoes and beef filling. 7. Add enough oil to a heavy skillet to cover the Papas Rellanas. Heat the oil over medium-high heat until hot, but not smoking hot. Carefully place the coated balls into the oil, do not overcrowd the pan or the temperature of the oil will drop, resulting in soggy fried balls. Fry until all sides are golden brown. Place the Papas Rellanas on a cooling rack and sprinkle with salt. Allow to rest for one minute and serve immediately. Secret Ingredient – Time. “Nothing is a waste of time if we use the experience wisely.” – Rodi

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Continued from Page 34 In this instance, time is subjective and we need to encourage creativity but also allow one to follow their dreams at their own pace. With that thought in mind, let us turn our attention to Papas Rellenas. This South American and Caribbean dish is a treasure that literally translates to “stuffed potato” and that’s exactly what they are. These delicious meatballs are traditionally encased in mashed potatoes and then deep fried for a crunchy exterior. They can be served as an appetizer or as a main meal. Even though they originated in Peru, you will find various versions of Papas Rellenas from Chili to Cuba. Ingenuity is a great thing, even when it comes to meatballs. The outer coating of mashed potatoes can be replaced with mashed plantains or cooked yucca. You can even substitute a vegetarian stuffing for the meat filling. In other words, the possibilities are endless so allow your personal preference to be your inspiration. The following recipe is a bit time consuming but the results are well worthwhile. Papas Rellanas gives new insight to what we perceive as the “classic” meatball. As we transition from winter to spring, consider adding Papas Rellanas to your menu. This delicious delight is sure to wow your guests, adults and kids alike. Papas Rellenas can be served plain or with salsa or an avocado sauce. Enjoy!

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PAGE 36

Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

COLLEGE COMMITTMENT

FILM FESTIVAL AWARD “The Biggest Little Farm� received the Damn Fine Film Award, the judge's choice for favorite film, during the third annual Ocean City Film Festival, held March 8-10. Pictured, from left, are Rina Thaler, Art League executive director; Erica Cramer Messer, the film's executive producer; Gwen Lehman; John Chester, the film's director; and Terry Sterner. Lehman and Sterner were Messer's and Chester's former teachers and mentors at Stephen Decatur High School.

Thirteen Worcester Preparatory School seniors have committed to college. Pictured, in front, from left, are Hailee Arrington (American), Molly McCormick (College of Charleston Honors College), Delaney Abercrombie (Washington & Lee), Ally Elerding (George Washington), Virginia Bateman (Sewanee), Claire Jobson (Salisbury) and Kendall Whaley (Boston University), and in back, Graham Hammond (Delaware), Will Todd (University of Miami), Dakin Moore (Wake Forest), Alex Canakis (Delaware), Cameron Hill (Boston University) and Parker Brandt (Northeastern).

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

AKTION CLUB The newest club sponsored by the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City is the Kiwanis Aktion Club, in the Worcester County Developmental Center in Newark, Maryland. On Jan. 28, the club received a $500 donation from the Kiwanis. The Aktion Club is for adults with disabilities. Pictured, from left, with some members are Kiwanis co-advisor to the Aktion Carolyn Dryzga, Worcester County Development Center Executive Director Jack Ferry, Kiwanis Club President Dick Clagett, Aktion Club President Donta Smith, and in front is co-advisor Steve Cohen.

GUEST SPEAKER Democratic Central Committee of Worcester County Chair Dr. Roxie Dennis Achlononu and Berlin Mayor Gee Williams welcomed Democratic State Chair Dr. Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, right, for a presentation of her goals.

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

NEW MEMBERS Three members were inducted into the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines - Ocean City on Jan. 30. Pictured, from left, are new member Tony Winter with his sponsor, Ron Graybill, Ed Weeks, Lynne McAllorum, his sponsor and the club's membership chair, and Tim Collins with his sponsor, Dave Herr.

SCHOOL PROJECT Students in Abby Harrison's second grade class at Ocean City Elementary, along with the other second grade classes, collected over 600 canned goods for their 100th Day of School Project. These cans were then donated to Our Daily Bread, a soup kitchen in Middletown, Delaware.


MARCH 15, 2019

PAGE 37

Ocean City Today

Decatur NJROTC members receive ‘outstanding’ mark By Josh Davis Associate Editor (March 15, 2019) An annual military inspection of several dozen Stephen Decatur High School students in Berlin last Thursday resulted in an outstanding report, according to Jennifer Miller. Miller is the booster club secretary for the Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps, or NJROTC. LCDR Dr. Robert C. Stewart, U.S. Navy (Ret.) said it the day was important for the unit and the annual regional inspection is a significant benchmark for NJROTC programs throughout the nation. The Stephen Decatur High School unit welcomed Region 5 NJROTC Commander Capt. James Daniels, also retired U.S. Navy, who conducted the inspection this year. “Our cadets worked hard to prepare for the inspection, which is a formal, rigorous opportunity for cadets to shine, demonstrate various skills and knowledge, leadership, self-discipline, and positive ability to work and function in a group dynamic,” Stewart said. “These are of course important life skills and character traits that contribute to personal positive growth, development, and help aid in lifelong success and happiness, regardless of the path students may elect after graduation.” By the end of the inspection, Stewart said, the unit “had an overall sense that we had a great day and positive experience.” “The cadets definitely have reason to be proud of their accomplishments,” he said. “Our school administration and leadership, local government leaders, our booster club, parents, and guests from the community demonstrated terrific commitment and support to our program and the cadets themselves. We are so thankful for all of our supporters who came out to cheer us on!” A formal report by Daniels providing the unit with a designated overall rating, along with detailed particulars, has yet to be completed, Stewart said. “We certainly are pleased with the positive comments received from him, as well as feedback for improvements already given,” he said. “This final report will not be formally completed and returned to us for about two weeks. “In the meantime, as we anxiously await the report [and] we are enjoying a sense of accomplishment,” he continued. “We are very grateful for the significant community support.”

Your Online Community: www.oceancitytoday.com

JOSH DAVIS/OCEAN CITY TODAY

NJROTC members at Stephen Decatur High School were given a preliminary rating of outstanding during an annual inspection in Berlin last Thursday. A formal report of the inspection is said to take several weeks.

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PAGE 38

Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

WCHS BENEFIT Berlin Intermediate School’s sixth grade students are working together to donate needed supplies and to raise money to benefit the animals at the Worcester County Humane Society. Students are competing in a Penny Race to raise money to be donated for the no-kill shelter’s 20th annual Boardwalkin’ for Pets event on Saturday, April 20.

DONATIONS Berlin Intermediate School received a donation of various school supplies from Worcester Youth & Family Counseling Services. Pictured, from left, are Dr. David Gell, assistant principal; Tiffany Scott, Worcester Youth & Family Counseling Services youth coordinator; and Steve Taylor, WYFCS executive director.

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

CLUB SUPPORT The Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines - Ocean City supports all five of the Student Leadership clubs, plus the Adults with Disabilities Aktion Club annually. The Berlin Intermediate School’s club on Jan. 15, received a $500 donation from the parent Kiwanis Club to support its BIS Builders Club which is making 300 blankets for Diakonia, a local shelter for people in transition from homelessness to stability. BIS Builders Club teacher advisor Jane Slotter, Kiwanis Club President Dick Clagett, center, and Kiwanis Club advisor to the BIS Builders Club Skip McComas are joined by club members.

GRANT Cato Inc. representative Kathleen Abercrombie and her daughter, Worcester Prep senior Delaney Abercrombie, present Upper School technology/science teacher Colleen McGuire, center, with a $500 ExxonMobil Educational Alliance Program grant. ExxonMobil believes in investing in educational programs for the next generation to pursue studies and careers in fields involving math and science.

GROUP MEETING RING CEREMONY The annual Junior Ring Ceremony took place in the Guerrieri Library at Worcester Prep on Feb. 13. It is tradition that seniors present the juniors with their rings along with a few insightful comments as to why the recipient is special to them. WPS juniors, from left, Korina Gjikuria, Quinn McColgan, Annika Larsen and Madison Van Orden proudly display their new Class of 2020 rings.

Members of the Eastern Shore Moms Demand Action group met in Berlin recently at the Baked Dessert Cafe & Gallery to discuss two bills: HB 740/SB 882, which prohibits sale or possession of “ghost guns,” and HB 786/SB 737, which closes background check loophole for private sales of long guns in Maryland. Pictured, in front, from left, are Kady Everson, social media/data lead, Nancy Osborne and Stephanie Schultz, co-lead, and in back, Danielle Veith, Maryland Chapter president, Laurie Brittingham, Lou Rimbach, Judy Davis and Leigh Sandifer.


MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 39


PAGE 40

MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Linda Dearing, owner of Copy Central in Ocean Pines with her husband, Michael, displays the donation box to raise money for colon cancer dedicated for their daughter, Gina, who passed away as a result of the disease in 2014. The Dearings will collect donations the entire month of March.

Dearings continue to raise colon cancer awareness By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) During Colon Cancer Awareness Month, Ocean Pines residents and business owners, Linda and Michael Dearing, are raising awareness and donations in memory of their daughter, Gina Barnes, to help save lives. The owners of Copy Central, on Cathell Road in Ocean Pines, will collect donations for Gina’s Comfort Fund at

HAPPY ST. PATRICK’S DAY

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the store throughout the month of March and offer raffle tickets to anyone who donates $5 or more. The raffle winner will receive a free 16x20 print of one of their photographs on canvas. The drawing will be held Friday, April 5. Barnes was 37 years old when she was diagnosed with colon cancer. She battled the disease for almost two years before passing in 2014, and her parents See FUNDS Page 41

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MARCH 15, 2019

‘If I Were Mayor…’ essay contest for Md. fourth graders (March 15, 2019) Fourth graders throughout Maryland are invited to take part in the Maryland Municipal League’s annual “If I Were Mayor…” essay contest. The contest, which draws nearly 3,000 essays annually, challenges Maryland fourth graders to share their thoughts on how they would engage with citizens to make their municipality a better place to live and work if they were mayor. Students must submit their essays to MML no later than Saturday, March 30. Since 2001, MML’s “If I Were Mayor…” essay contest has given fourth graders the opportunity to learn about municipal government through sharing their thoughts on how they would govern as mayor. Each 275-word essay must open with the line: “If I Were Mayor, I Would…” and answer three questions that address the theme, “Together We Can.” All Maryland students enrolled in the fourth grade during the 20182019 school year may participate in the contest. The student’s teacher must submit entries. The 11 regional winners will be presented with a $100 cash prize and a Governor’s Citation at the Maryland State House in front of their immediate family, teacher, their municipality’s mayor and other local dignitaries on May 10. “We value building Maryland’s next generation of local leaders by helping students learn more about how their municipality works,” said Scott A. Hancock, executive director of the Maryland Municipal League. “Together We Can is a fantastic theme that will frame these fourthgrade students’ vision for how communities can work together better.” The contest is sponsored by Maryland Municipal League, in partnership with the Maryland Mayors’ Association, Local Government Insurance Trust, and Injured Workers’ Insurance Fund. Essays are judged based on: essay relation to contest topic, displayed knowledge about municipal government and the role of a mayor, creativity, and proper use of grammar. To apply, download a form from www.mdmunicipal.org/essay.

Ocean City Today

PAGE 41

Funds benefit colon cancer patients Continued from Page 40 are determined to help save other families the pain they have endured from losing their daughter. “There’s a misconception that colon cancer hits older people and there’s been a big rise in young women in their 30s being diagnosed with colon cancer,” Linda Dearing said. “If I could save one person from having to go through what my daughter went through, then that’s good. Gina’s Comfort Fund was created to alleviate stress and financial barriers for individuals and families. The donations go toward providing gas and food gift cards, wigs, acupuncture treatments for the side effects of chemo, and house cleaning services. In four years, more than $8,000 has been raised and 45 patients have received aid, Dearing said. “Copy Central has had two customers

come forward and state that with our awareness campaign it helped them in finding their cancer and were able to get their treatment early,” Dearing said. “This is just what we are striving for: the awareness and getting help early.” Barnes’ family created Gina’s Comfort Fund in March 2015 to help with the stress and financial burdens on families after they witnessed the cost of getting sick. A colonoscopy can help prevent colorectal cancer and the disease is highly treatable when found early. Those with family history or notice changes in their body are urged to schedule a screening. “Any abdominal cramping, changes or bleeding in bowel movements can be signs,” Dearing said. “She also had a baby within 18 months. The symptoms she was having, she just attributed to having a baby, as a result of the pressures of delivery.”

When Barnes was ignoring colon cancer signs, she was juggling a husband, three children and a full-time job, Dearing said. She was physically active and officiated lacrosse games. “Every day individuals fight cancer, many of whom have families, jobs and life responsibilities regardless of how the disease and treatments are making them feel physically and emotionally,” Dearing said. “Gina fought her battle with courage and poise while serving as a role model for others fighting their own battle.” Stop by Copy Central in Ocean Pines this month, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to donate to Gina’s Comfort Fund. All donations are tax deductible and checks can be mailed to: Copy Central, 11065 Cathell Road Berlin, Maryland 21811. For more information, call Copy Central at 410-208-0641.


PAGE 42

Ocean City Today

REOPENING PARTY

MARCH 15, 2019

Conestabile’s song featured in episode of ‘The Bay’ TV show By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Rita Conestabile, of Ocean City, received her big break when her original song, “When It’s Over,” was selected for the Amazon Prime Emmy award-winning daytime drama series, “The Bay.” The track was chosen by the director over several submissions from various artists, to be the soundtrack in episode five of season four of the drama. “The reception has been fantastic,” Conestabile said. “The local community here gets behind you and really uplifts you.” The song came to life last August with the help of several musicians on the Eastern Shore, including Michael Smith, Lauren Glick, Conner Poole and Chris Poole. Music has always been a passion for Conestabile, but she had put her dreams on hold until very recently. “I’ve been singing and writing songs for the last 25 years,” Conestabile said. “However, I raised a family instead of pursuing my career, so anything that I’ve written had just been kind of shelved.” Conestabile found much of her musical inspiration from classic bands like the Beatles, and blues rock. More songs are planned in the future, with recording sessions beginning as early as next week, where Conestabile hopes to collaborate with Smith once again. “I booked some more studio time for March 25,” Conestabile said. “I’m going to crank them out and just keep it going.” The singer is also in the process of publishing a poetry book, hopefully

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Rita Conestabile, of Ocean City, performs her song, “When It’s Over,” at Bourbon Street on the Beach, 116th Street, March 10. The song was featured in the Amazon Prime show, “The Bay.”

by September. Conestabile premiered her song and the episode of “The Bay” at Bourbon Street on the Beach on 116th Street, to a crowd of supporters last Sunday. She then performed a short concert for the patrons of the bar with other original songs. The episode featuring “When It’s Over” is up for Emmy nominations for best actor, and Conestabile will be attending the 2019 Daytime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles on May 5. “I’m just very grateful for the support of the community because it’s really awesome to be uplifted by fellow musicians that I admire in this town especially,” Conestabile said. “And to have an establishment like Bourbon Street and [its] owner be happy for you and help support the cause is just awesome.” The song can be purchased or listen to on Spotify and Amazon Music. The episode of “The Bay” with her song is available on Amazon Prime. To hear more of Conestabile’s songs, visit her YouTube page.

9:30 PM Friday & Saturday Night Sing Traditional Irish Karaoke and get a free beer

IRISH FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS $5 IRISH COFFEES & MORE ALL WEEKEND GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

FINNEGAN’S WAKE In town just a few days ahead of schedule, St. Patrick, played by Vince Diorio, reads aloud to open the annual Finnegan’s Wake, a mock Irish funeral held to raise funds for the Worcester County Developmental Center, with pious oversight from Cardinal-attired Tom Gallagher, while WCDC Executive Director Jack Ferry watches on the back, last Saturday at Seacrets on 49th Street.


MARCH 15, 2019

PAGE 43

Ocean City Today

(Left) Kylie Mohler, a senior at Pocomoke High School, won second place in the Shirley Hall Memorial Youth Art Show on First Friday, March 1, at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street. (Right) Sara Miller, an eighth grader at Worcester Prep, earned third-place honors.

Students’ artwork showcased during exhibit (March 15, 2019) The Shirley Hall Memorial Youth Art Show was held March 1-3, at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street, showcasing the artwork of middle and high school students from public and private schools in Worcester County. For over 20 years, the Art League of Ocean City has presented the

youth art show in cooperation with Worcester County schools. The purpose of the event is to promote creativity and allow local youth to display their artwork in a professional gallery setting. The student artwork on display included original drawings, paintings and photography.

The art show is named in memory of Shirley Hall, a former Art League board member, who was instrumental in originally developing and presenting the show. Hall’s daughters, Betsy Hall-Harrison and Barbara Shade, are the show’s judges, and Hall’s son, Greg Hall of Towboat US, is the sponsor of the

cash prizes. First place went to Caleb King, a senior at Pocomoke High School. Kylie Mohler, a senior at Pocomoke High School, was awarded second-place honors. Sara Miller, and eighth grader at Worcester Prep, earned the third-place award.

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MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

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TRADER LEE’S HOUSE BAND Featuring Frankie Moran, Wilson Sawyer & Rod Vera Located at the corner of Rt 50 and Rt 611 In Trader Lee’s Plaza Shopping Ctr. West Ocean City

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$

Bagpipers Surprise Appearance on Saturday

PARTY ALL WEEKEND! MUSIC • FOOD & DRINKS! 8TH STREET OCMD

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Ocean City Today

Fenwick Island

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Duffy’s Bayside Bar & Grille

130th St OC's Best Cored Beef & Cabbage

March 16th & 17th

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Traditional Food Specials

EATS + DRINKS

CELEBRATE LUCKY 13 3/16 NOON-CLOSE

Corned Beef & Cabbage • Irish Lamb Stew Shepherds Pie • Fish & Chips • Bangers and Mash Reubens & Rachels Lamb Sammy w/Red Potatoes

FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS

$3.17 Smithwicks • Har s • Domestic Draſts • Miller Light Cans 16 oz.

139th St. & Coastal Hwy

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STT.. PADDY’S DA AY Y SPECIALS

Sunda ay y,, March 17 y Mama Denise’s Incredible

RUEBEN MEA ATTLOAF $12.95

W/green beans & roasted red potatoe - 5pm-cl

REUBEN SANDWICH with fries $8.95 Served All Day

241526 HAPPY HOUR 2 drinks 4 the price of 1 Everyday 5 to 6pm

443.644.5639 www.LongBoardCafe.net

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OCEANFRONT

RESTAURANT

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OPEN EARLY! COME IN FOR BREAKFAST KEGS • EGGS • BREAKFAST PIZZA BLOODY MARYS • MIMOSAS • IRISH COFFEE JAMESON • IRISH CAR BOMBS

Watch The Parade Here! - 56 Street -

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5601 Coastal Hwy Bayside, Ocean City 410-723-5600

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Ocean City

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$4 Nu Irishman $5 Guinness 12 oz. $4 Irish Coffees $1 Jello Shooters $2.50 All Domestic Draſts 16 oz. $3 Shamrock Shooters $2 Baby G Shots • Cored Beef Sandwiches • Reubens • Codfish Cakes Cored Beef, Cabbage & Potatoes Special Irish Music: Dave Pedrick (Crayhur Brothers) 1-6

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28th St. Plaza 410-289-3100

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17th Steet & Coastal Hwy

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NOW OPEN WEEKENDS!

IRISH FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS

$5 IRISH COFFEES & MORE ALL WEEKEND

On the Boardwalk Between 11th & 12th St.

FRIDAY 3/15 • DOORS OPEN @5

OC FOOLS SHAM JAM W/JOHNNY BLING

SATURDAY 3/16 • DOORS OPEN @NOON

SAM GROW


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Ocean City Today

Join Us Stt. Patty’s W We ee ekend! NOW OPE EN For The Season S

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Frrog hooters Sh Orange 6 Crushes

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ALL THE T TIM ME!

HAPPY HOUR H 4pm-6p pm

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2019 9 ST. T. PA PA AT T’S T-SHIR RT TS IN STOCK T

75 Bud Liggght Bottle & Rolling Rock

ALL THE TIME!

Home of the Famous Portabella Mushroom & Swiss Burger! At the Inlet Village V 806 S. Atlantiic Av Ave. Ocean City, M MD 21842

410-289-FR ROG Free Parking g

for Customers a at the Frog Bar

NOW OPEN EVER RY Y WEEKEND FRI-S SUN 11AM

Open Tues - Fri at 2pm Sat & Sun at Noon

Family Friendly!

MARCH 15, 2019

Delmarva Power to give away 1,000 trees to customers (March 15, 2019) Delmarva Power is giving away 1,000 free trees to residential customers through the Arbor Day Foundation’s Energy-Saving Trees program. This initiative helps customers conserve energy and reduce household energy use through strategic tree planting. For the eighth year, Delmarva Power is stepping up to support this environmental and energy saving program. Customers can reserve one free tree per household by visiting arborday.org/delmarva. “It’s always exciting to partner with the Arbor Day Foundation and provide our customers additional tools and resources to help them save,” said Gary Stockbridge, Delmarva Power region president. “Planting a tree is a tried-and-true method for saving money and energy at home and over the years these plantings have both enhanced the visual appeal of our neighborhoods and helped our communities become cleaner and more sustainable.” Customers will have the ability to choose from a selection of trees, including Bald Cypress, River Birch, White Dogwood, and White Oak, most available in varying sizes. One-gallon trees will be delivered to customers’ homes between April and May. All three- and five-gallon trees will be available for pickup only during company planned events in May and April. More information on these events can be found online during the reservation process. Through the Arbor Day Foundation’s website, customers also have

the power to explore interactive tools, including a tool to help customers determine the best location on their property to plant their tree for energy savings benefits. Properly planted trees can provide a homeowner many benefits, such as reducing energy use through summer shading and by slowing winter winds. Throughout a tree’s growth period, trees have the potential to lower energy bills by 15 to 30 percent. Additionally, trees provide benefits to a community by improving air and water quality, reducing stormwater runoff, and adding to the visual appeal of a neighborhood. In fact, since 2012, Delmarva Power customers have planted more than 9,400 trees, saving nearly 20 million kWh, and removing close to 150,000 pounds of air pollutants from the atmosphere. Prior to receiving a tree, Delmarva Power reminds customers to call 811 to have utility-owned underground lines marked before they start to dig. Every digging project, no matter how large or small, warrants a call to 811. Customers unable to reserve a free tree through the internet are encouraged to call 855-670-2772. To learn more about Delmarva Power, visit The Source, Delmarva Power’s online news room. Find additional information by visiting delmarva.com, on Facebook at facebook.com/delmarvapower and on Twitter at twitter.com/delmarvaconnect. Delmarva Power’s mobile app is available at delmarva.com/mobileapp.

28th Street Plaza • 410-289-3100 • www.coinspuboc.com

ST. PATTY’S PARADE PARTY Saturday, March 16th • Best Party in Town!

FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS Corned Beef Sandwiches • Cod Fish Cakes Reubens • Corned Beef • Cabbage & Potatoes Special

$4 Nu Irishman • $4 Irish Coffees • $2.50 All Domestic Draſts 16 oz. $2 Baby G Shots • $5 Guinness 12 oz. • $1 Jello Shooters • $3 Shamrock Shooters

LIVE IRISH MUSIC: DAVE PEDRICK • 1-6PM (FROM THE CRAYTHUR BROTHERS)

HAPPY HOUR EARLY BIRD DAILY 3-6PM DAILY 4-6PM Food & Drink Specials (excludes Saturday March 16)

Special Dinner Menu

PRIME RIB WEDNESDAY $17.99 with one side

½ PRICES ENTREES & DISCOUNTED MENU Every Sunday, Tuesday & Thursday 5-9 p.m. (Some Restrictions Apply)

NASCAR FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

GATHERING SUPPLIES Worcester County 4-H Club members, Justin, 11, and Tyler Udzielak, 14, of West Ocean City, collect wool and yarn during the Wool and Fiber Expo at the convention center on 40th Street, Saturday.


MARCH 15, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Put A Little Pickle In Your Paddy

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

WOOL AND FIBER EXPO (Above) U.S. Army veteran David Steele shakes hands with Les Wallace, while Suzanne Worrall, left, both representing the Quilts of Valor Foundation, award a handwoven blanket to provide warmth and healing, while Delmarva Wool and Fiber Expo organizer Susan Childs beams approvingly, last Saturday at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street. (Left) Sheri Hunt Smith, who operates Alpacas of York farm in Mount Wolf, Pennsylvania, works the spinning wheel last Saturday during the event.

Weekend FEATURING

THURSDAY MARCH 14TH

FRIDAY MARCH 15TH

BEATS BY WAX

6-10 SIDE PROJECT 10-2 BEATS BY JEREMY

SATURDAY MARCH 16TH

SUNDAY MARCH 17TH 1-5 CITY PAINTED GREEN 1-5 BEATS BY JEREMY 5:30-9:30 BEATS BY CASPER 8-12 JOEY HARKUM BAND 10-2 BEATS BY DUTCH

DRINK FEATURES Irish Car Bomb $8.50

LOCALS’ FAVORITE FOR OVER 61 YEARS Located In The Courtyard by Marriott • 15th Street & Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Md. For Reservations, Call: 410-289-7192/7191

Captainstableoc.com

Tullamore D.E.E Irish Whiskey & Guinness

Frozen Irish Coffee W/Rum Chata, Tullamore D.E.W

Dirty Leprechaun $12.00 • $8 Refill

Clover Crush $8.25

Vodka, Peach Schnapps, Blue Curaco & Fruit Juice

New Amsterdam Orange, Melon Liqueur & Fresh OJ

Pickleback $7.50

Irish Mule $8.25

THE FINEST SEAFOOD, STEAKS AND POULTRY

Frosty Irishman $12.99

Tullamore D.E.W Irish Whiskey & Pickle Juice Chaser

Tullamore D.E.E Irish Whiskey & Ginger Beer

Bud or Bud Light $4 16oz Aluminum Bottle Pint of Guinness $6 • Miller Lite Green Beer $4

BREAKFAST Monday - Saturday 7am - 11am SUNDAY BRUNCH 7am - 1pm DINNER Tuesday - Sunday 5pm

FOOD FEATURES

SATURDAY, MARCH 16th Corned Beef & Cabbage 5pm $5 Drinks Specials

EARLY BIRD 5 P.M.-6 P.M. PHIL PERDUE ON PIANO

Friday & Saturday

KID FRIENDLY

HAPPY HOUR 5 - 6pm

Rueben

Shepherd’s Pie

Corned Beef

$8.99

$7.99

Sliders $7.99 w/Cabbage $8.99

OPEN SAT & SUN 10AM 8TH St. Liquors Open 7 Days a Week! 8TH St. & Philadelphia • www.Picklesoc.com • 410-289-4891


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Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

Worcester County Historical Society dinner, March 29 (March 15, 2019) The Worcester County Historical Society will hold its annual spring dinner meeting at the Pocomoke Community Center on Market Street, Friday, March 29. Dinner guests will learn about Worcester County’s past while dining on chicken and dumplings with all the fixings prepared by the Ladies Auxiliary. Following the dinner, Jefferson Moak, archivist and genealogist, will give a presentation concerning the 1877 Atlas of Wicomico, Somerset and Worcester counties. He will discuss how cartographers obtained information for the maps and how the atlases were produced. This effort was the first time that a detailed map had been created for the three counties. The company, Lake, Griffing and Stevenson, actually created six publications for Maryland, three of which were for the Eastern Shore. Moak has studied extensively in the area of maps and atlases, beginning with the Free Library in Philadelphia. His experience includes the Philadelphia Bicentennial, the Historical Commission and the Philadelphia Archives. He has also worked with the National Archives. Later, he began an interest in local history and was instrumental in getting the Chestnut Hill neighborhood in Germantown on the National Register.

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

PERFORMANCE

CROSSWORD

The Ocean City Pipe and Drum Band fill the air with Celtic flavor during the seventh annual Finnegan’s Wake, which raises funds for the Worcester County Developmental Center in Newark, on Saturday at Seacrets on 49th Street.

Describing his interest in genealogy, Moak compared the research to putting together the pieces of a puzzle. He is a member of several historical organizations. Doors will open for the event at 5 p.m. and the dinner will begin at 6 p.m. Tickets cost $25 per person and can be purchased by sending a check to: Robert Fisher, WCHS Treasurer, 230 South Washington St., Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. The deadline for reservations for the dinner, which is open to the public, is March 23.

ALL ABOUT WINDOWS Displaying window frames from Designing Windows of Ocean City during the Home and Condo Show at the convention center on 40th Street, Saturday, March 9, from left, are Chris Olfers, Joan Parker and owner Debbie Priestley.

The #1 Resource for Ocean Pines News & Information

Find us on FB and on the Web:

www.BaysideOC.com

*2018 OPA Survey

Answers on page 52


MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

PAGE 49

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 50

MARCH 15, 2019

Dining Guide ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ■ RESERVATIONS: Reservations accepted ________________________________

DOWNTOWN

South end to 28th Street ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192, www.captainstableoc.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100, www.coinspub.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m. and early bird 4-6 p.m. Daily specials. ■ THE CORAL REEF CAFE / HEMINGWAY'S RESTAURANT 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612, www.ocsuites.com/dining $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Fourstory atrium cafe and an elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine, fresh seafood, fresh cuts of meat, farm-to-table produce, artisanal desserts, hearty sandwiches and much more. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-2891100, www.dunesmanor.com $$ - $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season.

MIDTOWN

29th to 90th streets ■ 32 PALM 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525, www.oceancityhilton.com/dining $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, extensive wine list and gourmet desserts. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575, www.bjsonthewater.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week, year-round. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ DOUGH ROLLER 41st Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-9254; 70th Street and Coastal Highway 410-524-7981, www.DoughRollerRestaurants.com $ | Kids’ menu Ocean City’s favorite family restaurant for more than 35 years. Great kid’s menu. Order online for carryout at both Coastal Highway locations. ■ DRY 85 OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-8989, www.DRY85.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Gourmet “stick to your ribs” home cooking. A made-fromscratch kitchen with every sauce and every

dressing hand crafted. It’s that attention to detail that takes the concept of burgers, fries, pork chops and wings and turns them completely on their head. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600, www.johnnyspizzapub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Featuring homemade pizzas, 18 gourmet pizzas, a variety of calzones, subs, burgers, sandwiches and jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Carry out, delivery or dine in. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443664-5639, www.longboardcafe.net $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MARLIN MOON 3301 Atlantic Ave., in the DoubleTree Ocean City 410-280-1201, www.marlinmoonocmd.com $$ | Full bar Featuring Executive Chef Gary Beach. Fresh cuisine featuring locally sourced seafood, steaks and vegetables. Small plate appetizers, fresh salads. Local craft beers and cocktails. Open for lunch and dinner, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ RED RED WINE BAR OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-6801, www.RedRedWineBar.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Coastal cuisine with a focus on local seafood and hand tossed pizzas plus artisanal cheeseboards. 35+ wines By the Glass, 120+ By the Bottle. Flights. Luxurious colors and custom built couches. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ SEACRETS 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900, www.seacrets.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762, www.skyebaroc.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials.

UPTOWN

91st to 146th streets ■ ALBERTINO’S BRICK OVEN EATERY 13117 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410250-2000, www.albertinosoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Lunch and dinner daily. Open Wednesday and Thursday, 4 p.m. and Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. Homemade pizza and pasta, seafood, steaks. Daily specials and happy hour. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983, www.bluefishocmd.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896, www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com $$-$$$ | Reservations recommended for large parties | Kids’ menu | Full bar Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, steaks and pasta dishes. Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, &

Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ THE CRAB BAG 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410250-3337, www.thecrabbag.com $-$$ | Full bar Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carryout and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DUFFYS 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449, www.duffysoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second season and daily dinner specials. Dine in, carry out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535, www.clarionoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving beach-inspired dishes in our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet, open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available Friday and Saturday, 5-9 p.m. ■ NICK’S HOUSE OF RIBS 144th Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-1984, www.nickshouseofribs.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual, family friendly with upscale atmosphere. Extensive menu from our famous baby back ribs, fresh seafood, black angus steaks. ■ NORI 11403 Coastal Highway (Gold Coast Mall), Ocean City 443-880-6258 $$ | Reservations accepted | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open 7 days serving lunch and dinner. Our creative menu features hand-cut steaks, grilled fish, crab cakes, sushi and sashimi. Dine-in or carry-out. ■ REEF 118 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-5241000, www.carouselhotel.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ WHISKERS PUB 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410524-2609, www.whiskerspub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Certified Angus® burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.

DELAWARE ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436-FOXS, www.foxspizzade.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery.

WEST OCEAN CITY ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717, www.ocitalianfood.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar

Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 11328 Samuel Bowen Blvd., West Ocean City 410-600-1020, Foxpizzamd.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Enjoy a brand new spacious dining room. Happy hour every day from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. with $5 food specials. Full menu includes appetizers, salads, stromboli, hoagies and wedgies, pizza, spaghetti and more. Open every day from 11 a.m. to midnight. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR AND GRILL 128741 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1846, weocharborside.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Home of the Original Fresh Squeezed Orange Crush! Open every day, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Appetizers, fresh seafood, steak and pasta. Live entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HOOTERS Route 50 & Keyser Point Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1841, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu and game room | Full bar New smoked wings with half the calories. Traditional wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with raw bar and crab legs. Sports packages and live entertainment. Large parties welcome. ■ PIZZA TUGOS Routes 50 and 611, West Ocean City 410524-2922; 114th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-2922, www.pizzatugos.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Open 7 days. Pizza Tugos is a family-friendly dining restaurant that features award winning pizza, pasta, craft burgers, sandwiches, subs, appetizers and salads. Great happy hour and football specials with full bar and 54 craft beers. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 $ | Kids’ menu Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drivethru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo.

OCEAN PINES ■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410-641-7222, www.OPyachtclub.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Amid a bay front setting, the Ocean Pines Yacht Club offers dining selections for lunch and dinner. Fresh seafood and signature drinks. Open Thursday-Sunday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ TERN GRILLE 100 Clubhouse Drive, Ocean Pines 410641-7222, oceanpinesgolf.org/dining $$ | Full bar The Tern Grille serves freshly-prepared breakfast and lunch items. Open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, weather permitting.

BERLIN ■ OCEAN DOWNS CASINO, POSEIDON’S PUB 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-6410600, www.oceandowns.com $-$$$ | Full bar House soups, small plates, sandwiches, burgers and entrees including steaks, chicken, veggie and Eastern Shore favorites. Dining room hours: Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 10 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, noon to 8 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, noon to 11 p.m. Pub open late.


MARCH 15, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD. Held March 1-3 and featuring the Men’s (18+) and Women’s (18+) divisions.

Philadelphia Ave. There will be two seatings, 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Also featuring a silent auction, door prizes, 50/50 raffle and games for adults and children. Tickets cost $8 for adults and $5 for children, 11 years and younger. Tickets: Jen Backof, 443-929-1505 or jmbackof@yahoo.com. Proceeds benefit the Ocean City scouting program.

WCDC AKTION CLUB FUNDRAISER

WOMEN IN ANIMATION: PART TWO

IHOP, 11328 Samuel Bowen Blvd., Building F, 6:30 AM - 12:00 AM. IHOP will donate 10 percent of participants’ purchases to the Worcester County Developmental Center’s Aktion Club when presented with the fundraiser flyer. Attendees must present the flyer to participate. Sponsored by the OP-OC Kiwanis Club. Flyers are available from club members or by asking for it at the restaurant.

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 5:30 PM. Featuring celebrated animated shorts from female animators, from the dawn of film to the Internet age. View discretion advised. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Fri., March 15 ST. PATRICK’S INDOOR SOCCER TOURNAMENT

FIBER FRIENDS Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:00 AM. Bring your lap work to this informal get-together. Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, etc. welcome. Victoria Christie-Healy, moonlightknitting@gmail.com, 703-507-0708, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

BERLIN BOOK OF THE MONTH Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 1:00 PM. Featuring The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. Copies of books are available in advance at the library. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

HOMESCHOOL BOOK CLUB Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:00 PM. Discuss books chosen by the club. For children reading at middlegrade level. 410-208-4014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

WOMEN IN ART PART II: 18TH-19TH CENTURY Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM. Explore the role of the woman artist during the 18th and 19th centuries. Look at several artists from each quarter of the century. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FISH FRY Bowen United Methodist Church, 8421 Newark Road, Newark, MD, 4:30 PM 7:00 PM. Platters cost $10 and include flounder filet, macaroni and cheese, green beans, corn bread and dessert. Beverages included for those who eat in.

SATURDAY STORY TIME Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11:00 AM. Saturday Story Time means books, singing and dancing. Stay for the Saturday Make and Take craft. For all ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT FRIED CHICKEN DINNER New Hope United Methodist Church, 7338 New Hope Road, 11:30 AM - 3:00 PM. Menu includes mashed potatoes, greens, string beans, macaroni and cheese, beets, biscuits, dessert and coffee. Cost is $13 for adults. Carry-outs available.v410-543-8244 or 443-2350251

THESIS FILM FUNDRAISER The Crab Bag, 13005 Coastal Highway, 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Emmi Shockley is raising money for the budget of her NYU Thesis Film, J-1 as well as giving back fifty percent of the proceeds to The Art League of Ocean City.. There will be live music provided by Two Hours and The Undateables and a silent auction. Donation is optional at the door or pay $20 and receive a pass to OC Laser Tag at Game World. Info: Facebook.com/J-1 Film Fundraiser.

Sat., March 16 ST. PATRICK’S INDOOR SOCCER TOURNAMENT Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, 12:00 AM. Held March 1-3 and featuring the Men’s (18+) and Women’s (18+) divisions.

CRAFTY SATURDAY MAKE & TAKE ‘ST. PATRICK’S DAY’ Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM. Drop in and show off your creativity. For all ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

ST. PATRICK’S DAY 5K Boardwalk at Fourth Street, 9:00 AM. The course will start running south toward the Inlet, around pier then down under the white tran station, turning to go north to 16th Street and back south to the finish line at Shenanigans. http://octrirunning.com/

FREE TAX PREPARATION Ocean City Senior Center, 104 41st St., 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM. Call for an appointment: 443-373-2667. The service is open to all ages and non AARP members.

SPAGHETTI DINNER FUNDRAISER American Legion Post #166, 2308

Eagle’s Landing Golf Course, 12367 Eagles Nest Road, 9:30 AM - 3:30 PM. Admission cost is $60 and includes green fee, cart, lunch and prizes. If a player’s ball lands in a clover, the bar is deemed holed. Lunch will include many Irish American favorites. Sign up: 410-2137277 or 800-283-3846. http://www.eagleslandinggolf.com

ST. PATRICK’S SCRAMBLE

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE & FESTIVAL The parade begins at noon at 57th Street and marches south on Coastal Highway to the 45th Street Shopping Center. Trophies will be awarded to parade winners in several categories. The Irish Festival features live entertainment, Irish apparel, food and drinks. Held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. with free admission. Viewers are urged to arrive before 10:30 a.m. to avoid traffic delays. Buck Mann, 410-289-6156, http://www.delmarvairish.org

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARTY American Legion Post #166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., 1:00 PM. Offering corned beef, cabbage and potatoes at a cost of $9. Open to the public. 410-2893166

OC HANDBELL FESTIVAL CONCERT Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, 3:40 PM - 5:30 PM. Concert of the Handbell Musicians of America, Area III, Ocean City Festival. Featuring more than 450 handbell ringers will play en masse under Guest Conductor: Kyler Brengle. Free admission. Debbie Henning, debbiehan@gmail.com, 410-848-5482, http://www.areaiii.org

ANNUAL BULL AND OYSTER ROAST Bishopville Volunteer Fire Department, 10709 Bishopville Road, 5:00 PM - 9:00 PM. Fried, raw and steamed oysters, fried chicken, livers and gizzards, beer and much more. Cash bar, 50/50, music and a gun raffle for a heavy barrel AR15. Tickets cost $35 in advance or $40 at the door. Tickets: 410-352-5757.

Featuring quality fruit, vegetables, meat, eggs, poultry an daily products, as well as, baked goods, jams, cider, wine, honey, maple syrup, coffee, sauces, soups, kitchen ware, treats for pets, unique finds and live music. Open to the public. 410-641-7717, Ext. 3006

Sun., March 17 ST. PATRICK’S INDOOR SOCCER TOURNAMENT Northside Park, 200 125th St., Ocean City, MD, 12:00 AM. Held March 1-3 and featuring the Men’s (18+) and Women’s (18+) divisions.

HOMECOMING Showell United Methodist Church, 10115 Pitts Road, 2:00 PM. Speakers are Courtland (former member of the congregation) and Betty Cropper. Music provided by Precious Memories, a Southern Gospel band. There will be a free will offering and a meal to follow.

Mon., March 18 CPAP MASK FITTING Atlantic General Hospital Sleep Disorders Diagnostic Center, 9733 Healthway Drive, 12:00 AM. Free mask fitting clinic for patients who are having trouble adjusting to their CPAP equipment. By appointment only: Robin Rohlfing, 410-641-9726.

FREE TAX PREPARATION Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM. Call for an appointment: 443-373-2667. The service is open to all ages and non AARP members.

DEMOCRATIC WOMEN’S CLUB MEETING Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway. Coffee served at 9:30 a.m. At 10 a.m., Linda Linzer’s presentation will focus on the 2019 National Women’s History Alliance Theme, Visionary Women, Champions of Peace and Nonviolence. All are welcome. Vicky, 410-208-2969

MOTHER GOOSE ON THE LOOSE Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 AM. Fun-filled, 30-minutes interactive session that uses rhymes, songs, puppets, musical instruments and more to stimulate the learning process of babies and toddlers. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

LAP TIME Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 AM and 2:00 PM. Children, under 2 years old, will be introduced to songs, stories, games and finger plays. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

INDOOR FARMERS & ARTISANS MARKET

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

Saturdays - Northside Fire House, 235 Ocean Parkway, 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM.

Atlantic General Hospital, Conference

Continued on Page 52


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Ocean City Today

CALENDAR Continued from Page 51 Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM. TOPS is a weekly support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. Berlin group No. 169. Rose Campion, 410-6410157

DELMARVA A CAPELLA CHORUS Mondays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 7:00 PM. All levels of singers and drop-ins welcome. Carol, 410-641-6876

Tues., March 19 STORY TIME ‘TURTLES’ Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

GENEALOGY WORKSHOP Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11:00 AM. Tom Dempsey will guide participants through the world of family research and give tips on how to find that long-lost ancestor. Register: 410-2084014. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PAINT A POT Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:00 PM. Participants will paint a flower pot of their own design and then seal it with a protective coating. All supplies furnished. Register: 410-208-4014. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

COLOR ME CALM Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 2:00 PM. Monthly adult coloring session. Explore different patterns. Bring your own coloring pages or use those provided. Colored pencils, gel pens and felt tips available, along with coffee and cookies. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY TIME MOVIE ‘A WRINKLE IN TIME’ Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM. The movie will begin at 4:30 p.m. Before, during and after the movie enjoy crafts and activities related to the movie. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Tuesdays - Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and health lifestyle. jeanduck47@gmail.com

Wed., March 20 WITTY KNITTERS Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Knitters, crochet enthusiasts and needle artist of all skill levels are invited. Work on our favorite patterns and exchange ideas. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

MARYLAND VA REPRESENTATIVE Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM. Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs representative

Michelle Licata offers outreach services to veterans and their families on the third Wednesday of each month. No appointment necessary. 410-713-3482, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PLAY TIME Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 AM. Children learn the meaning of words, how to express themselves and other early literacy skills by playing. Play with educational toys and make new friends. For infant to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

COZY LAP QUILTS Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM. A four-week initiative held March 20 through April 10. Make lap quilts to deliver to those living in local nursing homes. Bring a sewing machine if you have one. All fabric and materials will be provided. Attend as many as possible. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP John H. ‘Jack’ Burbage Jr. Regional Cancer Care Center Conference Room, 9707 Healthway Drive, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM. Women Supporting Women/AGH Support group for women and men who are battling breast cancer (current patients and survivors). Lunch is provided. RSVP: 410-548-7880.

St., 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STEAM STORY TIME ‘STEM FOR EVERYONE’ Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 AM. Hands-on science, technology, engineering and math activities for young children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

‘LET’S GROOVE TONIGHT’ DANCE PARTY Sello’s Italian Oven and Bar, 9802 Golf Course Road, 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM. Small plates by Sello’s, desserts by Baked Desserts, cash bar, disco prizes. Music by DJ Wax. Tickets cost $75 and are available at www.sellosoc.com or at Baked Desserts, 4 Bay Street, Berlin. Proceeds benefit the Jesse Klump Suicide Awareness & Prevention Program.

ANNIE, JR. Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic School, 11242 Racetrack Road, 6:00 PM. The performance is free of charge. Donations for the performing arts program may be made at the door.

WORCESTER COUNTY NAACP MEETING Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 6:45 PM. Sheriff Matt Crisafulli will discuss the protection and security of our community. The Executive Board meeting begins at 6 p.m. Interested persons are encouraged to attend. 443-944-6701

DIY BEESWAX CANDLES

BEACH SINGLES

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 5:00 PM. Create your own beeswax candles. Suitable for children 10 years old and older. Register: 410-632-3495. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Thursdays - Ropewalk Restaurant, 8203 Coastal Highway, 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM. Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577 or Kate, 410-524-0649. BeachSingles.org, http://www.BeachSingles.org

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OP/OC Wednesdays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB Wednesdays - Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM. Dance to the sounds of the ’50s and ’60s music. A $5 donation to benefit Veterans and local charities. Members and their guests welcome. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 410-208-1151, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

GRIEF SUPPORT Thursdays - Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11:00 AM. Coastal Hospice provides grief support and education. Participants work together to help each other navigate through grief at their own pace. Free and open to the public. Nicole Long, 443-614-6142

Wednesdays - Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St., 6:00 PM. 302-540-2127

Thurs., March 21

ONGOING EVENTS Kiwanis Club of Ocean Pines/Ocean City and the Ocean Pines Boat Club is sponsoring the trip planned for April 25. Cost is $20 and includes $15 slot play and a $7 food voucher. Guests are welcome. Reservations: Tom and Barbara Southwell, 410-641-5456.

PINE’EER CRAFT CLUB MEETING

BUS TRIPS

Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 10:00 AM. Refreshments served at 9:45 AM. March project will be Easter Bunny Bonnet. All are welcome. RSVP: Sharon Puser, 410-208-3032.

April 22 - Explore Washington, D.C. beginning at the National Mall, 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. The fee for transportation only is $45. April 28 - Day trip to the Virginia International Tattoo show in Norfolk, Va. The patriotic performance showcases more than 900 international performers.

STORY TIME ‘CATS’ Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington

MEDITATIVE LABYRINTH St. Paul’s by-the-Sea, 302 N. Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, Wednesdays, March 6 through April 10. It will be open from 68 p.m., except Ash Wednesday from 7:30-8:30 p.m.

BOOK A LIBRARIAN Any branch, through March. Need some one-on-one help with your resume, job application, eReader or basic computer skills? Contact your closest library branch to schedule a personal appointment. www.worcesterlibrary.org

FREE WELLNESS WORKSHOPS Free workshops dealing with hypertension, chronic pain self-management, chronic disease self-management, diabetes, fall prevention and cancer. If you would like to register for one of these workshops or you would like more information about bringing any of the workshops to your business or group, contact Jill at MAC, 410-742-0505, Ext. 159.

FORGE FRIDAY FORGE Youth and Family, 7804 Gumboro Road, Pittsville, every Friday, 6:308:30 p.m. This is a contemporary youth and family ministry, designed for kids ages 5-65 years. The program providees a meal, music, games, activities and a life lesson that can be of use to anyone. Info: Rob, 443-366-2813.

UMC THRIFT SHOP

HARRINGTON CASINO BUS TRIP OC/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING

Great for all ages and interests. Show begins at 2:30 p.m. The cost is $95 and includes a VIP seat and transportation. Bus will arrive back at 7:30 p.m. May 4 - Longwood Gardens Spring Bloom guided tour featuring more than 245,000 spring bulbs in bloom in the Idea Garden & Flower Garden Walk. The bus will depart at 8 a.m. and return at 6 p.m. Cost is $60 for adults for transportation and guided tour. These trips are open to the public and buses depart from the Ocean Pines Community Center. Reservations are required: Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department, 410-641-7052.

Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., Ocean City, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Open Monday through Saturday, year round. Located behind the church with a donation drop off room that is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 410289-4458

Crossword answers from page 48


MARCH 15, 2019

53 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.com and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

HIRING ALL POSITIONS!! Full time & Part time Stop by our location on 52nd street! or call 443-664-2825

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING

SALES SECRETARY

PM Restaurant ManagerEntry Level Position. Banquet experience a plus. Year-round position. Inquire within at 32 Palm at Hilton Suites 3200 Baltimore Ave Ocean City, MD

Busy Hotel is seeking, a year round full time Sales Secretary. Must have hotel sales experience. Applicant must be detail oriented and computer literate, proficient in Excel, Word & Publisher. Sales CRM experience a plus. Exceptional people skills, professional phone & email etiquette a must. Excellent benefits, working conditions and salary (commensurate with experience). Qualified applicants only, forward resume with salary requirements to: Sales Secretary P.O. Box 3500 Ocean City, MD 21843 EOE M/F/D/V

TOWN OF BERLIN EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY DIRECTOR-WATER RESOURCES AND PUBLIC WORKS The Town of Berlin is in search of a dynamic department head that will supervise and lead these departments. We have a competitive benefits package that includes life, health, dental, vision, enrollment with the Maryland State Retirement Plan and a 457(b) tax deferred savings plan. Duties: The Department Director oversees the day-to-day operations of the Waste Water Operation, Water Operation, Stormwater Operation and Public Works. The selected individual will coordinate and oversee all operations of these departments. The Director will manage a workforce of 25 personnel between the two departments. The selected candidate will develop and comply with an annual budget for all departments. The Director will provide technical direction and resolve operational issues. The Director will manage complex capital improvement projects from inception through completion. This Department Head also plans, coordinates and administers the Town’s recycling program. The Department Director will complete necessary information for grant applications and submittals. The Department Director will take action to resolve departmental, operation and administrative conflicts and issues which are in the best interest of the Town of Berlin and in accordance with State laws. Requirements: It is preferred that the selected candidate possess a college degree (BA/BS). Minimum requirement is a high school diploma or equivalent with seven (7) years of supervisory experience in a Water Resources/Public Works utility. Selected candidate must possess a valid state issued drivers license, a valid Maryland Water/Wastewater Operator license, Superintendent license and a Storm Water green card. Cover letter and resume may be mailed to the Town of Berlin or submitted via email to jfleetwood@berlinmd.gov, cover letter MUST state salary requirements

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!! Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities: Year Round, Full/Part Time: Pool Manager, Server, Bartender, Hostess/Host, Busser, Maintenance, Room Attendant, Housekeeping Housestaff

Free employee meal and excellent benefits.

Come be a part of our family! HIRING FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS: • Housekeepers • Houseman •Laundry Attendants • Front Desk Associates • Lifeguards All positions are required to work weekends. Interested applicants can apply in person or submit resume to: info@fskfamily.com 12806 Ocean Gateway Ocean City, MD 21842

Classifieds 410-723-6397 Ocean Resorts Golf Club is now accepting applications for Part Time Seasonal Clubhouse and Maintenance positions. Flexible hours. Golfing privileges included. Applicants must apply in person at Ocean Resorts Golf Club, 10655 Cathell Rd., Berlin, MD. Telephone inquiries will not be accepted.

Comfort Inn Gold Coast

HOTEL MAINTENANCE We are seeking to fill a hotel Maintenance position, full time, year round. Experience in hotel or condo maintenance preferred. Competitive pay and excellent benefits. Please apply in person at The Comfort Inn Gold Coast on 112th Street Ocean City, next to the Gold Coast Mall No phone calls please Worcester County Health Department Coordinator Special Programs I, Health Services - Full Time, contractual position located in Snow Hill. The main purpose of this position is to conduct assessments, planning, education and evaluation of activities in Emergency Preparedness, all Hazards Response Planning, implementation and recovery of the Worcester County Health Department. Must possess a Bachelor’s degree in nursing, social work, psychology, education counseling or a related field. Background check required. APPLY ONLINE at www.jobapscloud.com/md by March 29, 2019 We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. Appropriate accommodations for individuals with disabilities are available upon request by calling 410-632-1100 ext. 1221.

PT OFFICE ASSISTANT

for International Business located in Selbyville

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

Exciting opportunity in a positive, hard-working environment. Must have basic computer skills, including MS Word, Excel, and Microsoft Office. Tues. - Thurs., 9-3

Classifieds 410-723-6397

Email resumes to: samantha.z@gminsights.com

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Now hiring at both locations 67th St. & Tanger Outlets PT, FT Positions Available We are looking for friendly, energetic people to join our crew Experience preferred • Grill/Sub Makers • Dishwashers • Counter Persons Serious inquiries only! Call Angie at 443-523-8377

PUT COLOR IN YOUR CLASSIFIEDS! CALL 410-723-6397

Classifieds 410-723-6397 Rare opening at Ocean City’s premiere oceanfront hotel and conference center! We are looking for a yearround, full-time professional to join our terrific Sales Team. Position requires someone who is detail oriented and computer literate, with super people skills and a great attitude. Hotel experience is not required, but helpful. Excellent benefits, salary, commissions and an opportunity to grow and learn with an experienced team. Please send resume with salary requirements to: joann@princessroyale.com

Work in Ocean City, MD WORKon ONthe THEBeach BEACH THIS SUMMER •• Now Rent Hiring Umbrellas & Chairs to Beachgoers Students for Over 80 Positions •• Provide Now Hiring Students for Over 80 Postitions Exceptional Beach Service to Visitors •• Make Make Lifelong Friends Friends & Memories & Memories •• Prepare Earn Valuable SalesSales & Customer Service Skills to Sharpen & Customer Service Skills • Vibrant Energetic Individuals Wanted Wanted & Energetic Individuals • Hourly ++ Commission Commission++Tips Tips

Come See Us at Ocean City Job Fair on April 15 from 9A-2P

Apply at EightyFiveAndSunny.com/Employment

Worcester County Health Department COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSE II - Full Time, State Benefits. Occasional weekends and evenings required. Duties include but not limited to providing clinical services in the Communicable Disease Program including health promotion, maintenance, and education; case management and coordination of care for patients using the nursing process. Must possess a current license as a Registered Nurse from the Maryland State Board of Nursing. Valid driver’s license required. Background check & drug screening required. APPLY ONLINE at www.jobapscloud.com/md We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, gender, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or disability. Appropriate accommodations for individuals with disabilities are available upon request by calling 410-632-1100 ext. 1221.

Online www.oceancitytoday.com s d ie if s s la C Convenient, quick, no waiting, no calls ~ Days, nights and weekends Order Your


PAGE 54

MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Now Hiring

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Seasonal Positions

DINING ROOM MANAGER

Bus Drivers, Dispatchers, Tram Drivers & Conductors

We are currently recruiting an experienced food & beverage manager to oversee and be responsible for our busy dining room & convention center. Must have strong management experience in a large restaurant, banquet and/or convention services experience, ability to train staff, excellent communication skills and ability to solve problems. Must be able to work a flexible schedule including weekends and holidays. Our current F&B Manager is retiring after 26 years. Excellent salary and benefits package. Send resume and salary requirements to: Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 410-524-3535 Facsimile 410-723-9109

204 65th Street, Bldg. F, Ocean City, MD 21842 (410) 723-2174 ————————————— Solid Waste Collections Drivers & Assistants

EOE M/F/D/V

NOW HIRING Awesome People Apply Saturdays & Sundays Now through March 11am-2pm

Holding Open Interviews For:

• Servers • Bus Staff •Host/Hostess •Kitchen Staff •Security Come by and join our 2019 family! 54th Street, OCMD (Behind Chauncey’s Surf Shop) 410-723-5565

Accounting Clerk Wanted Full Time - $14-$15 per hour Responsible for providing accounting support to accounting supervisors and other managers within the department. Keys daily worksheets to the general ledger system, ensures files are complete and maintained as needed, handles accounts payable duties, and assists accounting personnel. Job Tasks and Responsibilities: Perform accounting and clerical functions to support supervisors. Research, track, and resolve accounting problems. Compile and sort invoices and checks. Issue checks for accounts payable. Record business transactions and key daily worksheets to the general ledger system. Record charges and refunds. Support accounting personnel. Input type vouchers, invoices, checks, account statements, reports, and other records. Provide front desk customer service. File and tally deposits. Work with adding machines, calculators, databases and bank accounts. Match invoices to work orders. Process bills for payment. Open mail and match payments to invoices. Arrange for money to be delivered to bank. Utilize computer systems to run databases, pay bills and order supplies. Contact individuals with delinquent accounts. Ensure customers accept payments or refunds. Email Resume to: dunkindonutjobs@gmail.com Subject Line: Accounting Clerk or Apply in Person @ 9919 Golf Course Rd., Ocean City, MD Serious inquiries only, must live within a 30 minute radius of West Ocean City Maryland.

PUT COLOR IN YOUR CLASSIFIEDS! CALL 410-723-6397

For more information or to apply in person:

For more information or to apply in person:

204 65th Street, Bldg. E, Ocean City, MD 21842 (410) 524-0318 ————————————— Boardwalk Comfort Station Attendants & Maintenance Workers For more information or to apply in person:

208 65th Street, Ocean City, MD 21842 (410) 524-0391 ————————————— For a complete list visit oceancitymd.gov

Fullll-Tiim Fu me/P e//PPaart-Tiim me

Recreation Attendants Housekeeping Staff PT Membership Coordinator Please apply in person at the new Health and Aquatic Club at Bayside 31264 Americana Prkwy., Selbyville, 19975 Call: 302.988.2315, x 0; or email: BaysideRecreation@troon.com

Property Management Assistant Needed We have a busy rental department. We are looking for someone to assist in organizing maintenance calls, dispatching vendors, and helping in the office. Maintenance knowledge a plus. q Professional/Friendly q Must travel to properties mostly in Ocean Pines and Ocean City. q Must work most weekends as needed q Minor maintenance abilities a plus. q Good clear handwriting Please fax resumes, letters, references & inquiries to

Hileman Real Estate, Inc. Attn: Chris to fax # 410-208-9562

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!! Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Golf Sales Manager We are currently recruiting a Golf Sales Manager. The successful candidate will be responsible for selling, coordinating, and packaging overnight accommodations, golf, and food & beverage. Previous golf packaging experience is a must. Excellent benefits package available. Compensation commensurate with experience. Apply in person or fax resume with salary requirements Mondays through Saturdays 10am – 4pm. Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

Come Join Our Winning Team!

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

PGN Crabhouse, 29th Street & Coastal Hwy. PGN Crabhouse Help Wanted Waitstaff, Kitchen Help Apply Within after 11:00 am.

MED. TECH. CPR, first aide certified. Must be able to pass background check. Drug free facility. Full time position 7pm-7am, and every other weekend. Email resume to truittsandy@yahoo.com or apply in person. 10602 Friendship Rd., Berlin, MD 21811.

AUTOMOTIVE GREAT OPPORTUNITIES! In business for 35 yearsWe have Auto / Marine parts stores, Service Centers and Used Car Dealership and still growing! Due to some recent retirements along with expansion, we are hiring for additional: - Exp. Technicians - Up to $27.00 hr. - Oil Lube - Tire Techs - Maryland State Inspector - Exp. Tow Truck DriversVery competitive pay!! - Auto Parts and Service Counter Associates Come grow with us Plenty of room for advancement!! Locations in the Bethany Beach, Rehoboth Beach and Ocean City Maryland areas. Company matched retirement plan and much more!! Call: 443-373-1324 or 443-497-0465

Papa John’s - Now Hiring Managers for the Ocean City area. Call Jeff: 302-5418081. OFFICE MANAGER. FT/YR. Seeking bright, energetic individual for our small busy office. Experience w/Word, Excel and QBooks. Excellent organizational, communication and customer service skills. Rental experience a plus. Send resume to Fred@paradiseoc.com Alex’s Italian Restaurant NOW HIRING YEAR-ROUND SERVERS. Apply in Person. Rt. 50, West OC. Busy Dental Office looking for Dental Assistant with Radiology Cert., good clinical & keyboard skills. Also, Front Desk position. Dental knowledge and good keyboard skills required. M-F, FT w/many benefits. Email: contact@atlanticdental.co m or fax 410-213-2955

Chairside

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE Email Resume:

is now accepting applications for the following positions:

Hostess, Cooks, Boutique Sales, A/V Staff, EMT, General Maintenance, Painter & Boat Mate For more details or to apply, please go online to www.seacrets.com/employment

molarbiz@yahoo.com www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.com

Hiring ALL Positions!!

NOW HIRING Server/Cook AM & PM Shifts apply in person: Atrium Café inside Quality Inn 54th

Full time & Part time To apply go to: www.mygcjob.com

Become a Better You in 2019! To Order Product Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net To Become an Avon Representative Sign Up at www. ChristinesBeautyShop.com

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew for our WOC kitchen facility Up to $16/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

Classified Deadline is

Now accepting applications for the following positions! Front Desk Recreation Room Inspector Room Attendant Maintenance Server Barista Hostess Line Cook Looking for experienced personnel with customer service skills. Must be flexible with hours. Email resume to jobs@carouselhotel.com or stop by and complete an application at the Front Desk. We require satisfactory pre-employment drug testing and background check. Carousel Resort Hotel & Condominiums 11700 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 EOE

Monday @ 5pm

- WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION TECHNICIANS & MANAGERS (IICRC certifications a plus)

- DECK COATING APPLICATORS - LEAD CARPENTERS/FRAMERS - INTERIOR REMODELING PROFESSIONALS Please apply in person: 12905 Coastal Hwy, Ocean City MD, online at https://oceantowerconstruction.com/careers/ or call 443-366-5556 during regular business hours


MARCH 15, 2019

RENTALS

RENTALS

Summer Rental: Waterfront, 2-Bedroom Condo with boat slip. $8,500 for summer. Call 443-366-0990.

RAMBLER MOTEL

Oceanfront Boardwalk Condo 2BR, 2BA, washer/ dryer. June 9, 2019 - June 29, 2019. No pets. Long term off season also available. 410-598-5572 Year-Round House Share. Ocean Pines. Furnished. Private bedroom and bath. Washer/dryer. $800/month plus security. Includes utilities. 443-996-4466. Text for photos.

9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

WEEKLY • SEASONAL

R E N TA L S

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626 VA C AT I O N S

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals

Please contact us: “JNBINVESTMENTSHILDA” on 302-222-6310 We have references available

We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com

ACCEPTING RENTAL LISTINGS!

REAL ESTATE

Contact us if you have a home you would like to rent. Call Bernie Flax Today!

Year-round remodeled furrnished studio Apt. 61st. $975/mo. Includes electric, water, cable w/HBO, outdoor pool. No pets. Call Donna for pics. 443-504-4460.

EXIT REALTY AT THE BEACH

3BR, 2BA THOROUGHLY RENOVATED HOME. 8 Miles to the Beach. Ready to move into! Great School District. VETERAN or USDA FUNDING AVAILABLE. $249,000. Call Howard Martin Realty, 410-352-5555.

410-208-3948 Cell: 410-629-9070

11002 Manklin Meadows Lane #3 Ocean Pines, MD 21811

RENTALS

Efficiency Starting at $850 2BR, 1BA starting at $1195 3BR, 2BA Starting at $1200 4BR, 2.5BA Starting at $1475 Available Summer Seasonal Rentals @ www.hilemanrealestate.com

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

FURNITURE

Deeply Discounted Below Market Foreclosure -1BR 1 BATH 2 LEVEL CONDO

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

123 Street Jockey Beach Club, Unit #325 $99,900.00!!!!!!

410-250-7000

BELOW MARKET FORECLOSURE WITH PRICE APPROVED AS AN ASSIGNMENT OF BANK CONTRACT. SOLD AS IS. THIS 1BR 1 BATH 2 LEVEL CONDO AFFORDS PRIVATE 2ND LEVEL BEDROOM 1ST FLOOR KITCHEN AND LIVING SPACE STEPS TO THE BEACH. END UNIT WITH EXTRA WINDOW BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE FOR RENT FIRST COME FIRST SERVE BASIS, ADD PAINT, CARPET, APPLIANCES & GAIN IMMEDIATE EQUITY, great rental potential and or a very affordable vacation getaway. BEST BUY IN OC! Email Seller For Special Assignment Documents at: jamessapia1@gmail.com or call Jim Sapia at 443-745-6905 ~ Licensed Maryland Agent --------------------------

146th Street, Ocean City

SERVICES

BUDGET MOVERS 443-664-5797 LOCAL & EAST COAST MOVING Full Packing Service Piano Movers - Full Service

For other foreclosure opportunities please visit our website at marylandforeclosures.net

We Want Your Rentals! We manage nice and updated long term rentals in Mid-North Ocean City area. Our business will take care of all the details in renting your property.

PAGE 55

Ocean City Today

Open 6 Days A Week Mon.-Sat., 9-5 * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

REAL ESTATE

SERVICES

West Ocean City Waterfront Lots. Two side-by-side with dock and rip rap. $175,000 each. Call Howard Martin Realty, 410-3525555.

House and Rental Clean Out, small and local moving, and removal of junk and furniture. Also, will clean out garages/ sheds. 302-2227297, 302-422-9390

DRASTICALLY REDUCED WATERFRONT LOT, Bishopville. $99,000. Howard Marin Realty, 410-352-5555.

Leaf Removal and Yard Clean Up all winter long. Please call Tyler Layton. 410-920-4292

www.facebook.com/OCBudgetMovers YARD SALE

DONATIONS

Downsizing.. Inside & Outside Tag Sale... Furniture, antiques, glassware, old farm items, some “yard sale” items! 9921 Main St., Berlin. March 22 & 23, 9am-6pm.

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065.

OPEN HOUSE

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

For Sale by Owner: 11207 West Marie Drive, Bishopville. $379,500. 4BR, 3.5BA. 3057 sq. ft. A TRUE GEM! Sat. 3/16 & Sun. 3/17, 1pm - 4pm.

Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

COMMERCIAL Self-Storage Units on Route 50. 100 sq. ft., 150 sq. ft., and 250 sq. ft. Call Bill, 301-537-5391. Berlin: Atlantic Business Center. Office space 350 sq. ft. for rent. Utilities incl. $400/ month. Also, several storage units available $95/month. Call 410-726-5471 or 410641-4300. Warehouse (Lrg.) For Rent 11212 Gum Point Rd., Berlin, MD $1,200 per month. Call 410-430-9797. 2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443-497-4200.

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EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINMARYLAND STATEWIDE ING-Get FAA certification to fix CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military benNETWORK efits. Call Aviation Institute of AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS Maintenance 866-823-6729. DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, FOR SALE RVs Lutheran Mission Society Privacy Hedges – SPRING of MD. Compassion Place ministries help local families BLOWOUT SALE 5ft Leyland with food, clothing, counseling Cypress or Green Giant ArTax deductible. MVA licensed borvitae, now only $49 each. #W1044. 410-636-0123 Beautiful, Nursery Grown. FREE Installation/FREE delivwww.CompassionPlace.org ery. Limited Supply! BUSINESS SERVICES ORDER NOW: 802-922-6947 Place a business card ad in www.discounttreefarm.com the Regional Small Display 2x2/2x4 Advertising Network – Let MDDC help you grow your business! Call TODAY at 410-212-0616 to increase your customer base and get results.

REAL ESTATE Delaware New Move-In Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. Homes from low $100's, No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866--629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com SERVICESMISCELLANEOUS Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-2120616. Ask for Multi-Media Specialist - Wanda & watch your results grow.

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Maryland, Delaware and D.C.: 106 papers with a circulation of 2.3 million and readership of 4.9 million! For only $495 Deadline is Wednesday of the week prior to publication.

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oceancitytoday.com • baysideoc.com


PAGE 56

MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

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PAGE 57

Ocean City Today

ROOFING

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References Available

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE WATERFRONT WITH A BAY VIEW

TAKE TIME TO ENJOY THE BEACH

717 SOUTH SURF ROAD

122 RAVEN WAY OCEAN CITY, MD

JUST LISTED This 3 bedroom 2 ½ bath home is located In Caine Woods and has a wide open floor plan. Large living room with a gas fireplace. Large Kitchen and a formal Dining room. Both a open deck and enclosed sunroom, Pier and a boatlift. Wide open canal with a view of the bay. Check this one out today won’t be on the market long. Sold Furnished for $535,000.

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

NEW PRICE Make every day a vacation in this 2-bedroom 1bath beach retreat. Can you picture yourself having your morning coffee on the beach or going for a long walk ? Located in a terrific neighborhood one block from the ocean with a pool . The yard is perfect for those summer cookouts and creating memories. A place you’ll love for only $104,900. Don’t wait Now for a L@@K today.

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

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For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

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MONTEGO BAY COMMUNITY MONTEGO BAY COMMUNITY Beautifully maintained 3BR/2BA single-family is turnkey. Front living room floorplan with cathedral ceilings, drywall interior w/crown & baseboard moldings, insulated windows and has been recently remodeled. Full master bathroom was redone in 2018 w/new fiberglass tub/shower combination, tile floor and walls, and a new toilet and vanity. Guest bathroom was redone in 2018 with tile walls and floor, new toilet, v anity and fiberglass shower. Kitchen has a breakfast bar, newly (2019) painted cabinets, an electric oven and range top (new 2019), tile back splash (2018), double stainless steel sink, dishwasher, frost-free refrigerator and tile floors. Living room, dining room & hallway features new (2018) luxury vinyl flooring & new furniture. Listed at $244,900.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

13205 PEACHTREE RD

Montego Bay Realty montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

This 3BR/2BA mobile home has been updated & shows great. Features newer appliances, newer laminate floors, newer berber carpeting, newer doors, and more. Located in the in Quiet North O.C. Community features 2 in-ground swimming pools, 2 tennis courts, 2 shuffleboard courts, 9 hole mini-golf, bayfront boardwalk with 3 fishing/crabbing piers, a wildlife sanctuary with pond and blacktop walking trail, all for only $272.00/yr. Conveniently located and within walking distance to shopping, dining, the beach and the beautiful North Side Park, home of the 4th of July fireworks. Listed at $169,900.

Call Bill Rothstein

443-280-2530 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

134 YAWL DR

Montego Bay Realty montegobayrealty@aol.com www.montegobayrealty.com

The #1 Resource for Ocean Pines News & Information Find us on FB and on the Web:

www.BaysideOC.com

*2018 OPA Survey


PAGE 58 BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 103 FOURTH ST. A/R/T/A 103 4TH ST. POCOMOKE A/R/T/A POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated February 17, 2011 and recorded in Liber 5670, Folio 356 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $247,500.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 2, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lien-

Ocean City Today / Public Notices holder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 330368-2) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE 10148 GERMANTOWN RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated March 2, 1989 and recorded in Liber 1530, Folio 18 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $37,839.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at

the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on APRIL 2, 2019 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $5,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any

MARCH 15, 2019 such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 320149-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 417 WALNUT ST. POCOMOKE A/R/T/A POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated February 27, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4879, Folio 306 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $134,550.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 26, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the pur-


MARCH 15, 2019 chaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Pur-

Ocean City Today / Public Notices chaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 307508-2) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/7/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 4340 East West Highway, Suite 600 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 3 BARNACLE CT. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from William G. Hill, III dated April 19, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4418, folio 459 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 22, 2019 AT 1:00 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #03-077276. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. The property will be sold subject to a prior mortgage, the amount to be announced at the time of sale. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by pur-

chaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale. Trustees’ file number 62693. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-3/7/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 101 S. CHURCH ST. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated February 14, 2017 and recorded in Liber 6946, Folio 327 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $299,570.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on

PAGE 59 MARCH 19, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $30,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within


PAGE 60 ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 327816-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-2/28/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 715 142ND ST., UNIT #430 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated March 11, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4052, Folio 428 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $108,500.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 19, 2019 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit No. 430 in Lighthouse Village Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of

Ocean City Today / Public Notices Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 326449-1) PLEASE CONSULT

WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-2/28/3t _________________________________ James Clubb, Jr., Esq. 108 8th Street Ocean City, MD 21842 JEFF HURLEY 10225 Silver Point Lane Ocean City, MD 21842 Plaintiff vs. ESTATE OF CECIE JANE PARADIS c/o Leo W. Ottey, Jr. 1190 West Northern Parkway, #124 Baltimore, MD 21210-1431 and THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF LAURA PARADIS, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, 0R UNDER THE DECEDENT and WORCESTER COUNTY c/o Maureen Howarth, Esq. 1 West Market Street Room 1103 Snow Hill, MD 21863 and ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY described as 5618 George Island Landing Road Stockton, Maryland 21864 Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-19-000032

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption from the tax sale on the following property located in Worcester County, Maryland, sold by Phillip G. Thompson, Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and for Worcester County, to the Plaintiff, the parcel of land described as follows: 5618 George Island Landing Road, Stockton, Maryland 21864, Deed Reference CWN 20/293, Parcel Number 08004862. The property is an improved lot, and is assessed to Cecie Paradis and Laura Paradis. The Complaint states among other things that the amount necessary for redemption has not been paid. The sale was held on May 18, 2018, and more than six (6) months has passed since that date. It is thereupon this 27th of February, 2019, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by t!he insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to redeem the property or answer the Com-

MARCH 15, 2019 plaint by April 29, 2019, or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property and vesting in the Plaintiff title to said property, free and clear of all liens and encumbrances. Brian D. Shockley JUDGE OCD-3/7/3t _________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MD 21204 410-296-2550 File #: 451444 Edward S. Cohn Stephen N. Goldberg Richard E. Solomon Richard J. Rogers Michael McKeefery Christianna Kersey David W. Simpson, Jr. 600 Baltimore Avenue, Suite 208 Towson, MD 21204 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs v. Gregory D. Butler, Jr. 1407 Saint Louis Avenue #5 Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-17-000285

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given this 22nd day of February, 2019, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 25th day of March, 2019, provided a copy of this notice be published in a newspaper of general circulation in Worcester County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 18th day of March, 2019. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $118,246.93. The property sold herein is known as 1407 Saint Louis Avenue #5, Ocean City, MD 21842. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/28/3t _________________________________ REGAN J. R. SMITH ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17744 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF BARBARA B. CEDRONE Notice is given that Nona J. Cedrone, 14605 Rolling Green Way, Gaithersburg, MD 20878, was on


MARCH 15, 2019 February 25, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Barbara B. Cedrone who died on February 3, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 25th day of August, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Nona J. Cedrone Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: February 28, 2019 OCD-2/28/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. DENISE A. COPES KARL R. COPES 2617 Lambertson Road Pocomoke A/R/T/A Pocomoke City, MD 21851 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-18-000323

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given this 26th day of February, 2019, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 2617 Lambertson Road, Pocomoke A/R/T/A Pocomoke City, MD 21851, made and reported by

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Ocean City Today / Public Notices the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 1st day of April, 2019, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 25th day of March, 2019. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $182,900.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-3/7/3t _________________________________ REGAN J.R. SMITH ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17723 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF VAUGHN O. MCABEE Notice is given that Regan J.R. Smith, Esq., 3509 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842, was on February 26, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Vaughn O. McAbee who died on December 27, 2018, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 26th day of August, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Regan J.R. Smith, Esq. Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street

Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 7, 2019 OCD-3/7/3t _________________________________ TOWN OF BERLIN

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING FRANCHISE AGREEMENT WITH COMCAST CABLEVISION The Mayor and Council of the Town of Berlin will hold a public hearing on Monday, March 25, 2019 at 7:00 p.m. in the Berlin Town Hall Council Chambers, 10 William Street, Berlin, MD 21811. The Mayor and Council will consider factors such as: has the cable operator substantially complied with the material terms of the existing franchise; quality of service, including signal quality; response to consumer complaints, and billing practices; whether the operator has the financial, legal, and technical ability to provide the services, facilities, and equipment as set forth in the operator’s proposal; and whether the operator’s proposal is reasonable to meet the future cable-related community needs and interests, taking into account the cost of meeting such needs and interests. This Public Hearing is not to establish customer rates for Comcast-provided services. Public input is encouraged. For more information, please contact Administrative Services Director Mary Bohlen at 410-641-4314 or mbohlen@berlinmd.gov. Comments for inclusion in the public record can also be mailed to Town of Berlin, Attn: Comcast Franchise Agreement, 10 William Street, Berlin, MD 21811. OCD-3/7/2t _________________________________ AYRES JENKINS GORDY & ALMAND PA VICTORIA L. O’NEILL ESQ. 6200 COASTAL HIGHWAY SUITE 200 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE

TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 17741 Notice is given that the Orphans’ Court of Berks County, PA appointed Michael B. Weaver, 1980 Fallow Court, Macungie, PA 18062 as the Executor of the Estate of Joan E. Weaver who died on December 09, 2018 domiciled in Pennsylvania, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Victoria L. O’Neill Esq. whose address is 6200 Coastal Hwy., Ste. 200, Ocean City, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before

the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Michael B. Weaver Foreign Personal Representative Terri Westcott Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of Newspaper: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: March 07, 2019 OCD-3/7/3t _________________________________ STEVEN W. RAKOW ESQ PO BOX 1909 BERLIN, MD 21811

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17737 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF KAROLYN P. GLASS Notice is given that Robert Craig Glass Jr., 622 East Roberts St., Norristown, PA 19401, was on February 19, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Karolyn P. Glass who died on January 30, 2019, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 19th day of August, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Robert Craig Glass Jr.


PAGE 62 Personal Representative True Test Copy Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: February 28, 2019 OCD-2/28/3t _________________________________ James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842 JEFF HURLEY 10225 Silver Point Lane Ocean City, MD 21842 Plaintiff vs: JOHN MARSHALL.(Deceased) c/o Paul A Marshall 999 Waterbury Heights Drive Crownsville, MD 21032-1434 and THE TESTATE AND INTESTATE SUCCESSORS OF JOHN MARSHALL, DECEASED, AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THE DECEDENT and WORCESTER COUNTY c/o Maureen Howarth, Esq. 1 West Market Street Room 1103 Snow Hill, MD 21863 and ALL PERSONS THAT HAVE OR CLAIM TO HAVE ANY INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY described as Lot South Side Pocomoke Road Stockton, Maryland 21864 Defendants IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND CASE NO. C-23-CV-19-000031

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption from the tax sale on the following property located in Worcester County, Maryland; sold by Phillip G. Thompson, Collector of Taxes for the State of Maryland and for Worcester County, to the Plaintiff, the parcel of land described as follows: Lot South Side Pocomoke Road, Stockton, Deed Reference 1650/541, Account Number 08005052. The property is an improved lot, and is assessed to John Marshall. The Complaint states among other things that the amount necessary for redemption has not been paid. The sale was held on May 18, 2018, and more than six (6) months has passed since that date: It is thereupon this 25th of February, 2019, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this Order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to redeem

Ocean City Today / Public Notices the property or answer the Complaint by 4th of May, 2019, or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property and vesting in the Plaintiff title to said property, free and clear of all liens and encumbrances. Brian D. Shockley Judge True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________

NOTICE

Disposal of Surplus Vehicles and Equipment to be Auctioned on GovDeals.com “Disposition of County Personal Property no longer used by the County” The following described personal property, including vehicles, furniture and equipment, have been determined to be no longer required for County use by the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland and deemed to be surplus property: SURPLUS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT Surplus vehicles, listed by make and model (with model year), as follows: Chevrolet Blazer (2004); Chevrolet C-1500 (2004); Chevrolet Cavalier (2004); Chevrolet G3500 Van (2004); Chevrolet S-10 (1996, 2003); Chevrolet Silverado 1500 (1991, 2002, three 2004, two 2005, three 2006); Dodge Charger (2007); Dodge Ram 1500 (2007); Dodge Ram 1500 4x4 (2007); Dodge Stratus (2005, 2006); Ford Crown Victoria (two 2006, 2008, two 2011); Ford Expedition (2006); Ford F-150 (1988, 2007, 2008, 2009); Ford F-250 (2002); Ford F-350 (2000); Ford F-800 (1992, 1997); and Ford Ranger (1992, 1997, 2001). Surplus equipment, including: CASE 580 Super K Backhoe (1992); JCB 930-2 Forklift (1998); John Deere 670B; Kohler 30KW Generator; Pequea TR616 Trailer (1995); and Powergard DLC20 Generator. Surplus furniture and miscellaneous equipment, including: Aluminum Tool Box (Truck); Lot of Spare Wheels and Tires; Electric Tabletop Drill Press; Trico Wiper Blade Display Cart; Rotary SM12 Vehicle Lift (12,000 lbs.); Bucket of Used Wheel Weights; Miscellaneous Shop Tools; Craftsman Rolling Tool Box with Top Box; Conference Table; Leaf Blowers (2); 400 Watt Hanging Shop Lights (2); Bicycles (2); PL920 Subsurface Camera; 5-foot Tractor 3Point Scraper Blade; 6-foot Tractor 3-Point Scraper Blade; Garage Doors and Tracks; Portable Air Compressor; Robinair A/C Machine Model34800; Refrigerator; Gas Auger with 8 Bits; Steel Angle Iron; Homelite Gas Operated Trash Pump; Full Length Truck Beacon Lights (2); Steel Concrete Curb Forming Boards (2); Wooden Tables (4 at 6-feet, 1 at 5-feet); McCullough Mite-E-Lite Generator, Small; Small Mountable

Traffic Arrow; Safco Mobile Blueprint Rack (2); Old Style Bridge Nails; Kids Table and 4 Wooden Children’s Chairs; Piano with Bench; PA System; Filing Cabinets (2); Coffee Pots and Miscellaneous Office Equipment; Dell Optiplex Computers (40); iPhone 5S; iPhone 6S (2); Tables - Folding Card Tables (3), Regular Table, Foldable Rolling Table; Filing Cabinets - 5-Drawer, 2Drawer (2), 4-Drawer (7); Wooden Storage Cabinet on Wheels; Leather Chairs (2); Wood Coffee Table; John Deere SX85 30-inch Riding Lawnmower; 3.5 HP 22-inch Push Lawnmowers (2); Trash Receptacle Holders for 50-Gallon Receptacles (2); Rolling Trash Receptacles - 64 Gallon (6); and Stainless Steel 3Sink Food Prep Table. TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF SALE AND CONVEYANCE: The County Commissioners propose to solicit competitive bids via an Internet-based auction system operated by GovDeals, Inc. for which the winning bidder pays a buyers premium of twelve and one-half percent (12.5%) of the winning bid for each transaction so that there is no net cost to the County. All of the above referenced surplus property will be offered for sale “AS IS, WHERE IS.” The County Commissioners make no warranty, guaranty or representation of any kind, expressed or implied, as to the merchantability or fitness for any purpose of the property offered for sale. The County Commissioners warrant to the buyer that the property offered for sale will conform to its description. The County Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids as they see fit and to withdraw from sale any of the items listed. Payment in full by successful bidders shall be made to Worcester County Commissioners. OPPORTUNITY FOR OBJECTIONS: Anyone objecting to the proposed conveyance of the above surplus vehicles and equipment shall do so in writing prior to 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 28, 2019, or in person at the regularly scheduled meeting of the County Commissioners to be held at 10:00 a.m. on April 2, 2019 in the County Commissioners Meeting Room, Room 1101 - Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING REQUEST FOR GROWTH ALLOCATION ATLANTIC COASTAL BAYS CRITICAL AREA Pursuant to Subsections NR 3110(b)(2) and NR 3-112(c)(4) of the Natural Resources Article of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, a request has been submitted to the Worcester County Commissioners by Hugh Cropper IV Esquire on behalf of Moore’s Boat LLC for the reclassification of 4.71 acres of land from Resource Conservation Area (RCA) to Limited Developed Area (LDA). The

MARCH 15, 2019 subject property is located along the eastern side of North Piney Point Road in Bishopville and is identified on Worcester County Tax Map 10 as Parcels 4, 171 and 304. Pursuant to Section NR 3112(c)(4) of the Natural Resources Article of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, the County Commissioners will hold a PUBLIC HEARING on: TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 2019 at 10:40 AM in the County Commissioners’ Meeting Room Room 1101 - Government Center One West Market Street Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 At said public hearing, the Commissioners will consider the request for the awarding of growth allocation for the above referenced property, any staff reports and recommendations, comments of other agencies, the recommendation of the Planning Commission, and any testimony or comments offered before them. The file containing the request for growth allocation and other pertinent information which will be entered into the record of the public hearing are on file and are available for inspection at the Department of Environmental Programs, Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Room 1306, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863-1070 during regular business hours. Diana Purnell, President OCD-3/14/1t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110 of the Code of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Zoning Ordinance for Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted by the Board of Zoning Appeals for Ocean City, Maryland in the Council Chambers of City Hall located on Baltimore Avenue and Third Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: THURSDAY, MARCH 28, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(2)(b) requesting a special parking exception to waive six (6) parking spaces to build a swimming pool. The site of the appeal is described as an unnumbered lot, Parcel 9135 of the Bayside Keys Plat, further described as located on the south side of Rusty Anchor Road, and known locally as Sunset Cove Condominium, 701 Rusty Anchor Road, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland.


MARCH 15, 2019 APPLICANT: SUNSET COVE CONDOMINIUM – (BZA 2524 #19-09400001) Further information concerning the public hearings may be examined in the office of the Department of Planning and Community Development in City Hall. Alfred Harrison, Chairman Heather Stansbury, Attorney OCD-3/14/2t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARING AMENDMENT TO WORCESTER COUNTY WATER AND SEWERAGE PLAN AND EXPANSION OF THE OCEAN PINES SANITARY SERVICE AREA AND THE RIVER RUN SANITARY SERVICE AREA TO ADD THE FORMER PINE SHORE NORTH GOLF COURSE PROPERTY The Worcester County Commissioners will hold a concurrent public hearing to consider applications filed by Mark Cropper and Dane Bauer on behalf of River Run Development Associates LLC and Nichols-Neff Properties, LLC for a proposed amendment to the Worcester County Water and Sewerage Plan and an expansion of the Ocean Pines Sanitary Service Area and the River Run Sanitary Service Area. The application for amendment to the Water and Sewerage Plan seeks to add the water and wastewater systems for a proposed residential community on land formerly known as the Pine Shore North Golf Course on the property shown as Parcels 127 and 259 on Worcester County Tax Map 15, Tax Account I.D. # 03-005364 and # 03-005372, located on Beauchamp Road, east of Racetrack Road, north of the current boundary of the Ocean Pines Sanitary Service Area and directly southwest of the current boundary of the River Run Sanitary Service Area. The applicant also proposes the sanitary services area for the project be re-designated from categories S-6 and W-6 (no planned service) to S-1 and W-1 (Present to 2years). The applicant is proposing that the sanitary services for the expanded service area be provided by the purchase of ninety (90) equivalent dwelling units (EDUs) of potable water capacity from the Ocean Pines Sanitary Service Area and ninety (90) EDUs of wastewater treatment capacity purchased from available excess capacity from the River Run Sanitary Service Area. The Worcester County Planning Commission reviewed the proposed Water and Sewerage Plan amendment at its meeting on January 3, 2019 and found it to be consistent with the Worcester County Comprehensive Plan and the zoning category for the subject properties. The County Commissioners will also evaluate the proposed expansion of the sanitary service area in accordance with the provisions of Section PW 5-305 of the Public Works Article of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland and the staff reports. The PUBLIC HEARING on these

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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

PUBLIC NOTICE The motor vehicles described below have been abandoned. The owners and lien holders are hereby informed of their right to reclaim the vehicles upon payment of all charges and costs resulting from the towing, preservation, and storage of the vehicles. The failure of the owners or lien holders to reclaim the vehicles within three weeks of notification shall be deemed a waiver by the owners or lien holders of all rights, title and interest and thereby consent to the sale of the vehicles at public auction beginning March 14, 2019 or to have it otherwise disposed of in a manner provided by law. Line No Year Make Model 036-19 2001 OLDSMOBILE ALERO

Color WHITE

Style 4S

VIN 1G3NL52T61C113579

Mileage N/A

All vehicles will be sold at auction on-line at www.govdeals.com. For details call 410-723-6643. AUTH: Ross Buzzuro Chief of Police OCD-3/14/3t ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ applications will be held on TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 2019 at 10:30 A.M. in the County Commissioners’ Meeting Room Room 1101 - Government Center One West Market Street Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 The case file for the applications may be reviewed at the Department of Department of Environmental Programs, Room 1306 (3rd floor) Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863 between the hours of 8:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday (except Holidays). Anyone having questions should contact Robert Mitchell, Director of Environmental Programs, at 410-632-1220. All interested citizens are encouraged to attend the hearing and express their views on the proposed amendments and actions. Both written and oral testimony will be accepted. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-3/14/2t _________________________________

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Sewer Line Cleaning and Inspection Services West Ocean City Service Area Worcester County, Maryland The Worcester County Commissioners are currently accepting sealed bids for sewer line cleaning and internal inspection services in the West Ocean City Service Area for the Water and Wastewater Division of the Worcester County Department of Public Works. The work will consist of light cleaning and closed-circuit television (CCTV) inspection of approximately 15,000 linear feet of 8-inch diameter gravity sewer lines. Bid specification packages and bid forms may be picked up from the Office of the County Commissioners, Worcester County Government Cen-

ter, One West Market Street - Room 1103, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, obtained online at www.co.worcester.md.us or by calling the Commissioners’ Office at 410-632-1194 to request a package by mail. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1:00 PM, Monday, April 8, 2019 in the Office of the County Commissioners, Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street - Room 1103, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Bid for Sewer Line Cleaning and Inspection Services" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, bids will be forwarded to the Department of Public Works for tabulation, review and recommendation to the County Commissioners for their consideration at a future meeting. In awarding the bid, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever bid they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering lowest or best bid, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of bidders being considered, previous experience of bidders with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to John Ross or Gary Serman with the Water and Wastewater Division of Public Works, at 410-641-5251. OCD-3/14/1t _________________________________ BUONASSISSI, HENNING & LASH, P.C. 1861 WIEHLE AVENUE, SUITE 300 RESTON, VIRGINIA 20190 (703) 796-1341 RICHARD A. LASH Substitute Trustee, et al, Plaintiffs, v. JERRY COLLINS CATHELL, et al., Defendants. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-18-000209

NOTICE

Notice is hereby issued this 11th day of March, 2019, that the sale of the property in this case, 11185 Racetrack Road, Berlin, MD 21811 reported by Robert E. Kelly, Substitute Trustee, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary be shown on or before the 15th day of April, 2019, provided a copy of this Notice be inserted in The Ocean City Digest, a newspaper published in Worcester County, Maryland, once in each of three (3) successive weeks on or before the 8th day of April, 2019. The report states the amount of sale to be $205,200.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ DAVID W. SIMPSON JR, ESQ PO BOX 3496 OCEAN CITY, MD 21843

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17754 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF ETHEL HINES Notice is given that Sherry J. Cooper, 634 Chestnut Street, Camden, AK 71701, was on March 07, 2019 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Ethel Hines who died on October 21, 2018, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7th day of September, 2019. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned per-


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MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today / Public Notices

sonal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written no-

tice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Sherry J. Cooper Personal Representative True Test Copy

Legal Advertising Call NANCY HAWRYLKO 410-723-6397, Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net

Terri Westcott Register of Wills for Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: March 14, 2019 OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________ FRANK, FRANK & SCHERR, LLC ALEXANDER J. ZARZECKI ESQ. 1400 FRONT AVENUE, SUITE 200 LUTHERVILLE, MD 21093

NOTICE

TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 17750 Notice is given that the Register of Wills court of Lancaster County, PA appointed Bradley Hauck, 683 Florin Avenue, Mount Joy, PA 17552; Gregory Hauck, 1712 Billview Drive, Lancaster, PA 17601 as the Executors of the Estate of Glen D. Hauck who died on September 12, 2018 domiciled in Pennsylvania, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Alexander J. Zarzecki Esq. whose address is 1400 Front Ave., Ste. 200, Lutherville, MD 21093. At the time of death, the decedent

owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Bradley Hauck Gregory Hauck Foreign Personal Representative Terri Westcott Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of Newspaper: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: March 14, 2019 OCD-3/14/3t _________________________________

Mar. 14 - Mar. 21 DAY/TIME

ADDRESS

BR/BA

Daily Assateague Point., Berlin 1BR/2BR/3BR Sat-Mon, 11-4pm Heron Harbour, 120th St., Bayside 1BR/2/BR/3BR/4/BR+ Sat. & Sun. 11-2pm Muirfield Lane., River Run 3-4BR/2-3.5BA Thurs-Mon 11-4pm 9801 Mooring View Lane, Unit 33, OC 3BR/2.5BA Saturday 10-2 Gateway Grand #1012, Ocean City 3BR/3BA Saturday 10-1 12139 Landings Blvd., Bayside – Berlin 5BR/3.5BA Saturday 10-1 14 39th St. #2, Ocean City 2BR/1BA Saturday 10-1 10214 Friendship Rd., Berlin 3BR/2.5BA Sat. & Sun. 11-2 213 N. Heron Dr., Heron Harbor 4BR/2.5BA Saturday 10-12 8 Watertown Rd., Ocean Pines 3BR/2BA Saturday 11-1 71 Ocean Pkwy., Ocean Pines 3BR/2.5BA Saturday 1:30-3:30 47 Coastal Dr., Mystic Harbor 3BR/2BA Saturday 12-2 14135 Sea Captain, Caine Woods 4BR/3BA Saturday 2-4 13461 Madison Ave., Ocean City 4BR/3.5BA Saturday 11-1 Barbary Coast Dr., Berlin 4BR/3BA Fri 11-1-Sat, 11-2-Sun 11-1 1 Freeport La., The Park – OP 4BR/3BA Fri 2-4-Sat. 12-2- Sun 1:30-3 31 Windswept Dr., Bayvista II 3BR/2BA Sat. & Sun. 12-2 207 Windward Dr. #303, Ocean City 2BR/2BA Saturday 10-12 13244 Rollie Rd. East Bishopville 4BR/2.5BA Sunday 12-2 210 Worcester St., Assateague House #408 3BR/2BA Sat. & Sun. 11-2 701 Rusty Anchor Rd. #21, Ocean City 2BR/2BA Saturday 10-4 13700 Wight St. #6N, Ocean City 2BR/2BA Sunday 10-12 10 143rd St., Le’Lisa #104 2BR/2BA Sunday 1-3 12702 Whisper Trace Dr., Oyster Harbor 4BR/2.5BA Friday 2-4:30 419 Bayshore Dr., Palm Bay #202 2BR/2BA Sunday 10-1 10300 Coastal Hwy.. Atlantis #902 2BR/2BA Saturday 12-4 325 Yacht Club Dr., Ocean Pines 3BR/2.5BA Saturday 11-2 132 Parkside Crl., Ocean Pines 4BR/3.5BA Sunday 11-2 827 Little John Dr., Salisbury 3BR/3BA Sunday 11-2 28 Grand Port Rd., Ocean Pines 3BR/2BA Sunday 11-2 13602 Wight St. #102, Ocean City 2BR/2BA

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Ocean City Today

Business

Mar. 15, 2019

Page 65 REAL ESTATE REPORT

St. Joseph statues used as guardian of home tradition

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The staff of Marlin Moon, located inside the Hilton on 33rd Street, celebrate being named a finalist in Maryland’s Favorite New Restaurant category. The Restaurant Association of Maryland’s 65th annual Stars of the Industry Awards will take place May 5 in Baltimore.

Four finalists for industry awards from Ocean City By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Finalists have been named and voters may now select their favorites for the Restaurant Association of Maryland’s 65th annual Stars of the Industry Awards, recognizing the best establishments in the state. Four resort restaurant groups were nominated in three different categories: Lisa and Brian Bolter of the Red Red Wine Bar on 45th Street, and Jay Taustin from Embers Restaurant/BLU Crabhouse & Raw Bar on 24th Street and Mad Fish Bar & Grill in West Ocean City (Restaurateur of the Year Award), Tom Ogilvie from the Hooked Restaurant Group (Heart of the Industry), and Marlin Moon located inside the Hilton on 33rd Street (Maryland’s Favorite New Restaurant). Lisa and Brian Bolter opened their first restaurant in Annapolis, the original Red Red Wine Bar, eight years ago. Today, they own four restaurants, including Dry 85 and Red Red Wine Bar locations in both Annapolis and Ocean City. “We’re really excited about [the nom-

PHOTO COURTESY LISA BOLTER

Lisa and Brian Bolter, owners of the Red Red Wine Bar on 45th Street, are finalists for the Restauranteur of the Year award, which will be announced May 5, during the Restaurant Association of Maryland’s 65th annual Stars of the Industry Awards.

ination],” Lisa Bolter said. “We have been up for a couple of awards in the Restaurant Association in years past. The wine and beverage program are something we’re really proud of but, when we got this call, we were really humbled and surprised, and just very excited.” Originally from Baltimore, the Bolters consider both Annapolis and Ocean City

their home and have become part of those communities. “We’re still very much a mom and pop operation. That’s what makes what we do so special,” Bolter said. “These are two towns that are very important to us. Ocean City has been home to us for many years, just as much as Annapolis is. We feel comfortable with it, we feel See WINNERS Page 66

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (March 15, 2019 Even though the real estate market is strong, and the average number of days on market are down, some homeowners follow a curious tradition of burying St. Joseph in their yard to help encourage a sale. According to the U.S. Catholic Information Center in Washington, D.C., the tradition can be traced back hundreds of years to Theresa of Avila, who prayed to St. Joseph when the convents needed more land and encouraged nuns to bury St. Joseph medals in the ground as a symbol of their devotion. Biblically, St. Joseph was the husband of Mary and earthly father of Jesus Christ, and is honored as the patron saint of married couples, families, carpenters and workingmen. It is also said that St. Joseph was a skilled craftsman and the reason he was made a Patron Saint is that he taught Jesus the craftsman’s trade and made sure that Jesus was always well housed. Many companies market the saint in a kit, which contains a few inch-tall plastic statues and instructions on how to bury them. Most say to bury the statue head first, with the feet pointing toward heaven. Others get more detailed and say bury the statue facing the house, feet pointing toward heaven, and near the for sale sign. One company includes the following prayer: “Oh, St. Joseph, guardian of household needs, we know you don’t like to be upside down in the ground, but the sooner escrow closes, the sooner we will dig you up and put you in a place of honor in our new home. Please bring us an acceptable offer (or any offer!) and help sustain our faith in the real estate market.” Customs dictate that once the house is sold, St. Joseph be dug up and put in a place of honor in the new home. There are two kinds of St. Joseph statues: one is the worker, who carries a water pitcher, a loaf of bread and an ax by his feet; the second is the patron of the family, holding his foster son, Jesus. Most people call on St. Joseph, the patron of the family, when trying to sell their home. – Lauren Bunting is an Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc., in Berlin.


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MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

Winners will be revealed in Baltimore, May 5 Continued from Page 65 like part of the community and we just want to bring what we do as a business, bring something different to the town. “Everything is from scratch in our kitchen and that’s very important to us. Nothing [is] frozen and the customers really like it,” she added. Red Red Wine Bar and Dry 85 both offer a relaxing atmosphere to enjoy wine or bourbon, Bolter said. “[Brian’s] passion was wine and that’s where we started with this. We were both just really involved with wine and the whole experience behind it,” Bolter said. “We were living in Baltimore at the time and wine bars were just popping up, just small little bars and shops, and places that looked a little stuffy and not very comfortable. “We just thought, ‘wouldn’t it be nice to have a place that you can go, drink good wine [and] listen to good music?’ We felt like combining basically all of our favorite things and that’s what we’ve done here,” she added. Above all, Bolter is proud of her staff and how enthusiastic they are to work in the industry, and she looks forward to a new season in Ocean City. “Having a nice core group of people on your staff and being able to keep them employed and working during the offseason was important to us,” Bolter said. “It’s one of the greatest compliments we can get when someone says we have a

great staff. “I hope that people come and check us out,” she continued. “We’re still very new, particularly in Ocean City, and we’re really excited to be [here] … we’re coming into our second season and everybody’s so excited.” For Taustin, the chance to be a nominee for Restauranteur of the Year is a humbling one, having worked in the restaurant business since the 1950s, when Embers first opened on Jay Taustin Ninth Street. “I think that it’s fantastic that people acknowledge that someone has been in the industry for as long as I have been, and it’s kind of cool,” Taustin said. Embers has become one of the largest restaurants in the Eastern Shore, he said, once it combined with BLU Crabhouse and Raw Bar. “Originally at Ninth Street, it was a couple hundred seats. Then, [when] we went to 24th Street, it moved to 350 seats,” Taustin said. “Today, with the attachment of the Embers and Blu, combined we’re over 1,500 seats.” Embers became a buffet-style eatery, whereas the crab house offers a more casual beach dining experience. Last year, Taustin also purchased Mad Fish in West Ocean City, which gives diners a harborside view. “We’re able to grow and diversify and be different,” Taustin said. “It’s cool to be able to interact with people at the bar [and] inside the restaurants, and it’s nice to work with our chefs to come up with creative food choices.” Most of all, the longtime entrepreneur is proud. “I’m proud of my accomplishments,” Taustin said. “I’m proud of my son, [who’s] taking over the range of the business right now. I’m proud of our director of opera-

tions, which has been taking a lot of leadership roles in the restaurant as well. “What makes me the proudest of the organization is the team that we have today, [which] can look at themselves and feel good about being a part of Embers, and part of the development and the new concepts and making it all better, season after season,” he added. Ogilvie has been working in the restaurant industry for nearly 19 years and described it as his passion. “Coming out of college, I didn’t know what I wanted to do. And so I started working for a company and I just realized that, [this] was my passion,” he said. “Here I am, 19 years Tom Ogilvie later, and it’s all coming together and it’s a privilege and an honor to be a finalist.” Primarily working at Tailchasers since opening last year, Ogilvie is the director of operations for the Off the Hook Restaurant Group, which consists of five restaurants spanning from Ocean City to Bethany Beach, and also includes a catering company. For Ogilvie, his job is not just about telling people what to do, it’s about performing the work side by side. “In my position ... you can take it one of two ways: you can go in and tell people what to do, or you can go in there and do it with them,” he said. “I’m the kind of guy who goes in and jumps on the line and cooks during the rush, or helps out on the floor and goes around and talks to our guests. I’d rather work with my employees than just tell them what to do.” Tailchasers is considered a casual American dining experience, with a children’s playground, rooftop bar and boat port to allow people to drive their boats up to the restaurant. Ogilvie encouraged newcomers to experience any one of the Off the Hook Restaurant Group establishments.

“I hope when people come to the beach, they understand that there are a lot of wonderful restaurants to go to and people that bust their butt year-round to give those out of towners that great experience,” Ogilvie said. “Everybody down here really goes out of their way to make everybody happy. I encourage people to come out and give Off the Hook Restaurant Group a shot if they haven’t been with us before.” Marlin Moon is not a new name for the Town of Ocean City. The operation first began in 2002, as a part of the Francis Scott Key Hotel in West Ocean City. The business moved after the lease ended in 2009, making a new name for itself as Micky Fin’s. Co-owner and head chef Gary Beach credits the nomination to his team. “I have a good crew. We get better every day,” Beach said. “I’m very humbled and very, very proud of our team.” Food served at Marlin Moon is inspired by original recipes Beach received from his grandmother, a Louisiana cook, and owning a restaurant was a dream of a young Beach when he was only 14 years old. His cuisine is also inspired by experiences in Florida and other travels, he said. For a brief time, Beach moved to Florida after spending a few years at Micky Fin’s to establish a restaurant in the south, but he decided to return to Ocean City not long after. Beach worked with the Harrison Group for two years before it was suggested he moved his operations to the Hilton. The new Marlin Moon opened for business last June. “I’m grateful for the Harrison Group,” Beach said. “It took a lot of people to get [Marlin Moon] off the floor. It literally was stripped down to the walls and it took a lot of people.” Winners will be announced on Sunday, May 5 at the Restaurant Association See DEADLINE Page 67

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Pllease vote – Bob Willey Bob W Wiilley


MARCH 15, 2019

PAGE 67

Ocean City Today

OC real estate agent to be featured on HGTV By Victor Fernandes Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) Ocean City real estate agent Chelsea Tull was worried her appearance on HGTV’s “How Close Can I Beach?” would never air. That’s not a concern anymore. Tull learned last weekend that her television debut is set for Sunday at 8:30 p.m., which sparked a new set of emotions. “It’s going to be weird to see and hear

myself on TV,” Tull, 26, an Ocean City resident and third-year agent with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage on 122nd Street, said. “I don’t know what to expect at all. I’m a little nervous, but excited at the same time.” The 30-minute episode, entitled “Breezy Boardwalk Dreams,” will feature Tull guiding an Annapolis couple that, according to the show’s website “is tired of dealing with traffic and wants to move

Gillis, Emberland families both donate $25K to AGH (March 15, 2019) Sandy Gillis, owner/operator of Creative Day Spa, and Palmer Gillis, founder and CEO of Gillis Gilkerson, as well as Trond and Linda Emberland, owners of Trond’s Pool Care, each donated $25,000 toward the Atlantic General Campaign for the Future. The Gillises are very active in the community and frequently open their home to local organizations, raising money for, among others, Maryland Capital Enterprises, PRMC Behavioral Health Campaign, Joshua M. Freeman Foundation, Ocean City Art League and the Atlantic General Hospital Junior Auxiliary Group. “We believe that emergency care is important to our family and, important as well to our local community. As year-round residents, our family and friends have had to utilize the vital services offered in the AGH Emergency Room,” the Gillises said. “Recognizing the importance of this community asset, we are excited to participate in its improvements and maintain this valuable resource in the most modern manner possible with today’s latest technology and ad-

vances in medicine.” “We are Ocean City locals and are very grateful for the opportunity to contribute to the AGH Campaign for the Future,” the Emberlands added. “Worcester County has a unique giving atmosphere and we are excited to help in any way we can.” The funds raised during the $10 million Atlantic General Campaign for the Future will allow Atlantic General Hospital to complete $35 million in capital projects. Among them is completion of a new 18,000-square-foot full service cancer care center, completion of the women’s health center in West Ocean City, renovation of existing surgical facilities and expansion of emergency services within Atlantic General Hospital as well as improvements to inpatient care areas. To date, the Foundation has already secured more than $7,077,000 of the $10 million goal in pledges, commitments and grants. Atlantic General Hospital has been providing quality health care to the residents of Worcester, Wicomico See DONATIONS Page 68

full-time to Ocean City,” through a search for their new coastal home. They evaluated three comparably-priced properties — a beachfront home in midtown, another within walking distance of the beach on the north end of Ocean City, and a third in Chelsea Tull Ocean Pines. The couple had to choose how close to the beach they wanted to live and how much they were willing to spend in order to, as the show’s website states, “give their kids the same positive experiences that come with living near the world-famous Boardwalk and gorgeous beaches.” Tull couldn’t disclose which home the couple chose since the episode hasn’t aired yet. But, the Prince George’s County native, who moved to Ocean City six years ago, fondly recalled the fourday stretch in June 2018 when normal everyday work life met the unique world of television. “The questions I asked them are real questions I would ask any client. So, it wasn’t too hard after a while getting used to that,” she said. “It was just the part [where] you had to redo [takes] over and over again. Saying the same lines [more than once] was a bit different.” Tull was in the right place with the right clients last March, when HGTV officials contacted a Coldwell Banker colleague in search of clients looking for a home in a specific price range. “She didn’t have anyone at that time, so she passed it on to me,” Tull said. “I happened to have a younger couple in the price range they were looking for. I thought I would ask them if they would be open to it, and they were thankfully.” After a couple of interviews with HGTV staff, Tull and her clients secured their chance to make their television debuts. Then they played the waiting game

for nearly nine months, which seemed longer each time Tull contacted HGTV to learn when the episode would air. The official word came last Sunday, which wasn’t soon enough for Tull to plan a big viewing party with family, friends and clients, but enough time for the nerves inside to build until showtime arrives. Until now, her lone on-screen experiences have been alongside Coldwell Banker colleague Kimii Leizure on their Facebook Live workshop, “Millennials on the Move,” which covers informative real-estate topics. But television is uncharted territory for Tull. “I’m pretty nervous. I’m not going to lie. I’ve never seen myself on television before,” she said. “I thought I would have a little bit more time to get ready. I don’t have time to do anything, plan anything.”

Deadline to vote online for award finalists, April 1 Continued from Page 66 of Maryland’s Stars of the Industry Awards Gala at the Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel in Baltimore. Each winner will get statewide bragging rights and the opportunity to display their 2019 award-winning logo on their website, menus and other promotional materials. Last year, the awards were held in Ocean City for the first time, with area restaurants winning 10 awards, include three resort-only categories specifically created in celebration of the event being held in the town. To the see the full list of nominees or vote, visit www.marylandrestaurants. com/gala, or vote on Facebook at facebook.com/marylandrestaurants.

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PAGE 68

Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

Sandy Gillis, owner/operator of Creative Day Spa, and Palmer Gillis, founder and CEO of Gillis Gilkerson, donated $25,000 toward the Atlantic General Campaign for the Future. Pictured, from left, are Toni Keiser, AGH vice president of public relations; Jack Burbage, AGH Campaign for the Future co-chair and CEO of Blue Water Development; the Gillises; Todd Ferrante, chair of the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation; and Michael Franklin, AGH president and CEO.

Trond and Linda Emberland, owners of Trond’s Pool Care, donated $25,000 toward the Atlantic General Campaign for the Future. Pictured, from left, are Greg Shockley, chair of the Board of Trustees at AGH; Toni Keiser, AGH vice president of public relations; the Emberlands; Todd Ferrante, chair of the Atlantic General Hospital Foundation; and Michelle Fager, AGH Campaign for the Future co-chair.

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Commentary

Ocean City Today Mar. 15, 2019

Page 69

Seismic testing will hurt in many ways How anyone with a reasonable amount of logic could support seismic testing off the Atlantic coast is a mystery wrapped in an enigma, considering how small the potential is for a big payoff. According to the environmental organization Oceana, finding anything more than a 16-month supply of oil beneath the ocean floor would be astonishing. Even the Bureau of Ocean and Energy Management concurs with that assessment, which it should, since the BOEM is where Oceana says it got that information. Why, then, has firing air cannons at the sea bottom been deemed so critical to our national well-being, when the adverse effects would seem to far outweigh any possible benefit? Is it, in the absence of any real need, just to show that we can do it? That’s certainly how it appears. The opposition of many coastal dwellers probably wouldn’t change even if there were a 20-year supply of oil or natural gas hidden somewhere below the continental shelf, but at least exploration in that instance would make a little more financial sense. As it is, proponents of seismic testing, what few there might be, can argue all they want that a continuous barrage of 850decible blasts won’t hurt anything, but that still doesn’t justify taking their word for it just to get to a relative puddle of oil, if it’s that much. Besides, we aren’t buying that no-harm-done argument, not after seeing strong evidence to the contrary with regard to marine mammals, sea turtles and all manner of sea creatures. These are the things that make the “ocean” in Ocean City. A beach resort situated next to a body of water that’s empty of whales and dolphins, as well as between 40 and 80 percent of its gamefish, according to some studies, is hardly a resort at all. That’s the risk the federal government wants coastal communities to take, and we shouldn’t stand for it. The public comment period for this proposed testing is coming soon, so get ready to respond. Local government, the media and business organizations will let you know how.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR ............................................ Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli ASSOCIATE EDITOR .................................. Josh Davis STAFF WRITERS .................. Greg Ellison, Morgan Pilz, ................................ Rachel Ravina, Victor Fernandes ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ................ Kelly Brown, Kyle Phillips PUBLISHER ...................................... Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.com. Copyright 2019

PUBLIC EYE

Bribe me into college

By Stewart Dobson Editor/Publisher What I don’t understand about the college admissions bribery scandal is why these people waited so long to take action. It would have made much more sense if Mr. and Mrs. Gotbucks recognized the urgency of the situation the first time they saw their little Boopsie sitting in the cow pasture saying, “Hmmmm, if Shinola is shoe polish, what’s this other stuff?” I know if my parents had known they could buy me better test scores they would have started with my kindergarten teacher, Miss Ewell, by saying, “Forget buying a vowel, we need the whole alphabet.” It seems to me that the more cost-efficient way of greasing the educational skids would be to make installment payments K-through 12. That way the Gotbucks family wouldn’t have to fork over a bundle all at once to have Coach Lugnut register Boopsie as a varsity ring-toss recruit, when she doesn’t know ringtoss from ring worm. I’m sure my first grade teacher, Miss Morgan, would have appreciated my parents’ assistance, given that teachers in those days were paid with fresh eggs and produce. “So, Miss Morgan, we see on our son’s report card that he scored poorly in the class rhythmic skipping exercise. What can we do?” The next thing you know, Miss Morgan’s cracking open a free pack of Lucky Strikes and swigging champagne in the teacher’s lounge at lunch and, according to my report card, I’m doing the cha-cha like Fred Astaire in the musical skipping department.

Not that scoring highly as a masterful skipper would have helped me on my SATs 11 years later, when I posted a 0006 or something, or just enough to get me into the remedial manure-spreading program at Farmer Bob’s Institute for the Hopelessly Disengaged. But, if they had started with bribing Miss Morgan with smokes and bubbly and worked their way up through the grades to floral print car mats for senior English, they would have paved my way to higher scores without having to write five- or six-figure checks to get me accepted into Yale, not that it would have worked out anyway. That’s the other thing that puzzles me — if high school Boopsie is still out in the pasture saying, “If this is Shinola, then this must be … ewwwwww,” how in the world is she going to stay in Yale once she gets there?” Further, even if she does make it through, what difference will that make when she will still be dumber than the butt-end of a two-by-four? “Mom, Dad, I’m thinking of neurosurgery. Buy me a hospital.” **** This just in from John Jarvis at Atlantic Aquatech: A guy is fishing on the rocks at the inlet early in the morning, when he slips, cracks his head, loses consciouness and rolls into the water. Bystanders pull him out and rush him to the emergency room, where he opens his eyes and sees a doctor, who says, “You’re going to be fine, but tell me, what day is it? The guy looks at the doctor a minute and then asks, how’s the weather? The doctor replies, “It will be raining for the next three days.” “Okay,” the guy says, “Then this must be Friday.”


Letters Leftist media at it again on impeachment story Editor, I read with amusement your editorial (“Impeachment lecture was misrepresented”) expressing your disappointment over the cancellation of a Democrat-party political briefing and rally, which was intended to encourage the impeachment of President Trump. I write to you as a private citizen and not as a representative of WGMD radio. Of course, the usual fig leafs and artful subterfuge, so well-practiced by the professional left in America for nearly a century, are always there on the shelf for them to pull out and wave at innocent passers-by: “It’s just a lecture on the Constitution,” or “It’s just one aspect of the Constitution,” and other such absurd attempts to disguise the actual intent of the program, which was obvious: Encourage local Democrat-party faithful to bolster an impeachment effort in Congress. (Although pains were taken to make it appear to be uninfluenced by current leftist agitation, one would observe that Marbury vs. Madison or

Ocean City Today Mar. 15, 2019

to the editor

even Article III, Sec. 3 would be topics germane to a simple talk about the Constitution, but, somehow, only impeachment seemed interesting enough to the former Democrat party chairman. Betcha he wouldn’t talk about Article V, though.) Any American who has paid attention and managed to think for themselves during the last half-century understands full-well that the Democrat party and mainstream media in America are one and the same. Their goals and agenda are identical and they act together to achieve them. I’ve worked in media since the ‘70s and there’s no question that the left controls the press and entertainment media in this country. Your editorial decried a lack of “patriotism” on the part of concerned citizens who don’t think it’s appropriate for a publicly funded building to be used as a rallying facility for local Democrat party activists. After all, if Tom Fitton wanted to offer a talk about The Necessity Of Keeping State Department Communications On a Secure Server at Foggy Bottom And NOT On a Private Server, Sribnik and his fellow travelers would be screaming bloody murder, and you would be

leading that cheer. Sherwood “Duke” Brooks On-air host, Radio Free Delmarva

Library lecture coverage was ‘distorted report’ Editor, “….law abiding Trump supporters — who did absolutely nothing wrong — were made to appear to be the equivalent of a pitchfork and torch carrying mob” is the valid opinion that I heard from a real great American patriot with regard to the March 6 cancelled library presentation. The presentation was about the constitution and how it sets forth the procedures for impeachment. Some conservatives, like myself, were concerned that there would be violence as illustrated all over the U.S. perpetrated by Democrats attacking Trump supporters. I asked if the library will consider having a sheriff present. The Berlin head librarian said, “I think it would be a good idea.” What is going on in America today is normal behavior in third world, dictatorial governments. We Ameri-

Page 70 cans used to pride ourselves about how we can have an election and no violence would follow no matter who got elected. We used to have a media that actually reported facts without regard to who it might offend. Now we have a media, with the exception of Fox News and OAN, (One America News Network), that just lies, not only fake news, but bold face lies. They exaggerate, leave out details and examples of their accusations. It has been proven that the alphabet networks, with the exception of OAN, report negatively about Trump 91 percent of the time. The media, late night comedies, and our educational system have fostered and greatly influenced the violence that is taking place today against conservatives. Consider what happens when a conservative goes to a college to speak. Did you ever, ever imagine that wearing a hat or shirt that promotes making the country you live in a better place would provoke a violent act against you? Conservatives are branded “extremists” by the liberal/progressive/socialists. Ex-


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR treme in what way please? We were not the party of slavery in the past, nor are we the party of baby murder as proven today. Take a good look at all the violent activity taking place in America today, like the riots that torch neighborhoods and stores. Take a look at Steve Scalise being shot down, with many other Republicans to follow if it were not for good men with guns stopping it. Editor, may I have two full pages to list the extremists, their activities and what party they belong to? I found consolation in the idea that Worcester County was above all this biased, non-substantiated reporting as it applies to our daily lives. The distorted report of who it was to blame for the library presentation blew that notion out of the water. The left wing Trump-hating disease is here. For those of you suffering from “The Hate Trump Derangement Syndrome,” try printing out all his America first accomplishments for only his past two years, 14 pages, the most accomplished president for this time span in U.S. history! Dennis W Evans Berlin

Setting record straight about Facebook group

is not Republican, in a lot of ways it is not even conservative. It is a proTrump bunch of people, period. And even though Trump carried this county by a margin of almost 2 to 1, Trump supporters here are targeted by haters, just as they are across the country. That said, the Gazette/Ocean City Today article painted a very unfair and inaccurate picture of a group that exists primarily as a Facebook page. Anyone and everyone can comment on that page, and the editors try to weed out inappropriate comment when they come across them. The majority of those inappropriate, vile, and threatening comments come from people who hate us for supporting our president. In the Gazette article in question, one stupid comment was quoted and sensationalized, and the implication was that the “Main Street Patriots” Face-

book page was riddled with threatening messages . . . “the decision [to cancel] was made in response to postings [plural] on the internet, including those [plural] appearing in the Facebook page of “Main Street Patriots Eastern Shore MD” and “When people [plural] threatened to disrupt the presentation, we thought that would raise a safety issue . . . ” The very people who are angry over the library event being cancelled are the ones telling us of the existence of numerous threatening postings/people! Where are “those postings”? Where are “those people”? Why is one off-the-cuff comment – among the thousands that are posted every week – being used to demonize a group of law-abiding citizens who did absolutely nothing wrong? In reality, the “safety concerns” expressed in the article were embellishments, exaggerated by those looking

to demonize folks who differ in opinion, those looking to blame the cancellation of the event on-an-off-the-cuff, stupid comment posted on Facebook by someone who is not even a resident of this state. Anyone can post a comment on the page, and in almost every case it is the anti-Trump crowd who post hateful and/or threatening comments. Facebook, like Twitter, is what it is, and with approximately two thousand “follows” and thousands of comments, the page’s editors do their best to monitor comments. One dumb comment by someone on Facebook (out of thousands and thousands on the page) is being used an excuse to discredit the group and distract from the real issue, which was that a partisan political event was being presented at a taxpayer-funded facility. Continued on Page 72

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Editor, In last week’s issue of the Gazette, a local, informal, loosely knit group was the target of accusation and innuendo, the story based solely on the statements of the very people who leveled the accusations and innuendo. Said local group basically exists only as a Facebook page and an email contact list . . . there is no membership list, there are no meetings, there is no board of directors, there are only folks who are bonded by an appreciation for all that our president has accomplished for America in only two years, people who are proud to be American. The “group” calls itself “Main Street Patriots, Eastern Shore of Maryland,” and it is not right wing, it

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from Page 71 Dozens of citizens of Worcester County formally objected to the inappropriateness of that and that alone, and even though many saw the presentation as a hate-fest of anti-Trump sentiment, Mr. Sribnick is certainly entitled to hold the event at a different venue, perhaps at a meeting of a local Democrat group. Yes, because locals objected to a taxpayer-funded library being used for a Democrat pep-rally presented by a Democratic committeeman, we are told that the meeting was cancelled due to safety concerns. Oddly enough, there were in fact safety concerns, but not in the way the article states. Worcester County Director of Libraries Jennifer Ranck (who was quoted in the article numerous times) fails to mention that said safety concerns were raised by the Trump supporters who planned

on attending, because of the hundred of attacks on Trump supporters nationwide over the last two years (the most recent attack is still in the news, with the attacker charged with three felonies, and the Jesse Smollet “MAGA” hoax has just resulted in a 16 count felony indictment). Ms. Ranck was well aware that OUR group intended to request the presence of the sheriff’s department (she was contacted by email, and the head librarian of the Berlin branch was notified in person), yet she is quoted in the Gazette as making an accusation that the attendees were “planning to disrupt” the presentation. So, according to the library director’s quote, the “patriots” were going to disrupt the presentation . . . after requesting that a deputy be there for their own safety. Was the group inviting the deputy so he/she could arrest

them when they disrupted the presentation (Ms. Ranck’s words)? Absurd. So, why didn’t she tell the Gazette reporter that Trump supporters who were planning to attend the event were the ones concerned about safety? Furthermore, why does the entire article fail to address — or even acknowledge — the basis of the objection to the presentation being held at the library (the “why” of a news story): the fact that using the taxpayer funded library as a venue for a partisan political presentation by a Democrat committeeman is not only inappropriate, it’s probably a violation of library policy. The library director was fully aware of the reason the program was objected to (again, via email), yet — as was the case with the groups stated intention to request the presence of a deputy because of concerns for their

safety — it wasn’t mentioned in the article. So if you folks want to see the original Gazette article discussed here, it’s titled “Conservative groups had planned rallies, prompting cancellation on Wednesday” . . . which by the way is totally incorrect and misleading. There was no rally or protest planned, as the Facebook post cited here clearly indicates: “We must attend, we must politely speak up to counter the hateful lies that the democrat party regurgitates. We are not suggesting protests . . . attend, and if you like, speak your mind when appropriate. If you choose not to speak be there to lend moral support to those of us who do speak.” There was no call to rally, there was no call to protest, there were only calls to attend and “speak up politely,” “when appropriate.” Yes, the presentation was cancelled . . . in fact it should have never been approved. But rather than acknowledge that a taxpayer-funded library should not be used to host a partisan, political event, some obscure comment on Facebook — and planned rallies and protests that did not exist — were used to change the whole focus of the story. The editorial staff of the Main Street Patriots Eastern Shore of Maryland Facebook page Worcester County

Freedom of speech ought to be embraced Editor, Many people are bemoaning the lack of civil discourse in this country. Most of us get our news and information from sources which reinforce what we believe. We do not seek input from people or organizations that challenge our beliefs. Commentators talk about information “silos.” So, what happens when a public library gives us a chance to break out of our comfortable opinion ruts? All hell breaks loose. I was disappointed to learn that the Worcester County Library had canceled a program about impeachment that was scheduled for March 6 at the Berlin Branch. I do not question the library’s decision to cancel, but I very much regret the reason for the cancellation. The library, in the persons of the library director, Berlin branch manager, trustees, and others, received complaints, protests, and in some cases threats from people who objected to the subject matter of the program. There were demands that specific library employees be fired. “Impeachment: Article II, Section 4 of the United States Constitution” was designed as an informational and educational program to explore a topic that is bandied about, often


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR ceptability” test? If supporters of the president were convinced that the program would be a partisan, one-sided affair, a reasonable response might have been to encourage people who had a different view to attend and voice their beliefs. In fact, there is evidence that this was one early response – to make sure that people who could keep things balanced attended the program. That is a far better, more civil, and healthier response. Suppose the program had proceeded as scheduled. And suppose that in the course of the discussion a genuine disagreement had surfaced among those in attendance. Some might have advocated impeaching the president. Others may have strenuously objected to this idea. Each side might have cited arguments for its position. Emotions might have been stirred. Voices might have been raised. People might have become uncomfortable. In all probability neither side would be convinced by the other and no consensus would have been reached among the group. Is this the worst outcome we can imagine? What is wrong with such an exercise in democracy? What are we afraid of? Vigorous, even emotional discussion of contentious issues should be the hallmark of a free and open society. Let us learn from this

unfortunate incident; let us embrace our freedom and exercise it confidently and responsibly. Mark Thomas Former Worcester County Library Director Berlin

Issues should be talked about in public setting Editor, Currently, the Ocean City Council is negotiating a union contract on salaries/benefits/schedules/working conditions. Typically, these contract meetings are held in closed sessions. The city government general employee’s salaries/benefits/working conditions are discussed in the public domain, usually during budget hearings. Continued on Page 74

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libraries are not vehicles for partisan politics. Providing information and education are cornerstones of a public library’s core mission. People who govern, run and work in public libraries are not hapless pawns that can be used by political groups. Some people who voiced strong objections to the program focused on the presenter. The man is a retired attorney, who has taught a multi-session course on the Constitution for the library several times in the past few years. His major flaw, apparently, is that he was once the chairman of the Democratic Party in Worcester County. To some this was a clear indication that the program would be tilted toward the Democratic Party position on impeachment (as if there is a single position). What is the basis for this assumption? How do we know for sure if he is for or against impeachment of the current president? Is it impossible for someone to subordinate his personal political views in the process of presenting information on a topic? Perhaps those who objected to the program would answer that no, someone cannot keep his personal feelings from influencing his presentation. What does this mean for how we view teachers, clergy people, journalists? Does everyone who deals with ideas need to pass a “political ac-

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carelessly, in the news and social media. I assume it would have dealt with the history of the process, in which only two presidents have ever been impeached by the House of Representatives and both were acquitted by the Senate. The program description mentioned emoluments, a word that is frequently referenced in news broadcasts and cable TV chatter but often not well explained. What constitutes a “high crime and misdemeanor?” Why were the writers of the Constitution so vague about such terms? Were there definitions and understandings that were common in the late 18th century that have been lost or muddied over the years? What are involved in the steps of the impeachment process, from committee hearing and vote to consideration by the House, to trial in the Senate? The program was not planned, advertised, or promoted as advocating the impeachment of President Trump. Such a position would be clearly out of line. Why then the fierce opposition? Have we reached such depths in this country that straightforward discussion of an admittedly controversial topic cannot be tolerated? One of the troubling aspects of this incident is the profound misunderstanding of the role of the public library in a community. Public

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WORLD WAR II

Czech Protectorate established by Germans By Peter Ayers Wimbrow III Contributing Writer (March 15, 2019) This week, 80 years ago, the German Reich established a “Protectorate” over the Czech provinces of Bohemia and Moravia. Czechoslovakia had been a country cobbled together by the Allies following the defeat of the German and Austro-Hungarian empires in “The Great War.” The Treaties of Saint German and Trianon — imposed upon the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Hungary, respectively — dismembered the Austro-Hungarian Empire and created Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia from the remnants. As noted, Czechoslovakia was cobbled together by ripping Slovakia from the Kingdom of Hungary, of

which it had been a part since, at least, the beginning of the Eleventh Century, and joining it with the Czech provinces that had been a part of the Austrian Empire since the Sixteenth Century. Also included within Czechoslovakian borders was the Sudetenland, which was mostly populated by 3.5 million German-speaking Austrians. In addition, the Sudetenland bordered Germany. Slightly less than half of the population of Czechoslovakia was Czech, with the rest being Slovaks(2,000,000), Ruthenians, Hungarians, and the 3.5 million Germans. In the old Austro-Hungarian Empire, because of their high level of education, the Czechs “minded the store,” and had become used to administer-

ER WINTE SALliver!y W/ De ater L Now or

ing the government. When Hitler came to power, he was determined to undo the results of “The Great War.” The Treaty of Versailles had attempted to Edvard Beneš reduce Germany to a second-class country by restricting its access to the Rhineland and the Saar regions of the country, stripping it of a connection with East Prussia, as well as its Baltic port of Memel. The Treaty of St. Germain had done the same to his birth country of Austria, when it stripped Austria of the Sudetenland, Bohemia, Moravia, and Slovenia. By this time, 80 years ago, Germany had reoccupied the Rhineland and the Saar. Hitler then set his eyes on Czechoslovakia, with its 3.5 million German-speaking Austrians, its heavy industry and coal. Hitler first threatened Czechoslovakia with war. Once Czechoslovakia’s

allies —Great Britain France — caved, Czechoslovakia agreed to: transfer the Sudetenland to Germany; grant Slovakia autonomy; change its name to CzechoSlovakia, to reflect Slovakia’s Emil Hácha new, coequal status and autonomy; transfer the city of Teschen/Těšín to Poland; and to negotiate the transfer of Slovakian territory to Hungary. In exchange, France, Great Britain, Germany and Italy guaranteed the independence of Czecho-Slovakia. The Czechoslovakian president, Edvard Beneš, resigned on Oct. 5, 1938, and relocated to London on Oct. 22. He was replaced by Judge Emil Hácha, on Nov. 30, 1938. At the time of his nomination, he was president of the Supreme Administrative Court of Czecho-Slovakia. Dr. Hácha was an internationally regarded jurist and Continued on Page 76

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By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) A proposed Atlantic General Hospital outpatient center cleared another hurdle last Tuesday after the Worcester County Commissioners unanimously approved two resolutions. Assistant Chief Administrative Officer Kelly Shannahan said Resolution 19-5, a water and sewer amendment resolution for the project, was “was conceptually approved on Dec. 18.” Attorney Hugh Cropper, representing the property owners Burbage/Melson, Inc., Silver Fox LLC and Sina Companies LLC, requested reclassification of the area’s water and sewer systems. The proposal aimed “to change the designation for the properties from W-6/S-6 (no planned service) to W1/S-1 (planned to be served within two years).”

Resolution 19-5 would allow water and sewer capabilities for the proposed 99,912-square-foot project on Racetrack Road, just south of the south gate to Ocean Pines. Shannahan added Resolution 19-6 would then “expand [the Ocean Pines Sanitary] Service Area to provide service to those properties.” Equivalent dwelling units for the proposed facility were unanimously approved during a Feb. 19 public hearing. The location needs 34 EDUs. The Worcester County Planning Commission issued a favorable reccomendation of the project’s site plan during a Feb. 7 meeting. Commissioner Jim Bunting moved to approve resolutions 19-5 and 19-6, and was seconded by Commissioner Bud Church. Worcester County Commissioners President Diana Purnell was absent from last Tuesday’s meeting.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from Page 73 The question is: why conceal from the public the union discussions when the same issues concerning the general employees are discussed in open session? The elected officials should avoid

close sessions unless it is absolutely necessary. After all, keeping the public informed is the idea. Retired Councilmember but still a taxpayer, Margaret Pillas Ocean City


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OBITUARIES LAWRENCE J. JOCK SR. Berlin Lawrence J. Jock Sr., age 85, of Berlin, died Tuesday, March 12, 2019 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was the son of the late John and Florence Jock. Larry graduated from South Philadelphia High School in L. Jock Sr. 1952 and then enlisted with the Navy from 1952 to 1954. He was well known as the best dental technician in the New Jersey and Philadelphia area before his retirement. Larry was vice president of everything of the Coastal Fisherman newspaper from 2006 to present. He enjoyed golf and fishing. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Maureen Jock, of Berlin; three sons, Larry Jock and his wife, Mary, of West Ocean City, Tom Jock and his wife, Maria, of West Ocean City and John Jock and his wife, Sue, of Egg Harbor Township, New Jersey; six grandchildren, Larry Jock, III, Melina Rodriguez, Kayla Jock, Thomas Jock, Kaitlyn Jock and Jack Jock; and a great grandson, Travis Jock. He was preceded in death by a brother, Frank Jock. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at Holy Savior Catholic Church on 17th Street in Ocean City.

Friends may call an hour before the service. In lieu of flowers, donations in his memory may be made to the Worcester County Humane Society, P.O. Box 48, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com. ROBERT F. HARRINGTON Dagsboro Robert “Bobby” or “Bear” F. Harrington, age 73, of Dagsboro, Delaware, formerly of Key West, Florida and Washington, D.C., passed away on Saturday, March 2, 2019 at the Charlotte Hall Veterans Home in Charlotte Hall, Maryland. He was born in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 10, 1945, son of the late Robert G. and Margaret Ann (Flynn) Harrington. “Bear” proudly served his country in the United States Army during the Vietnam War. He retired in 1991 as one of the most highly decorated Washington, D.C. firefighters. “Bobby” was a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Moose, American Legion Post #24 and the Emerald Society Firefighters of Washington, D.C. He also enjoyed fishing, riding his Harley Davidson and spending time with his family. He is survived by his five siblings, Thomas Harrington and his wife, Janice, of Cooksville, Maryland, James Harrington and his wife, Marie, of Roxana, Delaware, Anne Luke and her husband, Michael, of Willards, Maryland, Maureen Cathell

and her husband, Wayne, of Berlin, Maryland, and Kathleen Porterfield and her husband, Rick, of Madisonville, Tennessee, and several nieces and nephews. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, March 29, 2019 at Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church, 35318 Church Rd., Frankford, Delware, where friends and family may call after 10 a.m. Interment will follow with military honors at the Delaware Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Millsboro, Delaware. In lieu of flowers the family suggests memorial contributions in Robert’s name to the Emerald Society Firefighters of Washington D.C., 3002 12th Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20018 or by visiting www.dcfdemeralds.org Online condolences may be sent by visiting www.melsonfuneralservices.com. EVANGELINE MAE FRODAHL Ocean City Evangeline Mae Frodahl, age 84, passed away on Wednesday, March 6, 2019 at her home. Born in Oakland, Maine, she was the daughter of the late Fred and Beatrice Holt Mullen. She was preceded in death by her husband of 53 years, Jack (John) Henry Frodahl. Surviving are her children, Michael H. Frodahl and his wife, Kathy, of Mattawamkeag, Maine, Marcia Smith and her husband,

Phillip, of Ocean City, and Gail Crosby and her husband, Jack, of Berlin. She was an adored grandmother to, Andrew, Jonathan and Erik Frodahl, Amy, E. Frodahl Anna and Joshua (Brittany) Smith, and Jamie and Kevin Crosby. There are seven great-grandchildren, Axel, Hans, Finn, Issac, Ethan, Amelia, Callaway, and nephew, Brian McCarthy. She was preceded in death by a sister, Victoria McCarthy. Mrs. Frodahl had worked for many years in the sewing department of the local textile factory. She was a homemaker, beloved wife, loving mother and grandmother, and a devoted member of Lighthouse Church of God in Sinepuxent. In her spare time she enjoyed working in her flower gardens and knitting and crocheting. A funeral service was held on Tuesday, March 12, 2019 at Lighthouse Church of God in Berlin. Pastor Theo Hobbs and Pastor Ron Soulsman officiated. Interment followed in Evergreen Cemetery. A donation in her memory may be made to: Lighthouse Church of God, 11742 Sinepuxent Rd., Berlin Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Continued on Page 77

Moravia. That evening, the German Führer arrived in Prague and spent the night in the ancient Hradčany Castle, overlooking the River Moldau. The next day, der Führer announced, from Hradany Castle, the Protektorat. He claimed the Protektorat was necessary because Bohemia and Moravia were devolving into chaos, and that the Germans were merely seeking to restore and maintain order. The Protektorat had a population of 7,380,000, of which, at least 250,000 died during the German Protektorat. 85 percent of the 117,551 Jewish population was murdered. Although Hácha continued as president, the reichsprotektor controlled it. On March 21, 1939, Baron Konstantin von Neurath was appointed as reichsprotektor. He had previously, from 1932 to 1938, served as Germany’s foreign minister. Konrad Henlein and Karl Hermann Frank were appointed head of the civil administration and secretary of state, respectively. Both were Germans, born and raised in Bohemia. In September 1941, Hitler, feeling that von Neurath was too lenient, appointed Reinhard Heydrich deputy reichsprotector. At the time, Baron von Neurath was stripped of power,

with Heydrich assuming it all. After Heydrich’s death on June 4, 1942, from injuries received during an assassination attempt, Kurt Daluege became deputy reichsprotector. He served until suffering a massive heart attack in May of 1943. After the war, he was arrested by British troops, extradited to the reconstituted Czechoslovakia, tried on charges of “crimes against humanity,” convicted, and on Oct. 23, 1946, sentenced to die. The next day he was hung in Pankrác Prison, in Prague. Daluege’s duties were assumed by Wilhelm Frick, who had previously served as reichsminister of the interior. Frick was among the first defendants to be tried at Nuremberg, where he was convicted, and on Oct. 1, 1946, sentenced to die. Shortly after 2 a.m.., on Oct. 16, he was hung. Between 36,000 and 55,000 Czechs died under German rule. Next week: Memel Mr. Wimbrow writes from Ocean City, Maryland, where he practices law representing those persons accused of criminal and traffic offenses, and those persons who have suffered a personal injury through no fault of their own. He can be contacted at: wimbrowlaw@gmail.com.

WORLD WAR II Continued from Page 74 was fluent in Czech, Slovak, German and English, but was beginning to age. On March 13, 1939, and again the next morning, Dr. Hácha requested a meeting with Hitler, who agreed that afternoon. At 10:40 p.m., that evening, Dr. Hácha, accompanied by his daughter and Czecho-Slovakian Foreign Minister František Chvalkovský, arrived by train at Berlin’s Anhalt Station, where they were greeted by a military guard of honor and Foreign Minister Joaquin von Ribbentrop. Dr. Hácha was unable to fly because of a heart condition. From the station, the Czechs were taken to the Adlon Hotel, where they were kept waiting until 1:30 a.m., while Hitler watched a movie. When the two Czechs were finally transported to the Reichskanzlei, they were confronted by Hitler, Luftwaffe Field Marshal Hermann Göring, Foreign Minister von Ribbentrop, Gen. Wilhelm Keitel; State Secretary Ernst von Weizsäcker (#2 man in the Foreign Ministry) and the document to be signed consenting to the establishment of a German “Protektorat” over the remaining Czech provinces of Bohemia and Moravia. By then Slovakia

had declared its “independence.” Hitler addressed the Czechs very briefly and said they were not there for negotiation, but rather to be informed of the decision to establish the Protectorate and that Prague would be occupied at 9 a.m., and that whoever tried to resist would be “trodden underfoot.” Der Führer signed the document and left the room. The next few hours were spent by the four remaining Germans chasing the two Czechs around the table, with pens in hand, attempting to obtain their signatures on the document. Finally, after suffering a heart attack, induced by Field Marshal Göring’s threats that “his” Luftwaffe would soon reduce the beautiful city of Prague to rubble, and that German troops would enter the Czech provinces after the bombing began at dawn, whether the document was signed, or not, a beaten Hácha signed 4 a.m. As the two Czechs left the Reichskanzlei, the foreign minister said, “Our people will curse us, and yet we have saved their existence. We have preserved them from a horrible massacre.” Later that morning, German troops began marching into Bohemia and


MARCH 15, 2019

OBITUARIES Continued from Page76 PEGGY M. DULANY Ocean City It is with much sadness we announce the death of Peggy M. Dulany of Ocean City, Maryland. She passed away peacefully at home on Saturday, March 2, 2019. Peggy was born in Salisbury, Maryland, and was the daughter of late Benjamin Peggy Dulany Franklin Moore and Thelma Collier Moore of Salisbury, Maryland For 30 years Peggy and husband, Rod, were directors of tennis at Washington Golf and Country Club in Arlington, Virginia. They retired to Ocean City, Maryland, in 2002, where she enjoyed her friends and family at the beach, where she spent her summers. Both Peggy and Rod were born on the Eastern Shore. She is survived by her husband of 46 years, Rod Dulany; her daughter, Debbie Adams of Salisbury, Maryland; step-daughter, Debi Dulany Gehrm of Raleigh, North Carolina; and brother in-law, Page Dulany and his wife, Cheryl. Other beloved family included nieces and nephews and their children. Peggy will have a family ceremony in mid-April where she will have her ashes sprinkled on the beach in Ocean City. Peggy was married to Rod Dulany and together they served the WGCC membership for 30 years as directors of tennis. During this time, they had the great fortune to make several good friends which they have kept over the years. JOSEPH RICHARD BEATTY, JR. Berlin Joseph Richard Beatty, Jr., 68, passed away peacefully at home in his sleep on Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019. Born in Catonsville, Maryland, he was the son of the late Joseph R. Beatty, Sr. and Cornelia Beatty. In addition to his loving wife of 25 Joseph Beatty, Jr. years, Mary CarduffBeatty, he is survived by a daughter, Anna M. McBride of Baltimore; three grandchildren, Brandon, Samantha and Emily McBride; and his beloved “fur babies,” Cody, Beau and Sammy. He was a 1965 graduate of Baltimore Poly-Tech High School and attended Catonsville Community College and the University of Baltimore. He spent most of his adult life in the real estate/building industry. Joe will always be remembered for his great smile and positive attitude. He was an avid reader, sailor and had

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an intense love of animals. A Celebration of Life is planned for a later date. Contributions in his memory may be made to: Kenile’s Kupboard, P.O. Box 598, Ocean City, Maryland 21843 or Carolina F, 6705 Union Highway, Pacolet, South Carolina 29372 (Carolina Poodle Rescut.org). Arrangements are in the care of Holloway Funeral Home, P.A., 501 Snow Hill Rd., Salisbury, Maryland 21804. Please visit www.hollowayfh.com to express condolences to the family. MARGARET MCINTOSH Berlin Margaret “Elaine” McIntosh, age 87, passed away on Thursday, March 7, 2019 at the Woodlands in Ocean Pines. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, she was the daughter of John Allford and Alice Lewis. Elaine was preceded in death by her husband, Edwin M. McIntosh James McIntosh; son, Robert McIntosh; daughter, Lynne Spenia, and two sisters. She is survived by her sons, Thomas McIntosh (Mickie) and James McIntosh (JoAnne); daughters, Bethann McIntosh-King (Johnpaul) and Amy McElrath (Lee); daughter-in-law, Sabra McIntosh; son-in-law, John Spenia; seven grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews and a host of friends. Affectionately known as Lainie, Mom, Momma and Grammy, Elaine was a devoted mother, simple, full of love and happiest being at home. She lived in nine different states during her life and moved her “brood” of six children across and around the country multiple times. A dedicated nurse and a woman of great faith, she also enjoyed her years as a Girl Scout leader, and loved the many hours of service she provided as a volunteer in the emergency room and surgical waiting area at AGH. Always willing and ready to join in a bridge game or play Yahtzee, she also enjoyed listening to music especially Kenny Rogers and The Gaithers. She was happiest when sharing a cup of tea or a glass of white zinfandel with family and friends. Famous for her coleslaw and broccoli cauliflower salad, her ability to steam bushels of blue crabs at every family reunion was perhaps her greatest claim to fame since she refused to ever eat one herself! She spent many hours creating special scrapbooks for her family, and kept Hallmark in business by buying and mailing countless cards to family members and friends. Being on time was very important Continued on Page 78

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OBITUARIES Continued from Page 77 to Elaine and God help anyone who was late to dinner or made her wait. We shared so many laughs and smiles and loving times together. These are some of our most treasured memories. Services will be private for family at a later date. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. In lieu of flowers, family would like donations made in her memory to: Atlantic Hospital Auxiliary at www.atlanticgeneral.org or to the Berlin Public Library (www.worcesterlibrary.org/index.php/worclibrary/page/make-a-donation). FREDERICK CONRAD ENGELKE Berlin Frederick Conrad Engelke, age 84, passed away on Friday, March 8, 2019 at University of Maryland Hospital. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Leo Engelke; sons, Frank Aderson, George Piniero (Michaeleene), Raymond Pineiro and Bryan Piniero; daughters, Andrea Hudson and Linda Donnian; brother, George Engelke; grandchildren, Ashley, Emily, Anthony, Marie, Joseph, Miranda, Mariah, Jannell, Salvatore, Santino,

Damian, Dante, Mandy, Sarah, Emma, Maggie, Molly, Betty, Joy, Matthew, Samuel, Ashlee, Jeff, Marie, Judi, Waylon and Lola; great-grandchildren, Lauren, F. Engelke Devon, Dillon, Kylie, Timothy, Racheal, Scott, Zachary, Morgan, Maddison, Cameron, Mark, Alanis, Andrew and Keaton; nieces, nephews and host of friends. A funeral mass will be held on Friday, March 15, 2019 at St. John Neumann Catholic Church at 1 p.m. Friends may visit 12:15-1 p.m. prior to mass. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation in his memory to the Alzheimer’s Association at 225 N. Michigan Avenue Floor 17, Chicago, Illinois 60601. JOYCE ANN HAMMETT Ocean City Joyce Ann Hammett, aged 58, of Ocean City, Maryland, and formerly of Waldorf, Maryland, passed away gently in the care of Coastal Hospice and Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin, Maryland. She was born on Jan. 16, 1961 in

Maryland, to the late Henry C. and Virgina L. Thomas. She shared her family life with two sisters, Wanda and Diane. She was married to Joyce Hammett Robert Hammett in 1995, and worked 35 years as a manager for Creditor Claims of America. She was an animal lover, was talkative and loved to be with people. She was a fan of R&B music, and just loved the beach. She was kindhearted and always looked out for people and did all she could to help people. In addition to her sisters and husband, she is survived by many extended family members and friends. A Celebration of her Life will be held at 5 p.m. on Sunday, March 17, 2019 at the Watson Funeral Home located at 211 S. Washington St., Millsboro, Delaware 19966, where friends may call from 3-5 p.m. for visitation and viewing. The Rev. Dr. James Van Der Wall will officiate. Interment will be at 11 a.m. on Monday, March 18, at the Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Vines Creek Road, Dagsboro, Delaware. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests memorial contributions to: Coastal Hospice; P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21802.

Send condolences to: www.watsonfh.com. WILLIAM KENNETH TYLER SR. Ocean City William Kenneth Tyler Sr., 93, passed away Monday, March 11, 2019. Born in Cambridge, Maryland, he was the son of the late Soloman Goldsborough Tyler Sr. and Alma Aaron Tyler. He was preceded in death by two brothers, S. Goldy Tyler and Burtis Tyler. He is survived by William Tyler Sr. his wife of 61 years, Sylvia Tyler; sons, Chris Tyler (Polly) and W. Kenneth Tyler Jr. (Barbara); daughters, Theodora Ann Tyler and Robin Tyler Bunting; and sister, Phyllis North; 10 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Ken served in the United States Navy in the Pacific Theater during World War II on a USS LST 817 (fire control-man) until 1946 when he joined the Maryland State Police as a trooper. In 1956, he served as deputy sheriff of Worcester County, until 1959, when Governor Tawes appointed him to the office of sheriff. In 1962, he was re-elected and served as sheriff until 1966. Interested in real estate and all things Ocean City, Ken worked for Anderson-Stokes Realty firm in the 1970’s until opening his own business, Ken Tyler Real Estate. He held the office of president for the Greater Ocean City Board of Realtors and served as an associate broker for O’Connor, Piper and Flynn from 1982 to 1998. Additionally, Mr. Tyler served as a Worcester County commissioner and a judge of the Orphan’s Court. He was a life member of the Ocean City Fire Company and the American Legion Veterans of Foreign Wars. Other affiliations include: US LST Association, Masons, Shriners and Lions Club. An active member of St. Paul’s By the Sea, Ken served in many varied capacities: the vestry, warden, usher, kitchen work, building and construction, search committees and overseeing the building fund to name a few. A funeral service will be held on Saturday, March 16, 2019 at 2 p.m. at St. Paul’s By the Sea Episcopal Church in Ocean City, Maryland. Visitation with family will be held from 1-2 p.m. prior to the service. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin, Maryland. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: St. Paul’s By the Sea Episcopal Church or the Ocean City Fire Department.


Sports & Recreation

Ocean City Today Mar. 15, 2019

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www.oceancitytoday.com

Decatur’s Noah Reho 126-lb. Md. wrestling champ By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 15, 2019) Stephen Decatur freshman Noah Reho exuded confidence on the wrestling mat during the Maryland Public Secondary Schools Athletic Association 4A/3A championship, held March 1-2 at The Show Place Arena in Upper Marlboro, and that self-assurance helped him win a state title. “I think it was probably the best wrestling I’ve had in my career, so far. Hands down,” Reho said. “The reason why I think I did my best was because I was mentally tuned in. Every match that I wrestled, I didn’t think anyone was going to beat me, nor score a point on me.” Traveling to the competition, Reho said he had some “good nerves.” As soon as he weighed in, he was confident he could win his 126-pound division. Leading up to the state championship, Reho said Decatur Coach Todd Martinek told him not to get overwhelmed competing on the big stage. “He said, ‘it’s just you and another kid on the mat doing your thing,’” Reho said. Reho was seeded second in his weight class. He pinned his first two opponents on day one of the tournament. He won his semifinals match, 7-0, which took place around noon, Saturday, March 2, to advance to the championship round. Reho had a long break between his matches, so he spent time with his family, went out to dinner and then took a nap before wrestling for a state title. He tried not to think too much about his match, so he didn’t psych himself out. He finally stepped on the mat to battle for the championship around 10 p.m. “Having such a long break is tough, because you have more time to think about what could go wrong,” he said. Reho dominated his first three opponents and did the same in the finals. “After the first [period] I kind of put it out if reach. It was already 2-0, but I had him just done. He was already tired,” Reho said. “In the second, I got a standup and a takedown, so at that point it was 5-0 and the match was over. I knew I had him.” Reho won the match, 7-1. Winning a state title was surreal, he said. “I didn’t really know what to think. When I won it, it didn’t feel like I won,” he said. “It just felt easier than I was expecting. I thought it was going to be the hardest match of my life … but I dominated the whole match. “It was more like a dream of me winning it,” he continued. “I’ve worked 10

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur freshman Noah Reho stands outside his team’s wrestling room where a sign hangs acknowledging his state championship accomplishment.

years of my life just trying to win a state title. I did it my first year, so it felt pretty good. It was a surreal moment.” Even after having his arm raised by the official, being congratulated by friends, family, teammates and fans, and standing on the podium to receive his award, the reality that he just won a state championship didn’t sink in until the next morning. “The next morning I woke up at like 6 a.m. to my teammates coming in [the hotel room] screaming that I won,” he said. “It never kicked in I won states until then. It was probably the best feeling of my life.” To win a state title as a freshman is a great accomplishment, Reho said. “I was looking at all the awards for states and I’m actually the only freshman to win it for Maryland this year,” he said. “Wrestling is a mental sport. If you’re not mentally tuned in, if you don’t have confidence in your shots or your sprawls, you’re not going to go out and win,” he said. “You can be the best wrestler in the practice room and know every skill, but in a match, if you don’t have confidence you’re not going to win.” Reho, who started wrestling at the age of 5, said his goal is to beat Danny Miller’s record of three state titles. The Decatur alum won state titles in 2007, 2008 and 2009. Reho is the first Decatur wrestler to win a state championship since 2009. He is only the fourth wrestler in program history to earn a state title. Reho thinks he has the potential to

win four championships during his career at Decatur. “I 100 percent think I can, because of the way that I progressed from the beginning of the year,” he said. “I was very hesitant in the beginning of the season. I was afraid to shoot and I wouldn’t wrestle offensively, then by the end of the season in the finals match … I was shooting left and right, just going for it.” The 15-year-old said adding more muscle mass will help him be successful in the years to come. “My skill is there, it’s just everyone I’m wrestling, they’re just a lot stronger than me,” he said. “My cardio is already top-notch. As soon as I get my cardio to the college level – they can go for nine minutes straight non-stop – I just don’t think that anyone can beat me.” Reho finished the season with a 45-5 record. He also captured a regional championship title and took third in the Bayside Conference meet. His success this season was “definitely unexpected,” he said. “I didn’t even imagine me placing this year, honestly,” Reho said. “I’m a freshman, plus I was getting off a shoulder injury. I tore my rotator cuff and I wasn’t even supposed to wrestle.” Reho dislocated his left shoulder during the summer and suffered a tear. He wanted to wrestle this year, so he opted not to have surgery. Reho said his shoulder didn’t start bothering him until midway through the

season. After some physical therapy it felt better, he said. Reho plans to continue training during the offseason and compete in tournaments. He is looking forward to stepping back on the mat for Decatur next winter. “I think I knocked off over 10, maybe 15, state-ranked kids this year,” he said. “I beat a lot of kids with 100 wins and I’m doing that my freshman year, and I still got three more years to go.” Reho wasn’t the only Decatur wrestler to compete in the state tournament. Seven other Seahawks also qualified for the main event. Junior Jagger Clapsadle (43-4) came in second place in the 113-pound division and sophomore captain Nico D’Amico (44-6) finished in third place in the 120pound weight class. Senior captain Lukas Layton (39-12) and junior Shamar Baines (32-11) placed fifth at 182 and 106 pounds, respectively. Freshman James Parana (13-7) took sixth in the 160-pound weight class. Junior Kyle Elliott (35-13) and sophomore Micah Bourne (37-10) also participate in the tournament at 132 and 170 pounds, respectively. “I was hoping to have five state place winners and when we got six I was really excited. Six is a school record,” Martinek said. Decatur had an extremely successful 2018-19 season. The Seahawks went unSee REHO Page 80


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Reho only fourth Decatur wrestler to win state title Continued from Page 79 defeated (13-0) during the regular season. They captured the 3A East Region dual meet championship – the team’s first since 2011. Three days later, Decatur won the 3A state dual meet title. The last time Decatur had won a state dual championship title was in 2008. In the past 50 years, Decatur sports teams have won five state championships. The wrestling team holds two of those titles. The Berlin squad also won a Bayside Conference championship this season. Six Seahawks – a program record – won their divisions and individual Bayside championship awards. Baines (106), Clapsadle (113), D’Amico (120), Parana (160), Bourne (170) and senior Dakota Souder (285) earned Bayside titles. Reho (126) and Layton (182) then both captured regional titles. “I was very happy [with the season]. In the beginning of the season you always draw up, ‘we could do this, we could do that,’ and we did almost everything. Usually you never even come close,” Martinek said. “So much has to fall into place to have the kind of season we had. I’m just thankful that’s what

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur freshman Noah Reho is only the fourth wrestler in school history to win a state championship title. His name will soon be added to the board that hangs inside the team’s practice room.

happened. “The kids got along well and the assistant coaches did a great job keeping everyone together,” Martinek continued. “The kids dedicated a lot and sacrificed a lot and had fun. I’m happy for them.”

During last Saturday’s team banquet, Martinek presented awards to: Reho (MVP); Layton, Bourne and Clapsadle (Coaches Awards); D’Amico (Biggest Team Heart); and Elliott (Most Improved). The team will only graduate three

starters – Layton, Daletez Smith and Jhymir Blake – out of the 14-weight class lineup. Seven of the eight wrestlers who competed in the state tournament are slated to return next season. See DECATUR Page 81


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St. Patrick’s soccer tourney this wknd. Decatur wrestling team By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The 31st annual St. Patrick’s indoor soccer tournament series will continue at Northside Park on 125th Street, starting today, Friday, at 6 p.m. The event will feature men’s and women’s open divisions. Games will run from 6 p.m. to midnight, tonight. “A lot of these teams have been playing in our tournaments since they were kids and they come back year after year as adults now and still love the atmosphere and the competition and the rivalries,” Recreation Manager Kim Kinsey said. Games will resume Saturday at 8 a.m. and go until midnight. Sunday, matches will start at 9

a.m. The championships will take place in the afternoon with the women’s competition starting at 3 p.m. and the men division at 3:45 p.m. Games will be played every 40 minutes. The tournament will consist of 36 teams, with 24 in the men’s division and 12 in the women’s. Champions and finalists will receive a T-shirt and trophies. “I think that it’s a lot of fun and they love coming down for St. Patrick’s Day festivities. I think they really enjoy being able to include soccer as a part of that,” Kinsey said. There is no fee for spectators to watch the games at Northside Park. For more information, call 410-250-0125.

enjoys successful year Continued from Page 80 Schools are divided into classifications based on enrollment. The Decatur wrestling team will move from the 3A classification to 2A next year. “We’ll be going from the smallest 3A school to the largest 2A school,” Martinek said. “We just want to go wherever there’s more competition. I’m up for whatever as long as it’s as competitive as it can be.”

Martinek, who was named Bayside Conference Coach of the Year, said he is optimistic for Todd Martinek next year, with a strong core group set to return along with talented JV and new wrestlers joining the program.

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SD basketball season ‘learning experience’ By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 15, 2019) The Stephen Decatur boys’ basketball team’s season ended with a 65-46 loss to the Northeast Eagles of Anne Arundel in the second round of the 3A East Region tournament. “We just didn’t play well,” Decatur Coach BJ Johnson said. “We had a good week of practices going into the game. We just didn’t show up to play.” Turnovers were a big part of Decatur’s loss last Monday in Berlin, he said. The Seahawks turned the ball over 23 times during the match. “Against a decent team, you won’t

win turning the ball over that many times,” Johnson said. Sophomore London Drummond was Decatur’s scoring leader in the game, with 12 points. BJ Johnson Decatur finished the season with a 12-11 record. “It was a learning experience. We were young,” Johnson said. “We finished above .500, which is good, but we would have liked to win a few more games.” Junior captain Churchill Bounds was named to the Bayside South Conference Second Team. He led the

team this year with 326 points. He was second in rebounds, with 171. Honorable mention accolades went to Drummond, junior captain Drew Haueisen, senior Brett Berquist and junior Theo Hobbs. Haueisen was second in points this season for Decatur, scoring 273. He led the team in rebounds, with 189. Drummond was third in scoring and rebounds, tallying 136 points and 159 rebounds. Johnson presented team awards to Haueisen (MVP), Bounds (Offensive MVP), Berquist (Coaches Award) and junior captain Matt Brown (Sportsmanship). The team will only lose one player

– Berquist – to graduation. Johnson said the key to success next year would be training during the offseason. “I always say, ‘March to November is when you get better,’” he said. “I told them at the end of the season only they can make a change. We’ll see how many kids dedicate their time to get better.” Johnson said it was a good season overall, but, “we’ve just got a lot of work to do to get back to the regional championship next year.” The last three seasons Decatur won the 3A East Region championship title. “If they learn and get better, good things will happen,” he said.

Improvement evident by second half of season By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (March 15, 2019) The Stephen Decatur girls’ basketball team battled a tough Chesapeake squad during the second round of the 3A East Region last Tuesday in Pasadena, but came up a bit short of advancing in the tournament. “I think they got shell-shocked a bit,” Decatur Coach Scott Kurtz said. “It was 25-10 after the first, then we regrouped and played better in the second quarter.” Decatur outscored Chesapeake, 1413, in the second quarter, but the visiting Seahawks still had a large deficit to make up. Unfortunately, Kurtz said the Lady Cougars came out on fire in the third quarter and began to put the game out of reach. Chesapeake won, 69-42. “Our defense just couldn’t hold them,” he said. “We’re just not on the caliber of that team yet.”

Scott Kurtz

Decatur sophomore Jessica Janney led the team with 12 points. Freshman Nadia Bullock and junior Sarah Engle both scored 10. Eight of Bullock’s points came in the second

quarter. The Seahawks finished the season with a 13-10 record. “It took us a while to figure out our identity,” Kurtz said. Kurtz joined the basketball program last season and this year took over as head coach of the varsity team. It took some time for both Kurtz and the players to get acclimated to everything and find a balance, he said, with new plays and a new system in place. “It took awhile to find the right dynamic,” he said. By the second half of the season, Kurtz said Decatur was a different

team. “I would say we were one of the more improved teams in the [Bayside] Conference in the second half of the season,” he said. The squad will only graduate two players – captains Sofia Gordy and Grace Beres. “We’ll bring a lot of offensive power back. We’ll have a solid 10 back,” Kurtz said. “We’ve got to get them working in the offseason. Hopefully we can pick up where we left off [in March] in November.” Janney led the team this season, with 273 points and 205 rebounds. Bullock, who injured her foot over the summer playing basketball, joined the team about five games into the season. She finished second in scoring, with 200 points, and third in re-

bounding (101). Engle was third in points, with 134. Beres was second in rebounding, with 125, and fourth in points (107). Bullock earned Bayside South Conference Honorable Mention accolades. Beres was named a senior all star. Kurtz presented team awards to Janney (Offensive MVP), Beres (Defensive MVP), Engle (Coaches Award), Gordy (Sportsmanship) and junior Abby Yesko (Unsung Hero). Kurtz said he enjoyed his first season as head coach and is already looking forward to next year. “I can’t wait for next season,” he said. “The way the girls responded and their work ethic made it rewarding. The internal drive in them was infectious. They all want to do better.”

Ocean Pines offering indoor pickleball drop-in until May (March 15, 2019) Pickleball enthusiasts are invited to play indoors this winter at the Ocean Pines Community Center, located at 235 Ocean Parkway. Drop-in rates are $5 for Ocean Pines residents, $7 for non-residents and free for Ocean Pines pickleball members. Drop-in hours through May (ex-

cluding holidays) are Mondays, 79:30 p.m., Tuesdays, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Thursdays, 1:30-4:30 p.m., Fridays, 1:30-6 p.m. and select Sundays from 1:30-5:30 p.m. (dates available at OceanPines.org). For more information about indoor pickleball, call the Ocean Pines Recreation and Parks Department at 410-641-7052.


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Ninth annual St. Patrick’s Day 5K event this Saturday By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (March 15, 2018) Over 1,200 runners have already pre-registered online for the ninth annual St. Patrick’s Day 5K on the Boardwalk, which is set for Saturday at 9 a.m. Sponsored by OC Tri-Running, the

Ocean Pines Swim Team members Breyden Wright and Trista Harner recently competed in the 2019 Maryland LSC 14 & Under Short Course Championship Meet, at St. Mary’s College, and both brought home several awards.

Wright and Harner win several awards during swim meet (March 15, 2019) Trista Harner and Breyden Wright, of the Ocean Pines Swim Team, competed in the 2019 Maryland LSC 14 & Under Short Course Championship Meet, held Feb. 28 to March 3, at St. Mary’s College. Harner, 12, competed in the 11-12 girls age group over the four-day meet. Her highest finish was second place in the 100yard freestyle. Her time of 56.2 seconds was a personal best and a new team record. “She had a plan. She told me exactly what she was going to do [and] she dove in and executed it,” said Coach Brad Diehl. “It was an exciting race to watch and a proud moment as a coach.” Harner swam in nine events, earning many personal best times and new team records. She swam in the 500-yard freestyle (5:40.27), 50-yard freestyle (26.04 seconds), 200-yard freestyle (2:03.88), 50yard backstroke (30.68 seconds), 100-yard backstroke (1:04.97), 100-yard individual medley (1:05.03), 200-yard backstroke (2:22.4) and 400-yard individual medley (5:19.79). This meet was a trials and finals format, which requires swimmers to compete in a morning session with the goal of finishing in the top 16 to earn them the opportunity to swim at finals later in the evening. “It’s a tough meet to prepare for both See SWIMMERS Page 84

race is a precursor to the St. Patrick’s Day parade, scheduled to begin at noon along Coastal Highway from 60th to 44th streets. Runners will begin the festive race in front of Shenanigan’s before heading south on the Boardwalk to the inlet, around the pier and under the tram station. Then they will head north to 16th Street before racing south to the Fourth Street finish line. “Everybody usually dresses up in green, and that’s what we like about (it). It’s a sea of green going down the Boardwalk,” OC Tri-Running President Chris Klebe said. “You don’t have to be a runner. It’s more about the fun and celebrating St. Patrick’s Day together. We just hope to have a safe, fun run this weekend and pray for good weather.” Additional runners can sign up during packet pickup tonight, Friday, from 5:30-8 p.m. at Shenanigans Irish Pub on Fourth Street and the Boardwalk. The entry fee is $40. Pre-registered runners can pick up their race packets today, from 5:30-8 p.m., or Saturday morning from 7:308:40 a.m. at Shenanigan’s. There will be no signups on race day. This year’s event will be timed by Chip style computer timing. Runners will receive a running chip during checkin at packet pick up and will be in-

More than 1,200 endorphin lovers participated in OC Tri-Running’s eighth annual St. Patrick’s Day 5K, held in front of Shenanigans Irish Pub on Fourth Street and the Boardwalk, last year.

structed on how to attach it to their shoe lace. These chips must be returned on race day immediately after race completion. There will be a $25.00 charge for anyone who does not return a chip, with no exceptions. The first and second-fastest male and female will receive awards during a postrace ceremony scheduled for approximately 10 a.m., along with the top three finishers in seven male and female age groups ranging from 15-under to 60-over. Race fees include a tech-style long sleeve shirt, a finishers medal and one Guinness drink ticket that can be redeemed at Shenanigan’s after the event.

Last year, 1,245 people participated on race day. “That was one of the biggest [events] we had last year,” Klebe said. At Shenanigan’s, there will be an after-race party with live music, refreshments and lunch specials. “It’s a good way to start the day for the parade,” Klebe said. “The last runner/walker [should] be finished by 10:15 which is plenty of time to get their gear, have some drinks and food, head off to the parade and then come back to Shenanigans for some specials.” For more information, visit octrirunning.com.

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MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

Local equestrian heading to finals in Harrisburg, Pa.

Swimmers earn new records and achieve best times

(March 15, 2019) Olivia Brown, a sophomore at Stephen Decatur High School, was the highest point earner in the Open Division in Zone 3 of the Interscholastic Equestrian Association and has qualified for the national finals in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, on April 27. She will compete in the Varsity Open Championship. Brown rides for a team out of Easton, Little Clovelly-C-Line Stables, and competes in the Open Varsity Division with other high school riders. Zone 3 encompasses North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland and Delaware. “To receive high point rider in this zone is an amazing accomplishment, particularly for such a young rider,” her coach, Hilary Gibbons-Neff, said. She will compete against each high point rider from all 11 zones in the country.

Continued from Page 83 physically and mentally,” Diehl said. Wright, 13, competed in the 13-14 boys age group and swam in the 100yard backstroke (59.44 seconds), 200yard backstroke (2:08.7) and 100-yard freestyle (55.19 seconds). His times were personal bests and new team records in all three events. Each had to qualify for the state competition by meeting challenging time standards during the season, which began in September. “The level of competition at this meet is much more intense than the meets throughout the season,” said Coach Kristina Watts. “This is the best of the best swimmers in each age group in the state of Maryland battling against each other. “Trista and Breyden handled the higher pressures of this competition with poise and strength, something I am very proud of them for when we are one of the smaller teams at the meet,” she continued. “They both swam the fastest they have ever swum in their events, which is the most important goal to achieve, and OPST came home with some state medals to make their success even sweeter.” With 85 year-round members ages 518, the Ocean Pines Swim Team is the only competitive swim group in Worcester County. The Hammerheads are affiliated with Maryland Swimming and USA Swimming. For more information, visit www.opsthammerheads.org.

PHOTO COURTESY SHAWN MCMILLEN

Olivia Brown, riding Lapis, has qualified for the national finals Varsity Open Championship in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, April 27.

SURF REPORT

Literature describes surf culture By Dave Dalkiewicz Contributing Writer (March 15, 2019) It’s time for another one, another good book regarding our favorite subject, object, topic. The book is “Barbarian Days, A Surfing Life,” by William Finnegan. Finnegan is a staff writer for the New Yorker Magazine and is also on staff at SURFER Magazine. He’s not only a good surfer but quite a writer as well. Much of his writing has been as a war correspondent with extensive travel to risky, dangerous battle zones. As a world traveler, his surfing resume is impressive. His skill as a writer puts him in a class of his own. Growing up in Hawaii and California he was bitten by the surf bug early on. Segments of his life include Australia, Africa, Indonesia,

San Francisco and Madeira. Accolades, reviews and praise of the book encompasses the first four pages with reports from respected newspapers, sports magazines and literary reviews. So, it becomes not only a book about surfing but literature of adventure, culture and pursuit of some of the best waves in the world and the resulting lifestyle. Finnegan has managed to conduct a life of high professional standards entwined with wave riding of the highest standard. One of the consistent features, pervading through all segments of the book, is the description of waves, how they are

ridden, paddling out to them and even getting back to shore. The detail is outstanding: Breaks in the sandbar to get outside. Keyholes in the reef to do the same. Lining up a break, knowing where to sit. How the same spot can have a different complexion with a tide change, more favorable wind, or swell direction. Even returning to a surf spot after a period of time and noting differences whether good or bad. It takes experience to know of these things and indeed the author possesses plenty. An interesting aspect of Finnegan’s is that he has lived in Manhattan since 1987. Local spots for him are Long Island and the Jersey Shore, but with access to multiple airports, the world literally becomes available. Time and money being the obvious constraints.

The book was published in 2015. With a surfing “career” starting in early teens and a 20-year span prior to residence in Manhattan, the story bridges roughly a 50-year period with more than enough interesting places and episodes, keeping the stoke high to be read again and again. Recommendable to anyone, surfer or not, “Barbarian Days, A Surfing Life,” by William Finnegan is on many levels about as good as it gets. — Dave Dalkiewicz is the owner of Ocean Atlantic Surf Shop in Ocean City


MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

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Family marvels at impact of cannabis on daughter’s life By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The Martin family, of Ocean City, has had a tough few years, but the advent of medical marijuana has made at least one aspect of their lives a little easier. Buddy and Rachel Martin have a family with six children, one of whom, their 9-yearold daughter Shelby, has the genetic condition, Rett Syndrome. Rett Syndrome is a Buddy Martin genetic postnatal neurological disorder that affects several functions, including speaking, walking and swallowing. “What Shelby has is really about the worst thing a kid could have period,” said 38-year-old Buddy. “She can’t speak. She can’t walk. She has very little use of her hands. Eating is a problem. Swallowing is a problem,” he said. “Constant constipation is a problem, like bad enough where they can actually like rupture their intestines.” In addition to those difficulties, epilepsy is a concern with Rett Syndrome, Shelby experiences as many as 30 and 40 seizures a day, Buddy said. He added when she’s been tested in hospitals overnight, it’s been constant. “The biggest thing for epilepsy is sleep, and for her being up every hour, or two every single night of her life, she never gets the amount of rest that she needs so that just makes it worse,” he said. Shelby sleeps in a hospital bed in her parent’s room, and they continued to watch over her. “I mean we would before sleep in shifts,” Rachel said. “He’d go to bed at like 2 and I’d get up around 3 with her. And we’d done that for years. Just normal.” Shelby is on two highly addictive seizure medications, one of which takes

its toll on her organs. “They just tear your body up. We’re not really designed to handle them long-term and to be on them every single day for several years and to be so little and have to fight for your life a few times a year is a lot,” Rachel said. Even with that medication, however, the seizures can come on suddenly. “Anytime anything happens to Shelby, the seizures take over,” Buddy said. “She gets the flu, she starts seizing. She loses a tooth, she starts seizing.” Then the Martins began speaking with hi Tide Dispensary co-owner Bob Davis about their options for Shelby after doing researching online. Davis said he met with the family last November, and the Martins picked up Shelby’s products not long thereafter. Davis, who has been a pharmacist for more than 25 years, worked with the family to get her registered with the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission, and to develop a treatment. Davis said it involves a grapeseed oil based tincture administered from a dropper. It contains two compounds found in cannabis, CBD (Cannabidiol), which produces no “high,” and THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), which can generate a “high” in sufficients amounts. The ratio in the tincture, however, is 10 parts CBD to one part THC. Davis said the ratios are typically higher in CBD, and it “stabilizes the nerve impulses … increasing the seizure threshold, meaning it’s harder for them to get to the point where you’re going to actively have a seizure.” Shelby is a third grade student at Cedar Chapel Special School in Snow Hill, and uses a computer to communicate with her teachers, aides and fellow classmates. Rachel added Shelby takes the cannabis with pharmaceutical drugs. Both parents have noticed a drastic reduction in her seizures and Buddy

RACHEL RAVINA/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Shelby Martin, 9, of Ocean City, suffers from Rett Syndrome, a genetic disorder that impacts aspects of her life including speaking, walking and swallowing. She uses cannabis to help her seizures.

“think[s] she’s had four seizures in total” since starting the cannabis therapy. “That doesn’t happen, you know what I mean? That just doesn’t for anybody for any reason,” Davis said. “It shouldn’t happen, it’s not normal for something to be that effective and then not to be toxic at the same time.” Buddy and Rachel agreed that Shelby has become more alert, and cited instances when she held out her hands to others, which she hadn’t really done before. “She was really proud of herself,” Rachel said. “She’s doing amazing.” “We were all excited because she broke a bowl the other day because she tried to reach her own potato chips,” Buddy said. Buddy also noted how her eyes have been more expressive. “Rett girls speak with their eyes because they can’t talk, but you’d be surprised how much they can tell you with

their eyes,” he said. Buddy and Rachel also said Shelby has been sleeping through the night since taking sleepytime, a combination of THC and CBN, which Davis said is a subset of CBD and helps sleep functions. “She’s like 20 some days in a row now of sleeping through the whole night, which has never happened in her whole life,” Buddy said. For the Martin family, they continue to treasure every moment of Shelby’s life. “Rett [Syndrome] is a terminal diagnosis, so you never know how long you’re going to have with your daughter, so any day that she is happy is a good day for us,” he said. Buddy and Rachel agree Shelby’s improvements have affected their entire family. “That also puts a lot less stress on the family,” Buddy said. “Less fighting or arguing over things.”

Worcester County board approves licenses By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The Worcester County Board of License Commissioners issued a suspension for selling alcohol to minors and granted several licenses during a meeting last Wednesday. • Marlin Market was given a fine and a suspension for selling alcohol to minors. The market, located on the 9600 block of Stephen Decatur Highway in West Ocean City, was found to have violated the Alcoholic Beverages Article. The market received a seven-day suspension of off sale products from March 7-14.

The store had to pay $2,500 for two fines by last Friday. Board member Marty W. Pusey made a motion to approve the decision, which was seconded by board member R. Charles Nichols. • An application for a Class “D” beer, wine and liquor seven-day license for the WXYZ Bar and Tiki Bar in the Aloft Hotel on the 4500 block of Coastal Highway in Ocean City was approved. The license covered the entire hotel, as guests were permitted to take drinks from the bar back to their rooms. Three pieces of acoustic music indoors and outdoors will be allowed seven days a week. Inside will go until

midnight and outside would go until 9 p.m. A pool table was also approved. Pusey made a motion to approve the license and Nichols seconded it. • The board approved an application for a Class “B” beer, wine and liquor seven-day license for Three Anchors Coastal Eats and Spirits on the 7800 block of Coastal Highway in Ocean City. Pusey also moved to approve indoor and outdoor seating, no off sale of alcohol, as well as no pool tables or video games. Live entertainment up to four pieces from 6-11 p.m. up to to four nights per week was also approved. There will also be a one-piece non-amplified guitar permitted, and outdoor

speakers that are controlled by management from inside. Nichols seconded the motion. • A Class “B” beer, wine and liquor seven-day license for a Dough Roller Restaurant in West Ocean City was approved. The franchise location would replace the Applebee’s on Ocean Gateway. It closed in November 2018. There would be 150 seats with 24 seats at the bar from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. seven days per week. There would also be two outdoor tables, but no alcohol would be consumed. Two bar top games and arcade games were also permitted. There would be no disc jockey. See BOARD Page 86


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Ocean City Today

MARCH 15, 2019

OC considers room tax increase for January Updating 2007 ordinance language will require public hearing prior to enactment By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The Ocean City Council reconvened talks over increasing room-tax rates from 4.5 percent to 5 percent, with a proposed new start date of Jan. 1, 2020, but voted in favor of delaying a decision with fiscal year 2020 budget discussions looming. City Manager Doug Miller said the topic was last broached during a council work session in late January, at which point it was requested that Mayor Rick Meehan send a letter to the Worcester County Commissioners, who ultimately must approve the proposed countywide room tax increase. That letter was sent on March 1, but no reply has been received yet. Miller noted the prior discussion involved implementing the proposed tax increase either to coincide with the start of fiscal 2020 this July 1, or halfway through the budget year on January 1, 2020. Budget Manager Jennie Knapp estimated implementing higher room tax rates in January would yield about $5.8 million for advertising, $1.2 million for marketing and $608,000 for

visitor-related expenses. Miller said in the interim an increased focus has been placed on youth sports marketing. “We are keenly focused on creating a sports complex on the island or in north Worcester County,” he said. Knapp said the extra revenue would be required to offset increased costs related to maintaining the beach and Boardwalk, as well as higher costs from special events during the shoulder season. Miller noted that maintaining a clean and safe town continues to be a top priority. “Some of that room tax money should go back into the general fund for these purposes,” he said. Knapp also said the potential $600,000 in extra revenue should be dedicated for tourism related expenses, while noting the room tax boost would be required to balance the upcoming fiscal 2020 budget. Councilman John Gehrig said the increased funding should be used for economic development. “If we only raise room tax, if we don’t use this opportunity to reinvest in the community, I think it’s a lost opportunity,” he said. Miller noted the sports complex proposal was a new concept that deserves more attention. “We have to define our niche and find out how we’ll get there,” he said.

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Councilwoman Mary Knight said the room tax increase is not necessarily being done to spend more money, but regardless of the direction more concrete plans should be developed prior to enacting the rate change. Meehan said he would be meeting with the Worcester County Commissioners next Wednesday and will in-

quire about their support of the room tax increase. The council voted 5-2, with Gehrig and Councilman Matt James opposed, to further consider a room tax increase effective Jan. 1, which will require two readings and a public hearing to alter the current ordinance language.

Funding denied for lighting outside of Newark church By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (March 15, 2019) The Worcester County Commissioners feared setting a precedent if they decided to erect and cover the cost of a light on Bowen United Methodist Church property as they were requested to do last Tuesday. Sally Molnar, a representative of the Newark church’s board of trustees, asked the county install a light pole on Mill Street for the church’s back parking lot, and cited safety concerns. “We feel it is dangerous for people attending church functions at night,” she said in a letter. The commissioners, however, balked at the prospect. “Are we setting ourselves up with a precedent if we do this?” Commissioner Chip Bertino asked. County Public Works Director John Tustin replied, “I would say yes.” Chief Administrative Officer Harold Higgins also told commissioners the lighting responsibility would lie with the church on Newark Road. “The cost associated with it, the responsibility and liability … I don’t mean to seem cold-hearted, but it’s not our responsibility to do this,” Bertino said. The commissioners had two choices: either accept or deny the church’s request. Tustin said there were several places to light the church at the intersection of Mill Street and Newark Road: a street light at the intersection, a pole in the rear parking lot “where the church could mount a security light” or a pole on Mill Street. He added in a proposal that “DP&L could install a cobra head street light for about $20 [per] month.” Tustin appeared hesitant to pick the option that could inconvenience an existing house. “I would be afraid that if we put a light on that pole you’d have some overflow onto that house, especially if it’s an LED, and would be very upsetting to that resident,” he said. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic agreed.

“I’m concerned more with the house across the way,” Mitrecic said. “I mean ... it’s gonna be shining right in their front windows there, and then we’re gonna get complaints from them.” Tustin went onto say lights were added previously in West Ocean City for public safety reasons, but not on private property. Commissioner Ted Elder appeared to take issue with that and stressed the importance of safety. “I would just say the street lights that were put in in West Ocean City, I think the citizens of Newark, Maryland have the same rights as the people in West Ocean City to have their streets safe so they can move along those streets without feeling threatened,” Elder said. Elder moved to supply the church with lighting, and Commissioner Joshua Nordstrom seconded the motion. The vote was 3-3 with Commissioners Jim Bunting, Bertino and Mitrecic dissenting. “The motion fails,” Mitrecic said. Worcester County Commissioners President Diana Purnell was absent from last Tuesday’s meeting.

Board of License Commissioners nods to requests Continued from Page 85 Nichols made a motion to approve the license, and Pusey seconded it. • The board approved the transfer of a Class “D” beer, wine and liquor seven-day license from Big Tipps Mgmt. LLC. to O’Donnell Brothers Holdings LLC. The Baltimore Avenue restaurant was once called the Alibi Room and is now set to be the Lucky Anchor Bar and Grill. It would be open seven days a week from May 7 to Oct. 31, and open Fridays through Sundays in the offseason. Up to five pieces of live entertainment would be permitted seven days per week. Pusey made a motion to approve the transfer, which Nichols seconded.


MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

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MARCH 15, 2019

Ocean City Today

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