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FEBRUARY 21, 2014

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Worcester schools to open day after Labor Day, Sept. 2 Move will bump academic calendar four days later

WHAT’S COOKING? Some of the second grade bakers in Angie Bunting’s class at Worcester Prep take a break from their preparations for the 2014 Bread Sale to benefit Atlantic General Hospital. Pictured, from left, Jack Schell, Caleb Collins, Ashling Marshall, Riya Jani, Lebby Becker, Moorea Phillips and Loni Wederbrand.

City signs on with MDE to reduce water byproducts Deputy Director of Public Works. “There are so many variables that go into this. We can’t snap out fingers and make them happen all at once. It’s an issue affecting a lot of jurisdictions across the country.” Disinfection byproducts – referred to as DBPs - are created following the treatment of drinking water, when the leftover treatment chemicals combine with any microscopic organic matter remaining in the water. In most cases, residual chlorine from treatment combines to make trihalomethanes. “There are number of different compounds that are considered trihalomethanes, but they are collectively regulated and referred to as total trihalomethanes or ‘TTHMs’ by the EPA,” Parsons said. Since the Stage Two rule took effect in the fall, the city’s first two quarterly readings for the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 have been See CITY Page 6

OC expected to sign accord providing two-year window to complete improvements

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) Despite the presence of some ominous terminology from your sophomore organic chemistry lecture, the upcoming efforts to improve the city’s drinking water are not nearly as scary as they sound. The Town of Ocean City is expected to sign on to an agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment which will provide a two-year window for the city to finish water treatment improvements, which are expected to bring the town into compliance with the federallymandated Stage Two Disinfection Byproducts Rule. “We actually approached the MDE and said that the Stage Two rule concerns us,” said Jim Parsons, the city’s

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City expected to sign agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment which will give resort two years to finish improvements.

By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) Worcester County will be the only public school system in Maryland to start classes after Labor Day in the 2014-2015 school year. The decision to start school Sept. 2 came at Tuesday’s Board of Education meeting, where the board voted against starting classes before the holiday that marks the unofficial end of summer. The move bumps the school calendar four days later, with the last day slated for June 16, 2015. Worcester was the last school district in Maryland to adopt a pre-Labor Day start to the school year in 2009 and the debate over the first day of school has polarized discussions in the five years since. “Over the last three years or so, you started feeling the concern mounting about the decision to go prior to Labor Day,” Board of Education President Bob Rothermel said. “It’s been an ongoing discussion ever since.” In a resort driven by a summer economy, support for the change is strong. Proponents argue that starting school before Labor Day hurts businesses that rely on workers still in high school or employed by the schools and by cutting the vacation season short. “It’s almost un-American to go back to school before Labor Day,” Mayor Rick Meehan said at an Economic Development Committee meeting earlier this month. He argued that more than half of the county schools’ budget comes from the Town of Ocean City and “the more revenue we produce, the more successful we are (and) the more money will be available.” Rothermel added that Worcester County Public Schools is the largest employer in the county “and many of our employees work summer jobs as well.” However, Superintendent of Schools Dr. Jerry Wilson favored keepSee WORCESTER Page 7

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Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

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By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer

(Feb. 21, 2014) For its eighth year running, Maryland ranked No. 1 in the country in the percentage of high school graduates who passed one or more Advanced Placement exams, a College Board report released this month shows. Almost 30 percent of the state’s graduates succeeded on at least one 2013 AP exam, up slightly from 28 percent achieving the same in 2012. In Worcester County in 2012, 34 percent of the graduating class scored at least a three on an AP exam, considered passing on the five-point scale, Coordinator of Public Relations and Special Programs for Worcester County Public Schools Barbara Witherow said. “Last year, the performance of our seniors on AP exams was significantly higher than the state’s average,” she said, noting data for 2013 isn’t available for the county yet. Witherow does know that of the

465 AP tests Worcester students took in 2013, 269 earned a score of three or higher. “This means that 58 percent of all 2013 AP exams were scored at 3 or better,” she said. All students — not just seniors — may take the exams and one student can take more than one AP test. Maryland’s top scores come in part because so many students take AP classes and tests, with nearly half of students statewide sitting down for the exams before they graduate. However, disparities across subgroups of students exist, with blacks and Hispanics scoring below the overall student mean in the state.

And while the scores are high, a 2013 study from Stanford University challenged the assumption that students who do well on AP tests perform better than their peers in college. “Studies that simply establish that students who are involved with the AP program in high school perform better in college do not necessarily provide proof that the AP program caused the students to be successful in college,” the study says. It also notes that, while some students save money thanks to college credits earned through AP exams, “this tends to be the exception rather than the rule.”

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Better than one-third of Worcester students passed advanced tests in 2012

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Maryland ranks No. 1 in AP exams 8th straight year

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Amendment could give Berlin liquor license

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) The Town of Berlin could have a liquor store again if an amendment to state law is introduced into the Maryland General Assembly. That is if the Maryland General Assembly approves, if a Berlin business owner applies for the newly permitted liquor license and if the Board of License Commissioners approves the application. The town’s last liquor store, the country-run dispensary, closed a few months ago after the county opened a new, much larger store on Route 50 east of Stephen Decatur High School and outside the town limits. Mayor Gee Williams and many others wanted the town to have a liquor store and Chris Denny, owner of Cheers at the intersection of Main Street and Old Ocean City Boulevard, would like to

The 1.6-mile trip would be onerous during summer months when Route 50 is heavily traveled and Berlin residents would have to continue driving east to turn around at the Route 589 intersection and then returning home. “I might have to drive five miles to get a bottle of liquor,” Moore, a South Main Street resident, said. Senior citizens such as himself, he said, might be reluctant to buy liquor if it requires a five-mile trip. Furthermore, Moore said, the municipalities of Ocean City, Pocomoke and Snow Hill have liquor stores. “Berlin is the only one being less served that it used to be,” Moore said. Ocean City has seven businesses with licenses for off-sale liquor, the sale of liquor to go, and a proliferation of liquor stores in Berlin is unlikely, he said. The approval of the commissioners and pos-

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sible approval of the proposed amendment by the General Assembly would not “open up the floodgates,” he said. In addition, he said, no wholesale liquor business would be willing to drive from Baltimore to service a small business like Cheers. Denny would be buying his liquor wholesale from the county and would become one of the customers adding to the county’s bottom line. The commissioners were swayed by Moore’s argument and voted to support an amendment to the state code allowing someone to apply for a Class D liquor license so they would sell liquor by the bottle in Berlin. Bud Church, president of the Worcester County Commissioners, said he had never believed the county should be in competition with private businesses. “Berlin, in my opinion, should have its own store,” Church said. “Berlin deserves to have their own facility.”

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add liquor to his inventory of beer and wine. He also has the capability to expand his business to accommodate the additional bottles and a 25-seat bar, which is required as part of the Class D license to sell liquor. Representing Denny, attorney Joe Moore sought and received approval by the mayor and Berlin Town Council last month to proceed with trying to get an amendment passed by the General Assembly that would allow a person to apply for a Class D license within the corporate limits of the town. Shore Spirits, the county’s new liquor store on Route 50, serves the traveling public, Moore told the Worcester County Commissioners during their meeting Tuesday. The location, however, is a half-mile from the corporate limits and would be a 1.6-mile trip for most Berlin residents.

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) The Worcester County Commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a text amendment that would permit up to 12 children in a daycare home. The county code has permitted up to eight children who are not members of the caregiver’s family in a daycare home. The change becomes effectives 45 days after the vote. The change was made because state regulations permit up to 12 children in a daycare home and the commissioners wanted to make the county regulations match the state regulation. Members of the county Planning Commission had discussed the issue during their Jan. 2 meeting and voted unanimously to send a favorable recommendation to the county commissioners. Ed Tudor, director of the Department of Development Review and Permitting, said only two or three people might be interested in having the increased number of children in their daycare homes. Lindsay Ashton, who has a daycare home in Newark for children aged from 2 weeks to 12 years old, wants to have up to 12 children in her care. During Tuesday’s meeting, she asked if the change could go into effect sooner than 45 days. County attorney Sonny Bloxom said it did not qualify as emergency legislation. The law, he said, requires a 45-day period during which people may take the issue to referendum if they oppose it. The change also allows two instead of just one outside employee for daycare homes and also makes large daycare homes a home occupation instead of a special exception use in the agricultural and estate districts. To have up to 12 children in a daycare home, the daycare provider must meet criteria related to concerns such as outdoor activity space, staffing and sanitary facilities.


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 5

City plans to permit on-beach paddleboards Recreation and Parks give favorable reception to allow them toward season’s end

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) Although actual implementation is still a long way away, the city has plans to allow stand-up paddleboards along city beaches toward the end of the coming season. The city’s Recreation and Parks Commission gave a favorable reception to permitting paddleboards along the coastline on a limited basis this September, when the water is still warm but the population of bathers has died down. “I personally don’t know why you

would want to do it, but I get it that going and seeing how it works is a good test,” said Shelly Dawson of the OC Surf Club. “I don’t see it being a problem the way you have it set up.” Paddleboards currently do not fall within the city’s guidelines for bodyboards, which are allowed on the beach during the summer months, or surfboards, which are allowed only on a rotating section of beach during the season to separate them from swimmers. Under the proposed pilot program, paddleboards will be allowed under the same strictures as surfboards, but only after Labor Day, and only when the surf beach schedule has been declared “modified.” This is done when lifeguards are still on duty, but there are few swimmers, al-

Big Brothers, Big Sisters set ‘Bowl For Kids’ Sake’ event (Feb. 21, 2014) Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Chesapeake (BBBSGC) announced that its annual “Bowl For Kids’ Sake” fundraising event will be taking place from 1-3 p.m., Sunday, March 16, at Ocean City Lanes, 115 72nd Street. The funds raised from this event will go toward programs to serve disadvantaged children, including one-to-one mentoring, empowerment workshops, and enrichment activities. BBBSGC also provides training workshops for adults working with children to the general public, free of charge. Bowl For Kids’ Sake is an event that takes place across all of America. To participate in the Bowl For Kids’ Sake event, get together a team of six adults and sign up online at www.biglittle.org/BFKSES2014, or sign up individually. Each bowler is

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asked to raise a minimum of $50. Call 410-543-2447 with any questions about the sign-up process or the fundraiser. The theme for both events is St. Patty’s Day. Prizes will be given out to the most festive dressed, highest funds raised by an individual bowler, and the highest individual score. Participants will also receive pizza, drinks, two hours of bowling, shoe rentals and a t-shirt. Advance registration is mandatory. Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Chesapeake is a nonprofit, youth development organization, which is committed to helping children reach their fullest potential through professionally supported, one-to-one mentoring relationships and a full range of youth mentoring programs with measurable impact.

lowing surfers to spread out anywhere they’d like as long as they remain 50 yards away from bathers. After Sept. 30, when the Ocean City Beach Patrol is off-duty, any type of equipment is allowed in the water. Restricting paddleboards to “modified” days will prevent them from encroaching on the surfers on days when they area already confined to a small stretch. “The surfers are adamant that they don’t’ want them on their beaches,” said OCBP Lt. Ward Kovacs. Paddleboards will have to keep the same distance from others as surfers do, and will be required to wear a leash attaching them to their board. By state law, they are also required to have a whistle and life vest. Although some paddleboarders may try to catch waves, it is assumed that most will move north-south be-

yond the break point of the waves. Even if beyond the breakers, Kovacs said, paddleboards should still be required to stay within 200 yards of the beach. “There’s an assumption that if you launch off the beach, we’re responsible for them,” Kovacs said. “Therefore we’d want them to stay in an area where we could actually go get them if something happens.” Although paddleboarding in the ocean seems less favorable than in the bay, Dawson said he has never seen much conflict between surfers on Assateague and any paddleboards that may come through. “You can be a wave hog...but there’s a certain respect and understanding that people have,” Dawson said. “With everyone kept 50 yards apart, you could have a ball and not bother anybody.”

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 6

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

City to get time to improve water treatment Continued from Page 1 well within the limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency. However, the agreement with the MDE will exempt the city from Stage Two monitoring for two years while it finishes improvements to make sure that the levels will not increase. “Our first two quarters have been outstanding, but we didn’t want to roll the dice,� Parsons said. The Environmental Protection Agency began regulation of disinfection byproducts – referred to as DBPs, in 2006 with its Stage One ruling. The policy was the culmination of decades of development in water quality testing. “It’s been a topic of interest since the 1970s,� said Alan Roberson, Director of Federal Relations for the American Water Works Association, who assisted with the policy’s development. Beginning in earnest in 1991, Roberson said, “it was really a process that the EPA worked on for almost 16 years.� The Stage One ruling set a limit of 80 parts per billion (80 micrograms per liter) of TTHMs for any given water supply, over a running one-year average. It did not mandate how that testing was conducted within any given

jurisdiction. The Stage Two rule, however, requires that water be tested at a number of different sites throughout the jurisdiction, depending on the size of the area. In Ocean City, four sites must now be sampled quarterly. Further, these sites are not averaged together, as they could be for Stage One readings, but must each individually maintain an average of less than 80 ppb over the past year at any given time. “You can go over the limit any given quarter, as long s that annual running average stays less than 80 ppb,� Parsons said. “The whole health concern is chronic exposure. It’s not something where you drink the water one day and the next day you feel sick.� The city violated the Stage One rule in 2010, when its average TTHM level was found to be 83 ppb over the span of the previous year. However, a single spike could throw off the running average – since then, Parsons said, the city’s levels have been more stable. Attempts to reduce trihalomethanes and other DBPs are somewhat of a double-edged sword, as one has to reduce either the amount of disinfectant, or the amount of organic matter, in order to reduce the amount of byproduct that the two create. Disinfectant can be re-

OPPOSITE DIRECTIONS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21:

duced only to a certain extent before it ceases to be effective in neutralizing the bacteria and microbes which can make people immediately ill. Thus, the preferred tactic is to develop filtering technology that can remove smaller and smaller pieces of organic matter before the water is chemically disinfected. “Our approach is that we’d rather take something out of the water upfront rather than re-treat it afterward,� Parsons said. To this end, the city is already experimenting with new materials at its water treatment plants, located at 15th Street, 44th Street, and Gorman Avenue in the vicinity of 136th Street. This layout, and the town’s seasonality, also makes it more of a challenge to reduce TTHMs. “The formation of disinfection byproducts is not instantaneous,� Parsons said. “One of the big variables is what we call ‘water age.’ The longer the organic matter and the chlorine sit in proximity, the longer the reaction can continue to occur.� The 15th Street treatment plant is on year-round, Parsons noted, while the 44th Street location is only powered on at times of high demand throughout the year. The Gorman Avenue plant is typically utilized only in the summer. “The water age up north is naturally higher,� Parsons said. “But [the TTHM levels] don’t follow a straight line, so I can’t say exactly where and when it might be an issue.� November 2013 readings showed roughly 40 ppb at the extreme south end of town and in the midtown area. Readings at the extreme north end, taken at 141st Street, clocked in around 63 ppb. The city is also looking into consolidating some of its water storage tanks, so that some tanks are not sitting for excessive periods. Tank aeration systems, particularly on the

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north end of town, are also expected to be developed. Several studies commissioned by both the EPA as well as private universities have concluded that trihalomethanes can be carcinogenic – but only in extremely high doses, far more than one would experience from consistently drinking water with 80 ppb of TTHMs. “These numbers, including the 80 ppb threshold, were sort of the ones we can land on with the technology we have,� Roberson said. “It’s kind of a practical number given what the systems across the county can achieve.� As filter technology has increased over the past several decades, TTHM levels have already seen a massive decrease. Previously, many systems were unable to filter out most organic matter in their water, some of which could make consumers ill. Instead, water was disinfected with even larger amounts of chlorine, creating conditions for high trihalomethane content. “Back in the 1970s, when the testing was first developed, you were seeing places in the 200-300 [ppb] range,� Roberson said. Ocean City gets its water from two underground aquifers via 25 wells located throughout town, Parsons noted. This puts it at an advantage over areas which use surface water than is exposed to outside contaminants. “There are very hard-hit areas in North Carolina, for instance, where they have issues because its heavily forested and the runoff picks up microscopic bits of leaves and drains into the collection ponds,� Roberson said. “The issue of DBPs is typically associated more with water from surface sources,� Roberson said, “but there are some unique issues dealing with a seasonal, coastal community.�

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 7

Record numbers apply for police department positions By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) Gearing up for the summer season, the Ocean City Police Department has tested its highestever number of applicants for seasonal and potentially full-time officer positions. OCPD Capt. Greg Guiton said at last week’s police commission meeting that the department has tested 646 officer applicants since this past summer, up from 574 last off-season. Even more applicants would’ve been included if not for weather. “That affected us tremendously this year,” Guiton said. “Since a lot of our applicants are in college, we had several schools that pushed their exam dates back because of weather, so they had exams on our testing dates.” Of those applicants, 356 were eligible for hiring. Many applicants are disqualified after a background check due to previous arrests or other issues. More are disqualified on testing day after failing the written exam and physical fitness test that the department requires before recruits can even go the academy. “That’s about what you’ll find in most police agencies around the county, it’s about a 50 percent failure rate before they’re in the door,” Guiton said. The OCPD hires 110 seasonal officers each year, which nearly doubles the force for the intense summer months. Guiton said that 28 of those

slots are expected to be filled by returning officers who have already done summer stints. Although the jobs are temporary, summer officers are put through the same training as full-time rookies, and are eligible for full-time employment if they desire it. “Thirty years ago, you might have been able to do things a bit differently, but the expectation these days is that even the seasonal officers are fully qualified,” Guiton said. Although the majority of recruits will graduate from training at the end of May, the department encourages summer officers to take advantage of an earlier academy that puts them on the force at the beginning of the month, if their schedules allow. “There’s a comfort zone thing,” Guiton said. “It’s good for them to have a few weeks in May to get out there and get used to it.” Although the department makes an effort to market to the widest possible audience, Guiton said, the recruits’ makeup remains largely white and male. Women made up 16 percent of this year’s applicant pool, and 15 percent were non-Caucasian. The OCPD is the state’s only police force authorized to hire seasonal employees who are fully-sworn officers. The department also plans to hire 40 Public Safety Aides for the summer, who do not have the power of arrest but can issue parking tickets and perform other ancillary duties.

Worcester County schools to begin ademic year Sept. 2 Continued from Page 1 ing with the rest of Maryland in in starting school before Labor Day. Calendar surveys sent home to parents have shown support for longer holiday breaks and an earlier last day of school — things that fly in the face of a later start to the school year. In 1994, students only had two days off for Thanksgiving break, for example, but the three-day holiday has become the norm in the modern calendar. In the most recent calendar survey send home to parents, the majority chose the school year with the longest holiday breaks, though none of the three calendar options had a school year starting after Labor Day. In the survey, 5 percent of the 1,448 respondents wrote comments supporting a post-Labor Day start for school. State regulations mandate a 180day-minimum school year for students — a requirement that cannot be circumvented by adding hours to the school day, Coordinator of Public Relations and Special Programs for Worcester schools Barbara Witherow said.

The state also requires eight additional days for teachers’ professional development, meaning there are four professional development days (when students are out of school) built into the academic year. The other four days happen before the start of the school year. Labor Day can fall as late at Sept. 7, which can affect student’s preparation for high-stakes tests in October, Rothermel said. That was the case in 2009, when the schools originally made their move to a pre-Labor Day calendar on what he called an “experimental basis.” But with a Sept. 1 holiday in 2014, “it just seemed like a natural time to relook,” Rothermel said. “If we were to make a move, this year is the year.” Labor Day again falls on Sept. 7 in 2015 and the shift in the 2014-2015 school calendar has no implications for future school schedules, Rothermel said. “I know how important tourism is to our county’s success,” Wilson said, but “there’s trade offs on either said.” “The reality is, it’s where we live,” Rothermel said.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 8

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Council amends city code on under-21 clubs to OK extensions only by request

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) City Council cast two separate votes of approval at Tuesday’s meeting that will allow cheerleaders from the Epic Brands competitions to remain at the downtown H2O nightclub until 1:45 a.m., past the normal regulated hours for so-called “dry nightclubs.” The council first gave an affirmative vote to the second reading of an ordinance amending the city’s code on under-21 clubs to allow an extension of operating hours by request. Once the ordinance passed, council immediately moved to approve the specific request by Epic Brands and H2O owner Robert Rosenblit to extend hours for the upcoming Feb. 22 event. As they have before, council stressed that the leniency was on a case-by-case basis and not intended to be the norm. “It’s an accommodation specifically for this group, because we love having them in Ocean City,” said Council Secretary Mary Knight. Council members Brent Ashley and Margaret Pillas, both of whom

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City Council approved the specific request by Epic Brands and H2O to extend its hours for a Feb. 22 cheerleading event, giving participants an extra hour to enjoy the club.

had previously voiced concerns that the city was “opening Pandora’s Box” by permitting such requests, voted against both motions. Under city code, “dry nightclubs” cannot serve alcohol and may admit any patron age 15 and over. But if patrons 21 and over are admitted, then no persons ages 15-20 may be admitted simultaneously. Such clubs must also close at 12:45 a.m., but due to the late finish of Epic Brands’ competition, the group requested that their after-party at H2O,

located on Worcester Street, be able to run until 1:30 a.m., with all patrons off the property by 1:45. The group also plans to hold events on March 15 and April 9, which will likely receive the same extension. H2O is currently the only dry club in the resort. A 2001 code revision put strict regulations on such establishments, designed to combat the city’s finding that “dry nightclubs provide an arena for predatory-type sexual crimes.”

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Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Family life activity cut from classes

By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) Administrators at Stephen Decatur Middle School put a swift stop to a Family Life and Human Development class lesson that involved modeling the human reproductive system last week. Around 180 seventh grade girls carried out the activity in two classes before it was cut from the program. “We agree that there are more appropriate ways to teach students about reproductive anatomy and health,” Stephen Decatur Middle School Principal Lynne Barton said in a statement. “Although the intentions of the activity were centered on student learning, we want our parents and community to know that the modeling activity will be excluded from all future lessons on reproductive systems.” The modeling exercise was intended to teach anatomy and physiology. However, “we understand that learning about the reproductive system is a sensitive subject for our families and students,” said a statement issued by school system spokesperson Barbara Witherow. The lesson involved seventh-grade girls using Play Doh to model male genitalia. Because these classes are divided by gender, no boys participated in the exercise. The activity incited a polarized response when parents took to social media to either blast or defend the program. “I was appalled to (h)ear that it was taught to this age group,” Ruth Wilkerson posted to WBOC’s Facebook page. “For the most part my daughter had no problem with the class until the clay modeling,” Amy Hackler Stephan posted on Facebook. “My suggestion is that they present the parents with a night giving them the lesson plan and going over it.” Gina Betz, however, questioned why reproductive organs are “so disgraceful and inappropriate.” “It’s part of our bodies that we should be taught to accept and learn about,” she wrote. Students begin the Family Life and Human Development course in fifth grade, with the state-designed curriculum carrying through junior year. The classes are taught by same-sex teachers, who go through training before heading the class. Worcester schools send home a letter before the course begins, giving parents the chance to remove their children if they want. “If they are uncomfortable with the curriculum, they can opt their child out,” Witherow said. “Very few parents do because they realize the importance of the curriculum.” The schools are revising the letters they send to parents to give better information on the content Family Life and Human Development classes cover at each grade level. They are also working to define better ways of teaching the subjects covered in the classes.

PAGE 9

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Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 11

Schools start dropped; min. wage advanced

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) Unfortunately for resort-area business leaders, it looks like they will be getting the exact opposite of what they wanted out of Annapolis this year. While a proposed minimum wage hike is anticipated to pass, a recommendation on starting all Maryland schools after Labor Day will likely be waylaid another year. “It doesn’t look like there’s going to be any legislation this session,” said Greg Shockley, chair of the Maryland State Tourism Board and owner of Shenanigan’s on the Boardwalk, at last week’s Tourism Commission meeting. “They [the legislature] are much more concerned about the minimum wage bill than they are anything else.” Over the past year, Shockley has served on a state commission tasked with studying a state-mandated school start date. Currently, school calendar details are left up to county school districts, but the trend has been toward earlier and earlier starts to prepare for testing. “There’s an arms race in education, so to speak,” Shockley said. “Some of the larger counties are now going back Aug. 21. If the trend continues, we’ll see everybody go back before the 21st.” The commission was authorized by legislation from Sen. Jim Mathias, who had pitched that the state should look

into mandating a post-Labor Day school start in order to stimulate tourism at the end of August. Several issues have caused considerable resistance from school administrators. Getting kids back in school to prepare for competitive testing is the largest one, as well as the expansion of several holiday breaks due to teacher training and union-mandated vacation. Superintendents say it will be virtually impossible to compress all 180 days of school into a shorter time span. Shockley reiterated this week that he believes the situation to be workable. Lengthening the school day, as well as going further into June, have been floated. “We’ve tried to give ways for them to work through their schedules,” Shockley said, “but they have steadfast against it.” School athletics, Shockley con-

tended, also have considerable influence due to season start dates and the need for after-school time for practices. Although Shockley was hopeful last month that the committee would vote on a positive recommendation this month, “it didn’t go the way it should have,” he said. Further, legislative support for the issue has wanted given the extreme focus on Governor O’Malley’s minimum wage proposal, which would increase the state wage floor from the current $7.25 per hour to $10.10 by 2017. The proposal also changes the state’s tip credit, whereby employers can pay workers less than minimum wage if their tip earnings are projected to make up the minimum. Maryland employees currently must receive at least 50 percent of the minimum wage, but the O’Malley legislation would up that to 70 percent.

Restaurant owners have been staunchly against the proposal, saying it will increase their payroll costs dayto-day while providing limited benefit to workers. Especially in the resort, many employees make enough in tips that the federal withholding tax on their tips exceeds their hourly pay, meaning that their employer pays their weekly check to the government before they even see it. Shockley said he expected some type of increase to go through, but that there may still be time to soften the blow. “The bill was not thought out very well from a legal perspective,” Shockley said. “After the hearings, they’ll be bombarded with amendments.” Several industries, such as movie theaters, have already haggled exceptions into the bill exempting them from any hike.

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Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Groundbreaking ceremony honors SHHS renovations School to get facelift, including an addition, after years of hopeful planning

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) After years of planning and hoping, the Worcester County Commissioners joined Board of Education personnel and others in a groundbreaking ceremony for renovations and an addition to Snow Hill High School on Tuesday. “The school is being transformed on a daily basis,” said Superintendent of Worcester Schools Dr. Jerry Wilson in the school’s media center during a reception following the groundbreaking. “We are so excited about the project, to see it up and going. I’m exited to be a part of it.” The long-awaited construction project is pleasing many people. “The students are ready for a new school,” Wilson said. “And this is huge for the community.” The project will double the size of the school to 121,000 square feet, eliminating the need for portable classrooms. It will add state-of-theart classrooms, a new media center, computer labs, a science wing, a gym-

An architectural rendering shows how the high school will look after the project to renovate it and make it larger.

nasium, a cafeteria, a kitchen and a new athletic complex. The school will include several sustainable highly efficient features such as a geothermal heating and cooling system, motion-activated lights, thermally insulated glass and low-flow plumbing fixtures. The first phase of the four phases of construction is under way. This phase includes construction of the gymnasium, student entrance and parking lot, mechanical room, locker rooms and band and chorus rooms.

The project is expected to be completed for the start of school in the fall of 2016. The Worcester County Commissioners voted Jan. 7 to approve a bond bill authorizing them to borrow up to $45 million in general obligation bonds to finance a portion of the Snow Hill High School renovations and additions project. The project is anticipated to cost $49.6 million, with state funding of just under $4 million. In September, the commissioners approved the base bids of $37.3 mil-

lion. They also approved $2.3 million for 22 bids for additional items like ceramic tile, artificial athletic field turf, studio video production hardware and software and wireless Internet devices. Planning for the Snow Hill High School renovation and addition project has been under way since 2002. “Snow Hill has waited a long, long time for this,” said Bud Church, president of the Worcester County Commissioners, during the commissioners’ meeting later that morning.


FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 13

Unanticipated revenue will go to several initiatives

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) The first formal amendment to the Town of Ocean City’s 2013-2014 fiscal year budget appropriates nearly $3.5 million in unanticipated revenue toward a number of initiatives taken on by the city since the end of the 2012-2013 fiscal cycle. Grants from outside agencies made up a significant portion of the financing, with nearly $1.3 million being realized. These include state tourism grants of $450,000, $290,000 in additional county grants, and $383,000 in grant funding for the Ocean City Fire Department’s replacement of Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus. Most of these grants are restricted to specific uses, and must be spent on the projects for which they were authorized. However, the city is also pulling over $2.1 million in unrestricted monies from the town’s operating reserve – known as “fund balance” which closed out the 2012-13 year well above the town’s self-imposed minimum of 15 percent of annual expenses. City council voted in October to appropriate unrestricted funds funds to a number of initiatives, including a half-million dollars for canal dredg-

STAND UP AND SPEAK UP Ocean City Elementary Kindergarten students write about 100 ways to “Stand Up and Speak Up.” Pictured are students, from left, Cooper Fowle, Cameron Andrews, Sophia Ferrante, Maizy Jerns and Owen Phillips from Miss Rincavage’s class. Stand Up and Speak Up is an anti-bullying program at OCES which aims to prevent bullying by empowering students to “Stand Up and Speak Up” when they are being bullied or see someone else being bullied.

ing, as well as an additional $383,000 for street repairs, bringing the 201314 street maintenance budget up to the preferred $2 million per year. That level of funding was determined in 2007 to be the minimum needed for the town to ‘catch up’ on replacing its aging road infrastructure. The city also appropriated an addi-

tional $315,000 of fund balance to replace an ambulance and an industrial sweeper for the Boardwalk. Much of the un-budgeted excess of fund balance came from 2012-2013 room tax income, which was up roughly $350,000 from the year before and over $900,000 more than what the city had budgeted. The current amendment of the

2013-14 budget also realizes an excess of $120,000 in room tax so far this fiscal year. To date, room tax is up $400,000 over the same span last fiscal year. However, the city increased this year’s estimated income for room tax by $1 million, meaning the town will likely realize less of a windfall in actual revenue versus predicted.


PAGE 14

Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Boaters Aid Family Music Festival to benefit St. Jude’s

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

If a proposed boaters festival is approved, people in boats on the bay would be listening to musical acts performing on a stage at Isle of Wight Nature Park on July 4-6.

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) A boaters festival to raise funds for St. Jude’s is proposed for Isle of Wight Nature Park in July. Allen Barzak, a Florida resident who has been living in Worcester County since August, wants to hold the Boaters Aid Family Fun Music Festival at the park on July 4-6. “I was brought up here to put on a special event because local people wanted it. I have done a lot of research to make it happen,” Barzak said Wednesday. He is waiting on approval from the Department of Natural Resources to use the 12-acre park, which is part of the Isle of Wight Management Area owned by the state and leased to Worcester County. “The first step is getting approval to use the land,” Barzak said. “But with the cooperation from the DNR and the county, there should be no reason for it not to happen.” In addition to personnel at the Department of Natural Resources, Barzak has discussed his plans officials from the county, the U.S. Coast Guard, the Ocean City Fire Department and police departments in Ocean City and Ocean Pines. “Worcester County has been superb in working with me,” he said. The event would be a fundraiser for St. Jude’s Hospital and the Shriners, because the nationally known musical acts

that would be performing were big supporters of them. He did not name the bands, which he said would be performing on a stage facing the bay. Barzak said most participants would arrive by watercraft. Others attendees would arrive by shuttle buses from different locations throughout the area. Buses would also take people back to those locations all day until 7:30 p.m. He is working with owners of at least seven businesses about pick-up and drop-off locations. People attending the event may not park at Isle of Wight. Weitzel’s, a former restaurant and carry-out in Ocean City, will have a concession stand. Plans also call for a beer trailer. He chose the location, according to his application to the county, because no businesses would be affected and parking is available at Showell School. The festival’s area, according to Barzak, is more than nine football fields wide and nine football fields long and would accommodate many attendees because it has “a sandy bottom perfect for standing, mooring boats or anchoring.” He estimates the area could accommodate more than 15,000 people on and off boats. Bright yellow plastic caution tape with PVC pipes and openings for boats will mark the area. He anticipates 40 rows of boats and wrote that the area could accommodate at least 5,600 boats. See BOATERS Page 17


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 15

OCPD looking into jump in assaults on officers in ‘13

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By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Feb. 21,2014) The Ocean City Police Department’s year-end crime report issued this week showed that, while the force’s total activity stands at a historic high, arrests are at a long-time low, a trend which top brass don’t necessarily believe to be counterintuitive. “I don’t think that’s a bad thing,” OCPD Chief Ross Buzzuro told city council in presenting the report. “We have to be deliberate with arrests…I don’t think we need to increase arrest numbers to lower crime.” The total number of service calls performed by the OCPD was up 17.5 percent for 2013 over 2012. But this increase was due to entirely to officer-initiated actions, which rose from a total of 54,121 in 2012 to 69,743 in 2013. Calls generated from citizen complaints were actually down to 21,904 from 23,857 in 2012. Conversely, arrests for 2013 were down to 3,021 from 4,355 the previous year. But citations and warnings were up to 26,314 versus 20,124 in 2012. This statistical trend has been pushed by city leaders as indicating a sort of proactive policing. Taking the initiative for more mundane enforcement – such as traffic stops, which accounted for 20,844 calls for service has allowed officers to get out on the street and address minor issues before they become arrestable offenses. “You have officers who are able to spend more time on the street with the citizens and engaging the community, and it’s showing in our productivity,” Buzzuro said. On the other side of the coin, however, assaults on officers for 2013 jumped to 58 from 46 last year, despite the fact that the OCPD is now almost fully-equipped with Tasers. “We implemented more Tasers this year, but our assaults on officers have increased,” said Councilman Brent Ashley, “which is counterproductive to what the Tasers are supposed to be doing, at least in my understanding.” One of the OCPD’s major goals in using the devices was to prevent officers from having to physically grapple with suspects, thereby reducing officer injuries. “I want to assess this further and see if we’re seeing a drop-off in officer injuries,” Buzzuro said. “Some of these assaults could be very minor in nature.” “[Those assaults] may not have been an assault that presents itself in such a fashion that an officer could’ve pulled out their Taser and used it,” said Councilman and Police Commission Chair Doug Cymek. In most cases, the threat of a Taser is as effective as its actual use. Out of 70 instances in which OCPD officers drew their devices, only 16 resulted in a suspect being shocked. The 2013 report also indicated that the sole month of June continues to take up the bulk of the OCPD’s total demand over the course of a given year.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 16

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

COUNTY BRIEFS

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) The Worcester County Commissioners discussed the following topics and took the following actions during their Feb. 18 meeting.

Property purchase The commissioners approved the contract for sale for the purchase of the Dickerson property for $98,000. The property, at 110 Washington St., would be used for parking after the residence on it is demolished. The agreement is contingent on necessary approvals by the Town of Snow

Hill and the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Historic Commission. It is also subject to a survey showing no encroachments or major discrepancies in the boundary lines. The county also has the right to void the contract at any time before settlement because of condition on the property, including environmental conditions.

Boat ramp The commissioners awarded the contract for the reconstruction of Shell Mill boat ramp near Bishopville to Somerset Paving and Marine, which had bid $134,400. The company was the sole bidder.

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Sewage sludge

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The commissioners approved the request to waive the required 20-day notification period to expedite processing of the permit needed for Castaways RV Park to transport its wastewater sludge to Berlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wastewater treatment plant. The new owners of Castaways plan to decommission their wastewater treatment plant and connect to the countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mystic Harbour wastewater treatment plant.

The commissioners approved proceeding with an alignment of Eagles Nest Road. When Castaways RV Park was sold recently, it was discovered that a portion of the actual roadbed of Eagles Nest Road did not align with the description contained in the deed to the county for the road.

Scheduled hearings

The commissioners awarded the lease of one off-road truck for the Solid Waste Division of the Public Works Department to Alban Tractor Company. The final cost to the county will be $262,722 for purchase with a guaranteed buy back after five years, with a five year full machine warranty and five-year parts availability warranty.

The commissioners scheduled a public hearing for March 18 on a proposed water and sewer plan amendment because of a proposed expansion of Island Resort Campground near Newark. The applicant wants to expand the water and sewer planning area to accommodate a 32-lot expansion of the existing 110-lot campground. The commissioners also scheduled a public for March 18 on a proposed text amendment that would permit the construction of a private dock or pier on a parcel of land created for agricultural purposes. Currently a private dock or pier is permitted as an accessory use on a vacant lot only when that lot if allowed to have a single-family dwelling on it. Lots created for agricultural purposes are not permitted to have dwellings.

Off-road truck

Engineering services The commissioners approved a request for proposal for engineering services for preparation of a final design report for collection system improvements in the Ocean Pines Sanitary Service Area. The report is the first step in the process for implementing the collection system improvements being funded under the upcoming county bond issue.


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Boaters Festival expecting more than 1,500 for event Continued from Page 14 He also wrote that if 3,200 boats had four passengers each and if 3,000 nonboaters attended, the festival would have an attendance of 15,800. He said Wednesday that he anticipates approximately 1,500 people, but he wrote on the application about the area accommodating more than 5,000 people “to cover his bases” in case many more attend than he expects. “There’s not a certain amount of people at one time,” he said. He also plans to have volleyball, a tugof-war game, a treasure hunt, a fish find, a bounce house and kayak races. The event would take place 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. July 4-5 and from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Attendees could purchase tickets for the concert and the festival or just for the festival. Ticket prices range from $5 for only the festival to $75 and $100 to attend the concert.

He said 60 percent of the proceeds would go to charity. He will be able to keep costs down because he owns many of the things, such as games, tents and chairs, which will be used at the boaters’ festival. He uses those items in his south Florida business, Allen’s Ultimate Services. According to the Web site “http://www.allensultimateservices” www.allensultimateservices, the company is involved in catering, chauffeur services, party services, rental equipment, painting, plumbing, landscaping, cleaning services, commercial, business and home maintenance, flooring, remodeling, photography, wedding planning and more. Sponsors of the event, according to the application, are Pepsi-Holt, Bishopville Movers and Paddle House Outfitters, but according to Barzak, will be renting kayaks at the festival for a charitable donation.

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OC eyes ownership of lighting

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) A beam of light is shining on a way Maryland jurisdictions could save some money and become owners instead of renters of street lighting. Last week, Mayor Rick Meehan requested, and the council approved, a letter of support to Del. Al Carr, who is seeking backers for House Bill 729. The legislation would mandate that power companies sell street lighting equipment to any county or municipality that wishes to purchase them, instead of having the jurisdictions pay rent for the illumination of public roads. “Del. Carr said this approach has worked very well in other states,” Meehan said. “The ornamental acorn lights that we have downtown are owned by the city,” explained City Engineer Terry McGean. “The lights that come off the poles over the street, which we call ‘cobra lights,’ are all owned by Delmarva Power, and we pay a fixed monthly fee to ‘rent’ the lights, so to speak.” Because the city pays a flat fee for the street lights regardless of how much electricity is used, there is no incentive for more efficient lighting. Recently, however, the city has made a point of installing LED lighting wherever possible on its own projects, such as on the current reconstruction of St. Louis Ave. LEDs are more energy-efficient, and offer a brighter, less hazy light that is more aesthetically pleasing and improves visibility for traffic and pedestrians. The onetime investment of buying the lights from Delmarva Power and replacing them with LEDs would, theoretically, be off-set over time with savings in electricity usage. “If we bought the lights, it would give us the ability to put up an LED light, which Delmarva Power currently does not offer,” McGean said. Council President Lloyd Martin questioned if the city would still have to rent

the space on the utility poles where the lights are mounted even if it were to buy the lights. “I can see it being difficult because they’re changing poles and taking some out, removing the street lights and then putting them back,” Martin said.

PAGE 17

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 18

Going ...

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Going ...

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No outlet

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Feb. 1979: truly cold Sure, it’s been a tough winter so far, but it hasn’t been like that brutal cold spell 35 years ago. Now that was cold. These photos taken by Ricks Savage of near Berlin show just how cold it was back then, with, at top, the eventual destruction of a major section of the pier, a frozen-over Ocean City Inlet, middle left, boats iced in at the pier downtown (above) and, at left, Jay Bunting standing on an iceberg in front of the West Ocean City Harbor. Although that deep freeze has often been referred to as the time the ocean froze, much of the ice originated in the inshore at Ocean City, forming a sheet of ice so thick that people literally walked on the ocean.

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Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 19

POLICE/COURTS

Disorderly on bridge A 35-year-old Ocean City man was charged Feb. 16 with two counts of disorderly conduct and hindering a police officer after he reportedly was hanging over the Route 50 bridge. According to Maryland State Police, Evan John Griffiths was intoxicated and a danger to himself and others. They determined he did Evan Griffiths not want to harm himself and made several efforts to try to get him home safely. Griffith refused to cooperate and started cursing at the troopers. His disorderly actions drew the attention of people in passing vehicles. At the barrack where he was processed after being charged with disorderly conduct, Griffiths reportedly became

uncooperative and refused to give his home address. He was the charged with hindering and obstructing a police officer.

Burglary investigation Ocean City police are investigating several recent burglaries that have occurred in the uptown area, between 120th Street and the Delaware line. The burglaries, some of which appear to be related, have specifically targeted flat screen televisions. Ocean City police are asking anyone with information about these burglaries or the suspect(s) involved to contact Detective Nick Simpson of the Ocean City Criminal Investigation Division at 410520-5349. The police department’s crime tip line is available 24 hours daily and can be reached by dialing 410-5205136.  Those providing information may remain anonymous. The Ocean City Police Department re-

minds citizens to continue to remain vigilant for suspicious activity. Any citizen leaving the area for any extended period of time is encouraged to take advantage of the “Residential Security Check” program. This free program is available to all Ocean City homeowners. After providing police with basic information regarding their property, police will conduct security checks at random times each day.  For more information and to sign up for a “Residential Security Check,” visit http://oceancitymd.gov/ Police/securitycheck.html.

Heroin found Ocean City police arrested David E. Jones, 27, of Selbyville, Del., after finding heroin in his vehicle Feb. 14. A policeman stopped Jones’ car at 66th Street because its headlamp was not lit. He administered field sobriety tests to Jones because he smelled the odor of alcohol. Jones failed the tests.

During a search of the vehicle, which was required before the car could be towed to the impound lot, police found a quantity of plastic bags containing heroin. Bags were found in the glove compartment, in the center console and inside a duffle bag in the trunk, according to the charging document. Police also found straws used to snort heroin and rubber bands used in the packaging. They also found marijuana in a medicine bottle. Jones was charged with possession of heroin, possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana, possession of heroin with the intent to distribute it, two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, driving under the influence of alcohol, driving while impaired by alcohol, driving while impaired by a controlled dangerous substance and driving a vehicle “so far impaired by drugs/alcohol that he could not drive safely,” according to the charging document.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 20

OBITUARIES JAMES FRANCIS HASSETT Ocean Pines James Francis Hassett, Jr., age 88, died Monday Feb. 17, 2014 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in Washington D.C., he was the son of the late James Francis Hassett, Sr. and Theresa Juliano Hassett. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Mary McJames Hassett Connell Hassett and children, Deborah Stolz and her husband, Walter, of Ocean Pines and Kevin Hassett and his wife, Cheryl, of Berlin. There are three grandchildren; Craig, Christopher and Corey Hassett. Also surviving is a sister, Loretta Larrick, of Ellicott City and several nieces and nephews. Mr. Hassett had worked as a United States Park police officer in Washington D.C. He was a Navy veteran and member of St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Ocean Pines. Cremation followed his death. A memorial mass may be announced at a later date. A donation may be made in his memory to: St John Neumann Catholic Church, 11211 Beauchamp Rd. Berlin. Md. 21811. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent via to www.burbagefuneralhome.com. JOANNE W. THOMPSON Ocean Pines Joanne Wenger Thompson, age 76, died peacefully at her home on Feb. 10, 2014. Born in Lancaster, Pa. she was the daughter of the late John B. and Anna Snyder Wenger. She is survived by her husband of 52 years, James E. Thompson, Sr. and children; Sharon Klein and her husband Edward of Abbeville, Ala., Rhonda Hartman of Lancaster, Pa., Jeanne Blaettler and her husband Eugene of Port Angeles, Wash., Jodie McLaughlin of Wilmington, and James E. Thompson, Jr. of Wagontown, Pa. She was preceded in death by a daughter, Juliann Thompson, in

2003. She was an adored grandmother to eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. There are numerous nieces and nephews. Mrs. Thompson moved to Ocean Pines 20 years ago when her husband retired. She was an active member of Faith Baptist Church, and a homemaker. She loved gardening and was a skilled fisherman, out fishing Mr. Thompson most of the time. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, March 29, 2014, at Faith Baptist Church, at 2 p.m. Friends may call one hour prior to the service. Rev. John Abent will officiate. A donation in her memory may be made to: Faith Baptist Church, 519 S. Main St. Berlin, Md. 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. JOHN JOSEPH RINCK Ocean Pines John Joseph Rinck, age 92, passed away peacefully on Saturday Feb. 15, 2014 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in New York, N.Y., he was the son of the late John Francis Rinck and Catherine Wind Rinck. He is survived by his wife, Ann Rinck, three daughters, Alise Furlong and her husband, Thomas, of Havre de Grace; Janet Payot and Kathi Stevens both of Ocean Pines, seven grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. John had formerly served in the Navy in WWII and had worked for the U.S. Government as well as the Philadelphia Naval Yard. A memorial service will be held on Saturday Feb. 22, 2014 at 11 a.m. at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Friends may call one hour prior to the service. Interment will be private for the family. In lieu of flowers memorial donations may be made to Coastal Hospital at the Lake, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md., 218021733. Expressions of sympathy may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. DAWN ISABELLE HARMAN Berlin Dawn Isabelle Harman, age 80, died Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014 at her

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home in Berlin. Born in York, Pa., she was the daughter of the late Elmer Wiley and Olive Hayes Wiley. She was preceded in death by her husband, Robert (Bob) Harman. She is survived by her children, Douglas Stevens, Wanda Lamb and her husband Charles, and Dawn Michalik and grandchildren, Julia Wayland, Andrew Lamb, Stacy Powell, Kelly Varney and Jessica Sexauer, and 12 great-grandchildren. Also surviving is her brother, Jack Wiley. She was also preceded in death by a brother Robert Wiley, sonin-law Michael Michalik and granddaughter Dawn Shelly Lamb. Dawn enjoyed being a mother to her three children and loved them dearly. She also enjoyed spending time with her family and friends. Dawn had worked at the Sea Scape Motel in the Fireside Restaurant and also at the Dollar Store in Ocean City. A funeral service was held on Sunday, Feb. 16, 2014 at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Rev. Daryl McCready officiated. Interment was private. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Dawn Harman Memorial Fund, c/o Bank of Ocean City, 627 William Street, Berlin, Md. 21811. Expressions of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com”www.burbagefuneralhome.com. MARY ANN FERGUSON Berlin Mary Ann Ferguson, age 65, passed away on Feb. 7, 2014 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin, surrounded by her loving family. Born in Pittsburgh, she was the daughter of the late James and Elizabeth Dzurenda Ferguson. She is survived by her sister, Sis Potetz and her husband Ed, and niece Tracy Potetz, numerous relatives and a host of friends. Mary Ann enjoyed a successful career in the mortgage, title and research field before relocating to Berlin/Ocean City in 2007. She was employed by West Ocean City Comfort Suites and was recognized by her co-workers as a loyal and dedicated team member. Ms. Ferguson was proud of her Pittsburgh heritage and was an avid Steelers fan. No formal service will be held at this time. A donation in her memory may be made to Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21804, or

Atlantic General Hospital Foundation, 9733 Healthway Dr., Berlin, Md. 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. JOHN ANTHONY MCCOOL Ocean Pines John Anthony McCool, Jr., age 71, died peacefully on Friday, Feb. 14, 2014 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. Born in Philadelphia, Pa., he was the son of the late John A. McCool, Sr., and Catherine McDonald McCool. He is survived by his wife, Carol Ralston McCool, and four brothers, Thomas, Michael, Jerry and Christopher McCool. John had formerly served as a United States Marine and had worked as a social worker for the state of New Jersey. A funeral service was held on Wednesday Feb. 19, 2014 at St. John Neumann Catholic Church. Interment was private for the family. Memorial donations may be made to Most Blessed Sacrament Scholarship Fund, in Memory of John McCool, 11242 Race Track Road, Berlin, Md. 21811. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Expressions of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. LINDA F. TRUITT Millsboro Linda F. Truitt of Millsboro, Del. passed away on Feb. 12, 2014 at Nanticoke Memorial Hospital. She was 67 years old. Mrs. Truitt was born on Dec. 19, 1946 in Pikeville, N.C. to the late Levie and Emma Mae Kirby Hawley. In addition to her parents, she is Linda F. Truitt preceded in death by her husband George C. Truitt in 2009. Linda was employed by 1st National Bank of Maryland and also National Cash Register. She collected Beanie Babies and dolls. She was a laid back and easy going person but could be feisty when necessary. She loved her grandchildren and enjoyed attending their sporting events. She was a devoted mother and grandmother and will be missed dearly. She is survived by a son, Christopher Truitt and his wife, Lisa of MillsContinued on Page 21

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Ocean City Today

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OBITUARIES Continued from Page 20 boro; a sister-in-law and close friend, Judy Rogers and two grandchildren, Martin Coulter Truitt and Emily Alissa Truitt. She is also survived by extended family members and friends. The family would like to thank her many caretakers who did such an excellent job. A funeral service and celebration of her life was held Thursday, Feb. 20, 2014 at the Watson Funeral Home, 211 S. Washington St., Millsboro, Del. Pastor Robert Hudson officiated. Letters of condolence may be emailed to www.watsonfh.com. ERNESTINE ATES Snow Hill Ernestine “Teeny” Godwin Ates, age 95, died Monday, Feb. 10, 2014 at Harrison Snow Hill Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. Born in Memphis, Tenn., she lived in Seat Pleasant, Md., moved in the late 1960’s to Casselberry, Fla. until 2001 and moved back to Maryland living with her children until 2010 before going into assisted living. She was the daughter of the late Ernest and Blanche Godwin. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jesse W. Ates, in 2001; (retired Metropolitan Police) and son, James Ates. She is survived by her children, Phillip D. Ates of Glenn Dale, Md., Anne Marie Drescher, Sr. and her

husband, Robert, of Centreville, Md. and Linda Ates Moran and her husband, Marty, of Berlin. She is also survived by nine grandchildren; 25 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandson. A funeral was held at Gasch’s Funeral Home, P.A. in Hyattsville, Md. on Feb. 15. Interment was at Washington National Cemetery.

PAGE 21

Save The Date 

CRAIG DOUGLAS RETTIG Millville, Del. Craig Douglas “Red” Rettig, 55, of Millville, Del., died Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014 at the home of his sister and brother-in-law, Kathy and Mario Castro. Born in Woodbury, NJ, he was the son of Genevieve Claire Rettig and the late Arnold Henry Rettig, Jr. Craig Rettig He is survived by two sisters, Katherine Suzanne Castro and Claire Louise Columna; one brother, Walter Thomas Rettig, his best friend till the end and after. He is also survived by his two beloved daughters, Rachel Rettig and Ariel Rettig; one son, Alexander Rettig; two grandchildren, Kyleigh and Damarion along with his nieces and nephews. Craig will be deeply missed. A memorial service will be held at a later date for close friends and family.









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PAGE 22

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NOW’S THE TIME TO BUY. Make every day a vacation. Located in one of the most desirable locations in North Ocean City. This charming 2-bedroom, 2-bath home has a bright and cheery interior. You will enjoy the huge living room and formal dining room plus the kitchen has a breakfast bar. The outside porch is perfect for relaxing after a day at the beach. The yard is perfect for that cookout and creating memories. It is just right for your weekend getaway or year-round living. No worry living JUST $147,900. Call today and start living the good life at the beach now! THE ORIGINAL MONTEGO SPECIALIST SINCE 1971.

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Ocean City Today Feb. 21, 2014

Business

Page 23 REAL ESTATE REPORT

Can I afford to buy house?

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Seacrets on 49th Street is in the running for the Favorite Bar or Tavern award in the 2014 Restaurant Association of Maryland Stars of the Industry Awards. The public can vote for its favorite restaurants and restaurateurs now through March 7 on the Restaurant Association website or Facebook page.

Six OC restaurants make the cut Eateries among finalists for Stars of the Industry to be announced at April 6 gala

By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) The dining public had until Jan. 20 to nominate its favorite restaurants, bars, taverns, chefs and craft brew programs for the Restaurant Association of Maryland’s annual awards. Six Ocean City restaurants and restaurateurs made the cut this year and are among the finalists in the running for the Stars of the Industry Awards, celebrating Maryland’s top bars, eateries and hospitality professionals for its 60th year. The public determines the winners through a vote, cast on Facebook of the Restaurant Association website starting Monday and through March 7. Cast a ballot online at www.facebook.com/marylandrestaurants or www.bit.ly/1hq8koc. The Restaurant Association will announce the 2014 winners of its awards at the Bay Awards Gala on April 6 in Cambridge. “We are excited that Ocean City is well-represented on the nomination list this year,” said Executive Director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association Susan Jones, encouraging locals to “go vote and keep Ocean City on the map.” Here are Ocean City’s 2014 finalists: Chef of the Year: Travis Wright, Shark on the Harbor, Sunset Avenue

Wright, who’s been cooking at Shark on the Harbor, on Sunset Avenue in West Ocean City, for almost 20 years, is up for Chef of the Year for his second year in a row. He was also a finalist in the 2010 Restaurateur of the Year category. “I was surprised each time,” he said, but “I was really caught off guard this year” by the nomination. The Arlington, Va., native started working for restaurants during college in Charleston, S.C. and “just never left,” he said. “I love everything about the industry.” Wright opened the original Shark on 46th Street in Ocean City in 2000, moving his restaurant to the West Ocean City harbor front in 2008. He said the award nomination isn’t the result of his own work, but a collaborative effort between the Shark’s entire staff. “It’s weird for any one person to take the credit because it takes so many people to make it,” he said of the restaurant’s success. “We love the year-round local support that we get. It’s been a real blessing.” Craft Brew Program of the Year: Fager’s Island, 60th Street Fager’s Island is a finalist in this category for the first time. The restaurant was named Favorite Bar and Tavern in 2009, and also one of six inducted into the Maryland Hospitality Hall of Honor during the gala. Favorite Bar or Tavern: Seacrets, 49th Street Seacrets opened June 29, 1988 as a small bar employing seven staff members.

More than 25 years later, it is a megalith among Ocean City’s nightspots, with 20 bars and around 550 employees in the height of the summer season. “Its grown from a small, little idea with a large goal,” Owner Leighton Moore said, and “the goal’s been passed by more than I ever could have imagined.” He attributes Seacrets’ success — measurable in its ability to hold close to 5,000 patrons at one time — to “worrying more about the feelings of people than the cash register.” The secret is trying to make all of his customers feel comfortable, Moore said. “There’s people that were there that were 21 (or) 25 when I opened. They’re no longer that age, and yet they still feel comfortable,” Moore said. “It’s a place for everybody.” Seacrets was a finalist in the Favorite Bar or Tavern category in 2007 and won it in 2008. Moore took home the Restaurateur of the Year award in 2009. “It feels really good,” he said of another nomination. “It’s really a great honor.” Favorite Bar or Tavern: The Greene Turtle Sports Bar and Grille, statewide In 1976, the original Greene Turtle opened on 116th Street in Ocean City with no more than peanuts to offer as a meal to customers. But with the 1984 opening of its Fells Point location, complete with kitchen, the Ocean City restaurant See VOTING Page 24

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer Most people want to own their own home—it gives a sense of security and stability. It also allows for more flexibility in personalizing and renovating your home to make it your own. Most importantly, it allows the ability to build wealth as your equity grows. But, can you afford to buy? Here are a few important things to consider that will help answer that question: Do you qualify for a mortgage? The first step when thinking of buying a home is to contact a local lender to find out if you have an adequate credit score, income and debt to income ratio to qualify, and how much you actually qualify for. This is not as painful a process as many prospective homeowners may think, and in most cases, a lender can provide a “pre-qualification letter” for you with just a 15-20 minute phone call. Can you afford the principal and interest payment, plus the taxes and homeowner’s insurance? If you are using online mortgage calculators or apps to see what you can afford, be sure to factor in the cost of county taxes, city taxes if applicable, homeowner’s and/or condo association dues, hazard insurance, and flood insurance if applicable. Many of the mortgage calculators found online now do have fields for plugging in numbers for all of the abovementioned expenses. Do you have enough money for required down payment and/or closing costs? Even though there is a USDA/Rural Housing 100 percent financing loan available, it doesn’t cover all areas, for example, it doesn’t cover Ocean City or West Ocean City. Are you prepared to be responsible for all of the repairs and unexpected expenditures that come along with being a homeowner? Becoming a homeowner means you are responsible for repairing/replacing appliances, hot water heater, HVAC system, roof, well/septic, etc. Be sure you are prepared to save money over and above your mortgage payment for these expenditures that are sometimes unexpected but unavoidable. – Lauren Bunting is a licensed REALTOR®with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin


PAGE 24

Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Voting results in six area ‘stars’

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Travis Wright, of Shark on the Harbor, in West Ocean City, is a finalist for the Chef of the Year award in the 2014 Restaurant Association of Maryland Stars of the Industry Awards. The public can vote for its favorite restaurants and restaurateurs now through March 7 on the Restaurant Association website or Facebook page.

Continued from Page 23 rethought its operation. “We had to do a lot of renovations because the building wasn’t set up for that,” owner and founder Steve Pappas said of adding a full kitchen, but by 1988 the 116th Street location’s food service was in full swing. Convincing customers to rethink the bar as a dining spot was harder, he said, but today food sales at the Greene Turtle’s 39 locations surpass liquor sales. “Our food’s been very successful,” thanks to consistency throughout the years, Pappas said. “We’re just a local, neighborhood bar,” he said. “We’ve always tried to keep that local feeling. We do a lot of charity stuff. We donate back to the community. We do a lot with local sports teams.” The franchise has now grown to almost 40 locations in Maryland and beyond, with two new Greene Turtles

slated to open in New York and Delaware soon. But the founders, soccer and lacrosse players at Salisbury University, tried to stay true to the original, local feeling they brought to the Turtle in 1976. “That’s how we started out and we try to keep that local, tavern-type look to the place,” Pappas said. Restaurateur of the Year: Tammy Patrick Cebula, Galaxy 66 Bar & Grille and The Skye Bar, 66th Street With 10 years’ experience as a bartender and manager at downtown MR Ducks, Tammy Cebula and her husband Roger moved to their own 66th Street business in 2006. Less than five years later, Galaxy 66 Bar & Grille and The Skye Bar earned nominations for Wine and Beverage Program of the Year two years running, 2010 and 2011. “It’s just something that I enjoy doing,” Cebula said of running the business. “I enjoy people, I enjoy being out in the public service industry.” Customer service is what makes Galaxy and The Skye Bar stand out, she said. “It’s important being there, working it and listening to your customers to see what it is they love.” She was a 2012 finalist for Restaurateur of the Year and said “it’s a huge honor” to be nominated again. Hospitality Hall of Honor: BJ’s on the Water, 75th Street When Maddy and Billy Carder opened BJ’s on the Water, they were bartenders with little other experience in the hospitality industry. More than 30 years later, BJ’s is thriving with a year-round customer base, which has grown over the years as faithful patrons return and new customers hear about the restaurant on the bay, Maddy Carder said. “To think that we’ve come this far in 34 years, where we have the amount of employees that we have and have maintained a presence in the community — it’s really something,” she said. The restaurant now employs 130 staff members in the height of the summer and Carder attributes its success to customer service. “Over the years, you learn what’s important to your customers, and that’s really making sure that everybody leaves with a great experience,” she said. “We’d be nothing without our customers.” BJ’s has also worked to give back to the community, lending it outs house band free of charge for functions benefitting cancer patients, the humane society, veterans and more, Carder said. In addition to this year’s nomination, Billy Carder won Restaurateur of the Year in 2011. “That was a very, very big honor and just now to have this happen — we’re very humbled by it,” Maddy Carder said. “It’s quite an honor and we look forward to whatever the outcome is.” Visit www.facebook.com/marylandrestaurants or www.bit.ly/1hq8koc to cast a vote for your favorite restaurants and nominees now through March 7. Learn more about the Restaurant Association of Maryland at www.marylandrestaurants.com.


Sports & Recreation

Feb. 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

Page 25

www.oceancitytoday.net

Worcester tops DC in semis, advances to ESIAC title game

PHOTO COURTESY SDHS SWIMMING

The Stephen Decatur girls' swim team celebrates Monday after winning the 3A/2A/1A East Regional meet at the Arundel Swim Center.

Lady Seahawks regional champs Decatur girls’ swim team wins second crown; boys finish third at competition

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Feb. 21, 2014) The Stephen Decatur girls’ swim team was favored to win the 3A/2A/1A East Regional title and the Lady Seahawks didn’t disappoint, capturing their second consecutive championship Monday at the Arundel Swim Center. The Seahawks, who went undefeated (10-0) during the regular seasons, had already competed against this year, and beat, about half of the teams they faced at regionals. “The girls swam really well. Some did tremendously well,” said Decatur Coach Joe Keefe. Several Seahawks swam their best times of the season and a few took home regional titles. “The girls were excited to win regionals and I was excited for them. It was awesome,” he said. Decatur scored 349 points for first place. Easton was second with 275 points and Kent Island rounded out the top three (271 points). The top three finishers in each regional event qualified for the 3A/2A/1A state championship, scheduled for Saturday at Eppley Recreation Center on the University of Maryland-College Park campus. Individual competitors or relay teams who, in their regional meet, were among the next top-12 statewide times also qualified for states. Seahawks who automatically ad-

vanced to states because of top three performances during the regional meet are sophomores Hailey Williams (200-yard freestyle, 2:12.19, second; 500-yard freestyle, 6:02.09, second) and Marley Rakow (100-yard freestyle, 1:01.17, third) and juniors Madison Tinus (100-yard freestyle, 59.52 seconds, first; 50-yard freestyle, 26.85 seconds, second) and Carly Deickman (100-yard breaststroke, 1:13.36, first), who earned a new meet record. The previous top race time was 1:13.77. Rakow, juniors Maria Zweifel, Molly Wooten and Rachel Bourne won the 200-yard freestyle relay race in 1:54.83. Williams, Deickman, Wooten and Tinus teamed up for the 200-yard medley relay race. The girls took second place, completing the event in 2:05.25. Rakow joined Tinus, Williams and Deickman for the 400-yard freestyle relay race. The foursome finished second (4:10.95). Because of her regional time of 2:34.96 in the 200-yard IM (fourth place), Deickman will compete in the event at states. Zweifel’s time of 1:21.72 in the 100yard breaststroke (sixth) earned her a spot as an alternate in the state event. Keefe thinks the girls have the potential to finish in the top five at states. “The talent is definitely there,” he said. The Decatur boys’ team finished third overall with 285 points. Queen Anne’s won the competition with 314 points and Cambridge was second (305).

“The boys’ competition was much closer than the girls. I thought they did a very good job. I’m very happy with their performance,” said Decatur Coach Damien Sanzotti. “We had a lot of really good times.” Because of their top three performances during the regional meet, senior captains Collin Bankert and James Hillyer automatically advanced to states in their events. Bankert became the regional champion in the 100-yard freestyle race (52.57 seconds). Hillyer finished second in the 100-yard freestyle (52.99 seconds) and third in the 50-yard freestyle (23.36 seconds). Bankert, Hillyer, senior Cory Campbell and junior Chris Poole completed the 400-yard freestyle relay race in 3:38.62, good for second place. The foursome also participated in the 200-yard freestyle relay event and scored a third-place award (1:37.32). Campbell’s time of 2:05.28 in the 200-yard freestyle race (fourth) earned him a spot in the event at states. He is an alternate in the 100yard breaststroke (1:13.06, seventh). Bankert will participate in the 100yard breaststroke at states, with his regional qualifying time of 1:10.68 (fourth). Poole took eighth in the 50-yard freestyle race, but his time of 24.87 seconds was good enough to qualify him for the championship. Senior Tate Socha will join his teammates at states because of his time of 1:03.73 in the regional 100-yard butterfly event (fifth) as will junior Dalton Warren. See DECATUR Page 26

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Feb. 21, 2014) The Worcester Prep boys’ basketball team battled the Delmarva Christian Royals last Friday in the final match of the regular season, and the Mallards faced off again against the squad a few days later in the semifinal round of the Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference tournament. Worcester came out on the winning end in both games in Berlin. Coach Geiger Last Friday, the Mallards scored a 4841 victory over the Royals during the team’s Senior Night. Senior captain Ryan Nally made a lay-up to start the game, then seconds later he hit a three to give Worcester a 5-0 advantage. Delmarva Christian would tie it 5-5 and points were traded the rest of the quarter. After one quarter, the Mallards led 12-10. The Royals pulled ahead 13-12 early in second quarter. Worcester’s Jack Marshall, a senior, answered shortly after. Scoring went back and fourth in the quarter. At the end of the second, the Mallards were on top 23-20. The home team extended its lead to 38-30, outscoring the Royals 15-10 in the third quarter. Delmarva Christian netted 11 points in the final quarter, while Worcester added 10. “It was a good game. We won every quarter by a couple points and it ended up that way,” said Prep Coach Keith Geiger. “We did a great job of maintaining the lead late in the game, not letting them inch their way back.” Nally was Worcester’s (13-2) top producer with 21 points. Freshman Tate Shockley chipped in with eight points. “Tate’s points were very important. [Senior captain] Matt Reilly twisted his knee, came out in the beginning of the third, and did not return,” Geiger said. “Tate sank a couple of big three pointers in the third quarter. He’s a freshman, but has a lot of confidence. He’s not afraid to come off the bench and take shots. They were points that we desperately needed.” The Royals made the trip to Berlin again on Wednesday to take on the Mallards in the ESIAC semifinals. Worcester won 58-36 to advance to the conference finals. “This was a team win. It was important that we played as a team and not rely on Ryan to score every point, and that’s exactly what we did,” Geiger said. The Mallards built a 12-4 lead by the See MALLARDS Page 26


PAGE 26

Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Mallards to battle Dragons for ESIAC crown

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep senior captain Matt Reilly reaches over two Delmarva Christian players to score during last Friday’s game in Berlin.

Continued from Page 25 end of the first quarter. At the halftime break, they were ahead 34-7, and after three quarters, the Prep team held a 4523 advantage. “The first half was our best offensive and defensive basketball we played all year. We were patient, getting everyone involved, and it looked good,” Geiger said. “Sometimes on offense we get a little sloppy, but [Wednesday] everything, particularly in the first half, looked amazing. And, we only allowed seven points at halftime against a good team. I was so proud of the way everyone contributed and rebounded.” Reilly had 17 points and seven rebounds. Marshall scored 13 points and sophomore Wyatt Richins tallied 10 points and eight rebounds. Junior Erik Zorn recorded six points and eight rebounds. The No. 4 Salisbury School Dragons upset the top-seeded Salisbury Christian Jaguars 49-48 in the other semifinal game. The Dragons will travel to Berlin today, Friday, to battle the secondseeded Mallards at 6:30 p.m. The team’s are 1-1 against each other this season. On Jan. 8, Worcester won 66-35. Salisbury took the Feb. 11 game, 53-42. Playing at home is a huge advantage for the Prep squad, Geiger said. “We have great fans, and on a Friday

night, they will be out in full force. Also, our court is longer than theirs and that gives us an advantage if we can get out and run a little, which will be a focus,” Geiger said. “We are going to have to play good team defense. And, they have one of the best big guys in the league, so we must keep him from getting second shots. On offense, after the transition, we need to regroup and play patient offense. [Wednesday] we did that and things opened up for everyone on the team. If we keep that mentality, I feel good about the game.”

Decatur swimmers set to compete in Md. championship Continued from Page 25 He placed fourth in the 100-yard backstroke with a time of 1:05.62. The 200-yard medley relay team of Warren, Socha, junior Jake Lathroum and senior Michael Lott finished sixth at regionals, but their time of 1:59.83 qualified them for states. Keefe and Sanzotti said they are expecting tough competition at states. The goal, they said, is for the Decatur swimmers to get their best times of the season.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 27

Seahawks edged out in regional dual finals By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Feb. 21, 2014) The Stephen Decatur wrestling team came up short of a title in the 4A/3A South Regional Duals tournament last Saturday, edged out by Huntingtown, 34-33, in the finals. Decatur was seeded second in the four-team competition, held at Huntingtown High School. The Seahawks battled the No. 3 Leonardtown Raiders in the semifinals, while the top seeded Huntingtown Hurricanes went head-to-head with the No. 4 La Plata Warriors. Decatur outscored Leonardtown 41-

25. The Seahawks won nine of the 14 weight class matches. Seniors Nick Bennett (145 pounds) and Caleb Massey (195) and freshmen Robert Kaminski (106) and Andrew McKahan (113) pinned their opponents. Jared King (182), a senior, and junior captain TJ Scafone (120), earned 13-4 and 10-2 major-decision victories. Seniors Ethan Eibl (285) and Andrew Borradaile (170), a team captain, outscored their competition 6-0 and 74. Sophomore Brett Kim won his 160pound match 4-2. “I think the kids were more focused

on the second match. I was pretty confident,” said Decatur Coach Todd Martinek. “I knew we were the better team. We did what we had to do to get to the finals.” Decatur advanced to the finals, where the team met Huntingtown, who topped La Plata 37-36 in the semis. Before the regional duals, Martinek said there is a friendly rivalry between him and Huntingtown’s coach, Kevin Gilligan. The two coached together for a number of years and Gilligan led the Seahawks for 11 seasons. Martinek took over as Decatur’s head coach beginning

with the 2011-12 season. Huntingtown won the first finals match, 126 pounds, by pinfall, but Decatur senior Nate Rosenblatt answered, pinning his 132-pound opponent to even the competition at 6-all. The Hurricanes got another pin at 138 pounds, which was followed by Bennett (145) taking down his opposition to tie the score, 12-12. Huntingtown pulled ahead 19-12 with a major decision and decision at 152 and 160 pounds. Borradaile logged a 7-5 victory at 170 pounds to cut the home See DECATUR Page 30


Ocean City Today

PAGE 28

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Decatur earns wins over JMB, IR

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Feb. 21, 2014) The Stephen Decatur girls’ basketball team came out firing on all cylinders in the opening quarter of last Friday’s game against the James M. Bennett Clippers, and despite a less than stellar second-quarter performance, the Lady Seahawks won, 66-38. Host Decatur, outscored Bennett 18-4 in the first quarter. The Seahawks added 10 points in the second quarter, while the Clippers netted 12. At halftime, Decatur led, 28-16. “I thought that we started off very strong and then that second quarter we just got tired and we were flat and [Bennett] really capitalized off that,” said Decatur Coach Amy Fenzel-Mergott. “Also, defensively, we were just slow to react to what they were doing and they were getting easy shots. Then, we came down and missed our easy shots.” During the halftime talk with her team, Fenzel-Mergott said of Bennett, “this team’s going to play hard and they’re not going to go away.’ I said, ‘you’ve got to come out and make your easy shots [and] you’ve got to play intense defense and we’ve got to capitalize…’” The Seahawks logged 22 points in the third quarter and limited the Clippers to 13. “At first we came out in the third quarter and did the same kind of stuff,

but then we finally got into it and pulled away from them,” Fenzel-Mergott said. The coach said she was pleased with her team’s 75-percent success rate from the foul line. Decatur hit 8-of-12 freethrow shots. Sophomore Dayona Godwin led Decatur with 31 points, four rebounds and two steals. She was 5for-7 from the foul line. Junior captain Marina Jones contributed with 13 points and seven rebounds. Juniors Allison Beck, Jillian Petito (seven assists and four steals) and Payton VanKirk (seven rebounds) scored six points apiece. During Senior Night, the Seahawks honored their lone senior, captain Erin Florek. She had four points in the game. “Erin is a very special senior. Coming back from a devastating knee injury that she had last year, [then] rehabbing, she’s having a great senior year,” Fenzel-Mergott said. “She didn’t necessarily have the best game point-wise [Friday], but she did a lot of really good things.” The Berlin gym was packed for Monday’s Maryland-Delaware rivalry match between Decatur and the Indian River Indians. Both teams had numerous fans there supporting them. The energy in the gym was high as the Mason Dixon plaque was on the line. The winner of the annually game gets to take home the plaque.

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Decatur won it last year and it will stay at the school this season as the Seahawks came out on top Monday, 63-28. “We came out strong. We played good defense and we were really capitalizing [on steals] and hitting our shots,” Fenzel-Mergott said. Decatur scored 19 points in the first quarter and held Indian River to two. Fenzel-Mergott said the Seahawks “started relaxing mentally a little bit” in the second quarter and lost their flow on offense. The home team logged nine points in the second quarter, while the Indians tallied 10. “At halftime, I said ‘we need to play our game. We need to play Stephen Decatur basketball’,” Fenzel-Mergott said. The Seahawks netted 19 points in the third quarter and 16 in the fourth, while the visiting Indians tallied 13 and three points, respectively. “Overall, I thought it was a good game,” Fenzel-Mergott said. “The girls had a lot of energy. It was nice to have such a big crowd. It pumps the girls up.” Godwin led Decatur with 16 points. Jones contributed with 12 points and 15 rebounds. VanKirk added 10 points and four rebounds. The draw for seeding in the 3A South Regional tournament is Sunday. The first round sectional quarterfinal games are scheduled to take place Saturday, March 1.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur junior Payton VanKirk shoots over two Bennett players during last Friday’s game in Berlin. She scored six points and had seven rebounds in Decatur’s 66-38 win.


FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Lady Mallards to battle Sabres for conference trophy

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Feb. 21, 2014) The Worcester Prep girls’ basketball team wrapped up regular-season competition last Friday in Berlin with a 39-26 victory over the Delmarva Christian Royals, securing the No. 2 spot in the Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference tournament. The Lady Mallards, on their Senior Night, shut out the Royals 12-0 in the first quarter. Delmarva Christian bounced back in the second quarter, outscoring Worcester 12-6. The home team went into the halftime break on top 18-12. “They came out and playing pretty good. The first quarter we kept them down to zero points, but then I don’t know what happened,” Prep Coach Simona Holland said. “We just gave them too much space. We let them control the ball too much and our defense wasn’t as aggressive as we wanted to be.” The Mallards began to pull away in the third and at the end of the quarter they led 28-17. With less than 10 seconds on the clock, senior Alison Greer sank a three, much to the excitement of Mallard fans. Greer finished with eight points. Junior Sophie Brennan scored 10 points and senior captain Kristen Shriver had eight. “We missed a lot of lay-ups and we gave them the chance to score a lot in the second half,” Holland said. “We usually do a better job on defense. We pressed them the whole game too, so I think we were a little tired as well.” Worcester finished the season 13-2 and No. 2 in the ESIAC standings. The Mallards hosted the No. 3 Salisbury Christian Jaguars Wednesday for the conference tournament semifinal game. The Prep team edged out Salisbury 64 in the first quarter. Worcester added seven points in the second and held its opponent to two to go into the break ahead 13-6. After three quarters, the Mallards led 23-10. They won 29-22. “We would like to congratulate Salisbury Christian for a well played game,”

Decatur boys take down Indian River

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Feb. 21, 2014) After suffering a 4746 loss to the James M. Bennett Clippers last Thursday in Salisbury, the Stephen Decatur boys’ basketball team bounced back Monday, earning a 83-57 victory over the Indian River Indians. “Coming off a tough loss, the kids responded exactly how I hoped they would,” Decatur Coach Byron “BJ” Johnson said after Monday’s game in Berlin. “Sometimes the ball doesn’t bounce our way. [Monday] it bounced our way. It was a great team game.” Senior PJ Copes received the ball on the tip-off and scored as Decatur fans See SEAHAWKS Page 30

Ocean City Today

Holland said. “We were able to come away with a win thanks to our aggressive defense…” Greer led Worcester with seven points. Senior captain Lilly DiNardo scored six and sophomore Grace Tunis and junior Sophie Brennan logged four points apiece. The Mallards are headed to Easton today, Friday, to face the top-seeded Sts. Peter & Paul Sabres in the ESIAC championship game at 6 p.m. The Sabres won the first match-up this year, 29-21, on Dec. 19. The Mallards took the second game on Jan. 10, 34-30. “In order to win the game, we will have to establish our offense and control the boards,” Holland said. “We must contain their leading scorer, the ESIAC Player of the Year, Lauren Wilson.” During the teams’ first meeting, Wilson scored 17 points. Worcester held her to just four points in the second game.

PAGE 29

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep junior Natalie Twilley takes the ball to the basket during last Friday’s game against Delmarva Christian in Berlin.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 30

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Seahawks â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;keep climbingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur junior Colen Gaynor scores two of his game-high 30 points. He also had 11 rebounds in Decaturâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 83-57 victory over Delaware rival, the Indian River Indians.

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Continued from Page 27 teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lead to four points. Huntingtown took the 182-pound match to boost its advantage to 22-15. Massey (195) and Eibl (220) scored pins to give Decatur a 27-22 lead. Huntingtown won by forfeit at 285 pounds then earned decisions at 106 and 113 pounds to jump ahead 34-27. With the 4A/3A South Regional Duals title already won, Huntingtown forfeited the final match, 120 pounds, to Scafone. Martinek said the Seahawks did some good things during the finals, but it just wanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough to come out on top. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All day we werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t aggressive

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was successful, getting nothing but net on his next three-point shot and the Seahawks led 52-29. At the end of the third quarter, Decatur held a 62-39 advantage. DuPont finished the game with 22 points, five rebounds and six steals. He hit six threes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He found his shot tonight,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said after the competition. Gaynor chipped in with 30 points and 11 rebounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Colen had an awesome game. He just dominated,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If he continues to play like that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be tough to beat.â&#x20AC;? Hunter tallied 15 points and six rebounds, Copes had 12 points and sophomore Torrey Brittingham 15 assists. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very happy. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working really hard and they deserve it,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our motto all year has been â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;keep climbingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and this was a good bounce back from a tough loss.â&#x20AC;? The draw for 3A South Regional tournament seeding is scheduled to take place Sunday. First-round action, the sectional quarterfinals, is set to take place Friday, Feb. 28.

Decatur eyes Bayside title

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Continued from Page 29 erupted in cheer. The gym was packed as Decatur and Indian River fans came out to support their respective schools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was an awesome crowd,â&#x20AC;? Johnson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having home-court advantage, the crowd is like our sixth man.â&#x20AC;? Senior captain Tyler Hunter capped off the scoring before the buzzer to end the first quarter. Decatur led 21-15 after one quarter of play. The visiting Indians cut the Seahawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; advantage to four points seconds into the second quarter when they capitalizing on a steal. Junior Randy DuPont sank a threepoint shot to put Decatur on top, 24-19. DuPont was fouled about a minute later and hit both free throws, followed by netting back-to-back threes and the Seahawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; led 32-21 with 4:29 remaining before halftime. At the break, Decatur headed into the locker room ahead 44-29. DuPont got the third quarter started sinking a three. He attempted another seconds later that bounced off the rim, but junior Colen Gaynor was in position to grab the rebound and score. DuPont

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enough. When weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re aggressive, we score points,â&#x20AC;? Martinek said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heartbreaking, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re moving on.â&#x20AC;? Decatur will now compete in the Bayside Conference championship, today and Saturday in Cambridge. The Seahawks, who are undefeated (14-0) in conference matches this season, are chomping at the bit to finish on top during the two-day Bayside championship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be close,â&#x20AC;? Martinek said of the battle for the No. 1 spot between Decatur and Kent Island. He is predicting four or five match-ups in the final round will consists of a Seahawk going head-to-head against a Buccaneer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be another pressurepacked weekend,â&#x20AC;? he said. Martinek said bringing home the title will come down to â&#x20AC;&#x153;getting more championsâ&#x20AC;? than Kent Island and â&#x20AC;&#x153;wrestling to our potential.â&#x20AC;?

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Indoor Pool Concession Bartender: Part-Time Weekends. Must be 21. Fast Paced environment, must have previous cash handling exp., bartending knowledge, and able to multi-task. Email: Mlee@fskfamily Applications available at the Front Office, 12806 Ocean Gateway Ocean City MD 21842 No phone calls!

Marina Attendant

Seasonal Duties: Perform day-to-day operation of marinas, collect revenues from clientele for fuel, boating supplies, and merchandise, Ensure proper use of fuel dock, ensure proper mooring of vessels and enforce marina rules and regulations. Hours: 15-20 hours per week but may be extended in case of emergency. Must work weekends and holidays. Job Requirements: Graduation from high school or GED equivalent, some experience in the operation of a marina or dock system. Lifting objects up to and equal to 50 pounds. May be exposed to hazardous conditions. Resumes and/or completed applications should be submitted to: Ocean Pines Association, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD 21811 Attention: Dock Master Applications are available at the Administration Office or download from www.oceanpines.org

HELP WANTED

Restaurant Manager Wanted. Great work environment medical benefits - salary commensurate w/experience. Please send resume to PO Box 838, Ocean City, MD 21843. Hiring F/T & P/T Professional Sales Reps Motivated individuals wanted for rapidly expanding business. Training available, paid travel, with a high income earning potential. Manager positions available for experienced individuals. Please call 443-291-7651.

Now Hiring

Year Round - Experienced

~ Servers ~ ~ Line Cooks ~ ~ Bartenders ~ ~ P/T Bar Back ~

Apply within at Smitty McGee’s or submit application online www.smittymcgees.com

Now Accepting Applications for FT or PT Kitchen Staff, Front House Staff & Delivery Drivers Top pay, meal play & paid weekly. Come in for Interview on Wednesday @ 11:00 am 5601 Coastal Hwy. (Bayside)

Excellent Opportunity for the Right Person.

Now Hiring Full-Time, Year Round

Banquet Supervisor

Benefits include 2 weeks paid vacation, 7-paid holidays, medical, dental, life & disability insurances & 401k plan. Please apply in person at 2800 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, MD 410-289-1100

HELP WANTED

Sea Watch Condominium is seeking a dependable conscientious individual for our in-house “Unit Services” department. Applicant should have experience in HVAC and plumbing. This is a full-time position with benefits. Resume required. Call 410-5244003 or apply in person at 11500 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD. If your New Year’s resolution was to make more Money, Avon and a $10 investment can help. Work F/T or P/T, set your own hours, and make up to 50% commission. Call your Avon Representative Christine @ 443-880-8397 or email snowhillavon@comcast.net *The gift of beauty is the perfect gift anytime of year!

Lawn Maintenance, Valid driver’s license, experienced. Call 443-365-5195, leave name and contact info, call will be returned.

RENTALS RENTALS

Summer Seasonal - May 1st through Sept. 2nd. 2BR furnished. 28th St., bayside. Water view. $10,500/season + electric, + security. 410430-5316 Winter Rentals: 3BR/2BA Large Townhouse on 28th St., bayside, fully equipped kitchen, washer-dryer, 55” flat screen TV, $650/mo. 2BR/2BA-142nd St. bayside, fully equipped unit, $550/mo. John 410-726-8948.

RENTALS

Winter Rental - 2BR Apt. $150/wk. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED. No pets. Available now! 410-289-5831

YR-Newark-3BR/2BA-newly renovated Home, large yard, storage shed. $1050/mo. + security. 2BR/1BA-newly renovated Apt. large yard, storage shed. $950/mo. + security. Call 443-397-8919. For Rentals-Call Us Today! Bunting Realty, Inc. 410641-3313

Summer or YR Rental - 3BR/ 2BA in NOC. Community pool & tennis court. For details contact 443-865-3109.

YR-WATERFRONT - St. Martins by the Bay. 3BR/2.5BA Townhome. Modern upgraded kitchen. Boat slip available. Pool & tennis courts. $1100/mo. Purchase option available. Call 443-745-6905 or email jamessapia1@gmail.com WR OR YR (OPTIONAL)2BR/ 2BA - Bright, spacious, updated, furnished house in WOC. Near harbor. Potential studio in loft. Vaulted ceilings, FP & deck. 240-620-3040

WINTER RENTAL $200 $150/week Sleeps 4, Pool, Internet

Rambler Motel 9942 Elm St., right behind Starbucks

Manager On Site or Call 443-614-4007

SENIOR WEEK $800/week Sleeps 4, Pool, Internet

Rambler Motel 9942 Elm St., Right Behind Starbucks

Manager On Site or Call 443-614-4007 Call for reservations.

Single Family Homes Starting at $1000 Apartments Starting at $950 Condos Starting at $895

Office Space w/immediate availability, reception area & private office w/view. Plenty of customer parking in a great Ocean Pines location! Rent includes all CAM, trash removal, water & sewer. $700/mo.

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

Now you can order your classifieds online

Open 7 Days A Week for property viewing in: * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *


PAGE 32

RENTALS

Y/R Or Summer Seasonal Mid-town, remodeled 1BR/ 1BA Condo - furn., W/D, DW. No smoking. Security dep. & refs. req’d. $900/mo. + utilsYR. 302-834-7588

YR, WOC - 3BR/3BA, 2 Story Home, newly renov., unfurn. Central HVAC, W/D, DW, lge. garage. No smoking/pets. $1700/mo. + utils. & security. 410-289-6626 1 & 2 Bedroom

Summer Rentals

ROOMMATES

Roommate Needed for large, clean, modern, 2 bed, 2 bath on the water, downtown. $640 + elec. & cable. Call 814-577-3451.

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE

YR Park - 2BR/2BA Mobile 10 min. to the beach. $29,900/CASH. Ground rent$400/mo. includes water, sewer, trash & taxes. Call Howard Martin Realty 410352-5555.

Close to Ocean & Boardwalk Pictures available upon request Call for info 410-251-0576

REAL ESTATE LICENSE

Available May 8-Sept. 10. 312 Sunset Dr. 2BR/1.5BA, newly remodeled, big kitchen/ living area. Sleeps up to 8. $12,500/season, you pay utilities. Security deposit $2,000. Call 410-428-7333. www.SunsetTerraceRentals.com

Pre-Licensing Real Estate Classes

Summer Rental

ED SMITH REAL ESTATE SCHOOL

Pt. 1. April 1st, 2nd & 3rd Pt. 2. April 14th, 15th & 16th, 2014 8:00 am-5:30 pm Limited Space Web site/Registration www.edsmithschool.com 410-213-2700

FOR SALE FOR SALE BY BYOWNER OWNER

Open House Weekends Fantastic 3BR/2BA Condo FSBO Move in Ready, 65th Street, Ocean block. THINK SUMMER! Private showings 443-465-0554

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-524-7700 www.holidayoc.com

Classifieds 410-723-6397 By Monday, 5 p.m.

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

Office Space for Rent or Sale. 1200 sq. ft. Stephen Decatur Business Center, unit 112, Rt. 611, WOC. High traffic area. Immediate occupancy! 240-505-8685

Upscale Mid-town Office Space in O.C. for Lease.

Flexible floor plan. From 650 to 5,150 sq. ft. Call Brian 443-880-2225

Ocean City Today

COMMERCIAL

WOC Office/Rental Space, Teal Marsh Shopping Center 1400 sq. ft. Herring Creek Prof. Ctr. 1000 sq. ft. Call for pricing 443-497-0514 Units Available Rt. 50 in West Ocean City 1800 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 1728 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 1574 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 2211 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space Call 443-497-4200

Ocean Pines Office - Lease Purchase or Rent. Approx. 900 sq. ft. Ideal location for business exposure. Call for details 410-603-7373.

Ocean Pines Office Space for Sale - Ideal location with good traffic flow. PPF Realty. Call John 410-208-3500.

SERVICES SERVICES

Guaranteed to Succeed Tutoring Services Pre-K through 8. All subjects. Critical thinking skills, standardized testing, pre-algebra, writing process, reading. 551-804-6677 kathymeisten@gmail.com

AUCTIONS

The contents of mini storage units will be sold at public auction. Units to be auctioned: P-23 (trailer), O13, O-60, O-29, O-44, O110, O-125, O-156, O-164, B-6, B-8, B-11, B-32, B-37, B-71, B-72, B-73, B-90, B92, S-30, S-43, S-73, S132, S-181, S-209, S-415. Units being sold due to non-payment of rent. Common items in units are, household items, furniture, tools, fishing equipment, antique and vintage items. Date: SATURDAY, February 22, 2014 Time: 9AM #1 Starting @ Berlin Mini Storage (Rt. 346) #2 Continues at OC Mini Storage (Rt. 50) #3 Finishes at OC Mini Storage (Rt. 611) Terms: CASH ONLY! Auctioneer: Tom Janasek

COMMERCIAL

COMMERCIAL, BUILDER, DEVELOPMENT & INVESTMENT PROPERTY If you are looking to buy or sell visit OceanCityCommercialProperty.com Or call Ed Wehnert Commercial Realtor Condominium Realty at 410-726-2022 (cell) 410-524-6400 (O)

In this economy it’s no time to gamble with your marketing dollars . . . Advertise with

for proven results

Call Ocean City Today at 410-723-6397 to find out how we can help your business succeed.

SERVICES

Bishopville Movers Inc. Fast, reliable service. 410-352-5555.

DONATIONS

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hardworking international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be tax-deductible. Please contact Gary at 410-726-1051 for more information.

FOR SALE FOR SALE

Used Hot Tubs for Sale$500 each. Buy as is. No restitution. Contact Club Ocean Villas II for more details 410-524-0880 www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.net

Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

MARYLAND STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK

AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your donation helps local families with food, clothing, shelter, counseling. Tax deductible. MVA License #W1044. 410-636-0123 or www.LutheranMissionSociety.org

BUSINESS SERVICES Drive traffic to your business and reach 4.1 million readers with just one phone call & one bill. See your business ad in 104 newspapers in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia for just $495.00 per ad placement. The value of newspapers advertising HAS NEVER BEEN STRONGER ... call 1-855-721-6332 x 6 today to place your ad before 4.1 million readers. Email Wanda Smith @ wsmith@mddcpress.com or visit our website at www.mddcpress.com. FINANCIAL SERVICES DROWNING IN DEBT? Stop collection calls. New or consolidated credit available. Bad credit ok. Call Century Financial 1-800-931-1942

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

BOATS/PWC

2001 Keywest Boat - 2020 dual console, 21 ft., Bimini Top, 04 Johnson, 150/hp, Outboard Engine, GPS & Depth Finder. VHF Radio, w/Trailer. Kept on Lift. $11,900. 443-610-3422

BOAT SLIP RENTALS BOAT SLIP RENTALS

30 Ft. Boat Slip for Rent, C-45, Pines Point Marina. $1500/season. Call 443-5130445.

FURNITURE

BOAT SLIP RENTALS

White Marlin Marina - closest to Inlet, one block from beach & boards. Use of pool. $4000/season. Will accommodate 12 ft. beam. 443895-8955

Classifieds 410-723-6397

www.baysideoc.com

www.oceancitytoday.net

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000

146th Street, Ocean City

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

EDUCATIONAL TRAINING VETERANS! Take full advantage of your Educational training benefits! GI Bill covers COMPUTER & MEDICAL TRAINING! Call CTI for Free Benefit Analysis today! 1-888407-7173

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

MOUNTAIN PROPERTY HORSE LOVERS DREAM. 2.6 AC Only $19,900 ADD’L 4.8 AC AVAIL! PRISTINE MTN SETTING This parcel has it all! Level ridgetop, hardwoods, open pasture with fencing, 180° breathtaking mountain views, state road frontage, easy access. Short drive to town. Additional acreage available to make this a 7+ acre farmette for under $50,000. 2 percs, warranty deed, easy low down financing. Must see. CALL NOW 1800-888-1262

Want a larger footprint in the marketplace consider advertising in the MDDC Display 2x2 or 2x4 Advertising Network. Reach 3.6 million readers every week by placing your ad in 82 newspapers in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia. With just one phone call, your business and/or product will be seen by 3.6 million readers HURRY ... space is limited, CALL TODAY!! Call 1-855-721-6332 x 6 or email wsmith@mddcpress.com or visit our website at www.mddcpress.com

Wanted To Purchase Antiques & Fine Art, 1 item Or Entire Estate Or Collection, Gold, Silver, Coins, Jewelry, Toys, Oriental Glass, China, Lamps, Textiles, Paintings, Prints almost anything old HELP WANTED Evergreen Auctions 973-818Heating And Air Conditioning 1100. Email evergreenaucTechnician Training! Fast tion@hotmail.com Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. LifeREAL ESTATE time Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 Discover Delaware's Resort Living without Resort Pricing! MISCELLANEOUS Milder winters & Low Taxes! AIRLINE CAREERS begin Gated Community with amazhere – Get FAA approved Avi- ing amenities! New homes ation Maintenance training. mid $40's. Brochures avail1-866-629-0770 or Housing and Financial Aid for able qualified students. Job place- www.coolbranch.com ment assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance SERVICES-MISCELLANEOUS 800-481-8974


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 33

PUBLIC NOTICES

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY OPERATING BUDGET FISCAL YEAR 2014

!"#$%&'$(')&*&+,'-$.&/'+,'#)&'01,"*'1/2'3$#,'3"4/%$5'"6'7%&1/'3$#,'#)$('"*2$/1/%&'8#&/#1#$.&5,'1(($-/&2'1('7*2$/1/%&'9:;<=>?'$('(%)&245&2' 6"*'6$*(#'*&12$/-''1#'#)&'3"4/%$5'@&&#$/-'"/'A4&(21,B'C&+*41*,';DB'9:;<E'''F'%"@G5&#&'#&H#'"6'#)$('"*2$/1/%&'$('1.1$51+5&'6"*'*&.$&I'$/'#)&' 3$#,'35&*JK('766$%&B'3$#,'L155B'M*2'N#*&&#'1/2'O15#$@"*&'F.&/4&B'7%&1/'3$#,B'01*,51/2'9;D<9E'' BE IT ENACTED AND ORDAINED by the Mayor and Council of Ocean City, Maryland, that the following fund revenue and departmental expenditures, together with certain restrictions and authorizations are adopted: General Fund

1ST READING

General Fund

1ST READING

AMENDMENT # 1

AMENDMENT # 1

FY - 2014 A.

FY - 2014

Anticipated Revenue: Property Taxes

B. Anticipated Expenditures: $

Other Taxes

42,112,140

General Government

15,893,153

Public Safety

$

3,879,285 34,089,043

Licenses and Permits

3,986,656

General Public Works/Beach Maintenance

5,137,758

Revenue From Other Agencies

5,761,876

Sanitation and Waste Removal

5,645,750

Charges For Current Services

9,217,805

Highways and Streets

5,175,780

Fines and Forfeitures

752,238

Economic Development - Tourism

7,735,561

Other Revenue

431,285

Culture and Recreation

7,534,069

Prior Year Reserves Total Revenue

2,385,417 $

80,540,570

Debt Service

5,314,444

Total Expenditures

$

74,511,690

To Transportation Fund

1,722,688

To Airport Fund

235,932

To Convention Center

1,355,260

To Vehicle Trust Total Revenue

$

80,540,570

and Other Financing Sources

Transportation

$

7,234,336 $

Capacity/Impact Fees

Wastewater

Airport

Course

3,903,961 $

1,925,900 $

12,386,323 $

1,237,941 $

2,145,848

75,600

0

0

132,000

0

0

State and Federal Grants

0

4,015,315

1,424,280

0

0

0

Food and Beverage Tax

0

0

1,130,000

0

0

0

Build America Bond Subsidy

0

0

0

119,966

0

0

139,546

168,815

1,071,314

104,106

23,774

11,275

$

0 7,449,482 $

1,722,688 9,810,779 $

1,355,260 6,906,754 $

0 12,742,395 $

235,932 1,497,647 $

0 2,157,123

$

300,897 $

1,060,269

Prior Year Reserves Transfer-In From General Fund Total Revenue Anticipated Expenditures: Personal Services

2,006,663 $

3,630,632 $

2,896,622 $

4,098,768 $

Non-Personal Services

3,010,603

3,405,823

1,590,805

3,863,064

1,053,776

1,086,065

Capital Outlay

1,365,000

2,774,324

0

1,293,036

0

1,315

Debt Service

1,067,216

0

2,319,327

3,487,527

142,974

0

0

0

0

0

0

9,474

Transfer to General Fund Transfer to Reserves Total Expenditures

0 7,449,482 $

$

0 9,810,779 $

100,000 6,906,754 $

0 12,742,395 $

0 1,497,647 $

0 2,157,123

Information

Service

Vehicle

Risk

Pension &

Capital

Technology

Center

Trust

Management

OPEB Trust

Projects

Anticipated Revenue: Charges to Other Funds

$

9,314,132 $

0

Investment Earnings/Other

0

0

0

52,422

4,995,000

0

Employee Contributions

0

0

0

0

1,780,000

0

State and Federal Grants

0

0

3,401,239

0

0

0

12,009

10,456

407,350

0

0

0

0

0

130,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

871,000

Prior Year Reserves

1,857,726 $

Sale of Capital Assets/Contributions Bond Proceeds General Fund Contribution Total Revenue B.

Golf

Center

Anticipated Revenue: Service Charges

A.

$

Convention Water

B.

2,400,000 80,540,570

and Other Financing Uses

Enterprise Funds: A.

315,000

To Capital Projects Total Expenditures

5,266,033 $

2,099,590 $

315,000 6,353,179 $

2,232,519 $

$

0 1,869,735 $

0 5,276,489 $

0 2,284,941 $

0 16,089,132 $

2,670,000 3,541,000

$

958,627 $

1,860,429 $

911,108

3,416,060

762,471

2,036,435

250,000

0 $

0 0

Capital Outlay

0

0

5,590,708

0

0

0

Benefit Payments

0

0

0

0

5,600,000

0

Reserve for Retirement Benefit

0

0

0

0

10,239,132

Anticipated Expenditures: Personal Services Non-Personal Services

Capital Projects Total Expenditures

$

0 1,869,735 $

0 5,276,489 $

0 $

0 6,353,179 $

248,506 $

0 2,284,941 $

0 16,089,132 $

0 3,541,000 3,541,000

Special Authorization - Budget Manager The Budget Manager shall be authorized to reallocate departmental appropriations among the various objects of expenditures as she deems necessary. Such changes shall be approved by the Finance Administrator & City Manager

Restrictions - City Manager: A.

The utilization of any contingency appropriation shall be accomplished only with prior authorization from the Mayor and Council.

B.

Utilization of appropriations established in the Capital Improvement Fund may be accomplished only with the express approval of the Mayor and Council.

Tax Rate: An Ad Valorem Tax Rate of $0.472 per $100 of assessed valuation of real property and a rate of $1.29 per $100 of assessed valuation of corporate and personal property tax is required to fund this budget. INTRODUCED at a meeting of the City Council of Ocean City, Maryland held on February 18, 2014. SECOND READING of this ordinance shall be held at a meeting of the Mayor and City Council on March 3, 2014.

OCD-2/20/1t


Ocean City Today

PAGE 34

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICES COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 711 9TH STREET POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Nathaniel Gates, dated August 20, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4223, Folio 525 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $83,700.00, and an original interest rate of 6.000%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on March 11, 2014 AT 4:06 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $8,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA assessments or private utility charges, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available legal remedies, declare the entire deposit for-

feited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction. In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit. The sale is subject to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.  In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Randall J. Rolls, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-2/20/3t _________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 13321 NANTUCKET ROAD, A/K/A 13321 NE NANTUCKETT ROAD, OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Scott R. Hauser, Patricia E. Hauser, Steven M. Caldwell, and Jeanette E. Caldwell, dated May 4, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4786, Folio 600 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $192,000.00, and an original interest rate of 4.250%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on March 11, 2014 AT 4:03 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements

thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $20,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA assessments or private utility charges, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available legal remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction.  In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit. The sale is subject to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.  In any such event,

this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Randall J. Rolls, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-2/20/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 30 DRIFTWOOD LA. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Phillip Morgan Knapp, dated July 12, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4969, folio 371 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 10, 2014 AT 2:25 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $40,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any


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PUBLIC NOTICES reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2013-38015) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-2/20/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 4000 COASTAL HWY., UNIT #113 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Harlan Sammons, Sr. a/k/a Harlan E. Sammons, Jr. and Linda Sammons, dated February 1, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4875, folio 568 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on MARCH 10, 2014 AT 2:26 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and described as Unit No. 113, in the “Ocean Point Condominium - Number Two” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any

kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $14,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2011-14035) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-2/20/3t _________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

FORECLOSURE SALE 105 63RD STREET, #103 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND By virtue of a Statement of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to an Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland in Case No. 23-C-13-0960, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction in front of the

condominium building located at 105 63rd Street, #103, Ocean City, Maryland 21842, on FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2014 AT 11:00 AM ALL that property lying and being situate in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, more particularly desig¬nated and distinguished as Unit No. 103 in the "Sunset Pointe Condominium", together with an undivided percentage interest in the common elements thereof, as established pursuant to Condominium Declaration and By-Laws, dated July 28, 2005, and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber No. 4492, folio 610, et seq., and pursuant to the Condominium Plats recorded therewith in Plat Book No. 201, folio 10, et seq. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, with no warranties or guarantees, and will be sold subject to 1) a Deed of Trust recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in Liber No. 4560, folio 685, said Deed of Trust having had an original principal balance of $359,650.00 on September 14, 2005, 2) a Deed of Trust recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in Liber No. 4560, folio 706, said Deed of Trust having had an original principal balance of $83,750.00 on September 14, 2005, and 3) a Mortgage recorded among the aforesaid Land Records in Liber No. 4886, folio 658, said Mortgage having had an original principal balance of $15,500.00 on March 5, 2007. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the amount of Sixty Thousand Dollars ($60,000.00) will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in a cashier=s or bank check, with the balance to be paid in cash at time of settlement. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. The undersigned reserves the right to waive the deposit requirements as to the purchaser representing the interest of the party secured by the Statement of Lien. Real property taxes, wastewater charges, and condominium dues will be adjusted to the date of sale and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. All costs of conveyancing, including transfer and recordation taxes, shall be paid by the purchaser. The purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining possession of the property. Purchaser agrees to pay to the Seller an Attorney=s fee of $250.00 for review of any motion which may be filed with the Court to substitute a purchaser herein. In the event the undersigned

is unable to convey marketable title, the sale will be null and void and the purchaser=s sole remedy will be the return of the deposit without interest. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________ Covahey, Boozer, Devan, & Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 11477 MAID AT ARMS LANE BERLIN, MD 21811 CASE NUMBER 23-C-13-001351 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Steven M. Curtis and Kimberly S. Hall recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4989, folio 262, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, March 4, 2014 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4989, folio 262, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4989, folio 257. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. The purchaser assumes all risks of loss for the property as of the date of sale. Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE: A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $50,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale. Any amount tendered at sale in excess of the required deposit will be refunded and not applied to the purchase price. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence. The purchaser, other


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PUBLIC NOTICES than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.12500% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement. Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest. If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited. The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee's attorney. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor. Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________ Law Offices of Jeffrey Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, Maryland 20705 240-473-5000

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY 11039 Sinepuxent Rd Berlin, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Algia Mariner II, dated March 27, 2006, and recorded in Liber 4673, Folio 102 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction at Circuit Court for Worcester County, Courthouse Door for Worcester County, Snow Hill, MD on February 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND KNOWN AS metes and bounds, situated in Worcester

County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust, carrying Tax ID No. 03018717. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, agreements, easements, covenants and rights of way of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $69,000.00 will be required at the time of sale in the form of cash, certified check, or other form as the Substitute Trustees determine acceptable. No deposit shall be required of the noteholder where the noteholder bids in the property at auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, time being of the essence for purchaser. In the event that settlement does not occur within the said ten days, the purchaser shall be in default.  Upon such default the Trustees may file a Motion and Order to Resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, and purchaser(s) hereby consent to entry of such resale order without further notice, in which case the deposit shall be forfeited and all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit.  The Trustees may then readvertise and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser; or, without reselling the property, the Trustees may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser.  In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser.  Interest to be paid on the purchase money less the stated deposit called for herein, at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustee.  There shall be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason, including but not limited to exceptions to sale, bankruptcy filings by interested parties, Court administration of the foreclosure or unknown title defects. All taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/ assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, are to be adjusted to the date of auction and thereafter are to be assumed by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, agricultural transfer tax, if any and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of damage to the property from the date of auction forward. If the Substitute Trustee does not convey title for any reason, including but not limited to the Se-

cured Party executing a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allowing the borrower(s) to execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee’s prior knowledge, or if the sale is not ratified for any reason including errors made by the Substitute Trustees, the foreclosure sale shall be null and void and of no effect, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy in law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit without interest. Further terms and particulars may be announced at time of sale, and purchaser may be required to execute a Memorandum of Sale at the time of auction. (Matter #17618) Jeffrey Nadel and Scott Nadel, Substitute Trustees MDC Auctioneers 606 Baltimore Avenue, Suite 206, Towson, Maryland 21204 410-825-2900 OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10336 HARRISON RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Dana D. Collick and Natoshia C. Collick, dated May 29, 2003 and recorded in Liber 3741, folio 224 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on FEBRUARY 24, 2014 AT 2:40 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $9,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of

sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2012-25965) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 4433 PIPER LANE SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Keith R. Downes and Tina M. Downes, dated May 26, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4139, Folio 211 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded on November 8, 2004 in Liber 4285, Folio 304 among the Land Records of Worcester County,with an original principal balance of $190,000.00, and an original interest rate of 6.375%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on


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PUBLIC NOTICES February 25, 2014 AT 4:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $23,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA assessments or private utility charges, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available legal remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction.  In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit. The sale is subject to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determi-

nation of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Randall J. Rolls, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ Covahey, Boozer, Devan, & Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD  21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 122 OCEAN PARKWAY BERLIN, MD 21811 CASE NUMBER 23-C-13-001613 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Jennifer Leigh Bates recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4810, folio 324, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Mark S. Devan, Erin Gloth, Christine Drexel, Brian McNair, Melissa L. Cassell, Angela Nasuta, Thomas P. Dore as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, February 25, 2014 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4810, folio  324, also being further described in a Deed  recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4425, folio 591. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. The purchaser assumes all risks of loss for the property as of the date of sale.  Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE:   A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $22,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the  Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale.  Any amount tendered at sale in excess of the required deposit will be refunded and not applied to the purchase price.

Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.50000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement.  Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited.  The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor.  Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Mark S. Devan, Erin Gloth, Christine Drexel, Brian McNair, Melissa L. Cassell, Angela Nasuta, Thomas P. Dore, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 5740 EVERGREEN TERR. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated November 10, 2009 and recorded in Liber 5394, Folio 477 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $137,464.00 and an original interest

rate of 5.00000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on FEBRUARY 25, 2014 AT 4:03 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds re-


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PUBLIC NOTICES sulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 11956 MAJESTIC PRINCE LA., UNIT #102 BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Amelito Velasco a/k/a Amelito Tagle Velasco, dated April 13, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4722, folio 305 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on FEBRUARY 24, 2014 AT 2:42 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and described as Unit No. 102 in Phase No. 3 of “The Townhomes Condominium at GlenRiddle” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $47,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification,

the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2012-24299) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 13111 SELBY RD. BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Todd William Hancock and Lynn Marie Hancock, dated March 25, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4741, folio 124 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on FEBRUARY 24, 2014 AT 2:41 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to condi-

tions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $19,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2013-37200) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ McNamee, Hosea, Jernigan, Kim, Greenan & Lynch, P.A. 6411 Ivy Lane, Suite 200 Greenbelt, Maryland 20770

TRUSTEE’S SALE UNIMPROVED LOT 301 PIEDMONT CT. OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 Pursuant to a Statement of Lien recorded in Liber 6267 at folio 45

among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland and by virtue of an Order Appointing Trustee entered in the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Case No. 23-C-13001725, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the party secured thereby, the undersigned Trustee will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on FEBRUARY 26, 2014 AT 12:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the deed recorded in Liber 4735 at folio 203 among the Land Records for Worcester County, Maryland, and identified for taxation purposes as Tax ID No. 03-137252. The property is unimproved. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances, lis pendens and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. The entire property will be sold, with at least one-half of the property being subject to a prior deed of trust recorded in Liber 4735 at folio 206. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check or in such other form as the Trustee may determine, at his sole discretion, for $5,000 at the time of sale. If the lien holder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, MD. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 20% from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Trustee, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the lien holder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Trustee is unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further


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PUBLIC NOTICES claim against the Trustee. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the auction sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #13348-0334) Brent M. Ahalt, Trustee ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 Diane S. Rosenberg Mark D. Meyer John A. Ansell, III Kenneth Savitz Stephanie Montgomery 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff(s) v. Patrick A. Carey Lori D. Carey 120 Pinehurst Road Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13000947

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 31st day of January, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of 120 Pinehurst Road, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 3rd day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 24th day of February, 2014. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $150,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15452 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF CHARLES GAREY Notice is given that John D. Garey, P.O. Box 1331, Plaistow, NH 03865, was on January 27, 2014 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Charles Garey who died on November 22, 2013, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their

objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 27th day of July, 2014. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. JOHN D. GAREY Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: February 06, 2014 OCD-2/6/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. JOHN A. SPALDING 7 Gatehouse Trail Berlin ARTA Ocean Pines, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-13-001583

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 4th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 7 Gatehouse Trail, Berlin ARTA Ocean Pines, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 3rd day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase

price at the Foreclosure sale to be $24,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING on March 3, 2014 ORDINANCE 2014-3 AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF OCEAN CITY TO ACQUIRE, FOR NO MONETARY CONSIDERATION, CERTAIN SEWAGE TRANSMISSION FACILITIES FROM SUNSET ISLAND COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. BY DEED AND EASEMENT, AND TO LEASE BACK TO SUNSET ISLAND COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION A PART OF THE DEEDED PROPERTY FOR NINETY-NINE YEARS, SUBJECT TO CERTAIN REASONS FOR TERMINATION. WHEREAS, Sunset Island, an approved development and sub-division, which is controlled and managed by Sunset Island Community Association, Inc. (together "SUNSET"), which also owns certain land and improvements within the subdivision, were required as part of the approval process to build certain sewer facilities ("FACILITIES") to accommodate wastewater from the subdivision for transmission to the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City's ("TOWN") wastewater treatment facilities; and WHEREAS, after the construction of the FACILITIES and a period of operation to satisfy the TOWN that the FACILITIES meet the standards of the TOWN, SUNSET agreed to convey and the TOWN agreed to accept the FACILITIES; and WHEREAS, the FACILITIES have been constructed and are operational to the satisfaction of the TOWN. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ENACTED AND ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF OCEAN CITY THAT THE TOWN BE, AND IT IS HEREBY, AUTHORIZED TO ACCEPT SUNSET'S FACILITIES AS FOLLOWS: 1. SUNSET has or will purchase, at its sole cost and expense two (2) new pumps, meeting the specifications of the TOWN, to be installed by the TOWN, at its sole cost and expense, for the Pumping Station part of the FACILITIES; 2. SUNSET shall convey by special warranty deed, bill of sale, and assignment, Sunset Island Land Unit LU-CA 38, as shown on the plats of Sunset Island, and its improvements to the TOWN 3. TOWN shall lease back to

SUNSET, for no annual rental, a portion of the building constructed on Land Unit LU-CA38, presently utilized by SUNSET as a maintenance office, garage, storage area for such continued use for these purposes, for a term of ninety-nine (99) years, subject to the TOWN'S right to expand the pumping station usage into the leased area as may be required by its consultants, and/or regulatory agencies, at which time SUNSET will, after at least thirty (30) days notice, abandon the premises, and the lease shall be terminated and become null and void without further action. 4. SUNSET shall convey by deed of easement a "wet well" beyond the boundary of Land Unit LU-CR38, and the force main transmission pipes from the FACILITIES to 67th Street, with the requirement that all future maintenance, repair and replacement be at the expense of TOWN. 5. SUNSET and TOWN shall execute, acknowledge and deliver such other documents as reasonably required and approved by the City Solicitor. INTRODUCED at a meeting of the City Council of Ocean City, Maryland held on February 3, 2014. ADOPTED AND PASSED by the required vote of the elected membership of the City Council and approved by the Mayor at its meeting held on March 3, 2014 OCD-2/13/2t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. ROWLAND J. BURNQUIST 23 East Wind Drive Ocean City, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001571

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 6th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 23 East Wind Drive, Ocean City, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 3rd day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $102,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________


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PUBLIC NOTICES BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. SAMUEL P. SULLIVAN 917 Greenbackville Road Stockton, MD 21864 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001281

3rd day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $150,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 5th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 917 Greenbackville Road, Stockton, MD 21864, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 3rd day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $102,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. GLENN A. BAUBLITZ. SR. 19 Decatur Street Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-13-001614

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 4th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 19 Decatur Street, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING on MARCH 3, 2014 ORDINANCE 2014-4 AN ORDINANCE DECLARING CERTAIN PROPERTY TO BE SURPLUS, AND NO LONGER NEEDED FOR PUBLIC USE, BEING OF NO MONETARY VALUE TO THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF OCEAN CITY; AND TO AUTHORIZE THE CONVEYANCE OF SAME TO THE ADJACENT PROPERTY OWNERS AS A BOUNDARY LINE ADJUSTMENT FOR NO CONSIDERATION WHEREAS, a 15 foot by 40 foot lot distinguished on the Plat of Caine Woods, Section Two-A recorded in the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Plat Book FWH No. 22, folio 12 was legended to be a pumping station site to service the sanitary sewer needs of lot owners in Caine Woods, and WHEREAS, said property has been conveyed to the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City by a deed dated November 5, 2012 and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland at SVH No. 6032, folio 228. WHEREAS, the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City has expanded the pumping station site by the acquisition of and the construction on Lot 11 on said Plat of Caine Woods, Section 2A so that the hereinafter described property is no longer needed for public use; and is considered surplus property; and WHEREAS, the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City desire to convey the surplus property, for no consideration, to the property owners of Lot 10 of said Plat of Caine Woods, Section Two A, to adjust their boundary line. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ENACTED AND ORDAINED BY THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF OCEAN CITY THAT THE HEREINAFTER DESCRIBED PROPERTY BE, AND IT IS HEREBY, DECLARED TO BE SURPLUS, OF NO FURTHER PUBLIC USE AND OF NO MONETARY VALUE, AS SAME IS TOO SMALL TO BE A LOT UNDER THE ZONING CODE; AND IT IS FURTHER ENACTED AND ORDAINED THAT THE MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL OF OCEAN CITY BE, AND IT'S HEREBY, AUTHORIZED TO CONVEY TO THE LOT

OWNER OF LOT 10, AS A BOUNDARY LINE ADJUSTMENT, THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: Being the northern half of that parcel of land situate, lying and being located on Tax map 118 as a 15' x 40' lot of Worcester County, Maryland. Also being referred to as a 15' x 40' Lot of Block 31 as found on a plat titled "Caine Woods: Section Two-A" and recorded among the land records of Worcester County, Maryland in Plat Book 22 Page 12, being described more particularly as follows; Commencing at a Rebar and Cap found in the east Right of Way line of Dukes Avenue (being 50 feet wide) at the southeast corner of the aforementioned 15' x 40' lot, thence binding on said road and on the northeast line of said lot, referring all courses of this description to the Maryland Coordinate System (NAD 83/91) as now surveyed in accordance with the requirements set forth in COMAR 09.13.06.12, North 39 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds East 20.08 feet to the Point of Beginning of this survey so fixed, having a coordinate of North 291,017.9779 feet and East 1,866,796.5984 feet. Thence continuing to bind on the East side of said road and north side of said lot; 1) North 39 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds East 19.94' to the north corner of said lot, thence 2) South 50 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds East 15.00 feet to Northwest corner of said lot, thence 3) South 39 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds West 19.94 feet to a rebar and cap found, thence 4) North 50 degrees 40 minutes 48 seconds West 15.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Containing 299 sq. ft. or 0.00691 acres, more or less INTRODUCED at a meeting of the City Council of Ocean City, Maryland held on February 3, 2014. ADOPTED AND PASSED by the required vote of the elected membership of the City Council and approved by the Mayor at its meeting held on March 3, 2014. OCD-2/13/2t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. JOYCE A. ROSENSTEEL EUGENE R. ROSENSTEEL 1605 Baltimore Avenue, Unit #9B Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001048

CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 3rd day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $171,146.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. WALLACE S. CROPPER, JR 12428 Jarvis Road Bishopville, MD 21813 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-1300-1540

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 5th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 12428 Jarvis Road, Bishopville, MD 21813, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 3rd day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $277,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________ JOSEPH E. MOORE ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON P.O. BOX 739, 3509 COASTAL HWY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given this 4th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1605 Baltimore Avenue, Unit #9B, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15460 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE B. CONNER III Notice is given that Earla S. Conner, 11040 Assateague Road, Berlin,


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 41

PUBLIC NOTICES MD 21811, was on February 06, 2014 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of George B. Conner III who died on December 22, 1013, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 6th day of August, 2014. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Earla S. Conner Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: February 13, 2014 OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. BERTO PEREYRA 5947 Snow Hill Road Snow Hill, MD 21863 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-13-001601

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 11th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 5947 Snow Hill Road, Snow Hill, MD 21863, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee,

will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 17th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 10th day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $88,400.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/20/3t _________________________________ WORCESTER COUNTY SHORELINE COMMISSION

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Pursuant to the provisions of Sections 3-101 and 3-102 of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be conducted by the Worcester County Shoreline Commission in the meeting room at the Ocean Pines Branch of the Worcester County Library, 11107 Cathell Road, Berlin, Maryland on Thursday, March 6, 2014. The Board members will convene at 1:30 p.m. to discuss administrative matters and may perform on-site viewing of all or some of the following cases. Thereafter, the members will reconvene at 2:00 p.m. at the library to hear the scheduled cases. MAJOR CONSTRUCTION MAJOR 1 G. Marvin and Beverly P. Steen Request No. 2014-12 – Request to install a 3’ x 20’ access to a 3’ x 55’ elevated walkway over marsh to a 6’ x 57’ perpendicular pier with a 10’ x 20’ “T” shaped platform not to exceed 80 feet channelward.. This request also includes the installation of one boatlift and two PWC lifts with associated pilings. The project is located on a vacant lot on Langmaid Road, also known as Tax Map 49, Parcel 137, Lot B-1, Marshall Creek Corporation, Fourth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 2 Coastal Compliance Solutions, LLC on behalf of Phillips Family LLC - Request No. 2014-13 – Afterthe-fact request for a 6’ x 41’ perpendicular pier not to exceed 41 feet channelward. The project is located 3554 Bayside Road, also known as Tax Map 73, Parcel 128, Phillips Family LLC, Second Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 3 Coastal Compliance Solutions, LLC for Hi-Tide Marine Construction on behalf of Homers Hideaway LLC - Request No. 2014-14 – Request to conduct maintenance dredge activity to remove approximately 2,000 cubic yards of material by hydraulic method and dispose of spoil at Skimmer Island or other approved site. The project is located at 12490 Inlet Isle Lane, also known as

Tax Map 27, Parcel 227, Lot 23, Inlet Isle, Tenth Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 4 Coastal Compliance Solutions, LLC for Mid Atlantic Marine on behalf of Whitehorse Park Association – Request No. 2014-15 – Request to replace existing 5’ x 535’ pier with a 6’ x 535’ pier with 46 boat slips, 48 mooring poles, 48 finger piers and 11 PWC lifts not to exceed 422 feet channelward. This project is located at 11647 Beauchamp Road, also known as Tax Map 16, Parcel 51, Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 5 Hidden Oak Farm, LLC on behalf of Frank and Kathleen Cini – Request No. 2014-16 – Request to install one boatlift with associated pilings not to exceed 20 feet channelward. This project is located at 27 Moon shell Drive, also known as Tax Map 16, Parcel 41, Section 4, Lot 154, Ocean Pines Community, Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. MAJOR 6 Hidden Oak Farm, LLC for Bayshore Marine Construction on behalf of Howard and Martha Bubert – Request No. 2014-17 – Request install a 5’ x 30’ perpendicular pier not to exceed 30 feet channelward. This request also includes the installation of one boatlift and one PWC lift with associated pilings. The project is located at 14 Clubhouse Drive, also known as Tax Map 16, Parcel 41, Section 4, Lot 423, Ocean Pines Community, Third Tax District of Worcester County, Maryland. OCD-2/20/2t _________________________________

to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 7th day of August, 2014. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Dale Emory Venable William Weldon Venable Personal Representatives True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: February 13, 2014 OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________

RAYMOND C. SHOCKLEY ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON PA 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY, P.O. BOX 739 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15467 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF SARAH H. VENABLE Notice is given that Dale Emory Venable, 12507 Collins Road, Bishopville, MD 21813 and William Weldon Venable, 11213 Beverly Street, Bishopville, MD 21813, were on February 07, 2014 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Sarah H. Venable who died on February 2, 2014, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT TRANSPORTATION DIVISION

INVITATION FOR BIDS BUS VEHICLE STORAGE BUILDING METAL ROOF REPAIRS The Mayor and City Council of Ocean City, Maryland will be accepting Sealed Bids for BUS VEHICLE STORAGE BUILDING METAL ROOF REPAIRS to the Transportation Bus Barn located at 204 65th Street, Building G, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. Work will include, but is not limited to, removal, disposal, provision, repair and installa-

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 42

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PUBLIC NOTICES tion of metal roof materials. Bids must be received by the Office of the City Manager, located at 301 Baltimore Ave., Ocean City, Maryland 21842, by no later than 4:30 PM on Monday, March 10, 2014. Bids will be opened at the City Council Work Session at 1:00 PM on Tuesday, March 11, 2014. Bidders are welcome to attend but need not be present. A Pre-Bid meeting will be held on Tuesday, February 18, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the Ocean City Public Works Administration Conference Room, located at 204 65th Street, Building E, Ocean City, Maryland 21842. Prospective Bidders are encouraged to visit the project site prior to submission of final bids. Bid documents and specifications are available from: Ocean City Public Works Department of Transportation Mr. Brian Connor 204 65th Street, Building E Ocean City, Maryland 21842 Email: bconnor@oceancitymd.gov Office: 410-723-2174 Project funding provided by the Federal Transit Administration, Maryland Transit Administration and Town of Ocean City. Registered Disadvantage Businesses Enterprise’s (DBE’s) are encouraged to apply. OCD-2/13/4t _________________________________

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 15471 Notice is given that the Register for the Probate of Wills Court of Sussex county, Delaware appointed Mary Patricia Ruck, 1532 Shipsview Rd, Annapolis, MD 21409 as the Executrix of the Estate of William Deatley Callahan who died on November 22, 2013 domiciled in Delaware, USA. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred.

Mary Patricia Ruck Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: February 20, 2014 OCD-2/20/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. ELAINE M. MCCRAY 509 Dighton Avenue Snow Hill, MD 21863 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001533

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 5th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 509 Dighton Avenue, Snow Hill, MD 21863, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 10th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 3rd day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $38,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________ _ CAROLE G. GELFELD ESQ. 11101 HUNTOVER DRIVE ROCKVILLE, MD 20852

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 15457 Notice is given that the Circuit court of Fairfax County, VA appointed Joseph P. Drummey III, 1250 Cresthaven Drive, Silver Spring, MD 20903 as the Executor of the Estate of Patricia C. Drummey who died on July 29, 2013 domiciled in Virginia, USA. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester.

All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Joseph P. Drummey III Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: February 13, 2014 OCD-2/13/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. JAMES FISHER CHRISTINE L. FISHER 13034 Muskrattown Road Bishopville, MD 21813 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001294

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 13th day of February, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 13034 Muskrattown Road, Bishopville, MD 21813, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 17th day of March, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 10th day of March, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $308,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-2/20/3t _________________________________


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Ocean City Today Feb. 21, 2014

Page 43 Wild & Scenic Film Festival to feature 11 short movies

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

Joe Webster, second from left, is helped by SOUL Ministry volunteers Rob Colone, Eric Snyder and Matt Coffin in a parking lot off Worcester Street on Monday night.

SOUL Ministry helping those in need Monday nights, Colone and friends provide clothing, food in Worcester Street lot

By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) The former owner of a pizzeria who sold his business so he could concentrate on giving food away instead of selling it was dispensing love along with soup in downtown Ocean City on Monday night. Rob Colone and some friends are in a Worcester Street parking lot each Monday night giving away hot soup, bread, crackers and pastries to anyone in need. Along with that food, they give donated toiletries, clothes and non-perishable food items if they are needed. This week, Joe Webster was among those the group helped. “They really help us out a lot,” Webster, a homeless man, said as he ate a hot bowl of beef vegetable soup. Down on his luck, Webster had no place to spend the night and said he expected to sleep on a bench, with just half of a blanket for warmth. Colone gave him a knit scarf to go around his neck and talked to him for a long time. “This is a beautiful foundation here,” said Gabriel Mills, who, along with his wife, got hot soup plus toys for their children. “They go out and look for people in the woods and share the word

of God with them.” The group starts their food ministry in Rehoboth, Del., and travels down Route 1 to Ocean City, where they park adjacent to Lands End Fellowship on Worcester Street at about 8 or 8:30 p.m. On Monday, they went into a wooded area in Rehoboth, where they fed six people. Then they drove to Millsboro where they fed 20 people. Ocean City was the next stop, to be followed by the woods in West Ocean City. They were not expecting to get home until 1 a.m. or 2 a.m. Colone, who started the food ministry in mid-November, does some property maintenance, but “really, my mission work is 24/7,” he said Monday. He was born and raised Catholic and attended a private Catholic school until age 11. For a while, he was in and out of various churches until he met Eric and Cherith Snyder of Frankford, Del., who attend Bethel Tabernacle Church in that town. “And now it’s home,” said Colone. It really is home, because Colone and the Snyders live in the parsonage next door. The ministry started when Colone, 26, who has a history of drug and alcohol abuse, attended a meeting after getting clean and sober. There, he saw some homeless people drinking coffee and eating donuts. Colone had extra soup in his truck

Rob Colone

from his pizza business, Goodfellas in Dagsboro, so he gave it away to the homeless. When he was told more homeless people were behind the building, it spurred him to return the following night with more soup, some of his old jackets and shoes and even the blankets off his bed. The next time he went, the Snyders and Matt Coffin of Selbyville joined him. “And we haven’t stopped since,” Colone said. “I sold my pizza place so I can do this full time. “When I had the pizza business, I had a BMW and a Rolex watch and I wasn’t happy. Now I’m happy surrounded by family and friends who love me.” Colone is unconcerned about money for himself. “Since giving myself to God fully . . . God provides,” he said. See MINISTRY Page 44

(Feb. 21, 2014) The third annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival will kick off at Seacrets’ Morley Hall on Friday, Feb. 21, with a special children’s show set for the Sarbanes Center near Assateague Island on Feb. 22. This year’s festival offers a menu of 11 films. The audience will move from a mountaintop lightning strike to a night kayak ride to a prank-filled octogenarian swim meet spanning 18 years. Hosted locally by Assateague Coastal Trust, The Wild & Scenic Film Festival is organized by a northern California watershed group which each year assembles a catalog of award-winning, mostly environmentally focused films and offers them to local conservation nonprofits to help educate and engage their communities. “We are thrilled to have the opportunity to once again share these amazing films from around the world with our local audience,” said ACT Executive Director and Coastkeeper Kathy Philllips. “Many of the films showcase environmental issues which helps us to engage and inspire people around the challenges facing our planet and our local area. There’s even a film this year that features the efforts of our colleagues right here on the Eastern Shore.” Phillips noted it’s not all about teaching or preaching. “There is a healthy mix of adventure and pure fun which makes the festival as much about entertainment as education,” she said. The Wild & Scenic Film Festival will include two screenings at Seacrets Morley Hall on Friday, Feb. 21: a matinee at 2 p.m. and an evening show at 6. Both events will feature Morley Hall’s new crystal clear projection system, discounted food offerings and a silent auction. Tickets cost $15 in advance and $20 at the door. ACT has also selected a separate set of three films from the Wild & Scenic catalog geared especially for a younger audience that will be presented by the organization’s Coast Kids program on Feb. 22. This screening will take place at the Sarbanes Coastal Ecology Lab, adjacent to Assateague Island National Seashore’s Visitors Center, and will be preceded by a special Coast Kids workshop on renewable energy. Tickets for this program will be available only at the door and are $5 for Coast Kids members and $10 for nonmembers. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.ActForBays.org or call 410-629-1538.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 44

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

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Continued from Page 43 After just a couple of mission trips, Colone and his friends named their venture the SOUL (Serving Others Under the Lord) Ministry. Sometimes in Ocean City, five people might show up to get food. At other times, 25 people might show up. “In summer, there will be more,” Colone said. “People come from Baltimore because it’s easier to be homeless at the beach. It’s warm and there are places you can stay without being bothered. Panhandling is not that bad and it’s easier to survive here. People make the best of it.” After giving food and other items on Worcester Street, Colone and his friends go to woods in West Ocean City to feed the homeless there. “We go in with flashlights,” he said. Sometimes, they will find a homeless person within minutes. On other nights, they might walk for an hour before finding a campsite. They would already have been in wooded areas in Rehoboth. And they go to more wooded areas on Thursday nights when they take hand out soup and other items in Seaford, Laurel, Delmar and Salisbury. Almost everything given away by the SOUL Ministry is donated. “We make the soup ourselves. And if we run low, we’ll purchase something,” Colone said. A box for donations is inside Bethel Tabernacle Church in Frankford. Mon-

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

Joe Webster enjoys a bowl of hot soup provided by SOUL Ministry while volunteer Eric Snyder looks on with joy.

etary donations may be sent to Colone expects to continue the SOUL Ministry “for the rest of my life,” he said. A goal of the ministry is to “bring people into the kingdom to experience the love and happiness we share, but the main goal is to provide what is needed. We just give people what they need. “We don’t just help the homeless,” said Colone, “but kids affected by drugs and alcohol and anybody in need of a

helping hand.” To help, people may send checks, made out of SOUL Ministry, to SOUL Ministry, 34180 Omar Road, Frankford, DE 19945. Canned goods may be taken to the same address. People who need items picked up or people who are in need of food or clothing by call Colone at 302-858-9940. “We’ll give them enough to get through a day or two,” he said.


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 45

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Consider meat when making beef stroganoff Filet mignon, flank, blade and sirloin steaks options to choose from for meal

By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (Feb. 21, 2014) The diary of a chef is personal and straightforward. The sweetness of Valentine’s Day lingers but a different direction must come to the forefront. The thought of savory Beef Stroganoff sends my senses into a whimsical chapter of anticipation. The last time my palate devoured this dish was at the Russian Tea Room in New York City. The setting was divine. Chilled Russian vodka, delectable caviar, scrumptious borscht, and luscious Beef Stroganoff were a culinary delight. But the piece de resistance was

dining in the Russian Tea Room’s infamous red booths next to Woody Allen and Mia Farrow. In order to attempt to repeat such a feat, I must get out my trusty notes. Time plays havoc on my mind and a quick review is mandatory. The first consideration is the meat. Filet mignon instantly comes to my mind, but I must confess it is simply too pricey for my budget. Flank and blade steaks are other possible options. The flavor of the meat is there but the texture of the small pieces will be tough. Then I came up with another possibility. How about cooking a large sirloin steak that will allow a rich, dark fond to form? Then the meat can rest and eventually be cut

into smaller pieces. This option will give me essence and tenderness. Traditional beef stroganoff recipes do not contain mushrooms, but I am forgoing convention and adding them to the sauce. I want to incorporate the meatiness of the mushroom without the natural moisture of the vegetable, which will dilute the consistency of the sauce. Cooking the mushrooms in the microwave will extract the mushroom broth from the actual fungi. The broth can be frozen for future use and the meat of the mushrooms can be successfully browned with the other vegetable components. Building a sauce is imperative; flavors and consistency need to be incorporated at the appropriate time. Contemporary recipes call for ketchup; tomato paste will give me the same

quality without the sweetness. The tomato paste will also parlay beautifully with the earthiness of the mushrooms. The evening is coming to an end and my pen must be put to rest. That being said, Beef Stroganoff is delicious and easy on the budget. It can be served at an elegant sit down affair or a simple dinner for your loved ones. Beef stroganoff is a keeper and perfect for a cold, winter’s night.

Ingredients 1 ¼ pounds sirloin steak tips, trimmed of excess fat and cut (with the grain) into four pieces 2 teaspoons soy sauce 1 pound white mushrooms, wiped clean, stems trimmed and sliced. 2 teaspoons hot water See SERVE Page 46

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 46

ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Your efforts in behalf of a colleague do not go unnoticed, let alone unappreciated. Meanwhile, arrange to spend more time investigating that troubling fact you recently uncovered. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Devot-

ing a lot of time to a current career move means having less time for those in your private life. But once you explain the circumstances, they should understand and be supportive.

GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Organizing your many duties in order of importance should help you get through them pretty quickly. Additional information puts that still-to-be-made decision in a new light.

CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Lingering bad feelings over a recent misunderstanding should fade as reconciliation efforts continue. Meanwhile, vacation plans might need to be revised because of new developments. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Love dominates the Lion’s heart this week, with Cupid shooting arrows at single Leos and Leonas looking for romance. Partnered pairs also enjoy strengthened relationships. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22)

“Getting to Know You” should be the single Virgo’s theme song as you and that special person discover more about one another. That workplace situation needs looking into.

LIBRA (September 23 to October 22)

You might be upset at having your objectivity questioned in the handling of a dispute. But it would be wise to reexamine your feelings to make sure you’re being fair with both sides.

Serve beef and sauce over Zumbathon for noodles, garnish with parsley Marshall family Continued from Page 45 1 tablespoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon sugar 4 tablespoons canola oil 1 large clove garlic 1 medium sweet onion 2 teaspoons tomato paste 4 teaspoons all-purpose flour 1/3 cup dry white wine 1 cup veal stock ½ cup chicken stock ½ cup sour cream fresh parsley as a garnish very coarse fresh, ground pepper kosher salt to taste egg noodles 1. Using a fork, poke each piece of steak nine times. Place in dish, rub both sides evenly with soy sauce. Cover with plastic and refrigerate for an hour. 2. While the meat marinates, place the mushrooms in a medium microwave-safe bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Microwave four to five minutes or until mushrooms have decreased in volume by half. Strain and set mushrooms aside; freeze mushroom broth for future use. 3. Combine water, dry mustard, sugar, and ½ teaspoon fresh ground pepper in a small bowl until a paste is formed. Set aside. 4. Pat beef dry with paper towels and season generously with fresh ground pepper. Heat half of the oil in medium cast iron skillet over medium-high heat

SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A family dispute creates mixed

until the oil starts to smoke. Carefully, place the beef in the pan and cook until both sides are well browned. If the meat starts to burn, reduce the heat. Transfer meat to a plate and set aside while cooking the sauce. 5. Reduce heat to medium-low and add mushrooms, onions, garlic, and remaining oil to medium sauté pan and cook until the vegetables start to caramelize. This process will take about 10 minutes, constantly stirring. 6. Add tomato paste and flour; stir constantly until the ingredients are thoroughly combined. Stir in wine, stock, and mustard paste and bring to simmer, scraping the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon to loosen the brown bits. 7. Cook sauce until it has slightly reduced and begins to thicken. You may have to add Wondra Quick-Gravy flour to help thicken the sauce. 8. While sauce is reducing, cut the steak pieces across the grain into ¼inch slices. Stir in the steak and meat juices. 9. Remove pan from the heat and keep stirring for 30 seconds. Stir in sour cream. Serve over noodles and garnish with parsley. Serves four. Secret Ingredient - Letting Go. “It doesn’t take a lot of strength to hang on. It takes a lot of strength to let go.” –J.C. Watts

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feelings about how you hope it will be ultimately resolved. Best advice: Stay out of it and let the involved parties work it through by themselves.

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Making an effort to

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HAPPY HOUR

PISCES (February 19 to March 20)

You find yourself swimming in circles, looking for some way to get back on a straight course. But things get easier once you’re able to refocus your energies.

Sunday thru Thursday 10pm-2am

friend’s problem calls for an honest approach. Provide explanations, not excuses. Another friend might be able to offer support for your decision.

LATE NIGHT

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Being unable to get involved in a

Serving the Entire Menu Daily Year Round 11 am - 1:30 am 7 Days A Week

HAPPY HOUR

can be upsetting, but your longtime supporters want you to defend your position so you can win over even your most adamant detractors.

www.bjsonthewater.com

Monday thru Friday 4-7pm

smooth over even the smallest obstacles now will go a long way to assuring that things run smoothly once you’re set to move on with your plans.

E N T E R TA I N M E N T

HOROSCOPE

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

By Donald Putnam Intern (Feb. 21, 2014) WOC Fitness will sponsor a “Zumbathon” open to all ages to raise money for the Marshall family as they recover from the loss of their father/husband, Dan Marshall. Marshall suffered from a series of organ cancers that took his life on New Year’s Eve. Kim Marshall, his wife, is a participant in the Zumba classes offered at the gym. Karen Holland, a Zumba instructor, will host the Zumbathon from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Most Blessed Sacrament in Ocean Pines on Saturday, Feb. 22 to benefit the family. “We’ve done Zumbathons before for several different causes, including breast cancer awareness, and other benefits for local families. It’s great to be able to provide the assistance in any way we can,” Holland said. “We wanted to find some way to help and this surely is a great way to do so,” said WOC owner, Bonnie Zemo. The event will feature DJ Jeremy, as well as raffles for prizes, including a sixmonth membership to the gym that includes private classes with a personal trainer. Tickets cost $10 in advance and $12 at the door. They can be purchased at WOC gym located behind Bliss in West Ocean City. For more information, call WOC Fitness at 410-213-7000.

Friday, February 21st 9pm No Cover

CHEST PAINS Friday, February 22nd 9pm No Cover

JOE SMOOTH & 2 MUCH STUFF Wednesday, February 26th Happy Hour • Deck Party 4pm-8pm

THIN ICE 11am til...closing

SUNDAY Twin Crab Cakes Dinner Served w/ 2 sides .... $21.99 MONDAY Crab Imperial Dinner Served w/ 2 sides ......... $18.99 TUESDAY Twin Crab Cakes Dinner Served w/ 2 sides .... $21.99 WEDNESDAY Stuffed Flounder Dinner Served w/ 2 sides..... $20.99 THURSDAY Flash Fried Shrimp Dinner Served w/ 2 sides..... $17.99

$11.00 $9.50 $11.00 $10.50 $9.00


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 47

NOW PLAYING 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILL

HIGH STAKES

9636 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 410-213-9204 Feb. 21: Dave Sherman, 7-10 p.m. Feb. 22: Carl Baucmann, 7-10 p.m. BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 Feb. 21: Chest Pains Feb. 22: Joe Smooth & 2 Much Stuff Feb. 26: Thin Ice CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Feb. 21-22: Phil Perdue FAGER’S ISLAND

Everett Spells

60th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-5500 Feb. 21: DJ RobCee Feb. 22: DJ Groove; Scotts New Band Feb. 23: Everett Spells

Bobby Burns

Route 54 Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 Feb. 21: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; DJ Zman, 9 p.m. Feb. 22: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; Chris Button & Joe

Mama, 9 p.m. HOOTERS Rt. 50 & Keyser Point Rd. West Ocean City 410-213-1841 Feb. 21: Zion Reggae, 8 p.m. to 12 a.m. Feb. 22: 50 East, 8 p.m. to 12 a.m.

SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-4900 Feb. 21: Rew Smith, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Feb. 22: Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; Band Showcase, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Feb. 27: Opposite Directions, 5-8 p.m.

56th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-524-7499 Feb. 21: Opposite Directions

103 N. Main St. Berlin 410-629-1022 Feb. 21: Funky Ukulele by Ryan Perez OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Feb. 21-22: Power Play

SIMPLE TRUTH Harborside: Saturday, Feb. 22, 2-6 p.m.

12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 Feb. 21: Ladies Night w/DJ Billy T Feb. 22: Simple Truth, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. Feb. 23: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m. Feb. 27: Opposite Directions, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. HARPOON HANNA’S Route 54 and the bay Fenwick Island, Del. 800-227-0525 302-539-3095 Every Friday: Dave Hawkins, 6-10 p.m. Every Saturday: Dave Sherman, 6-10 p.m. Dave Sherman Every Thursday: Aaron Howell, 6 p.m.

113 N. Main St., Berlin 443-513-4158 Feb. 21: Spare Change; Guest Bartender Night, 6-10 p.m.

JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB

66th Street, bayside Ocean City 410-723-6762 Feb. 21: Philly George

HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL

In the Princess Royale 91st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-7777 Every Friday and Saturday: Harry O, 7-11 p.m.

131st Street Ocean City 410-250-3100 Feb. 21: Bob Hughes Feb. 22: Howard on the Piano

MARYLAND WINE BAR

12 Broad St. Berlin 410-641-0784 Feb. 21: Mike Armstrong & Lauren Glick, 7-10 p.m. Feb. 22: The Brooks Long Band, 7-10 p.m.

SISTERS

J/R’s

GALAXY 66

THE GLOBE RESTAURANT & BAR

SCHOONER’S RESTAURANT

CHEST PAINS BJ’s on the Water: Friday, Feb. 21

SMITTY MCGEE’S Route 54 West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-436-4716 Feb. 21-22: Rick Artz, 8 p.m. Feb. 27: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 8 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 443-365-2576 Feb. 21: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey


PAGE 48

Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

OUT & ABOUT

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Tom and Kristal Alexander, from near Philadelphia, pause for a photo at The Oyster Garden at Fager’s Island last Saturday. (Left) Sean Forman, of Berlin, shucks oysters for diners at The Oyster Garden at the 60th Street restaurant.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Doug and Rose Dawson, left and right, enjoy local oysters with Ninl Gugliodta at The Oyster Garden at Fager’s Island last Saturday. The all-you-can-eat event featured shellfish from five local oyster companies and part of the funds from ticket sales benefit Oyster Recovery Partnership projects to help restore the shellfish to local waters.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Couples, from left, Lou Golfredi, Suzie Tomb, Becky Golfredi and Don Tomb enjoy food and drinks at The Oyster Garden at Fager’s Island last Saturday. The event featured shellfish from five local oyster companies and part of the funds from ticket sales benefit Oyster Recovery Partnership projects to help restore the shellfish to local waters.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Bay Landing Shellfish Company members, from left, Jess Baunhofer, John Apple and Richie Schubach pause from shucking oysters for a photo at The Oyster Garden at Fager’s Island on Feb. 15.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Bliss Salon & Spa was one of 19 West Ocean City businesses participating in the seventh annual Death By Chocolate event on Feb. 16. Representing the business, from left, are Gina Blanchard, Jenny Barrientos and Elisa Urban. (Right) Bungalow 7 also took part in the festivities Sunday. Pictured are Kathy Hewitt, left, and owner Dani Pogge. Participants visited each merchant for sweet treats and to find clues to fill out a game card. Prizes were awarded.


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

COMMUNITY BRIEFS

History of Delmarva Examine the image of a Garden of Eden on Delmarva and how its inhabitants came to tend it and remake it over four periods of history by taking “Making a Heavenly Dwelling: Delmarva Nature Remade,” which is being offered by the continuing education division at Wor-Wic Community College on Tuesdays, March 4-25, from 1-2:30 p.m., at the college campus on the corner of Route 50 and Walston Switch Road in Salisbury. For more information, visit www.worwic.edu or call 410-334-2815.

MBS Casino Night Come to Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic School’s Casino Night, Saturday, March 8, from 6 p.m. to midnight. Admission is $40 in advance or $50 at the door. There will be blackjack, roulette, Texas Hold’em, cash games, money wheels, as well as live and silent auctions. Catering by Hooked and A Taste of the Town. Reservations can be made by e-mailing mbscasinonight2014@gmail.com. All proceeds benefit Most Blessed Sacrament Catholic School.

Ribbon cutting Join the Berlin Chamber of Commerce with its first ribbon cutting and Business After Hours event at Brews Up, Delmarva’s First Brew-On-Premise beer and wine supply store. The ribbon cutting is scheduled

to take place at 5 p.m., followed by Business After Hours. Brews Up is located at 9028 Worcester Hwy., Building C, in Berlin, across from the Berlin Little League fields on Route 113. For information, call Brews Up, 443-513-4744, visit www.brewsup.net or www.facebook/BrewsUpBOP or e-mail homebrew@brewsup.net.

Worcester Chorale All singers are invited to be part of the Worcester Chorale as the group begins rehearsals for its June 29 concert, “Poetry, Lyrics and Music.” Billie Wall and June Todd are the director and accompanist. The Worcester Chorale rehearses Wednesday evenings, 7-9 p.m. at the Atlantic United Methodist Church on Fourth Street in Ocean City. Spring rehearsals begin March 12. For more information, call 410-208-4707.

Hall of Fame The Maryland Senior Citizens Hall of Fame, Inc., is seeking nominations of Maryland residents, 65 years of age or older, who as active volunteers have made outstanding contributions to improve the lives of others in the community. Nomination forms and details are available at mschf.org or by written request to MSCHF, 800 Southerly Road, Box 1, Towson, Md. 21286-8403. Nomination forms must be postmarked by April 30.

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PAGE 49

Resort’s annual St. Patrick’s Day parade set for March 15 Donovan family named this year’s grand marshals; will lead procession down hwy. (Feb. 21, 2014) Ocean City will be glowing with green at the 33rd annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Festival, which marches down Coastal Highway on Saturday, March 15. Sponsored by the Delmarva Irish-American Club, this Ocean City tradition has grown to become the second largest St. Patrick’s Day Parade in the state, in addition to a seasonal kick-off for many local businesses. Leading the parade will be the Donovan family, this year’s grand marshals and long-time members of the DIAC. In 1978, Mike and Cathy Donovan moved to Ocean City from the Baltimore area. They opened up a gift shop in the 45th Street Village, and Mike started a screen printing company, New Wave, in the attic. Their business blossomed and they quickly outgrew their space in the 45th Street Village, so they moved their operations to Sunset Avenue in West Ocean City. Mike and Cathy are original members of the Delmarva Irish-American Club. They had a daughter in 1983, Colleen, who has attended every St. Patrick’s Parade in Ocean City since birth. New Wave has been making the St. Patrick’s Parade T-shirts every year, sell-

ing them on parade day in the 45th Street Village where it all started. Profits from the T-shirt sales are donated to the Delmarva Irish-American Club for scholarships that are awarded every year to local high school students. Mike Donovan passed away in 1990. Cathy and Colleen, along with Mike’s children from a previous marriage, Andrew Donovan and Kyla Porter, are all members of the DIAC. Now there are five Donovan grandchildren. In 2010, Colleen married Matt Brown, and they are now the owners of New Wave. Matt’s most important role in this year’s St. Patrick’s Parade is to continue the tradition of selling the official apparel in the 45th Street Village, thus allowing other members of the Donovan family to enjoy the parade as grand marshals. With pipe and drum bands, including the Chesapeake Caledonia Pipe and Drum Band and the Ocean City Pipe Band, the St. Patrick’s Day Parade brings the sounds of Ireland to the streets of Ocean City. Also participating are several area high school marching bands including the Stephen Decatur High School Marching Band and numerous festively decorated St. Patty’s Day floats. The procession begins at noon at 58th Street and marches south on Coastal Highway to the 45th Street Village, See OCEAN Page 51


PAGE 50

Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILLE, 9936 Stephen Decatur Highway, West Ocean City 410-2139204 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual and family-friendly, featuring great American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner at affordable prices. Open seven days a week, year-round. Happy hour daily, 3-7 p.m. Entertainment Friday through Sunday. ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.oceancityhilton.com/dining / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717 / www.ocitalianfood.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room with fireplace. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ BILLY’S SUB SHOP, 140th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-1778; Route 54, Fenwick Shoals, Fenwick Island, Del., 302-436-5661 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Dine in, carry out, free Delivery. Open 7 days 11 a.m. – 3 a.m. Ocean City’s most famous sub and pizza shop since 1959. An OC tradition where a sandwich is a meal, serving fresh dough pizza, subs, burgers, cones, shakes and sundaes with beach delivery available. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. Open Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. Open 7 days a week, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. ■ CRABCAKE FACTORY, 120th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-4900 / www.crabcakefactoryusa.com / $-$$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family restaurant serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Open Friday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to midnight; Sunday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Monday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Menu selections are Eastern Shore favorites: creamed chipped beef, omlettes and daily breakfast special crab dishes. World famous Crabcakes served all day starting at 8 a.m. Other menu selections include Chicken Chesapeake, prime rib,

steamed shrimp, Philly cheesesteaks, burgers and homemade soups. www.crabcakefactoryusa.com ships Crabcakes year-round. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410-5245500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar / Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside. ■ FENWICK CRAB HOUSE, 100 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-539-2500 / www.crabcakeexpress.com / $-$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Carry-out available. Casual dining. Open for lunch and dinner. Big crabs are our specialty. Perfect crabcakes are our passion. Seven different fish served 15 different ways! Great local seafood, good times and good service is our mission. ■ GALAXY 66 BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / $$-$$$ / V-MAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Contemporary restaurant offering light fare and full entrees. Award- winning wine list, signature drinks and cocktails. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846 / www.ocharborside.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and all-you-caneat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdhotels.com/hemingways / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Sea-food, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE, 31st Street, Ocean City, 410-289-2581; 128th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-2403 / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open 7 days a week. We have proudly served Ocean City, Maryland for over 40 years. Known for All You Can Eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HIGH STAKES BAR & GRILL, Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 / $-$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Carry-out available / Full bar / Casual dining, daily happy hour and daily food specials. Live entertainment. ■ HOOTERS, Fifth Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-2690 and Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-1841 / www.hootersofoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS. Things are always getting better at Hooters! Fresh menu offering a number of ground chuck burgers, green salads, world famous chicken wings with 11 flavorful sauces and a fun children’s menu. Relax in the beach atmosphere or enjoy the outdoor seating. Happy hour every day, 3-7 p.m. Full bar available. Authentic Hooters merchandise in kids and adult sizes. Enjoy all the sports packages on large,

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Get a Direct Link to Your Business

Add a QR Code to your Dining Guide listing and give your patrons a direct link to your Web site, Facebook page, App, etc. Cost is $15 for current advertisers ~ $25 for new listings Contact a Sales Representative at 410-723-6397

flat screen TVs and great service by the delightful Hooters girls. Live entertainment. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Find out why we say, “Hooters makes you happy!” ■ HOOTERS, 123rd Street, Bayside, Ocean City 410-250-7081 / www.hootersofoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full Bar / Casual dining. Newly remodeled and open for the season. Our More Than A Mouthful Burger speaks for itself. We have everything from soups and salads, great sandwiches, and a variety of seafood choices. We look forward to seeing you and don't forget to stop in our gift shop and check out all the great merchandise. Seasonally open every Thursday through Sunday. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Proud to have Chef Shawn Reese creating beach-inspired dishes in both oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breaker’s Pub. New all-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., features many favorites, as well as exciting new creations with a local flare. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB, 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600 / www.johnnyspizzapub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Ocean City’s official pizzeria and pub featuring homemade pizzas, serving 18 different gourmet pizzas including local favorites Johnny’s Special, Neptune’s Seafood Feast Pizza, and MD Blue Crab. Huge variety of calzones, subs, burgers and sandwiches to choose from. Ocean City’s place for jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Coldest draft beer in town served in a chilled mug. Voted best sound system for live music. Carry out or delivery til 4 a.m. ■ J/R’S, 131st Street, Ocean City 410-2503100 / www.jrsribs.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s Menu / Full bar / Carry-out / Early bird specials daily. This is the PLACE for ribs, steaks, chicken, seafood and steamed crabs. Try our Ribs in our family oriented spacious dining room or cheer on your favorite team in our new enlarged sports bar. You’ve tried the Rest- Now try the Best. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ MERMAID COVE PUB, 33195 Lighthouse Road, Williamsville, West Fenwick, Del. 302436-0122 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Full bar / Get ship-wrecked at the Mermaid Cove with pub, drink and food specials daily. Lump crab cakes, rock and mahi tacos, fried oyster sandwiches and platters are among the items to choose from. Breakfast served weekends. Open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. Take-out available. ■ MIO FRATELLO ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE, 38018 Fenwick Shoals Blvd., West Fenwick, Del. 302-436-6400 / miofratello.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining in a relaxed atmosphere, specializing in steaks, seafood and pasta. Take out and delivery. Open for lunch and dinner. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-

MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ REFLECTIONS RESTAURANT, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdhotelscom/reflections / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Tableside flambé dining. Casually elegant, cuisine prepared tableside in the European tradition. Private dining rooms. Eclectic chef’s specials accompanied by an award-winning wine list. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410524-4900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SEASONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-5241000 / www.carouselhotel.com / $-$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., featuring a wide variety of entrees, seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ SIMMER TIME, Rt. 54, Fenwick Island, next to Mio Fratello 302-436-2266 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Fondue and more in an intimate atmosphere; small and large parties. ■ SMITTY McGEE’S, 37234 Lighthouse Road, West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-4364716 / www.smittymcgees.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / No children’s menu / Full bar / Casual. Big menu, including hot wings and drinks. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE BRICK HOUSE PUB, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410524-5252 / www.ocmdhotels.com/brickhousepub / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Relax and enjoy the laid back atmosphere of this casual brew pub. Enjoy a lite bite, or watch the game on one of our huge flat-screen TV's. Dine on the freshest raw bar specialties, or try one of the local favorites, including fresh rockfish, shrimp, crab cakes, spicy hummus, juicy burgers and steaks, piping hot made-toorder pizzas, flavorful sandwiches and gourmet salads. Extensive micro-brew list and beers on tap. Happy hour specials daily. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Old World saloon-type feel, Whisker’s is famous for its Certified Angus® burgers and delicious casual fare, as well as its entertaining atmosphere and photo lined walls of famous and infamous “whiskers.” Enjoy flat screen TVs to watch your favorite sports. Open year-round, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m., serving lunch and dinner daily. Happy hour every day 4-7 p.m. Nightly food specials.


FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 51

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Ocean City St. Patrick’s Day parade 2014 grand marshals, from left, are, Cathy Donovan, Matt Brown and Colleen Donovan Brown.

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Ocean City goes green March 15 Continued from Page 49 where the reviewing and judges stand will be located. Trophies will be awarded for best marching band, best commercial float, best non-commercial float, best motorized unit, best adult marching unit, best youth marching unit, special committee award, judges’ choice award and best overall entry in the parade. In addition to the celebration on the street, the 45th Street Village will once again be transformed into a lively Irish festival complete with live Irish entertainment, dancers, face painting, Irish apparel and plenty of food and drink. With music provided by Pat O’Brennan and dancing by the Footsteps Irish

'

Dancers, spectators can enjoy the freeadmission festival beginning at 11 a.m. running until 3 p.m. To avoid traffic delays, viewers are urged to arrive before 10:30 a.m. and to view the parade from 58th Street south to 45th Street. The Delmarva Irish-American Club was founded in 1980. The first membership drive resulted in 75 members; today the membership totals more than 300 and is open to anyone who is Irish, of Irish descent or just likes things Irish. The club has awarded over $250,000 for scholarships to local students from the proceeds of previous parades. For more information, visit www.delmarvairish.org or contact Buck Mann at 410-289-6156.

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PAGE 52

Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Md. fourth graders invited to submit essay for contest Students have opportunity to learn about municipal govt. through competition (Feb. 21, 2014) Fourth graders throughout the state are invited to take part in the Maryland Municipal League’s “If I Were Mayor…” essay contest. The contest, which draws nearly 3,000 essays annually, challenges Maryland fourth graders to share their thoughts on how they would engage with citizens to make their municipality a better place to live and work if they were mayor. Students must submit their essays to MML no later than March 31. Since 2001, MML’s “If I Were Mayor…” essay contest has given fourth graders the opportunity to learn about municipal government through sharing their thoughts on how they would govern as mayor. Each 275-word essay must open with the line: “If I Were Mayor, I Would…” and answer three questions that address the theme, “Engaging My Community.” All Maryland students enrolled in the fourth grade during the 20132014 school year may participate in the contest.

Entries must be submitted by the student’s teacher. The 11 regional winners will be presented with a $100 cash prize and a Governor’s Citation at the Maryland State House in front of their immediate family, their teacher, their municipality’s mayor and other local dignitaries on May 16. “This contest is a testament to the value we place on building our next generation of local leaders by helping students learn more about how their municipality works,” said Scott A. Hancock, executive director of the Maryland Municipal League. “Engaging My Community is a fantastic theme that will frame these fourth grade students’ vision for how communities can work together better.” The contest is sponsored by Maryland Municipal League, in partnership with the Maryland Mayors’ Association, Local Government Insurance Trust, and Injured Workers’ Insurance Fund. Essays are judged based on: essay relation to contest topic; displayed knowledge about municipal government and the role of a mayor; creativity; and proper use of grammar. To apply, download a form from www.mdmunicipal.org/essay.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Fletcher Chmar retrieves a balloon under the watch of his father, Sam Chmar, during the 31st annual OC Seaside Boat Show at the 40th Street convention center last weekend.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/CLARA VAUGHN

Landon Daniel, of Ocean Pines, relaxes while his family browses during the 31st annual OC Seaside Boat Show last weekend.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 53

Handbell Musicians of America Area 3 host March festival

Jack Ferry named executive director of WCDC in Newark

(Feb. 21, 2014) On Jan. 17, Dale Smack, president of the Worcester County Developmental Center, announced that Acting Executive Director, Jack Ferry, was unanimously approved by the board to serve as executive director. Ferry has been with WCDC for five years and has supervised the transition of the day program from its temporary home in Snow Hill to its start and growth in the Newark facility. Ferry and the staff have worked together to provide more opportunities for the clients both in the facility and in the community. Since moving to the Newark facility in January 2011, the day program team has started food service, catering, janitorial, commercial laundry, assembly/repackaging and greenhouse employment programs as well as a day habilitation area where clients receive skills of daily living training. Prior to coming to the Eastern Shore, Ferry lived in Bethlehem, Pa., and taught high school English for 11 years. After leaving education, Ferry moved to Hazleton, Pa., where he owned and operated a snack food distributorship. In Hazleton, as a member of the Jaycees, Ferry was involved with Special Olympics. He worked with clients

Jack Ferry, left, pictured with Worcester County Developmental Center Board President Dale Smack, was recently named the organization's executive director.

from United Rehabilitation Services, a program similar to WCDC. He decided to put his teaching and business skills together, sold the snack distributorship, and began working at URS teaching clients job skills which helped them secure community employment. At URS, Ferry supervised and helped expand the catering, janitorial and business— which included printing, engraving and mailing—programs. Ferry was also an active member of the Hazleton Kiwanis Club and was an advisor to the Hazleton Aktion Club, a Kiwanis-sponsored program which enables adults who live with a disability the opportunity to perform community service. One of his proudest moments as advisor was when the club decided to adopt an orphanage for disabled children in Bulgaria. The club purchased

medicine, formula, vitamins and clothes for the children and on two occasions Ferry traveled to Bulgaria to help deliver these supplies directly to the children. Ferry worked at URS for 15 years, until leaving to join the staff of WCDC in November 2008. In addition to working with staff to grow the program, Ferry has spoken to many groups and organizations to help spread the word about WCDC and about the abilities of people who live with a disability. Ferry has worked closely with Friends of WCDC and feels Friends is one of the keys to WCDC’s future success. Friends has brought families and community members together as a way of raising awareness of WCDC and the clients and as a way of providing support for the families.

(Feb. 21, 2014) Handbell Musicians of America Area 3 will present its annual Ocean City Festival March 14-15, at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center on 40th Street in Ocean City. The weekend will commence with the Festival concert on Saturday, March 15 at 4:45 p.m. The concert, a multi-sensory program, will include both sacred and secular handbell compositions rung by more than 575 handbell ringers en masse. The concert is free to the public. The guest conductor for the concert will be Deborah Rice of Winston-Salem, N.C. Drawing on her experience as a professional singer, choral conductor and passion for teaching, Rice maintains a demanding travel schedule of national, international and denominational events as clinician, adjudicator and conductor. In 1983 she founded the handbell ministries of Becks Baptist Church in Winston-Salem, N.C. where her ensembles ring on the largest sets of handbells and handchimes that are commercially available. Since 2008 Rice has served as executive director for the International Handbell Committee. For information about the event or Handbell Musicians of America Area 3, contact Debbie Henning at 410-8485482 or debbiehen@gmail.com.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 54

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

OUT & ABOUT

FENZEL-MERGOTT SDHS TEACHER OF THE YEAR Stephen Decatur High School has named Amy Fenzel-Mergott as the 2014 SDHS Teacher of the Year. Fenzel-Mergott has been teaching mathematics and coaching at the school since 1996. She is a graduate of Salisbury University where she has also gone on to earn her Masters Degree and be inducted into the SU Athletic Hall of Fame. Fenzel-Mergott is currently the girls' varsity basketball coach, the advisor of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes and a member of the Maryland Safe and Supportive Schools committee. The Worcester County Teacher of the Year will be named at the annual banquet on March 28.

RELAY FOR LIFE Relay for Life North Worcester organizers, Dawn Hodge, second from left, and Jill Elliott, second from right, honor Tammy Simington, left, and Connie Collins from Atlantic Endoscopy Polypeers as the top 2013 fundraising team. The next Relay event is Feb. 26, 6 p.m. at the Ocean Pines library.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

HAND DANCE CLUB DONATES

Roxie Dennis holds a proclamation recognizing the month of February as Black History Month that was presented to her by the Worcester County Commissioners.

Susan Blaney, coordinator for Diakonia, right, is presented with a $1,000 donation from Delmarva Hand Dancing Club officers, from left, Treasure, Joann Arter; Secretary, Janie Fillomaro and President, Barbara Chaffinch.

VALENTINES FOR VETS The Worcester County Recreation and Parks Department's after-school program participants volunteered to help the Valentines for Veterans program by providing homemade valentines. Children are pictured with Charlotte Cathell, co-chair of the Valentines for Veterans; Paige Hurley, recreation director; Jen Standish, recreation program director and Kim Moses, Worcester County Public Information director. The Valentines were sent to veterans hospitals throughout Maryland.


FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 55

Finnegan’s Wake on tap for March 1 at Seacrets in OC (Feb. 21, 2014) The second annual Finnegan’s Wake, sponsored by the Friends of the Worcester County Developmental Center, will take place in Seacrets’ Morley Hall on Saturday, March 1, from 5-9 p.m. The event is a mock Irish funeral inspired by the traditional Irish song of the same name. The doors to Morley Hall open at 5 p.m., and the evening’s festivities will commence at 5:15 p.m. with the funeral procession led by the Ocean City Pipes and Drums. Included in the cortege will be St. Patrick, clergy members, mourners, pall bearers and a leprechaun or two. The procession will wind its way through Morley Hall and end with the placement of Finnegan’s casket at its viewing site. Well-known, local performer Patrick McAllorum, will start the night off with his rendition of Finnegan’s Wake. At this point, audience members can view Finnegan for $1 and tell him a joke or funny story. If Finnegan laughs, the teller wins a free drink. Jack Ferry, Sr., Cecil Tull and Lee Gerachis will return as the night’s Finnegans. Viewing times will be displayed at Morley Hall. Audience participation will be encouraged throughout the evening. In addition to the opportunity to raise Finnegan from the dead with laughter, there will be a sing-along and a Keening

contest. Wealthy Irish would hire professional mourners called Keeners to cry for their dearly departed. Contestants will be judged on volume, style and feeling as they compete for cash prizes. “Last year we had a wonderful time. Patrick had the audience singing and smiling all night long and the Pipes and Drums were awe-inspiring and moving,” said Cathy Gallagher, president of the Friends of WCDC, the auxiliary that supports the mission of the Developmental Center. “We had so many nice comments from people who attended the first wake that we expecting a great crowd. This year all our entertainment is sponsored by Kirk Burbage and the Burbage Funeral Home.” Admission is $20. Happy hour prices will be available and the Seacrets kitchen will be offering an Irish menu. WCDC provides employment opportunities, day habilitation training, residential services and community-based supports for adults who live with a disability in Worcester, Somerset and Wicomico counties. For information about WCDC’s programs or Finnegan’s Wake, call 410632-2382. WCDC is a member of the United Way of the Lower eastern shore, the Ocean City, Berlin, Ocean Pines and Snow Hill Chambers of Commerce and the Berlin Chapter of BNI.

The second annual Finnegan’s Wake will take place in Seacrets' Morley Hall on Saturday, March 1. The event is a mock Irish funeral. Cecil Tull lays in the casket as Finnegan last year. Guests can pay $1 to tell Finnegan a joke. If he laughs, the joke teller wins a free drink.

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PAGE 56

Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

SENIOR SLANT

DINNER AND DANCE Everyone had a great time during Ocean City’s annual Valentine’s dinner and dance for seniors at the Clarion Hotel on 101st Street. PHOTOS COURTESY IRISH KEMP


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 57

Calendar sons from 6-7 p.m., open dancing 7-10 p.m. No cover charge. Info: DC Hand Dance Club, 302-541-0728.

Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

FRI. Feb. 21 BINGO — Knights of Columbus, 9901

Coastal Highway (rear of St. Luke’s Church) in Ocean City. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games begin at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments for sale. Info: 410-524-7994.

POURING FOR A CURE — Relay for Life of

North Worcester team Marvel’s Marvels will guest bartend at Sisters, 113 N. Main St., Berlin, 6 p.m. A percentage of all sales will benefit American Cancer Society. Info: Jean Holloway, 410-422-4337.

BERLIN MAIN STREET PROGRAM FUNDRAISER — Burley Oak Brewery,

Sweet Adeline’s, under the direction of Carol Ludwig, meets each Monday from 7-9 p.m., at the Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, White Horse Park. Women interested in learning the craft of a cappella singing welcome. Info: 410-208-4171.

HAND DANCING — House of Welsh, 1106

Coastal Highway, Fenwick, Del. Free les-

10016 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, 6 p.m. Live music, guest bartenders and Chinese auction. Proceeds will help revive the visitor center, fund Berlin events and the beautification of downtown.

WED. Feb. 26

BINGO — Every Wednesday at Ocean

City Elks Lodge 2645, 138th Street and Sinepuxent Avenue, rear of the Fenwick

Inn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start 6:30 p.m. Food is available. Open to the public. No one allowed in the hall under 18 years of age during bingo. Info: 410-250-2645.

DELMARVA HAND DANCING CLUB —

Meets every Wednesday at Peaky’s Rooftop Restaurant & Bar, located in the Fenwick Inn, 13801 Coastal Highway, Ocean City. Beginner and intermediate lessons, 5:30-6:30 p.m., followed by dancing 6:30-9 p.m. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ’50s, ’60s and Carolina beach music. All are welcome. Discounted food and drink prices. Info: 302-337-3638.

Continued on Page 58

SAT. Feb. 22 CHILI COOK-OFF, SECOND ROUND —

American Legion Post 166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, 1-4 p.m. Chili, hot dogs, cornbread, salad, cheese, bread, draft beer and soda. Tickets cost $15 in advance or $20 at the door. Tickets: 410-289-3166.

ZUMBA FUNDRAISER — A Zumbathon will be held 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Most Blessed Sacrament School, 11242 Race Track Road, Berlin. Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 day of event and are available at WOC Fitness. Benefits Kim Marshall and her children. Her husband recently lost his battle with cancer. PANCAKE BREAKFAST — VFW, Post 8296, 104 66th St., bayside in Ocean City, 8-11 a.m. A $5 donation for all-you-can-eat pancakes or 2-2-2, two eggs, two pancakes and two bacon slices, includes coffee and juice. Bloody Marys cost $3. Info: 410-524-8196.

FARMERS MARKET — White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway in Ocean Pines, 8 a.m. to noon. Produce, farm fresh eggs, organic goods, herbs, fresh cut flowers, soaps, jelly, homemade baked goods, honey and more.

SUN. Feb. 23

CONCERT AND HYMN FESTIVAL — A benefit concert and hymn festival for St. Paul’s by the Sea Episcopal Church recovery will be held at Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., Ocean City, 4 p.m. An offering will be taken. Info: June Todd, 410-289-7373.

MON. Feb. 24 DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS MEETS WEEKLY — The Delmarva Chorus,

THANK YOU

FOR YOUR OVERWHELMING SUPPORT OF OUR

1ST ANNUAL EMPTY BOWL PROJECT

All funds beneit the programs and services of Diakonia & the Art League of Ocean City.

OUR SINCERE THANKS TO. . .

The many VOLUNTEERS from Diakonia, the Art League of OC and the Community The RESTAURANTS and BUSINESSES

ATLANTIC HOTEL * BAYSIDE WINE & SPIRITS * BAYVILLE PACKAGE STORE * BULL ON THE BEACH * COASTAL TENTS * COFFEE BEANERY * D3 CORP * DESSERTS BY RITA DUNKIN DONUTS * FENWICK WINE CELLARS * FOOD LION * FRESCOS * THE GLOBE HARRIS TEETER * HOOKED * LIGHTHOUSE SOUND * LIQUID ASSETS * PANERA BREAD PICKLES PUB & GRILL * SEACRETS * SUPERFRESH

Special Thanks to the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore for sponsoring the event through a grant, Ceramic Director Erik Hertz and his assistant Monika Lilley, the staff of the Art League and the local newspapers for the wonderful PR . . . and to all who attended!

With sincere appreciation and gratitude,

The Empty Bowl Committee Rina Thaler, Executive Director – The Art League of Ocean City Claudia Nagle, Executive Director - Diakonia


Ocean City Today

PAGE 58

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

CALENDAR Continued from Page 57 TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING — Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Wednesdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Info: 302-436-3682.

SIMPLE SUPPER — Knights of Colum-

bus, 9901 Coastal Highway (rear of St. Luke’s Church) in Ocean City, last Wednesday of each month, 5-7 p.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $2 for children 11 and younger. Reservations: 410-5247994.

THURS. Feb. 27

BEACH SINGLES — Every Thursday,

EXHIBIT WINNERS The winners of the February “Interiors”-themed exhibit at the OC Center for the Arts were announced during a reception at the 94th Street facility Feb. 7. Pictured, from left, are exhibit judge, Ed Brown; Anne Hanna, third place; David Simpson, first place; Dean Peterson, honorable mention and Marian Bickerstaff, ALOC president.

Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour at Harpoon Hanna’s, Route 54 and the Bay, Fenwick Island, Del., 4 p.m. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577; Kate, 410-524-0649; or Dianne, 302-5414642.

REPUBLICAN MEETING AND LUNCHEON — The Republican Women of Worcester County will have a general meeting and luncheon at the Dough Roller Restaurant, 4103 Coastal Highway, Ocean City. Speaker Lynne McAllorum of Broker Benefit Services will talk about The Affordable Care Act. Doors open at 10:30 a.m., meeting starts at 11 a.m. Cost is $15. Info: 410-208-9767 or annlutz@verizon.net.

WORCESTER COUNTY NAACP MEETING—

A Benefit Concert a nd Hym n Festival for

Berlin Multipurpose Center, 130 Flower St., 6:30-7:30 p.m. Worcester County Health Department’s Lower Shore Insurance Assistance Program staff will offer guidance through the health insurance application process. Info: 443-9446701 or 410-632-9230.

BINGO — American Legion Post 166,

Recovery

S u n d a y , F eb. 23 ~ 4 p.m.

at the Atlanti c Uni ted Met hodi st Church 105 Fourth Stre et, Oce an Ci ty , MD r in Fea tu

g the

Wicomico Presbyterian Churc h Choi r Susan Zimmer - Organ ist

For more i n format ion con ta ct June R . Todd, 410-2 89 -7 373 An offering wil l be receiv ed

2308 Philadelphia Ave., in Ocean City, every Thursday, year round. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to the public. Info: 410289-3166.

ONGOING EVENTS

AUMC THRIFT SHOP — Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., in Ocean City. Now open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Info: 410289-4458. Crossword answers from page 19


Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

PAGE 59

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Ocean City Today

FEBRUARY 21, 2014


Commentary Opening on Sept. 2 fits for county OUR OPINION

Worcester County Public Schools will open the 2014-15 school year on September 2, a day after Labor Day. School Board President Bob Rothermel who got it right, saying, “The reality is, it’s where we live.” That reality more than justifies Worcester as being the only Maryland county to open after Labor Day. The county was also the last to join the pre-Labor Day school opening date five years ago in 2009. Whether anyone outside of Ocean City wants to admit it, the resort area is the engine that drives the county’s budgets. OC Mayor Rick Meehan said earlier this month half of the county school’s budget comes from the Town of Ocean City and “the more revenue we produce, the more successful we are (and) the more money will be available.” This isn’t Montgomery County nor is it Baltimore or even Anne Arundel County where a diversity of employment opportunities thrives and wealthy industrial contributors to the tax base go to work each day. In both high-density suburban areas around Baltimore and the Washington Beltway, a large number of federal government employees feed the tax base. Ocean City has ostensibly four months of real opportunity to generate revenue for its residents’ salaries, to work into the profit margins of shops, grocery stores, realty agencies, restaurants and so many resort-supportive businesses. The region relies on the tourists who come from both the Baltimore and Washington areas. Worcester County’s largest employer is its school system. Many teachers work summer jobs in the resort, as do high school students. It’s money for their families, but it’s also much needed revenue for Worcester County. What works for the other counties doesn’t have to work for Worcester. And what works for Worcester doesn’t have to be the solution for the rest of Maryland. But here in this area of lower Eastern Shore, the school season needs to open Sept. 2, the day after the tourist season begins to end.

Feb. 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

Page 61

Olympics will be over soon, yay! THE PUBLIC EYE

Catching up with Mayor Meehan EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

By Phil Jacobs

It’s an early February afternoon. Another day of guess what of freezing cold weather. Ocean City has already experienced snowcovered roads and ice flows in the waters. Still, the state hasn’t even had its heaviest snowfall, and Atlanta drivers don’t know yet about the ice storm that will soon paralyze the city. In other words, it’s winter. The last thing on most minds at least west of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge is summer vacation. The thought of diving into the summer water and cooling off from June, July and August heat…well, that’s months away for most. Yet on this day in arguably our coldest month of the year, Ocean City Mayor Rick Meehan is already thinking of summer. Fact is, he started on the summer of 2014 the day after Labor Day, 2013, the unofficial last day of summer. The work for the summer is done during the coldest, darkest days of the year. His goal, once Memorial Day arrives, is to be able to walk from his downtown home to the beach, hear the sounds of visitors, see lots of beach umbrellas by the ocean and know that the city was ready to go from small town to the state’s second largest populated city day after day, week after week. “I don’t stop a whole lot,” he told me, “not even in February.” On some nights when there are few cars on Ocean Highway, it is for the mayor, “a yeararound town.” This off-season has been about perhaps more visible pieces of news besides the snow. We watched how the town worked to help ease the tragedy of the St. Paul’s by The Sea fatal fire and the loss of its pastor. We still see DelMarva Power replacing wooden utility poles with taller, stronger metallic replacements. There’s been the debate over the Convention Center’s new performing arts center; new restrooms are built on the beach near the inlet. There’s so much more during the offseason, which leads Meehan and the City Council towards March and three or four days of budget

hearings. Most people I talk to think of surfing in Ocean City, playing with their children on the beach, chasing seagulls or playing mini-golf. All of the work the mayor, city council and town employees have done is awaiting the tourists. For those who live here, their input is important. Go to a Town Council meeting, and respect is given to any resident or visitor who has a comment or question for the Mayor. Ask people about the Mayor, and there’s one anecdote that gets shared a lot. He returns emails and phone calls within minutes. “Yeah, especially if I read an email and someone is upset about something,” he said, “I know that for them to hear back from the mayor makes a great deal of difference.” He has had several experiences where people have emailed saying, “we’re never coming back to Ocean City.” But when the mayor calls or emails back, their words change to “see you next year.” In public, he said, “If the mayor takes time to meet with our visitors, it means an awful lot to them and to me.” But still, it’s February. The mayor showed me his schedule. He’s full-time in real estate and full-time as mayor. There’s appointment after appointment, day after day. And this he said is one of those months that come after the holiday season when activities are a bit slower. If there’s one area of life that he sees as a game changer for many mayors everywhere, it’s technology, which he called “the dictator of change. There is so much out there that we have done and we can do in Ocean City. But at this point, we know what the next steps are going to be. It really hits the ground running when we do our media tour. We start at 7 a.m. each day and make eight stops (at newspapers and TV and radio stations), and it is intense.” The media tour takes the mayor to Baltimore and Washington, D.C. He’s been the mayor since 2006. It’s a cold day in February. The mayor is running his city in the off-season. But he seems so at peace. The summer is a short time away.

Please tell me the Olympics are over soon. Whenever that happens, I’ll do a 720 Japan or a 545 Magilla By Gorilla or Stewart whatever they call it, folDobson lowed by a triple Lutz/double axle/quad salchow in my toe-looping stocking feet right there on the living room floor. Don’t get me wrong. The Olympic games are one of the world’s preeminent sporting events, especially women’s hockey (as opposed to the men’s, which is really the NHL vs. the NHL) and the snowboard cross events. The latter, at least, is easy to understand: people slide down extremely bumpy hills until whoever survives wins. What bothers me most about the Olympics, other than it interrupts my regular viewing schedule (thus leaving me to wonder when the charmingly felonious Boyd Crowder is going to blow up the Detroit mob on “Justified,”) are the nauseatingly let’s-create-somedrama interviews by NBC. “So, Alexi, you finished out of the medals, embarrassed yourself, your family and friends. How do you feel at this moment? Bad? Distraught? No? Well, remember the fun you used to have as a little boy with your dog Sparky 20 years ago, before you spent five years in an iron lung? As you rolled down the course on every appendage except your feet, didn’t you hear little Sparky yipping up there in heaven wanting to be with you except that he can’t because he’s, well, dead? Yes, we have tears here! Close-up shot now!” I can’t stand it. In baseball, for instance, I am familiar with the players. After all, who doesn’t know that Jemile Weeks only batted .221 in his last full season and has an on-base percentage of just .319, yet the Continued on Page 62


Letters Thanks to those attending Kupboard meet and greet

Editor, I want to thank everyone that attended the Meet and Greet for our newly formed organization, Kenille’s Kupboard Pet Pantry and Rescue, Inc. It was held on Jan. 18 at Adolfo’s on the Ocean. Owners Kim and Dave (Kanook) Griffin and their wonderful staff provided us with a delicious buffet and great hospitality. The purpose of our organization is to assist families in need by providing food and medical assistance for their pets. This enables them to keep their pets in their loving homes and not have to be surrendered for adoption elsewhere. The many food and monetary donations we received will certainly give us a great start with helping as many families as possible. The community support for this new endeavor means a lot. Kenille Davies Ocean City

Keep voting for Berlin

Editor, About the same time the railroad came to Berlin a man wrote a short children’s story that exemplifies optimism and hard work. This short story has been read by millions and will come to mind. As Berlin has gone through a renaissance with its smart development while keeping its historical flavor and past in mind, it has become a popular place to live, raise a family, have a business or just visit. Thanks to some believers, visionaries and people who really cared

to the editor

about Berlin, the area is alive and now an Eastern shore must see. The area is scenic with unlimited activities. The public schools excel for the children and the sports programs and activities are endless. This process began a few decades ago by people who were optimistic and hard working. Many of these visionaries, sadly, are no longer with us. Their names are known and the citizens, businesses, communities and visitors should be thankful. As that children’s short story reminds us all, to be successful in anything you must be optimistic and work hard. The book I was referring to was written in the early 1900’s when Berlin when just on the verge of becoming a thriving area. The author was Watty Piper and the book was “The Little Engine That Could”. Now, Berlin is proving it is “The Little Town That Could”. Keep voting for Berlin and make everyone in the area even more proud of a special place to live, visit and enjoy. Jay Stulz Ocean Pines

Warm welcome at senior center

Feb. 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

Editor, In February, 2011 and again 2012 I wrote a brief article to the Ocean City Today newspaper expressing my appreciation for the welcome my wife and I received and functions in which we were invited to participate at the Worcester County Ocean City Senior Center. I wrote that letter in hopes to encourage seniors living near Ocean City to visit the center located under

a huge water tower next to the convention center off Coastal Highway at 40th Street and enjoy the services it had to offer that is available to them. Though circumstances prevented our visit in 2013 my wife and I are once again this year visiting OC and returning to the center with hopes of reconnecting with people we previously met there. We did just that, almost as though time had not passed us by … and we shared exciting yells of reconnection. Names were forgotten but faces were recognized right away and names reintroduced. As with our previous visits, we received a cordial recognizing welcome from the Center’s Activity Director Ann Toney when we signed in at the door and entered the dining room. My wife joined with women in the huge activity room working on some projects and playing games while I joined the pool players in the twotable poolroom. Thank you Ann for your welcoming and friendly greeting. You are truly an asset to the OC Center. Perry and Pat Phipps Severn, Md.

Unfortunate way to dispose of trash

Editor, It is unfortunate that the Town of Ocean City took this route to dispose of its trash, because the reality of "waste to energy" incineration schemes is a toxic soup of air emissions by-products that are forced onto communities near the incinerator and downwind. Heavy metals like arsenic and mercury fall back to earth and into waterways. It only takes 3

Page 62 grams of mercury to contaminate a 60-acre lake. On the other hand, if Ocean City (and Worcester County) were to move toward a true 'zero waste' goal, an entire local economy in composting, recycling and re-use could be developed that would not only create hundreds of year round jobs right here, by establishing a 'green' re-use manufacturing industry, but would also relieve Worcester County of its pending landfill build-out. I refer to the July 2013 report from the 'Institute for Local Self-Reliance' titled "Pay Dirt" which clearly shows how Maryland could move away from overburdened landfills or trash incineration and instead create local economies that would be based on product reuse. One of the “Pay Dirt” authors, Benda Platt, said, "Reuse manufacturing is even more jobintensive than recycling. It is a knowledge-based industry, with a premium placed on accurate sorting and pricing, and good inventory management. Re-use operations employ more people per ton than manufacturing enterprises." As I write this letter, the Maryland General Assembly is considering a number of legislative bills that will take Maryland farther away from sustainable, job-creating, ‘greener’ trash composting and reuse industries and instead pollute Maryland's Renewal Energy Portfolio Standard with nonsustainable/non-renewable inventories that will lead our state down a road of smoke stack filled horizons and greater pollution to our communities and waterways. Kathy Phillips Ocean City

THE PUBLIC EYE







 

Continued from Page 61 dumb Orioles think he might work out at second base. I mean, who doesn’t know that? But I don’t know Alexi from Sparky, may he rest in peace, and won’t get to know him no matter what the interviewers do, barring an on-air physical or something (Please turn your head and … how do you feel now?”) My feeling is these interviews would be worth watching if the interviewers had to conduct their business while sitting in the goal during women’s hockey practice. “So, Alexi, how do you feel …” WHACK! “Unghghgh.” And about those national medal counts. With everyone playing wherever for whatever country they choose these days, does it matter? I would be more excited if NBC said, “The citizens of whatever country wins the most medals get free beer and pizza.” I’d throw down a double-cork 1440 for that.


FEBRUARY 21, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 63


Ocean City Today

PAGE 64

FEBRUARY 21, 2014

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2/21/14 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

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