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JANUARY 13, 2017

SERVING NORTHERN WORCESTER COUNTY

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Anglers reply to aquarium’s canyon pledge Search for common ground pointless — it doesn’t exist

PHOTO COURTESY BOB GIZINSKI

A convoy of snow plows operated by private contractors makes its way down Coastal Highway Monday morning in one of the multiple attempts to clear the resort’s main artery despite conditions that made the job more difficult than usual.

Ice wasn’t nice for snow plowing Wonder why it took so long to clear Coastal Highway? It was fault of sub-layer

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Ice lying beneath the snow in Ocean City was just one of the problems that led to a slowerthan-normal street plowing process following the weekend’s snow storm. As numerous motorists found on Monday, even by late in the day, main roads such as Coastal Highway seemed to remain snow-covered longer than usual. Public Works Director Hal Adkins told the Transportation Commission Tuesday that a foundation of ice under the snow was the main reason the State Highway Administration had difficulty plowing Coastal Highway and Baltimore Avenue, while the

same problem hampered city crews trying to clear municipally maintained roads. ‘The plows that were out were privately owned and sub-contracted to the SHA, and they have rubber edges on them to minimize damage to manholes and water risers,” Adkins told the commission. “It’s great when you’re pushing fluffy snow. But when there’s an ice pack under it, and with the freeze-thaw of the ice pack, the rubber edge is going to bounce across the top of it.” He added that there were other issues with getting additional help since the SHA assistant district engineer for maintenance retired two weeks ago. “Ryan White, who is the district engineer for construction, pulled double duty. When we called to share concerns, he assured us that things would be speeded up,” Adkins said.

By Monday afternoon, the SHA was out in full force with a salt and brine tanker. A subcontractor from Prince George’s County also worked all night to clear out intersections. SHA spokesman Charlie Gischlar said later that the agency was not able to pre-treat the roads in time before the roads froze. “What you have to understand is that [moving] 12 inches [of snow] is a large effort, and we had temperatures in the single digits,” Gischlar said. “We needed a little cooperation from mother nature for the ice to melt and to get the treatment chemicals to work. Folks got to be more patient.” Mayor Rick Meehan also told city officials and staff that there were several complaints about snow plowed in front of driveways by city vehicles. Adkins explained that it is city policy not to do residential driveways beSee LAYER Page 5

By Stewart Dobson Editor/Publisher (Jan. 13, 2017) Ocean City attorney Mark Cropper fired a shot across the bow of National Aquarium officials this week, following their late December pledge to withdraw their application to designate Baltimore Canyon an urban marine sanctuary if no common ground could be established between the aquarium and local opponents of its protectionist efforts. In a Jan. 5 letter to National Aquarium CEO John Racanelli, Cropper, who represents numerous local marinas and the Ocean City Marlin Club, said the aquarium should make good on that promise because the common ground he seeks does not exist. “It is clear that the local community in and around Ocean City, Maryland is not supportive of this endeavor by the aquarium, nor will it ever be,” he wrote. Cropper included in his correspondence to Racanelli copies of letters of opposition from the Town of Ocean City to Gov. Larry Hogan and a similar letter from the Worcester County Commissioners to Hogan and the county’s delegation to the Maryland General Assembly. Also enclosed in the packet was a copy of a letter from seven members of congress, including Rep. Andy Harris (R-1st), to the administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Kathryn D. Sullivan. That correspondence, sent Dec. 7 by congressional representatives from the coastal regions of New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland, opposes not just the nomination of Baltimore Canyon, but also that of the Hudson and Norfolk canyons, which also are being considered or proposed for sanctuary See SANCTUARY Page 3


Ocean City Today

PAGE 2

JANUARY 13, 2017

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

PAGE 3

Sanctuary foes ask for proposal’s withdrawal

Correction In last week’s article, “Previewing new legislative session,” Delegate Mary Beth Carozza was incorrectly quoted regarding the state’s fiscal year 2017 budget deficit which was actually $209.4 million. Ocean City Today regrets the error.

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tinental Shelf Lands Act to ban offshore oil drilling indefinitely in the Mid-Atlantic from New England down through Virginia. The administration also denied all pending permits for seismic testing on the ocean floor in the same area. In light of these actions and referencing Racanelli’s open letter promise, Cropper wrote, “In your note entitled ‘Finding Common Ground on the Ocean Floor’ … you stated, among other things: ‘If, in fact, we come to agreement that a national marine sanctuary is not the best way forward, I will ask that our application be withdrawn.’ “On behalf of my clients and all other persons or entities that have expressed complete and unconditional opposition to this undertaking by the Aquarium, I am asking that you withdraw the application at this time.”

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with representatives of the National Aquarium and clearly expressed the opposition of all my clients …” He added that others in the room did as well, yet “The aquarium filed the application for the sanctuary ...” The application was formally recognized by NOAA on Dec. 2. He and other opponents also argue that the effort to protect these areas from destructive pursuits such as oil and gas exploration and bottom-scraping commercial fishing rigs has become moot. They note that on Dec. 14 the regional fisheries council declared the sea floor in all the mid-Atlantic canyons off limits to dredge-like fishing apparatus and other “bottom tending” equipment that could damage deep-sea corals. A week later, the Obama administration invoked the 1953 Outer Con-

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with the sanctuary managers. “[The] National Marine Sanctuaries [Act] do not contain any legal protections for the fishermen who have been fishing the waters surrounding sanctuaries for decades,” the congressmen wrote. They added that the law does not require the sanctuaries to be managed based on scientific interests, thereby allowing “the sanctuary managers to prohibit fishing … without having to scientifically justify the fishing ban.” That’s the barb on the hook that worries Cropper, whose letter suggests that sanctuary proponents are not as concerned with maintaining a harmonious relationship with the fishing community as they make themselves out to be. “I attended a meeting at the Ocean City Marlin Club on Nov. 18, 2016

5 WINGS

Continued from Page 1 status by national aquariums in New York and Virginia. The Hudson and Baltimore canyons applications await NOAA’s decision, while the Norfolk Canyon’s designation is in the developmental stage. Altogether, they represent 3,900 square miles of ocean from 60 to almost 90 miles off the Mid-Atlantic Coast. The applications and the Virginia proposal say much the same thing — a desire to add another layer of protection for these deep-water trenches because of their scientific and, in some cases, historic, value. Their fisheries, which account for billions in revenue to coastal areas, are already regulated largely by the National Marine Fisheries Service through the Mid-Atlantic Regional Fisheries Council. Of concern to Cropper and the local fishing interests is that the sanctuary designation does not guarantee the continuation of recreational angling (or lobster potting or certain above-bottom commercial fishing enterprises) for years to come. Their sponsors can only recommend to NOAA that it be allowed to continue. In addition, if the designations were to be granted, the authority to allow or deny fishing would rest

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

Mid-Atlantic seismic survey permits denied Environmentalists, tourism, towns unite against first step toward oil exploration

By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 13, 2017) Opponents of potential offshore drilling along the coast breathed a sigh of relief on Friday, when the governing body of those operations, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management announced it had denied six pending permits in the south and mid-Atlantic regions. “The decision is based on a number of factors, including a diminished need for additional seismic survey information because the Atlantic Program Area has been removed from the 2017-2022 Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leas-

ing Program,” the bureau announcement said. “I am solidly opposed to testing. I’m opposed to drilling, and I’m opposed to testing, so I’m pleased by the decision,” State Sen. Jim Mathias said. Mathias said he was happy to join the Ocean City Council, HotelMotel-Restaurant Association and Chamber of Commerce against seismic testing in the region. Also joining the opposition is Del. Mary Beth Carozza. “I have supported the past resolutions passed by the towns of Ocean City and Berlin opposing the use of seismic airguns off the coast of Maryland,” Carozza said in a prepared statement. Carozza said she signed a letter in July, along with a bipartisan group of members of the General Assem-

bly, requesting the denial of the permits. Potential harm to wildlife was also considered. According to the bureau, deep penetration seismic surveys are conducted by vessels towing an array of airguns that emit acoustic energy pulses into the seafloor over long durations and large areas. “Seismic airguns can penetrate several thousand meters beneath the seafloor. Surveys for other, shallow depth purposes typically do not use airguns,” the press release states. “While surveys may have some impacts to marine life, airgun seismic surveys have the potential for greater impacts.” Matt Heim, the offshore drilling campaign manager for the Assateague Coastal Trust, said bottlenose dolphins, fish, horseshoe

crabs, and by extension, the local bird population could have been harmed by the survey. “BOEM’s own report estimated over 10,000 Bottlenose dolphins could have been killed or physically harmed if airguns were allowed in the Atlantic,” Heim said. “It’s not just marine mammals, this is a big win for the fishing community as well. Scientific studies have shown the use of airguns leads to a 40-80 percent reduction in harvest from impacted fisheries and increases mortality rates in embryonic and juvenile fish.” Locally, the horseshoe crab population could also be affected, along with the bird species that feed on horseshoe crab eggs as they migrate. “This is a great victory. Working on this campaign, it was inspiring to see the incredible outpouring of support for our coast from both citizens and elected leaders … We hope this victory will be long lived, but it’s hard to say what direction the incoming administration will take when it comes to oil and gas development in the Atlantic,” Heim said.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

PAGE 5

Winter’s first snowfall was big one But, area gets on with business, despite some closures here and there

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (Jan. 13, 2017) Schoolchildren across the county had their prayers answered last weekend as the first snowfall of the New Year also brought about the first batch of school closings on Monday and Tuesday. Worcester County announced on Facebook that its offices would be open during normal hours on Monday, although the liberal leave policy was in effective for nonessential employees. Worcester County Public Information Officer Kim Moses said road crews started working on Saturday morning at 5 a.m. and worked to salt and plow the roads until late into the evening. “Sunday, they worked from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. and spent all day pushing back windblown snowdrifts to make the roads passable,” she said on Tuesday. “Currently, icy road conditions continue, but all county roads are passable. Roads crews are look-

ing forward to the warmer temperatures today to speed up the clearing of ice and snow.” County Emergency Services Director Fred Webster said snowfall totals varied in Worcester, but that weather stations were generally reporting 10 inches in the south end of the county and as much as a foot of snow in the north end. In Ocean City, Communications Manager Jessica Waters said a “wintery mix” covered the sand and roads on the resort over the weekend, with freezing temperatures and an expected accumulation of 8-10 inches playing havoc on the roadways, along with 10-15 mile-per-hour winds that topped out as 25-mile-per-hour gusts. “Our crews worked over 16 hours on Saturday and a full day Sunday, starting in both days at 4 a.m.,” Waters said. “They did an excellent job pre-storm, during the storm and now post-storm at keeping on top of the weather.” She encouraged residents to tune to FM 99.5 and to follow @townofoceancity on Twitter and www.facebook.com/TownOfOceanCity for regular updates during winter storms.

Layer of ice impedes effort to clear roads after storm Continued from Page 1 cause of time constraints. “We do our best to get out there before a snow event to blow out the snow before Harry homeowner comes out to shovel their driveway,” he said. “About a year ago we went through our residential areas and did a single plow – a bad move on my part. [Residents] had dug out their

driveways and we had locked them back into it. But this year we cleared it back as far away from them as we could get.” Adkins added that his department did receive a few complaints. “If you think about the people who live here on a year-round basis, it was a small percentage of complaints,” he said.

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Berlin Mayor Gee Williams issued a release on Monday announcing that a regular Town Council session would proceed as planned. “The town administrator, our public works and police departments and many other town employees worked diligently Friday, Saturday, Sunday and will continue today to ensure that all Berlin town streets are cleared of snow and are safely passable for motor vehicles,” Williams said in the release. “All public parking areas and on street parking downtown that the town is responsible for were also cleared by 10 a.m. Sunday.” Williams praised the State Highway Administration for its work in the cleanup effort and said Berlin Police “patrolled all streets and roads within the town during and after the snow storm and will continue their regularly scheduled patrols.” “I know we are all once again very proud of the preparations and extraordinary performance of our town employees in clearing and patrolling our Berlin roadways, and also for their successful work in keeping all other functions of the town operating smoothly through this first major snow storm of 2017,” Williams said. He noted that Town Hall was open during normal hours on Monday. According to Berlin Water ReSee SOUTHERN Page 6

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By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Communications company Crown Castle has struck a deal with Ocean City, and no new cell poles will be installed in singlefamily residential (R-1) or mobile home (M-H) districts at this time. City Engineer Terry McGean informed the City Council during Tuesday’s work session that mobile operator who was interested in improving the resort’s Internet accessibility had submitted a written agreement to that effect. “Based on that and a revised statement of their location and a commitment to abide by guidelines, we are suggesting to move forward under other conditions,” McGean said. Last year, the council opposed Crown Castle’s plans to install 90 antenna systems throughout the island because they would encroach on residents’ property. Although city staff and officials disagreed with the placement of the poles, they did understand the need to keep up with technology demands of its visitors. Crown Castle also had the advantage of being named a public utility, which gave them the legal authority to install in public rights-of-way. But that meant the company needed to negotiate with the city instead of property owners. In the end, the mobile operator agreed to guidelines set by the Plan-

ning and Zoning Commission and the council. Under these guidelines, no new poles can be erected in R-1 or M-H districts. Antennas can be permitted in medium residential (R-2), general residential district (R-3) and moderate residential (R-3A) zones, if it replaces an existing light pole. In that case, the poles must be the same height in R-2 districts. In R-3 and R-3A, poles could be 50 feet or maximum allowed by zoning. All other zones with existing underground utilities prohibit new poles or antennas, and replacement of existing light pole is preferred. McGean also told the council that other conditions mandated that if there were utility pole replacements needed, those replacements would be metal or fiberglass to reduce footprint in sidewalk. Crown Castle would also pay Ocean City five percent of its gross revenue, estimated to be $300,000 over the next 10 years. Under the new terms, that number could be adjusted if the revenue increased. Councilman Wayne Hartman addressed a handful of Crown Castle representatives at the meeting and expressed his hopes for the project moving forward. “I hope moving forward in installation they take a more proactive approach in cleaning up [than in the past] and that not every installation would be cookie cutter,” Hartman said. “Take into consideration the ocean view. People bought those properties for a reason.” With that said, the council unanimously approved the right-of-wayagreement with Crown Castle.

Southern Worcester hit with 10 inches; gov’t offices open Continued from Page 5 sources and Public Works Director Jane Kreiter, the town got about 10 inches of snow. Town government offices in Snow Hill and Pocomoke were also open on Monday, although some offices in Ocean Pines were apparently closed. Pocomoke City Manager Ernie Crofoot said there were no incidents there and that offices opened normally on Monday. A city council meeting there would also run as scheduled on Monday evening. Crofoot did not have snowfall totals as of press time. Snow Hill Economic Development Director Michael Day estimated the town received more than 10 inches of snow. Ocean Pines Public Works Director Eddie Wells reported 12 inches of snow across the community and said crews were working to clean up areas

they had calls on as of Monday. “The main roads have been salted, now we just need warmer temperatures and the sun to shine,” Wells said. Before the storm, Ocean Pines workers installed “snow salt spreaders and plows” on public works trucks and started preparing staging equipment as of Friday. Plowing there is triggered by three or more inches of snowfall “or when conditions warrant.” According to a press release from Marketing and Communications Director Denise Sawyer, Ocean Pines uses “a seven-truck system, plowing all streets to make sure that all roads are passable for emergency vehicles.” “After precipitation stops, all intersections and side streets will be widened. Cul-de-sacs will be done after roads are completed,” Sawyer said in the release.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

PAGE 7

OCPD expands recruitment plan Police launch ad campaign, increase college visits to boost seasonal program By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) The Ocean City Police Department is casting a wider recruiting net this year to address the difficulty the department has had finding a sufficient number of qualified applicants for seasonal officer positions. Because of tougher hiring standards imposed in 2015, a significant number of applicants have been unable to make it past the testing stage. During Monday’s Police Commission, Chief Ross Buzzuro reported that department has taken a more aggressive approach to recruit seasonal officers for the upcoming season via recruitment trips and its advertising campaign. “I remain optimistic, but we continue to be challenged,” he said. “We’ve expanded by 375 miles to the north, south and west. We go as far up as Boston, just above Myrtle Beach and Ohio. We looked at colleges where we saw good returns and dropped some that didn’t.” This year, Ocean City police recruiters visited 68 colleges and universities, the highest number of visits in recent history. In 2013 and 2014, that number was level at 46 colleges. In 2015, that number of visits increased to 56 colleges. Despite the increase in recruitment visits, the number of qualified and hired candidates has been flagging. Last year, 153 people applied for seasonal officer positions, but after the two-day testing period, 110 people remain for consideration. In the end, police brought on 50 seasonal officers. In 2015, 124 recruits out of the original 180 applicants made the post-testing cut. There were 65 seasonal police officers that year. At the same time, however, the quality of the summer hires has been higher, Buzzuro said. He added that there could be up to 30

former seasonal officers return this year, and that the department keeps in contact with its summer people. “We are seeing less [people] come through the door, but what I can tell you is that the caliber of some are better than what we’ve seen the last couple of years,” he said. The department has also boosted its online marketing campaign. In November, three videos that highlight the seasonal officer program were posted on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Breaking down those sites, the videos have reached 121,150 people on Facebook from November and December. In that same period, 48,815 people saw the 30-second ad on Instagram. The Twitter ad has 11,400 views. Altogether, $5,000 has been al-

‘We are seeing less [people] come through the door, but what I can tell you is that the caliber of some are better than what we’ve seen the last couple of years.’ Chief Ross Buzzuro located to social media advertising, and roughly $1,400 has been spent so far. “This definitely puts us in a positive light,” Buzzuro said. “The product really captures the essence of the program and it has a shelf life of three to five years. We’re garnering our share of attention – it’s just the matter of getting the folks in.” Mayor Rick Meehan pointed out that two of the main deterrents to the seasonal officer program in the past were restrictions of marijuana use. Under the current state policy, people cannot become officers if they used marijuana more than 20 times in their lives, or five times since turning 21 years old. Officers are also required to have used no drugs for three years before applying, which is the Ocean City

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Police Department’s Achilles heel. Buzzuro said it appeared that the cumulative 20-time marijuana use restriction is about to be changed, which would help, but that the three-year abstinence requirement remains a difficult hurdle to overcome. Meehan said he hoped both policies would be revisited as the culture changes. “The laws across different states become liberal, and to disqualify kids coming out of college is counterintuitive,” Meehan said. “Hopefully, we’re moving in the right direction so it not only affects our [Police Department], but all of us.” Ocean City Police Department is halfway through the testing period for next summer, with the most recent exam being held on Jan. 7 and 8. Forty recruits were tested. “With those numbers, we would be alarmed, but because of the inclement weather, the showing we had for the first week of January is promising,” Buzzuro told the commission. The remaining testing dates are Jan. 28-29 and Feb. 18-19. Saturday testing will take place at Ocean City Elementary School in West Ocean City at 8 a.m.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

Ocean City construction projects boom again Planning and Zoning head says upward trend evident through increased permits

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Building activity in Ocean City is on the upswing following a mid-decade crash that saw the total value of permits issued in a year bottom out at just 14 percent of what they had been at during the construction frenzy five years earlier. Planning and Zoning Director Bill Neville said Ocean City’s development in 2017 looks bright with several residential and restaurant projects on the agenda. In 2016, the total value for permits was approximately $60 million. This compares to the $184

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million in permit value at construction’s high point in 2006 and $25 million at its low ebb in 2011. Neville said several high-profile hotels, like the Residence Inn, the Cambria Hotel and the Royalton Hotels helped lead the resort out of the building recession, but that small construction jobs were what kept the building industry alive. “When you look at the permit activity for the last five years, we’ve been running steady at 1,500 permits a year. What’s changed is the value of the permits,” he said. “The good news is that the smaller contractors have worked to renovate homes and condominiums and the community as they age.” Neville also pointed out that a majority of the high-rise condominiums were built in the 1970s, thus requiring maintenance to make them marketable to owners and renters. “Even though the sense has been that there hasn’t been much development activity lately, we’ve been so busy with these renovations. It’s not just hotels here,” he said. Included in that activity is work in bayside residential neighborhoods. Over the past years, Montego Bay has been trading out mobile homes for stick-built homes. Design standards have also been updated to allow two-story construction there and homes are elevated above flood elevation. “The two-story construction hasn’t been a popular topic, but we see it as trading out new construction and people are getting more modern living space in each generation,” Neville said. “As for the stick homes, we see it as a positive thing that people are putting down their roots.” Neville said another signpost of Ocean City’s residential development is Sunset Island, a bayside

neighborhood with condominiums and townhouses on 67th Street that started roughly a decade ago. The final permit has been pulled for a family townhome in the area. “When that gets its final completion, we should see some fireworks go off,” he said. “That’s been a spectacular addition to Ocean City as a new community with a mix of housing types. It’s one of the last pieces of remaining residential lots.” Another residential project the resort should see completed in 2017 is the new Believe in Tomorrow house on 66th Street. That location will serve families that may require the assistance of medical support or

‘I believe the Planning and Zoning Commission will want to move forward with this sometime in the future, possibly around the timing of the demolition of the water tanks.’ Bill Neville extended family support because of their child’s illness and end-of-life circumstances. On the restaurant and retail side, Doug Buxbaum of Buxy’s Salty Dog Saloon recently turned in a permit to renovate the closed Pizza Hut on 28th Street into a restaurant, tentatively named Dry Dock 28. “We’re excited because we had our Christmas party at Buxy’s. [The restaurant] is going to be a real positive because it’s a favorite local spot,” Neville said. La Quinta Inn & Suites on 33rd Street could also be welcoming a new restaurant, as the Planning and Zoning department understands that a deli is looking to use its open space. The hotel had room available

for a restaurant, but no business has moved in. A laser tag attraction on 146th Street also opened at end of 2016, as final inspections were completed. The next phase is to expand the neighboring miniature golf course. As for student housing, Neville pointed to John Fager, who recently bought an office building across the street from his Bad Monkey restaurant on 58th Street. The intention is to renovate the site for housing for Fager’s Island employees. “We’d love to encourage business owners to continue doing this and celebrate it since it’s good for the community to have,” Neville said. “OCDC [Ocean City Development Corporation] has inspired us with their work to provide housing with the downtown Fat Daddy’s.” The final major project the Planning and Zoning Department expects to see some headway on is OCDC’s model block program. The idea is to place a sizable development between Dorchester and Somerset Streets, which is currently a gravel parking lot. “I believe the Planning and Zoning Commission will want to move forward with this sometime in the future, possibly around the timing of the demolition of the water tanks,” Neville said, referencing the tear-down of the Dorchester Street water tank as it is replaced by the First Street beach ball tower. “Everyone wants to see something happen and have development partner come in with a plan and to encourage other developments.” As for what 2017 portends beyond the obvious, Neville is in no position to forecast. “We only see three months out and something could change dramatically,” he said. “But in general, the trends are good.”


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

Sen. Mathias previews new session of General Assembly Large-scale animal abuse and registry, mammography coverage on Md. rep’s plate

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Maryland State Sen. Jim Mathias is sponsoring several bills for the 2017 legislative session that began Wednesday and is monitoring a number of issues. Following an incident in April when Wicomico officials removed 310 dogs from a suspected puppy mill, Mathias consulted with local authorities there and subsequently has introduced two bills for aggravated cases of animal cruelty. Senate Bill 80 would create a felony level animal abuse charge for cases involving 10 or more creatures with a maximum of three years in jail or fines up to $2,500. Currently, animal abuse is a misdemeanor carrying a maximum of 90 days in jail or a $1,000 fine. Also, Senate Bill 84 would create a statewide Animal Abuse Registry through the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. The measure would require anyone found guilty of animal cruelty to register within 10 days of being convicted. Offenders would stay on that registry for five years per charge. Assuring access to the most advanced breast screening technology is the aim of another bill sponsored by Mathias. SB 61 would prohibit insurance companies from charging higher copays for digital tomography to produce 3-D mammograms as compared to the charges for other breast cancer screening methods. Mathias pursued the same measure last year. “If your doctor says to a man or a woman … there’s a lump … a more clear radiological shot is with 3-D tomography,” he said. “3-D gives a much better resolution and a much better image.” Mathias said the legislation has the

support of CareFirst Blue Cross and Blue Shield. “Some insurance companies require a higher co-pay for a 3-D mammogram than for a standard mammogram,” he said. “If your doctor says they need that imaging to be more clear, I think you should be treated equally in the eye of the law.” Another issue Mathias will be closely monitoring is an effort to repeal an executive order signed by Gov. Larry Hogan last August establishing a postLabor Day launch for public schools. Related legislation Mathias backed in 2015 and 2016 failed to pass in both instances. “It appears there’s going to be some kind of a push back legislatively,” he said. “They’re going to try and repeal that or do an end around.” Mathias said based on feedback from Senate President Mike Miller, legislation to repeal the executive order would be unlikely to gain traction. Another issue Mathias and Gov. Hogan agree on is repealing House Bill 1013, commonly referred to as the Road Kill bill, which created a new transportation scoring system for state funding of projects. The legislature overrode a Hogan veto to pass the bill. “I voted against the bill and I voted to sustain his veto,” he said. “If a bill comes through and makes it out of committee I’ll vote to repeal.” Under the new scoring system, funding is directed to highway projects that affect the most people and have other major impacts. That leaves out many highway improvements in rural areas, such as Caroline County, where much of the alternate beach route, Route 404, remains two-lane, and the possibility of widening Route 589 in Ocean Pines. “If I had to forecast it, I don’t think the repeal is going to pass,” he said. “When I can be with the governor, I will be with him and when I can’t, I can’t, and we move on to the next thing.”

Faulty revenue forecasting make ‘17 budget challenging By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Efforts to address the state’s structural budget deficit in recent years have been made difficult due to what Sen. Jim Mathias says is faulty revenue data. “The governor’s office in Maryland has the strongest authority in the United States of America when it comes to setting the budget,” he said. “The governor proposes the budget and we can’t add money, all we can do is subtract money, it’s an executive budget.” For much of the past decade, the state also has spent more than it receives in revenues, hence the deficit. “He works off of revenue forecasts

that come from the comptroller’s office,” he said. “The revenue forecasts have been off.” Mathias explained that each November members of the Senate Spending Affordability Committee are provided with numerous metrics, including revenue forecasts prepared by the comptroller’s office. “They’ve been overstated a few times in recent years,” he said. “So the governor makes his budget based on those forecasts and when he puts his budget out under spending and affordability, that committee says we can only spend this amount of money.” This leaves legislators few options besides cutting expenditures, Mathias See TAX Page 11


Ocean City Today

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By Brian Gilliland Associate Editor (Jan. 13, 2017) Though without the impact of last year’s bill sponsored by Sen. Jim Mathias to start the process that may, one day, result in a southern crossing of the Chesapeake Bay to the shore, the new session of the General Assembly began on Wednesday with the usual full slate of prefiled bills. Mathias himself is the primary sponsor of six bills, four of which could affect Worcester County. The first, SB36, allows for an exemption to filing for certain tax credits online. Next,

SB61, was submitted last year, and would require health insurance companies, and related entities provide coverage for digital tomosynthesis —a form of mammography. The final two, SB80 and SB84, are related to animal abuse, stemming from an incident in Wicomico County. Del. Mary Beth Carozza is a cosponsor of a single bill, HB25, which would include police officers as a protected class within the scope of hate crime legislation. On the House of Delegates side, HB06 would require the state police to make a report to the General Assembly every six months on the number of applications received and processed to carry, wear or transport a handgun. See PREFILED Page12

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tax revenues. Mathias equates his stand on fracking to his opposition to offshore oil drilling off the coast. “I’m solidly opposed to offshore drilling here,� he said, adding that fracking — and the safeguards called for by Gov. Larry Hogan and other proponents — merit further study. “We know the value of natural gas has kept our energy costs down but we’ve seen the reality in some of theses states that have engaged in fracking,� he said. Mathias said before fracking is allowed in western Maryland the geological realities should be carefully examined. “There is going to be a move to prohibit fracking in Maryland,� he said. “That is going to be a very interesting debate.�

Tax, spending cuts on table rather than hikes this session Continued from Page 10 said. “Then the budget comes to us and we reduce it, but because a revenue shortfall happens then it looks like the legislature is the bad guy,� he said. “Really the culprit has been these revenue forecasts, which my friend Sen. (Roger) Mano has been urging through Spending Affordability that you have to revisit this model. That the model is off.� Regardless of the path taken, the result is a deficit, which Mathias said shouldn’t necessitate a tax increase. “When we go back, we’re not raising taxes,� he said. “That’s not an issue that’s on the table. What is on the table is a tax reduction.�

From Mathias’ perspective there is a sole solution. “The only way it’s going to happen is they’re going to have to cut spending,� he said. “The good news is we got a billion dollar rainy day fund. It was not touched during the economic downturn of 2008 forward and we still have our triple A bond rating so we’re in solid shape here in Maryland.� Moving forward, Mathias is hopeful an accord can be reached concerning revenue forecasts. “What they’ve really got to do besides being fiscally responsible they’ve got to look at those revenue projections,� he said. “They’ve got to get them right because that leaves us in a bind.�

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Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 13, 2017

Prefiled bills under consideration this year Continued from Page 11 HB07 would require the Department of the Environment to establish procedures for investigations to determine the source of exposure for children who are found to have lead levels in their system greater than 10 micrograms per deciliter, which is the amount established by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s benchmark for concern. HB17 attempts to establish primary and secondary school calendar based upon hours, in this case 1,080, rather than a 180-day school year. If HB24 passes, forest, park and wildlife rangers who are not sworn law enforcement officers will be able to issue parking citations. HB27 would expand the regulations governing what information is made public by legislative bodies online including individual votes, amendments and the text of modified bills. For the pinball wizards, HB32 eliminates the requirement that prohibits minors from using a free-play pinball machine. HB33 allows for an income subtraction modification to taxes on money withdrawn from retirement accounts to pay for college tuition within the state. If a local law enforcement agency initiates electronic surveillance equipment and HB37 passes, the agency would need to send a report on its ac-

tivities to the municipal governing body within that jurisdiction within 30 days. HB41 requires common ownership communities, condominiums and homeowners associations to register with the State Department of Assessments and Taxation. HB42 establishes a Class I distillery license, allowing for distillery operation. Cameras would be allowed in courtrooms during sentencing under certain circumstances if HB43 passes, and HB48 would allow shielding of nolle prosequi in criminal proceedings. All tolls at the Chesapeake Bay Bridge would be required to be paid via electronic means by 2027 if HB49 passes. HB50 would require officers to file a report every time they deploy an electronic control device, such as a Taser, outside of training and other circumstances. HB56 requires boards of education to provide meals with less sugar content, per a Food and Drug Administration guideline. On the Senate side, SB9 would require the department of transportation to establish guidelines for the inspection, registration and operation of autonomous and connected vehicles. SB12 prohibits objects hanging from a rearview mirror and considered obstructions as a secondary offense,

which means drivers won’t be pulled over for having hanging objects, but could be cited in addition to other infractions. SB17 exempts employees of a business from the requirement to seek work elsewhere if the employer closed for a period not exceeding 10 weeks. SB30 extends to all vessels the prohibitions against operating them under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Employers won’t be held liable for negligently hiring or failing to supervise an employee based on evidence the employee received probation before judgment or been convicted of certain offenses if SB55 passes. Homeowners and tenants won’t be able to be prevented from establishing a backyard garden if SB62 passes. SB64 allows individuals who have declined to affiliate with a political party the opportunity to do so any time voter registration is offered. SB68 would allow the use of cannabis to treat post-traumatic stress disorder. SB83 allows a petitioner to change his or her name to the one given at birth, or any other former name within 18 months of a decree of divorce. SB85 allows the placement of three children into foster care in a single home if two of the children are siblings. SB87 grants destination-marketing officials within the Maryland Tourism Development Board voting rights.

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Sprinklers halt spread of kitchen fire in Ocean City

(Jan. 13, 2017) The Ocean City Fire Marshal’s Office is crediting fire sprinklers for allowing an Ocean City woman to safely escape a kitchen fire on New Year’s Eve. Firefighters responded to the unit, located in the area of 25th Street and Baltimore Avenue, for a reported building fire at approximately 7:29 p.m. on Dec. 31. The female occupant of the unit had been cooking when grease spilled over onto the stove burners and ignited, quickly spreading to the cabinet area above. A single sprinkler head in the kitchen activated and extinguished the fire prior to the arrival of firefighters. The occupant was able to safely escape with her pet, both unharmed. The fire department was initially notified by the fire alarm monitoring company, who reported the water flow of the sprinkler system. “Fire sprinklers are proven to save lives,” said Ocean City Fire Marshal Capt. Josh Bunting. “This incident is a great example of sprinklers doing exactly what they are designed to do…containing the fire and giving occupants the time to safely escape.” The unit suffered limited fire and smoke damage in the kitchen. The adjoining staircase and first floor restaurant area also experienced water damage. The cause of the fire is classified as accidental.

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SB90 grants students the right to refuse to participate, in whole or in part, classwork involving animals, and allows for other coursework to be substituted instead. SB91 would require the State Board of Elections to make video recordings of its open meetings available to the public for four years after the date of the meeting. The Maryland General Assembly’s term lasts 90 days.

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By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Ocean City officials, via the Recreation and Parks Commission, will be discussing how to expand the Light Up OC campaign throughout the resort and how to find the funding for it. During the Jan. 3 council session, Downtown Association President Kevin Gibbs outlined his vision to improve the Christmas experience by increasing the decorations and special events. In the past, the inlet parking lot had a miniature version of Winterfest of Lights with drive-by displays on the beach but that was eliminated years ago because of budget cuts and a greater concentration on the much larger Northside Park event. In 2012, the Downtown Association and Ocean City Development Corporation resurrected the decorations push through the “Donate to Decorate” program to pay for light displays. Now, Gibbs told the council, the community is seeking to do more through the Light Up OC initiative. “We finally got some lights downtown, but it’s not enough,” he said. “We need to expand Winterfest and

need to expand Christmas in Ocean City, and we need to get up to par. Christmas is big business, and this would also serve the locals and the community.” The initiative would involve two phases, starting with installing light displays at the inlet parking lot. Gibbs said a public/private partnership could help purchase new displays or move an underused Winterfest exhibit south to the inlet. “People miss being able to drive down to the inlet and look at the lights. They miss that part of their holiday routine,” Gibbs said. The next phase would include expanding Winterfest at Northside Park by adding more lights, craft tables and live entertainment or by booking readings with Mrs. Claus. Gibbs also floated the idea that another Winterfest location could be the convention center, where an ice rink could be created and holiday concerts could tie it together. Council President Lloyd Martin and Councilmember John Gehrig agreed that there seemed to be momentum building for the expansion. “There was a difference this year. I think it’s time to bring some of these things back and start cementing some of the private-public partnerships,” Gehrig said. Councilman Dennis Dare said he supported Light Up OC, but warned

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the council that even with private investments there would need to be financial support from the city. “In 2008, we faced a financial crisis and a lot of things were cut and haven’t come all the way back,” he said. “One of the things that was cut was the holiday decorations downtown. Special events are huge for the town and for the business community, but to have the taxpayers pay for more decorations downtown seems a little unfair.” Dare recommended raising room tax from four-and-a-half percent to five percent to fund items such as Light Up OC. Councilwoman Mary Knight backed this idea. “Our room tax rate has remained the same, but our costs associated with providing things have gone up. The taxpayers shouldn’t pay for that – the visitors should.” Gibbs told the council he was not seeking any financial help at this point, but was looking for support. “The first phase is just reusing or repurposing some of the things we have,” he said. “I don’t want to raise taxes for Christmas decorations and I don’t want this to be lumped into anything related to budgets. I want to look for private donations … I think people want to reinvest in the town.” The council unanimously voted to support the Light Up OC initiative and to move the discussion to the Recreation and Parks Commission.

Budget amend. to boost fiscal plan by $1.9 million Measure recognizes FY16 funds, new revenue stream

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By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) The first proposed amendment to Ocean City government’s fiscal year 2017 budget seeks to move dollar amounts from one column to another and bolster the general fund by $1.9 million. While that seems like a sizable figure, Budget Manager Jennie Knapp told the council that this adjustment recognizes additional revenue and money left over from last year. “The funds were appropriated in FY16 and unspent,” she said during Tuesday’s work session. “We closed the books at the end and put it in fund balance and we’re bringing it forward in FY17 so we can spend it.” See PROPOSAL Page 15

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JANUARY 13, 2017

PAGE 15

Proposal covers $1M increase in ad fund via grant, room tax Continued from Page 14 The overall increase in the general fund reflects $1.2 million in additional revenue. Breaking that number down, there was $330,500 in room tax and income tax, $764,000 in several grants in this and last year, $68,800 in permit revenue and $40,700 in other streams. Another $23,000 came from expanding the inlet lot metering dates to April 1 and Oct. 31 and increasing the rates. But Knapp said that revenue was used to cover salary and operating costs for expanding the staffed parking lot season. Expenses rose to $2.1 million, and the proposed budget amendment seeks to use $754,000 from the fund balance, something similar to a rainyday account, to offset the cost. Of the costs, $1 million of expenditures is dedicated to advertising. However, that includes $427,000 in revenue over the estimate of room tax from April to June 2016 and other funds remaining in the advertising budget at the end of the fiscal year. “We are increasing our advertising from $5.7 million to $6.7 million, but we’re increasing it by $400,000 from last year,” Knapp said. Other major line items were $450,000 for the 65th Street Public Works Department campus design

and a $45,000 grant match for rehabilitating the Ocean City Airport’s ramp. Those items were paid out of the Transportation and Airport funds. Knapp also told the council that the unrestricted fund balance in the risk management fund was reduced by $200,000 at the end of fiscal year 2016. This was because an actuarial evaluation recommended that the resort increase its amount of restricted reserves, which covers existing and future liability claims. Maryland increased the cap on general liability and auto claims to $400,000, which makes Ocean City liable for $250,000 per claim before excess coverage policies applied was another factor. Knapp said 2016 was an above average year for claims. “We typically pay out $1 million per year in worker’s comp, Auto, and liability claims, but paid out $1.4 million in FY 16,” she said. “In the current fiscal year, we have paid out $456,000 in claims against a $975,000 budget.” She recommended transferring $200,000 to risk management using savings from the pension plan. The council agreed to send the proposed budget amendment to its first reading at the Jan. 17 regular council session.

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Tourism report indicates OC visitor count grew for 2015 State data shows city had nearly 9 percent increase in guests versus prior year

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2016) In terms of tourism, 2015 was a good year for Ocean City, posting as it did a 9 percent increase over the year before, Ocean City Tourism and Marketing Director Donna Abbott told Ocean City Tourism Commission members on Monday. “The Maryland Tourism Board did a study, they do it every year, to see the economic impact of tourism in Maryland.” The state report released last week shows tourism spending generated nearly $17 billion during calendar year 2015, an increase of 3.5 percent from 2014. Also, approximately 40.5 million people visited the state in 2015, a roughly six percent increase over the previous year. In Ocean City, the report estimated tourism spending at roughly $1.46 billion in 2015, increasing by 3.1 percent over the 2014, while visitor numbers hit approximately 1.95 million, up 8.8 percent from the roughly 1.79 million visitors in 2014.

Abbott said the numbers are estimates provided by Philadelphiabased Tourism Economics, whose methodology she has investigated. “They have a formula that they use that’s based on visitor spending,” she said. “They have to assume a certain amount of information. It’s apples to apples from year to year.” Although a more exacting means to count heads would be Abbott’s preference, other tourism directors maintain that it’s better to follow the money. “It really should be on visitor spending,” she said. “Not how many visitors you have, but are they spending money to boost your economy.” Breaking down the approximately $1.46 billion of tourist dollars, the largest percentage, more than $290 million, was spent on food and beverages. Lodging ranked a close second at more than $284 million. Abbott told the commission that Tourism Economics is the “gold standard” when it comes to assessing tourism’s impact. “We’re getting to ready to renew the contact with Tourism Economics,” she said. “We’re lucky to have them. They’ve offered a very competitive rate.”

OC hires Kade Construction for major Boardwalk project Ocean Pines firm lowest bidder for re-decking; in past worked on same task

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Using some of the money refunded last year by the Maryland comptroller’s office after its tax distribution miscue, Ocean City will be re-decking the Boardwalk this winter. During the Jan. 3 session, Public Works Director Hal Adkins told the council that hundreds of boards have begun to show their age since the last replacement was finished in 2011. City officials had expected some repair work would be needed in 2017 and had set aside $10,000 in the budget for materials. But after city crews checked the entire Boardwalk, it became evident that its condition was worse than anyone realized. “It became eye-opening on the greater work that needs to be done,” Adkins said. “The concept was that we would do this in-house… but when we realized the scope, it became clear that the only way to achieve this was outsourcing it.” A request for bids produced eight offers, with the highest around

$400,000. Adkins, backed by the Procurement Department, recommended that the council accept the low bid of $38,104 from Kade Construction in Ocean Pines. “Some of the numbers were out there,” Adkins said. “Kade Construction did this work for me 10 years ago, he knows the routine, and they know what’s involved so I have a comfort level.” To make up the difference, Budget Manager Jennie Knapp told the council that the additional $28,000 would come from the reimbursement from Maryland comptroller’s office. Ocean City was refunded $76,800 for additional income tax in 2016. With a variety of bids, Council Secretary Mary Knight questioned how Kade Construction could complete the project at a low cost. Adkins explained that lack of construction work during this time of year could be the answer. “I have seen contractors just trying to hold on in the winter months and keep people working and that might be the case here,” he said. “He might just be doing it at cost. He has broken it down with unit prices. It’s a legitimate bid and not just a lump sum.” Adkins also told the council that he believed this would be a reoccurring See BOARDWALK Page 19


JANUARY 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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Short-term rental bills under review for state City Tourism Commission will watch next legislative session for new proposals

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Potential legislative efforts to regulate short-term rental platforms like Airbnb were discussed at the Ocean City Tourism Commission meeting on Monday. Commission member Michael James, president of Hospitality Partners and managing partner of the Carousel Group, said he has worked with Susan Jones, executive director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-

Restaurant Association, to quantify the resort’s primary concerns. “First is, for us anyway, are these people renting properties in areas that are properly zoned for it? Have the properties been inspected and third are we getting the room tax like were suppose to get?” he said. Noting that Ocean City government continues to examine how to address potential loss of tax revenues, James said Sen. John Astle (D-30) is going to introduce a bill in the General Assembly this session that addresses how to ensure that such rentals pay the room tax. “His area of concern is more on getting the tax from Airbnb and the like,” he said. “He didn’t want to nec-

essarily get involved with the zoning aspect because each jurisdiction is different.” James said what would be ideal is the creation of a registry to easily identify properties that advertise on short-term rental platforms. “Then we can backtrack to see if they are properly zoned, do they have a rental license, (and) are they paying tax,” he said. Jones told the commission that the goal should be drafting legislation that will pass, unlike the bill that was defeated last year. “It didn’t pass because it didn’t have the support of the Maryland Hotel Lobbying Association,” she said.

She feels encouraged the legislative effort this session may be fruitful based on initial discussions. “They’ve been talking with them and they’re trying to sort of flesh it out before it gets to where it needs to go,” she said. “I’m taking the bill to our board on Thursday to see if they support it, in which case then we would write a support letter.” Jones said the Maryland Hotel Lobbying Association is also drafting a regulatory bill that would leave enforcement up to the local municipalities and cities. “I don’t have their bill yet,” she said. “They are just fleshing out the details right now. It’s definitely an opportunity to create collaboration.”

Boardwalk boards to be replaced for ‘17 summer rush Continued from Page 16 expense at the same cost. “We’re projecting that we’ll need to replace 21 boards per 350 feet, a block, this time next year,” he said. “I envision that between now and 2020 you would be in the position to redeck a lot more based on its life expectancy. “The treatment processes in the lumber industry are limited by the EPA [Environmental Protection Agency],” he continued. “Terry’s [McGean, the city engineer] opinion is that the board will degrade somewhat faster than what we saw for the past 30 years.” The council awarded the bid to Kade Construction with the understanding that members would examine the issue come budget season. “This is low, but it looks like something that will be perpetual, especially with the boards hitting their life expectancy,” said Councilman John Gehrig. “It’s like a Boardwalk replenishment project.”

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Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 13, 2017

POLICE/COURTS

Assaults Ocean City police arrested Andrew Stevens, 42, of Riverdale, Maryland, for first- and second-degree assault in addition to reckless endangerment on Dec. 29. According to the report, police were called to a domestic assault downtown after Stevens became physically violent with his girlfriend over a disagreement on financial affairs. Police reported Stevens began to yell before grabbing his girlfriend by the neck, throat and hair. In addition, he allegedly threw her into furniture and walls. The noise from the confrontation got the attention of her four-year-old son who attempted to push Stevens off his mother, the report stated. Police reported the victim had scrapes and bruises on her wrists, forearms, elbows, face and neck.

Reckless endangerment Paul Koehrsen, 47, of Berlin, Maryland, was arrested and charged with first- and second-degree assault, reckless endangerment, using a firearm in a violent crime and intoxicated endangerment on Jan. 4. Deputies from the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office were called to a residential area in Berlin because the complainant was receiving death threats, the report stated. Upon arrival, police reported

Koehrsen was in his garage and raised his rifle at a deputy. Shortly after, additional deputies and members of the Berlin Police Department were able to take Koehrsen into custody without further issue. Koehrsen was taken before a district court commissioner, where he was held without bond at the Worcester County Jail.

Agencies from the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, Maryland State Police, Berlin Police Department and Wicomico County Sheriff’s Office assisted in capturing Carmean. Carmean was taken before a district court commissioner where he was held on a $30,000 bond at the Worcester County Jail.

Hit-and-run suspect

Second-degree assault

Glenn Carmean, 47 of Salisbury, was arrested and charged with second-degree assault, obstruction, failure to obey traffic signals, driving under the influence of alcohol, driving while impaired by alcohol, fleeing and alluding and numerous other traffic violations on New Year’s Day. A Worcester County Sheriff’s Office Deputy was on patrol in the area of Routes 50 and 589 when Carmean’s vehicle was spotted. Police reported the suspect’s vehicle was involved in a hit-and-run crash in Ocean City and Carmean had fled from a Maryland State Trooper of the Princess Anne Barrack a day earlier. According to the report, the deputy attempted to initiate a traffic stop in which Carmean refused to comply and a 35-mile pursuit began. Police reported Carmean intentionally tried to ram a Worcester County deputy, was driving over 100 miles per hour and eventually crashed into the median of Route 50 in Wicomico County.

Ocean City police officers arrested and charged Thomas Maya, 47, of Millsboro, Delaware, with two counts of second-degree assault on New Year’s Day. Police were called to a downtown hotel where they met with a complainant

who stated he watched Maya throw his girlfriend down the steps before she screamed for help at a local bar while he was working as a bouncer, the report stated. According to the report, the bouncer followed the couple outside the bar where Maya was dragging the victim across the parking lot, then slapped her across the face and threw her to the ground. The bouncer was able to catch up with Maya and the victim in a nearby hotel parking lot. Maya allegedly became aggressive towards the bouncer for trying to help and was eventually pinned to the ground until police arrived, the report stated.

Firefighters respond quickly to small fire in Montego Bay

By Katie Tabeling Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) An electrical issue sparked a blaze Tuesday evening at a Montego Bay residence. Ocean City Firefighters were dispatched to the 100 block of Yawl Drive around 5 p.m. for a small fire. When they arrived, flames were on the exterior of the front porch. Firefighters extinguished the fire within minutes. Investigators from the Fire Mar-

shal’s Office determined that the fire was electrical, Ocean City Communication Manager Jessica Waters said. “The occupants had been working to identify an electrical issue with their kitchen outlets at the time of the fire,” she said. “They attempted to extinguish the small fire before exiting the building. No one was injured.” Fire damage was contained to the wall between the external porch and the kitchen area. Damage was minor.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

PAGE 21

On Behalf of Atlantic General Hospital - Health System and Foundation, we would like to thank our Event Sponsors for their generous suppor t. L E G A CY S P O N S O R G L AC IE R S P ON S ORS

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“ THE E M P E R O R P E N GUI N ” Bull on the Beach

I C E B ER G S P O N SO R S Hardwire, LLC

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I G L O O SP O N S O R S Bluewater Development Corp. Casino at Ocean Downs Fisher’s Popcorn of Delaware Trond’s Pool Care, LLC Above Aerial Clear Channel Outdoor Direct Media USA Dough Roller Restaurants Chris Parypa Photography OC Wasabi

S NOW F L AK E S P ON S ORS Red Sun Custom Apparel Funcade Family Fun Center The Bonfire Restaurant The Original Greene Turtle Sports Bar & Grille Ocean Pines Recreation & Parks

Lollipop Face Painting The Home Depot – Ocean City #2578 Gregory & Associates, LLC Seacrets Old Pro Golf

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Craig Kettler (Leesburg, Va.) $5,150

Bull on t he Beach (Ocean City, Md.) $35,645

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AGH Poppin’ Penguins (Berlin, Md.) $2,202.47

Liliana Franklin (Berlin, Md.) $1,100

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Nicholas Franklin, age 15 (Berlin, Md.) $1,100 Max Ewancio, age 15 (Berlin, Md.) $640 Samantha Ewancio, age 18 (Berlin, Md.) $590

Team Parker (Gaithersberg, Md.) $500 Team Cylc (Snow Hill, Md.) $388 O'Jettskis (Ocean City, Md.) $325

*The Bull on the Beach team has contributed more than $460,000 to the AGH Penguin Swim since it started.

Prizes were also awarded for the youngest and oldest swimmers and winners of the costume contest. YOUNGEST PENGUIN:

B E ST O VE R A L L C O S T U M E :

MO ST C REATI VE:

Hazel Long Berlin, Md. (8 Months, 23 Days)

B u t c h L o r d i t ch “ K i n g Ne p t u n e ” (Denver, PA)

OLDEST PENGUIN:

MO S T S P I R I T E D :

M i ke S c hl e ge l S h “ ar k E at i n g K id ” ~ I t ' s 5 ' O ' C l o ck S o m e w h e r e (Breinigsville, PA)

Papa Joe Gaf fney Selbyville, De. (83 Years, 10 Months, 6 Days)

T h e R o l f e s F a m il y “ Cl o w n s i n P a j a m a s ” ~ K y l i e' s P e n g u i n s (Reisterstown, MD)

B E S T L I T T L E P E N G U IN : J a y K e t t le r “ C la rk K e n t / S u p e r m an ” (Leesburg, VA)

B E S T T E A M /G R O U P C OS T U ME : M c K en n a S ch l e g el , S i e n n a P e a r c e & Ke e r a P e a r c e “ W i n t er P r i n c e s s e s ” ~ I t ' s 5 ' O ' C l o c k So m ew h er e (Breinigsville, PA & Effort, PA)

Thank You to all of this year’s Penguins, Teams, and Suppor ters for their par ticipation and contributions to the 2017 Penguin Swim! Thank You to Michael Cylc and the Penguin Swim Committee for their hard work and dedication to make this event a success! Special Thanks to... Chris Pappenfor t and the Princess Royale Staf f and the many AGH Associates and Volunteers who helped with this event!


Ocean City Today

PAGE 22

JANUARY 13, 2017

OCFD captain becomes Palm Beach fire chief Trevor Steedman ends long Ocean City career, but eager for new experience in Florida (Jan. 13, 2017) Long-time Ocean City Fire Department member, Capt. Trevor Steedman, is moving south to become fire chief in Palm Beach Shores, Florida, the department announced this week. Steedman, who began his career in the fire service in 1987 as a cadet in Ocean City, served the resort for nearly three decades, concluding his tenure as the commander of the Of-

fice of Training, Health & Safety. Previoiusly, he has served as shift commander, special operations commander and training officer. He developed many of the Trevor Steedman Special Operations Teams and training programs for his department, including the Dive Rescue Unit, Helicopter Emergency Aerial Tactical (HEAT) Team, SCBA Re-

Certification program, a state recognized Fire Training Academy, recruit testing and training, the Office of Training, Health, & Safety and a variety of internal policies, programs and training initiatives. Capt. Steedman earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Fire Science from the University of Maryland and is a current candidate in the Executive Fire Officer Program at the National Fire Academy. He has served the department as a rescue diver, rescue swimmer, hazardous materials technician, and rescue specialist and nationally

registered paramedic. During Hurricane Katrina, Capt. Steedman was deployed as a team leader, served as Water Rescue Unit leader during Hurricane Irene and was designated as Planning Section & Logistics Section chief and Fire Branch director during Hurricane “Super-Storm” Sandy. On leaving Ocean City, Steedman said, “Ocean City helped shape me, both personally and professionally.” “I am eager to take the excellent experiences I have had here and apply it to serve the residents and town of Palm Beach Shores.”

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Sports & Recreation

Jan. 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

Page 23

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Decatur wrestling team takes down SH and Parkside

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

(Left) Worcester Prep senior captain Leigh Lingo makes a layup during Wednesday’s game against Saints Peter & Paul in Berlin. (Right) Worcester freshman Emily Copeland fires a shot late in the game. Copeland had six points, 11 rebounds and two steals in the 24-20 victory.

Worcester girls’ basketball team tops STPP, 24-20

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 13, 2017) The Worcester Prep girls’ basketball team faced the Saints Peter & Paul Sabres –  its toughest competition of the season – Wednesday night in Berlin, and the Lady Mallards pulled out a 24-20 victory over their Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference rivals. “It was a pretty equal game. We’re both very rusty, not having been on the court in four or five days [because of snow and schools being closed]. I think that showed,” said Prep Coach Scot Dailey. “This is one of the toughest, most competitive four-quarter games we’ve played in. We needed that.” Worcester led 4-1 at the end of the first quarter. The Mallards went on a 6-0 run in the second quarter to increase their advantage to 10-1. At halftime, the home team was ahead 12-5. The Sabres cut the Mallards’ lead to 16-15 with just over a minute remaining in the third quarter. Freshman Emily Copeland scored in the final seconds of the quarter to put Worcester on top 18-15. Saints Peter & Paul tied the score 20-20 with five minutes to play. Both

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester Prep senior Madison Bescak dribbles by a Saints Peter & Paul player during Wednesday’s competition in Berlin.

teams missed a number of shots in the following minutes. Prep senior Melissa Laws broke the tie, netting a shot with 1:27 left on the clock. Copeland provided the Mallards with an insurance basket with 39 seconds remaining in the game. “They played just as hard as we did. We missed some assignments – five of the 20 points were defensive miscues –  but I thought we played great defense on them,” Dailey said. “Their pressure defense got to us more than I would have liked, so we’ve got something to work on. “I think at the end it was who was going to make the last play and we were lucky enough to make the last

play and get a four-point win,” he continued. Laws led Worcester with eight points, four rebounds and two blocks. Copeland chipped in with six points, 11 rebounds and two steals. Sophomore Hailey Merritt tallied six points and four rebounds. “We’re happy get the ‘W.’ Happy to be 10-0,” Dailey said. The Prep squad will host the Chincoteague Ponies today, Friday, at 4 p.m. “It will be a tough game. We’re looking to try and get to 11-0,” Dailey said. The Gunston Day Herons come to Berlin on Monday for a 3 p.m. match.

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 13, 2017) The Stephen Decatur wrestling team scored victories over two Bayside Conference opponents – the Parkside Rams and Snow Hill Eagles – during a tri-meet Wednesday night in Berlin. “Usually I’m not happy when we wrestle some Bayside matches and we give up some points – like double digits and things like that – but I felt like we wrestled well,” said Decatur Coach Todd Martinek. “I’m really happy. Usually I harp on the negatives – the glass is half empty – but I’ll say half full tonight.” Decatur took on Parkside first and won 66-8. The competition began with the 113pound match, which Parkside forfeited to Decatur junior Cade Solito. Senior captains Josh Lawson (120) and Robert Kaminski (126) and juniors Jeremy Danner (132) and David Braciszewski (138) pinned their opponents. “David Braciszewski coming back from four collapsed lungs, he got one match tonight,” Martinek said. “We’re trying to ease him back in. I was really happy with him.” Senior Andy McKahan outscored his 145-pound competition 6-4 to boost Decatur’s lead to 33-0. Parkside earned a 2-1 decision at 152 pounds, then Decatur sophomores Jaron Purnell and Lukas Layton pinned their 160- and 170-pound opponents. Parkside got a pin at 182 pounds, which was followed by Decatur junior captain Caleb Bourne (195) and senior Jian Joobeen (220) pinning their competitors. Senior Ean Spencer raised his arms with excitement after outscoring Parkside’s Jose Vazquez, 5-2, in their 285pound bout. “That was the [2016] Bayside [Conference 285-pound] champion. He pinned Ean last year and he’s ranked seventh in the state,” Martinek said. “We believed in Ean, but Ean’s got to believe in himself. Sometimes you’ve got to beat good kids to think that you really belong there. He works hard.” Decatur freshman Austin Miller finished the meet with a pin at 106 pounds. Decatur topped Snow Hill 60-21. The Eagles forfeited the first two matches – 120 and 126 pounds – to Kaminski and Lawson, respectively. Snow Hill won by pin at 132 pounds, then forfeited the 138-pound match to Danner and McKahan pinned his 145pound opponent. The Eagles recorded a pin at 152 See SEAHAWKS Page 24


Ocean City Today

PAGE 24

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(Left) Despite his headgear slipping down over his face during the 138-pound match, Stephen Decatur junior David Braciszewski pinned Parkside’s Jake Becker Wednesday night in Berlin. “David Braciszewski coming back from four collapsed lungs, he got one match tonight,” said Decatur Coach Todd Martinek. “We’re trying to ease him back in. I was really happy with him.” (Right) Decatur sophomore Lukas Layton works to turn Snow Hill’s Zerrick Collins on his back. Layton succeeded and pinned his opponent.

Seahawks wrestle well during meet with Rams, Eagles Continued from Page 23 pounds as did Layton at 160 pounds. Snow Hill logged a pin at 170 pounds and a 7-0 decision at 182 pounds. The Eagles forfeited the 195-, 220,285- and 106-pound matches to Bourne, senior Gavin Payne, Spencer and Miller, respectively. Solito wrapped up the meet with a pin at 113 pounds. Decatur will host its annual War on the Shore tournament this weekend, featuring 20 teams from Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and Pennsylvania. “War on the Shore is going to be a whole different level Friday and Saturday,” Martinek said. “Our lineup is getting back to healthy. It’s a good performance going into War on the Shore.”

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Stephen Decatur senior Ean Spencer battles 2016 285-pound Bayside Conference champ, Jose Vazquez of Parkside, Wednesday night. Spencer won 5-2. “He pinned Ean last year and he’s ranked seventh in the state,” Decatur Coach Todd Martinek said, adding, “We believed in Ean.”

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Ocean City Today

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Decatur’s annual War on the Shore this wknd. Twenty varsity teams from Maryland, Delaware, Pa. and Virginia participating

(Jan. 13, 2017) The Stephen Decatur wrestling team will host its annual War on the Shore tournament today and Saturday at the Berlin high school. Twenty varsity teams from Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and Pennsylvania will be competing. The top two wrestling teams in Maryland (Damascus and Mt. St. Joe) and

Delaware (Sussex Central and Milford) will be participating, as will highly-ranked Lake Braddock of Virginia and Freedom High School from Pennsylvania. Tournament matches will take place on five mats – two in both the main gym and cafeteria and one in the school’s smaller gym. “We’re expecting to see some really good, quality matches,” said Todd Martinek, Decatur coach and tournament organizer. For Decatur to be successful, Martinek said the Seahawks must be able

to “get through the grind of the tournament.” “I hope we wrestle well. It will be a good test for us to see where we stand,” Martinek said. “Our goal is to get at least two in the finals and six place winners [top eight]. If we can place top six or seven [as a team] that would mean we had a really good tournament.” Matches are slated to begin at 3:30 p.m. today and action will run until about 9:30 p.m. Competition will start at 9 a.m. on Saturday. Weight class finals for third/fourth

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and first/second place are scheduled to kick off at 5 p.m. on Saturday. The top five wrestlers in each weight class will take home awards. In addition to the varsity tournament, about 22 teams are slated to participate in a junior varsity competition. Altogether, War on the Shore will include about 500 grapplers, ranging from state champions to first-year participants. The cost for spectators is $10 per day or $15 for a tournament pass. The results will be available live online at www.trackwrestling.com.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 26

JANUARY 13, 2017

Girls’ team sixth, boys’ squad 11th Decatur athletes preparing for Bayside Conf. indoor track championship meet

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 13, 2017) The Stephen Decatur girls’ indoor track team finished in sixth place out of 20 schools participating in the Jan. 4 meet at the Worcester County Recreation Center in Snow Hill, while the boys’ squad came in 11th. “I thought the girls’ team did pretty well in their first meet back from [Christmas] break. I think the girls will have a good chance to do pretty well at the Bayside meet [on Jan. 18],” Decatur Coach Jody Stigler said earlier this week. “The boys struggled a little bit. Our boys are going to have to work very hard over the next [week] to be in top condition before the Bayside meet.” James M. Bennett took top honors in the girls’ competition, scoring 97.5 points. Cape Henlopen was second (85) followed by North Caroline (83.5), Smyrna (61.5), Kent Island (57.5) and Decatur (54). Decatur Lady Seahawks who scored points by placing eighth or better in their individual events were: seniors Bethany Williams (high jump, first, 4 feet 8 inches; triple jump, fourth, 31 feet 8 inches),

Christina Romano (high jump, tied for fourth, 4 feet 6 inches), Jillian Mitrecic (pole vault, tied for third, 8 feet 6 inches) and Peyton Dunham (3,200-meter run, eighth, 14:46.6), sophomore Adriana Serpe (55meter hurdles, eighth, 10.09 seconds) and freshmen Alyssa Romano (500-meter run, fifth, 1:30.88) and Abbie Baker (pole vault, fifth, 7 feet). Mitrecic, C. Romano and seniors Claire Billings and Jessica Wharton crossed the finish line third overall in the 800-meter relay race (2:01.6). The Romano sisters, Billings and sophomore Ivy Stearn won the 1,600-meter relay race (4:37.83). Dunham, senior Brigitte Ardis, sophomore Dori Krasner and junior Laila Mirza placed sixth in the 3,200-meter relay event (11:57.1). “Top performers were Bethany in the high jump and the 1,600-meter relay team,” Stigler said. North Caroline won the boys’ competition, tallying 96 points. Lake Forest was second with 76 points and Parkside took third with 67. Decatur logged 20 points for 11th place. Decatur athletes who earned points for their squad for finishing in eighth place or better in individual events were: sophomore Kevin Beck (800-meter run, third, 2:11.19), junior Jack Reimer (1,600-

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meter race, eighth, 5:20) and seniors Javier Hernandez (3,200-meter run, sixth, 11:17), Cameron James (3,200-meter run, seventh, 11:23.7) and Jared Massey (triple jump, fifth, 39 feet 1 inch). Beck, James and seniors Chance Coley and Alton Walker placed fifth in the 3,200-meter relay race (9:17.5). “Standout performer for the boys was Kevin Beck in the 800m and 3,200m relay,” Stigler said. The Bayside Conference championship meet will take place on Wednesday, Jan. 18 at the Worcester County Recreation Center, beginning at 2 p.m. Stigler said the favorite in the boys’ competition is North Caroline and Kent Island in the girls’ event. “I think Decatur girls can finish third or fourth and boys will probably be a place or two lower than the girls…To individually be successful, our athletes need to work hard at practice and have their best performance at the Bayside meet,” Stigler said. “I think there could be some individual Bayside champs. We are counting on: Bethany/ Christina in the high jump, girls’ 4x400 [relay], Jillian in the pole vault and Kevin Beck/Cameron James in mid-distance. I would not be surprised if any of these could be individual champions.”

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MILESTONE Stephen Decatur senior captain Robert Kaminski recorded his 100th career win during last weekend’s Iron Horse Duals, hosted by C. Milton Wright High School in Bel Air. As of Wednesday, Kaminski has 102 career wins.

Delmarva Whiskey Club’s annual golf event, Jan. 28-29

(Jan. 13, 2017) The Delmarva Whiskey Club will hold its third annual Whiskey Winter Golf Outing and Scotch Dinner, Jan. 28-29. The event will begin with a Scotch Whiskey dinner on Saturday, Jan. 28. The sit-down pairing of fine food and high-end Scotch will be held at the Cove Bar and Grille located at Bayside Golf Resort in Selbyville, Delaware. The golf outing will feature a shotgun start at noon on Sunday, Jan. 29 in a four-person team scramble format. Proceeds from the events will go to Operation SEAs the Day, a beach week event for soldiers and veterans who are recovering from injuries sustained while serving the country, and their families. During this week, Bethany Beach, Delaware hosts soldiers and their immediate families for a well-deserved week of rest and relaxation. The Delmarva Whiskey Club was established for whiskey fans. The club sponsors various whiskey-tasting events during the year. It welcomes those who have just begun to appreciate whiskey, as well as seasoned whiskey aficionados. To register for the Whisky Winter Golf Tournament, or for more information, visit www.delmarvawhiskey.com. To become a tournament sponsor or join the Whiskey Club, contact Kevin Clover, president, at 215-815-1706 or at kevin@delmarvawhiskey.com.


Jan. 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

Business

Page 27 REAL ESTATE REPORT

Mortgage brokers help prepare new owners financially

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Marco Hiemenz shows off the laser tag gear and entrance at Game World on 146th Street.

NYC-themed laser tag provides two floors of fun in OC

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Children of all ages must play a round of laser tag in the twostory, 7,500-square-foot and New Yorkthemed addition to Game World on 146th Street. “It’s a New York City scene, the place is huge and upscale,” Owner Nolen Graves said. “There are two levels. It’s a battle for New York City with lowlives living in the underground in storm drains and the second level is the street [level]. It is like being in a video game.” The venue is perfect for birthday parties with more than 40 arcade games including Skee ball, pinball machines and an air hockey table, an 18-hole outdoor miniature golf course and 32 players can participate in a laser tag game on two teams at any given time. “There are not a lot of activities for kids to do in the winter. It’s the biggest complaint I hear,” Graves said. “What indoor activity can we do? Being a block away from the movie theater makes it a nice date night for teenagers. They can make a whole night out of it.” During a game of laser tag, players have two stories of free roaming area in the underground and street levels while they wander through haze, defend home bases and compete for points. “There is nothing else like it around and it is state-of-the-art. That’s why you See MINI Page 28

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Children of all ages must play a round or two of laser tag in the two-story, 7,500-square-foot, New York-themed addition to Game World on 146th Street.

KARA HALLISSEY/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Game World includes more than 40 arcade games, Skee ball, pinball machines and an air hockey table, an 18-hole outdoor miniature golf course and laser tag.

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) For those considering a purchase of a new home in 2017, there are steps you can take to prepare yourself financially. The first step is to contact a local mortgage broker that can help review your current financial situation. The two most important aspects to define are your credit score and your debt to income ratio. Your mortgage broker can help you by pulling your credit score and giving you advice on how to it, if needed. Most lenders want a score of 640 or higher to approve you for a home loan, but knowing your credit score is also important if you are borderline to receive the best interest rate available. Usually a score at or above 700 is needed to gain the best interest rate. Sometimes there are mistakes on credit reports, but clearing them up takes time, so reviewing your credit report ahead of time is essential. Additionally, mortgage brokers can help review your current debts and prioritize any possible payoffs that will help to improve your debt to income ratio, and in turn, your purchase power. For instance, if you have three credit cards and you are carrying balances on all of them, which create a monthly debt of $300, or $100 per card, you could pay off the card with the lowest balance and reduce your monthly debt by $100 a month. But, lenders look negatively at reports that show recent payoffs for credit card balances, so planning ahead to pay off debt is a necessity. Also, do not close any credit card accounts, because capacity to borrow is a big factor in your credit score. Another important discussion to have with your mortgage broker is a review of your tax returns. In many cases, an average of two years tax returns is needed, especially if you are self-employed. For example: 2015 your adjusted gross income was $30,000 and in 2016 your adjusted gross income is $50,000—then the lender would only be able to qualify you for a purchase based on a $40,000 annual income. In some cases, you may not be happy with the way a prior year’s taxes were filed, and there is a process you can utilize to amend a prior year’s return. However, be sure to consult an accountant/tax See HIGH Page 28


PAGE 28

Ocean City Today

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Jones earns LCSW-C Caitlin Jones, a social worker with Coastal Hospice since 2010, has earned her Licensed Clinical Social Worker – Clinical (LCSW-C) from the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB). To earn her LCSW-C, Jones performed at least 3,000 hours of supervised clinical social work experience in direct service to clients, Caitlin Jones and supervised in the assessment and formulation of diagnostic impressions. She also passed the required examination administered through the ASWB, the nonprofit association that tests a social worker’s competence to practice ethically and safely. Jones earned her BA and MSW from Salisbury University. Born in England and raised in Canada, she now resides in Salisbury with her husband and two children. She currently is a member of the Coastal Hospice Fair Winds team that services Worcester and Somerset counties.

Bassett joins Harim Allen Harim, a leading producer and processor of chicken on Delmarva, has named veteran communications expert Catherine M. Bassett as the new director of Public Relations to help share positive news about the company and oversee community relations. A graduate of George Washington Uni-

versity, Bassett began her career in Salisbury as a newspaper reporter for The Daily Times in 1989. She later served as communications director for Congressman Wayne T. C. Bassett Gilchrest (R-Maryland1st), where she worked in Washington, Annapolis and later in the Salisbury District Office during her 16-year career. She started her own public relations company in 2009, and has worked with a range of clients including Delmarva Power, the Ocean City Air Show, Maryland Capital Enterprises and the Delmarva Zoological Society. She lives in Salisbury with her two children.

Becker Morgan ranked Building Design + Construction magazine ranked Becker Morgan Group 60th on the Giants 300 list of the Top Architecture/Engineering Firms nationwide. This report ranks leading firms in the nation’s architecture, engineering and construction industry. The firm was also ranked among the top architecture firms in numerous building sectors, including K-12 (48th), Healthcare (82nd), Sports Facility (25th), Multi-Family (76th), State Government (37th), Local Government (40th), Green Building (126th) and Data Center (10th). Additionally, the firm ranked 85th on the Top BIM Architecture Firms for use of

3D Building Information Modeling (BIM) in project planning and design. Becker Morgan Group provides architecture and engineering services with offices in Delaware, Maryland and North Carolina. For more information, visit www.beckermorgan.com.

BOC welcomes Connelly Reid Tingle, president & CEO of Bank of Ocean City along with the Board of Directors, welcomes Chief Risk Officer/VP, Edward Connelly, as the newest addition to their staff. Connelly joins Bank of Ocean City with 29 years of banking experience. He is a CPA and graduate of the UniverEdward Connelly sity of Baltimore and the Stonier Graduate School of Banking. He most recently served as SVP chief operating officer at a community bank in Anne Arundel County. Connelly is community minded, and has served as past chairman of the NAACCC Foundation, Inc., a 501(c) (3) formed to fund requests by teachers to help them teach, as well past chairman of Maryland Bank Services.  He was involved with programs at Anne Arundel Community College, the Northern Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce and other local community events. He is looking forward to becoming an active volunteer in the Sussex/Worcester community. Bank of Ocean City is a locally-owned, independent community bank. It was established in 1916 and is headquartered in West Ocean City. For more information, contact Tingle at the 59th Street office at 410-524-6144.

JANUARY 13, 2017

Mini golf, arcade room, laser tag all at OC Game World Continued from Page 27 have to come check it out,” Graves said. “The installers said the only one bigger, that they have seen, is in Las Vegas.” There are different modes, but most participants want to play in teams. Players will notice graffiti on the walls, a burned-out bus, signs for a number of New York districts and illuminated targets to go along with the experience. “Adults have as much fun as the kids,” Graves said. “Moms and dads were playing more than the kids and it was cool to have all ages in here. The parents were worn out.” Laser tag was unveiled Dec. 28 and the venue had a great opening weekend. “We were pleasantly surprised,” Graves said. “We didn’t do any advertising. All we did was turn the lights on and they came.” Game World is having a grand opening special where customers can play laser tag and miniature golf all day long for $20. “We make our own pizza with fresh dough and it’s excellent,” Graves said. In addition to Fat Albert’s homemade pizza, hungry laser tag, arcade and miniature golf players can munch on chicken fingers, mozzarella sticks, fries, soft serve ice cream and even macaroni and cheese on a pizza. “We are located within 30 miles of many towns. It’s a great way for kids to get exercise,” Graves said. Game World is open year-round on 146th Street. To book a birthday party, call 410-250-3888. Winter hours are Friday from noon to 10 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

REAL ESTATE REPORT

High credit scores essential Continued from Page 27 professional before making any changes. “Upfront preparation is key. If you think you are on the fence in any of these categories, get to a lender as soon as possible so we can help plan and

make your purchase as smooth as possible,” said Ned Delaney, branch manager of 1st Mariner Mortgage in Ocean City. — Lauren Bunting is a licensed Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.


JANUARY 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

PAGE 29

Ribbon cutting officially opens Royal Farms Numerous area politicians attend ceremony for store on Route 50, Decatur Hwy.

By Josh Davis Associate Editor (Jan. 13, 2017) The mood was noticeably light during the official ribbon cutting for the new Royal Farms at the corner of Route 50 and Stephen Decatur Highway in Berlin, which drew about 100 people last Friday, including several local officials and many members of town staff. They were there for the free chicken, but also to welcome the new store to the area, which had been in development since at least early 2015. Berlin Mayor Gee Williams said the shop was a perfect example of what makes the town unique and successful, balancing both environmental stewardship and economic development. “We are very proud to have you here,” he said. “We think that you’re leading by example. Berlin is trying to

lead by example on a small scale [environmentally]. “Please have fun,” he added. “If you’re going to be a part of the Town of Berlin, fun is required.” Worcester County Commissioner Bud Church joked that he would show up every morning to speak at the store, so long as he was allowed to stand next to the large Krispy Kreme donut display. Church was also flanked, it should be noted, by a bright yellow, six-foot-tall chicken, as well as by fellow commissioner Diana Purnell. “Welcome to the neighborhood. Welcome to the tax rolls. We love having you,” he said. Senator Jim Mathias came in fashionably late and quipped, “the band will be here in about 15 minutes” as a flustered Brittany Eldredge, Royal Farms’ public relations manager, apparently unsure who he was, invited him to speak. “We love our chicken here on the Eastern Shore,” Mathias said, throwing an arm around both Eldredge and “Foghorn,” the Royal Farms mascot.

Mathias noted a countdown crosswalk was being installed in order to improve safety at the street corner, with concerns about the store’s approximation to Stephen Decatur High School. He also praised the school itself. “We have a great education system here,” Mathias said. “Our children are our most valuable asset and our future, and you guys do a fabulous job from an entrepreneurial perspective and we’re proud to have you as part of our community.” Eldredge presented checks to several area nonprofits at the end of the roughly 20-minute introduction. Accepting donations were Diakonia Executive Director Claudia Nagle, Worcester County Gold President Carol Jacobs and coordinator Hans Zieger, Worcester Youth and Family Counseling Executive Director Steven Taylor and Church Mouse Director Helen Wiley. Stephen Decatur High School CoPrincipal Ryan Cowder accepted a donation on behalf of the school marching band, and Eldredge said a

donation would also be made to the Ocean City Reef Foundation, although the store has had some difficulty in reaching representatives there. Royal Farms President John Kemp introduced the new Royal Farms Rewards program, which launched nationally the day before, and noted the corporation dates back to 1918, started by his grandfather and two great uncles. Kemp struggled, at times, with the correct pronunciation of “Worcester County.” “I was actually little nervous before I came up here, because I said I know I’m going to refer back to ‘warchester,’” he said with a laugh. “We’re very excited about this store. It’s been a couple years in the making [and] the town and the county have been great working with us to get this approved.” Kemp said the store had about 30 employees, and that Royal Farms was known for its fried chicken and western fries, made in-store. The oil used to fry the chicken is also used in the making of biodiesel fuel, according to Eldredge. Royal Farms Environmental and Fuel Leader Tom Ruszin, a graduate of Salisbury University and former Ocean City resident, noted the store sold ethanol-free fuel at the pumps behind the store.

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Public officials help cut the ribbon during a ceremony at the new Royal Farms store at the corner of Stephen Decatur Highway and Route 50, last Friday. Pictured, from left, are Berlin Councilman Thom Gulyas, Berlin Mayor Gee Williams, Worcester County Commissioner Diana Purnell, Worcester County Commissioner Bud Church, Sen. Jim Mathias and Royal Farms manager Greg Fields.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 30

OBITUARIES LOIS ANN ROGERS Berlin Lois Ann Rogers, age 83, died on Monday, Jan. 2, 2017 at Health South Rehabilitation Center in Salisbury. Born in Willards, she was the daughter of the late Louis Timmons and Mabel Adkins Timmons Deneau. She was preceded in death by her husLois Rogers band, William “Bill” Rogers. She is survived by her daughters, Linda L. Baull and her husband, Guy, of Roxana, Delaware, and Carol Ann Rogers of Berlin. There are three grandchildren, William Hastings, Adam Hudson and Kelly Baull, and two great-grandchildren, Alexis Hudson and Hunter Hudson. Also surviving is her brother, J. Richard Timmons, of Virginia. Mrs. Rogers had formerly been employed at the Berlin Shirt Factory, was manager of the Berlin laundromat, and was a member of the First Baptist Church of Berlin where she had been active in their food pantry. She was also a proud member of the Boggs-Disharoon American Legion Post #123 Ladies Auxiliary. A funeral service was held on Thursday, Jan. 5, 2017 at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Interment followed at Evergreen Cemetery in Berlin.

A donation in her memory may be made to: First Baptist Church of Berlin, 613 William St. Berlin, Maryland 21811, or the American Cancer Society, 1138 Parsons Rd. Salisbury, Maryland 21801. Letters of condolence may sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. BRUCE CALDWELL Berlin Bruce Caldwell, 75, of Berlin, died on Dec. 31, 2016. Formerly from New Jersey and Lancaster, Pennsylvania, he graduated from RumsonFairhaven High School, Rumson, New Jersey, in 1960. He was employed for over 25 years as Bruce Caldwell executive director of the Gate House for Men, Lititz, Pennsylvania, and the Gate House for Women, Mountville, Pennsylvania. Professionally and with his own 40 years of continuous sobriety, he was a source of help and hope for countless men and women recovering from alcoholism. He was a member of Bethany United Methodist Church in Berlin, where he was a former member of the choir, chairman of the Trustees, and ran the monthly outdoor flea markets each summer. He was the son of the late John and Alice Caldwell.

JANUARY 13, 2017

In addition to wife of 35 years, the former Susan Mae Shepherd, he is also survived by his brother, Stewart Caldwell, Hazlet, New Jersey; his sisters, Nancy Spiezio, Oakhurst, New Jersey, and Connie Jurewicz, Spring Lake, New Jersey; and six nieces and nephews. A memorial service was held on Saturday, Jan. 7, 2017 at Bethany United Methodist Church in Berlin. In lieu of flowers, please perform an act of kindness. CHARLES LUDWIG SACHS Ocean City Charles Ludwig Sachs, age 90, passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2017 at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Andrew Sachs and Eva Rixie Sachs. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife, Helen Sachs. He is survived by his children, Charles Russell Sachs, Nancy Lee

Dlugokeski and Kathryn Ann Frederick and her husband, John. He was adored grandfather to five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Also surviving is his sister, Margaret Ford. Mr. Sachs had served in the United States Marine Corps during World War II. He was owner/operator of Chuck’s Vacuum Cleaners, Inc. for 39 years which is still in business today. Music and dancing were among his favorite pastimes, along with traveling and visiting the casinos, but family get-togethers were what he loved the most. A graveside service in Garden of the Pines will be private for the family. A donation in his memory may be made to: Worcester County Humane Society, P.O. Box 48 Berlin,  Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin.

OBITUARY NOTICES Obituary Notices are published free each week in the Ocean City Today and Bayside Gazette. E-mail: editor@oceancitytoday.net Mail: Ocean City Today, P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Fax: 410-723-6511

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE YOUR PLACE ON THE WATER

You will love this location and you can walk to the beach . This is the lifestyle you deserve on the waterfront and the whole family will enjoy it too. You can step out your back door and catch some for dinner, or just sit back and watch the world go by. The community offers 3-pools , 2-tennis courts and miniature golf. Are you in the market for waterfront then this is the one for you. 2-bedrooms, 1-bath offers a big country kitchen with a breakfast bar plus the enclosed porch is just right for family and friends to relax and enjoy. Sold furnished for WOW ONLY $181,500. For a L@@K today. Now. THE ORIGINAL MONTEGO BAY SPECIALIST SINCE 1971.

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Obituary Notices are published as space allows. Every effort is made to publish all that are received.

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This cozy 3 bedrooms, 2 bath vacation getaway is being sold furnished. Little care required so you can enjoy the beach, so close you can walk. Located in the heart of a fabulous resort community with 3-pools, 2-tennis courts and you can walk to the beach. It is sure to be your perfect home away from home. New paint throughout and remodeled bathrooms and kitchen. Also New Heating & A/C and Roof. The whole family will love some of the outstanding features like an built in fireplace, big comfortable living room with cathedral ceiling, formal dining room. This is the home you’ve worked so hard for at just the right price. WOW! Only $186,000. Call to see for yourself. WE ARE THE ORIGINAL Montego Bay Specialists since 1971.

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MONTEGO BAY COMMUNITY

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This well maintained 3BR/2BA home is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City. The home is situated on a corner lot and features a porch, cathedral ceilings, a gas fireplace and cen. air. Recent upgrades include new floor coverings, new light fixtures, new refrigerator and a freshly painted interior. HOA fees are only $209 a year. Listed at $237,000.

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This 3BR/2BA well maintained home in N. Ocean City is located close to the beach. Home features 1536 sq. ft. of living space, large family room, open floorplan & kitchen island/breakfast bar. Recent renovations include new floor coverings, freshly painted interior, new appliances, new outside enclosed shower, new electric awning and much more. Listed at $285,500.

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Lifestyle

Jan. 13, 2017

Ocean City Today Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertaiment, Events, Features, Music

Page 31

Inside Going Out Taylor Sloan ave you told anyone your New Year’s resolutions or dreams? This week I received a Facebook message from a young woman who asked me for fitness advice, and besides giving her advice, I congratulated her on pursuing her dreams. I believe that is what the world needs more of in 2017, not only people who make goals and pursue dreams, but also ones who support each other in their endeavors. It’s easier to instill confidence in someone who might not know how capable they are than to judge and tell a person they can’t do something. C.S. Lewis said, “You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” I would suggest meeting a friend for lunch or happy hour at one of the restaurants below to discuss your goals for this year. BJ’s on the Water, 75th Street, offers a variety of weekly specials. Sunday through Thursday, enjoy half off dinner prices with beverage purchase starting with a fried seafood platter every Sunday. It includes flash fried shrimp, flounder and clam strips served with hand cut fries, coleslaw and hushpuppies for $12. Monday, have crab imperial served with a choice of two sides and a roll, $12. Tuesday, try a twin crab cake dinner served with choice of two sides and dinner roll, $13. Wednesday, enjoy stuffed flounder with two sides and a roll, and Thursday, eat a flash fried shrimp dinner, which included five colossal gulf shrimp with two sides and a dinner roll, $10.50, or have stuffed founder in case you missed it Wednesday. Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday through Thursday 10 p.m. to 2 a.m., get a half-pound of steamed shrimp for $5.99 and $1 10-ounce domestic drafts. Watch your favorite team while having a few NFL tailgate specials. A three-pack of saloon burgers is $6.99 (add $1 for cheese.) A threepack of pulled pork sliders is $7.99. A three-pack of chicken finger sliders is $5.99. A Redskin See INSIDE Page 32

H

PHOTO COURTESY JACKIE GALLAGHER

PHOTO COURTESY WAYNE ROWE

(Left) All of Jackie Gallagher’s jewelry is designed and handmade in her Crofton, Maryland workshop using sterling silver, stainless steel, sea glass, leather, pearls, lures, bone or horn, antler tips and gemstones. Check out her handmade jewelry at the Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival and Craft Show inside the convention center on 40th Street this weekend. (Right) Rowe House Tile, out of Cape May, New Jersey, features handmade ceramic tile and will have decorative tile wall hangings for purchase during the show in Ocean City.

Vendors to display handmade items Annual Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival and Craft Show this weekend in Ocean City

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) A wintertime favorite, the 32nd annual Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival and Craft Show, returns to the convention center on 40th Street this weekend. Approximately 60 vendors will showcase original handmade pieces and products including jewelry, paintings and prints, ceramics, pottery, woodwork, metal art, skin care, candles, wearable art, baked goods, sewing and textiles, among many others whose creations have a nautical and wildlife theme. Generally, potential vendors contact organizer Ami Hastings to be in the show and she has a mailing list of contacts who come every year. “Visitors will find unique gifts and personal items that typically can’t be found on the Boardwalk or in other local shops,” Hastings said. “This is a great opportunity for people to see the works of both talented local artists (Maryland, Delaware and Virginia) and also the works of some coming from as far away as Maine, New York and Pennsylvania.”

Jackie Gallagher Designs, out of Crofton, Maryland, is a new vendor participating in this year’s show. “I’m excited for the festival,” Gallagher said. “I thought it would be a lot of fun. A lot of the jewelry that I make falls into the nautical category and in the past few months I have been adding new categories that include fishing lures, antler tips and horns, and I thought this show would be a great place to exhibit and promote these items.” All of Gallagher’s jewelry is designed and handmade in her Crofton workshop using sterling silver, stainless steel, sea glass, leather, pearls, lures, bone or horn, antler tips and gemstones. “My motto is that, ‘Jewelry is art that you wear every day’ and I really try to provide these pieces at reasonable prices,” Gallagher said. Rowe House Tile, out of Cape May, New Jersey, features handmade ceramic tile and will have decorative tile wall hangings for purchase at the festival. “We have blue claw crabs, horseshoe crabs, fish and mermaids as well as impressed scenes of sea grasses and underwater murals,” said owner Wayne Rowe, who has participated in the Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival & Craft Show for three years. “We’ll also

be bringing samples of our custom address plaques that can be ordered at the show.” Rowe likes how the Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival and Craft Show is a smaller show, which allows for lighter travel and a weekend gateway for his family. He also said Ocean City and the surrounding towns have been good to his business with close to 100 custom address plaques adorning homes in the area. “There aren’t many opportunities for artists to sell their work during the winter months in the northeast, so we’re thankful for the opportunity,” Rowe said. “Ami Hastings does a wonderful job. The Comfort Inn Gold Coast offers us a reduced rate, some of our favorite Ocean City restaurants are still open, and we love how peaceful the town is this time of year.” Last year, about 3,200 people visited the Nautical & Wildlife Art Festival and Craft Show. Tickets cost $5 at the door with children 12 and under admitted free. The show will take place at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday. For a complete list of vendors and more information visit, www.ocshows.com.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 32

JANUARY 13, 2017

Inside going out Taylor Sloan Continued from Page 31

fried shrimp in a basket tossed in homemade wing sauce is $8.99. Have “Old Bay” cheese topped fries for $8.99. Drink specials include $5 “Redskin” crushes made with cherry vodka, banana, a splash of triple sec and cranberry, topped with Sierra Mist, served in a pint glass for $5. Miller Lite, Coors Light and Natural Light cans are $2. Sunday lunch specials include steak and eggs with home fries and toast, $15.99. A bacon, egg, lettuce and tomato served on 12 grain toast served with home fries is $8.99. Happy hour Monday through Friday, at the bar, includes food and drink specials. Have pork barbecue sliders, $7.99; pretzel dog and fries, $4.99; hot fingers and fries, $5.99; and three saloon burgers $6.99 (with cheese $7.79.) Drink specials include Miller Lite, Coors Light and Natural Light cans for $2.25; domestic bottles, $3.25; happy hour rail and premium beverages, $3.50; house wine, $4.25; and happy hour imports, $4.50. BJ’s has live entertainment Friday, Jan. 13, featuring Lennon LaRicci & the Leftovers, 9 p.m. and Saturday, Jan. 14, Over Time at 9 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 18, catch Monkee Paw during the happy hour

party at 5 p.m. For more, visit www.bjsonthewater.com. Bourbon Street on the Beach, 116th Street, has happy hour every day from 4-7 p.m. which includes $2 Natural Light, $2.50 drafts, $3.50 rail drinks, $5 house wine and margaritas and $6 hurricanes and crushes. Food specials include $1 oysters, $8 char grilled oysters, $9 wings and $8 half-pound burgers. Friday, Jan. 13, hear Otto play from 7-10 p.m. Saturday, listen to Randy Lee Ashcraft, 7-10 p.m. Open mic night is Wednesday, Jan. 18 from 8-11 p.m. To view the New Orleans-style cuisine menu, visit www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com. Captain’s Table, 15th Street, is open daily for breakfast and dinner. Monday through Saturday breakfast is served 7-11:30 a.m. Sunday breakfast is offered 7 a.m. to 1 p.m., with lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday indulge in $3 Bloody Mary’s and mimosas. Dinner and lite fare starts at 5 p.m. daily. Happy hour is 5-7 p.m. daily. Drink specials include $1.50 Miller Lite drafts, $1 off house glass wine and premium rail cocktails. Enjoy music by Phil Perdue on the piano this Friday and Saturday, Jan. 13-14, 5:30-9:30 p.m.

To make reservations, call 410289-7192. Clarion, 101st Street, offers several dining and nightlife options. At Horizon’s Oceanfront Restaurant receive 50 percent off dinner menu entrées, 5-8 p.m. Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday and 30 percent off from 5-7 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Saturday, enjoy a breakfast buffet from 7-10:30 a.m. The cost is $11.95 for adults, $8.95 for children ages 4-12, and 3 and younger are free. Sunday, indulge in a deluxe breakfast buffet from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. The cost is $14.95 for adults and $9.95 for children. Breakers Pub offers happy hour daily from 4-7 p.m. Drink specials include $2.30 select drafts, $2.90 domestic beers, rail drinks and house wines and $3.85 margaritas. The Ocean Club Nightclub has Power Play providing entertainment Friday, Jan. 13, and Saturday, Jan. 14, at 9 p.m., along with DJ Dusty. For more, call 410-524-3535. Coins Pub and Restaurant, 28th Street, opens Tuesday through Friday at 2 p.m., and noon Saturday and Sunday. Coins offers happy hour food and beverages daily from 3-6 p.m. Domestic draft beer is $2, domestic bottle beer, $2.75, and Chardon-

nay, Cabernet and rail beverages, $3.50. Food specials include $6 wings and steamed clams, $7 steamed shrimp/mussels and a $2 quarter-pound hot dog. Come to Coins on Wednesday for prime rib night, where you can enjoy a 16-ounce prime rib with one side for $15.99. To view the full menu, visit www.coinspuboc.com. The Cove at Ocean Pines Yacht Club, 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, has lunch, dinner, a variety of drinks as well as a children’s menu. Friday, Jan. 13, the Cove will open at 7 p.m. Enjoy smooth jazz style music from Bryan Clark starting at 8 p.m. Guests are invited to join the Cove for a dinner buffet. Tickets cost $25 and reservations are required. Call the Cove at 410641-7501. Saturday, Jan. 14, the Cove opens at 7 p.m. Catch Full Circle providing entertainment at 8 p.m. The Cove will reopen Friday, Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. For more, visit www.oceanpines.org. Crab Bag, 130th Street, opens at 11 a.m. year-round. It offers all day super happy hour with drink specials that include $1.50 domestic drafts, $2 rails and domestic bottles, $3.50 wine by the glass, $3.95 32-ounce mini pitcher, $4.95 Bloody Mary’s and $5.95 orange crushes.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

PAGE 33

Inside going out Taylor Sloan Food specials include $6.95 cracklin kielbasa; $7.95 smoke house chili dog, chicken sandwich, one-third rack baby back ribs, or smoke house cheese fries; and $8.95 half-pound cheeseburger. The Crab Bag offers an NFL Sunday special with all-you-can-eat fried chicken, hot steamed crabs, spiced shrimp, cole slaw and French fries for $39.95. For more specials, call 410-250-3337. Duffy’s Bayside Bar and Grille, 130th Street, features happy hour from noon until 6 p.m. daily. Happy hour drinks include domestic bottle/drafts for $2.25, import beers for $3.50, Guinness for $5, rails are $3 and calls and house wine are $3.75. Sunday NFL specials will be available all day, and include $5.99 bang bang shrimp, personal cheese pizza and cheese quesadilla for $5.50 each and $5.99 wings. Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. enjoy eggs Benedict for $10.99, corned beef hash for $12.99 and steak and eggs for $13.99. Monday night football food and drink specials include a personal pizza for $5.50, fish and chips for $7.99, 16-ounce Natty Boh cans for $2.25, and rail and call drinks at discounted prices. Thursday, night enjoy NFL football specials as well. Wednesday is burger night from 6 p.m. to close and includes beef, turkey or black bean burgers for $6.99, and house wine will be available for $3.75. Friday have a crab cake dinner for $13.99 and hear Bob Hughes play from 5-9 p.m. Check out Duffy’s happenings at www.DuffysOC.com. Fager’s Island, 60th Street, offers daily lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. Enjoy “Island Time,” Tuesday through Sunday, 3-6 p.m. Drink specials include $5 crushes, martinis and Fager’s Island wines, two-forone rail drinks, domestic beers and Coronas. Entertainment this weekend kicks off Friday, Jan. 13, with D.J. Hook spinning on the deck at 9 p.m., and Nelly’s Echo on stage at 9:30 p.m. Don’t forget to purchase tickets for Blues Bake 2017 happening Saturday, Jan. 14 from 1-5 p.m. Sample craft beer provided by Dogfish Head paired with clambake, raw oysters, top round of beef, BBQ chicken and ribs. Hear live music by Ricky Wise and the Dirty Unit. Also, win a chance to receive a 2017 Fager’s V.I.P. card. Tickets cost $40 in advance and $45 at the door. Later on, catch DJ Groove spinning at 9 p.m. on the deck and Crushing Day will perform on the stage at 9:30 p.m. For more Fager’s events, visit

www.Fagers.com. Fox’s Pizza Den, located in the Harris Teeter Shopping Plaza, Route 54, offers locals’ dine-in only specials. Monday, starting at 4 p.m., enjoy a prime rib dinner for $13. Tuesday, stop in for half-price pizza, and Wednesday, get your taste buds ready for $10 parmesan night. Thursday is “Lucky Burger” night for $7.77, which includes a half-pound Angus burger. Friday, have fish and chips for $10. Come in for happy with drink specials until 6 p.m. that include $3 domestic drafts and rails, $4 house wine and $5 orange crushes. For more, call 302-436FOXS (3697). Harborside Bar & Grill, 12841 S. Harbor Rd. West Ocean City, of-

fers happy hour from 4-7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Drink specials include $2 rails and domestic beer bottle/drafts and $5.50 orange crushes. Food specials include $5.99 buffalo wings/pound of steamed shrimp, $7.99 bowl of garlic mussels and $12.99 two dozen steamed clams. NFL game specials include $2 16-ounce Miller Lite, Coors Light and Yuengling drafts, as well as $2 rails. Friday, Jan. 13, Billy T will provide tunes beginning at 4 p.m. Friday is also ladies night starting at 7 p.m. Enjoy $2 16-ounce Miller and Coors Light drafts, $3 shooters and $4 house wine, and of course, happy hour prices on orange crushes. On Saturday, Jan. 14 hear Simple Truth/Side Project, 2-6 p.m.; DJ

Jeremy T, 8 p.m. and on Sunday, listen to Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m. then DJ Billy T, 6:30 p.m. For all things from the home of the Original Orange Crush, visit www.weocharborside.com. Stop by Harpoon Hanna’s in Fenwick Island, Delaware, off Route 54, and try its exclusive house beer, RAR Deep Brew Pale Ale, a medium bodied pale ale with refreshing citrus notes, a slightly malty sweetness and a balanced hop finish (5.5 percent ABV). Happy hour is Monday through Friday, 3-7 p.m. Drink specials include $1.75 Coors Light and Miller Lite drafts, $2.75 Coors Light and Miller Lite bottles, $3 rail drinks, $3.75 house wines, $4 call drinks and $5.50 crushes. See INSIDE Page 40

Enjoy One Of The Best Happy Hours On Coastal Highway Fresh New Bar with 16 Drafts & Tons of TVs Lunch Specials

Daily Happy Hour Menu 3 pm–7 pm

ribs baked oysters wings flatbread

Monday Funday $1 fish tacos Tuesday $5 Bozman’s original crabcake sandwich with fries Wednesday All Day Happy Hour Thursday $5 RAR beer-battered cod ‘n’chips Friday $5 plain jane burger $5 Burley Oak’s rude boy BBQ chicken sandwich Sunday All Day Happy Hour

Dinner Specials

shrimp crab cod burger chicken shrimp $1 ~ Buck a Shuck Oyster $5 ~ snow crab cluster (1/4 lb.)

Monday Funday 25¢ wings (minimum order of 6) $10 shrimp ‘n’ grits Tuesday 1/2-off fish entrees Wednesday All Day Happy Hour Thursday Taco/Burger Nite $2 fish or shrimp taco $6.50 burger Friday 3 courses for $25 Sunday All Day Happy Hour Friends & Family 3 chef-selected courses $18

8003 Coastal Hwy., Ocean City, Md. • 410-723-4665 • www.HookedOC.com


Ocean City Today

PAGE 34

JANUARY 13, 2017

Blood Bank of Delmarva’s 19th OC drive, Jan. 18

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) The Blood Bank of Delmarva will host its 19th annual blood drive on Wednesday, Jan. 18, inside the Dockside Hall at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street. “Your blood can save someone’s life and your donation is a precious gift,” said Suzanne Murray, BDD account executive. “The winter months are a difficult time for us to maintain the community blood supply, and this large blood drive gives our inventories a big boost to get us through the season. This is the largest blood drive that we do.” Since its inception, the Blood Bank of Delmarva has collected blood from at least 9,000 donors during this event. Every year, organizers set a goal and at least 450 people need to sign up in order to reach it in 2017. Last year, 395 people donated blood. “We need 350 [people] each day to donate to meet the needs of our hospitals on the shore,” Murray said. “The Ocean City Blood Drive on the 18th will provide over a day’s worth of blood for our community. We will have other blood centers open in Delaware that day as well.” Donating blood only takes about 5-7 minutes, but the entire appointment runs approximately one hour. The donation appointment includes a miniphysical (blood pressure, temperature and pulse), medical history review, giving blood and post-donation refreshments. All donors will receive a souvenir Tshirt, and many local businesses will be providing free refreshments for participants to enjoy after giving blood. The businesses and food provided will include pizza from the Dough Roller, fruit and doughnuts from WalMart and sweet treats from Candy Kitchen and Wockenfuss. Applebee’s

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20

Aries, relaxation seems like the perfect idea, but some restlessness might get in the way of these plans. Low-impact activities may be the way to go.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21

Taurus, if you find it difficult to ask for what you desire, garner the courage and make a stand. Trust your instincts that you deserve what you are seeking.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21

Participants donate blood during the Blood Bank of Delmarva’s 2016 OC Blood Drive at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street. The 2017 event will take place Wednesday, Jan. 18.

will provide brownies; hot beverages will be available from Centerplace Catering and the Worcester County Girl Scouts are donating cases of cookies for the event. “The Ocean City Blood Drive is a fun event, and for those who have never donated, I encourage you to give it a chance. We make it a pleasant and easy experience, plus you get cookies and a T-shirt as well as the good feeling knowing you helped save someone’s life,” Murray said. People with all blood types are urged to schedule an appointment in order to ensure an adequate supply of blood for all patients during the winter months. Every blood donation saves three lives. Anyone who is between the ages of 17 and 79 years old (ages 80 and older should contact the Blood Bank of Delmarva eligibility coordinator at 1-8888-BLOOD-8 for medical approval), weighs at least 110 pounds, is in general good health and meets the minimum eligibility requirements may give blood as often as every 56 days. All donors must provide a photo ID or two other forms of identification, including date of birth.

Organizers ask people who have active cold or flu-like symptoms such as fever or sore throat on donation day to choose another time to donate. Those on antibiotics for infection must wait 24 hours after they are finished to give blood. Donors who got a tattoo or body piercing must wait 12 months to donate. Those who have travelled to certain parts of the world may be deferred due to a potential risk of contracting an infection that may be transmitted through blood transfusion. A few tips for giving blood are to stay hydrated and drink eight to 10 glasses of water a day leading up to the blood donation, avoid highly caffeinated energy drinks and get a good night’s sleep. Eat a substantial meal within three hours before giving blood and afterward avoid participating in strenuous physical labor or athletic activities for 24 hours. The blood drive will be held from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the convention center inside the Dockside Hall on 40th Street, and walk-in donors are welcome, but See OC Page 37

Gemini, you are in your element this week and you will be soaring on good vibes for several days. There’s no pressure to get things done, so keep on sailing.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22

Cancer, find your footing this week, which figures to be busy and hectic. Prepare a schedule so you can complete all the tasks at hand on time.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23

Leo, optimism is good, but you may need to be a realist this week as well. Do not compromise common sense for the sake of seeing the bright side of everything.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22

Virgo, concentration comes naturally to you, but don’t focus so much that you begin to miss what’s going on around you. Seek a friend who can keep you smiling.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23

Libra, you are eager to listen and learn but you also want to share your own experiences. This week you will need to find a balance between being the student and the teacher.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22

Scorpio, avoid jumping to conclusions and encourage others to do the same. Allow things to play out before forming any concrete opinions or developing a course of action.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21

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FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS DURING ALL LIVE NFL GAMES WEDNESDAY: KARAOKE WITH DJ JEREMY

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Ladies Night

Every Friday, 7PM-til

$2 16 oz. Coors Light & Miller Lite Drafts $3 Shooters • $4 Glass Wine $5.50 Original Orange Crush Bar and Pub Area Only — Some Restrictions

Where You Always Get Your Money’s Worth

Make your decisions now before you add any more information to the mix, Sagittarius. Your judgement could be clouded by unnecessary data coming your way.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20

Capricorn, you are at a turning point in your life and now may be a good time to make a few important changes. This may involve a new career path or new friends.

AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18

Aquarius, even if you have a lot to get done, you will be able to think on your feet and make changes as needed. Maintain your self-confidence throughout the week.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20

Actively explore your impulses in the next few days, Pisces. You may not have a chance to do so in the coming weeks.


JANUARY 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Enjoy cauliflower mac and cheese on cold, winter day

By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) Visions of the splendid sun reflected in the frolicking tide keeps me from my moment of truth. I look forward to this brief escape, as it is a chance to be one with myself. But as I stroll down the path of actuality, I become aware winter is in full swing and Jack Frost is playing peek-a-boo with my sense of wellbeing. The first prediction of the storm to be is a light dusting of snow with no accumulation. But as time circles the clock of progression, the current calculation has changed to the possibility of 6 inches. The story does not end here; the latest forecast is 8 to 11 inches. Should I trust our beloved weatherman or should I forgo the warnings and continue with my daily routine? My culinary intuitiveness senses a period of no interruption so indifference must be discarded without prejudice. Exploration outside of my comfort zone will be the preferred choice, so allow me to get my trusty pen and paper. Yes, I must confess I am old school, but I am content with that and that is what matters. Each day my fragile ego is besieged by my imperfections; trust me I am far from a state of excellence. But in reality is there such a thing as flawlessness? Let me be more specific and concentrate on the subject at hand. Is absolute precision even feasible in the world of cookery? There are those who will argue in favor of the utmost brilliance. Then there are those who will insist cooking is subjective and therefore conclusion is up for debate. Sometimes answers are not as important as the intelligible discussions themselves. That being said, I welcome the time when the white powder blankets our little island on the Eastern Shore. For a brief moment, the past is non-existent and the future is in present. The shimmering snowflakes are a pageantry in motion and tranquility instantly soothes my soul. Cauliflower mac and cheese is on the horizon. Details are a must if success is to come my way. Replacing some of the pasta with cauliflower will lend credence to my vow of “nutritional fit.” Pungent garlic, sweet onions and dry white wine will up the ante of flavor. But for every act of refrainment, I become weakened and succumb to temptation. Since distinction is my intention, I will open myself up to the sinful pleasures of gooey goodness. Mascarpone, gruyere and fontina are the trinity of delightful bliss. If others judge me to be indulgent, so be it. Before I depart to my coveted

kitchen and cook a delectable cauliflower mac and cheese; let me entice you with the final stage of pure decadence. Crispy panko breadcrumbs, Herbs De Province, and coarse black pepper seal the crust of contrast. No matter what Mother Nature decides upon, all I know is I am going to be nestled in front of a warm, cozy fireplace, sipping on a glass of Pinot Grigio, and devouring delicious cauliflower mac and cheese. Enjoy!

Cauliflower Mac and Cheese Ingredients 1 pound Fusilli or favorite pasta for mac and cheese 8 ounces pancetta, julienned 1 ½ pounds cauliflower, break florets according to their natural shape extra virgin olive oil for drizzling 7 tablespoons unsalted butter 2 small cloves garlic, minced 1 small sweet onion, minced ¼ cup all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon tomato paste 3 tablespoons dry white wine 4 cups heavy whipping cream 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 8 ounces mascarpone cheese 8 ounces shredded fontina cheese 8 ounces shredded gruyere cheese 8 ounces shredded extra sharp cheese kosher salt to taste 3 cups unseasoned panko bread crumbs ¼ cup minced fresh parsley 2 teaspoons Herbs de Province 2 teaspoons coarsely ground black pepper ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese 1. In a medium pot, allow salted water to come to a boil. Add pasta and cook for only half of the instructed time. Drain and allow to cool on a sheet pan. Spreading out the pasta helps the cooking process cool down faster. 2. In a small sauté pan, cook pancetta until a light crispness has been developed. Set aside. 3. Roast cauliflower florets with a drizzle of olive oil under the broiler just until a light golden color is achieved. Set aside. 4. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. 5. In a large pot, melt 3 tablespoons butter and sauté garlic and onions for approximately 7 minutes over low heat. 6. Add 3 tablespoons butter, flour and tomato paste. Turn heat to medium and stir frequently for 3 minutes. 7. Whisk in wine and heavy cream and cook until thickened, about 10 minutes. 8. Remove from heat; add mascarpone, fontina, gruyere, sharp, nutmeg, cayenne pepper and salt. Stir until all ingredients are fully incorporated. 9. Fold in pasta, cauliflower and See GARLIC Page 37

PAGE 35


Ocean City Today

PAGE 36

JANUARY 13, 2017

OUT & ABOUT Jim and Monique Garratt, of Millville, Delaware, left, pose for a photo with Jeanette Beatley and Brooks Trimper, of Ocean City, during the Red Doors Community Center Gala, held at Fager’s Island on 60th Street, Jan. 8. The community center is located at St. Paul’s ByThe-Sea Episcopal Church on Third Street and Baltimore Avenue in Ocean City. TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Andrea Powland, left, and Sasha Motsko, of Ocean City, attend the annual Red Doors Gala, benefitting the nonprofit community center in Ocean City, held at Fager’s Island, 60th Street, Sunday.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Jamie Jiron, left, hangs out at the bar with KellieAnn Cunningham, both of Fenwick Island, Delaware, at Fox’s Pizza Den in Selbyville, Jan. 6.

Jessi Mixon, of Annapolis, joins David Hartig, of Selbyville, Delaware, at Fox’s Pizza Den, located inside the Harris Teeter Shopping Plaza, Route 54, Jan. 6.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Jill Douglas, left, Kelly Wesseldine and Dave Douglas, all of Ocean Pines, stop by the Crab Bag on 130th Street, Jan. 6.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Ryan Story, left, Leisa Stellman and Nick Elko work behind the bar at Crab Bag, 130th Street, Jan. 6.

TAYLOR SLOAN/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Gail and Steve Lednum, of Fenwick Island, Delaware, enjoy crabs at Crab Bag, 130th Street, Jan. 6.


JANUARY 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

Second Berlin Restaurant Week runs through Sun. By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) The second annual Berlin Restaurant Week began on Monday and runs until Sunday with more than a dozen restaurants offering special prices on select menu items. “The specials are so reasonably priced,” said local realtor Cam Bunting, creator and promoter of the event. “Restaurants are trying out new items that they may add to their menus, and the food is great.” Diners can check out a number of Berlin favorites who will be serving breakfast, lunch and dinner options at a reduced price. Participating restaurants are: Main Street Deli, Maryland Wine Bar, Rayne’s Reef, On What Grounds, Drummer’s Café inside the Atlantic Hotel, Siculi, Baked Dessert Café, Blacksmith, Crush N Crab, Fins Ale House and Raw Bar, Brooklyn Baking Barons and The Globe. “Try out different places and food,” Bunting said. “Many use local ingredients and didn’t know until last minute what would appear on the menu. It’s really good.” Bunting came up with the idea in 2016 to show the variety of restaurants in Berlin and the inaugural event was a huge success. Organizers are also having a contest where the winner will receive a $20 gift card from all participating restaurants in addition to $100 in cash – a $360 value.

OC Beach Blanket Blood Drive slated for Wed., Jan. 18 Continued from Page 34 appointments are appreciated. To schedule an appointment, visit www.delmarvablood.org, call 1-888825-6638 or use the Blood Bank’s free mobile app. “It’s no surprise that our annual Beach Blanket Blood Drive is scheduled during National Blood Donor Month,” Michael Waite, Blood Bank of Delmarva’s director of Marketing and Community Relations, stated in a press release. “This event is very important in helping us maintain our blood supply, which serves the 18 hospitals and 20,000 patients a year, across the Delmarva region. It’s also an opportunity for us to acknowledge those donors on the Eastern Shore who support us every year for this important event.” Blood Bank of Delmarva is a nonprofit, community service program that provides blood for hospitals in the region. The organization provides the majority supply of blood for 18 hospitals and a few secondary ones. More than 350 blood donors are needed every day to meet the needs of patients at these hospitals.

To enter the contest, diners must first pick up a Berlin Restaurant Week card at a participating restaurant or the Berlin Welcome Center. Then, patrons should make sure to get a stamp at each restaurant visited. After three stamps, drop the card into the ballot box located at the welcome center for a chance to win. The winner will be announced on the Town of Berlin Facebook page on Tuesday, Jan. 17. For more information and a list of all menus, check out the Berlin Restaurant Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ events/956355361177817, or visit www.BerlinMainStreet. com.

PAGE 37

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Garlic, onions and dry white wine up ante of dish flavor

THOMPSON VISITS Board of Education member Sara Thompson recently made a visit to Julie Moeller’s fourth grade class at Ocean City Elementary School. She received a letter from fourth grader Sarah Parypa inviting her to visit their classroom during American Education Week, Nov. 14-18.

Continued from Page 35 pancetta. Adjust seasoning if needed. Transfer to a buttered 2 quart baking dish. 10. In a medium bowl, combine panko, parsley, Herbs de Province, black pepper and Parmesan cheese and mix thoroughly. Spread panko mixture on top of the mac and cheese. 11. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes; then turn the oven to broiler and cook until bread crumbs are crispy and brown, about 4 to 5 minutes. Allow to rest for 3 minutes and serve immediately. Secret Ingredient - Worry. “Worry is interest paid on trouble before it is due.” — William Ralph Inge


PAGE 38

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

BLOOD DRIVE HOE-DOWN AT OCES The first grade physical education and music classes at Ocean City Elementary School teamed up to perform a hoe-down during American Education Week, Nov. 14-18. The children displayed their square dancing and singing skills, while performing for their parents, family members and special guests. Pictured with some of the performers are PE teacher Tracey Drocella and music teacher Bethany Pugner.

Stephen Decatur senior Lucia Vicidomini was just one of over 90 blood donors during the annual Key Club’s drive on Nov. 18 at the Berlin high school. Each year the school is in the running to be the top donation site on the Lower Eastern Shore for the Blood Bank of Delmarva. One pint of blood can save as many as three lives.

GOLFERS SUPPORT AGH CHICKEN FOR LUNCH Faith Murray’s fourth grade class at Ocean City Elementary School enjoys a Chick-fil-A luncheon in their classroom with some of the Ocean City Volunteer firefighters. This was a special treat they earned for having 100 percent participation in the fire department’s annual Fire Prevention Week essay and poster contest.

The Ocean Pines Ladies Golf Association held its annual Pink Lady Golf Tournament at the Ocean Pines Golf & Country Club on Oct. 4 to raise money to help provide mammogram screenings through the Eunice Q. Sorin Women’s Diagnostics Center at Atlantic General Hospital. The association raised $2,079, bringing the total contribution over the past six years to more than $6,800. Pictured, from left, are Norma Kessler, OPLGA; Michael Franklin, FACHE, Atlantic General Hospital president and CEO; Janet Stoer, OPLGA Pink Lady chair; Maria Phillips, director of radiology at the Women’s Diagnostic Center; Tammy Patrick, Atlantic General Hospital Foundation development officer; and Stephanie Banks, lead radiology technician at the Women’s Diagnostic Center.

SPECIAL VISITORS

MEETING SANTA

Julie Vorsteg’s kindergarten class at Ocean City Elementary School had many special visitors during American Education Week, held Nov. 14-18. Gary Johnson and his mother, Mayra Guerrero, work on an activity together during American Education Week.

Worcester Prep’s 45th Christmas Bazaar on Dec. 4, was another successful fundraiser for future school and program updates. Pre-Kindergartener Isabella Rice tells Santa what she wants for Christmas.


JANUARY 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

PAGE 39

Open

We d n e s d a y – S u n d a y

On The Bay 82nd St & Coastal Hwy 410-524-1009 David Kelton represents American Blue Claw manufacturing and supply company during the Maryland Watermen’s Association’s 42nd annual East Coast Commercial Fishermen’s and Aquaculture Trade Expo at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street last year.

Annual commercial fishing and aquaculture expo in OC

By Kara Hallissey Staff Writer (Jan. 13, 2017) The Maryland Watermen’s Association presents its 43rd annual East Coast Commercial Fishermen’s and Aquaculture Trade Expo at the Ocean City convention center on 40th Street this weekend. This is the only commercial fishing and aquaculture expo in the Mid-Atlantic region with more than 4,000 people checking out the show in 2016 and even more expected during the three-day event, Jan. 13-15. “It is a special show because it encompasses a lot of information for commercial fishing and the industry,” said Irene Oladeinde, Maryland Watermen’s Association editor. “You learn a lot at the seminars. There is a lot of education involved and you get to interact with other watermen. It is a family reunion with people who come from Canada to Florida and Texas.” Organizers expect close to 100 exhibitors at the event selling commercial watermen gear and equipment needed for the coming harvest including crab pots, oyster baskets, nets, buoys, rods, reels, engines, clothing and boats. “Any type of fishing gear you can think of will be available for purchase,” Oladeinde said. “We will have a couple clothing vendors selling Tshirts and sweatshirts, jewelry, and a person selling art.” For the second year, Capt. Dave Marciano, one of the captains on the “Wicked Tuna” National Geographic television series, will have a booth in the expo. He will be there Friday, Saturday and half the day on Sunday to sign autographs, take pictures and sell his merchandise. “You can purchase any items you may need at a good price on gear, and it’s quality,” Oladeinde said. “It is going to be a good show. We have plenty of new vendors and a lot of old favorites.”

In addition, there will be an information booth on Lyme disease, people taking blood pressure and a financial planner in attendance. “It is open to the public and you don’t have to be a commercial watermen to enjoy the show,” Oladeinde said. “You get to interact with people you would not normally see, learn from them and it is a fun time.” There will be a cocktail party on Friday night with an open bar from 6:30-8 p.m. with seafood hors d’oeuvres and an oyster bar for $35 at the Clarion hotel on 101st Street. After 8 p.m., it switches to a cash bar and there will be auction items donated from trade show vendors. Proceeds will benefit the Maryland Watermen’s Association. Seminars will be held on Saturday from 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. with a huge focus on aquaculture and topics including loan programs, information for oyster and shellfish growers, sonar mapping and oyster production. The annual Waterman of the Year Contest will be held on Saturday around 3 p.m. when participants compete for money and prizes in individual skill competitions including net mending, rope splicing, knot tying, roping a piling and a simulation of docking a boat. To close out the show on Sunday at 3 p.m., the Maryland Watermen’s Association will hold a drawing for a Ford F-150 pick-up truck. The Association is selling 600 tickets at $100 each at the expo, in advance at marylandwatermen.com or by calling 410216-6610. Participants will receive a free ticket if they purchase 10. Admission is $15 per day for adults; youth 12 and under get in free. The cost for a three-day pass is $25. The expo runs from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Sunday.

Saturday & Sunday Brunch 10AM – 2PM

Available at Tables & Bar

HALF PRICE

WINGS & BADA BING SHRIMP • BUCK A SHUCK

2

$

OFF

All Drafts

(Liberty Oysters from our private farm)

2.50

$

Select Domestics

4

$

Slushies/Wines & Rails

5.50

$

Crushes

NIGHTLY DINNER SPECIALS WEDNESDAY 1/2 Price Steam Pots THURSDAY Crabs Cake Specials FRIDAY Prime Rib Night

SATURDAY Buy 1 Get 1 Free Dessert Night SUNDAY 1/2 Price Entrees

F E NWI CK OYSTER HOU SE 7 0 0 C o a s t a l H w y. Fe n w i c k I s l a n d , D E 3 0 2 -5 8 1 - 0 15 3

Reopen in Fe b r u a r y 2 0 1 7


Ocean City Today

PAGE 40

JANUARY 13, 2017

NOW PLAYING BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com Jan. 13: Lennon LaRicci & the Leftovers, 9 p.m. Jan. 14: Over Time, 9 p.m. Jan. 18: Monkee Paw, 5 p.m. BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium Ocean City 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com Jan. 13: Otto, 7-10 p.m. Jan. 14: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 7-10 p.m. Jan. 18: Open Mic, 8-11 p.m. Jan. 19: Chris Button, 7-10 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com

Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m. CASINO AT OCEAN DOWNS 10218 Racetrack Road Berlin 410-641-0600 www.oceandowns.com Jan. 14: Aaron Howell Duo, 4:308:30 p.m.; Kevin Poole, 9:30 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. DUFFY’S TAVERN 130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com Every Friday: Bob Hughes, 5-9 p.m. FAGER’S ISLAND 60th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-5500 www.fagers.com Jan. 13: DJ Hook, 9 p.m.; Nelly’s Echo, 9:30 p.m. Jan. 14: Ricky Wise & the Dirty Unit, 1 p.m.; DJ Groove, 9 p.m.;

Crushing Day, 9:30 p.m. HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com Jan. 13: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. Jan. 14: Simple Truth/Side Project, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 8 p.m. Jan. 15: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 6:30 p.m. Jan. 18: Karaoke w/DJ Jeremy Jan. 19: Opposite Directions, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. HARPOON HANNA’S Route 54 and the bay Fenwick Island, Del. 800-227-0525 302-539-3095 www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com Jan. 18: Kevin Poole, 6-10 p.m.

Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Jan. 13-14: Power Play, 9 p.m. THE COVE AT OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford’s Landing Road Ocean Pines 410-641-7501 www.oceanpines.org Jan. 13: Bryan Clark, 8 p.m. Jan. 14: Full Circle, 8 p.m. TOUCH OF ITALY 67th Street and Coastal Highway, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront Ocean City 302-703-3090 Every Tuesday: Piano Bar w/Bryan Russo, 9 p.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL

In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean

11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 443-365-2576 www.whiskersbar.com Jan. 13: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey

524-1009. Skye Bar, 66th Street, features a raw bar, lite fare, fresh seafood and steaks, creative cocktails and an award-winning wine list. The restaurant opens at 3 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 11:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Happy hour is 3-6 p.m. daily and includes $1 oysters from the raw bar and food and drink specials such as $1 off draft beer, $3.50 rails, $4 house wines and $5 orange crushes. Skye Bar offers NFL game day specials including chicken tempura bites, $9; crab nachos, $14; fried pickle spears, $6; naked wings, $10; fish soft shell tacos, $12; and spicy queso dip, $5. Drink specials include $5 orange crushes, $3.50 rails, $1 off draft beers and $4 house wines. For Skye Bar’s menu and entertainment schedule, visit www.skyebaroc.com. Touch of Italy, 67th Street, features the Soprano bar/café every Tuesday at 9 p.m. with Bryan Russo and friend(s). Touch of Italy offers a New York-style deli and Italian marketplace with specialties straight from the Bronx. Walk around and you are in a quaint Italian restaurant with bar and fire brick oven. Touch of Italy offers specials Sunday through Thursday. Sunday, buy one pizza, get one half off, and indulge in Nonna’s $39 dinner special (feeds two to four people). Monday, try the manicotti for only $10 and save on wine with select bottles half-price. Ladies, Tuesday is for you. With the purchase of one entrée, take

half off another. Savor your palate in seasonal ravioli for $11, while enjoying beverages at happy hour prices all day and night. Wednesday, have chicken parmigiana for $12, and Thursday, eat classic spaghetti and meatballs for $11. Happy hour is available every day at bar and bar tables from 3-6 p.m. Drink specials include $3 domestic beer and $5 rail drinks/house wine. Food specials include $7 Italian nachos and sausage and pepper sliders (yum), and $8 meatball lollipops and chicken parmesan fingers. Definitely try the tiramisu for dessert, it’s delicious. For more information or reservations, call 410524-5252. I know throughout the past couple weeks I have encouraged everyone to pursue their resolutions, so here are a few of my own. I have vowed to remain single all of 2017, thus why I’m focusing on me. I plan to come out of beauty pageant retirement, therefore I will engage in vigorous fitness training. Since I have time off from serving at Seacrets, I want to go exploring and read more books. I also want to engage in conversations with people who have different views than my own so I become more open minded and tolerant of others’ opinions. If you have an event coming up you would like me to highlight in Inside Going Out, please send me an email at Taylor@OceanCityToday.net. Don’t forget you can also check out this column online at www.oceancitytoday.net.

OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB

Inside going out Taylor Sloan Continued from Page 33

Food specials include $6 steamed shrimp, wings, mini burgers, boom boom shrimp, chicken fingers, chicken salad sliders and mozzarella sticks. Dave Hawkins will play from 5-9 p.m. Friday, and catch Dave Sherman, 6-10 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 14. Thursday, Jan. 19, catch Kevin Poole, 6-10 p.m. For all things happening at Harpoon Hanna’s, visit www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com. Higgins, 31st and Coastal Highway, is now open for the 2017 season. Enjoy its all-you-can eat crab and corn for $29.99. For more specials, call 410-289-2581. West Ocean City Hooters, Route 50, offers happy hour every day from 3-6 p.m. with drink specials including $2.50 domestic drafts/bottles, $3 wells, $3.50 house wine and $4 calls. If you’re in the service, enjoy Military Mondays with 10 percent off for active or retired military. Celebrate wing fest Tuesdays from 6-8 p.m. with 50-cent traditional or boneless wings. For more, call 410-213-1841. KY West, 54th Street, offers fine dining and casual fare, open daily at 4 p.m. Take advantage of a twofor-$25 and two-for-$45 dinner menu. The kitchen is open until 10 p.m. To make a reservation, call 443-664-2836. To view the menu, visit www.kywestoceancity.com. Nick’s House of Ribs, 145th Street, has NFL specials during games that include $2 Miller Lite and Yuengling drafts and $2 Blue Monster shots. Food specials include $9.99 ribs (one-third rack)

and fries, and 75-cent loaded skins (sold by four). Nick’s is open Monday through Friday, 3 p.m. to midnight, and noon to midnight Saturday and Sunday. Enjoy two-for-one happy hour from 3-5 p.m. at the bar only. Tuesday, order a single crab cake or flounder almondine with two sides and a dinner rolls for $13.99. Wednesday, have a half-rack of ribs with two sides and dinner rolls for $13.99, and Thursday, eat half a BBQ chicken with two sides and rolls for $13.99. For more, visit www.nickshouseofribs.com. Pizza Tugos, Route 50 in West Ocean City, has happy hour Monday through Friday, 3-6 p.m. Drink specials include $1.75 Miller Lite and Yuengling drafts, $2.99 craft beer drafts and $1.99 rail drinks. Get $1 cheese pizza slices during happy hour. NFL specials include AUCE wings and pizza for $10.99 and $2 drafts. Order your pizza online at www.pizzatugos.com. Ropewalk, 82nd Street, is open Wednesday through Sunday. Happy hour is available all day and all night. Drink specials include $2 off drafts as well as $2.50 select domestics, $4 Slushies, wines and rails and $5.50 crushes. Nightly dinner specials include half-price steam pots on Wednesday, crab cake on Thursday, prime rib on Friday, buy-one-get-one-free desserts on Saturday, and halfprice entrées on Sunday. Enjoy weekend brunch at Ropewalk, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To hear more, call 410-


JANUARY 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.oceancityhilton.com/dining / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717 / www.ocitalianfood.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room with fireplace. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ BILLY’S SUB SHOP, 120th Street, Food Lion Shopping Center, 410-723-2500; 140th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-1778; Route 54, Fenwick Shoals, Fenwick Island, Del., 302-436-5661 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Dine in, carry out. Fast delivery. Open 7 days 11 a.m. – 3 a.m. Serving fresh dough pizza, subs, burgers, cones, shakes and sundaes with beach delivery available. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER, 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575 / www.bjsonthewater.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open year-round. Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishocmd.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH, 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896 / www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations recommended for large parties / Children’s menu/ Full bar / Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, Steaks & Pasta dishes— Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$-$$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ CLADDAGH ON THE SHORE, 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-4200 / www.claddaghontheshore.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining in a relaxed atmosphere specializing in steaks and seafood. Open for breakfast on Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Lunch and dinner Thursday through Sunday. Take out available. ■ COINS, 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100 /

www.coinspub.com / $-$$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar/ Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m., 6 days a week and early bird 4-6 p.m., daily specials. Closed Mondays. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE COVE AT OCEAN PINES, 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410641-7501 / www.oceanpines.org/ $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS/No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Coastal cuisine. Serving lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. Open Thursday at 4 p.m. for dinner. Open Friday-Sunday at 11 a.m. for lunch and dinner. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. for brunch buffet. Friday and/or Saturday, live entertainment. Sunday brunch buffet, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Happy Hour ThursdaySunday, 4-7 p.m. ■ THE CRAB BAG, 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410-250-3337 / www.thecrabbag.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Full bar / Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers, barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carry-out and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DOUGH ROLLER, 41st Street & Coastal Hwy, 410-524-9254; 70th Street & Coastal Hwy, 410-524-7981 / www.DoughRollerRestaurants.com / $ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Ocean City’s favorite family restaurant for more than 35 years. Great kid’s menu. Dayton’s Fried Chicken available at South Division, 41st and 70th streets. Breakfast served daily at 3rd, 41st and 70th streets. Order online for carryout at both Coastal Highway locations. ■ DUFFYS, 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449 / www.duffysoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second Season & Daily Dinner Specials. Saturday and Sunday, 9 a.m., serving breakfast, lunch and dinner; Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Dine In, Carry Out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410524-5500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar / Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside. ■ FLYING FISH CAFE & SUSHI BAR, The Village of Fenwick, 300 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-581-0217 / www.flyingfishfenwick.com / $-$$ /V-MCDIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Featuring the freshest and most innovative sushi, sashimi, and rolls plus creative and delicious small

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plates. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN, 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436-FOXS / www.foxspizzade.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846 / www.weocharborside.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and all-you-can-eat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdhotels.com/hemingways / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Seafood, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE, 31st Street, Ocean City, 410-289-2581 / $-$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Known for all-you-can-eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-5243535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Serving beach-inspired dishes in both our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ KY WEST BAR & RESTAURANT, 5401 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 443-6642836 / www.kywestoceancity.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Our experienced chefs deliver the finest in cuisine nightly. OC’s best veal chop, the freshest seafood and great pasta dishes. Ky West offers fine dining and a beautiful bar described as New York funky chic. Providing excellent food and drink for a great dining adventure. ■ MY THAI OC, 138th Street, Bayside Plaza, 13727 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-9918 / www.mythaioc.webs.com / $ / V-MC-Dis / Authentic Thai food served Thursday-Sun-

day. Free parking for customers. Eat in or take out. Vegetarian options also. ■ NICK’S HOUSE OF RIBS, 144th Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-2501984 / www.nickshouseofribs.com / $$/ V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual, family friendly with upscale atmosphere. Extensive menu from our famous baby back ribs, fresh seafood, black angus steaks. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ ROPEWALK, 82nd Street on the bay, Ocean City 410-524-1109 / www.ropewalkoc.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full Bar / OC’s best spot to watch the sunsets. Indoor dining and bar, deck dining and tiki bar. Serving lunch and dinner in casual atmosphere. Happy hour specials all day and all night every day available at tables and bar. ■ SICULI RUSTIC ITALIAN KITCHEN, 104 N. Main St., Berlin 410-629-0550 / FB-Siculi Italian Kitchen / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Full Bar / Family friendly. Open for lunch and dinner, 11 a.m.; Sunday brunch, 10:30 a.m. Locally sourced, freshly prepared. Brick oven pizza, steaks, seafood, chicken and veal selections. Daily lunch, happy hour and dinner specials. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE, 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762 / www.skyebaroc.com / $$-$$$ / V-M-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials. ■ TOUCH OF ITALY, 67th Street and Coastal Highway, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 302-703-3090 / www.TouchofItaly.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Full bar / Full Italian style restaurant with Italian style deli and pasticceria/bakery too. Just stop in for a look and a taste of some fresh prosciutto fresh loaves of Italian bread. Large circular bar with Happy Hour and check our Web site with our daily specials from our great menu including pasta, wood fired pizzas, delicious heros and catering. Daily lunch special $6.95 plus take out service. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT, Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410289-1100 / www.dunesmanor.com / $$ $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations not required but recommended / Full Bar / Children’s menu / Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily 7:30am to 9:00pm (Fri & Sat to 10pm). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Certified Angus® burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.


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Writers and visual artists to discuss show collaboration

(Jan. 13, 2017) The writers and visual artists of “Shared Visions,” the January show at the Ocean City Center for the Arts, will come together to discuss what inspired their collaboration in a free presentation on Tuesday, Jan. 17, from 6-8 p.m. All are welcome. A free reception will follow with food provided by Rosenfeld’s Deli. “Shared Visions” is a partnership between the Art League of Ocean City and the Ocean City branch of the Worcester County Library, home of the Ocean City Writers Group, headed by Ruth Wanberg-Alcorn. The Art League invited local visual artists to submit a significant piece of art. Then the Writers Group composed poetry and prose to accompany the artwork. In all, 19 writers and 22 artists collaborated for the fourth annual show. On Thursday, Jan. 19 from 5-7 p.m., Connie Hall will present a free seminar entitled “Working Magic with Words” for adults and teens 16 and older. Hall is a recently retired AP English teacher from Worcester Prep who has mentored budding local writers for many years. The class is for hobby writers or anyone thinking about writing professionally. Hall will engage students in a close study of prose, poetry and creative nonfiction. Pre-registration is suggested by calling the Arts Center at 410-524-9433. The Ocean City Center for the Arts at

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

‘Addiction Hurts’ program at ‘The Lion King Jr.’ Stephen Decatur HS, Jan. 17 performed in OC (Jan. 13, 2017) Atlantic General Hospital is partnering with the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office and New Castle County Delaware’s Heroin Alert program, “The Heroin Trap,” to offer a free event, “Addiction Hurts: Struggles Facing our Families and Community.” Free and open to the community, the goal of this event, held Tuesday, Jan. 17 at 6 p.m. at Stephen Decatur High School in Berlin, is to raise awareness about the risk of addiction and to provide resources for addiction rehabilitation, counseling and family support. According to the Worcester County Health Department: In 2012, there was only one reported opioid use related death in Worcester County. In 2015, that number rose to 11 reported overdose deaths tied to heroin/opioid use. Admissions to treatment for heroin doubled in Worcester County; whereas

statewide the number remained constant (2009-2011). Opioid-related admissions to treatment tripled in Worcester, while the number increased by less than 2 percent statewide. Representatives from the Heroin Alert Program and the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office will provide information about the heroin epidemic, the effects on the community and how people can get help overcoming addiction. Marie Allen, author of “Dope Help,” will share her personal story of losing a child to addiction. Contact Donna Nordstrom at 410-629-6820 or dnordstrom@atlanticgeneral.org.

(Jan. 13, 2017) The Ocean Pines Children’s Theater’s production of Disney’s “The Lion King” Jr,” will take place Jan. 13-14 in Ocean City. With music and lyrics by Elton John and Tim Rice, the show was the recipient of 70 awards, including the 1998 Tony for best musical. The critically-acclaimed Ocean Pines Children’s Theater promises to delight audiences at the Ocean City Performing Arts Center on 40th Street, Friday, Jan. 13 at 7 p.m., and Saturday, Jan. 14 at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets cost $15. Purchased through Ticketmaster, or at the Convention Center Box Office on 40th Street. For more information, call 410-251-1402.

CROSSWORD

502 94th Street is the home of the Art League of Ocean City, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the visual arts in the Ocean City area through education, exhibits, scholarships, programs and community art events. The arts center is supported by memberships, corporate and civic funding, donations and sales of art. More information is available at 410524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org.

15% OFF Your Lunch Check Valid through 1/31/17

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

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Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

FRI, JAN. 13

and more. New vendors welcome. 410641-7717, Ext. 3006

Clarion Fontainebleau Crystal Ballroom, 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 7 to 9 a.m. An inspirational and uplifting morning, where the entire community can come together. Featuring key note speaker Dr. Lou Ann Daly. Tickets are $20 and include a full hot breakfast buffet. Purchase tickets online or at the following area chambers: Ocean City Chamber Visitors Center, 12320 Ocean Gateway; Ocean Pines Chamber, 11031 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines; Berlin Chamber, 124 N. Main St., Berlin; or Pocomoke Chamber, 6 Market St., Pocomoke City. Lisa Layfield, lisa@oceancity.org, 410-213-0144, Ext. 104, http://www.oceancity.org

OCEAN PINES ANGLERS CLUB MEETING

EAST COAST COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN’S & AQUACULTURE TRADE EXPO

NAUTICAL & WILDLIFE ART FESTIVAL & CRAFT SHOW

MAYOR’S PRAYER BREAKFAST

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Seminars, fishermen gear, equipment and more. Admission. 410289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://www.marylandwatermen.com Stevenson United Methodist Church, 123 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 4 to 6:30 p.m. Menu includes baked chicken, green beans, baked potato, salad, drink and dessert. Cost is $15 for adults and $5 for children. Carry out available. Proceeds benefit Stevenson’s New Pipe Organ Fund. 443-614-2518

2ND FRIDAY DINNER

Columbus Hall (behind St. Luke’s Church), 9901 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 6:30 p.m. Held each Friday night. Doors open at 5 p.m., games begin at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments for sale. 410-524-7994

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS BINGO

Ocean City Performing Arts Center in the Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 7 p.m. Featuring the Ocean Pines Children’s Theater. Tickets cost $15 and can be purchased online through Ticketmaster or at the Convention Center Box Office. Paulette, 410-251-1402

‘THE LION KING’ JR.

SAT, JAN. 14 White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Held every Saturday. Locally grown vegetables and fruits, eggs, honey, kettle korn, flowers, artisan breads, seafood, meats

FARMERS MARKET

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 9:30 a.m. Speaker will be Dennis McDermott, the Reel Doctor at Atlantic Tackle. McDermott will provide insights on how fishermen should regularly care for their reels and technical advice for them. All are welcome. Jack Barnes, 410-641-7662

EAST COAST COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN’S & AQUACULTURE TRADE EXPO

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Seminars, fishermen gear, equipment and more. Admission. 410289-2800 or 800-626-2326, http://www.marylandwatermen.com Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: www.ocshows.com, 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326. Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., Pocomoke City, MD, 11 a.m. Come play family-friendly board games, giant sized. For all ages. 410-957-0878, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY GAME DAY

Ocean City Performing Arts Center in the Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. shows. Featuring the Ocean Pines Children’s Theater. Tickets cost $15 and can be purchased online through Ticketmaster or at the Convention Center Box Office. Paulette, 410251-1402

‘THE LION KING’ JR.

SUN, JAN. 15 Berlin Fire Hall, 214 N. Main St., Berlin, MD, 7:30 to 10:30 a.m. Menu includes pancakes, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, creamed chipped beef, hash browns, waffles, biscuits, coffee, milk and juice. Cost is $9 for adults, $5 for children ages 5-12 years and free to those 4 and younger. Carry-outs cost $7.

ALL-U-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET

EAST COAST COMMERCIAL FISHERMEN’S & AQUACULTURE TRADE EXPO

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Seminars, fishermen gear, equipment and more. Admission. 410289-2800 or 800-626-2326,

PHOTOS COURTESY SARGE GARLITZ

PEARL HARBOR REMEMBERED The 75th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor was not forgotten by American Legion Post #166 on Dec. 7 at its 24th Street facility. Pictured, in front, from left, are Bob Gilmore, Unit #166 President Marie Gilmore, Marie Rose, Commander Tom Wengert, (SAL) Charles Herbert, Jim Mills and Sen. Jim Mathias, and in back, Bob Rose, Chaplain Ben Dawson and 2nd Vice Commander/Bugler Bo Spicer. http://www.marylandwatermen.com

NAUTICAL & WILDLIFE ART FESTIVAL & CRAFT SHOW

Ocean City convention center, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: www.ocshows.com, 410-289-2800 or 800-626-2326. Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 2, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 12 to 1 p.m. Group shares experience, strength and hope to help others. Open to the community and to AGH patients. Rob, 443-783-3529

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS

‘GOD’S COUNTRY CROSSROADS’ GOSPEL CONCERT Friendship United Methodist Church, 10537 Friendship Road, Berlin, MD, 6 p.m. Following the concert, refreshments will be served in the community hall. No tickets required, but a love offering will be taken. 410-641-2578, http://www.friendshipchurch.us

MON, JAN. 16 Atlantic General Hospital Sleep Disorders Diagnostic Center, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, All Day Free, bimonthly mask fitting clinic for patients who are having trouble adjusting to their CPAP equipment. By appointment only: Robin Rohlfing, 410-641-9726

CPAP MASK FITTING

Ocean Pines Yacht Club, 1 Mumford’s Landing Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 9:30 a.m. Held the third Monday of each month. Coffee at 9:30 a.m. followed by

DEMOCRATIC WOMEN’S CLUB MEETING

10 a.m. meeting. All are welcome. The club will also be collecting non-perishable food, toiletries and paper products to be shared with a local food ministry. Call 410-641-8553. 410-208-2969 Atlantic General Hospital, conference room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 5 to 6:30 p.m. Berlin group No. 169. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. Edna Berkey, 410-251-2083

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 7 to 9 p.m. The group meets each Monday. Women interested in learning the craft of a cappella singing welcome. 410-6416876

DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS

TUE, JAN. 17 Berlin Town Hall, 11 a.m. Open to entrepreneurs whose businesses are located within an Enterprise Zone and will provide an overview of the tax credits that may be available to them.. Enterpise Zones are located in the Towns of Berlin and Snow Hill and Pocomoke City. There is no cost to attend and lunch will be provided. Advance reservations are required by contacting Merry Mears at mmears@co.worcester.md.us or 410632-3112.

ENTERPRISE ZONE TAX CREDIT SEMINAR

All Hallows Church Parish House, 109 W. Market Street, Snow Hill, MD, 7:30

SNOW HILL ROTARY CLUB MEETING

Continued on Page 44


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JANUARY 13, 2017

CALENDAR a.m. Contact agibb1@verizon.net or 410546-1978 for more information.

Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th St., Ocean City, MD, 5 to 7 p.m. Connie Hall will present this free seminar for adults and teens 16 and older. Hall, who has mentored budding local writers for many years, will engage students in a close study of prose, poetry and creative non-fiction. Preregistration is suggested by calling 410-524-9433. http://www.artleagueofoceancity.org

Continued from Page 43

SEMINAR

Pocomoke library, 301 Market St., Pocomoke City, MD, 10:30 a.m. Children, infant to 5 years, will learn new skills while playing with educational toys. 410-957-0878, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PLAY TIME

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St. Berlin, MD, 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. 410-641-0650, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STORY TIME

Berlin Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 9715 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Support group for caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients. It meets the third Tuesday of each month. Open to the community. Info: Heather Cormack, 410-641-4400, Ext. 6123 or Kenneth Lewis, 410-208-1701 or 410430-4818

ONGOING EVENTS

ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP

Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Berlin group 331. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. It meets weekly. jeanduck47@gmail.com

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING

Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th St., Ocean City, MD, 6 to 8 p.m. The writers and visual artists of “Shared Visions,” the January show at the Ocean City Center for the Arts, will come together to discuss what inspired their collaboration in a free presentation. Open to the public. Walk-ins welcome. A reception will follow. 410-524-9433, http://www.artleagueofoceancity.org

‘SHARED VISIONS’ FREE PRESENTATION

ADDICTION HURTS: STRUGGLES FACING OUR FAMILIES AND COMMUNITY

Stephen Decatur High School, 9913 Seahawk Road, Berlin, MD, 6 p.m. Free and open to the community. Representatives from the Heroin Alert Program and the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office will provide information about the heroin epidemic, the effects on our community and how people can get help overcoming addiction. Marie Allen, author of “Dope Help,” will share her personal story of losing her daughter to addiction. Donna Nordstrom, dnordstrom@atlanticgeneral.org, 410-629-6820 Pocomoke Elks Lodge 1624, 1944 Worcester Highway, Pocomoke City, MD, 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m., early bingo at 7 p.m. and regular games start at 7:30 p.m. Food and non-alcoholic drinks available. Open to the public. 410-957-3556

BINGO

WED, JAN. 18 19TH ANNUAL OCEAN CITY BEACH BLANKET BLOOD DRIVE

Ocean City convention center - Dockside Room, 4001 Coastal Highway, Ocean

Ocean City Senior Center, 41st St., bayside, Feb. 1, noon to 3 p.m. Advance tickets cost $10 for 4 cards if purchased by Jan. 26. Tickets at the door cost $10 for 3 cards. Rachel Zelkind, 410-6321277, Ext. 114.

MID-WEEK MANIA CASH BINGO

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

KIWANIS COAT DRIVE For the second year, the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines - Ocean City held a Coat Drive. Pictured, from left, are members, Tom Southwell, President Barbara Peletier, Ted Vanvick, Co-Chair Joe Logisz, Jackie Todd, Co-Chair Mary Logisz and Char Vanvick with donated coats. The coats were delivered to St. Peter’s Lutheran Church in Ocean City and St. Joseph’s House in Salisbury. City, MD, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Schedule an appointment by visiting www.delmarvablood.org, calling 888-825-6638 or by downloading the free Blood Bank of Delmarva app to iPhones or Android. All donors will be treated to local goodies donated by various eateries, plus receive a free T-shirt.

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OCEAN PINES/OCEAN CITY

Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, MD, 8 a.m. Meets every Wednesday. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org

OCEAN CITY/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING

Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St, Ocean City, MD, 6 p.m. The group meets every Wednesday. cliff0917@aol.com, 410641-1700 Ocean City Elks Lodge 2645, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave, Ocean City, MD, 6:30 p.m. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start at 6:30 p.m. All cash prizes; $1,000 Jack Pot. Food and non-alcoholic drinks available. Open to the public. 410-2502645

BINGO

Walgreens, 32979 Coastal Highway, Bethany Beach, DE, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sponsored by Atlantic General Hospital. Free blood pressure screening and health information. Dawn Denton, 410641-9268

THU, JAN. 19

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, MD, 10:30 a.m. Children, infant to 5 years, will learn new skills while playing with educational toys. 410-524-1818, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

YOUNG AND RESTLESS ‘PAINTING FUN’

HYPERTENSION CLINIC

PLAY TIME

Atlantic Health Center Conference Room, 9714 Healthway Drive, Berlin, MD, 1 to 2 p.m. Women Supporting Women/AGH Support group for women and men who are battling breast cancer (current patients and survivors). The speaker will be Roopa Gupta, MD, Medical Oncologist, Regional Cancer Care Center. Lunch is provided. RSVP: Women Supporting Women, 410-5487880

BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP

Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., Ocean City, MD, 5:30 to 9 p.m. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the ‘50s, ‘60s and Carolina Beach music. Meets every Wednesday. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 302-200-3262, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB

Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., Snow Hill, MD, 10:30 a.m. For 2 to 5 year old children. 410-632-3495, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STORY TIME

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 10:30 a.m. For 3 to 7 year old children. 410-208-4014, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

COASTAL HOSPICE GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, Ocean Pines, MD, 11 a.m. The group meets every Thursday. Free and open to anyone who has lost a loved one, not just Coastal Hospice families. 410-251-8163 Harpoon Hanna’s, 39064 Harpoon Road, Fenwick Island, DE, 4 to 7 p.m. Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Arlene or Kate, 302-436-9577 or 410-524-0649

BEACH SINGLES

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St. Berlin, MD, 4 p.m. Join the Teen Advisory Group to help plan teen programs and events. For 12 to 18 year olds. 410-6410650, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TEEN ADVISORY GROUP

‘WORKING MAGIC WITH WORDS’ FREE

RCIA is a process for individuals, adults and children 8 years and older, who are seeking Baptism. Also for those already baptized in another Christian tradition who want to come into the Catholic Church. Call Rita at 410-289-7038 or come to a session held on Monday evenings at 7 p.m. in the Father Connell Parish Center, 1705 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, MD. All are welcome.

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CATHOLIC FAITH

28th St. Pit & Pub, 2706 Philadelphia Ave, Ocean City, MD, the first Tuesday of each month and for the Sunday NFL games to raise money for local families in need. Ravens Roost 58 is seeking new members and new officers. Dues are $20 per year. Stop by the restaurant if interested.

RAVENS ROOST 58 MEETS MONTHLY

Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., Ocean City, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Open Monday through Saturday, year round. Located behind the church with a donation drop off room that is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 410289-4458

AUMC THRIFT SHOP

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10 a.m., on the first Friday of each month. Meeting of volunteers. Info: Anna Foultz, 410-641-7667.

STAR CHARITIES MEETING

Berlin library, 220 N. Main St. Call the library at 410-641-0650 to schedule your individual tutorial.

DIGITAL DROP IN

Crossword answers from page 42


JANUARY 13, 2017

45 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Comfort Suites, 12718 Coastal Gateway (Rt. 50), Ocean City, MD (WOC). Now hiring PT Front Desk Attendant. Apply in person.

Chairside

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE Email Resume:

molarbiz@yahoo.com

Classifieds 410-723-6397

Experienced Servers Needed for year-round position. Apply in person @ Alex’s Italian Restaurant, Rt. 50, West Ocean City.

Spring Lacrosse Coaches

Worcester Preparatory School, a coeducational college preparatory day school serving over 500 students in grades PK-12, is currently seeking coaches for the following spring sports: Head JV Girls Lacrosse, Assistant JV Girls Lacrosse and Middle School Boys Lacrosse. Minimum of 2 yrs. experience and CJIS Background Screening required. Contact: Matt McGinnis 410-641-3575 or mmcginnis@worcesterprep.org

Maintenance Man Looking for reliable individual to work hotel maintenance. Pool knowledge helpful. Must be personable, hardworking and possess a valid drivers license. Exp. in plumbing, electrical, HVAC a plus but not necessary. Weekends & Evenings required. Lifeguard Part-Time Lifeguard for Indoor Pool. Must be available weekends, including Sundays. Must be Red Cross Certified with Valid Certificates. Applications available at the Front Desk or email info@fskfamily.com

MARKETING COORDINATOR We are currently seeking a Marketing Coordinator for our Sea Colony location. Responsible for assisting with the development and execution of Sea Colony Recreational Association marketing programs. Qualified candidates should possess a college degree in English, Journalism, or Marketing OR have equivalent work experience. Demonstrated ability to work well under pressure, possesses good written and oral communication skills, and have an eye for taking great photographs. Highly capable in Social Media, InDesign, Microsoft Office Suite, Wix.com, Sony Vegas and Photoshop.

Interested candidates can apply online:

Careers.WyndhamWorldwide.com Employment is contingent on a drug screen and background check. ResortQuest is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

ASSISTANT PROPERTY MANAGER Attention Community Managers - ResortQuest, a Division of the Wyndham Worldwide corporation, is recruiting for a career-path professional in our Delaware Property Management Division in Bethany Beach. The ideal candidate will be proficient in Microsoft Office, have 1-2 years’ experience in Property Management, be detailoriented and have a drive to succeed! Exposure to management contracts, budget preparation, maintenance supervision and project follow-through are key areas of responsibility. Excellent verbal and written communication skills are needed. This is a growth opportunity with potential for advancement for the right person.

Interested candidates can apply online:

Careers.WyndhamWorldwide.com Employment is contingent on a drug screen and background check. ResortQuest is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

HELP WANTED

PT, Seasonal Housekeeping/Inspecting Position. Hours vary. Email resume to oh@defenderresorts.com. Call 410-520-0003. A busy contractor company in Ocean Pines, MD is currently hiring HVAC Maintenance Technicians. START IMMEDIATELY. To apply call Marc at 302-682-1777.

Myers Tool Rental & Parties Your Way! Help Wanted

Now accepting applications for hard working, strong individual to help with equipment, tent set ups, deliveries and more.

410-641-3497

NOW HIRING!! Production Supervisor

for our WOC kitchen facility Up to $17/hour Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

The Princess Royale Hotel & Conference Center Located at 91st St. Oceanfront, Ocean City, MD

Full Time, Year Round • AM & PM Front Desk Supervisor

Competitive Pay & Benefits Apply online at www.princessroyale.com or fax to 410-524-7787 or email to employment@princessroyale.com

Become a Better You in 2017!

To order Product or to Become an Avon Representative Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew

for our WOC kitchen facility Starting at $10.50/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

RENTALS RENTALS

House For Rent in Ocean Pines. Fully furnished. 3BR, 2BA. No pets. Located on quiet cul-de-sac. $1300. Call Bob, 443-250-3531.

Townhouse Outside of Ocean Pines. Water view. 2BR, 2BA. Partially furnished. No smoking. $1250/mo. Includes water. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-3525555.

RENTALS

Year-Round Rental. 3BR/ 1BA, newly renovated Single Home on 2 acres. Berlin. $1200/mo. + sec. dep. & util. Call for appt. 410-599-6906

YR Efficiency, 32nd St., OC - Must have good credit. No smoking / no pets. $900/mo. Includes HBO, cable & electric. Call 443-504-4460.

RAMBLER MOTEL 9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

WINTER WEEKLY RENTALS Pool Front Rooms $175. Efficiencies $195. 2BR Apartments $280. Burgundy Inn 1201 Philadelphia Ave. 410-289-8581

Apartments Starting at $675 Single Family Homes Starting at $995 Condos Starting at $995

Townhouses Starting at $1200 CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

MARYLAND STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING NETWORK

AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your donation helps local families with food, clothing, shelter, counseling. Tax deductible. MVA License #W1044. 410-636-0123 or www.LutheranMissionSociety.org

AUTOS WANTED CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2000 and Newer! Nation’s Top Car Buyer! Free Towing from Anywhere Call Now: 1-800864-5952

Open 7 Days A Week for property viewing in: * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *

RENTALS

YEAR ROUND - 2BR/2BA. 142nd St. $950/mo. + utilities. WINTER RENTAL - 2BR Condo. 142nd St. $550/mo. + utilities. Call John 410-7268948.

Move In Today! Month-ToMonth Winter Rental on 57th St. Oceanside and steps to bus. Clean and Cozy. 2BR/1BA, Fully furn. All util. No pets. Adults only. 2 max per apt. $700 plus $350 sep. sec. Also $325-375 a month for 1/2 apt. Call 410-4224780 for more details. If I do not answer, please leave a detailed message. See at BlueTurtleApartments.com.

WEEKLY • SEASONAL

R E N TA L S

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626 VA C AT I O N S

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK

Place your ad on Facebook; Twitter; LinkedIN and Google Ads Words through MDDC’s Social Media Ad Network; Call today to find out maximize your presence on Social Media; 410-212-0616; or email Wanda Smith @ wsmith@mddcpress.com EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING – Get FAA certification to fix planes. Financial Aid if qualified. Approved for military benefits.Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-823-6729 HELP WANTED: SALES

EARN $500 A DAY: Insurance Agents Needed * Leads, No Cold Calls * Commission Paid Daily * Lifetime Renewals * Complete Training * Health & BUSINESS SERVICES Dental Insurance * Life LiBulk advertising at its best: ad- cense Required. Call 1-888vertise in over 70 newspapers 713-6020 and reach millions of readers with ONE call. Broaden your reach and get results for pennies per reader. Call Wanda at 410-212-0616 or email wsmith@mddcpress.com.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Delaware New Move-In Ready Homes! Low Taxes! Close to Beaches, Gated, Olympic pool. FOUR New Homes from $90's. No HOA Fees. Brochures Available 1-866-629-0770 or www.coolbranch.com.

SERVICES-MISCELLANEOUS Want a larger footprint in the marketplace consider advertising in the MDDC Small Display 2x2 or 2x4 Advertising Network. Reach 3.6 million readers every week by placing your ad in 71 newspapers in Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia. With just one phone call, your business and/or product will be seen by 3.6 million readers HURRY … space is limited, CALL TODAY!! Call 1-855-721-6332 x 6 or 410-212-0616 email wsmith@mddcpress.com or visit our website at www.mddcpress.com

Advertise in MDDC 410-723-6397

Now you can order your classifieds online


PAGE 46

RENTALS

YEAR ROUND RENTAL, Emerson House, 68th and Coastal Hwy. 1 bed, 1 bath, 1 off-street parking space, $700/month. Call 443-3656169 after 5pm.

ROOMMATES ROOMMATES

ROOM FOR RENT 3BR, partially furnished, Ocean Pines House. Month to month rent. Call for more details, 443-373-9174.

Roommate Wanted. Single occupancy. $550 monthly + 1/2 electric bill. W/D, cable & WiFi included. Off-street parking. 74th St. area. Call 410251-6678 after 6pm. Roommate Needed. Call 443-996-1069.

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE

2BR, 1.5BA Mobile on 1/2 acre in Bishopville. Garage & 12x60 storage unit. $119,000. Make offer! Call Howard Martin Realty 410-3525555.

Classifieds 410-723-6397

REAL ESTATE

Condo For Sale By Owner. 1BR/1BA Orleans Court. 140th St. & Coastal Hwy. Furnished, second floor, elevators, 2 pools & courtyard. Great rental unit. Priced to sell. $117,500. Call for details 410-598-1194.

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443497-4200.

Berlin, 225 sq. ft. Office Space, $275/mo. includes utils. Two 120 sq. ft. Storage Sheds, each $95/mo. Call 410-726-5471 or 410-6414300.

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT

Looking for space, comfort and great views? Spacious, climatecontrolled offices available, with use of Conference Room, in a modern, wellmaintained building, in prime Ocean City location. Call 410-524-3440 for appointment.

Ocean City Today

SERVICES

Bishopville Movers Inc. Fast, reliable service. 410-352-5555

House Cleaning

Offices, Houses, Apartments & After Construction Call Iza at 443-397-2395 Free Estimates!

House Cleaning Offices, Houses & Apartments Call Liliane Mendes at 443-859-3527

JANUARY 13, 2017

DONATIONS

Your

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hardworking international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be tax-deductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065.

Classifieds Online

FOR SALE FOR SALE

2016 Arising 6x12 Enclosed Trailer. Electric breaks. Call 765-215-8184.

www. oceancitytoday.net

BOATS/PWC BOATS/PWC

2004 20 Ft. Pontoon Boat. 65 HP Motor. $2900. Call 410-726-1197.

www. baysideoc.com

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH

FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

Updated Every Friday!

410-250-7000

146th Street, Ocean City

Jan. 12 - Jan. 19 DAY/TIME Daily

Daily 10-5 Daily 11-5

Sat-Mon 11-4 pm

ADDRESS

BR/BA

STYLE

PRICE

AGENCY/AGENT

Assateague Point, Berlin

1BR/2BR/3BR

Mobile

From $100,000

Tony Matrona/Resort Homes

West Harbor Village

3BR/2.5BA

Townhomes

From $270,000

Single Family

From $489,900

Gateway Grand – 48th Street

Condo

Heron Harbour, 120th St., Bayside

1BR/2/BR/3BR/4/BR+

Condo, Towns & SF

Sunset Island, Ocean City

Condos, Towns & SF

Sun 12-5 & Mon-Sat 10-5 11769 Maid at Arms Way Fri, Sat & Sun 10-5pm

3 & 4BR, 3BA

4BR/4.5BA

Inquire

Fritschle Group/Condominium Realty

Nanette Pavier/Holiday Real Estate

From $369,000

Terry Riley/Vantage Resort Realty

Dan Demeria/Harbor Homes Evergreene Homes


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

PAGE 47

A/C & HEAT PUMPS

BLINDS & SHADES

BLINDS & SHADES

CARPET CLEANING

CLEANING SERVICE

CONSTRUCTION

UnderCover Cleaning Service RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

A PROFESSIONAL CLEANING SERVICE

Keeping It Clean Call For A Free Estimate

20% Off

COSMETICS

FREE

Orders of $50 or more ~ plus ~ Shipping on $40 orders

Order Avon online at www.christinesbeautyshop.com

Use coupon code: WELCOME at checkout

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Donna Snyder - Owner 443-513-4024 Office 301-712-5224 Cell undercovercleaning@outlook.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT

PipeLine

No job is too small. We take care of your “To Do� list, so you , LLC don’t have to!

DECKS, PORCHES, PATIOS, ADDITIONS All types of Home Improvement Alfred Frizzell & Family, Inc.

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Home Improvement Services Company

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• Drywall • Flooring • Tile • Room Remodeling • General Carpentry

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MDHIC # 107489 • DE # 2014100304 PAHIC#104744 • Insured & Licensed

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Pella Windows & Doors of Lewes, DE Schedule your free in-home consultation appointment today and receive 20% OFF qualifying projects.

Call: 202-591-1815 Click: www.leweswindowsales.com Visit: 34634 Bay Crossing Blvd., Ste. 2, Lewes, DE 19958

Disclaimer: Minimum purchase required. Visit your local showroom for more details.

HOME IMPROVEMENT

EAST COAST CONSTRUCTION, LLC

Owner P.O. Box 1408 Ocean Pines, MD 21811

Specializing in Additions, Kitchens, Baths and All Types of Custom Remodeling. Let us help you with your insurance claims!

0+,& 

)5 5(((67,0$ $7 7(6 410-6777-4748

MHIC #123198

Home Improvement and Plumbing

410-259-5686

MHIC #47627 Master Plumbers License #3798

dchristensen@jandjconst.net ~ www.jandjconst.net

We accept MC/Visa (410) 641-3762

â&#x20AC;˘Â&#x2021;BRUSH AND /$ /$: $:1CLEAN-UP 0$,17( 0$ 7(1$ 1&( & REMOVAL Â&#x2021; / /$ $ 1 '6&$ & $ 3,1 , 1 *  â&#x20AC;˘ LANDSCAPE DESIGN & Â&#x2021;,5 ,55 5INSTALLATION 5,*$ *$7,21 215( 5(3$ 3$,56 â&#x20AC;˘ GRADING AND Â&#x2021;'5$ '5$,1 $*(DRAINAGE :25. 5. :2 WORK Â&#x2021;3$ 3$PITS, 7,2 WALKWAYS :$/.:$<& :$ â&#x20AC;˘ FIRE PATIOS ,167$ 7 $//$7,21 21 â&#x20AC;˘ LAWN MAINTENANCE  â&#x20AC;˘ FIREWOOD 0'$ '$

Lic. & Ins.

HOME IMPROVEMENT

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LANDSCAPING

240.344.9372

Now Provides Full Service Siding, Roofing, Painting and Tile Work. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quality you deserve and dependability you can count on.â&#x20AC;?

PAINTING

Zimmerman & Son LLC

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ROOFING


Ocean City Today

PAGE 48

JANUARY 13, 2017

PUBLIC NOTICES BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 722 ANCHOR CHAIN RD., UNIT #14 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated July 13, 1995 and recorded in Liber 2180, Folio 359 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $61,750.00 and a current interest rate of 8.125%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 31, 2017 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit No. 14 in the “Harbor Lights Condominium” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $5,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE

ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 130093-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR

LEGAL ADVERTISING

Call NANCY HAWRYLKO 410-723-6397, Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net DEADLINE: MONDAY, 5 P.M.

STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/12/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, MD 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 4004 JONES RD. POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from John W. Russell and Jennifer M. Russell, dated November 24, 2010 and recorded in Liber 5585, folio 232 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 23, 2017 AT 2:25 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $36,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 5% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges

and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, and front foot benefit charges, if applicable, to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2013-35303). Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/5/3t _________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 423 BAYSHORE DRIVE, UNIT 6 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Ruth I. Owens and Richard E. Owens, dated October 7, 2010 and recorded in Liber 5578, Folio 443 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $190,750.00, and an original interest rate of 3.125%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on January 17, 2017 AT 3:20 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust.  The property being sold is a condominium unit and all common elements appurtenant thereto. Terms of Sale: The property will be sold “as is” and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 13, 2017

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PUBLIC NOTICES kind.  A deposit of $17,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  At the Substitute Trustees’ discretion, the foreclosure purchaser, if a corporation or LLC, must produce evidence, prior to bidding, of the legal formation of such entity.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  All due and/or unpaid private utility, water and sewer facilities charges, or front foot benefit payments, are payable by the purchaser without adjustment.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, ground rent, or condo/HOA assessments, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser, and the purchaser agrees to pay reasonable attorneys’ fees for the Substitute Trustees, plus all costs incurred, if the Substitute Trustees have filed the appropriate motion with the Court to resell the property.  Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction.   In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property.  If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit without interest.  The sale is subject to postsale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to,

determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.  In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Michael McKeefery, Christianna Kersey, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-12/29/3t _________________________________   BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 413 BLUEWATER CT. OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated August 19, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4679, Folio 443 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $597,000.00 and a current interest rate of 3.125%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 17, 2017 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $60,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are

payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 301952-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-12/29/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 1211 CEDAR ST. POCOMOKE A/R/T/A POCOMOKE CITY, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 19, 2006 and recorded in Liber

4703, Folio 512 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $186,000.00 and a current interest rate of 1.73%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 17, 2017 AT 3:33 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $11,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub.


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PUBLIC NOTICES Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 200136-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-12/29/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 853 OCEAN PKWY. OCEAN PINES, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated October 26, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5029, Folio 647 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $330,000.00 and a current interest rate of 1.55%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 17, 2017 AT 3:36 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $22,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the pur-

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chaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 303008-2) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-12/29/3t _________________________________

AYRES, JENKINS, GORDY & ALMAND, PA WILLIAM E. ESHAM III ESQ 11047 RACETRACK ROAD P.O. BOX 1244 BERLIN, MD 21811

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 16781 Notice is given that the Ophans’ Court of Perry County, PA appointed Christina Eaton, 1785 N. Meadow Drive, Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 as the Personal Representative of the Estate of Norma J. Aughenbaugh AKA: Norma J. Abbott who died on January 04, 2016 domiciled in Pennsylvania, America. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is William E. Esham III whose address is 11047 Racetrack Road, Berlin, MD 21811. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Christina Eaton Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: December 29, 2016 OCD-12/29/3t _________________________________ THOMAS M. MCCARTIN ESQ. 51 MONROE STREET, SUITE 1407 ROCKVILLE, MD 20850

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 16776 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF YVONNE T. RODLER Notice is given that David J. Rodler, 2141 Sudbury Place, NW, Washington, DC 20012; Eve T. Rodler, 77 Buckeye Avenue, Oakland, CA 94618; and Paul E. Rodler, 102 Windsor Avenue, San Rafael, CA 94901, were on December 23, 2016 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Yvonne T. Rodler who

died on November 4, 2016, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 23rd day of June, 2017. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. David J. Rodler Eve T. Rodler Paul E. Rodler Personal Representatives True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: December 29, 2016 OCD-12/29/3t _________________________________ RAYMOND C. SHOCKLEY ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON PA 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY P.O. BOX 739 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 16790 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF LAURA E. BIRCH Notice is given that Verla Hammond, 12618 Collins Road, Bishopville, MD 21813, was on December 28, 2016 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Laura E. Birch who died on May 17, 1971, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their


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PUBLIC NOTICES objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 28th day of June, 2017. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Verla Hammond Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County One W. Market Street Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 05, 2017 OCD-1/5/3t _________________________________

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Blacktop Surfacing of Roadways Worcester County, Maryland The Worcester County Commissioners are currently accepting bids for county-wide blacktop surfacing of various sections of roadways in Worcester County to be completed by June 15, 2017 and requiring approximately 28,506 Tons of Superpave 9.5 mm Bituminous Concrete for paving of roughly 26.08 miles of road for the Roads Division and approximately 1,055 Tons of Superpave 9.5 mm Bituminous Concrete for paving of approximately 12,661 square yards of parking lots at two County boat landings for the Maintenance Division of the Worcester County Department of Public Works. Bid specification packages and bid forms are available from the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, obtained online at www.co.worcester.md.us or by calling the Commissioners’ Office at 410-632-1194 to request a package by mail. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1:00 PM, Monday, January 30, 2017 in the Office of the County Commissioners at the above address, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Blacktop

Bid" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, bids will be forwarded to the Department of Public Works for tabulation, review and recommendation to the County Commissioners for their consideration at a future meeting. In awarding the bid, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever bid they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering lowest or best bid, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of bidders being considered, previous experience of bidders with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to Frank Adkins, Roads Superintendent, at 410-632-2244, Monday through Thursday, 6:00 am to 4:30 pm. OCD-1/12/1t _________________________________

TOWN OF OCEAN CITY

ORDINANCE 2017-01 RE: Real Property Purchase Notice is hereby given by the Mayor and City Council of Ocean City, that an ordinance was introduced for first reading at their meeting of January 3, 2017. Second reading is scheduled for January 17. A complete text of the ordinance is available for review in the Office of the City Clerk, City Hall 3rd Street and Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD 21842, or online at oceancitymd.gov in the January 3 agenda packet. This ordinance authorizes the purchase and financing of real property known as 200 St. Louis Avenue, Tax Parcel 3949. OCD-1/12/1t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS TOWN OF OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 110 of the Code of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Zoning Ordinance for Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted by the Board of Zoning Appeals for Ocean City, Maryland in the Council Chambers of City Hall located on Baltimore Avenue and Third Street, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland on: THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Sec-

tion 110-93(2), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-94(2)(b) requesting a special parking exception for a five (5) parking space waiver for an outdoor dining patio on the north end of the restaurant and the placement of a walk-in cooler next to the door located on the west side of the restaurant; and pursuant to Section 110-94(3)a) requesting a special yard exception to expand the entrance on the east front yard in a manner similar to the existing expansion granted in 2003, providing a 5’ setback instead of 10’ as required by Code. The site of the appeal is described as Lots 66, 67, 68, 94, 95, and 96, #3 Skyline Development Plat; and further described as located on the west side of Philadelphia Avenue and south side of 28th Street, and locally known as 2707 & 2709 Philadelphia Avenue, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: 3 BUX LLC/ BUXY’S SALTY DOG (BZA 2473 #17-09400001) at 6:10 p.m. Pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-93(3), Powers, of the Code, an appeal has been filed pursuant to the provisions of Section 110-95(1)(a) requesting a variance in accordance with Chapter 30 Environment, Section 30-561 to allow approximately 126 square feet of impervious structures including an above ground pool and a built in outdoor grill and fireplace to be constructed within the 15’ waterfront setback established by the Atlantic Coastal Bays Critical Area Program in the R-1, SingleFamily Residential zoning district pursuant to Section 30-554(d)(1)a. The site of the appeal is described as Lot 24 of the Caine Keys II Plat, extended; further described as located on the west side of Point Lookout Road, and locally known as 10613 Point Lookout Road, in the Town of Ocean City, Maryland. APPLICANT: COREY & CATHERINE ROBERTS – (BZA 2474 #17-09500001) Further information concerning the public hearings may be examined in the office of the Department of Planning and Community Development in City Hall. Alfred Harrison, Chairman Heather Stansbury, Attorney OCD-1/12/2t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER AMENDMENTS TO DESIGN GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS FOR COMMERCIAL USES AND U.S. ROUTE 50 TRANSPORTATION CORRIDOR PLAN WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Pursuant to Section ZS 1-114 of the Worcester County Zoning Ordinance, the County Commissioners of Worcester County, Maryland will hold a public hearing to receive comments on proposed changes recom-

mended by the Task Force established by the County Commissioners for the review of the Design Guidelines and Standards for Commercial Uses and the U.S. Route 50 Transportation Corridor Plan. Background on these documents is as follows: Design Guidelines and Standards for Commercial Uses These standards were originally adopted on November 3, 2009 to identify architectural styles and features indicative of Worcester County’s heritage and to provide direction to developers in designing projects that reflect the local character. The goal of the design guidelines is to offer a representation of traditional seaside, town center and agricultural designs. While the design guidelines are predominately voluntary, designers and developers are strongly encouraged to ensure that building design is representative of the examples therein. U.S. Route 50 Transportation Corridor Plan The Corridor Plan affects properties on the south side of U.S. Route 50 between Seahawk Road and Holly Grove Road and was originally adopted on March 18, 1997 and last amended on July 27, 2004. The primary goal of the plan is to create and maintain a transportation network in the affected area that is safe, efficient, and provides for varying modes of travel in an integrated manner that will address the future commercial development demands of this corridor, while protecting the integrity of the U.S. Route 50 arterial highway and observing the directives of the Worcester County Comprehensive Development Plan. The County Commissioners have scheduled the PUBLIC HEARING on TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 2017 at 10:30 A.M. in the COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MEETING ROOM Room 1101- Government Center One West Market Street, Snow Hill, MD 21863 At said public hearing the County Commissioners will consider the recommendation of the aforementioned Task Force and the comments of the public at large. A copy of the revised draft of the Design Guidelines and Standards for Commercial Uses and the revised draft of the U.S. Route 50 Transportation Corridor Plan as recommended by the aforementioned Task Force is available for review on the County website at www.co.worcester.md.us . A hard copy is also on file and available for review at the Department of Development Review & Permitting, Room 1201, Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland during the regular business hours of 8:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday (except Holidays). Anyone having questions should contact Phyllis Wimbrow, Deputy Director of Development Review & Permitting, at 410-632-1200, ext. 1110,


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PUBLIC NOTICES or at pwimbrow@co.worcester.md.us. All interested citizens are encouraged to attend the hearing and express their views on the draft Design Guidelines and Standards or the draft Corridor Plan. Both written and oral testimony will be accepted. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-12/29/2t _________________________________

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Big Millpond Bridge Replacement Project No. 0085B034.A01 Worcester County, Maryland The County Commissioners of

Worcester County, Maryland are currently accepting sealed bids for the construction of Big Millpond Bridge over Swan Gut Creek near Stockton, Maryland for the Roads Division of the Department of Public Works. Contract Documents, Construction Specifications and Plans are available from the office of Davis, Bowen & Friedel, Inc., One Plaza East, Suite 200, Salisbury, Maryland 21801 (phone 410-543-9091). Interested bidders are encouraged to attend a pre-bid meeting to be held on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 10:00 am, at the Worcester County Department of Public Works, 6113 Timmons Road, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, at which the project scope and Bid Documents will be discussed in depth and Biddersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; questions will

be answered. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1:00 pm, Monday, January 30, 2017 in the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Bid for Big Millpond Bridge Replacement Project" in the lower left-hand corner. No bidder may withdraw his bid within ninety (90) days after the actual date of opening thereof. After opening, bids will be forwarded to the Public Works Department for tabulation, review and recommendation to the County Commissioners for their consideration at a future meeting. In awarding the bid, the Commission-

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ers reserve the right to reject any and all bids, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever bid they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering lowest or best bid, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of bidders being considered, previous experience of bidders with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to Andrew E. Welch, P.E., Project Engineer, at 410-543-9091, or by FAX at 410-5434172. Email correspondence is encouraged to aew@dbfinc.com and will be binding. OCD-1/12/1t _________________________________

NOTICE TO BIDDERS Digital Video Recorders for Jail Worcester County, Maryland The Worcester County Commissioners are currently accepting bids from qualified vendors for procurement and installation of replacement video recorders, controllers and software for the Worcester County Jail. Bid specification packages and bid forms are available from the Office of the County Commissioners, Room 1103 - Worcester County Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863, may be obtained online at www.co.worcester.md.us or by calling the Commissionersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Office at 410-632-1194 to request a package by mail. Interested vendors are encouraged to attend a Pre-Bid Inspection on Wednesday, January 25, 2017 at 9:00 A.M. to be held at the Worcester County Jail, 5022 Joyner Road, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. Sealed bids will be accepted until 1:00 PM, Monday, February 13, 2017 in the Office of the County Commissioners at the above address (Room 1103), at which time they will be opened and publicly read aloud. Envelopes shall be marked "Proposal for Digital Video Recorder - Worcester County Jail" in the lower left-hand corner. After opening, proposals will be forwarded to the Worcester County Jail for tabulation, review and recommendation to the County Commissioners at a future meeting. In awarding the bid, the Commissioners reserve the right to reject any and all bids, waive formalities, informalities and technicalities therein, and to take whatever bid they determine to be in the best interest of the County considering lowest or best bid, quality of goods and work, time of delivery or completion, responsibility of vendors being considered, previous experience of vendors with County contracts, or any other factors they deem appropriate. All inquiries shall be directed to Donna Bounds, Assistant Warden of Security and Custody, at 410-632-1300. OCD-1/12/1t _________________________________

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Commentary

Don’t misconstrue sanctuary protest

Given its stance on the Baltimore National Aquarium’s Baltimore Canyon sanctuary proposal, the local fishing community might be cast by some as a bunch of sea-going rednecks who don’t care about what happens in the ocean as long as they can use it for their own purposes. That would be dead wrong. No one cares more about the welfare of these offshore areas than blue water anglers. More than many advocates of marine resources preservation, they are part of the ocean fabric. They have seen more and know more about what lies beneath the surface out there than most people, which is why their opposition to the aquarium’s marine sanctuary application should not be misread. They strongly support the principles of the sanctuary proposition — ensuring that the area is off-limits to oil and gas exploration and preventing the further degradation of the ecosystem in the canyons — but they don’t want to risk the possibility of some day being kicked off the waters they have treasured for generations. No one can guarantee that won’t happen. Expressions of good intentions and solemn assurances don’t have the force of law and neither do they bind future administrators, perhaps far removed from the coast, from changing course in the future. It could be that the sanctuary applications awaiting review by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration — one for the Baltimore Canyon and the other for the Hudson Canyon off New York and New Jersey — and one that is being promoted for the Norfolk Canyon in Virginia, are preemptive actions designed to thwart promises by the new Trump administration to open all U.S. waters to oil exploration. If that ever should occur, national aquarium officials, conservationists and environmentalists know that the multi-billion-dollar offshore fishing industry and the anglers themselves would join their protest. The local opposition against the sanctuary application should not be construed as an expression of anti-aquarium sentiment. It is simply an effort to ensure that the enjoyment of these waters by thousands of conservation-minded anglers and benign commercial operations, such as lobster potting, are equally protected.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR/PUBLISHER.......................... Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli ASSOCIATE EDITORS.......... Josh Davis, Brian Gilliland STAFF WRITERS............ Kara Hallissey, Katie Tabeling, .............................................................. Greg Ellison ASSISTANT PUBLISHER.......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS................ Kelly Brown, Kaitlin Sowa .............................................................. Debbie Haas COMPTROLLER.................................. Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net.

PUBLIC EYE

Jan. 13, 2017

Ocean City Today

Page 53

A robotic wonder gift

Do not ever buy someone a vacuum cleaner for Christmas. To say that this would be a holiday gift-giving faux pas of pole-shifting proportions would be an understatement. In other words, there aren’t enough little blue pills in this world to fix what would happen to you, which, metaphorically speaking, would be like putting gas in a car that has no tank. This is why I bought the vacuum cleaner as a gift to “the house,” rather than for any one individual who has By access to sharp instruments. Stewart Also considered was the fact budgetary restraints preDobson that vent me from hiring a food taster for the next few months. I am not saying that poisoning would be a real possibility, as some people in our household are much more direct than I, but no one wants to risk sitting down to dinner and saying, “My meatloaf is a different color than yours,” and hearing the reply, “Why yes, yes it is.” Which brings me back to the point that this particular vacuum was a gift to us all, including the duo of four-legged hair-bombs that necessitated its purchase. Besides, this is not just any vacuum cleaner, it is one of those robot models that will do room after room all by itself (admittedly, I have been told that I must think that’s how the vacuuming is done anyway, as in, “Do you think this room got vacuumed by itself, mister?”). I have always wanted to answer that question in the affirmative just for the fun of it, but ... (see sharp instruments, food taster references above). Now, I can. The thing is, our dogs tend to grow completely new coats of fur daily. Sometime during the night, I think, they go totally bald and lie shivering in the dark, where no one can see

their embarrassingly pink sub-selves, until they are follicly reupholstered and ready for the new day. Meanwhile, their discarded hair suits of the previous day float gently and silently throughout the house until they settle wherever it might be appropriate to create an organic look. You’ve heard of no-till farming; we have what appear to be no-till floors, at least until the vacuuming cycle begins. This bad boy robot, however, will take care of that, while we enjoy other, more intellectual pursuits, such as me playing the armchair drums in front of the TV and her ignoring me. I will tell you, though, that the house’s robot vacuum cleaner really and truly does work. It’s so amazing that I almost feel guilty. As I was non-vacuuming over the weekend — yes, I can now say I did the vacuuming — while I watched TV, it occurred to me that our home has made the leap into the Jetson era, when people do nothing except wait for various machines to do it for them. “You know,” I said, as we enjoyed the sight of dogs doing Looney Tunes burnouts to escape the oncoming Robot Monster — a nice side benefit of this whole approach — “if we continue on this path of automation, I’ll end up being a lump incapable of physical movement.” “Too late,” she replied. On the other hand, it also occurred to me that this whole dog cleanliness business might eventually be addressed in the same technological fashion. “Just think,” I said. “Some day they’ll create robot dogs out of steel and make pet owners’ lives even easier.” “How’s that?” she asked, less than intrigued. “When you go outside to clean up after them, you’ll be able to do it with a magnet.” “You’re just a ———- genius.” “I know. By the way, is it me or does that meatloaf in the kitchen look a little funny?”


Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 13, 2017

Letters to the editor Original zoning use best for camp proposal

Editor, Anyone who hears someone say a development will have “no runoff” should be extremely suspicious. Without denigrating Mr. Cropper’s credentials as the representative of the proposed site’s developers, there is no way any such development will not have runoff. Even if it is into existing ponds, that water and the dissolved ingredients will impact the local waterways and aquifers. He can check with any Maryland farmer who has to regulate the type and amount of fertilizer placed on their fields no matter how far from a water body. Next, keep in mind that the original zoning development plans for the property was E-1 or five or six mini-estate properties. If he believes that customers visiting and staying at over 300 campsites will have less impact than these estates, well, I have a bridge in Brooklyn to sell him. He should also note that the existing golf course has not been in use for over ten years and appears to have not harmed the environment while sitting there unused. In fact, he should also note that as a member of Lower Shore Land Trust there is an adjacent property set up for limited development that is doing quite well.

Has his developer thought of putting it under this type of positive environmental protection? It is an excellent program. Some may also question why no one uses the golf course. Wasn’t it profitable? I should note that I have kayaked Ayers Creek for years, even going up the canals adjacent to the proposed development. It is a pristine environment with loads of wildlife. It is quite easy to put over on the causeway along Route 376 to kayak the Creek. I ignored the “No Trespassing” sign they had on the wooden bridge over the canals. As Mr. Cropper knows, no one can be caught ‘trespassing’ on a public water body. I have seen bald eagles on some of my trips and numerous ducks on others. I know it is Mr. Cropper’s job to paint a rosy picture of this proposed development. But surely he knows that the impact of over 300 campsites on the sewer infrastructure will be massive. And costly. Does he expect local residents to willingly pay large sums of money to connect to this system no matter what? Surely he knows about the new Best Management Practices required for septic systems. If not, I can show him as I was required to put it in on my residential property. Just the huge numbers of people flushing into his proposed devel-

opment will create a much greater impact on the environment than he seems to recognize. Finally, regarding the safety issue, let me assure Mr. Cropper that Route 611 (and Castaways) is heavily used during the summer. But he would know that since he is proposing to put a profitable campground on that road. He knows customers will drive large caravans to and from his operation using 611 and adjacent roads. I can tell you from personal experience that the road is dangerous. My accident last summer occurred across from Mystic Harbor entrance when someone unfamiliar with the road pulled out into 611. The county and state roads had not placed a white warning stripe in the side road for those unfamiliar with the road to know where to stop. It was just an accident but trust me, the traffic is very heavy on Route 611. Regarding Mr. Cropper’s uncalled for comment that local residents are “just selfish,” I would only ask him one question. Why do he and his patrons want to put a large campground at this location? Could it be that they saw where Castaways and Frontier Town campgrounds were sold to a large outof-state conglomerates for tens of millions of dollars? Are Mr. Cropper and his patrons being selfish? Don’t leave it as a park. Develop it as was called for a

long time ago. Estates.

Tom Wieland Bishopville

Hospice thanks 1,173 community ‘angels’

Editor, Our community is filled with angels. The outpouring of generosity for our annual Angel fundraising drive proves it. Thank you to all of the angels — 1,173 of you — who this year contributed $106,344 to help fund the charity care we provide. Last year, Coastal Hospice cared for 1,185 patients and families in the four counties on the Lower Eastern Shore and provided more than $670,000 in charity care to patients who lacked the resources to pay for the care they desperately needed. The average gift this year was more than $90, which will have a significant impact on the care Coastal Hospice provides. For example, a $100 donation pays for one month of oxygen for a hospice patient at home. A $70 donation pays for one month of medical equipment for patient at home. Angels like you are the bright lights in the midst of our lives. We truly appreciate your support. Alane K. Capen President Coastal Hospice

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 13, 2017

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