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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.NET

JANUARY 19, 2018

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By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) After the Maryland General Assembly opened its session last week by overriding Gov. Larry Hogan’s 2017 veto of mandated paid sick leave, area legislators and the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce are continuing efforts to mitigate the impact on businesses that depend on seasonal employees. Last Thursday, the House voted 88-52 to override Hogan’s veto of HB01, the Maryland Healthy Working Families Act. The Senate followed suit the following day with a 30-17 vote. The legislation will become effective within 30 days, retroactive to Jan. 1, although the potential to delay the start date by several months is under discussion in Annapolis. Montgomery County is exempted from the bill as it already requires businesses to provide paid sick leave. The new law stipulates that businesses with 15 or more employees who clock in for at least 12 hours per week must give them one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 worked. Businesses with 14 or fewer employees would be required to provide unpaid sick leave at the same rate. Following the veto override last week, Sen. Jim Mathias said the Maryland Attorney General is being consulted as work began to develop an emergency bill to extend the legislation start date. “This isn’t over,” he said. “This is a work in progress.” Mathias also noted the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation has yet to write regulations for See EFFORT Page 3

BRIAN GILLILAND/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Minutes after this photo was taken of the Instigator returning to harbor with a load of black sea bass last Friday, it ran aground because of increased shoaling in the waterway.

Stuck again, fish on board Capt. says inlet talks continue to produce shallow outcomes

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) There have been meetings, there have been talks, there have been “action items” and there has been dredging, but boats are still running aground in the state’s only ocean port, and the commercial fishermen have had just about enough. “We’ve been battling this for five years, I just don’t know what to do,” said Mike Coppa of the fishing vessel Instigator. “What happened [on Friday] was a crock of crap. We’re told they have to study this, they have to study that, but in the meantime, the boat has to get from point A to point B.” The Instigator attempted to navigate the inlet around 4 p.m. on Friday. It was a challenge from the start, because the recent storm had caused the buoys to be removed. Buoys 10-12, which marks the major trouble spot in the inlet,

PHOTO COURTESY MIKE COPPA

Crews work into the night to sort fish caught by the Instigator after it had run aground in the Ocean City inlet. If the fish weren’t processed quickly enough, they would have to sit an extra day due to the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday.

had been replaced by the time the Instigator tried to return, but couldn’t prevent the boat with its thousands of pounds of black sea bass from hitting bottom and running aground on its way back in. Merrill Campbell, of Southern Connection Seafood, said he’s been to meeting after

meeting and nothing is being done. “I’ve got guys waiting to unload the boat. I just want to be able to work. We waited for high tide and everything,” he said. Commercial fishermen, in a workaround to the current See DREDGING Page 5

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) With all signs pointing toward an opening next week, Worcester County’s first medical marijuana dispensary, Positive Energy, is set to hold an information session for prospective patients in O c e a n Pines on Saturday. “ I ’ m really ex- Lyndsey Odachowski cited for the opportunity to let the community get to know us,” Lyndsey Odachowski, general manager, said. “It’s one thing to read about us, but it’s another thing to be able to approach us in a way that can be easily absorbed. That way people can understand what it is we’re doing here and can maybe support us.” The meeting is scheduled to start at 3:30 p.m. in the Assateague Room of the Ocean Pines Community Center at 235 Ocean Parkway. “I’m calling it ‘New Year, New Medicine,’ and it’s going to explain what the medicine can and can’t do for you, and how you can get it,” she said. During the presentation, expected to last between 30 and 45 minutes, Odachowski said she would explain, in depth, the merits of medical marijuana. Following her presentation will be a question-and-answer period. “You’ll be able to learn about the different benefits and the different ways to consume the medicine,” she said. “I’ve talked to people who don’t like the smell or don’t want to smoke — and that’s See APPLICATIONS Page 4


Ocean City Today

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Effort begins to delay sick leave bill impact Continued from Page 1 paid sick benefits which, if for no other reason, would likely delay the start date. The topic continues to concern Ocean City business owners, who each summer hire more than 5,000 J-1 workers. These workers generally receive 120-day visas. Delegate Mary Beth Carozza, who voted to sustain Hogan’s veto, said the focus remains on mitigating the fiscal impact on seasonal employers. “There should be a delay in implementation … but this is in addition to the sense of urgency in … providing some targeted relief to our small businesses,” she said. Calling the legislation flawed, in a press release Hogan called for lawmakers to find “common sense” solutions. “We all agree that hardworking

Marylanders need and deserve access to paid leave,” he said. “Our administration is committed to providing these benefits without crushing small mom-and-pop businesses and killing thousands of jobs.” In light of the veto override, Hogan established the Office of Small Business Regulatory Assistance through executive order on Monday. The new office will serve as a “clearinghouse of information,” for statewide services and report on compliance problems, as well as propose policy improvements. Mathias said he appreciates and supports the move by Hogan to create address employer concerns. “I’ll work with that,” he said. “It’s good to see how quickly he’s moving.” Mathis said paid sick leave legis-

lation has been under discussion in Maryland for half a dozen years. “In 2016, I addressed our business community and said it would pass in 2017,” he said. “I asked them to give me their needs to make it work.” Although the initial bill allowed earned sick leave to be used after 90 days of employment, Mathias responded to concerns from resort businesses that requested an extension to 120 days. While the approved legislation sets the usage date short of that mark at 106 days, Mathias negotiated a stipulation permitting employers to require a doctor’s note for sick leave used prior to 120 days of employment. “I believe I achieved the compromise,” he said. Carozza said she would continue working with the Hogan administra-

tion and small business leaders to fix the most “egregious” parts of the legislation. “The bottom line is that we need to fix this bill now so our employers stay here in Maryland, and we don’t lose our businesses and workers to other states,” she said. According to a senate fiscal and policy note on the bill, fewer than 20 percent of businesses in the state have 15 or more employees, but they employ 86 percent of workers. Also it said approximately 84,000 Maryland businesses that have fewer than 15 employees would be required to provide unpaid sick leave. According to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, during 2016 about 61 percent of Marylanders employed in private industry received paid sick leave, as did 92 percent of those with state and local government.

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JANUARY 19, 2018

Tinus looks to capture house seat By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) Political outsider Ed Tinus, who announced his candidacy last February to challenge State Sen. Jim Mathias (D-38) in 2018, re-filed last month after Delegate Mary Beth Carozza (R-38C) entered the state senate race and is now focused on filling her vacated House seat. “I don’t fit the mold of either party,” he said. “I want citizens to be engaged in political process.” Although running as a Republican, Tinus, a master upholsterer who lives in

Whaleyville, has engaged in past political contests as an Independent and Democrat. In 2016, Tinus ran for U.S. Senate from Maryland as a DemocEd Tinus rat and lost the primary to Chris Van Hollen, before losing as an independent write-in candidate. In 2012, the outcome was the same when he challenged incumbent Sen. Ben Cardin. The western shore native who

moved across the bay nearly a quarter century ago, said he “got his feet wet” working for Baltimore city under then Mayor William Donald Schaefer. “I gained insights on how the ‘good old boys’ worked,” he said. “While working for the City of Baltimore, I saw examples of ‘creative-financing,’ and learned what political parties traditionally do for pre-selected candidates.” Tinus wants to use technology, specifically an “Ed app,” to engage the public with the legislative process to foster “direct Democracy.” See TINUS Page 5

Applications on session’s agenda Continued from Page 1 totally fair. We have things, like lotions and balms, that you would never know contained marijuana unless you looked at the label.” The dispensary’s clinical director, Nurse Practitioner Vanessa Adams, and Dr. William “Eddie” Gunn of Shore Wellness and Med Spa, a certifying practitioner, will be on hand to answer questions. The process for obtaining medical cannabis in Maryland is somewhat inverted from the traditional doctorpatient relationship, where a patient brings a complaint and the doctor

prescribes medicine. A patient, having registered with the Maryland Medical Cannabis Commission, schedules an appointment for certification from a provider, also registered with the state. The patient describes to the provider a result they would like to achieve, and if that matches one of the state’s qualifying conditions, a certification is issued. That certification is taken to the dispensary by the patient, who determines, with assistance from the dispensary staff, what product best suits their needs. “We’re going to provide the simple

intake forms we need at the meeting, so if you’re issued a certification we can take you right into the back where the products are,” Odachowski said. “There’s also a state-mandated form we need to certify the patient will use the products responsibly by promising not to drive, etc.” Registration for medical marijuana is open in the state and Odachowski noticed something about the people first in line for treatment. “They’re all over 40,” she said. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/PositiveEnergyOC.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

PAGE 5

Tinus campaigning for seat OC seeks court’s opinion in growing District 38C race on county tax differential Continued from Page 4 “The Ed app would expose a bill to volunteers to read and red flag issues that don’t suit us,” he said. Simplified legislation in the form of single-subject bills, written for ease of comprehension, is what Tinus envisions. “The content in bills is too much to digest,” he said. Tinus said the electorate should be allowed further input to regulate government activities. “It’s our tax money; we should have a say in how it’s spent,” he said. “We need methods to give people a chance to vote on each bill.” Under the proposed Ed app, Tinus said voters in District 38C would experience total transparency with an opt out option for “one-size-fits-all,” legislation.

“Even if it passes the General Assembly, it would not be law here in this district,” he said. “My question is if you want to vote with me?” Tinus admits the concept of providing citizens that kind of conduit into lawmaking might be denounced by the political parties. “Lobbying groups won’t be able to approach me,” he said. “When my term is over, my bank account will show what I got paid through the … state of Maryland and nothing more.” Tinus currently faces two challenges for the Republican nomination after James Shaffer filed on Jan. 8 and Joe Schanno joined the group last Friday. City Councilman Wayne Hartman also has declared his intention to run. The filing deadline is Feb. 27, with primary elections on June 28. The general election will be on Nov. 6.

Ocean City Today Staff Report (Jan. 19, 2018) The Town of Ocean City has filed suit against the Worcester County Commissioners seeking a declaratory judgment regarding the resort’s right to a split tax schedule that would levy one property rate on resort property owners and another on county properties. The suit, filed Tuesday in Worcester County Circuit Court, doesn’t ask the court to impose what is known as a tax differential, only whether it’s entitled to a separate tax under Maryland law. “Ocean City is challenging the property tax statues that differentiate between municipalities,” City

Solicitor Guy Ayres said. “It was filed on Tuesday and nobody has been served yet.” Worcester County Public Information Officer Kim Moses confirmed Ayres’ statement. “We are aware of the action, but haven’t been served yet,” Moses said. Once the county has been served, Moses said a response would be prepared. For years, Ocean City’s mayor and City Council have pressed for a differential, which would recognize the multiple county services resort property owners pay for but don’t use because resort government provides those same services. See RESORT Page 16

Dredging ranking system one complication Continued from Page 1 situation, have waited for high tide to return to port. While it may delay the catch for a few hours, it’s a small price to pay relative to not being able to sell anything at all. Which also added to Friday’s pressure — with Martin Luther King Day on Monday, the fish markets were closed. So if the Instigator couldn’t unload her catch on Friday, the fish would have to sit until Tuesday before they could attempt to sell them. The Instigator eventually found mooring space next to the Coast Guard station downtown, and brought up a smaller boat to help unload the catch. Campbell said the work crew of 20 finished unloading at 11:30 p.m. Friday night. The Army Corps of Engineers was

originally scheduled to perform Assateague bypass work with a few days of inlet-specific work in early February, according to Chris Gardener, corps spokesman. Gardner said the schedule has been changed, with the dredge Murden returning in early February to perform 5-7 days of inlet-specific work. The bypass work has been pushed to March, he said. “Everyone we call is the same way — everyone is nice. I don’t care about niceness — I want to get over that hump,” Coppa said. “I’m working to feed people and I don’t know how to do it.” Complicating matters is the ranking system used by governmental agencies to determine funding, and by extension, attention. Since access to the har-

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JANUARY 19, 2018

County rejects raises for lower paid workers Worcester has experienced nearly 20 percent drop in staff over last 18 months

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) In the last 18 months, Worcester County government has lost about 20 percent of its workforce for a variety of reasons, but also has had trouble filling a number of long-term vacancies, according to a report by Human Resources Director Stacey Norton. Norton delivered her report as part of a special work session on county salaries following the commissioners’ regular meeting on Tuesday. County Administrator Harold Higgins said the county staff’s budget priority for this year was salaries above all other concerns, while also remaining realistic about funding opportunities to pay for any increases. Higgins said he knew it was an election year and there would be no tax increases to help offset any requested expenditure increases from county departments. During the budget process, expenditure requests frequently outpace the county’s ability to pay for them, requiring the commissioners to make cuts. However, the hiring problems are so dire they required Norton to make a mid-year salary increase request to

help fill the ranks. The proposal pre- the budget process, when that money pared by Norton targeted the lowest- might be more useful elsewhere. paid employees first, and wouldn’t “We sit here and laud department require any new spending from the heads for cleaning the roads, and they commissioners. didn’t do it alone,” Commissioner Joe “After conferring with Budget Of- Mitrecic said. ficer Kathy Whited, we have deterThe people doing the heavy lifting, mined that these reclassifications can putting “shovels to the sidewalk” be funded in our current budget due were making $12 per hour, Mitrecic to savings from current employee re- said. tirements and vacant positions,” Nor“We’re going to lose people beton wrote in her cause we don’t have proposal. the salaries,” Com‘We’re going to lose The total cost to missioner President people because we don’t implement this part Diana Purnell said. have the salaries.’ of the plan is about “The bottom line is $291,000. Commissioner President we need to get betThe plan focused ter salaries.” Diana Purnell on four concerns: Commissioner compliance with Chip Bertino saw the federal minimum wage, the posi- the logic, but didn’t fancy the timing. tions with the highest turnover, the “I understand the need, but I have positions with the lowest pay and set- a problem doing it now instead of at ting a minimum rate for supervisor budget time. The trouble I see is that positions. we saved it, so now we think we can In total, 39 county positions would spend it,” he said. be affected by this part of the plan. If Commissioner Merrill Lockfaw implemented, the changes would was concerned with Roads Division have gone into effect immediately, workers who would accept employgiving some of the county’s lowest- ment with the county, get trained for paid workers an immediate boost. a commercial driver’s license, and Future phases would work their way up the ladder to all county staff. Commissioner Jim Bunting was the harshest critic of the idea, and said he was not comfortable spending $290,000 so close to the beginning of

then leave immediately after earning the license for a higher-paying job elsewhere. Lockfaw said he would like to see some kind of time commitment attached to training, as is done in the Sheriff’s Office with the police academy. However, the academy is considered outside training, Norton said, and the commercial driver’s license classes are performed internally. To change the process would require a massive policy overhaul, she said. Commissioner Bud Church said the county gets what it pays for. If the rate is eight or nine dollars per hour, the work will reflect that salary, he said. “We have to start getting better people,” Church said. Commissioner Vice President Ted Elder was present for much of the discussion, but had to leave before the motion to proceed with the plan was made by Church and seconded by Mitrecic. The vote split 3-3, with Purnell joining Mitrecic and Church in favor, and with Bunting, Bertino and Lockfaw against.

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) During the Worcester County Board of Education meeting on Tuesday afternoon, board members approved a 2018-2019 school calendar. The first day of school is set for Sept. 4, with winter break taking place from Dec. 24 to Jan. 1 and spring break following from April 19-22. The last day of school is scheduled for June 13, depending on the three inclement

weather days. This calendar received more than 55 percent of the overall vote. In October, a committee of 30 students, parents, teachers and administrators developed two calendar proposals. A survey was conducted online from Dec. 4-21 to find out which calendar was preferred. There were 896 responses and 96 percent were from employees or parents.

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JANUARY 19, 2018

PAGE 7

OCDC boosts grant program funding limit by 50 percent

Boardwalk locations up to 15th Street, Irwin said. Eligible property owners can apply for: the Façade Improvement Program, which provides funds for exterior improvements, such as siding By Greg Ellison and porches; the Green Building IniStaff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) The Ocean City De- tiatives Program, which assists with velopment Corporation, which has projects such as new Energy Star provided grant assistance for down- rated windows and doors; and the town building improvements for Business Assistance Program which more than 15 years, recently in- selects new and expanding busicreased funding amounts by 50 per- nesses for fixed interior improvecent for a maximum reimbursement ments. “Currently, we have eight facade of $7,500. Executive Director Glenn Irwin projects underway, eight rebuilding said funding is currently available as and two business assistance projpart OCDC’s Façade Improvement, ects,” he said. OCDC also is helping the India Green Building, and Business AssisEmporium, 106 tance initiatives. South Baltimore “These programs ‘Spring is our busiest period Ave., relocate while have really helped its present location to improve the apfor these programs and undergoes renovapearance of downthis funding generally tions, Irwin said. town, and are at the goes very quickly.’ “They’re going to heart of our mission Executive Director go right across the to revitalize downstreet,” he said. town Ocean City … Glenn Irwin “They’ve been there one building at a for four years time,” he said. “We actually kicked a little more money downtown and they have their own … into each project. It’s been capped at niche … it’s not your typical clothing $5,000 and we increased it to store.” OCDC also secured a demolition $7,500.” In the past, OCDC restricted grant for a redevelopment project at grantees to one-time assistance, 16 Baltimore Avenue, with plans to which Irwin said was also recently re- construct a mixed-use four-story structure, including 1,000 square feet vised. “If you’ve received assistance from of first floor retail space and three us over 10 years ago, you can reap- floors of housing above. In December the site plan for 16 ply,” he said. “As long as it’s for a difBaltimore Avenue was approved by ferent improvement.” OCDC must approve projects seek- the Planning and Zoning Commising grants, which can cover one third sion, with a building permit to be of improvement costs for up to submitted soon, Irwin said. Noting that applications are con$7,500, Irwin said. “The application process is simple, sidered on a first come, first served and the programs are easy to work basis, Irwin said the time to act is now. “Get a jump-start on any planned with,” he said. “The building must be at least 25 years old and cannot be a improvements,” he said. “Spring is condominium with more than six our busiest period for these programs and this funding generally goes very units.” The funding is available for com- quickly.” For more information, contact mercial and residential properties within OCDC’s designated area, gen- OCDC at 410-289-7739, or email erally south of 17th Street, as well as glenn@ocdc.org.

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JANUARY 19, 2018

OC to provide thousands of free bike lights

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) Motorists will find it easier to spot J-1 students bicycling at night along Coastal Highway and the Route 50 Bridge this summer after the State Highway Administration confirmed a grant request last week to purchase and install 2,000 bike lights. Councilman Tony DeLuca said following a Green Team meeting last Wednesday that the highway administration emailed him with a bright bit of news.

“We asked them if they could please give us 2,000 lights [because] we said there’s 4,000 J-1 students … and about half of them have bikes,” he said at a council meeting Tuesday. “They wrote back, ‘We think we can make those lights happen.’” To qualify for support from the state highway’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Funding Program, however, the city has to meet one condition: don’t just give the lights to students, install them on the bikes. “So we’re putting a plan together

… [and] it looks like we can make it happen this year,” DeLuca said. DeLuca said the Ocean City Police Department had already acquired approximately 200 bike light kits for its own safety program but could now have an increased total if required. The state highway funding will also allow the city to provide light kits to enhance the efforts of local churches that have programs to recycle bikes, DeLuca said. “We will have them available at City Hall [and] we’re also going to

distribute them to seasonal workers at their orientation meetings,” he said. The Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce will also help in the bike light outreach, DeLuca said. While the bike light kits retail for roughly $15, DeLuca said Continental Cycles CEO Joe Marx was able to cut that figure almost in half. “If we buy in bulk … we can get them for around $8,” he said. “The great thing about these lights is they don’t require tools to put on [and] the batteries should last a season.”

Beach equipment rentals bring bigger haul

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) Renting umbrellas for summer shade remains profitable, judging by the more than $128,000 Ocean City government raised from auctioning off beach equipment franchise rights last month for 13 spots between 34th78th streets. That represents a 25 percent increase over previous contracts. City Clerk Diana Chavis said the winning bidders are awarded threeyear contracts, which can be renewed one time for an annul fee 10

percent greater than the initial contract. During the City Council meeting Tuesday, Chavis said the award of 18 beach rental spots between 28th-84th streets, which included a handful of contract renewals, raised more than $227,000 in annual fees. There was one location, between 72nd-74th streets that failed to solicit a bid during the Dec. 6 auction, Chavis said. The following week, Chavis sent an email to the four successful bidders requesting sealed bids for the

remaining location, which she said yielded one response, from Patrick McLaughlin, who submitted a bid of $917. “This would put him above 50 percent of all the spots, which is not allowed by [city] charter,” she said. Councilman John Gehrig asked Chavis why the limitation existed. “To give other people a chance,” she said. “They come up for renewal every three years.” City Solicitor Guy Ayres said McLaughlin’s bid could be accepted once the code was amended. “You can award the other ones

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tonight,” he said. Following a motion by Gehrig, 12 of 13 first-term contracts were awarded, with the last spot contingent on the charter amendment. Councilman Wayne Hartman said since the sealed bid submitted by McLaughlin was revealed, it should be given preference. “If we do amend, it goes to that bidder,” he said. Council President Lloyd Martin said the increased revenue is a sound fiscal indicator. “It shows our beaches are still worth something,” he said.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

LIKE US ON

PAGE 9

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PAGE 10

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

OC looks for solutions from Annapolis to limit car events New legislation discussed during second meeting of Motor Events Task Force

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) As Ocean City works to eliminate mayhem associated with annual car and motorcycle gatherings, the discussion Wednesday at the second meeting of the recently formed Motor Events Task Force focused on reducing the throngs of spectators who line Coastal Highway. Jim Knapp, National Street Rod Association division director and 37year member, provided his perspective on curtailing dangerous behavior. “We do shows across the country and have been doing this for 50 years,” he said. “We have found it has to be a community effort … police can not do this by themselves.” From Knapp’s perspective, whenever sidewalks are packed with spectators bent on inciting high-horsepower vehicles to engage in reckless behavior, disaster is on the horizon. “The main problem is not specifically the car, but the nut holding the wheel,” he said. Knapp said hotels and condominium buildings could focus on monitoring their parking lots for unauthorized vehicles to discourage spectators from congregating. “I think 95 percent of businesses will buy into it,” he said. “Most people want the events to be here, but they don’t want trouble.” G. Hale Harrison of the Harrison Group Resort Hotels agreed. “We have to work together as a community to get our arms around the problem,” he said. Ocean City Police Chief Ross Buzzuro said state legislators have progressed with a bill to allow jurisdictions to establish temporary special event zones, where much stiffer penalties for motor vehicle violations could be imposed.

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“Right now, the fine schedule is woeful in terms of allowing us to maintain a proper level of public safety,” he said. Mayor Rick Meehan said special events zones would be similar to highway work zones, where traffic fines can be two or three times more than the standard penalty. “Our goal would be to make the whole town a special event zone,” he said. “We plan to go up [to Annapolis] and testify in favor of that legislation. It’s a step and I think it’s a big step.” While Cruisin’ event organizers reviewed plans for a host of associated activities, including concerts at the Performing Arts Center and rev-it-up fun at the U.S. 13 Dragway in Delmar, no similar attractions and distractions seem to have surfaced for the unsanctioned H20 International gathering. Although last summer’s foreign car event was cancelled at the last minute, Meehan said social media posts helped generate an impromptu crowd of thousands, many of whom seemed intent on being disruptive. What troubled Buzzuro was H20i fans’ brazen disrespect for law enforcement. “I think they come here for one reason – to cause havoc in the town of Ocean City,” he said. “There is very little redeeming value with this group and how they conduct themselves. The vast majority of those motorists are just here to violate the law.” Buzzuro said the lawlessness of this particular crowd has worsened, further heightening the importance of legislation establishing special event zones. “Passing this bill will … start to change the tempo of what we’ve been experiencing,” he said. Meehan said the task force would reconvene to continue developing strategies to be bolstered by the lobbying effort in Annapolis. “We need to focus on giving the police department the tools they need,” he said. “We want the public to see we’re working very hard and together.”

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

Bid documents to be readied for new school in Showell County agrees to spend $375,000 to move forward

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) To enter the next phase of construction on the replacement Showell Elementary School, the Worcester County Commissioners approved spending $375,000 to pay for pre-construction and marketing the project to bidders. This will allow the schools to produce documents for bidders, with delivery expected in April, followed by a bid opening in June. Additionally, Superintendent Lou Taylor said, the board of education is set return to the State Board of Public Works to seek additional funding next week. Taylor said the school board received only $2.5 million of a $4.3 million request from the state for the project, and is making a final pitch for the remainder of its request. The schools are not expected to break ground on the project until next year, with a projected completion date of 2021.

PAGE 11

Frontier Town adds zip lines to slide Construction underway to replace 1970s-era features with taller, updated versions

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) While approval was granted and work is underway on replacing Frontier Town’s 1977-era waterslide, the application to increase the height of the slide neglected another attraction situated in the same area: zip lines. At the Worcester County Board of Zoning Appeals meeting last week, this oversight was corrected, and the board agreed to expand the application on behalf of the park to grant an exception to the zip line course, which is on the same tower as the waterslide. Though the two attractions will share space on the same structure, the lines for riders are not expected to interact, Harold Decker, park manager, said. Because the previous waterslide was set at the maximum height for a structure in the code at 45 feet, the park needed a special exception to install the new slide, which will be 50 feet tall, but also includes a canopy

BRIAN GILLILAND/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Work crews are in the process of removing Frontier Town’s 1970’s-era water slide, to be replaced with a newer, taller version. It is expected to be in service for the summer. The slide will require a new staging area, which will also serve as a zip line hub.

pushing it to about 62 feet. The canopy is to provide shade for the attendants while they monitor the ride and riders. Some sections of the new slide are expected to be transparent, and improved safety features like red and green traffic lights to assist rider flow will be installed. The zip line terminus won’t be quite that tall at 56 feet, Hugh Crop-

per, attorney representing the park said. The extra height is to ensure the people starting at the top of the attractions make it to the bottom at the proper rate of speed. “It’s the amount of thrill you want to incur,” Cropper told the board in October when slide height increase was approved.

www.oceancitytoday.net


Ocean City Today

PAGE 12

JANUARY 19, 2018

Trimper’s makes third wish, removes Aladin’s fun house Nostalgic ride reached end of useful life, would cost too much for total restoration

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) Generations of visitors to the Ocean City Boardwalk have explored Aladin’s Lamp fun house at Trimper’s since it was installed in 1975, but those times are over, as the ride was removed last week. Brooks Trimper, family spokesman, said the ride had aged to the point where repairing it didn’t make sense any more. “We restored it several times but it just reached the end of its life,” Trimper said. “We did a major refur-

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bishment about 8-10 years ago to restore the bones of the structure.” They also significantly altered the path through the fun house, cutting it by 40 percent and removing some of the attractions. “We did a lot of work, but it has been deteriorating inside ever since — it needed aesthetic work and the bones had gone bad again,” he said. “The maintenance staff said we needed to do something or we were going to have a problem, including not meeting safety standards.” The family was forced to choose between putting more money into propping up a nostalgic, but aging, attraction or going in a different direction. The family chose the latter. “It was by no means an easy decision — I grew up in that ride. We have customers who are going to miss it but we have to make business decisions as well,” he said. Because of the subject matter, Trimper noted he would get the odd

PHOTO COURTESY BROOKS TRIMPER

Trimper’s Amusements has removed the Aladin’s Lamp fun house, which was first installed during the 1970s. The attraction had simply become too old and too costly to repair.

complaint about the fun house, both in favor and against. He said those comments did not play a part in the removal of the ride. Trimper’s has also replaced a 25year-old Samba Balloon ride for kids with an updated version. The new attraction, along with some reshuffling of other rides, will fill the hole left by

County cuts election board space request nearly in half

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) Refusing space at other Snow Hill locations for a variety of reasons, the Worcester County Board of Elections, priming for the gubernatorial primary in June, will enter lease negotiations for a smaller temporary facility under the supervision of a county commissioner and Chief Administrative Officer Harold Higgins. The negotiations are scheduled to take place at the next Board of Elections meeting on Feb. 7, following a meeting with Higgins and the State Board of Elections scheduled for today. While the board requested 8,000 square feet of combined office and warehouse space for five years, Higgins suggested and the commissioners approved a three-year plan with an accompanying space not-to-exceed 4,500 square feet. Commissioner Jim Bunting made the motion, and added the provision for an unnamed commissioner and Higgins to be present at negotiations. The measure was adopted unanimously. The Board of Elections office, currently at 100 Belt Street, is under consideration for future renovation by the county, according to Higgins. Since the office can’t be occupied during construction, the county and board have been looking for a suitable space. According to Higgins, as far back as 2015 the board has been storing equipment at the Department of Liquor Control warehouse on Snow

Hill Road. The board was given the option to occupy the office space at the warehouse, but declined, because of suspected mold. However, Higgins reported a contractor was employed to determine if mold was present, and the contractor determined simple cleaning would be sufficient. According to Patricia Jackson, election director, the board reviewed eight other properties before settling on the Royal Plus Building in Snow Hill, a stone’s throw from the current office. Jackson suggested leasing 8,000 square feet, composed of 2,400 square feet of office space and 5,600 square feet of warehouse space. Jackson noted that the county’s election equipment is currently stored in Glen Burnie. At the rental rates quoted by real estate agent Gary Weber of Snow Hill, the county would spend $26,400 each year on the office space and $39,200 annually on the warehouse space. The state would reimburse half of the warehouse space rent, according to Jackson. However, Higgins said state payments dating back to the Department of Liquor Control warehouse deal never materialized. He also disputed the need for so much warehouse space and suggested the board could get by with 2,000 square feet. Weber, in a letter to Jackson, said the rental rates he quoted were based on a five-year lease. Based on the commissioners’ actions, those prices could change in the final agreement.

the fun house — at least for this year. “Rides are major, major investments — we would live to buy rides whenever, and we’re always looking to add something new,” Trimper said. But for now, he said, the removal and reshuffling will cover the 2018 season.

Grants awarded to prepare local biz for offshore wind

(Jan. 19, 2018) Devreco, LLC, a Salisbury-based development company has been awarded a $100,000 Offshore Wind Business Development Grant from the Maryland Energy Administration. MEA recently announced awards for both the 2018 Offshore Wind Business and the Offshore Wind Workforce Development grants totaling $900,000. The aim of these grants is to prepare Maryland’s businesses and workforce to participate in the two offshore wind projects, recently approved by the Maryland Public Service Commission. “This grant is giving us the opportunity to leverage our area’s resources to create a supply network center,” said Brad Gillis, principal of Devreco. “Ultimately the project will bring new revenue streams, jobs and training opportunities to the local community, region and state.” Devreco will use the grant funds to plan, design, and permit the construction of offshore wind operations and maintenance centers in West Ocean City. Once complete, these facilities will have the potential to house up to two crew transfer vessels each, Gillis said. The space could also be used for other marine activities such as tourism, charter fishing, and offshore survey vessels. Gillis also said the centers will contribute up to $36 million annually in local economic impact for the projected 20-year operational life of the wind farms. Devreco has teamed with AWB Engineers in Salisbury for the project.


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 13


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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

AGH provides county health update

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) Michael Franklin, Atlantic General Hospital CEO, presented an annual review for 2017 and a look ahead into 2018 for the hospital at the Worcester County Commissioners meeting on Tuesday. Franklin didn’t pull any punches as he began his presentation — Worcester ranks 15th of 24 counties, or the “wrong end of the middle,” he said, in what are called health Michael Franklin factors. With Baltimore City as last in the state, the four lowest-ranked counties in the state are on the shore — Wicomico, Somerset, Dorchester and Caroline counties. Health factors are split into four subheadings: behaviors, clinical care, social and economic and physical environment. Where Worcester hits the most trouble is in behaviors, or the element that relies on people doing the right things

with regards to health. Things like tobacco use, diet and exercise, alcohol and drug use and sexual activity are the risk factors associated with this subheading. Clinical care is access and quality of care to residents. Access to care is measured by a variety of factors, but include insurance enrollment rates and doctor-to-patient ratios. According to Franklin, only 5.6 percent of Worcester adults had no health coverage in 20132014, which is ahead of the state’s 11.7 percent during the same time period. About 21 percent of the county, or about 11,000 people, uses Medicaid, and half those people are adults between the ages of 18-64 Franklin said. As for access to care, Franklin highlighted the ratio between Worcester residents and mental health care providers, at one per 16,833 people. Somerset County, for comparison, has a ratio of one per 85,944 people, in a county with a population of about 26,000. The state average is one per 10,086 people. For primary care, the Worcester ratio is one per 1,667 people against a state average of one per 1,534.

The county fared somewhat better in outcomes, ranking 10th of 24 political subdivisions, which are ranked on quality and length of life. Franklin said he is going to lead the hospital into improving those statistics in 2018 by focusing on four factors: improving population health, enhancing patient experience and outcomes, reducing costs and caring for physicians and providers. One way to meet all four, Franklin noted, is through the various capital programs the hospital has running. Right now, AGH has raised about half of its current $10 million campaign. That money, along with a September bond issue, will help build five facility upgrades, including the Jack Burbage Cancer Care Center, a comprehensive women’s health center, modernization of patient care areas, renovating surgical facilities and expansion of emergency and outpatient centers. Franklin is expected to deliver similar presentations at municipal government meetings over the next few weeks.

Meehan, Mathias protest oil plan

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By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) All across the areas affected by the Department of the Interior’s proposal to open up coastal waters to offshore oil exploration, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is holding public information sessions and soliciting comments. Earlier this week, sessions were held in Annapolis and Dover, Delaware, which constitute the closest meetings to Ocean City itself. A meeting scheduled for Jan. 17 in Richmond, Virginia has been postponed, but no new date has been released. However, materials from those meetings are available online at www.boem.gov/National-ProgramVirtual-Room. That website also provides a direct link to the comments section, allowing users to leave their thoughts on

the proposal after reviewing the information. Nearly 3,200 comments have been submitted so far, and the public comment period is open until March 9. Representing the resort at the meeting in Annapolis were Ocean City mayor Rick Meehan and State Sen. Jim Mathias, who both reaffirmed the resort’s official opposition to the proposal to allow offshore drilling near the Maryland coast. Ocean City passed resolutions in 1974 and 2015 opposing offshore drilling. Mathias said he is preparing a letter to be signed by the entire Eastern Shore delegation to the General Assembly in opposition to the plan, but also sent in an individual letter. “Please allow this letter to serve as notification of my complete opposition to any form of oil exploration drilling in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Maryland, Delaware and Virginia,” the letter reads.

“Also, for any other regional areas in which a coastal accident can cause harm to Maryland’s Atlantic coast and Chesapeake Bay shorelines which impacts environmental and economic health and well being.” Mathias called it a critical health, safety and welfare issue for his constituents. Gov. Larry Hogan also opposes the plan, and directed Attorney General Brian Frosh to “commence and prosecute any viable legal claims, actions or suits against the U.S. government to prevent it.” Del. Mary Beth Carozza said she did not attend the BOEM meeting. Carozza said she attended a meeting of the Kirwan Commission yesterday, which is tasked with examining the funding formula for public schools. Tracey Moriarty, deputy chief of public affairs at BOEM, said about 65 people attended the town hall style meeting.

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By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) The final piece of the puzzle to allow full use of the Mystic Harbour Wastewater Treatment Plant was approved on Tuesday, although a contingency was added to the approval, dependent on grant funding from the federal Department of Agriculture. If everything goes as projected, Deputy Director of Public Works John Ross said, the critical last step — the interconnection between the plant and golf course — will be installed and the treated effluent from the plant could then be used at the Eagle’s Landing golf course this summer.

The bids to complete the interconnection were slightly higher than the budgeted amount, Ross explained, but contingency funds and USDA funds could make up the difference. Ross said he would contact the USDA to seek funding. The approved bid, from Somerset Well Drilling in Westover, Maryland, is about $696,000, but could be reduced further by changing the pump configuration. Exercising this option will save the county about $8,000. Development in Worcester County is dependent on proper water and sewer services, and it’s a goal of the commissioners to remove as many sep-

tic systems in favor of county tie-ins as possible. The Mystic Harbour treatment facility operates at about 220,000 gallons per day of capacity, but can be scaled to 450,000 gpd or even 600,000 gallons of capacity. Ross said previously the county is about 20 years away from needing the 450,000 gallons, and 600,000 is estimated to be 20 years after that. The plant currently uses injection wells to dispose of effluent, or the liquid portions left over from the treatment process, and can only handle 250,000 gallons per day. Spraying the liquid to irrigate the golf course will allow the plant to process more waste.


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

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Court sides with high bidder in county liquor store case

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) A three-part appeal to the Board of License Commissioners’ decision to allow the sale of the Pocomoke Shore Spirits to Kalpesh Patel failed in circuit court, allowing the county to complete its exit from wholesale and retail alcohol sales. Worcester County originally intended to be out of the liquor business by July 1, 2017, but the dispute over the license for the store forced the county to develop a budget of about $1 million to continue operations until the case was settled. Attorney Hugh Cropper brought three challenges to the decision to award a Class A beer, wine and liquor license to a store owned by Patel, which was a condition of the sale. Patel bid $1.175 million for the store and its contents last year. Cropper contended the application to appear before the Board of License Commissioners filed by Kalpesh Patel was completed in bad faith, the need for a store selling beer at that location was exaggerated, and also questioned the semantics of the Class-A license itself. Cropper explained the application was for a beer, wine and liquor license, though sales data provided by Worcester County showed wine was not in high demand for that store, and beer demand was being served by two other stores in the same strip mall. Without proving the demand for all three would be served, the application should be denied, Cropper argued. The application, he argued first, was required to be filled out by resident property owners who are registered voters within the municipality of Pocomoke City. The application required 10 signatures of people certifying Kalpesh Patel is an appropriate person for a liquor license. One of the required fields in the application is a notation of the length of

time the signatory is acquainted with Kalpesh Patel. Patel submitted 16 signatures, all from people who indicated they had “just met” Patel. Cropper argued the standard for a certification could not be met by people who meet the applicant for the first time when collecting signatures. Judge Broughton Earnest disagreed, and said in his opinion that the legislative intent was not to establish a required time limit of acquaintance between the parties, but to provide some kind of reference point. Further, Earnest noted, a resident can know a person by reputation without ever having physically met. Next, Cropper argued the protests of area residents and adjacent business owners, including Pocomoke City Mayor Bruce Morrison, should be enough to disqualify the application. Not so, Earnest said, and noted the past sales records of the store while still under county control demonstrates there is a need in the community for a store at that location. Finally, Cropper parsed the terms beer, wine and liquor in the Class A license, and argued the need demonstrated was for liquor only, as beer and wine sales were relatively weak. Earnest noted the only available licenses in Worcester are for beer only, wine only, beer and wine, and beer, wine and liquor. “Considering the Board [of License Commissioners] looks at the factors in the statue in deciding whether to issue the license and the only license available to sell liquor includes the sales of beer and wine, it would be illogical to think anything but the Board should consider the factors for the license as a whole,” Earnest wrote. For those reasons, the appeal was denied.

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Ocean City Today

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P

JANUARY 19, 2018

‘Sir Rod’ cleared of assault charges on former girlfriend

C

Alleged victim passed away in December, rendering her statement hearsay in court

k c i w n e F n i 4 5 . Rt

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) Thomas Edward Braswell III, 57, of Ocean City, who performs regionally as a Rod Stewart impersonator “Sir Rod,” was found not guilty of second-degree assault as the alleged victim succumbed to pancreatic cancer in mid-December. The charges stem from an incident on Sept. 14 where police responded to reports of disorderly subjects in first block of 93rd Street at approximately 8:20 p.m. Officer Jessica Johnson, who responded to the call, testified in Ocean City District Court on Wednesday that she was met by Kelly Coughlin who said her boyfriend, later identified as Braswell, had assaulted and grabbed her by the throat about 30 minutes earlier and subsequently left the scene. “I observed redness around her neck,” Johnson said. “She was crying and appeared in pain.”

At this point defense counsel Cynthia MacDonald objected and said the witness statement should be deemed inadmissible as hearsay. “Evidence that is testimonial can not be admitted unless the witness is available,” she said. “There’s no opportunity to cross-examine.” Judge Daniel Mumford said that was obvious due to Coughlin’s recent passing. MacDonald went on to note Braswell was not present when police responded and Coughlin was not in immediate danger. “There is reasonable doubt, and he should be found not guilty,” she said. Mumford acknowledged the unusual nature of the proceedings. “I’ve never had a case like this where the alleged victim is deceased,” he said. “It’s most unfortunate really.” After taking a few moments to ponder the legal morass, Mumford dismissed the charges. “How many times did we see victims of domestic violence come in and say, ‘I didn’t tell the truth?’” he said. “I’m not comfortable finding the defendant guilty based on an uncorroborated hearsay statement.”

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Continued from Page 5 Although the annual plea by city officials for this consideration has resulted in larger county grants to the city government, a huge gap exists between what each side believes is the correct number. The results of separate studies of duplicate services by the city and the county produced were millions of dollars apart in terms of what the cost was to taxpayers. At the heart of the issue are two words in the code. The current version states Worcester County “may” provide a tax differential, while the resort would like to see it changed to

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“shall,” which would make compliance compulsory. Ayres said the Maryland Constitution prohibits legislation for a single or group of municipalities that is not applied statewide. County elected officials are reluctant to acknowledge any tax rate disparity for multiple reasons, not the least of which is that whatever revenue the county would lose via a tax break resort for property owners might would have to be made up by the rest of Worcester’s taxpayers. Since Ocean City property taxes constitute the largest contribution to the county budget, the tax increase to residents on the mainland could be substantial. “I’m pretty sure there’s going to be a trial,” Ayres said. Ocean City Council President Lloyd Martin said the goal remains unchanged from ongoing conversations surrounding tax differentials. “We’re just looking for equality in the town of Ocean City from the county,” he said.

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JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

WORLD WAR II

Capital of China, Nanking, falls to Japanese during war By Sam Ghaleb Contributing Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) Eighty years ago, during the Second Sino-Japanese War, Nanking, the capital of China, fell to Japanese forces, and the Chinese government fled to Hankow, further inland along the Yangtze River. To break the spirit of Chinese resistance, Japanese Gen. Matsui Iwane ordered that the city of Nanking be destroyed. Much of the city was burned, and Japanese troops launched a campaign of atrocities against civilians that became known as the “Rape of Nanking.” But executing the order was another matter. When the Japanese troops smashed through Nanking’s walls in the early predawn hours of Dec. 13, they entered a city in which they were vastly outnumbered. It was estimated that more than half-million civilians and 90,000 Chinese troops were trapped in Nanking, compared with the 50,000 Japanese soldiers who assaulted the city. Gen. Kesago Nakajima knew that killing tens of thousands of Chinese captives was a formidable task: “To deal with crowds of a thousand, five thousand, or ten thousand, it is tremendously difficult even just to disarm them . . . It

would be disastrous if they were to make any trouble,’’ he said. The massacre and brutality lasted for six weeks. Because of their limited manpower, the Japanese relied heavily on deception. The strategy for mass butchery involved several steps: promising the Chinese fair treatment in return for an end to resistance; coaxing them into surrendering themselves to their Japanese conquerors; dividing them into groups of one to two hundred men; and then luring them to different areas near Nanking to be killed. Nakajima hoped that, faced with the impossibility of further resistance, most of the captives would lose heart and comply with whatever directions the Japanese gave them. All this was easier to achieve than the Japanese had anticipated. Resistance was so weak it was practically nonexistent. Having thrown away their arms when attempting to flee the city as the Japanese closed in, many Chinese soldiers simply turned themselves in, hoping for better treatment. Once the men surrendered and permitted their hands to be bound, the rest was easy. After the soldiers surrendered en masse, there was virtually no one left See WORLD WAR II Page 19


JANUARY 19, 2018

WORLD WAR II Continued from Page 18 to protect the citizens of the city. Knowing this, the Japanese poured into Nanking, occupying government buildings, banks, and warehouses, shooting people randomly in the streets, many of them in the back as they ran away. As victims fell to the ground, the streets, alleys, and ditches of the fallen capital ran red with rivers of blood. During the last 10 days of December, Japanese motorcycle units patrolled Nanking while Japanese soldiers guarded the entrances to all the streets, and alleys. Troops went from door to door, demanding that they be opened to welcome the victorious armies. The moment the shopkeepers complied, the Japanese opened fire on them. The Japanese Imperial Army massacred thousands of people in this manner and then systematically looted the stores and burned that for which they had no use. These atrocities shocked many of the Japanese correspondents who had followed the troops to Nanking. Even seasoned war correspondents were shocked at the orgy of violence, and their exclamations found their way into their reports to the newspapers back home. The killing went on nonstop, from morning until night, but they were only able to kill 2,000 people in this way. The next day, the Japanese soldiers tried killing the Chinese civilians in a different fashion. They set up machine guns across a river. Two of them raked a crossfire at the lined-up prisoners. The prisoners fled into the water, but no one was able to make it to the other shore. Next, the Japanese turned their attention to the women of the city. The rape of Nanking is considered the worst mass rape in world history. A former soldier in the 114th Division of the Japanese army in Nanking recalled, “No matter how young or old, they all could not escape the fate of being raped. We sent out army trucks to the city streets and villages to seize a lot of women. And then each of them was allocated to 15 to 20 soldiers for sexual intercourse and abuse.’’ One of the most bizarre polices of the Japanese army encouraged its soldiers to kill their victims after raping them. According to surviving Japanese veterans, many of the soldiers felt remarkably little guilt about this. “Perhaps when we were raping her, we looked at her as a woman, ‘’ a former Japanese soldier in Nanking wrote, “but when we killed her, we just thought of her as something like a pig.’’ Again, one of the most bizarre consequences of the wholesale rape that took place at Nanking was the response of the Japanese government. The Japanese high command made plans to create a giant underground system of military prostitution — one that would draw in hundreds of thousands of women from across Asia. The plan was straightforward. By luring, purchasing, or kidnaping 200,000 women, most of them from

Ocean City Today the Japanese colony of Korea, but many also from China, Taiwan, the Philippines, and Indonesia, the Japanese military hoped to reduce the incidence of random rape of local women (thereby diminishing the opportunity for international criticism), to contain sexually transmitted diseases through the use of condoms, and to reward soldiers for fighting on the battlefront for long stretches of time. Later, of course, when the world learned of this plan, the Japanese government refused to acknowledge responsibility, insisting, for decades after the war, that private entrepreneurs, not the Imperial government, ran the wartime military brothels. But in 1991, Professor Yoshiaki Yoshimi unearthed, from the Japanese Defense Agency’s archives, a document entitled “Regarding the Recruitment of Professor Women for MiliYoshiaki Yoshimi tary Brothels.’’ The document bore the personal stamps of leaders from the Japanese high command and contained orders for the immediate construction of “facilities of sexual comfort’’ to stop troops from raping women in regions they controlled in China. By the end of the massacre, an estimated 260,000 to 350,000 Chinese had been killed, and between 20,000 and 80,000 Chinese women were raped. Many soldiers went beyond rape to disembowel women, slice off their breasts, and nail them alive to walls. So brutal were the Japanese in Nanking that even the Nazi officials in the city were shocked. Yet the “Rape of Nanking” remains virtually an unknown incident today. Although the death toll exceeds the immediate number of deaths from the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (140,000 and 70,000 respectively, by the end of 1945) and even the total civilian casualties for several European countries during the entire war (Great Britain lost 61,000 civilians, France 108,000, Belgium 101,000, and the Netherlands 242,000), the horrors of the Nanking Massacre remain virtually unknown to people outside Asia. After the 1949 Communist Revolution in China, neither the People’s Republic of China, nor Taiwan, demanded wartime reparations from Japan (as Israel had from Germany) because the two governments were competing for Japanese trade and political recognition. And even the United States, faced with the threat of communism in the Soviet Union and mainland China, sought to ensure the friendship and loyalty of its former enemy Japan. In this manner, Cold War tensions permitted Japan to escape much of the intense critical examination that its wartime ally, Germany, was forced to undergo. Next Week: Dismissal Of Field Marshal Werner Von Blomberg

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Ocean City Today

OBITUARIES HARRY SADTLER NOLEN, JR. Berlin Harry Sadtler Nolen, Jr., age 89, died Saturday, Jan. 6, 2018 at the Berlin Nursing and Rehab Center. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Harry Sadtler Nolen, Sr. and Lauray Jubb Nolen. He is survived by his daughter, Robbin Nolen and her husband, Glenn Heath, of Harry Nolen, Jr Hampstead, Maryland. He was preceded in death by his sons, Phillip Lee Nolen and Arthur James Nolen. Also surviving are grandsons, Michael A. Nolen of Salisbury, Matthew Heath of Hampstead, Maryland, and two great-grandchildren, Madison and Christian. Mr. Nolen had been a realtor with Grempler Realty and Moore, Warfield and Glick. He had also worked at Nichols Fishing Center and Ultra Construction Co. He was a United States Army veteran, member of the Ocean City Golf and Yacht Club and the American Legion. Cremation followed his death. No formal services are planned at this time. Arrangements are in the care if the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

VIRGINIA SCIUTO Ocean City Virginia Sciuto of Ocean City, died on Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018. She was the loving wife of 52 years to Francesco Sciuto, devoted mother of Lina (Elio Briguglio) Sciuto and Teresa Sciuto and cherished grandmother of Sabrina, Antonio and William. In lieu of flowers, contributions in her memory may be made to: Coastal Hospice and Palliative Care at P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21802. ISABELLA FRANCES BERRY Berlin Isabella “Isabelle” Frances Berry, age 91, passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018 at her home. Born in Washington D.C., she was the daughter of the late William and Frances Woodson Karsunky. She is survived by her beloved husband of 70 years, Douglas Isabelle Berry P. Berry, and son, Curt Patrick of Laurel, Delaware. She was preceded in death by her sister, Joanne W. Schafer. Also surviving are two beloved nieces, Debbie Goudy and Peggy Vosburg. Mrs. Berry had worked as a medical secretary for Dr. Paul O’Donnell.

An avid cook, she also loved gardening, especially raising orchids and poinsettias, and was an animal lover. A memorial service was held on Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Berlin. Rev. Michael Moyer officiated. Inurnment was private for the family. A donation may be made in her memory to: St Paul’s Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 429, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home. DOROTHY GENEVA HYNES Berlin Dorothy Geneva Hynes, age 94, passed away peacefully at her home on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. Born in Houlka, Mississippi, she was the daughter of the late Dewel Clifton Chrestman and Willie Young Chrestman. She was preceded in death by her Dorothy Hynes beloved husband of 65 years, William J. Hynes, and by her sister, Marcelle Chrestman. Surviving are her children, Carolyn Bartlett and her husband, Steve, of Berlin, Maryland, Patrick Hynes and his wife, Laurie, of Ijamsville, Maryland, Theresa Hynes of Baltimore and Owen Hynes and his wife, Sherry, of Gilbert, Arizona. There are 10 grandchildren, Jamie Thompson, Kimberly Thayer, Steven Bartlett, Caitlin Bartlett, Jared Hynes, Nicholas Hynes, Jacob Hynes, Joshua Hynes, Madison Hynes and Nicholas Hynes, and four great-grandchildren. Also surviving are two sisters, Carolyn Pirtle of Olive Branch, Mississippi and Shirley Sue Pulley of Millington, Tennessee, and two brothers, Leodis Chrestman of Bruce, Mississippi and Elmo Chrestman of Houlka, Mississippi, and numerous nieces and nephews. Mrs. Hynes was a homemaker. She enjoyed quilting, crocheting, gardening and taking cruises. She loved reading and studying the bible and

JANUARY 19, 2018 taking care of her grandchildren. A funeral service was held on Monday, Jan. 15, 2018 at the Burbage Funeral Home. Deacon Dave McDowell officiated. Interment followed in Evergreen Cemetery, Berlin. The family would like to thank Coastal Hospice and her longtime caregivers for their years of loving and devoted care. A donation in her name can be made to: Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21802. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolences may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. JOAN LEE HERANDER Berlin Joan Lee Herander, age 86, passed away on Monday, Jan. 8, 2018 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury, Maryland. Born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, she was the daughter of the late Irvin Ziegler and Frances Sturdevant Ziegler. She was also preceded in death by her husband of 60 years, George Robert Herander and her brother, Paul Ziegler. She is survived by her children, Mark Joan Herander Herander (Lib) of Tampa, Florida, Kirk Herander of Burlington, Vermont, Karen Thompson (Noel) of Ridgeley, West Virginia, and Lynne Jennings (Ken) of Parsonsburg, Maryland. There are two grandchildren, John Thompson of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Caitlin Thompson of College Park, Maryland; two sisters, Mary Withers of Reno, Navada, and Louise Duggan of Plymouth, Massachusetts; a sister-in-law, Ann Ziegler of Allenwood, Pennsylvania; and several nieces and nephews. Mrs. Herander had been an administrative assistant at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania and had worked for the Pennsylvania Newspapers Publishers’ Association in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Continued on Page 21


JANUARY 19, 2018

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 20 Joan was a resident of Gull Creek Senior Living Community in Berlin, Maryland. A memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, Jan. 20, 2018 at 11 a.m. at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Ocean Pines, Maryland. Rev. Joseph Kennedy will officiate. Friends and family may call one hour prior to the service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association at 225 N. Michigan Ave. FL. 17, Chicago, Illinois 60601, or to Coastal Hospice at P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21804. Arrangements are in the care of Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Letters of condolence may be written to the family at burbage@burbagefuneralhome.com. WILLIAM NICOLAS KLEIN Parkville William Nicolas Klein, 93, of Parkville, Maryland, passed away peacefully on Dec. 18, 2017 in Hospice Care at MedStar Franklin Square in Baltimore. He was born on Dec. 6, 1924 in West Stockbridge, Massachusetts. After serving in the U.S. Marine Corps, William married his late beloved wife of 61 years, Sophia Francis Cecula in 1946 and settled in the Washington, D.C. area, William Klein where he worked for the Federal Government for over 25 years. In 1978, the Kleins moved to Ocean Pines, Maryland where William continued to be a public servant at the Ocean Pines Volunteer Fire Department. Ocean Pines became home for over 30 years. In his later days, Mr. Klein was a resident at Oakcrest Retirement Community. William Nicholas Klein lived a full life, privately and publicly. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and gardening in his youth. As an avid reader, he was passionate about the Civil War and proud to be a Yankee. He will forever be missed, especially his wits about current politics. William is survived by his daughter, Barbara Ward, Shirley Klein and Victoria Klein; grandchildren, Sean Harper, Andrea Landauer and Lisa Harper; and by his great-grandchildren, William, Jack, Isabella and Gavin. A committal service will be held at Crownsville Veterans Cemetery on Monday, Feb. 5, 2018 with a time to be announced. PATRICIA JOY BURNS Bishopville Patricia Joy Burns, 84, of Bishopville, died Saturday, Dec. 30, 2017 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury, Maryland. Born in South Baltimore, she was the youngest of five siblings of the late Charles and Eva Jacobs. Patricia spent the majority of her

Ocean City Today working career at the Montgomery Ward catalog house in Baltimore City. She devoted her life to her family, always striving to create a beautiful home and loving environment. Her love for coastal living called her to move to the Ocean City area upon her retirement. Her hobbies included gardening, interior design, sewing, cooking, swimming, playing Patricia Burns pinochle and volunteering for many years at the Berlin Nursing Home. She always did her best to make this world a better place to live, letting her creative spirit shine in her home and her community. She is survived by her loving husband of 58 years, Bernard R. Burns; her only son, George C. Bilenki and daughter-in-law, Patricia A. Bilenki of Bishopville; two sisters, Etta Hamilton of Bedford, Virginia and Alice Heck of Arnold, Maryland; three grandchildren, Jonathan M. Bilenki and wife, Shannon Boyd, of Eugene, Oregon, and Erin E. and Adam J. Bilenki of Berlin, Maryland; four great-grandchildren, Cara, Trybe, Lotus and Owen George. A Celebration of Life gathering will be announced at a later date. Donations in her name may be made to the Berlin Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, The American Lung Association, and the Bishopville Volunteer Fire Department; P.O. Box 350, Bishopville, Maryland 21813. Visit jolleymemorialchapelmd.com to send condolences. WILLIAM CURTIS WOOTEN Berlin William Curtis “Bill Curt” Wooten, age 76, died on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018 at his home. Born in Showell, Maryland, he was the son of the late Clarence and May Griffin Wooten. He is survived by his wife, Bonnie Esham Wooten, and children, Dean William Wooten Wooten and his wife, Brenda, of Bishopville, Tammy Balster of Berlin, Donnie Wooten of Berlin, Darin Wooten and his wife, Valerie, of Fruitland, and bonus children, Lisa Cook and her husband, Douglass, of Berlin, and Norman “Nornie” Bunting, Jr. of Berlin. There are 12 grandchildren, Megan and Gabby Wooten, Will Robertson, Brandon Wooten, C.J. Balster, Jr., Molly and Michael Wooten, Garrett and Austin Cook, Madison, Andrew and Natalie Bunting, and great-granddaughter, Pamela Cook. Also surviving, is a brother, John Wooten of Georgia, and two sisters, Janet Daisey and Mary Lou Smith, both of Millsboro, and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his brothers, Griffin and Thomas

Wooten, and sisters, Jean Hudson, Florence Cathell and Ruth Ann Mitchell. Mr. Wooten was a graduate of Stephen Decatur High School, Class of 1959, and had worked as an electrician for Davis Electric in Showell. He attended St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, and was a member of the Ocean City Golf & Yacht Club. He had a great passion for the game of golf, and loved working outside in his yard. A funeral service will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018 at 11 a.m. at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 3 Church St., Berlin, Maryland 21811. Rev. Michael Moyer will officiate. Interment will be private for the family. A donation in his memory may be made to: Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21804, or St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 429, Berlin, Maryland 21811, or Boggs-Disharoon American Legion Post #123, 10111 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. DANIEL TAHER Ocean Pines Daniel Taher, age 83, died on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2018 at the stroke of midnight. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he was the son of the late Abdyl and Afifa Taher . He was preceded in death by his wife, Franceline Jane Taher, and a brother, Norman Taher. Surviving are his children, Elizabeth Kovic of Ocean Pines, Dean Taher and his wife, Katja, of Dusseldorf, Germany, Andrew Taher and his wife, Marie, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Jennifer Taher and her partner, Shawtane Bowen, of Brooklyn, New York. There are four grandchildren, John and Eliot Taher and Patrick and Daniel Kovic. Also surviving are his brothers, Joe Taher and Alec Taher, and sisters, Barry Taher, Fran Sault, Geri Badea and numerous nieces and nephews. Mr. Taher was a foreign service officer for the State Department for over 30 years before retiring to the Eastern Shore. He was a child of the depression who made good but never forgot his beginnings and espoused fairness for all till the end. No formal services are planned at this time. Inurnment will be in Forrest Hills Cemetery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania at a later date. In lieu of flowers, a donation in his memory may be made to: the American Civil Liberties Union, 125 Broad St.18th Floor, New York, New York 10004 or ACLU.org. DUNCAN J. RUNYON Bishopville Duncan J. “DJ” Runyon, age 91, of Bishopville, died Friday, Jan. 12, 2018 at home. He was born in Port Huron, Michi-

PAGE 21 gan and was the son of the late Joseph A. and Zena M. (Crain) Runyon. DJ attended Detroit Bible Institute after graduation and did missionary work on a Navajo Indian reservation in Arizona. He served in the U.S. Navy during WWII on the USS Bushnell Submarine Tender. He had been a carpenter and poultry grower before retirement. He loved the outdoors and spent time fishing and hunting. Throughout his life he enjoyed motorcycle riding, horseback riding, playing the banjo and traveling with the Airstream club. In his later years, he enjoyed getting outdoors in his “chair” for rides. He was also a member of Zion United Methodist Church in Bishopville. He is survived by a son, Duncan J. Runyon Jr. and wife, Jamie, of Berlin; a daughter, Lynn Wiseman and husband, Michael, of Holiday, Florida; two step-sons, Tyler Travers and wife, Chrissy, and Jerry Travers and wife, Jamie, both of Bishopville; a sister, Rejina Runyon of Arizona; 11 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his wife, Kay S. Runyon, in 2010. A graveside service will be held at 1 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 19, 2018 at Bishopville Cemetery in Bishopville with Rev. Paul Sherwood officiating. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com.

OBITUARY NOTICES Obituary Notices are published free each week in the Ocean City Today and Bayside Gazette. E-mail: editor@oceancitytoday.net Mail: Ocean City Today, P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Fax: 410-723-6511 Obituary Notices are published as space allows. Every effort is made to publish all that are received.

www. w.oceancitytoda ay. y.net


Jan. 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

Business

Page 22

Shore Wellness medical facility opens in Berlin

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) Concierge, integrative and aesthetic medicines are available at Shore Wellness and Med Spa, opened to the public on Jan. 3 in the Pavillions on Race Track Road in Berlin. “We look and treat each patient as an individual,” Dr. William “Eddie” Gunn said. “It makes good medicine to spend a lot of time with each patient and make sure they feel well taken care of and not rushed. Patients receive quality care with us.” Along those lines, Gunn said integrative medicine puts the patient first and addresses all needs, including physical, emotional, mental, social, spiritual and environmental influences that affect a person’s health. “We try and get to the route of the problem,” Gunn said. “Why are you feeling this way? Once we get to the route, we treat naturally, focusing on saliva and urine testing more so than blood testing. We talk about their social environment and look at the whole individual.” Aesthetic medicine focuses on improving a patients’ cosmetic appearance through treatment of scars, skin laxity, wrinkles, hair loss, excess fat, cellulite, unwanted hair, skin discoloration and spider veins. “[We offer] Botox, derma fillers, sclerotherapy and chemical peels – all the nonsurgical and natural ways to make people look and feel better,” Gunn said. “For anti-aging, we use bioidentical hormones that come from plants and are identical to our own hormone levels. We have a weight-loss clinic, which is all patient dependent and is specific to each client.” The weight-loss program at Shore Wellness and Med Spa monitors pa-

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KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Dr. William “Eddie” Gunn offers concierge, integrative and aesthetic medicine at Shore Wellness and Med Spa, which opened to the public on Jan. 3, in the Pavillions on Race Track Road in Berlin.

tient heath, while designing a diet and fitness regimen for each individual based on their lifestyle, medical history and needs. Under the realm of concierge, each patient receives a personal health-care coach, and doctors make sure to take time with each individual, Gunn said. “Patients have access to us 24/7, with same-day and next-day appointments and no wait times,” he said. There are four exam rooms at the facility, in addition to a lab on-site. “A lot revolves around our stress and hormone levels,” Gunn said. “It’s all about getting to the route of the problem.” Shore Wellness and Med Spa doctors can also give medical cannabis recommendations for those suffering from chronic pain, post-traumatic stress disorder, seizure disorder, glaucoma, severe nausea, and persistent muscle spasms. In March, Dr. Angela Gibbs will join the team at Shore Wellness and Med Spa. “We practiced at PRMC together and she is truly a patient advocate,” Gunn said. “She spends hours getting to the route of the problem and fights

for her patients. You don’t find too many doctors out there like that and she makes me a better doctor.” In the future, Gunn would like to offer additional wellness services such as massage therapy, acupuncture and reflexology treatments. “We want to add these treatments to help people with chronic pain,” Gunn said. “We stay away from narcotics and addictive medicines. I would also like to see a gym attached to the clinic to further encourage healthy lifestyles.” On Friday, Jan. 26, Shore Wellness and Med Spa in Berlin will have an open house from 5-8 p.m. where future or current patients can tour the facility, get more information on services, munch on some treats, take home a brochure, or meet and ask Gunn questions. Shore Wellness and Med Spa is located at 11200 Race Track Road #104, inside the Pavillions. For more information, visit www.shorewellnessmedspa.com or call 410-973-1030 to make an appointment, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. A doctor is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Imagination Library receives $80K (Jan. 19, 2018) In 2012, the Eastern Shore lost a well-respected pillar of the community. Local entrepreneur Donnie Williams died unexpectedly, leaving behind a legacy and a group of close friends determined to see it fulfilled. Throughout his successful career in real estate development and property rentals, Williams maintained a focus on developing the minds of students and young professionals through mentorships and community service. His hard work and success earned him millions.

Before he passed away, Williams sat down with advisors to create a plan for how his hard earned dollars would make an impact in the community. The Donnie Williams Foundation was born and a path to his lasting impact was taking shape. Williams insisted that the funds from his estate be to support and develop children, specifically youth in Wicomico and Worcester counties where he lived as an adult, and in St. Mary’s County where he was raised. Donnie Williams Foundation President Mark Granger, a Salisbury

certified public accountant, and his wife, Kimberly Roemer, were longtime friends of Williams. They, alongside other board members Kirk Kinnamon and Greg Johnson, recently met with United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore to present an $80,000 check to the Imagination Library, a program that Williams would have celebrated had he been alive to see it flourish. Williams served as a United Way board member, donor and dedicated volunteer for many years. See LOCAL Page 23

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) There is a Federal Housing Administration program that allows for the financing of a mobile home. It is called the Title I program, and it allows FHA-approved lenders to make loans from their own funds to eligible borrowers, to finance the purchase or refinance of a manufactured home and/or lot. FHA insures the lender against loss if the borrower defaults. Credit is granted based on the applicant’s credit history and ability to repay the loan in regular monthly installments. FHA explains that they do not lend money; instead, FHA insures loans in order to encourage mortgagees to lend. Title I manufactured home loans are not Federal Government loans or grants. The interest rate, which is negotiated between the borrower and the lender, is required to be fixed for the entire term of the loan, which is generally 20 years on a mobile home vs. the traditional stick-built home term of 30 years. A Title I loan may be used for the purchase or refinancing of a manufactured home, a developed lot on which to place a manufactured home, or a manufactured home and lot in combination. However, to qualify for the Title I program, the home must be used as the principal residence of the borrower. Another interesting distinction is that Title I insured loans do not require borrowers to purchase or own the land on which their manufactured home is placed. Instead, borrowers may lease a lot, such as a site lot within a manufactured home community or mobile home park. When the land/lot is leased, HUD requires the lessor to provide the manufactured homeowner with an initial lease term of three years.  In addition, the lease must provide that the homeowner will receive advance written notice of at least 180 days, in the event the lease is to be terminated. These lease terms are designed to protect homeowners in case the lessors sell the land or close the park. The maximum loan amount for Title I backed mobile home financing is: See TITLE Page 23


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 23

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Phyllis R. Mitchell Donnie Williams Foundation President Mark Granger and Board Members Kimberly Roemer, Kirk Kinnamon and Greg Johnson, recently met with Kathleen Mommé and Pam Gregory of United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore to present an $80,000 check to the Imagination Library. Williams served as a United Way board member, donor and dedicated volunteer for many years.

Local foundation funds United Way Continued from Page 22 The Imagination Library, launched locally by United Way in 2012, has provided over 117,000 books to over 5,000 local children since its inception. Serving Wicomico, Worcester, Somerset and Dorchester counties, the book program is provided at no cost to children under the age of 5, and is funded primarily through grants. The positive impact of the Imagination Library is seen in over 1,200 communities throughout the United States and the program serves as a key resource for families and a tool that empowers children for success. Upon registering for the program, a child receives a high quality, ageappropriate book delivered directly to his or her home each month until age 5. Children enrolled as newborns can receive as many as 60 books throughout the course of enrollment to build their home libraries. According to the most recent Kindergarten Readiness Assessment (KRA) in Wicomico, Dorchester and Somerset counties, children enrolled in Imagination Library test higher in all categories of kindergarten readiness than children who are not enrolled. Tested categories include Lan-

guage and Literacy, Mathematics, Physical Development and Social Foundations. Worcester County’s Reading Readiness test scores showed Imagination Library enrollees testing at 61 percent ready versus non enrollees at 45 percent. “Donnie was such an important part of our United Way when he was alive, and we are blessed to have his generosity and spirit live on through our Imagination Library,” said Kathleen Mommé, United Way’s executive director. “This program is right up Donnie’s alley. He always stressed the importance of program results and measurable data. With the support of the Donnie Williams Foundation, our United Way is committed to providing the program to all children in our community… and the measurable results speak for themselves.” Now in its 73rd year, United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore continues to be the largest non-governmental source of funding for 80 critical programs in Wicomico, Worcester, Somerset and Dorchester counties. United Way helps Eastern Shore residents obtain educational success by reducing the achievement gap between low and middle income students, financial stability by advancing the economic security of families and

individuals in the community, and good health by improving access to and awareness of local health and wellness services. In 2017, United Way provided over $1.4 million to community programs and helped to change the lives of over 82,000 individuals. For more information, visit www.unitedway4us.org.

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PAGE 24

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

FINANCIAL LITERACY PROGRAM Five years and nearly 400 students later and the partnership between the Bank of Ocean City and the Stephen Decatur High School business program is still going strong. Forty-seven students recently completed the BOC-sponsored EverFi Financial Literacy program, which covers nine categories including savings, banking, payment types, credit scores, higher education, renting versus owning, insurance and tax, consumer protection, and investing. Bank of Ocean City representatives Caleb Miller, left, and Earl Conley, second from left, and Stephen Decatur High School business teacher Kurt Marx, second from right, and Principal Tom Zimmer, right, join students who recently graduated from the BOC EverFi Financial Literacy program.

Happy New Ye Year fr from Rave ven Roost #4 #44 Oce cean City ty Celebra rati ting Our 20th th Annive vers rsary ry In our 20 year history, y, Raven Roost #44 has: Awarded over $158,600 in college scholarships to 107 students from our 3 local high schools www.ocravensroost44.com Raised $50,360 fo for Atlantic General Hospital through our Penguin Sw wim Te Team Donated over $31,717 to local charities and Council of Roost charities Hosted 20 Golf To Tournaments and 19 Council of Raveen Roosts Conventions and Parades 21 Raven Road Trips including: London, New Orleans, s, Dallas, s, Nashville, e, Phoenix ix, Kansas Ci City ty, Jacks ksonville, e, Miami,i, Minneapolis, s, Indianapolis, s, Ch Charl arlotte, e, Ta Tampa Countless bus trips, tours and special events including: Oriole and Shore rebird rd games, s, Rave ven Tr Training Ca Camp, p, Sp Spring and Fa Fall trips to Harr rrington Casino, o, Pub Cra rawl wls, s, Wi Wine Ta Tasting, g, boat tri rips to Smith and Ta Tangier Islands, s, Berl rlin Ghost To Tour,r, tour of o Dove ver Air Museum, tour of Dogfish Head brewery ry, tour of Wa Wallops Island, d, a miniature golf tournament and a Ducka kaneer Cr Cruisee. Dedicated Johnny Unitas Wa Way (19th St.) and the Johhnny Unitas Tr Tree in Northside Park rk

Community Foundation grant extends oral health services (Jan. 19, 2018) Chesapeake Health Care will be able to extend oral healthcare services to those who have limited or no access to dental care in Somerset, Worcester and Wicomico counties thanks in part to a grant from the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore. The money will be used to provide uninsured and underinsured patients with dental exams, X-rays and tooth extractions if needed, all without cost to the patients. One of the goals of providing dental care to these patients is to reduce the number of urgent dental treatments resulting from the lack of dental care catching problems earlier to reduce complications later. “We are grateful to the Community Foundation of the Eastern Shore for this grant to assist us in providing dental care to adults in our community,” said Susanne Gray, CEO/COO of Chesapeake Health Care. “This grant will mean that many more people in our community will receive access to the critical dental care that they need, who would otherwise not be able to afford it.” Peninsula Regional Medical Center, through its mobile Wagner Wellness Van, sees many patients who have oral health issues, but they do not have the resources to treat those patients with the dental care they desperately need.

With this grant, Peninsula Regional Medical Center will now be able to refer those patients to Chesapeake Health Care’s Dental Department, where they can be treated. This grant also provides an opportunity for Chesapeake Health Care to continue its successful partnership with H.O.P.E. (Help and Outreach Point of Entry, Inc.) ministries in Salisbury, to refer homeless patients in need of oral healthcare services. In providing essential dental care to those in need in the community, Chesapeake Health Care is striving to improve the general health of residents of the Eastern Shore, regardless of financial circumstances. Founded in 1994, Chesapeake Health Care is a multidisciplinary healthcare practice serving Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester counties. Approximately 100 providers are on staff to provide healthcare to the region’s patients in the following disciplines: Adult and Family Medicine, Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Urogynecology, Mental Health, Dental and Pharmacy. Health care is extended to individuals who are uninsured, underinsured and insured. A Sliding Fee Scale program is available to assist eligible patients with healthcare payments. For more information about Chesapeake Health Care, visit www.ChesapeakeHC.org.

Marc rched in 18 St. Pa Patrick Day ay Para rades Enj njoy oyed 13 Christmas Pa Parties, s, 12 Summer Picnics, s, 11 Bull Roasts ts, 7 Cra rab Fe Feasts , 5 Dances & 1 Hawa waiian Luau Wiitnessed 2 Rave W ven Super Bowl Ch Championships 20000 & 2012 & 9 Super Bowl Pa Parties 20 yyears rs of Season Home Game bus rides and countless tailgate parties FFiirs rst pri rinted paper Roost news wsletter and now electrro ronic we weekly ly and monthly ly news wsletters rs Cre reated and sold countless Roost T Shirts ts and Co Coozzies Th T hank yo you to ALL past Officers rs, Dir irectors rs, Co Committee Chair irrss, Vo Volunteers rs and eve very ry Roost Member, r, Fo For wi without yo you, u, th his is wo wonde derfu ful famil fa ily we we ca call ll Rave ven’s ’s Roost #4 #44, 4, wo would ld neve ver be!

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Sports & Recreation

Jan. 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

Page 25

www.oceancitytoday.net

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester Prep junior Cooper Richins pulls up for a shot during Monday’s game against Delmar in Berlin. He scored 12 points in the 5049 win.

WP wins by one pt. over Delmar LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur senior captain Caleb Bourne stands atop the podium after winning the 220-pound weight class title during the annual War on the Shore tournament, last Saturday at the Berlin high school. He is the first Decatur wrestler since 2012 to take first place in the event.

Bourne Decatur’s first WOTS tourney champ since ‘12

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) In front of family, friends and supporters last Saturday, Stephen Decatur senior captain Caleb Bourne became the first wrestler from the school to win a War on the Shore title since 2012. “My senior year, the first time in six years anyone at Decatur’s won it; it feels good,” he said. “Thanks for my family supporting me, always coming out. To look up in the stands and see them rooting for me feels good.” Among family members in attendance to cheer Bourne on was his brother, Nathan, who wrestled for Decatur from 2002-2006. He also won War on the Shore his senior year, competing at 160 pounds. Nathan Bourne finished his fouryear career with 121 wins, putting him sixth overall on the school’s 100wins club board. A two-time state runner-up, Nathan Bourne visited with his brother before his War on the Shore finals match to give him some words of encouragement. “I started to coach him and then I said, ‘just go kick his ass.’ At the end

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur senior captain Caleb Bourne, left, battles Mount Saint Joseph junior Keagan Rill in the 220-pound finals match of War on the Shore, last Saturday in Berlin.

of the day, it’s a fight,” Nathan Bourne said. “I’m super proud of him. Wrestling is a very physical sport, but it’s a mental sport even more than it is physical. “He had to believe that he was a champion, so what he did was solidify, ‘I am a champion’ and now he can go into every match knowing that,” he

continued. “You could see he wrestled freely. He wrestled in the flow.” Bourne battled junior Keagan Rill of Mount Saint Joseph in the 220pound weight class finals, last Saturday at Decatur in Berlin. He led 6-1 at the end of the first period. See DECATUR Page 26

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) The Worcester Prep boys’ basketball team held off the Delmar Wildcats to win Monday’s game in Berlin, 50-49. “I thought we probably made it harder than it really should have been,” Prep Coach Keith Geiger said. “I don’t think we rebounded very well, but they had some really tough guys – I think there was some football players in there, so they’re strong kids and we had a little bit of trouble securing the rebounds. “We grinded one out,” he added. “We got the win. It wasn’t pretty, but we did it.” Delmar outscored Worcester 13-12 in the first quarter. At halftime, the Mallards led 28-21. After three quarters, the Berlin squad was ahead 39-32. Baskets were traded during the fourth quarter, but the Mallards held on for the victory. Junior Colin Miller had 13 points, four steals and four assists. “I thought Colin Miller had a good game, probably his best game this year,” Geiger said. “He was shooting the ball with confidence. That was good to see.” Senior captain Tucker Brown contributed 13 points and had six rebounds, five assists and two steals. Junior Cooper Richins added 12 points. “We kind of stumbled our way through it. We made some mistakes at the end of the game, but we were able to stick with it and finish,” Geiger said. “It’s a good learning experience for me to see things I can probably do better, practicing those end-of-the-game situations and things we can do better toward the end of the game to not get so flustered and start turning the ball over.” The Salisbury Christian Jaguars will come to Berlin tonight, Friday, to play Worcester at 7 p.m.


PAGE 26

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

Decatur wrestling squad places ninth during WOTS Continued from Page 25 “I knew I had to wrestled smart and wrestling well on such a big kid and I knew I needed to start off very early, so in the first couple of seconds I took a shot and I was very surprised that I came up with it so easily,” he said. “I got on top and I think right then I broke him. I could feel it in him he started to give up. I knew once I started to tilt him and got some back points on him I was in his head. After the first period, I knew I had him.” Bourne pinned his opponent with 54 seconds remaining in the second period. “I was thinking lower body all match and then he got a nice undertook on me and I was getting kind of frantic, and I pulled something out I haven’t done since freshman year – hit the butt slide, arm drag right to my butt, came around, got my two [points] and that for me is what put me over the top,” he said. “I was like, ‘I’m going to win this match no matter what.’ “At the end he was just pushing into me and I was thinking, ‘I can’t throw him he’s too big,’ but as soon as he pushed into me I said ‘I’m going to throw him’ and I threw him right to his back and I wasn’t letting go from there,” he continued. “It was the best feeling ever.” Bourne was ranked second in the tournament, while Rill was seeded first. He received a first-round bye. Bourne then pinned Octarara sophomore Colby Wrigley in 44 seconds. It only took him 32 seconds to pin freshman Nathanie Sears of Nansemond River in the next round. He pinned Archbishop Ryan senior Brett Tetlow in 1:36 in the semifinals. “He’s a monster. I haven’t worked with him on the mat, but you can tell he’s got the same mindset,” Nathan Bourne said of his “much bigger,

stronger, better-looking younger brother,” he added. “It was a cool experience to see him wrestle,” he said. “I was very proud of him. He wrested a great tournament,” said Decatur Coach Todd Martinek, who is also director of War on the Shore. Sophomore captain Jagger Clapsadle lost 5-4 to sophomore Brennan McBride of Coatesville in the 106pound finals to finish runner-up in his weight class. “Jagger Clapsadle lost by a point to a very tough kid. That was a tough bracket,” Martinek said. “He wrestled outstanding. “Caleb’s realized now he can be a state champ. Jagger’s realized he can do the same thing,” he continued. “Some of the other guys are challenged now. ‘Hey if I want to be a place winner I have to work as hard as these guys.’ It makes them realized they have a lot of work to do, whether you’re Caleb or a kid that went 0-2 for us. Everybody’s got work to do.” Bourne is currently ranked second in the state at 220 pounds and Clapsadle is third at 106, which includes both public and private schools. Decatur is raked 15th overall. Co-captains, senior Cade Solito (120 pounds) and junior Lukas Layton (170) finished in eighth place in their weight classes. Decatur placed ninth overall out of 24 teams. “I was very pleased. I thought topeight would be a good tournament, so ninth is certainly respectable,” Martinek said. “You remember your loses more than your wins sometimes. But our losses we were competitive, we were tough, we didn’t get pinned and our wins were dominant. I feel like we’re in good shape, we stayed healthy again and that’s tough to do in a tournament like this.”

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur senior captain Caleb Bourne is joined by his brother, Nathan, after winning the 220-pound War on the Shore title, last Saturday. Nathan Bourne wrestled for Decatur from 20022006. He won the 160-pound tournament title his senior year.

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Stephen Decatur sophomore captain Jagger Clapsadle, top, takes on sophomore Brennan McBride of Coatesville in the 106-pound War on the Shore finals.


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 27

WP Lady Mallards ‘come out firing’ ‘It was a good win,’ Coach Dailey says after his team’s 43-21 victory over Dragons

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) The Worcester Prep girls’ basketball team stepped on the court ready to do battle Wednesday night with the Salisbury School Dragons. The Lady Mallards won 43-21. “We played well. We came out firing,” Prep Coach Scot Dailey said. “Defense was great. We got some steals, we got some layups and made some

easy jump shots.” Worcester led 19-4 at the end of the first quarter in Salisbury. At halftime, the Mallards were on top, 27-10. After three quarters, the Berlin squad was ahead 33-17. Junior captain Hailey Merritt scored 14 points and had four steals. Junior captain Gracie Gardner added eight points, six rebounds and three blocks. Sophomore captain Emily Copeland chipped in with six points, three rebounds and three steals. “It was a good win,” Dailey said. “We’re trying to finish feeling good before the break.”

Worcester will host the Salisbury Christian Jaguars today, Friday, at 5:30 p.m. Worcester’s two seniors – Reese Gittelman and Mia Meacci – will be recognized following the game. “We need to play really good defense and we need to execute on offense,” Dailey said. “We’re looking forward to the challenge. It’s going to be a dogfight.” When the two teams met on Dec. 15 in Berlin, the Mallards won 52-45. Worcester students will have semester exams next week and then are off for winter break during the following week.

*

Lack of practice hampers Decatur track participants

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) The Stephen Decatur boys’ indoor track team finished in sixth place, while the girls’ squad came in eighth during a 12-school meet last Wednesday at the Worcester County Recreation Center in Snow Hill. “I thought we definitely could have done better. We hadn’t practiced in a while because of snow and it really showed,” Decatur Coach Jody Stigler See SD Page 28

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 28

JANUARY 19, 2018

SD indoor track athletes preparing for Bayside meet Continued from Page 27 said. “We have [less than a] week before Baysides, so we need to work hard the next few practices in order to have our best performances thus far at Baysides.” Caesar Rodney won the boys’ competition with 135 points. Cape Henlopen finished second (91), followed by North Caroline (72). Decatur scored 35 points for sixth place. Decatur athletes who scored points for the team for placing eighth or better in their individual events were freshman Kashif Reyes (55-meter dash, sixth, 7.33 seconds; 300-meter dash, sixth, 41.85 seconds), juniors Gavin Bunting (300-meter dash, fourth, 41.54 seconds), Chad Fischer (500meter run, fifth, 1:17.66) and Kevin Beck (800-meter run, fourth, 2:17.45; 1,600-meter run, fifth, 5:09.92) and senior Jack Reimer (3,200-meter run, eighth, 11:08.47). Reyes, Bunting, junior Zack White and sophomore Andrew Ball took fourth in the 800-meter relay race (1:46.41). Bunting, Fischer and sophomores Sam Rakowski and Austin Cheynet came in eighth place in the 1,600meter relay event (4:17.16). Beck, Rakowski, Fischer and freshman John James crossed the finish line eighth in the 3,200-meter relay race

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(10:06.40). Kent Island won the girls’ competition with 124 points. North Caroline was runner-up with 110.5 points, followed by Smyrna with 62.5 points. Decatur scored 22 points for eighth place. Decatur Lady Seahawks who scored points for the team were freshman Kinsie Ruckle (shot put, eighth, 19 feet 11.5 inches), sophomores Alyssa Romano (300-meter dash, sixth, 49.48 seconds; high jump, eighth, 4 feet) and Gabby Izzett (800-meter run, third, 2:51.34) and junior Dori Krasner (800-meter run, fourth, 2:52.20). Krasner, Izzett, senior Laila Mirza and freshman Lydia Woodley placed fifth in the 3,200-meter relay race (11:58.30). The Bayside Conference championship is set for Wednesday, starting at 2 p.m. at the Worcester County Recreation Center. “I think the athletes need to work hard this week and next. Also, I think they need to be ready mentally to have their best performance at the Bayside meet,” Stigler said. “As a team, it is important that we have individuals compete for the individual championships, as those carry large point values for team scores. I just want each individual Decatur athlete to do their best and I think the team scores will take care of themselves.”

Stephen Decatur sophomore Sarah Engle shoots over an Arcadia defender during Tuesday’s game in Berlin. She contributed eight points and four assists in Decatur’s 59-36 victory. LISA CAPITELLI/ OCEAN CITY TODAY

SD Lady Seahawks try new things and are successful

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) The Stephen Decatur girls’ basketball team incorporated some new things and it paid off, as the Lady Seahawks won 59-36 over the Arcadia Firebirds on Tuesday in Berlin. “I think we did really well, coming off last Thursday losing to Parkside

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by five (47-42),” Decatur Coach Kate Coates said. “I just thought tonight was a really great team win. “We tired some new things on defense and we tried some new things on offense,” she continued. “Just implementing it less than 24 hours prior to the game, I thought they did a really nice job.” Decatur led 11-1 at the end of the first quarter. At halftime, the home team was on top, 26-10. After three quarters, the Seahawks held a 45-26 advantage. “I feel like we were making better passes than we have in the past few games,” Coates said. “We were actually looking to take shots, which is something we’ve been stressing. The fact that the girls were actually looking and wanting to score was good to see.” Senior Savannah Walton had 16 points and four steals. Senior captain Amya Mumford added 12 points, junior Grace Beres chipped in 10 and sophomore Sarah Engle contributed eight points and four assists. Decatur will host the Mardela Warriors on Monday at 4 p.m. The next day the Seahawks will travel to Crisfield to play the Crabbers at 5 p.m. “I think we’re doing well. We were talking before the [Arcadia] game that we have three conference losses, but the total points that we’ve lost by is 14 points,” Coates said. “That comes from missed [easy shots], missed foul shots, turnovers, making bad passes, so if we can just clean up the little things and go back to fundamental team basketball, we should be successful from here on out. I think tonight was the first step moving forward.”

Your Online Community: www.oceancitytoday.net


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 29

Decatur wrestlers ‘a little sluggish’ but still win 63-13 By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 19, 2018) Despite not having their best performance, the Stephen Decatur wrestlers still earned a 63-13 victory over the North Dorchester Eagles on Wednesday in Hurlock, Maryland. “We looked very flat. No urgency,” Decatur Coach Todd Martinek said. “Hopefully we are just a little sluggish after the weekend [from competing in the War on the Shore tournament]. We have a lot of work to do if we want to be Bayside or region champs.” Freshman John Hofman (160), sophomore Shamar Baines (106), junior co-captain Lukas Layton (170) and seniors David Braciszewski (145) and

co-captain Justin Manganiello (195) pinned their opponents. Senior captain Cade Solito outscored his 126pound opponent 4-3. North Dorchester forfeited matches to co-captains Jagger Clapsadle (113), a sophomore, and seniors Jeremy Danner (132) and Caleb Bourne (220), as well as to sophomore Keegan Mitchell (120) and senior Shakur Nock (285). Decatur will host the Kent Island Buccaneers today, Friday, at 5 p.m. All wrestling alumni are invited to attend and a group photo will be taken following the meet. Decatur is also celebrating the 2008 state dual championship team. There will be a reception after at The Globe in Berlin.

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

STREAK ENDED Stephen Decatur senior captain Kevon Voyles helps keep his team in the game on Wednesday when the Berlin squad hosted Wicomico. Decatur trailed 25-14 at the end of the first quarter and 38-29 at halftime. Voyles scored his 1,000th career point in the first quarter. He finished the game with 26 points. Decatur battled back in the third quarter and pulled ahead 51-48. Baskets were traded in the final quarter, but Decatur was unable to maintain its advantage. Wicomico won 76-74, ending Decatur’s 29-home game winning streak. The last time Decatur had lost a home game was Feb. 28, 2015.

OPEN HOUSE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 9:00 A.M.

Coast Guard Aux. to present Safe Boating Class, Feb. 6-8

(Jan. 19, 2018) The Coast Guard Auxiliary is offering the Maryland Basic Boating Safety Course, Tuesday through Thursday, Feb. 6-8, at the Ocean Pines Library. The Maryland Safe Boating Certificate required for all those born after July 1, 1972 is awarded following successful completion of the course. The course also includes topics such as piloting in local waters, tying nautical knots, foul weather tactics and legal issues, maintenance and common medical issues that can occur while boating. The fee is $15 and includes materials. To register or for more information, call Barry Cohen at 410-9354807, or email CGAUX1205 @gmail.com. Pre-registration is re-

quired. This class will be held at the Ocean Pines Library, located at 11107 Cathell Road. The three-night course will begin at 6 p.m. and end no later than 9 p.m. each evening. The United States Coast Guard Auxiliary will teach the state mandated Recreational Safe Boating Course at the Ocean Pines Library five additional times on three consecutive week nights in 2018. Future classes will be held: March 6-8, April 24-26, June 5-7, July 10-12 and Sept. 11-13. The Maryland Safe Boating Class will also be taught twice in a one-day format: Saturday, May 5 and Saturday, Aug. 4. They will run from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

The

Salisbury School

Nurturing your child’s intelligence & creativity. Early Explorer STEM Curriculum in Pre-K • Experiential Learning • Inquiry-based Lessons Engaging Activities • 100% College Placement • Transportation Available To find out more, call Gail Carozza, Admission Director, 410.742.4464 x123 www.thesalisburyschool.org


Lifestyle

Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertaiment, Events, Features, Music

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Annual soup and sandwich lunch returns to AUMC

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Butch Walter, left, and John Trumpower package to-go soup during Atlantic United Methodist Church’s soup and sandwich fundraiser last Thursday.

make the fundraiser a success. Betty Kurka, 92, and Virginia Harmon, 97, have been cashiers for the Methodist Church’s soup and sandwich fundraiser since its inception. “We enjoy being around the people. It helps the church and we both work in the thrift shop too,” Harmon said. The preparation for these local lunch favorites starts at the beginning of the week, Yates said. Shopping or ordering the ingredients takes place a week prior and they complete prep work such as chopping meat and vegetables on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Page 30 Delmarva Birding Weekend to take place Jan. 26-28

During Atlantic United Methodist Church’s soup and sandwich fundraiser last Thursday, from left, Pastor Patty Frick, Becky Yates, Larry Yates and Terry Hoption gather for a photo while displaying homemade desserts.

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) Atlantic United Methodist Church’s soup and sandwich fundraiser – a “Thursday must” and wintertime favorite for Ocean City residents – has returned to warm up the cold days. The first fundraiser lunch of the new year took place on Jan. 11, where navy bean and ham and vegetable beef soups were served along with chicken salad and ham salad sandwiches. An eclair cake in addition to eclairs, German chocolate cake, cranberry muffins, coconut cake, pumpkin pie and pineapple upside down cake were a few of the homemade desserts offered. “There is a lot of camaraderie and fellowship among church members coming together for a common cause,” said Becky Yates, organizer of the event with her husband, Larry. “No one could do it last year and there were a lot of questions [from repeat customers.] The community involvement is great and we have a reputation with people who have been here before. Some customers come back every year.” The church receives “a lot of help from about 30 to 40 volunteers” to

Jan. 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

At 5:30 a.m. on Thursday morning, the volunteers come to the church and start cooking the soup. On Jan. 11, nine pots of soup were prepared. A team of church volunteers help keep everything running smoothly on soup and sandwich fundraiser Thursdays. The biscuit makers arrive at 8 a.m. to prepare them from scratch. At 9:30 a.m., volunteers come in to start making sandwiches. There are also people responsible for cutting desserts. Carry-out volunteers start filling orders, which come in by phone, in person or by fax.   When the fundraiser is over at 1 See SOUP Page 31

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) Waterfowl, seabirds, raptors, shorebirds and even seals are some of the animals that have been spotted across the area during Winter Delmarva Birding Weekend, which will take place this year, Jan. 26-28, in Worcester County and Sussex County, Delaware. The third annual Winter Delmarva Birding Weekend usually features species such as harlequin duck, great cormorant, purple sandpiper, snow bunting and American white pelicans. “One of the biggest things is if you don’t get outside during the wintertime, you are missing out on an entire group of animals,” said Jim Rapp, organizer of the event with Dave Wilson. “There are 27 species of waterfowl including colorful ducks with bright feathers, seabirds and songbirds. Snowy owls; there is always a chance for that. I guarantee you will see some interesting and cool stuff you won’t get to see in May.” As of Tuesday afternoon, nearly a dozen field trips are taking place next weekend and some have already sold out. There are trips where 120 people can participate and others are capped at 22 bird watchers. Delmarva Birding Weekend kicks off on Friday, Jan. 26 from 8-11 a.m. with a driving and hiking tour of the Chincoteague Bay Wilderness Landings. The cost is $25 per person and participants will meet at the Public Landing Pier at the end of Public Landing Road. This tour features some of the most unspoiled historic areas on the East Coast and takes bird watchers through remote and exclusive saltwater and marsh landings within 16,000 acres of protected property on Chincoteague Bay. “Most of the field trips take place along the coast either in the coastal bays or on islands and freshwater bays,” Rapp said. “One of the coolest things is the relationships we have with local owners. Some of these places you can’t go on your own.” On Friday afternoon, participants will meet in the parking lot of Berlin Falls Park for a driving and hiking tour. The cost is $25 per person and runs from 1:30-4:30 p.m. The trip goes through Berlin’s 60acre nature park and a 150-acre private farm. Berlin Falls Park features a wide variety of duck species like northern shovelers, hooded mergansers and ruddy ducks. Hawks and eagles are also usually spotted in the area. Then, bird watchers will head to the Golden Quarter Farm along Ayers Creek to check out the forest, ponds, fields and creek for brownheaded nuthatches, kinglets, eagles, See SEVERAL Page 31


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

PAGE 31

Soup and sandwich sale supports Ocean City church Continued from Page 30 p.m., a group of volunteers come in to clean up and all leftovers are placed in coolers. No one has a definitive answer as to how long these soup and salad fundraisers have been going on, but the estimate is close to 40 years. Local businesses in the area are huge contributors to the sales of soups and sandwiches during this fundraiser, calling in large orders for their employees. The Town of Ocean City sends a carry-out fax each time the fundraiser is held. Last Thursday, the Bank of Ocean City, Quiet Storm and the Harrison Group were a few placing orders.

On Jan. 11, 142 quarts of soup, 89 pints of soup, 112 sandwiches and 501 biscuits were sold during the fundraiser, Yates said. Fundraisers will also take place on Jan. 25, Feb. 8 and 22 with the same soup and sandwich selections from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sandwiches cost $5 and desserts $2. A 16-ounce soup with a biscuit costs $5 and a 32-ounce with two biscuits is $6. Pepsi products and coffee are available for $1. Guests can pay with cash or check. The church is located at the corner of Fourth Street and Baltimore Ave. in Ocean City. To make a carry-out order, call 410-289-7430 or fax the order to 410-289-8175. For questions, email atlanticumc@atlanticumc.org

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Betty Kurka, left, and Virginia Harmon, have been cashiers for the Atlantic United Methodist Church’s soup and sandwich fundraiser since its inception.

Several trips planned during Delmarva Birding Weekend Continued from Page 30 wood ducks and Wilson’s snipe. This trip will also take place on Saturday, Jan. 27, from 8-11 a.m. Delmarva Birding Weekend participants can choose to end their Friday night at the Berlin Tally Rally at Burley Oak from 5-7 p.m. “People enjoy the social nature and going out to the bar to swap stories and talk about the day,” Rapp said. There is no fee to attend, craft beer and root beer will be available for purchase. Local guides will also be in attendance. For $50 per person, a three-hour boat tour will take bird watchers around the mouth of the Delaware Bay next Saturday afternoon while visiting ice breakers and two stone breakwaters looking for gulls, cormorants, gannets, loons, scoters, eiders, ducks and razorbill. Attendees also have a good chance of seeing a harbor or gray seal hauling out on the ice breakers. “Eighty people have already signed up for one of our premier trips of the weekend,” Rapp said. “The boat has a cabin inside to warm up and when you see seals hauled out on rocks, it’s like you

are in Maine for the weekend. [There are] great birds and you see Cape Henlopen from out on the Atlantic.” The Lewes Boat Trip is aboard the Thelma Dale V, which has an enclosed cabin with window viewing and a topdeck area for open-air views. The trip takes place Saturday, Jan. 27, from 1-4 p.m. and the meeting location is at the Fisherman’s Wharf in Lewes, Delaware. Saturday’s festivities conclude with the Lewes Tally Rally at Irish Eyes from 4-6 p.m. There is no fee to attend and food and drinks will be available for purchase. Local guides will be in attendance and bird watchers can discuss the weekend. On Sunday morning, bird lovers have the option to enjoy a remote duck-filled, 50-acre freshwater pond next to the forests and marshes of Newport Bay in Berlin. The 2,000-acre Newport Farm is home to winter bald eagles, American white pelicans, golden eagles and several waterfowl species. The driving and hiking field trip takes place Sunday, Jan. 28, from 8-11 a.m. The cost is $25 per person and bird watchers will meet at the cul-de-sac at See BIRDING Page 32

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Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 19, 2018

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20

Aries, if a special opportunity or circumstance comes your way, jump at the chance to be a part of it. Such opportunities might not come along too often, so enjoy the ride.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21

Taurus, a newfound devotion to exercise may improve your life in many different ways. If you have been vacillating on whether or not to embrace a new lifestyle, just do it.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21

An unexpected situation has put you out of your element, Gemini. For now you can simply go with the flow and see how things work out. Don’t let this get the better of you. PHOTO COURTESY JIM RAPP

Bird watchers gather for a photo during the Lewes Boat Trip in 2017. This year, the trip takes place Saturday, Jan. 27, from 1-4 p.m. in the Delaware bay.

Birding Weekend grows each year Continued from Page 31 the eastern end of Hayes Landing Road. Taking place during the same time on Sunday, Jan. 28, there will also be a driving and hiking adventure through Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes, Delaware. The cost is $25 per person. The park is located where the Delaware bay meets the Atlantic and has a pitch pine forest, tidal marsh, forested

wetland, dunes and beach habitats with a wide array of birds. Look forward to seeing brown-headed nuthatch, snow bunting, loons, scoters and other bay and sea ducks. Rare birds include the “Ipswich” Savannah sparrow, common redpoll, razorbill, common eider, great cormorant, lesser black-backed, blackheaded and little gull. “Every year it gets bigger and bigger,”

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Rapp said. “People are looking for something to do. Put on a coat and get outside to share the experience with other people who like being outside.” Organizers recommend attendees bring binoculars and spotting scopes. “The guides will teach you about the birds and the environments’ they live in,” Rapp said. “We will have a couple spotting scopes available and everyone is going to see something they haven’t seen before, which is part of the reason people continue to come back and participate each year.” In addition, look forward to the 23rd annual Spring Delmarva Birding Weekend slated for April 26-29. For more information and a list with descriptions of all trips taking place during Winter Delmarva Birding Weekend, visit delmarvabirding.com/winter-dbwjan-27-29.

Kindergarten and Pre-K registration

(Jan. 19, 2018) Ocean City Elementary School will begin the registration process for the 2018-2019 Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten programs in February. Children who will be 4 years old on or before Sept. 1, 2018 may be eligible for the school’s Pre-Kindergarten program. Space is limited and children from families who meet the federal income guidelines will be given priority enrollment. Children who will be 5 years old on or before Sept. 1, 2018 must register for Kindergarten. Children who are currently attending Pre-Kindergarten at Ocean City Elementary School do not need to register for Kindergarten. They will be enrolled automatically. Call Ocean City Elementary School at 410-632-5370 beginning Feb. 1 to schedule a registration appointment.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, dabbling in a few different projects may give you a unique perspective and the inspiration to take things in a new direction. Keep putting out those feelers.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23

Leo, you have just about sold one of your ideas and now it’s just a matter of being patient. Soon the results will support your vision, and you can enjoy the fruits of your labors.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22

Let other people’s perceptions roll off you like water off of a duck’s back, Virgo. To get the full picture, you need to immerse yourself and make up your own mind.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23

Libra, take a few steps back and think about whether or not a new approach is needed regarding a specific situation. Thinking logically instead of emotionally may help.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22

Scorpio, take a day to recharge your batteries if you feel your energy stores are running low. You may not need an extended vacation to do so, just a day to relax.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21

Sagittarius, looking within yourself can help you get a grasp on your situation and your future. Make the most of this introspection and use it as a catalyst for positive change.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20

Take certain things with a grain of salt, Capricorn. Until you can flush out the facts, there is no point in worrying or passing judgement. Be patient and things will come to light.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18

Find more time to explore an important relationship, Aquarius. Don’t overlook the importance of date night. Make time for this important person even if it requires sacrifices.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20

Pisces, do something unexpected this week and watch as those around you are inspired by your willingness to try new things.


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 33

OUT & ABOUT

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ocean City Councilman Wayne Hartman spends time with his son, Trent, who recently turned 21, during the Star Charities Beef and Beer dinner to support wounded soldiers at the Ocean Pines Community Center, Jan. 12.

Operation We Care representatives, Diana and Jeff Merritt, pose for a photo during the Beef and Beer event hosted by Star Charities at the Ocean Pines Community Center, Jan. 12. Operation We Care is a nonprofit organization that collects funds to create care packages for military personnel deployed overseas.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Star Charities founder Anna Foultz, center, smiles for a photo with her son, Carl “Gilly,” and his wife, Janet, during the Star Charities Beef and Beer event at the Ocean Pines Community Center, Jan. 12.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Kurt Herring and his children, Marshall and Wyatt, of Frankford, Delaware, enjoy pizza at Game World on 146th Street during the Worcester County Relay for Life Kickoff fundraiser, Jan. 12.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Mary Berquist and her daughter, Brooke, of Bishopville, attend the Relay for Life kickoff fundraiser at Game World on 146th Street, Jan. 12.

Sarah Reynolds, left, and Dorothy McCormick, both of Salisbury, snack on pizza at Game World on 146th Street during the Relay for Life kickoff fundraiser, Jan. 12.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 34

JANUARY 19, 2018

NOW PLAYING BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com Jan. 24: DJ EJ Foxx, 5-9 p.m.

15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. DUFFY’S TAVERN

SEACRETS

130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com Jan. 19: Bob Hughes, 5-9 p.m.

49th Street and the bay, Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com Jan. 19: DJ Tuff, 10 p.m. to 1:55 a.m. Jan. 20: Full Circle Duo, 5-9 p.m.; DJ Bobby-O, 6 p.m. to 1:55 a.m.

HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com Jan. 19: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jan. 20: Side Project/Chris Button,

BOB HUGHES

OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jan. 19-20: New Censation

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2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jan. 21: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m.

WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 www.whiskersbar.com Jan. 19: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

RELAY FUNDRAISER Posing for a photo during the Worcester County Relay for Life kickoff fundraiser at Game World on 146th Street last Friday, from left, are Lorelei Auker, co-organizer Dawn Hodge, Sully and Chrissy Auker, Michelle and Layla Prestas and Saige Figgs, all of Ocean City.

CHILDREN’S THEATER TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

DINNER EVENT Star Charities volunteers Barbara Mazzei, left, and Mary Evans, collect tickets during the Beef and Beer event held at the Ocean Pines Community Center, Jan. 12, to benefit wounded soldiers.

Ocean City Elementary students recently enjoyed the annual Children’s Theater at Stephen Decatur High School. This year’s production was “Jack and the Beanstalk.” Students Tristan Pendleton and Yaretzi Castro Gutierrez are pictured with the giant, played by Stephen Decatur student Frankie Nanna.


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 35

BEST HAPPY HOUR ON THE BEACH! HAPPY HOUR 3--6PM DRINK SPECIALS 7 DAYS A WEEK

PHOTO COURTESY STEVE SISK

Forty cadets in the Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) boosters at Stephen Decatur High School attend Wreaths Across America at Arlington National Cemetery last month.

Cadets join Wreaths Across America By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) About 40 cadets in the Navy Junior Reserve Officers Training Corps (NJROTC) boosters at Stephen Decatur High School attended Wreaths Across America at Arlington National Cemetery last month. “It was important for the cadets to see firsthand the true meaning of the sacrifice that military members have given for our country,” Commander Steve Sisk said. “They loved it and it gave them the chance to go out and see things they don’t experience every day by being in Washington D.C. with more than 75,000 people, memorializing veterans through a dedicated effort.” The annual Wreaths Across America ceremony commemorates fallen heroes at Arlington National Cemetery in addition to veterans’ cemeteries nationwide and overseas by placing wreaths on their graves during the holiday season. “We try to instill in kids the sacrifices people have made in this country,” Sisk said. “We will try and do this

as an annual event and have them participate in Memorial Day events so we never forget our history.” Currently, about 70 students are participating in the NJROTC program at Stephen Decatur High School, he said. “It is important for the community to understand the goal is not to act as a recruiting tool [for the military], but to give these kids leadership and ethics skills, enhancing their ability to succeed in college and work,” Sisk said. “We want them to have the opportunity to join the military, but also develop day-to-day skills like interviewing for a job or survival skills to help them succeed in what they want to do.” In addition, the program teaches fellowship and naval historical lessons through trips and activities. Funds will also provide scholarships for cadets. Earlier this school year, students in the program went to Norfolk, Virginia to tour an aircraft carrier and submarine. During their trip to Washington D.C. in December, they visited the National Air and Space Museum. “Part of why we do this is so they

are not sitting in class all day,” Sisk said. “They learn leadership skills from others who have accomplished specific things.” Next month, NJROTC cadets are slated to take a trip to the naval academy and observe a legislative session in Annapolis. “We want to build up the program, double the number of cadets and offer more to students participating,” Sisk said. “The [boosters] program needs to be ongoing. We can grow and offer scholarships for kids, ROTC college units and workmanship programs [and] send out information to parents. The benefits of being in the program are numerous.” The Navy helps with funding when at least 100 students are enrolled. The school lost funding a few years ago, although the county makes a small contribution each year, Sisk said. “We hope all kinds of folks make contributions,” Sisk said. “We are trying to grow the program and make it more attractive to students.” Individual donations can be sent to: SDHS NJROTC at 9913 Seahawk Road, Berlin, Maryland, 21811.

Group’s first 2018 meeting, Jan. 23

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) The 100+ Women Who Care on the Shore charity will have its first meeting of the new year on Tuesday, Jan. 23, at the West Ocean City Bottle Shop on Route 50. Women interested in donating $300 to worthy charities in 2018 are encouraged to attend the 5:30 p.m. hour-long meeting. “It’s really fast and simple,” said Janelle Mulholland, co-founder of 100+ Women Who Care on the Shore,

along with Susanna Eisenman and Anna Newton. “There’s no selling raffle tickets, no bake sales. Just women getting together for one hour, discussing how they can make a difference in their community and writing a check. The impact is immediate.” The 100+ Women Who Care on the Shore members directly contribute $100 to three different charities each year. During the hour-long meetings, each woman in attendance fills out a nomination form with their favorite nonprofit charity from Worcester,

Wicomico or Somerset counties. The submissions go into a basket and three potential winners are picked. “Those three women present their nominations by telling the group about why they are passionate about their charity and what great work the charity does for the community,” Mulholland said. After presentations, each member votes for their favorite and the charity with the most votes receives checks from all 100+ Women Who Care on See ORGANIZATION Page 37

130th St. OC, MD 410.250.1449

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WEDNESDA D Y Burger Night $6.99

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PAGE 36

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

SKULL DISPLAYS During the 44th annual East Coast Commercial Fishermen’s and Aquaculture Trade Expo at the convention center last Friday, Johanna Pedersen, left, Bridget Harner and Joshua O’Connor from NOAA Fisheries display the skulls of seals found in the Ocean City area during wintertime.

TOP STUDENTS Audra Ely, manager of Ripley's Believe It or Not in Ocean City, recently honored fourth graders from Berlin Intermediate School. Ripley’s Students of the Month for December, from left, are Emily Blume, Megan Brown, Mason Lyons, Brody Olsen and Hunter Hudson.

FINANCIAL CHOICES

TOY DONATIONS

Every year, Bank of Ocean City teaches Junior Achievement classes at various elementary, middle and high schools promoting good financial choices. Explaining the difference between needs and wants at an early age promotes fiscal responsibility and will pay huge dividends in the future. Pictured are Buckingham Elementary third graders.

Members of the Ocean Pines Hammerheads swim team, and their coach, Brooks Ensor, deliver plush animals to the Atlantic General Hospital Emergency Department to be given to pediatric patients. Pictured, from left, are team members Will Schlesinger, Nat Fink, Audrey Iman, Katie Pizlo, Emma Coyman, Emily Fink, Victoria Iman and Molly Hoffman.

ARTISTS (Left) Painter Wendy Cossman displays her floral art during the "Shared Visions" show where artists and writers collaborate, through January at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street. (Right) Artist Michel Demanche features her mixed media creation during the show.


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

PAGE 37

SURF REPORT

Dalkiewicz discusses friend, surfer, Realtor, PJ Aldridge

By Dave Dalkiewicz Contributing Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) We lost a good guy this past week. PJ Aldridge finally succumbed to the lung cancer that was supposed to take him a long time ago. Back in the 1980s, PJ along with his brother, Mark, and a few friends lived upstairs from my shop. I can recall sponsoring him and Mark and a few others to represent Ocean Atlantic Surf Shop in Eastern Surfing Association contests. He did well enough to make regionals, the Eastern Championships and one year he went all the way to the United States champs, which he and Gary Hastings surfed in, that year in Hawaii. Not only was PJ a talented surfer of note but he went on to gain a degree from Salisbury University and proceed to a career as a Realtor in the Ocean

City area. In true surfer fashion he learned of his malady while on a trip, surfing in Costa Rica. He got plenty busy with his own foundation doing what he could to raise money for lung cancer research. His diagnosis was of stage four but I think it only served to drive him harder in his fight to help others along with himself. His foundation even got the attention of Oprah Winfrey to the point of Winfrey inviting PJ to appear on her show to help in promotion. A car was part of the arrangement which PJ donated to a raffle to benefit the new cancer and medical center now located near the North Gate of Ocean Pines. I got to know his family, especially Mark, to the point of going a long distance to purchase one of the few new vehicles that I’ve had. Members of his family had a Ford dealership in Lexington Park in Southern Maryland where PJ was originally from. Wish I See ALDRIDGE Page 38

Organization raised $12K for local charities in 2017 Continued from Page 35 the Shore members. “Charities can be nominated over and over again,” Mulholland said. “But once a charity has been chosen, it cannot be nominated again for one year. Charities must be 501(c)(3). The money must also stay on the shore to help our residents in Worcester, Wicomico and Somerset counties.” Members directly contribute $100 to three different charities each year, totaling $300. There are no administrative fees, and all donations are tax deductible. The organization held its first meeting last February where members donated $3,900 to the Stephen Decatur High School Band Boosters to help replace 29-year-old uniforms. During their second meeting in May, members contributed $3,400 to the CRICKET Center, a child advocacy center in Berlin. At the final meeting of 2017, which was held in October, participants raised $2,500 for Women Supporting Women, a local nonprofit organization that provides awareness, education and support for those affected by breast cancer. “Several weeks after the meeting, an anonymous donor came forward and matched the members donation by donating an additional $2,500 to Women Supporting Women,” Mulholland said. The money specifically helped to fund compression sleeves for breast cancer surgery patients, which can

cost up to $100 and many insurancecompanies do not cover. “All funds raised by 100+ Women Who Care on the Shore for Women Supporting Women will go to purchase these sleeves,” Mulholland said. “They will be available through Women Supporting Women free of charge for those who need them.” The 100+ Women Who Care on the Shore members have raised more than $12,000 for local charities in three meetings throughout 2017, she said. “I first heard of the organization while visiting my mother in Iowa,” Mulholland said. “Her friends started their own chapter and I loved the idea of a group of women getting together and discussing charities in their community and then writing checks to the chosen local charity.” The nonprofit organization, 100+ Women Who Care, began in Michigan more than a decade ago. Currently, there are more than 400 active chapters across the world. The local chapter will have its first meeting of 2018 on Tuesday, Jan. 23, at the West Ocean City Bottle Shop on Route 50 from 5:30-6:30 p.m. The others are scheduled for April 24 and Oct. 9 at the same time and location. All $100 cash or check donations should be brought to the meeting on Tuesday. For more information or to become a member, email Mulholland at mjmulholland@mchsi.com or visit www.facebook.com/100womenwhocareontheshore.

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PAGE 38

Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

JANUARY 19, 2018

SURF REPORT

Walker prepares pot roast Aldridge ‘one of the good guys’ dinner in pressure cooker

By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (Jan. 19, 2018) It is understood that a master chef strives for excellence and consistency. With this theory in mind, knowledge is a state where the teacher becomes the student. Questions, concepts and difficulties are not only justified but necessary for achieving awareness in a field of endless possibilities. The art of cookery is based on delivery where ingenuity can flourish. As a result, we can assume variation is inevitable and change becomes the norm. With that in mind, let us delve into the benefits of the unassuming pressure cooker as opposed to the popular slow cookers. Before we begin, allow me to clarify a misunderstanding. People tend to use the terms “Crock Pot” and “slow cookers” interchangeable, but this is incorrect. While all Crock Pots are slow cookers, not all slow cookers are Crock Pots. According to Humble to High Tech, A Slow Cooker History, Irvin Naxon, a prolific inventor, applied

for a patent on May 21, 1936, for a slow cooking device that would not only be portable, but would provide solutions for may of the complaints issued about previous models, namely uneven heating. Four years later he received the patent for a particular appliance known as a Crock Pot. I know I am venturing on a touchy subject; people love their slow cookers and Crock Pots. But if one is willing to keep an open mind, the thought of revision could become a reality. I am by no means suggesting that you should retire your slow cooker. Month after month, the popular appliance continues to be the subject of many websites and books and for good reasons. Slow cookers offer a level of convenience that no other cooking method can match. Simply add your ingredients, turn the switch to on and “viola,” hours later you have a hot meal ready and waiting. But if one understands the specifics and intricacies of culinary science, you might realize you are forfeiting a lot of flavor just for the sake of convenience. See SERVE Page 39

Continued from Page 37 still had that 1985 F-150 pick-up truck. Surfing, and especially surfers, often get a bad reputation for being unruly, lazy, and non-productive, sponging off of others, only caring about the next wave. There is some truth to this notion but it’s quite minimal; a bad rap so to speak. PJ was anything but. He was a credit to his family, friends, profession and surfing in general. You couldn’t have met a more friendly, upstanding person. He became a part of the fabric of this area choosing to live by the ocean with all it has to offer. An obituary appeared in the Jan. 12

issue of OC Today starting on page 27. A memorial gathering is scheduled for Saturday, Jan. 20 at 11 a.m. at the Ocean City Marlin Club in the West Ocean City Harbor. There is also talk of a paddle out on Sunday, Jan. 21. I’m sure details of such will be available at the memorial. Notice is short by the time this column comes out, but try to make the gathering if you knew PJ to show your respects. Rest in peace, PJ my friend. Thanks for your inspiration. You were one of the good guys. — Dave Dalkiewicz is the owner of Ocean Atlantic Surf Shop in Ocean City

CROSSWORD

Answers on page 42


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Serve pot roast with mashed potatoes, assorted veggies Continued from Page 38 An article, “Why Anything Slow Cookers Can Do, Others Can Do Better” by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, is quite enlightening and worth review. Lopez-Alt is the author of the James Beard Award nominated column The Food Lab, where he explores the science of home cooking. Slow cookers, pressure cookers and Dutch ovens are used for moistheat cooking techniques that consist of braising, simmering and stewing. But there are fundamental differences in the way that they heat, which can affect the outcome of a dish. For the purpose of this article we will compare slow cookers and pressure cookers. Lopez-Alt wanted to know exactly what these differences are and how they impact flavor. He made batches of beef stew, red sauce, split pea soup and chicken stock, and compared the results. The purpose was to see if a pressure cooker produced a better tasting dish. Following is a very brief and condensed summation of his findings. One of the biggest factors that can affect the taste and body development in braises and stews is the temperature at which they are cooked. The temperatures in slow cookers can vary greatly from brand to brand, but in most cases, the range of heat is below a pressure cooker. More importantly, because you are heating through a thick ceramic insert, that energy comes gently from the bottom. In addition, the moisture that evaporates from the food being cooked condenses on the lid and drips back down, simultaneously slowing the rate of reduction which intensifies taste. Thus, all foods cooked in slow cookers experience almost no extra browning or reduction, which means that it is difficult to build flavor. Pressure cookers function on a different principle than slow cookers. Pressure cookers are tightly sealed and the boiling point of liquid is much higher. As the pot heats up, pressure begins to build. This pressure makes it more difficult for water molecules to turn to vapor. The steam generated in the cooker makes food cook faster. And because the pot is sealed, it requires less cooking liquid which enhances the flavor. As a bonus, once the pressure is reached, you cook with the heat turned down as low as possible, and the cooking time is very brief as opposed to a slow cooker. The philosophy of cooking is to be willing to step out of your comfort zone and test the theories of possibilities. You never know, there may be an occasion where you have to make pot roast “on the fly.”

In that case, cooking this favorite dish in a pressure cooker may save the day. Enjoy!

Pressure Cooker Pot Roast

Ingredients 1 (4-pound) boneless beef chuckeye roast, pulled apart at the natural seam and trimmed of any large pieces of fat kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 4 pieces 2 tablespoons good quality extravirgin olive oil 1 sweet onion, quartered 2 large cloves garlic, quartered 1 celery rib including the leaves, quartered 1 large carrot, peeled, ends removed and quartered 3 cups red wine 2 cups concentrated beef stock 2 cups chicken stock 2 teaspoons soy sauce 2 rounded teaspoons veal demiglace 3 bay leaves 2 rounded teaspoons dried thyme 2 rounded teaspoons dried herbs de Province 2 teaspoons dried crushed rosemary 2 teaspoons tomato paste

1. Salt and pepper meat heavily and set aside. 2. Melt butter and olive oil in pressure cooker over medium-high heat. Add meat and sear both sides. Remove from pressure cooker and set aside. 3. Turn heat to medium-low and add onion, garlic, celery and carrots and sauté for seven minutes. 4. Add all of the remaining ingredients. Lock lid in place and bring pot to high pressure over high heat, 3 to 8 minutes depending on the type of pressure cooker you have. As soon as the pot has reached high pressure, reduce temperature to medium-low and cook for 1 hour, adjusting heat as needed to maintain high pressure. 5. When meat is fork tender, remove it and place on a plate in a warm oven. 6. Remove bay leaves. 7. Using a handheld immersion blender, puree the broth and vegetables. 8. Place blended broth in a pan, reduce and thicken with cornstarch slurry. 9. Serve meat and thickened sauce with mashed potatoes and a medley of assorted vegetables. Secret Ingredient – Consistency. “Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative.” — Oscar Wilde

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Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.oceancityhilton.com/dining / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717 / www.ocitalianfood.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room with fireplace. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ ASIAN GARDEN, Philadelphia Avenue, between 15th and 16th streets, Ocean City 410-289-7423 / www.asiangarden.us / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Serving Chinese and Indian cuisine. Eat in, carry out or we can deliver. Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. ■ THE BIG EASY ON 60, 5909 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-2305 / www.thebigeasyon60.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full Bar / An Ocean City restaurant with a New Orleans flair. Amazing atmosphere with beautiful outside patio seating. Come try some Ocean City favorites as well as our take on traditional Louisiana cajun dishes. Everything from outstanding starters, unique entrees, to awesome desserts along with extraordinary hospitality. A family friendly Ocean City Restaurant New Orleans menu. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishocmd.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH, 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896 / www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations recommended for large parties / Children’s menu/ Full bar / Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, Steaks & Pasta dishes—Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS, 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100 / www.coinspub.com / $-$$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m. and early bird 4-6 p.m. Daily specials. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends.

■ THE COVE AT OCEAN PINES, 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 / www.oceanpines.org/ $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS/No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Coastal cuisine. Open Friday from 4-10 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. ■ THE CRAB BAG, 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-250-3337 / www.thecrabbag.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Full bar / Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carry-out and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DOUGH ROLLER, South Division Street and Boardwalk 410-289-3501; 41st Street and Coastal Hwy. 410-524-9254; 70th Street and Coastal Hwy. 410-524-7981 / www.DoughRollerRestaurants.com / $ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Ocean City’s favorite family restaurant for more than 35 years. Great kid’s menu. Dayton’s Fried Chicken available at South Division. Breakfast served daily at 41st and 70th streets. Order online for carryout at both Coastal Highway locations. ■ DRY 85 OC, 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-8989 / www.DRY85.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Steps from the beach. Named one of the Top 40 Whisky Bars in America by Whisky Advocate plus Craft Beer and Craft Cocktails. Gourmet “stick to your ribs” home cooking. A made-from-scratch kitchen with every sauce, every dressing hand crafted. It’s that attention to detail that takes the concept of burgers, fries, pork chops and wings and turns them completely on their head. Each dish is creatively deconstructed allowing the essence of flavor and spice to shine. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ DUFFYS, 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449 / www.duffysoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second Season & Daily Dinner Specials. Dine In, Carry Out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ FLYING FISH CAFE & SUSHI BAR, The Village of Fenwick, 300 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-581-0217 / www.flyingfishfenwick.com / $-$$ /V-MC-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Featuring the freshest and most innovative sushi, sashimi, and rolls plus creative and delicious small plates. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN, 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436-FOXS / www.foxspizzade.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery. ■ GUIDOS BURRITOS, 33rd Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3663 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining. Full service Mexican restaurant featuring the freshest ingredients matched with authentic recipes, intoxicating aromas, and an upbeat atmosphere … one bite and you’re transported to Mexico City. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and all-you-caneat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites,

JANUARY 19, 2018

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Add a QR Code to your Dining Guide listing and give your patrons a direct link to your Web site, Facebook page, App, etc. Cost is $15 for current advertisers ~ $25 for new listings Contact a Sales Representative at 410-723-6397

Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdhotels.com/hemingways / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Sea-food, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Serving beach-inspired dishes in both our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. Allday menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open yearround and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ, 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443-664-5639 / www.longboardcafe.net / $$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, paninis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MY THAI OC, 138th Street, Bayside Plaza, 13727 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410250-9918 / www.mythaioc.webs.com / $ / VMC-DIS / Beer, wine / Authentic Thai food served 6 days a week, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Closed Tuesdays. Free parking for customers. Eat in or take out. Vegetarian options also. ■ NICK’S HOUSE OF RIBS, 144th Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-1984 / www.nickshouseofribs.com / $$/ V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual, family friendly with upscale atmosphere. Extensive menu from our famous baby back ribs, fresh seafood, black angus steaks. ■ OC 360 EATS+DRINKS, 13801 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 443-664-4008 / www.fenwickinn.com/360-eats-drinks / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / One of North OC's best kept gems and only rooftop restaurant. Nestled on the 8th floor of The Fenwick Inn, you can enjoy amazing views of both the ocean and bay. Join us for breakfast Saturday or Sunday from 8-11 a.m. or dinner from 3-9 p.m. Come for a Happy Hour cocktail everyday from 3-7 p.m. and catch an amazing sunset from our 8th floor patio. Our large neighborhood bar houses all of your favorite spirits. We also offer weekly dinner specials. Check us out on Facebook or our website! Can't wait to see you. ■ OCEAN DOWNS CASINO, DINE N DASH, 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-6410600 / www.oceandowns.com / $-$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Full bar in Casino / This eatery and bar is sure to satisfy your appetite! With everything from hearty soups, overstuffed deli sandwiches and snacks. Open for breakfast, 8-11 a.m., lunch and dinner, 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. and Grab & Go, 3-4 a.m. Must be 21 years old to enter. ■ PIZZA TUGOS, Routes 50 and 611, West Ocean City, 410-524-2922 / 114th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-5242922 / www.pizzatugos.com / $-$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Serving lunch and dinner. Open 7 days. Pizza Tugos is a family-friendly dining restaurant that features award winning pizza, pasta, craft burgers, sandwiches, subs, appetizers and salads. Great happy hour and football specials with full bar and 54 craft beers. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-

MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ RARE AND RYE, 106 32nd St., Ocean City 410-213-7273 / https://www.rareandrye.com / V-MC-AE-DIS / Full Bar/ Whiskey and Wine Bar. Farm to Table. Locally grown and prepared cuisine with an eclectic menu. Unique libations with robust selection of ryes, bourbons, whiskeys and specialty drinks. Authentic green space with industrial and rustic décor. ■ RED RED WINE BAR OC, 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-6801 / www.RedRedWineBar.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full Bar/ Steps from the beach. Coastal cuisine with a focus on local seafood and hand tossed pizzas plus artisanal cheeseboards. 35+ wines By the Glass, 120+ By the Bottle. Flights. Full bar. Luxurious colors and custom built couches make this the spot to escape for lunch and dinner. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ ROPEWALK, 82nd Street on the bay, Ocean City 410-524-1109 / www.ropewalkoc.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / OC’s favorite spot to watch the sunsets. Indoor dining and bar, deck dining and tiki bar. Serving brunch on Saturday and Sunday. Serving lunch and dinner, 7 days a week in casual atmosphere. Happy hour specials all day, every day. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410524-4900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / www.skyebaroc.com / $$-$$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials. ■ SUSHI CAFE, 13711 Coastal Hwy., Ocean City 443-373-2370 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Dine in, carry out. Offering the freshest Sushi, nigiri, sashimi and rolls along with traditional kitchen entrées. ■ TOUCH OF ITALY, 67th Street and Coastal Highway, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 302-703-3090 / www.TouchofItaly.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full bar / Full Italian style restaurant with Italian style deli and pasticceria/bakery too. Just stop in for a look and a taste of some fresh prosciutto fresh loaves of Italian bread. Large circular bar with Happy Hour and check our Web site with our daily specials from our great menu including pasta, wood fired pizzas, delicious heros and catering. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT, Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-289-1100 / www.dunesmanor.com / $$ - $$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations not required but recommended / Full Bar / Children’s menu / Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Certified Angus®burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

PAGE 41

Calendar for adults and children. 410-632-3495, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FRI, JAN. 19 COFFEE AND COLORING

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Join the group for a relaxing coloring session. 410-208-4014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

LAP TIME

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, 10:30 a.m. Children, under 2 years old, will be introduced to songs, games and finger plays. 410-6323495, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FIBER FRIENDS

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Knitters, crocheters, embroiderers, etc. are welcomed. Victoria Christie-Healy, moonlightknitting@gmail.com, 703-5070708

WRITING FOR WELLNESS

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 1 p.m. Featuring “The Dovekeepers” by Alice Hoffman. Copies of the books are available in advance at the library. 410641-0650, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Group uses exercises to stimulate the process of creative expression. No prior writing experience needed. 410-208-4014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

BERLIN BOOK THE MONTH

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842, 1 p.m. Learn how to prepare snacks. Hosted by Taryn Bradley. Register: 410-524-1818, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

SNACKS & APPS

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 2 to 4 p.m. Play for a chance to win a prize. Prizes courtesy of the Friends of the Ocean Pines Library. 410-208-4014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

BINGO AT THE LIBRARY!

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 4 p.m. This is an informal Q&Abased meeting and an opportunity to be the first to sign up for the weekly program to start March 2. For girls in 6th through 12th grades. 410-641-0650, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

CODING FOR GIRLS

Bowen United Methodist Church, 8421 Newark Road, Newark, MD, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Platters cost $10 and include flounder filet, mac and cheese, green beans, corn bread, dessert and for those who eat in includes beverage.

FISH DINNER

Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., Pocomoke City, MD, 7 p.m. Featuring “E.T.” Light refreshments served. 410957-0878, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY RETRO MOVIE NIGHT

SAT, JAN. 20 MEDICAL MARIJUANA INFORMATION SESSION

Ocean Pines Community Center, Assateague Room, 235 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 3:30 p.m. During the presentation, expected to last between 30 and 45 minutes, Lyndsey Odachowski will explain in depth the merits of medical

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

TRADE EXPO Rick Miller, of Miller’s Marine Service, out of Chestertown, Maryland, poses along with a number of motors during the 44th annual East Coast Commercial Fishermen’s and Aquaculture Trade Expo at the convention center on 40th Street, last Friday. marijuana. The dispensary’s clinical director, Nurse Practitioner Vanessa Adams and Dr. William Gunn will be on hand to answer questions. White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Held every Saturday. Locally grown vegetables and fruits, eggs, honey, kettle korn, flowers, artisan breads, seafood, meats and more. New vendors welcome. 410-6417717, Ext. 3006

FARMERS MARKET

Ocean Pines War Memorial, South Gate Pond, Ocean Pines, MD, 9 to 10 a.m. There is a short presentation by a doctor on a current health topic followed by a walk around the pond at your own pace while you visit with others and have conversation with the doctor. Family and pet friendly. Ashley, agodwin@atlanticgeneral.org, 410-641-9644

WALK WITH A DOC

St. Paul United Methodist Church, 405 Flower St., Berlin, MD, 11 a.m. Choice of three entrees: chitterlings, $12; pig feet, $12; or chicken and dumplings, $9. Each entrée comes with two sides. Info: Michelle Smack, 410-251-7584 or Darlene Bowen, 443-614-1554

SOUL FOOD DINNER

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Discuss your favorite anime or learn about a new series. For teens. 410-208-4014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TEEN TIME: ANIME!

New Hope United Methodist Church, 7338 New Hope Road, Willards, MD, 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Menu includes mashed potatoes, greens, string beans, macaroni and cheese, beets, biscuits, dessert and coffee. Cost is $13 for adults. Carry-outs available. 410-543-8244 or 443-235-0251

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT FRIED CHICKEN DINNER

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Hear a story, sing songs and make a craft. Siblings, families and caretakers welcome. Register: 410-632-3495, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

SENSORY STORY TIME

Whiskers Bar & Grill, 11070 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 2 to 6 p.m. Believe In Tomorrow candidate Frankie Schmidt will host this event.

‘80S PARTY

SUN, JAN. 21 Ocean City Inlet, 806 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, 12:45 p.m. Paddle out or hang out on the beach and pay tribute to P.J. Aldridge. Remember to support the Pj Aldridge Foundation. Brad Hoffman, brad@live-wire-media.com, 443-3665944

PADDLE OUT FOR P.J.

Ocean City Boardwalk, 709 S Atlantic Ave., Ocean City, MD, 2 p.m. Members of Indivisible Worcester Maryland and the Women’s Democratic Club of Worcester County will rally and march on the Boardwalk. The theme will be “Empowering Women to Vote, Run for Office and Help Other Women.” All are invited. The group will meet on the Boardwalk near the Tram Station and march up to N. Division Street and back. Participants are encouraged to wear “pink pussy hats” and to bring signs honoring the undying spirit of the march.

WOMEN’S MARCH REUNION RALLY

MON, JAN. 22 Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, All Day Take some time to relax and color this week, choosing from a selection of coloring pages suitable

KEEP CALM AND COLOR

Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 5 to 6:30 p.m. Berlin group No. 169. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Edna Berkey, 410-251-2083 Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 7 to 9 p.m. The group meets each Monday. Women interested in learning the craft of a cappella singing welcome. 410-6416876

DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS

TUE, JAN. 23 Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, All Day Take some time to relax and color this week, choosing from a selection of coloring pages suitable for adults and children. 410-632-3495, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

KEEP CALM AND COLOR

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Explore the world of iPads while learning from each other. Men are welcome. Register: Norma Kessler, 410-641-7017, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

IPAD CHICKS - BEGINNERS

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 10:30 a.m. For 3 to 7 year old children. 410-641-0650, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PLAY DOUGH CREATIONS

TOT TIME: ACTIVE PLAY FOR ACTIVE. TODDLERS

Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., Pocomoke City, MD, 10:30 a.m. Active free play program for toddlers ages 1 to 3. 410-957-0878, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 1 p.m. Learn hair fashion tips and secrets for Valentine’s Day. Corrina and Suzi from Headlines Salon will show you how to solve any hair problem. 410-524-1818,

HAIR SALON DEMONSTRATION

Continued on Page 42


Ocean City Today

PAGE 42

JANUARY 19, 2018

CALENDAR annlutz60@gmail.com, 410-208-9767

http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Continued from Page 41

Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., Pocomoke City, MD, 2 p.m. Learn to blend essential oils specific to your needs. The group will be make roller balls of oils for calmness, muscle pain, headaches and more. Register: 410-957-0878, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

ROLLIN’ WITH ESSENTIAL OILS

LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC DISEASE WORKSHOP

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 1 to 3:30 p.m. A free, 6week interactive workshop proven to help people manage their chronic conditions and maintain an active lifestyle. Register: Jill Kenney, jak@macinc.org, 410-7420505, Ext. 159

Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 2 to 3 p.m. Providing physical and emotional support for survivors and caregivers to share personal experiences and challenges. Coping strategies also discussed. Anne Waples, awaples@atlanticgeneral.org, 443-614-5720

STROKE SUPPORT GROUP

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 2 p.m. Detective Tish Ottey will give some tips about staying safe in the community as well as online. 410-208-4014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

OCEAN PINES POLICE

TAI CHI

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 3 p.m. Tai Chi is an ancient for of relaxation, exercise and meditation combined. Limit of 15 participants. Register: 410-524-1818, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

BEACH SINGLES

Harpoon Hanna’s, 39064 Harpoon Road, Fenwick Island, DE, 3 to 6 p.m. Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Info: Arlene, 302-4369577 or Kate, 410-524-0649. http://www.BeachSingles.org

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 4:30 p.m. Enjoy books, crafts and games for the whole family. Snacks and drinks provided. 410524-1818, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FIRESIDE CHAT

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 3 p.m. Explore new authors and genres. 410-641-0650, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY NIGHT ‘THE MITTEN’

Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 5:30 to 7 p.m. The group meets each Tuesday. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and health lifestyle. jeanduck47@gmail.com

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

Pocomoke Elks Lodge 1624, 1944 Worcester Highway, Pocomoke City, MD, 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m., early bingo at 7 p.m. and regular games start at 7:30 p.m. Food and non-alcoholic drinks available. Open to the public. 410-957-3556

BINGO

WED, JAN. 24 Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, All Day Take some time to relax and color this week, choosing from a selection of coloring pages suitable for adults and children. 410-632-3495, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

KEEP CALM AND COLOR

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OCEAN PINES/OCEAN CITY

Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 8 a.m. Meets every Wednesday. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-6417330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10:30 a.m. For children under 2 and their caregivers. 410-2084014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

LAP TIME

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10:30 a.m. Best for

STORY TIME ‘COLORS’

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Join the group for Coke Floats and make your own Olympic award buttons to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the first Winter Games. Teens welcome. 410-641-0650, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY NIGHT ‘WINTER OLYMPICS FEVER’

GUEST ARTIST Jeweler Skylar Reed of Chincoteague is the artisan in residence during January at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on 94th Street. Reed turns everyday objects like oyster shells, yard sale finds and antiques into artwork. 2 to 5 year old children but all are welcome. 410-524-1818, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., Ocean City, MD, 5:30 to 9 p.m. The group meets every Wednesday. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ‘50s, ‘60s and Carolina Beach music. A $5 donation per person to benefit Veterans and local charities in the Delmarva region. Elk members and their guests welcome. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 410-208-1151, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB

OCEAN CITY/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING

Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St, Ocean City, MD, 6 p.m. The group meets every Wednesday. cliff0917@aol.com, 410-6411700 Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 7 to 8 p.m. The group gathers the fourth Wednesday of each month. Preregistration is not necessary. Pastoral Care Services, gmansell@atlanticgeneral.org, 410-641-9725

BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP

THU, JAN. 25 Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington

KEEP CALM AND COLOR

St., Snow Hill, MD, All Day Take some time to relax and color this week, choosing from a selection of coloring pages suitable for adults and children. 410632-3495, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, 10:30 a.m. Learn new skills while playing with educational toys. For infant to 5 year old children. 410-6323495, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PLAY TIME

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. 410-208-4014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STORY TIME ‘FRIENDSHIP’

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 11 a.m. The group meets every Thursday. Free and open to anyone who has lost a loved one, not just Coastal Hospice families. 410-251-8163

COASTAL HOSPICE GRIEF SUPPORT

REPUBLICAN WOMEN OF WORCESTER COUNTY LUNCHEON MEETING

Captains Table Restaurant, 2 15th St., Ocean City, MD, 11 a.m. Several speakers, including Chip Bartino, Pat Schrawder, Carol Frazier and Liz Mumford, will be updating the group on what’s happening at the county, state and federal levels. Cost of the luncheon is $20. Doors open at 10:30 a.m. and meeting begins at 11 a.m. Reservations: Ann Lutz,

ONGOING EVENTS The Maryland Senior Citizens Hall of Fame, Inc. (MSCHF) is seeking nominations of Maryland residents, 65 years of age or older, who as active volunteers (since age 65) have made outstanding contributions to improve the lives of others in the community. Nominations are accepted until April 10. Approved nominees are inducted into The Maryland Senior Citizens Hall of Fame at our annual Awards Luncheon held in October. The nomination form and specific details for eligibility are available on our website at mschf.org, by emailing mschf.mail@verizon.net or calling 410828-5852.

NOMINATIONS SOUGHT

Crossword answers from page 38


JANUARY 19, 2018

43 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew

for our WOC kitchen facility Starting at $11.50/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

HELP WANTED The Comfort Inn Gold Coast

has the following positions available: Room Attendant Maintenance Night Auditor Please apply in person at 112th St., Ocean City. We offer competitive pay and benefits.

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Employment Opportunities:

Year Round, Full/Part Time: Room Attendant, Hskpg Housestaff, Laundry Attendant, Line Cook, F&B Manager, Sales Manager, Sales Secretary, Admin Secretary, HSKPG Supervisor, Front Desk

Free employee meal and excellent benefits.

Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Attn: Human Resources Dept. 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Phone: 410-524-3535 Fax: 410-723-9109 EOE M/F/D/V

WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION TECHNICIANS & MANAGERS ~ IICRC, WRT, ASD Certifications a Plus ~

PAINTERS DECK COATING APPLICATORS FRAMERS INTERIOR REMODELING PROFESSIONALS VALID DL, Background Check, Drug & Alcohol-Free Environment

Please send your resumes at oceantowerconstruction@yahoo.com or call 443-366-5556 during regular business hours.

Work At The BEACH... Work With The BEST!!

Top wages, excellent benefits package and free employee meal available to successful candidates.

Director of Sales & Marketing

Hotel is seeking, a year round full time Director of Sales & Marketing. 250 rooms & 85 suites on the beach with a 40,000 sq ft conference center. Must have hospitality experience and demonstrate strong sales & marketing skills. Responsible for leading sales, catering, golf and convention services team. Applicant must be computer literate – Delphi and Opera experience a plus. Excellent salary, benefits and working conditions. Salary commensurate with experience. Qualified applicants only, forward resume with salary requirements to: Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel Human Resources 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842 Fax: 410-723-9109 ~ lwatson@clarionoc.com EOE M/F/D/V

HELP WANTED

Full or part time

Small Engine Mechanic

Call 410-641-3497 or stop by 10714 Ocean Gateway Berlin, MD

OUTDOOR MAINTENANCE HELPER Year Round – Full Time Motivated, honest worker with a sense of pride in his/her work and who likes to work with people. Must have driver’s license, good driving skills and reliable transportation. Must be able to lift 50 pounds or more and work in nice and inclement weather. Weekend and holiday work required. Some previous experience with mechanical, gas powered equipment and/or irrigation systems preferred Pay based on experience. Excellent Benefits! To apply or for additional information, contact the management office at 410-520-0044. We are a drug free, equal opportunity employer.

HELP WANTED Now Hiring Groundskeeper

Full-Time, Year Round Health Benefits Apply in person Tues. thru Thurs., 9-3 p.m. @ Golden Sands 10900 Coastal Highway

HELP WANTED

Embroidery Assistant. Full time, year-round. M-F, 9-5. Apply at OC Monogram Co. 9809, Route 611, West OC.

Chairside

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE Email Resume:

molarbiz@yahoo.com 8003 Coastal Hwy.

Now Hiring

All Positions! Apply online:

HookedOC.com or call:

410.723.4665

NOW HIRING!!

Store Managers for our Ocean City, MD locations. Salary 49-59K + bonus, 401K, health insurance, vacation & sick time. Apply online at www.joindunkin.com or via email dunkindonutjobs@gmail.com

Classifieds 410-723-6397

PILE GROUND MAN

for SUN PILE FOUNDATIONS INC Boots on the Ground all day with Heavy

chain Rigging experience needed. Chainsaw and hand power tool experience required. Must be Team Player and willing to pull the load. Traveling per diem included in wage package with good benefits. To interview, please forward your resume and/or all contact info with experience to info@spe-usa.net

Loss Prevention Assistant Wanted

Full Time - $10.00-$12.00 per hour Job Tasks and Responsibilities: Conducts video surveillance of assigned stores to identify loss of company assets and non-compliance with store operating policies and procedures. Education and Experience: High School Diploma or Equivalent. Competent computer skills including MS Office or equivalent internet skills including use of e-mails, group messaging and data collection, numeracy and literacy skills Required Key Competencies: Strong skills in accuracy, attention to detail, prioritizing and follow up, and problem solving. Organization and planning skills, Verbal and written communication skills, flexibility, reliability, and teamwork Email Resume to: dunkindonutjobs@gmail.com Subject Line: Loss Prevention or Apply in Person @ 9919 Golf Course Rd., Ocean City, MD Serious inquiries only, must live within a 30 minute radius of West Ocean City Maryland.

Bay Country Professional Concrete is looking to hire Foremen, Carpenters, Concrete Finishers, and Laborers. Hourly pay based on experience. Please call Linda or Heather 410-335-4116. Trabajo: Bay Country Professional Concrete busca Foremen, Carpinteros y Trabajadores. Pago por hora basado por experiencia. Por favor llame a Linda o Heather 410-335-4116.

DENTAL ASSISTANT NEEDED West OC practice, FT, M-F, with Benefits & Monthly Bonus Radiology cert., good clinical & keyboard skills required. Email or fax resume: contact@ atlanticdental.com or 410-213-2955

Become a Better You in 2018!

To Order Product Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net To Become an Avon Representative Sign Up at www. ChristinesBeautyShop.com

HELP WANTED

PT Custodial Position Worcester Preparatory School is seeking a part-time 12-month employee. Applicant must have experience in the maintenance, care, and cleaning of a large building. Candidate must be able to crawl, stoop, and lift a minimum of 50 lbs. and dexterity to perform all required tasks indoors or outdoors in a variety of weather conditions and temperatures. Approximately 25 hours per week. CJIS Background Screening required. Heather Parsons, Director of Human Resources, 410-641-3575 ext. 146

RENTALS RENTALS

Year Round Rentals available in West Ocean City. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Call 1-877-289-1616 for more information. NORTH OC YR CONDO 1BR, 1BA Newly renovated, flat screen TV’s. Furnished. Pool. $850mo + ref.'s & sec. dep. No pets. Vic 410-422-5164

WINTER WEEKLY RENTALS 4BR House $450/wk. 2BR Apartments $249/wk. Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave. 410-289-8581

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PAGE 44

RENTALS

Winter Rentals Available on St. Louis Avenue, right before 1st Street, Ocean City. Call 301-331-2209.

Winter Rental - OC Furnished, 3BR, 2BA Condo available January-April 2018. 11200 Coastal Hwy. $2000/ month. Call 703-314-9829.

RAMBLER MOTEL 9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com

Classifieds 410-723-6397

www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.net

By Monday, 5 p.m.

ROOMMATES

Room for Rent, 75th Street, now and/or summer. Call Dave, 954-816-9669.

Female Roommates Wanted. YR/Seasonal, Cozy House to share. Safe neighborhood in OP. 2 rooms w/shared bath $550 each. Utilities included. Just move in. Pets ok/No smoking. Employed females only. 410-208-3570. Roommate Needed. Call 443-996-1069.

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE

Bishopville. Energy efficient totally remodeled Home. 3BR, 2BA. Certified lead free. $249,000. Call Howard Martin Realty, 410-352-5555.

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443497-4200.

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

Looking for space, comfort and great views? Spacious, climatecontrolled offices available, with use of Conference Room, in a modern, wellmaintained building, in prime Ocean City location. Call 410-524-3440 for appointment.

COMMERCIAL

Ocean City Today

COMMERCIAL

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 225 sq. ft. Office space, $275/month. util incl Two 120 sq. ft. Storage Sheds, each $95/month Call 410-726-5471 or 410-641-4300

Office Space For Rent, Berlin Main Street - 1,040 square feet of office/retail space just south of Atlantic Hotel. Open front room 20’ x 26’, back room 20’ x 26’, including 13’ x 13’ office. High visibility location in bustling downtown Berlin. Contact Sharon Chandler at 443497-3097. Self-Storage Units on Route 50. 300 sq. ft. $190/mo. and 100 sq. ft. $75/mo. Call Bill 301-537-5391.

Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com

Ocean City, MD

Restaurant for Lease 203 seat restaurant located on landmark corner & prime hotel row. 5,730 sq ft newly renovated building, plenty of parking, upgraded HVAC, full liquor license, plenty of walk-ins & freezer space. Ideal for crab house, Mexican, BBQ, sports bar, or Ale House concept.

Contact Kevin Decker @ 443-235-6552 kevin@kevindeckeroc.com

SERVICES

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MOVE PRO movers

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Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065.

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BOAT SLIPS

Annual Boat Slip Rentals in Marsh Harbor (West Ocean City, MD) - 2 Available 40’ Slip plus metered electric - Slip 38 60’ Slip plus metered electric - Slip 43 Please email: mdavidson72@gmail.com

AUCTIONS

The contents of mini storage units will be sold at public auction. Units to be auctioned; B1, B11, B18, B31, B83, B97, O19, O24, O60, O68, O79, O134, O178, O29, O115, O164, S26, S40, S56, S102, S117, S135, S160, S177, S180, S185, S315, S317, S714, S748. Units are being sold due to non-payment of rent. Common items in units are, household items, furniture, tools, fishing equipment, paintings, antique and vintage items. Date: Saturday, January 27th, 2018 Time: NEW TIME 10:00AM #1 Starts at Berlin Mini Storage: Route 346 #2 Continues at OC Mini Storage: Route 50 #3 Finishes at OC Mini Storage: Route 611 Terms: CASH ONLY! Auctioneer: Tom Janasek

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REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Delaware New Move-In Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. New Homes from low $100’s. No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com.

SERVICES-MISCELLANEOUS Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-2120616 Ask for Multi-Media Specialist -Wanda & watch your results grow. EDED WANTED TO BUY OR TRADE FREON R12 WANTED: CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

PAGE 45

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 46

JANUARY 19, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICES COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10124 BLUE MARLIN DRIVE OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Douglas J. Williams and Christine U. Williams, dated January 5, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4337, Folio 74 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $250,000.00, and an original interest rate of 5.875%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on February 6, 2018 AT 3:25 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.  The property is improved by a dwelling. Terms of Sale: The property will be sold “as is” and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind.  A deposit of $19,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  At the Substitute Trustees’ discretion, the foreclosure purchaser, if a corporation or LLC, must produce evidence, prior to bidding, of the legal formation of such entity.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.   In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  All due and/or unpaid private utility, water and sewer facilities charges, or front foot benefit payments, are payable by the purchaser without adjustment.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, ground rent, or condo/HOA assessments, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the

risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser, and the purchaser agrees to pay reasonable attorneys’ fees for the Substitute Trustees, plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction. In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property.  If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit without interest.  The sale is subject to postsale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.  In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Michael McKeefery, Christianna Kersey, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com CGD File #: 450661 OCD-1/18/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 3 BEACH CT. OCEAN PINES A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October 30, 2015 and recorded in Liber 6662, Folio 359 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of

$315,933.00 and a current interest rate of 3.75%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on FEBRUARY 6, 2018 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $31,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not lim-

ited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 319860-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/18/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 11599 SOUTH DOLLY CIR. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 6, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4949, Folio 311 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $185,000.00 and a current interest rate of 3.87501%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on FEBRUARY 6, 2018 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 19, 2018

PAGE 47

PUBLIC NOTICES Terms of Sale: A deposit of $20,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus

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proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 321864-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/18/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE WHEREAS, on March 15, 2006, a certain Deed of Trust was executed by Stephen E. Matthews, and Geneva M. Matthews as Grantors in favor of 1st Mariner Mortgage as Beneficiary, and Millard S. Rubenstein as Trustees, and was recorded on March 30, 2006, in Book 4672, Page 116 in the Office of the Land Records for Worcester County, Maryland; and WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust is now owned by the Secretary, pursuant to an assignment dated January 28, 2014, and recorded on February 18, 2014, in Book 6323, Page 440, in the office of the Land Records for Worcester County, Maryland; and WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Deed of Trust in that the payment due on May 11, 2017, was not made and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this notice, and a Borrower has died and the Property is not the principal residence of at least one surviving Borrower, and no payment has been made sufficient to restore the loan to currency; and WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent as of October 26, 2017 is $373,207.68; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust to be immediately due and payable; NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to powers vested in me by the SingleFamily Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, notice is hereby given that on February 6, 2018 at 3:20 pm local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the following de-

scribed premises (“Property”) will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder: Commonly known as: 19 White Crane Drive, Berlin, MD 21811 Tax ID: 10-371007 The sale will be held at the courthouse entrance for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid $373,207.68. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorata share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a deposit totaling $37,300.00 in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. A deposit need not accompany each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of $37,300.00 must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within 30 days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveying fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extensions will be for 15-day increments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form of a certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of HUD. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused po1tion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder may be required to forfeit the cash deposit or, at the election of the foreclosure commissioner after consultation with the HUD representative, will be liable to HUD for any costs incurred as a result of such failure. The Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD representative, offer the property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance

with the terms of the sale as provided herein. HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be cancelled or adjourned if it is established, by documented written application of the mortgagor the Foreclosure Commissioner not less than 3 days before the date of sale, or otherwise, that the default or defaults upon which the foreclosure is based did not exist at the time of service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified or cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before public auction of the property is completed. The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is N/A (Full Balance Due) as of N/A (Full Balance Due), plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-of-pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner for recording documents, a commission for the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement. Tender of payment by certified or cashier’s check or application for cancellation of the foreclosure sale shall be submitted to the address of the Foreclosure Commissioner provided below. Date: December 21, 2017 Cohn, Goldberg & Deutsch, LLC Foreclosure Commissioner By: /s/ RICHARD E. SOLOMON COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE, SUITE 208 TOWSON, MD 21204 410-296-2550 IF YOU ARE A DEBTOR, OR AN ATTORNEY REPRESENTING A DEBTOR, THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED HEREBY WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. However, if you are either a debtor in a pending bankruptcy case, or have obtained an order of discharge from a United States Bankruptcy Court, which discharge includes this debt, or an attorney representing such a debtor, and you (or your client), has not reaffirmed liability for this debt, this office is not attempting to obtain a judgment against you (or your client) nor are we alleging that you (or your client) have any personal liability for this debt. We may, however, take action against any property which may have been pledged as collateral for the debt, which action may include repossession and/or foreclosure of the property, if otherwise permitted by law and/or order of court. OCD-1/18/3t _________________________________


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PUBLIC NOTICES JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-17-000402, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Bay Club Condominium building located at 302 32nd Street, Ocean City, MD 21842, the following described property located in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2018 AT 10:00 A.M. Units

Time Intervals

501 501 308 207 207 211 211 205 410 404 307 408 305 305 305 405 510 411 211 402 309 309 412 412 505

12 27 23 8 29 12 31 15 33 24 22 24 22 12 25 23 22 14 32 41 9 34 8 28 23

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and By-Laws recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and subsequent Time-Share Instruments as to each condominium unit, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2018 maintenance fee, and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen

(15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE BAY CLUB CONDOMINIUM OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-17-000404, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Bay Club Condominium building located at 302 32nd Street, Ocean City, MD 21842, the following described property located in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2018 AT 10:30 A.M. Units

Time Intervals

208 406 403 311 506 411 411 411 210 504 502 212 212 205 405 404 508 509 204 204 407

21 38 21 37 26 22 7 37 20 21 20 36 14 20 38 20 36 35 36 7 38

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each unit being part of the Bay Club Condominium as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration and By-Laws recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and subsequent Time-Share Instruments as to each condominium unit, and recorded among the aforesaid Land Records. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and

with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2018 maintenance fee, and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB, JR., ESQ. 108 N. 8th Street Ocean City, Maryland 21842

TRUSTEE'S SALE OF TIME-SHARE INTERVALS IN THE LUCAYAN CONDOMINIUM OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND By virtue of a Claim of Lien recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, and pursuant to the Order of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, Case No. C-23-CV-17-000403, the undersigned Trustee will offer for sale at public auction at the Lucayan Condominium building located at 119 72nd Street, the following described property located in the Town of Ocean City, in the Tenth Election District of Worcester County, Maryland, on FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 2018 AT 9:00 A.M. Units

Time Intervals

56 52 35 33 31 31 31 46 54 39 40 51 56 48 40 35 47 53 32 47 32 54

28 11 48 23 14 35 36 43 21 14 40 3 51 42 13 18 51 17 28 40 13 35

Each time interval being one week per year of the corresponding unit, each time interval and unit being part of the Lucayan Condominium as established pursuant to a Condominium Declaration, ByLaws, and Time Share Instrument recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland. The property will be sold in an "as is" condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranties or guarantees. A secured party may bid and shall be excused from deposit requirements. The Trustee reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the full amount of sale per time interval will be required at the time of sale, such deposit to be in cash or check. Cost of all recordation and transfer taxes, 2018 maintenance fee and all other incidental settlement costs shall be borne by the purchaser. The date of settlement shall be fifteen (15) days after final ratification by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, time being of the essence; otherwise, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, or in any manner designated by the Trustee; or, without forfeiting deposit, the Seller may exercise any of its legal or equitable rights against the defaulting purchaser. For more information, call: James E. Clubb, Jr., Esq. Trustee 410-289-2323 OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 11204 COASTAL HWY., UNIT #1C OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated November 7, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4590, Folio 310 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $311,750.00 and a current interest rate of 5.5%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 23, 2018 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit No. 1-C, in the High Point Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an â&#x20AC;&#x153;as


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PUBLIC NOTICES is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $28,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale

even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 202319-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 302 YAWL DR. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated January 16, 2003 and recorded in Liber 3587, Folio 437 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $91,000.00 and a current interest rate of 6.25%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 23, 2018 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $7,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current

year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 306239-3) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________

Stern & Eisenberg Mid-Atlantic, P.C. 9920 Franklin Square Dr., Suite 100 Baltimore, MD 21236 410-635-5127

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 205 125TH ST., UNIT #334HE5 A/R/T/A 334 125TH ST., UNIT H OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Gary Spencer a/k/a Gary J. Spencer, dated August 28, 2008 and recorded in Liber 5168, folio 709 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 22, 2018 AT 1:45 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit No. 334, Building No. E (Hawaii Building), Phase V, and the exclusive use of Dock Limited Common Element No. 400 in The Island at Hidden Harbour Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within 10 days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If the purchaser fails to settle within the aforesaid ten (10) days of ratification, the purchaser relinquishes their deposit and the Sub. Trustees may file an appropriate motion with the court to resell the property. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed with the Court in connection with such motion and any Show Cause Order issued by the Court and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper or Order by certified mail and regular mail sent to the address provided by the purchaser and as recorded on the documents executed by the purchaser at the time of the sale. Service shall be deemed effective upon the purchaser 3 days after postmarked by the United States Post Office. It is expressly agreed by the purchaser that actual receipt of the certified mail is not required for service to be effective. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement the deposit shall be forfeited to the Sub. Trustees and all expenses of this sale (including attorney fees and full commission on the gross sales price of the sale) shall be charged against and paid from the forfeited deposit. In the event of


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PUBLIC NOTICES resale the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property regardless of any improvements made to the real property. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate of 3.25000% per annum from the date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for the costs of all transfer taxes, (including agricultural transfer taxes, if applicable), documentary stamps and all other costs incident to settlement. Purchaser shall be responsible for physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss from the date of sale forward. The sale is subject to post sale audit by the Noteholder to determine whether the borrower entered into any repayment/forbearance agreement, reinstated or paid off prior to the sale. In any such event the Purchaser agrees that upon notification by the Sub. Trustees of such event the sale is null and void and of no legal effect and the deposit returned without interest. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or good and marketable title, or the sale is not ratified for any reason by the Circuit Court including errors made by the Sub. Trustees, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without any interest. Steven K. Eisenberg, Paul J. Moran, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________ Samuel I. White, PC 5040 Corporate Woods Drive, Suite 120 Virginia Beach, VA 23462 JOHN E. DRISCOLI, III, et al Plaintiffs, Substitute Trustees v. EI TIFFANY LOWRY Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil Action No. 23C16000901

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 22nd day of December, 2017, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10 Deerfield Court, Berlin, MD 21811 will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 29th day of January, 2018, provided a copy of this NOTICE be published at least once a week in each of three successive weeks in the some newspaper of general circula-

NOTICE The Mayor and City Council, a public community transit service provider in Ocean City, Maryland, is offering the opportunity for a public hearing to provide citizens a forum to present views on the following proposals: FY 2019 Annual Transportation Plan (ATP).   The ATP contains requests for operating funds from the following programs: Section 5311 of the Federal Transit Act, which provides funds for general public transit service in rural areas; Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) program, which provides funds for federally required para transit services for persons with disabilities. In addition, capital funds will be requested for the following items: ITEM Public Works Campus Plan Construction One (1) year preventative maintenance and repairs including parts and labor for rolling stock Fifteen (15) 40’ heavy duty bus replacements One (1) ADA para transit van replacement Two (2) 60’ heavy duty articulating buses Three (3) ADA accessible transit support vehicles Replace Park N Ride parking lot light fixtures with LED retrofit energy efficient units Two (2) year preventative maintenance and repairs for bus wash system Transit passenger shelter parts Transit station benches TOTAL

TOTAL $6,505,005 $785,000 $7,098,000 $65,611 $1,410,000 $180,000 $90,000 $20,000 $25,000 $20,000 $16,198,616

A Public Hearing will be held upon request. Requests for a Public Hearing must be in writing and will be received until 4 p.m. on Friday, February 9, 2018.  Requests for a Public Hearing and/or other written comments should be sent to the following address and clearly marked “Public Hearing Comments”: Ocean City Transportation 204 65th Street, Building E Ocean City, Maryland 21842 Written comments can also be emailed to: Mr. Mark D. Rickards at mdrickards@oceancitymd.gov If requested, a Public Hearing will be held: Monday, March 5, 2018 6:00 p.m. City Hall Council Chambers 301 Baltimore Avenue Ocean City, Maryland 21842 If special assistance is required at the Public Hearing contact Ocean City Transportation, Administrative Coordinator, at 410-723-2174 prior to 4 p.m. on Friday, February 9, 2018. OCD-1/18/5t ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ tion published in said County before the 22nd day of January, 2018. The Report of Sale states the amount of the sale to be $153,649.67. Susan R. Braniecki CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________ MARIA WORTHINGTON MCKENNA ESQ. COUNCIL, BARADEL, KOSMERL & NOLAN, P.A. 125 WEST STREET, 4TH FLOOR ANNAPOLIS, MD 21401

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 17219 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF

THOMAS TEMPLIN MILLER Notice is given that Douglas Rule Miller, 727 Hurricane Road, Ocean City, MD 21842, was on December 20, 2017 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Thomas Templin Miller who died on June 21, 2017, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 20th day of June, 2018. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the

decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Douglas Rule Miller Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative:


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PUBLIC NOTICES Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 4, 2018 OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________

SHERIFF’S SALE VALUABLE PERSONAL PROPERTY LOCATED AT WORLD GYM 107 67TH STREET OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF A WRIT OF EXECUTION issued out of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, in PNC Bank, National Association v. Tidal Wave Fitness, LLC, Case No. C-23-JG-16000025, and to me directed, I have levied upon, attached and taken into execution, as Sheriff of Worcester County, Maryland, all of the rights, title, interest and claims in and to any and all personal property of the judgment debtor, Tidal Wave Fitness, LLC, (“Judgment Debtor”), which are located on the premises of the World Gym at 107 67th Street, Ocean City, MD 21842. All of said personal property shall be sold to satisfy a judgment against the said Judgment Debtor and in favor of PNC Bank, National Association. I HEREBY GIVE PUBLIC NOTICE that COMMENCING AT 11:00 O’CLOCK A.M., on January 19, 2018, on the premise of the WORLD GYM, located at 107 67th Street, Ocean City, MD 21842, I will offer for sale at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash, all rights, title, interest, and claims in and to all of the personal property of Tidal Wave Fitness, LLC, which are located on the premises, including the following: Quantity 12 Life Fitness Treadmill (used) 5 Nautilus Stairmaster (used) 8 Precor USA Elliptical (used) 1 Cybex Arc Trainer (used) 2 Concept Rowing Machine (used) 9 Life Fitness Bikes (used) 1 Star Trac Leg Extension Machine (used) 2 Abductor Machine (used) 1 Leg Curl Machine (used) 1 Seated Leg Curl Machine (used) 4 Weight Benches (used) 1 Biceps Flex Fitness (used) 1 Deltoid Raise Machine (used) 1 Bisolator Machine (used) 1 Dorsifelxor Machine (used) 1 Dip Machine (used) 1 Incline Machine (used) 1 Vertical Press Machine (used) 1 Deltoid Fly (used) 1 Low Row Machine (used) 1 Flex Fitness Ab Machine (used) 1 Ab Crunch (used) 3 Ab Mats used) 1 Chin Up Assit (used) 1 Torso Rotator Machine (used) 2 Smith Bench Press (used) 1 Preacher Station/Bicep Curl (used) 1 Incline Hammer Strength Station (used) 1 Flat Hammer Strength Station (used) 2 Cable Rigs (used) 1 Lap Pull Down Chin Up (used) 1 Standing Calf Machine (used)

1 Seated Calf Machine (used) 1 Military Press/Shoulder Press (used) 2 Incline Bench (used) 1 Trap Machine (used) 2 Squat Racks (used) 1 Leg Press used Military Dumb Bells various weights MANNER OF SALE: The property will be sold in “AS IS”, “WHERE IS” condition and subject to all prior liens, encumbrances, conditions, restrictions, violations, and agreements of record affecting the same, if any. Neither the Sheriff, the Auctioneer nor the Judgment Creditor makes any representation or warranty, either expressed or implied, regarding the description or condition of the property, and shall have no liability with respect to any matter involving the sale. TERMS OF SALE: ALL CASH. A Bidder’s Deposit is required prior to the start of the auction in the amount of $3,500, by cash, money order, or certified or cashier’s check, except for a bidder on behalf of the noteholder or an affiliate. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by cash, money order, or certified or cashier’s check, on date of sale immediately after the hammer falls at the completion of the auction. Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. If the Sheriff is unable to convey the Personal Property as described above, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be limited to the refund of the aforementioned deposit, without interest thereon. Upon refund of the deposit to the purchaser, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Sheriff or the Judgment Creditor. In the event the purchaser fails to make full payment of the purchase price as required, in addition to any other legal or equitable remedies available to the Sheriff, the Sheriff may, subject to further order of the court, resell the said personal property at the purchaser’s sole risk and expense and retain and apply the aforementioned deposit to any deficiency in the purchase price sustained by the Sheriff, all costs and expenses of both sales, reasonable attorneys’ fees, and any other damages sustained by the Sheriff and/or the Judgment Creditor as a result of the purchaser’s default, including, without limitation, all incidental damages. The information contained herein was obtained from sources deemed to be reliable, but is offered for informational purposes only. The Sheriff, the Auctioneer and the Judgment Creditor do not make any representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy of this information. Auctioneer Raymond C. Nichols BSC America, Atlantic Auctions, Inc. (410) 803-4161 802-A BelAir Rd., Bel Air, MD 21014 Attorney for Judgment Creditor Richard Iain Hutson, Esq. Weinstock Friedman & Friedman,

P.A. 10461 Mill Run Circle, Suite 550 Owings Mills, MD 21117 Phone: (410)559 9000, ext. #282 Fax: 410-559-9009 Email: rhutson@weinstocklegal.com Counsel for PNC Bank, National Association Publish Ad: Reggie T. Mason, Sr., Sheriff Worcester County, Maryland OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY

PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BIDDERS TITLE: NON-TIDAL WETLAND CREATION SITE AND DESIGN/BUILD SERVICES BID NO.: B21-18 Sealed Proposals for this project shall be accepted by The Mayor and City Council of Ocean City, Maryland, c/o the City Manager, Town of Ocean City, Maryland at 301 Baltimore Avenue, Room 230, Ocean City, Maryland 21842 until 4:00 p.m. local time on Friday, March 9, 2018. They will then be opened and read aloud at the Council Work Session at 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, March 13, 2018. The Scope of Work consists of providing all land, supervision, labor, materials, equipment, tools, agency coordination, and associated incidental work necessary to complete the Non-Tidal Wetland Creation Site and Design/Build Services for Ocean City Municipal Airport (OXB). This shall consist of wetland replacement services for wetland impacts proposed at OXB. These services are to be in the form of an approved wetlands mitigation bank or approved wetlands mitigation site and within the Sinepuxent Bay Watershed or watershed as otherwise approved by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) for use in replacing and mitigating for wetland impacts at OXB. The bank or site must have available space for creation or credits for, at minimum, 5.36 acres of non-tidal palustrine wetlands for mitigation of impacts at OXB. A current map of the proposed site or mitigation bank must be provided. Approval status of the site or bank by the USACE and the MDE, Nontidal Wetlands & Waterways Division must be provided with this response for use in mitigating the OXB wetland impacts. The bidder’s services must include creation rights on the proposed site, design and approvals of the creation area, permitting and wetland construction activities including all earthwork and planting to complete the mitigation, and all required monitoring. All work shall have approval of all regulatory agencies governing work in the respective site area. All NonTidal Wetland Creation Phase 1 and

Phase 2 design must be completed and approved with issuance of a permit by August 31, 2018. All NonTidal Wetland Creation construction must start by September 1, 2018 and be completed and approved by no later than August 31, 2019. Approvals consist of that required by both the USACE and the MDE, and consider all Mitigation Rule criteria including the mitigation site monitoring plan. Contract Documents may be obtained at Ocean City Municipal Airport, 12724 Airport Road, Berlin, Maryland 21811 (443-235-4434) upon payment of $20.00 for each set, no part of which is refundable. Contract Documents will be available for purchase after 11:00 a.m. on Friday, December 22, 2017. Questions regarding this bid will be accepted by Jaime Giandomenico by emailing jgiandomenico@oceancitymd.gov. The cutoff date for questions is 5:00 p.m. on Friday, February 23, 2018. Each bid shall be accompanied by completed bid forms and the Contractor’s proposal for the work (Form of Proposal, Bidder’s Affidavit, Certification of a Drug-Free Workplace, Disclosure of Interest, Bid Tabulation Form, Contractor Response Form, and Certificate of Buy American Compliance). Interested parties should submit proposals detailing the attributes of the replacement site or mitigation bank and capabilities to meet replacement wetland requirements. The Town of Ocean City reserves the right to reject any or all bids or to accept any bid, or portions thereof, when in their judgment, the public will be better served. OCD-12/21/4t _________________________________ CHARLES T. CAPUTE, LLC CHARLES T. CAPUTE ESQ. 1006 S. WASHINGTON STREET EASTON, MD 21601-4303

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 17228 Notice is given that the Register of Wills court of Chester County, PA appointed Denis J. O’Brien, 676 Thomas Jefferson Road, Wayne, PA 19087 as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Mary A. O’Brien who died on September 22, 2017 domiciled in Pennsylvania, America. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is Charles T. Capute whose address is 1006 S. Washington Street, Easton, MD 21601. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this


Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 19, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICES published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Denis J. O’Brien Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of Newspaper: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: January 4, 2018 OCD-1/4/3t _________________________________ REGAN J. R. SMITH ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON LLP 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY PO BOX 739 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 SMALL ESTATE

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 17242 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF MIDDLETON H. MCABEE Notice is given that Regan J.R. Smith, 3509 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD 21842, was on January 11, 2018 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Middleton H. McAbee who died on December 29, 2017, without a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in

the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Regan J.R. Smith Personal Representative True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Charlotte K. Cathell One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House

Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 18, 2018 OCD-1/18/1t _________________________________

Publication Date: 01/18/2018 OCD-1/18/2t _________________________________

IN THE ORPHANS’ COURT FOR (OR) BEFORE THE REGISTER OF WILLS FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND IN THE ESTATE OF: WILLIAM E. FOREMAN ESTATE NO. 17238

The Town of Berlin is seeking proposals from qualified brokerage firms to serve as the broker for health insurance needs for the Town of Berlin. Sealed PROPOSALS, in duplicate, will be received by the Town of Berlin, 10 William Street, Berlin, Maryland 21811 for the “Health Insurance Broker Service” RFQ # 2018-01. Proposals will be accepted by the Town until 3:00PM, on February 2, 2018, at which time they will be opened publicly and read aloud. The anticipated scope of work may include, but shall not be limited to, assisting in the process of benefit administration and renewal. The right is reserved as the interest of the Town of Berlin may appear, to reject any and all proposals, to waive any informality or irregularity in bids received, and to accept or reject any items of any proposal. Questions regarding this project may be directed to Jeff Fleetwood via e-mail at jfleetwood@berlinmd.gov from January 15, 2018 through January 23, 2018. Answers will be posted to the Town’s website by January 26, 2018. Any oral communications will be considered unofficial and non-binding on the Town. By: Town of Berlin Wm. Gee Williams III Mayor OCD-1/18/1t _________________________________

NOTICE OF JUDICIAL PROBATE To all Persons Interested in the above estate: You are hereby notified that a petition has been filed by K. Alice Young, Esq., 6225 Smith Avenue, Suite 200B, Baltimore, MD 21209 for judicial probate and for the appointment of a personal representative. A hearing will be held at Worcester County Court House, Court Room 4, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863 on 02/13/2018 at 10:00 a.m. This hearing may be transferred or postponed to a subsequent time. Further information may be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills. Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Phone: (410) 632-1529 Newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS

Jan. 18 - Jan. 25 DAY/TIME Daily Daily, 10-5 Sat-Mon, 11-4 pm Saturday, 11-2

ADDRESS

BR/BA

STYLE

PRICE

AGENCY/AGENT

Assateague Point, Berlin

1BR/2BR/3BR

Mobile

From $100,000

Tony Matrona/Resort Homes

Gateway Grand – 48th Street

3 & 4BR, 3BA

Condo

Inquire

Fritschle Group/Condominium Realty

Condo, Towns & SF

Nanette Pavier/Holiday Real Estate

Single Family

$284,960

Craig Hyatt/Berkshire Hathaway PenFed

Heron Harbour, 120th St., Bayside 1BR/2/BR/3BR/4/BR+ 2 Fort Sumter, The Parke - OP

3BR/2BA

Presented free as a courtesy to Licensed REALTORS who are regular Ocean City Today & Bayside Gazette Advertisers. For all other REALTORS, there is a weekly charge of $10 per listing. Call 410-723-6397 or fax 410-723-6511 and a sale representative will contact you.


Commentary

Jan. 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

Page 53

Offshore farms an ill wind for resort

GUEST EDITORIAL

Forces are quickly aligning in Maryland to build large industrial power generation projects within eyesight of the coast of Ocean City. Much of the conversation over the location and size of these projects has happened without Ocean City’s direct participation. However, this pending decision weighs heavily on me as a fifth generation Eastern Shoreman. It will permanently change what we see, and what we expect to see, when sitting on Maryland’s world-class beaches. The project was born from then Gov. Martin O’Malley’s failed launch of a presidential campaign, with offshore wind central to his campaign platform. This impractical political stunt is being resurrected by forcing Maryland rate-payers and taxpayers to subsidize the construction and maintenance of more than 100 wind turbines. Only after the full investment by the citizens of this state will the energy generated from this project then be sent north through Delaware and into New York and New Jersey for distribution. This is not responsible tax-and-spend policy for Maryland. The size of these proposed wind turbine projects also ignores the rapid advancement of future technologies. A new generation of smaller and safer turbines is now being tested. These turbines will also be designed for better performance in hurricane-impacted areas. Also, current best practices in clean energy are increasingly focused on energy storage and not large-scale production. This will be accomplished through innovative battery and micro grid technologies. These advancements will quickly render the current turbine designs obsolete. And unlike large solar projects that can be removed when their useful lifespan expires, these 600-foot-tall metal structures will remain forever. Ocean City and its waters are a destination and migratory route for mammals, birds, and fish. The physical toll on birds flying through a turbine field is well known. The extreme adverse consequences of a droning turbine to all wildlife needs to be better understood by science. All future negative environmental impact must be clearly determined. This is as important See WIND FARMS Page 54

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR ............................................ Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli ASSOCIATE EDITORS .......... Josh Davis, Brian Gilliland STAFF WRITERS................ Kara Hallissey, Greg Ellison ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTIST .................................... Kelly Brown PUBLISHER ...................................... Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net.

PUBLIC EYE

The curse of profanity

By Stewart Dobson Editor I’ve never liked the idea of using profanity in news writing (fishing is different), because I believe it’s employed for shock value when a piece is poorly written. Yet, recent events have presented me with a challenge: Did the president in a recent White House meeting with a handful of senators, say “s…hole” or “s…house?” If he said either, it matters, because a major difference exists between the two. The latter, obviously, is superior to the former, but, in the absence of more detailed information, we are left to guess how much greater. Specifically, are we referring to modular (good) or stick-built (better) or design guidelines compliant (best)? Or, as has been observed as regards certain aspects of human development, brick? It might be that the implication was, “these countries are built like a brick s...house” which, in some circles, is considered an expression of admiration. Why that is, incidentally, continues to baffle me, since being compared to an outdoor latrine, regardless of its structural integrity, would seem to be less than complimentary. On the other hand, the brick could have been laid in the Herringbone bond style, which would make a difference, I suppose. Even so, one would be wise not to employ that term just anywhere or anytime. One would not, for example, use it in an address to the garden club, unless, of course, they actually had one out back. “It’s a pleasure to address you today, and I’d like to start by complimenting you on the lovely nasturtiums by your brick s...house.” That’s what they call an “attention grabber” in public speaking courses. Even though many people and countries

took umbrage at whatever was said or might have been said, or was never said, it remained amusing to watch CNN news anchors and commentators struggle not to say it while the PRINTED WORD ITSELF rolled and rolled across the screen in big bold type. The FCC-regulated broadcast networks generally avoided the word for fear of being cited for using profanity — the fine can be up to $383,038, which in the federal statutes is listed as “Deep S..., see Subsection A.” Meanwhile, the news scroll on CNN and other cable stations, which isn’t regulated by the FCC, was in type that was bigger than a brick and mortar commode installation. Their theory, apparently, was that anyone who watches cable news can’t read, which may be true, depending on your political beliefs. What I do know, however, is that modern language useage has evolved rapidly in recent years to include — even on broadcast television — words that once led to having one’s mouth washed out with soap. This approach to language hygiene, if you will, is no longer permitted by the authorities, as it might cause subsequently scarred children to avoid soap altogether as adults, thus leading to employment problems. Besides, we don’t have “soap” anymore; we have “body wash,” and saying “I’ll cleanse your mouth with body wash, young man,” doesn’t carry the same threat level. Consequently, we must guard against the prospect that our growing acceptance of profanity will lead us to the day when its use will become so casual that we will substitute once unacceptable words out of laziness for otherwise towering expressions of thought. Call me old-fashioned, but I don’t want to hear about little Johnny (yes, that little Johnny) stand in class to recite the Gettysburg Address and begin by saying: “Four score and a s...load of years ago, our forefathers …”


Ocean City Today

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Problems with automated speeding enforcement

Editor, We refer to an article in The News Journal, dated Monday, Jan. 15, 2018 entitled “Police Technology Raises Questions.” It elaborates on methods used by police who use technology gained by cameras in airborne drones, on traffic signal poles etc. to gain information about motorists without their knowledge. This technology is helpful in ap-

prehending criminals but raises concerns regarding individual privacy. Coban Technologies in Houston, Texas is available to police to advance this type of “artificial intelligence.” We relate the above information to our experiences in Salisbury, Maryland on Nov. 27, 2017. We traveled on E. Main Street, Salisbury and a camera took a picture of our license plate, identifying us as exceeding the speed limit. To our knowledge, there are/were no posted signs alerting motorists that cameras are being used.

JANUARY 19, 2018

When we sought information from the mayor of Salisbury, he did not reply to our letter. We phoned a number on the citation and were told that Automated Enforcement, P.O. Box 5046, Hagerstown, Maryland 217415046 is the enforcing agency. This means that the Town of Salisbury gets a percent of the citation fee collected by an agency outside of the city. Our concerns are 1. To our knowledge, there are no signs alerting motorists that cameras are being used. 2. That cameras are used rather than an

GUEST EDITORIAL

Wind farms require due diligence Continued from Page 53 for the benefit of our environment and wildlife as it is for Maryland’s economy. One of the major benefits of having such a large project located near the Eastern Shore is the promise of jobs and economic opportunity for a region that sorely needs a jump-start. Provided we can keep these jobs truly local to Eastern Shore counties, I agree and have supported the advantage this opportunity provides. But advocates for offshore wind should also understand the importance Ocean City plays in economic de-

velopment for the state. With more than $8 billion in taxable base, Maryland simply cannot have permanent projects desecrating the view-scape for property owners and visitors who come to Ocean City for the sand, salt water and vista. Truth is, we only get one chance to get this right. I think it is debatable that offshore wind is a cost-effective means for delivering safe and clean energy. However, we can all agree that as currently proposed, these offshore wind projects will forever change the view and skyline of the magnificent beaches of Ocean City for generations to come.

The topic of offshore wind will be a major chance for collaboration among stakeholders during the 2018 legislative session in Annapolis. All Marylanders are stakeholders in the beauty and recreation that Ocean City provides. We can take the time to do our due diligence. This is a decision that will leave a lasting and permanent legacy for our home. I believe we have the political will to get this right and look forward to participating in this process as it unfolds. — Del. Christopher T. Adams (R-37B)

actual policeman. 3. That an outside agency is used to entrap motorists for profit. Ann and John McDermott Ocean City

Coastal Hospice sees record-breaking year

Editor, There are truly angels among us. In November, we asked you, our neighbors on the Lower Shore, to “Be an Angel,” and 1,163 of you responded, giving us a record-breaking year, raising more than $118,000. All of us at Coastal Hospice would like to thank you for contributing to help fund the charity care we provide. Last year, Coastal Hospice cared for nearly 1,200 patients and families in Wicomico, Worcester, Somerset and Dorchester counties and provided more than $600,000 in charity care to patients and families who have no resources for care or have needs beyond their insurance coverage. The average gift this year was $101, which will have a significant impact on the care Coastal Hospice provides. For example, if you made a $100 donation, you paid for one month of oxygen for a patient at home. We sincerely thank everyone who took the challenge to “Be an Angel.” Alane K. Capen President Coastal Hospice & Palliative Care

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE WAIT A MINUTE!

This home is just what you’ve been L@@KING for with 3-bedrooms, 2-full baths, family room plus a den. Located in North Ocean City in a community that offers 3-pools, 2-tennis courts and a miniature golf course. It’s the one you thought you would never find. Your own place at the beach. It will be the perfect place to relax and enjoy. WOW $267,500 FURNISHED. We’re ready to move, ARE YOU? Pick up the call NOW. THE ORIGINAL Montego Bay Specialists since 1971.

703 GULF STREAM DRIVE

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc© 13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

NORTH OCEAN CITY ONE BLOCK FROM OCEAN

This 1-bedroom, 1-bath will be your favorite place away from home is move-in condition. The complex renovated within the past 8 years, windows, bedroom slider, siding, sidewalks, porches, staircases, doors roof, pools and ground. The building is professionally managed. Building has an elevator, 2-pools, (adult and kiddie pool), and beautiful courtyard. So convenient to shopping, miniature golf, movies, restaurants, bus stop & beach. Taxes 119.85/m, Condo Fee $219.67/m. Sold Furnished for $119,900. OWNER IS ANXIOUS TO SELL.

JUST LISTED

14001 COASTAL HWY #213 ORLEANS COURT

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc© 13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

NORTH OCEAN CITY

MONTEGO BAY COMMUNITY

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

This 3BR/2BA custom built home is located in the Montego Bay community and is located close to the beach, restaurants & the Northside Park. Features include an open floorplan, cathedral ceilings, a family room, a kitchen island/bar, a laundry rm. and attic. Community amenities incl. pools, tennis min. golf, a bayfront boardwalk & more. The HOA dues are just $225/yr. Listed at $295,000 furnished.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

124 PINE TREE ROAD

This 3BR/2BA home is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City. Located close to the beach, this home features an enclosed porch, an open floorplan, an eat-in kitchen, gas heat and central air. The community features pools, tennis, min. golf and a bayfront boardwalk. The HOA dues are just $225/yr. The property is listed at $177,900 and is being sold fully furnished.

13318 PEACHTREE RD

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

Montego Bay Realty

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com


JANUARY 19, 2018

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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WEDNESDAY AY & THURSD DA AY A Y 50% OFFFF Dinner Menu EEnnttrrees 55--7p 7pm $12 $1 12.95 & $16.95 Di Din inner SSppeciiaallss 55--100ppm Holidayyss & Speciallss E Exxcluded

SUND DA AY A Y & THURSDA AY Y STTE EA E AK NIGHTTS S • 55--10pm

50% OFFFF Steak kss SA AT TURDA AY Y

SUNDA AY Y

BREAKF EA E AKF FA AST BUF FF FET FE

DE EL LUX XE E BREAKF EA E AKF FA AST BUFF UF FF FE ET

7a 7 am-10:30am $12.95 Adulttss • $9.95 Children • 3 & Under F Frree

7a 7 am-1 1p pm $15.95 ADULTTS S • $10.95 CHILDRE EN N • 3 & UNDEER R FFR REEEE

1/19/18 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

1/19/18 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...