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JANUARY 11, 2019

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Coast Guard waits to see if it will get paid Caught in shutdown, it still must operate regardless By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) As the partial government shutdown grows closer to becoming one of the longest in U.S. history, Ocean City Coast Guard personnel continue to work without knowing if they will be paid next week. The Coast Guard is the only branch of the United States military not getting paid because of the partial shutdown. Coast Guard service members are paid every two weeks, with the next paycheck scheduled for Jan. 15. That means that while approximately 42,000 active-duty, reservist and civilian personnel continue to work to ensure the maritime safety, security and stewardship of the nation, they are not getting paid for it, See COAST GUARD Page 7

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

PAWS THAT REFRESHES Arya, a 9-month-old mix breed, and Luke Dunlevy, 11, of Fruitland, soak up some wintertime sunshine Sunday on the beach near Division Street.

Heiser sworn in as county’s Room tax hike gets closer look at tourism commission state’s atty. By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) The Worcester County Circuit Court in Snow Hill was packed with commissioners, board of education members, a retired judge, the sheriff, several police officers and multiple attorneys on Monday. Not for a trial, but for the swearing in ceremony of newly elected State’s Attorney Kristin Heiser. Heiser, who has been a prosecutor for the past decade, officially accepted her position the first See HEISER Page 5

Need for more revenue has city looking to find a way

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester County’s newly elected State’s Attorney Kristin Heiser poses with her husband, Jeff, during her swearing in ceremony.

By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) With expenses outpacing revenue over the last decade, Ocean City government is considering increasing room tax rates a half cent to net an estimated $1.7 million in new income annually. Budget Manager Jennie Knapp provided expense and revenue data comparing fiscal years 2008 and 2018 as part of a room tax ordinance discussion during the Tourism Commission meeting last Thursday. Knapp and City Manager Doug

Miller had discussed a proposal to bump room tax rates for hotels, motels and rentals from 4.5 to 5 percent as part of a fiscal policy presentation during an Ocean City Council work session in late November. The resort began collecting room taxes in 1998 and last increased rates from 4 to 4.5 percent in 2008 as part of an agreement with the lodging industry to spend a portion of that on resort marketing. Although the Worcester County Commissioners would need to approve the change, the city has the ability to raise room tax rates to 5 percent without state authorization. See ROOM Page 8


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Assateague herd remains in danger of ‘Swamp Cancer’ By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) A disease that has killed more than seven horses on the Virginia end of Assateague Island could claim more victims if left unchecked. The condition, known as “Swamp Cancer,” is also known by its scientific name, Pythiosis, which is a rare and deadly tropical disease caused by the aquatic microorganism oomycete Pythium insidiosum. The organism was not discovered until 1987 and until that point, scientists believed the infections were See TOXIC Page 8

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Ocean City Today

Heiser vows to stand with police, residents Continued from Page 1 Monday of January, which has been tradition for all new state’s attorneys. “I’m so humbled today to be sworn in as Worcester County’s State’s Attorney,” Heiser said. “Being a prosecutor is the best job in the criminal justice system.” To provide an example as to why she felt prosecutors were so important, she read a quote from Berger vs. United States (1935). “The prosecutor is in a peculiar and very definite sense, a servant of the law,” she said. “Guilt shall not escape, nor innocence suffer. He may prosecute with earnestness and vigor, and indeed he should do so, but while he may strike hard blows, he is not at liberty to strike foul ones.” Heiser, raised in a family of law en-

forcement and married to a Worcester County police officer, thanked the officers who gathered to celebrate her swearing in ceremony, and made a pledge to help serve the boys in blue. “For my part, as state’s attorney, I promise to collaborate with you, to be a resource for you, and to stand next to you in defense of our community,” Heiser said. “Together, we will work to address the opioid crisis, protect vulnerable adults and children, and to ensure the safety and security of our county.” Promises were also made to the residents of Worcester County. “I do not take this position lightly. As chief law enforcement officer, I will face difficult decisions and I am prepared to make them,” Heiser said. “I pledge to work hand in hand with our

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester County’s newly elected State’s Attorney Kristin Heiser is sworn in during an official ceremony in the Worcester County Circuit Court in Snow Hill, Monday.

law enforcement, representing all of the agencies in Worcester County, to keep you and your families safe and to

hold offenders accountable. I also pledge to [be] transparent, communicative and accessible to you.”

Airbnb hosts netted $1.5M in county in ’18 By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) In light of Airbnb’s recent report indicating lodging hosts in Maryland earned about $57 million during 2018, including roughly $1.5 million in Worcester County, the resort’s Tourism Commission revived the discussion of short-term rentals at its meeting last Thursday. In Worcester alone, Airbnb disclosed approximately 10,800 guests paid around $1.5 million to private lodging hosts during 2018. Susan Jones, executive director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association, said the earnings report quantifies the economic impact of online short-term rental sites at the resort. “This proves how much money Airbnb is generating in our area,” she

said. While her organization continues to pursue level playing field conditions for traditional and individual lodging proprietors, Jones said questions abound regarding proper remittance of applicable taxes. Rental property owners are required to charge a 4.5 percent room tax, payable to Worcester County, and a 6 percent sales tax, payable to the State of Maryland. Property owners renting housing units in Ocean City, through online sites or other means, are required to obtain a license and noise permit. Rental properties also are subject to inspections for occupancy rates, as well as fire and safety standards. Owners of single-family residences or condominiums who rent their property are required to obtain an an-

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nual rental license for $116 and a noise ordinance permit for $25. The cost for rental licenses in R-1 districts is $166. Statewide in 2018, Airbnb reported more than 6,500 hosts earned more than $57 million in supplemental income from more than 383,000 guests. This represents an increase from

2017 when Airbnb reported Maryland hosts netted about $42.4 million, which was significantly more than the approximately $25.3 million earned statewide in 2016. Jones said Maryland Hotel & Lodging Association CEO Amy Rohrer will See RENTAL Page 7

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2019

GREG ELLISON/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Attorney Joe Moore, left, argues against proposed code revisions to special parking exceptions before Planning and Zoning Commission members Joel Brous, Peck Miller and Pam Buckley on Tuesday.

Downtown parking problems draw focus at P/Z meeting By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) Proposed zoning code revisions for nonconforming parking requirements sparked a lengthy debate regarding future development downtown during the Ocean City Planning and Zoning Commission meeting on Tuesday. Zoning Administrator Frank Hall said the topic was discussed at the zoning commission meeting on Dec. 4 and, after failing to reach a consensus, revisions were formulated. The new proposed code language specifies that parking nonconformity would only be permitted in cases without a change in use, bulk or increase in density. Any changes to those three areas would require the redevelopment plans to meet parking requirements for the new use or added density. “This still does not prohibit anyone from going to ask for a special parking exception,” he said. “This isn’t changing the authority of the Board of Special Zoning Appeals … that option would still exist.” After confirming with Hall the zoning changes would apply to the entire resort, Commission Secretary Peck Miller suggested another approach. “Have we given any consideration to downtown being different than the rest of Ocean City?” he asked. Miller also asked how the proposed code revision would affect condominium developments involving a change in bulk. “For condominiums, parking spaces are based on bedroom count,” Hall said. “In multi-family developments, unlike single-family home developments, any accessory room … must be counted as if it’s going to be a bedroom.” Commission member Joel Brous asked how the code changes would affect a condominium project involving mixed use elements. Hall said under the proposed revisions, a change in use would negate prior nonconformity determinations. “All nonconformity goes away,” Commission Chairperson Pam Buckley said. Attorney Joe Moore, representing

downtown property owners Amanda Cropper, the Mathias family and the Harrison Group, questioned the inclusion of language relating to change of use and loss of prior nonconformities. “So, any change in use …. simply goes back to zero and I do not have any nonconformity I had in the old use?” he asked. “What is the purpose of that?” Quoting directly for the city’s code regulations, Moore said the idea behind special regulations for nonconforming uses and structures is to encourage preservation, revitalization and redevelopment. “My question rhetorically, what is the detriment to the use of land if the parking nonconformity is not intensified?” he asked. “I’m at a loss to know why … ‘change of use’ is in there.” Moore said redevelopment projects with increased density or bulk that are unable to meet the new parking or other requirements can seek a special exception from the Board of Zoning Appeals. “To take away the [BZA] discretion, which either stifles or ... in many instances prohibits redevelopment … is detrimental to the code,” he said. Moore said the code revisions would hamper downtown redevelopment. Buckley said the option to seek special exceptions from the Board of Zoning Appeals would still remain. “If they feel your case would justify giving you … more parking credits in a particular location,” she said. Moore argued that if previous parking credits were negated through a change of use, the subsequent exception request would be exponentially larger. “It exacerbates in a significant way the burden of proof I have to the Board of Zoning Appeals,” he said. “I don’t see the harm of change of use if it does not exacerbate parking nonconformity.” Commission member Lauren Taylor said different uses have varying parking requirements under zoning code. “If you’re going to change the use, that means you’re going to change the parking requirements,” she said. “You need to See PARKING Page 10


JANUARY 11, 2019

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Coast Guard personnel, stationed on South Philadelphia Avenue, must continue to perform their duties – whether or not they get paid.

Coast Guard awaits action on bills authorizing its pay Continued from Page 1 according to the website, Homeland Security Today. “We don’t know yet if we’re going to get a paycheck on the 15th,” said Master Chief Nathan Beach, the officer in charge of Coast Guard Station Ocean City. The Coast Guard did get paid at the end of December despite the shutdown having begun on Dec. 22, by reshuffling money already in the service’s budget. But with that spent, the Coast Guard’s next payroll depends on whether the shutdown is ended or if congressional efforts to protect the Coast Guard from shutdowns succeeds. Other military services are paid through the Department of Defense, which is unaffected by the stymied budget bill. But the Coast Guard operates under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security, which does not have the same protection. Nevertheless, this is not expected to impact the Coast Guard’s ability to complete its tasks, Beach said. “From a search and rescue standpoint, it’s not affecting us at all,” Beach said. “We’re still maintaining the same response posture as if things were totally normal.”

However, some duties that could be affected, not just in Ocean City but every Coast Guard station, include training, recreational boardings and safety checks, issuing license renewals and other merchant documentation, fisheries enforcement patrols and routine equipment maintenance. Efforts to spare the Coast Guard from the current budget situation have been made by the U.S. Coast Guard Chief Petty Officers Association, the Coast Guard Enlisted Association and the Sea Service Family Foundation, which generated 141,015 letters to every member of Congress, asking for the reintroduction of the Pay Our Coast Guard Act, Homeland Security Today said. The bill, which was initially introduced in 2015 by Sen. John Thune (R-S.D.) but never made it to the floor for a vote, was reintroduced last Thursday, the first day of the 116th Congress. It ensures continued funding for the Coast Guard even if appropriations lapse due to congressional inaction. If the measure passes and funding is approved, all Coast Guard military and civilian employees are expected to receive their back pay within threeto-five days.

Rental regs issue in legislature Continued from Page 5 revive previous legislative undertakings to draft a regulatory bill granting local municipalities and cities the ability to enforce online short-term rental regulations during the Maryland General Assembly 2019 session. In Ocean City, unlicensed rentals are subject to an initial fine of $500, which doubles if the property is not in compliance within 15 days. If the property remains unlicensed after 30 days, a $1,000 per day fine is assessed. To avoid overcrowding rentals and maintaining safety standards, minimum floor area requirements are established for bedrooms, dining and living areas. These include minimum bedroom

sizes of 70 square feet, to include 40 square feet per person, as well as at least 120 square feet of living space. Rental properties with three to five tenants require at least 200 square feet of combined living /dining space, which increases to 250 square feet for six or more individuals. The Property Review and Enforcement Strategies for Safe-housing committee, or P.R.E.S.S., coordinates housing regulation enforcement between numerous city departments, including police, building, zoning, fire marshal and rental licensing. Citizens with concerns or complaints are asked to call the Office of Planning and Community Development at 410-2898855.

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Toxic organism’s spread a threat Continued from Page 3 being caused by a fungus. The disease it causes occurs most commonly in horses, dogs, and humans, with isolated cases in other large mammals. Pythium insidiosum, when in water, results in the release of zoospores that are attracted to open cuts or sores of hosts. Once the spores find their way into a host, they cause Pythiosis. Symptoms of Pythiosis in horses can include gastrointestinal distress, fever, vomiting and diarrhea. As conditions deteriorate, it can spread to lymph nodes and bones. “As of right now I believe each case of swamp cancer has been isolated on the Chincoteague region of the island,” said Billy Weiland, communications manager for Assateague Coastal Trust. “This is likely because of the presence of more standing water in that section of the island. Further, this stuff spreads quick, and, though treating it is possible, early

detection is critical. That said, it’s going to be tough to catch this because, as we know, the island’s herds are indeed wild. “As for Assateague Coastal Trust’s role in this, for now I think the most important thing for our organization to do, for me to do as the communications director, is to make our public aware of this latest issue,” he continued. Humans are not immune from the disease. Conditions brought on by pythiosis include arteritis, keratitis – inflamed eyes –, and periorbital cellulitis, an infection of the eye tissue. Severe cases can lead to a cornea transplant. “Education is critical in any environmental issues,” Weiland said. “If people are aware of something and know a little bit about it, they will be more prepared to abate any adverse results.” Pythiosis is heavily underdiagnosed due to unfamiliarity of the dis-

ease. Symptoms often occur once the disease has progressed to the point where treatments are less effective. Most successful treatments include surgery, immunotherapy, and chemotherapy. Environmentalists are encouraging hikers and other guests of the island to avoid marsh waters, particularly if they have any open sores. “I suspect that this swamp cancer is probably, at some capacity, a result of warmer air and water temperatures that we’re seeing across the region as climate changes,” Weiland said. “So, I think those that are venturing out need to be aware, and should probably use precaution if they are moving through any kind of standing water that may exist in the marshier, swampier areas of our region. Something tells me that pythium insidiosum is not just confined to the southern portion of the island.”

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Room tax could go up a half-cent Continued from Page 1 In an interview this week, Knapp said the city’s three largest sources of revenue, which account for approximately 70 percent of the general fund, are property taxes, room taxes and parking fees, with the first two sources slightly decreasing since 2008. “We’ve operated business on the same money for 10 years,” she said. “Our budget has grown but the three big revenue sources have not grown.” Real property taxes account for 48 percent of the general fund revenues, with other sources such as room tax, charges for services and funding from outside agencies providing 52 percent. The general fund is the city’s primary operating budget, which in addition to supporting public safety, public works, solid waste, recreation, tourism, special events, general government and debt service, also provides partial funding for the Ocean City Municipal Airport, the convention center, transportation department and “pay-as-you-go,” projects. Knapp said property taxes, room taxes and parking fees in fiscal year 2008 totaled $54.3 million, which grew less than four percent to $56.1 million in fiscal 2018. On the other end of the scale, expenses grew more than 12 percent during the same period, going from $75 million in 2008 to $84.4 million in 2018. “These are the three largest sources in the general fund,” she said. “Take your pick which one we want to increase.” Knapp said the city has maintained

property tax rates, which totaled $43.1 million in 2008 and $42.9 million in 2018, at the same rate through annual adjustments based on assessment totals. “If the assessment goes down, the rate goes up; if the assessment goes up the rate goes down,” she said. Of the big three earners, Knapp said parking fees, which jumped from $2.7 million in 2008 to $4.5 million in 2018, is the sole area with boosted revenue. “Parking has increased because we’ve extended the season when we charge … and we’ve increased the rates,” she said. When room tax rates were last raised, Knapp said although the halfcent increase was earmarked for advertising, that percentage, which started at 1.4 percent in 2009, was raised to 2 percent in 2012. “It was supposed to dedicate the half percent to advertising but the way the ordinance was written it actually dedicated 2 percent of gross room revenue,” she said. Over that same stretch the advertising budget has more than tripled, increasing from $2.2 million in 2008 to more than $6.9 million in 2018. “What that means is the amount that has stayed in the general fund has not increased over that 10-year period and at times has actually gone down,” she said. In 2008, room taxes raised roughly $10.7 million, with advertising and marketing costs taking about $2.2 million of that figure to leave more than $8.5 million for general fund expenses. By 2018, although room taxes net-

ted more than $15.5 million, with advertising costs of roughly $6.9 million, the tally remaining for general fund expenses, about $8.6 million, was nearly identical to a decade earlier. “As it increased to 2 percent, it started taking away from what we had to work with toward other expenses in the general fund and we’re just starting to get that back now,” she said. Knapp also said if the percentage of room tax dedicated to advertising was limited to the 2009 rates the current $6.9 million total would be cut to $3.4 million. “We’ve devoted the entire increase in room tax to increase the advertising budget and now I’m saying we can’t do that anymore,” she said. Knapp said room taxes should continue to fund marketing and advertising but could perhaps be supplemented. “We want to increase a bit every year and we don’t want to tie it to gross room revenue and we have to figure out what that formula is,” she said. Knapp also said the options are limited in terms of cutting expenses. “There’s no place to cut expenses unless we cut them from public safety or tourism,” she said. Following last week’s tourism meeting, the mayor and City Council will examine the proposed rate increase before budget work sessions start in April. “We just need to increase what’s going into the general fund to offset the town’s expenses,” she said. “It’s not us being greedy, it’s just trying to do our business.”


JANUARY 11, 2019

PAGE 9

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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Boardwalk barricade project revenue bond sale underway By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) The Ocean City Council approved a $2.5 million revenue bond sale ordinance for the second phase of the Boardwalk barricade project on first reading this week. The council will hold a second reading and final passage on Jan. 22. The city has solicited bids from 14 financial institutions with a submission deadline of Jan. 24. Financial Advisors Kevin Quinn and Pam Kelly, with Annapolis-based Wye River Group, prepared a proposed finance plan for the second phase of the barricade project, which involved temporary measures last season, and includes 26 access points along the 2.9-mile Boardwalk and at the inlet parking lot. The Boardwalk Access Control Project is estimated to cost $2,454,500, with construction slated for completion this May. The bond

measure also includes $45,500 for the cost of issuance. The bond terms are 10 years at a 3.4 percent interest rate, a closing date of March 14 and a first interest and principal payment due this September. The final principal payment is scheduled for March 2029, with interest totaling more than $467,000, increasing the final bond cost to $2,967,125. Bond principal and interest amounts are payable from general revenue funds and require annual council appropriations for the debt service. Exact costs will be determined on the actual bond bid accepted by council. In late November, council voted 51 to accept a $1.95 million bid from Hercules Fence to install permanent vehicle barriers on the Boardwalk. Hercules’ bid, the lowest of four received, was nearly a $1 million under project budget.

Parking debate broaches future Continued from Page 6 evaluate the new use and its parking based on its use, not on what used to be there.” Moore suggested the term “use” be removed from the language revisions. Miller said there were larger issues to consider in terms of downtown parking. “We’ve had nonconformity downtown forever and it has not fostered the growth that we’d like to see,” he said. “There is the opinion … and I think I subscribe to it, that we need parking garages downtown.” With adequate parking facilities on the resort’s south end, Miller opined the use of nonconformities would be significantly, if not wholly, reduced. “We have bigger issues downtown we need to address,” he said. Commission member Joe Wilson asked if developing a parking garage should occur before revising parking requirements. Moore agreed with Wilson’s assertion while reiterating that the proposed language would stifle redevelopment. “We have a philosophical disagreement with the fact that parking nonconformity, which has been recognized in this town since it had zoning, is suddenly detrimental to the area, including the downtown area,” he said. Taylor fired back that the use of nonconformity parking exceptions has proven to be detrimental. “Every project that’s come in, all the restaurants downtown on the waterfront have bought additional lots for offsite parking so that they can meet the … requirements for the use,” she said. “You can change the use if you want you just have to make it work so it’s not a public

problem.” Moore next suggested redevelopment projects should be permitted to retain previous special parking exceptions if the proposed change in use doesn’t exacerbate parking or other site issues. “’Change of use’ is where I’m hung,” he said. Wilson asked if “change of use” was removed from the language revisions, if in fact any change would be involved. “Isn’t that how we do it right now?” he asked. Moore again agreed with Wilson, while noting the decision to increase parking downtown, or elsewhere in the resort, rests with the mayor and City Council. “If you do this without resolving the problem that everybody says is the issue, which is beyond our control ... you’ve gotten the chicken before the egg hatches,” he said. Following the public hearing, the zoning commission vote deadlocked at 3-3, with Buckley, Miller and Taylor opposed to the language changes, and Wilson, Joel Brous and Chris Shanahan in favor. Commission member Palmer Gillis was absent. Again failing to reach a consensus, the commission will consider further language revisions and revive the discussion at a subsequent meeting. Hall agreed that removing the change of use condition leaves the code language essentially unchanged. “Change of use is what really kicks in the parking problems we face in some parts of the city today,” he said. “With code changes that spark this much debate perhaps we need to think what’s causing the problem.”


JANUARY 11, 2019

PAGE 11

Ocean City Today

Beach Bum Motel adds poolside breakfast By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) Proposed poolside food service at the Beach Bum Motel, at 203 Ninth Street, generated a lengthy discussion over delineating between accessory uses and commercial ventures for lodging establishments during a Planning and Zoning Commission meeting on Tuesday. Beach Bum Motel owner Joe Jobson submitted a site plan review for a new 20-by-40-foot open pool house with an 8-by-18-foot kitchen that would serve limited breakfast and lunch exclusively to onsite guests. Zoning Administrator Frank Hall said the proposed pool house would be an expansion of a comparable structure currently being used. “It’s going to be next to the pool, right where the existing pool house already is,” he said. Hall said aesthetic assistance was obtained from the Ocean City Development Corporation and the city’s Technical Review Committee. “The initial review of the plans had a less ornate feature and it looked more like a shed,” he said. “They’ve [now] included some shutters, a peaked roof and other amenities.” Hall also said the applicant was informed zoning restrictions prohibit the inclusion of a restaurant on the property. Noting a comparable size restaurant would require eight parking spaces, Hall’s recommendations included a prorated total. “In this case I put down four spaces for an 800-square-foot breakfast nook, so to speak,” he said. “I’m not even sure they need that because this is obviously an accessory use for guests only.” Hall said the plans also call for demolishing a small structure facing Philadelphia Avenue, resulting in a dozen additional parking spots to bolster the 38 spaces currently available for the 38-room motel. “One of the benefits of this project is it’s going to add parking and reduce the nonconformity for the hotel itself,” he said.

The applicant also proposed joining the several parcels that comprise the establishment, with Hall noting the expanded pool house would cross current property lines. Commission Secretary Peck Miller concurred with the recommendation to require four parking spaces with the expansion. “It allows for some additional people that are working on site,” he said. Attorney William Esham III confirmed the applicant had no intentions to obtain an alcohol beverage license. Representing the applicant was attorney Brian Peter Cosby, who questioned the parking requirement noting the facility would be an amenity solely for motel guests. “It’s not a complementary breakfast type situation, it is a paid facility,” he said. Jobson said the intent is to limit service to paid guests only. “We’re trying to stick to who is staying at the place, not additional people,” he said. Commission member Lauren Taylor questioned the ease of enforcement. “Between checkout and check-in, you’re going to have overlap,” she said. Commission Chairwoman Pam Buckley echoed Miller’s sentiments regarding four additional parking spaces. Cosby said the request could be easily accommodated in light of the 12 new spots slated in the expansion. Esham questioned the plans to limit food service to motel guests. “If someone comes up with money in their pocket that’s not staying there, they’re going to be turned away?” he asked. “That just seems against everything we try to do in Ocean City.” Project architect Patrick Angell said the motel’s downtown location limited the scope of the proposed food establishment. “We’re kind of stuck with the zoning code, because we’re not allowed with the zoning to have a full restaurant,” he said.

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Presenting plans for proposed poolside food service at the Beach Bum Motel on Ninth Street are architect Patrick Angell, left, and attorney Brian Peter Cosby, during the Planning and Zoning Commission meeting on Tuesday.

Esham said lodging establishments offering free continental breakfast for guests have an obvious incentive to restrict public access, but raised issue with this application. “If you’ve got somebody walking down the street that sees there’s a place to go have breakfast, I don’t see how you’re going to turn them away,” he said. Jobson said several methods are utilized to limit nonpaying guests on the property, including wrist bands, pool attendants and 24-hour security guards. “We try to track how many people

are on the property at all times,” he said. Taylor said in her estimation the pool side kitchen would qualify as a private club. “Is this area zoned for a private club, because that’s essentially what it is,” she said. “Every hotel in this city that I know of that sells food to their guests also sells food to the public.” Hall said private clubs are allowed by special exception, but the city’s zoning code does not provide a definition. Taylor offered further support for See MOTEL Page 12

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JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

Motel prohibited from selling food Continued from Page 11 the private club designation. “You’re selling in a private facility to a limited clientele,” she said. “If you’re giving it away that’s one thing, but selling is another.” Cosby countered the argument and noted the pool house would be situated in the middle of the motel property and not roadside. “You’re selling a product, but you’re selling a product to the patrons of that hotel,” he said. Angell noted larger hotel chains in Ocean City typically provide free breakfast for guests. “You’re hurting the people that have been here a long time, the small owners of the small hotels because they can’t compete,” he said. Esham raised issue with the distinction being drawn.

“It looks like a restaurant, walks like a restaurant, talks like a restaurant, but you’re telling us you’re going to treat it like a private club,” he said. Hall said from a zoning perspective the issue boils down to a matter of scale. “We had very large restaurants with hotels before that were obviously out of scale,” he said. “This being no bigger than a large shed [800 squarefeet] is what made me think it was clearly an accessory use.” Buckley agreed with the accessory use designation in theory, but questioned if zoning code would permit food sales. Hall countered the proposal would be permitted as an accessory use to the hotel. Miller said eliminating cash sales would be an ideal accord.

“If this was charged to the room and no cash was taken, I’d be fine with that,” he said. “If you’re actually handing cash over in that space, I think you’ve crossed over into a restaurant.” Miller said room rates could be slightly adjusted to cover food costs, which caused Taylor to question the inclusion of lunch fare. “You’re not going to raise the rate enough to cover breakfast and lunch,” she said. In conclusion, Jobson agreed to limit food service to breakfast and build those costs into room charges. After the commission voted unanimously in favor of the revised plans, Hall said he would consolidate the motel’s various parcels and return for a final approval before sending the matter before the mayor and City Council.

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OC presents letter opposing offshore seismic blasting By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) The Ocean City Council has joined the chorus of voices sounding off against proposed offshore seismic blast testing to locate oil and gas deposits offshore. The council on Monday approved a letter to federal and state officials that opposes the testing because of its potential harm to the ocean environment and area economy. City Engineer Terry McGean reviewed a letter addressed to Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Acting Director Dr. Walter Cruickshank re-affirming city government’s opposition to offshore seismic blasting. “There are concerns with that process, plus what the process potentially could lead to, which is oil and gas drilling off the coast,” he said. McGean reminded the council that the city passed a resolution in 2015 opposing seismic testing off the coast. “It is essentially a process that is used to perform geological explorations of the sea floor to look for oil and gas deposits,” he said. Although BOEM had rejected permit applications from a trio of firms proposing seismic blasting off the Atlantic Coast on Jan. 6, 2017, four months later the incoming Trump administration reversed that decision and resumed the review process. Among the final requirements for permitting is issuance of Incidental Harassment Authorization, which the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration granted to seven companies on Nov. 30, 2018, with three of those firms proposing to test directly off the Ocean City coast. On Dec. 20, Maryland General Attorney Brian E. Frosh, in conjunction with attorney generals from Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina and Virginia, unveiled a federal lawsuit to prevent offshore drilling activities in the Atlantic. McGean said the Incidental Harassment Authorization is required because seismic blasting involves significant sonar activity that affects marine mammals. “The primary concern with the seismic blasting process itself is the effect that it has both on marine mammals and migratory fish, which is primarily tuna [and] dolphins,” he said. McGean said seismic blasting uses high-powered compressed air cannons to blast sound waves into the ocean floor. “Based on the sonar reflections of that compressed air, they look to determine the geology of the ocean floor,” he said. In Aug. 2014, Maryland submitted responses to BOEM’s request for information regarding its 2017-2022 Outer See OC Page 14


JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

State undertakes climate change planning By Greg Ellison Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) The Maryland Climate Leadership Academy, which began enrollment in September, is the nation’s first state-led program to provide training for state agencies, local governments and community leaders to develop strategies to address the impact of changes in the climate. Maryland Department of Natural Resources Secretary Mark Belton, whose division is facilitating the undertaking, said in a press release the goal is to provide training to integrate climate change into community decision-making “Maryland is well-equipped to continue to lead the country in driving creative, innovative and successful strategies aimed at addressing climate change-related impacts on our businesses, citizens and communities,” Belton said. Maryland Natural Resources contracted with the Association of Climate Change Officers, a professional society and credentialing body, to establish the Maryland Climate Leadership Academy. Daniel Kreeger, executive director of the Association of Climate Change Officers, said the intent is for government and community leaders to align efforts for addressing long-range impacts from climate change. “This is kind of the frontier for what

planners are going to need to be able to know and do in the future,” he said. Unlike weather, which describes short term regional atmospheric conditions, climate involves long-term weather patterns and statistical data. Kreeger said his organization has previously contracted with Maryland Natural Resources for comparable training within the department. “It’s one thing … to train their own personnel … to build the competencies to effectively integrate climate change preparedness and an understanding of climate risk and opportunity into their planning activities,” he said. “It’s another when you’re trying to roll it out to other organizations [and] try to start making it available to key decision makers, planners and implementors across the state.” To avoid information disconnect, Kreeger said the Maryland Climate Leadership Academy was formed in partnership with the Association of Climate Change. “We serve as kind of the administrator and the architect of the academy,” he said. “We’ve established an advisory council around the academy consisting of state agency officials, local government leaders and national experts … to provide input as to what sorts of programs we should be developing and deploying.” For the first iteration of training pro-

grams, a three-part series that started in November, Kreeger said the association employed existing educational curriculum. “We administer the Certified Climate Change Professional credential,” he said. “The first cohorts that were established under this are training programs designed to prepare people to be able to satisfy [that] requirement.” Bill Neville, Ocean City director of planning and community development, attended the climate academy’s initial meeting in late November at Chesapeake College in Wye Mills along with representatives from Worcester County, Town of Berlin, and the Maryland

Coastal Bays Program. “The information presented about climate science was useful, and the opportunity to share ideas and solutions with other community representatives on the Eastern Shore was beneficial, he said. Looking forward, Kreeger said the climate academy will offer classes across the state, and will tailor them for each specific region. Neville said the first session’s agenda, focused on climate change, sea level rise and strategies for coastal communities. Additional information about the Maryland Climate Leadership Academy, including educational resources, is available at: MDClimateAcademy.org.

OC opposes offshore oil drilling Continued from Page 12 Continental Shelf Oil & Gas Leasing Program. The state said that in addition to seismic activities’ effect on marine life, recreational and commercial fishing, data is lacking on the deep sea canyons. Located between 60-80 miles offshore, submarine canyons — the Baltimore, Washington and others — provide crucial foraging locations for species such as white and blue marlin, tunas, black sea bass, monkfish, and golden tilefish. “Although we have been on record numerous times opposing oil and gas we felt it would be good to reemphasize our opposition to issuing these permits,” McGean said. Council President Lloyd Martin said federal estimates of potential oil and gas reserves off the entire mid-Atlantic coast are approximately a four-month supply of oil and one-year’s supply of natural gas exists. “This may cost a lot more than that if just one oil spill or anything else happened,” he said. Councilman Mark Paddack asked McGean how the reserve estimates were calculated. “They don’t specifically know what’s down there but … based on the best available data they have, that’s what they

feel,” McGean said. “This does not come from a third [party] environmental watchdog group. That is BOEM’s own estimate of what they believe is out there for the entire Atlantic coast.” Councilman John Gehrig said in addition to opposing seismic blasting, the city should stand against offshore drilling for other purposes. “We’re consistent that we don’t want anything that disrupts the migratory patterns of our fish and our fishing economy out there, [including] seismic blasts, drilling for oil or drilling hundreds of foundations for wind turbines,” he said. McGean said the letter addresses a range of offshore endeavors. “One of the points I make in there is we oppose any industrial activity off our coast,” he said. The letter to BOEM Acting Director Cruickshank, which will also be forwarded to Ocean City’s state and federal delegations, notes the area economy is heavily reliant on fishing and beach tourism, with the latter supporting 27,000 jobs in Worcester County and providing $16 billion in economic impact for Maryland. “You’re putting a well-established economy at risk for a very short-term gain,” McGean said.

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PAGE 15

Ocean City Today

Seismic testing opposition

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Assateague Island National Seashore has been closed as a result of the government shutdown, though some workers still survey the park without pay.

Government shutdown impacts Assateague Island employees By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) The second longest federal government shutdown in United States history shows no sign of ending any time soon, and while it applies to smaller parts of the federal government, it still affects more 800,000 employees, including park rangers and other employees working at the Assateague Island National Seashore. Several facilities within the national park limits have been closed, including bathrooms and visitor centers. Trash collection has been halted as well as any required road maintenance. This does not mean the park itself is closed and left completely unpatrolled or observed, but those who are still working

at the park are doing so without pay. “There are still a couple personnel ‘patrolling’ the island,” Billy Weiland, communications manager for Assateague Coastal Trust, said. “I’m on the island just about every day and I’ve still seen a natural resource police vehicle as well as a [National Park Service] vehicle each time. “It sounds like most of those that work year-round on Assateague are simply out of work and not receiving paychecks,” he continued. “Especially for those that are working without pay, I’m wondering how long they’ll be willing to do that should this shutdown go longer. Though I have my doubts that it will go for months, as our POTUS has said if appropriate funding for a border wall is not agreed on, if it should See SHUTDOWN Page 16

By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) As more lawmakers on the East Coast show disapproval for seismic testing offshore, so do more than 1,000 realtors on the Eastern Shore. A letter sent to U.S. Rep. Andy Harris by the Coastal Association of Realtors called on the congressman to take a stronger stance against seismic testing. The Coastal Association of Realtors, headquartered in Berlin, serve Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester counties. The association strongly disagrees with the offshore testing, which could impact not only the environment, but also property values. “In 2017, our members sold over $984 million in real estate in Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester Counties,” Association President Bernie Flax said in the letter. “Of that amount, over $450 million was sold in Ocean City, which would suffer the hardest economic blow as a result of fish kills and oil spills. The lower Eastern Shore cannot afford to lose that economic activity.” Harris said he remains op-

posed to seismic testing. However, earlier this month he refused to sign a bipartisan letter opposing the activity, stating he would not speak out for other states. Flax strongly disapproved of this approach in her letter to the congressman. “Your constituents in District 1 don’t need you to speak for other states on this issue. They need you to speak for one state – Maryland – whose interests you are sworn to protect,” Flax said. Maryland Attorney General Brian E. Frosh leads a coalition of nine attorney generals in suing the National Marine Fisheries Service in order to prevent seismic testing off the Atlantic. Oceana, the South Carolina Coastal Conservation League, Center for Biological Diversity, Defenders of Wildlife, Natural Resources Defense Council, North Carolina Coastal Federation, One Hundred Miles, Sierra Club and Surfrider Foundation have also filed a suit against U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, the National Marine Fisheries Service and Assistant Administrator for Fisheries Chris Oliver.

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JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

Broadband moves forward By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) One small step for man, one giant leap in communications for Worcester County? After much debate, the Worcester County Commissioners on Tuesday approved a motion to collect bid requests for a broadband feasibility study. The county commissioners approved hiring a broadband consultant for $30,000 at a Nov. 7, 2018 meeting, and with that done, IT Manager Brian Jones asked the commissioners to proceed with getting bids for the study. Commissioner Jim Bunting opposed the proposal, instead suggesting investigating other broadband options and recommendations. “I’m not going to vote to approve it,” Bunting said. Bunting cited high costs as one of his main concerns with the initiative. “It’s going to cost the county a lot of money,” Bunting said. “We’re going to have to make a decision whether we’re going to spend that money.” Jones emphasized the need to get numbers via a study in order to secure a successful jumping off point for the county.

“We can come up with all kinds of ideas … but doesn’t necessarily mean we’re going to do it correctly,” Jones said. “That’s the whole reason for the feasibility study… before we can start to build it, we’ve got to understand what our needs are.” Commissioner Joshua Nordstrom also acknowledged the expense and asked Jones if the consultant would be present for the entire process. “I think it’s necessary, but if we’re going to have this expenditure, I want to makes sure we’re getting our money’s worth out of it, and I don’t want someone to come in and just drop some things on the table and just say here’s your options, look them over, we’ll see you later,” Nordstrom said. “I want someone who is there to answer questions.” Jones said gauging the county’s need is critical to the process. “Before we get started on anything, we really want to see what’s available to us,” Jones said. “Where we’re located on the Eastern shore … we have a lot of limitations.” But until the county gets an education and obtains figures for broadband, the outcome would be unclear, Jones said.

“We’re going to have issues,” Jones said. “We don’t know enough about it to know what our problems are going to be until we hit them.” But Jones said this initial fee is just a jumping off point, and the county could be “looking at starting at $5 million, just to start.” He clarified this step is needed because “we have to start somewhere.” Commissioner Bud Church said the investment is worth it. “It’s just a drop in the bucket to do it right the first time, and I speak in favor of the motion,” Church said. “It’s something that we need to do.” Church made the motion to approve the request, which was seconded by Commissioner Chip Bertino. The vote was 5-1 in favor of the bid requests, with Bunting opposed. Proposals will be opened at 1 p.m. on Feb. 11. Anyone with questions should contact Brian Jones at bjones@worcester. md.us, or send an inquiry in writing to the Worcester County Department of Information Technology, Attn: Brian Jones, at the aforementioned address. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic was absent from Tuesday’s meeting.

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Planning Commission recommends change By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) A proposed site for a residential community near Ocean Pines received a favorable recommendation for water and sewer reclassification by the Worcester County Planning Commission last Thursday. The proposed site is on two parcels of land spanning a vacant golf course, located from the northwest side of Beauchamp Road to northeast of the junction with Route 589, according to the proposal. The property was previously classified as S6/W-6 (no planned service) and was requested to change to S-1/W-1 (within two years). The joint applicants are River Run Developments Associates LLC., and NicholsNeff Properties LLC, according to the proposal. The proposed residential subdivision would consist of 90 single-family homes. The proposed development plans to have 90 equiv-

alent dwelling units of public sewer from the River Run Sanitary Area, and 90 EDU’s of public water from the Ocean Pines Sanitary Area, according to the proposal. The developer cited previously established sewer capacity from the November 2000 amendment for the Most Blessed Sacrament School on Route 589, according to the proposal. Zoning from the River Run and Ocean Pines planning areas were previously approved and zoned appropriately as an R-1 rural residential district, according to the proposal. “The project appears to be consistent with the comprehensive plan and existing zoning,” said Director of Environmental Programs Robert Mitchell. Planning commissioner Jay Knerr made the motion to issue a favorable recommendation for the water and sewer classification, which was seconded by Commission member Jay Barbierri.

Shutdown affects Wor. workers Continued from Page 15 go on that long, I foresee some changes in the future, positive or negative.” Park visitors have been picking up the slack for trash collection, Weiland said, but there have also been instances where guests are getting too comfortable near the wild animals without park services around. “Issues such as trash collecting in some of the parking lots and such are being taken care of by vigilant park goers playing a good citizen card,” Weiland said. “[However,] I will say that with the absence of a full force of staff on the island, I’ve noticed some folks

approaching horses too closely. “I’ve received several pictures from an acquaintance that show some people in cars calling the horses up to the window,” he continued. “The park service, both state and national, makes it very clear that approaching the horses too closely or feeding them is prohibited. It protects the horses and it protects the visitors. But without the normal kind of enforcement, incidents are occurring.” Since the shutdown has taken affect during the offseason, damaging or negative affects to the park itself have not shown up … at least not yet.

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Ocean City Today

WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS BRIEFS By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) The Worcester County Commissioners approved several items during a meeting Tuesday in Snow Hill:

Amended CIP The Commissioners voted unanimously to approve an amended capital improvement plan for the fiscal years 2020-2024. The revised plan includes a $1 million request in additional funding for the Showell Elementary Replacement School project, which would provide additional classrooms to accommodate the increasing number of preKindergarten students, according to the proposal. The revised planning document also accounts for a running track and other athletic improvements for Stephen Decatur High School’s turf field project. No members of the public participated in a public hearing related to the plan. Commissioner Chip Bertino moved to approve the amended plan, Resolution 19-1, which was seconded by Commissioner Jim Bunting.

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pointments for three members of the Youth Council of Worcester County. Pocomoke High School sophomores Abby Boyce and Tamari Cutler, as well as Stephen Decatur High School sophomore Aaron Cohen, will each serve for two years, according to the proposal. Bertino moved to appoint the students. Commissioner Bud Church seconded the motion. Bertino also moved to approve reappointments for Snow High School junior Chloe Goddard and Pocomoke High School junior Mccammon Mottley (two years each) and Worcester Preparatory School senior Liam Hammond (one year). Commissioner Joshua Nordstrom provided a second.

Building sale The Worcester County Liquor Control Warehouse is one step closer to being sold after the county commissioners unanimously approved sending the property out to bid. The county commissioners previously approved selling the building in its current condition, but Assistant Chief Administrative Office Kelly Shannahan recommended looking into an asking price to be presented at the next meeting. The property’s “as is” fair market value was assessed at $990,000, according to an appraisal by Lefort Appraisal & Consulting, Inc. The county had several options in proceeding with the selling process: advertising sealed bids, using a real estate agent or going through an auctioneer. Shannahan then consulted Commissioner and realtor Bud Church’s expertise, who recommending the bid option. “My fellow realtors might not be happy with me,” Church said. Church moved to put a building request out to bid with the asking price of $990,000. Commissioner Ted Elder seconded the motion.

Sectional rezoning The Worcester County Commissioners approved a resolution for sectional rezoning of several properties on Racetrack Road. The properties would be changed from estate to commercial classifications. There was a public hearing held Dec. 18 that brought much discussion from the county commissioners, attorneys and members of the public. Bunting moved to approve Resolution 19-2 in the sectional rezoning, which was seconded by Church. Bertino opposed the motion and had previously dissented during the Dec. 18 meeting. The vote was 5-1.

New vehicle The Worcester County Commissioners unanimously approved a request to allow the sheriff’s office to purchase a new patrol vehicle. A deputy in a 2012 Tahoe patrol vehicle was involved in a crash on Nov. 26, according to a request memo by Sheriff Matt Crisafulli. The investigation found the officer was not at fault, but the vehicle was totaled, according to the other driver’s insurance. Crisafulli said parts from the old patrol vehicle, such as lights or the siren speaker, that were in good condition would be repurposed in the new vehicle, according to the memo. Col. Doug Dods said he’d use the money in his current budget from under-budget bids, as well as the insurance money, but said he may need an additional $9,171 for the purchase in order to stay in budget. He said the incident was unforeseen and he couldn’t account for it. “There’s no way to know there’s going to be an accident,” Bertino said. Nordstrom moved to approve the request and Bertino seconded the request. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic was absent from Tuesday’s meeting and did not participate in voting.

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Land Preservation & Parks plan gets recommendation By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) The Worcester County Planning Commission agreed to back the revised Land Preservation and Parks plan for the county last Thursday, clearing it for final consideration by the county commissioners and the state. The state-mandated plan is designed to find ways to improve and preserve parks, recreation and open spaces in in the county, as every county must do every six years to remain eligible for grants from Maryland Program Open Space. The previous plan was signed last February, but County Planner Katherine Munson said minor changes needed to be made to keep the county eligible for the same level of state funding it received the year before. “The state brought to our attention that due to some of the content of our plan, the county would receive a decrease in state matching funds,” Munson said. “Counties with a deficit in recreational land are penalized with a significantly reduced Program Open State match.” Munson said some of the changes included proximity analysis of fields at public and private schools, multipurpose fields, playing fields, the Half Mile Service Area, and agreements between several schools and the county’s Department of Recreation and Parks. Commission member Jerry Barbierri asked why Pocomoke was not included in the revised plan. When another member asked him if he felt left out, Barbierri responded, “You know we always do in the south.” Munson clarified Pocomoke was not included in the revised plan because no changes were made to plans for that part of the county. Because the plan’s presentation was a public hearing, members of the audience could offer testimony. Kathy Phillips, executive director and Assateague coastkeeper of the Assateague Coastal Trust, told commission members the plan should include environmentally friendly land options such as trails rather than just playing fields, “which require[s] more impervious surfaces, more infrastructure and more use of pesticides and fertilizers.” In a memorandum, Phillips said the recreation plan should embrace Worcester County’s rural nature and its strengths as a recreational area. “We are a rural county with an abundance of natural land and water areas that provide the basis for most of our recreational activities – watersports, boating, fishing, crabbing, hiking, and biking,” she said. Commission member Marlene Ott made a motion to issue the favorable recommendation, which was seconded by Commission member Betty Smith.


JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

OCPD warns of phone scam By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) A scam to con residents out of potentially thousands of dollars has made its way to Ocean City, with this one involving an IRS impersonator. The Ocean City Police Department is advising residents that a caller, impersonating an IRS worker, often demands immediate payment for unpaid taxes. In some instances, police said the caller would threaten an arrest if the victim did not comply. Area residents said the imposter would often have the victim’s personal information, use false IRS badge numbers or titles, or change the caller identification to show the IRS calling the victim. The IRS has provided tips to help residents identify suspicious calls, especially those that demand immediate payment, won’t giving the victim an opportunity to question or appeal, requires a specific payment method such as a debit or gift card, asks for credit card information, or threatens to call the police or law enforcement to arrest the victim for not paying. The IRS mails a bill to anyone with outstanding taxes and does not call people to demand immedi-

ate payment, police said. Lindsay Richard, public information for the Ocean City Police Department, said the department receives calls about various scams year-round, but got more calls during December, as it coincides with the holiday season. “It’s really easy to fall for this stuff, so it’s always good for us to put out reminders of what to look out for,” she said. Richard went on to say she’s often heard people question how someone could become a victim of a scam, but she emphasized that anyone could be susceptible. “You’ve heard stories of people being out thousands of dollars and people you’d never really expect,” she said. “People who are highly educated can still fall for this stuff and be out thousands of dollars of money. “One thing I say is always trust your intuition when you get these scam call[s],” Richard said. “If it doesn’t seem right, it’s probably not right.” For more information, about tax scams and consumer alerts agency’s tax scams and consumer alerts, visit the agency’s website at https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/t ax-scams-consumer-alerts.

No action, but further talks for Riddle Farm Service Area Commissioner Nordstrom compares situation to issue of paying for faulty car part By Rachel Ravina Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) It’s back to the drawing board for officials responsible for the Riddle Farm sanitary service area because of the continuing failure of a portion of its waste treatment facility. The county commissioners eventually voted for starting a dialogue to see if the manufacturer of a potentially faulty part would take responsibility for the problem. At issue initially was the inability of the treatment center to process solid waste effectively. The facility, which is located near the GlenRiddle development, has incurred several expenses as a result, and Deputy Director of Public Works John Ross told the commissioners possible fixes could cost more than $100,000. Commissioner Chip Bertino asked if that figure was an estimate, which Ross said it was. “My first priority was to get the plant back up and running,” Ross said. Ross said there were three issues

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surrounding the service area over the past few months: the flow equalization tank, screening and membranes. He added the upper tank is unusable, which put the lower portion of the tank at a disadvantage because the available storage space was significantly reduced. However, he noted fixing the tank was addressed during a December commissioners meeting. As for the screening issue, the current screen allows material to be reduced to 3 millimeters, but new recommendations dictate the screening should reduce materials to 1-millimeter. Ross said the Landings and Mystic Harbour plants have adapted the 1-millimeter screens as standard. Ross said the final issue surrounding the membranes themselves was that they were deemed defective as they were easily clogged. Ross added the department was able to get through the summer season, and had ample space to cover the area during the winter months, but crews had to take the waste to other plants. New membranes were installed under warranty at no cost the week prior to Christmas. Ross said problems surrounding the membranes were then corrected. “The situation is very much under control right now,” Ross said. Commissioner Joshua Nordstrom asked Ross if faulty parts caused the issues? If so, he said with such an expense, the manufacturer should bear some of the expense. Ross was cautious in his answer citing possible legal implications. Nordstrom used his experience working in the automotive industry to illustrate his point, which questioned the reasoning for the hefty cost. “If we had a faulty part from GM or Toyota, and we went to one of our customers and said we’ll replace the part but you’ve got to pay us to do the work, we would have some unhappy customers,” Nordstrom said. “Being that we’re the customers here, that makes me very unhappy if we’re taking six figures worth of taxpayer money and spending it on something that was caused through no fault of the county.” Bertino made a motion to have a discussion about the manufacturer’s potential liability and responsibility, which was seconded by Nordstrom. Commissioner Joseph Mitrecic was absent from Tuesday’s meeting.


JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

Business

Jan. 11, 2019

Page 22

Berlin Restaurant Week specials run through this Sun. By Josh Davis Associate Editor (Jan. 11, 2019) Fifteen local restaurants are taking part in the 2019 Berlin Restaurant Week, which began on Monday and will continue through Sunday. The event began in 2016 to encourage patrons to try new eateries and to dine during the offseason, as restaurants offer special menus and discounts in an attempt to attract new customers. The Town of Berlin hosts the event and Cam Bunting and Bunting Realty. sponsor Berlin Restaurant Week. “I wanted to do something to help the community and nobody was doing a restaurant week, so I thought I would take my time and organize it, and here we are,” Bunting said. Patrons who dine in three or more restaurants may also be entered into a drawing to win $100 and a basket of gift cards to participating restaurants. Entry cards are available at each restaurant and can be stamped with each visit, and then returned to the Berlin Welcome Center on 14 South Main Street. Restaurant owners say the event has been successful, Bunting said. “They enjoy doing it and you can get some good meals at good prices,” she said. “People can sample all the different restaurants in town, and I look forward to it as well, and to seeing what all the restaurants are doing.” Economic and Community Development Director Ivy Wells has been posting special menu updates on a “Berlin Restaurant Week” Facebook page. Visit the site at www.facebook.com/events/31430677 9175122. Early response from the public has been strong, Wells said. “I’m really excited about the response we’ve gotten and Restaurant Week hasn’t even started yet,” Wells said last Wednesday. “People are already making plans to come to Berlin for it.” Bunting said the desired takeaway is simple: a full belly for anyone who partakes. “Just come to Berlin,” she said. “It’s a quiet time of the year, and you can bring some friends and have some good food and good fellowship.” Participating restaurants and specials as of press time include: Fins Ale House and Raw Bar (119 North Main Street): Thursday: Crab cake night. $7 crab

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Micalene Dorcak, left, and Sarah McCree toast the start of Berlin Restaurant Week at the Burley Café on Jefferson Street. More than a dozen downtown restaurants are offering specials through Sunday, including bottomless mimosas and choice of three small plates for $30 at the Burley Café.

cake sliders, $10 crab cake sandwich with one side, $18 crab cake entree with two sides from 4-8:30 p.m. Friday: All day happy hour from 11 a.m. until 6 p.m. Chef’s featured dinner specials from 4-9:30 p.m. * Free dessert with purchase of any entree from 4 p.m. until close all week The Globe (12 Broad Street): The Globe will launch a new menu on Jan. 7. Restaurant Week specials feature $10 “Sweater Weather Specials,” including $1 off half bottles of wine and growler specials. On What Grounds (103 North Main Street) Specials include a $6 made-toorder breakfast sandwich and small coffee, or upgrade to any other drink and get $1 off the additional price. Burley Café (17 Jefferson Street): Choose any three small plates and drink bottomless mimosas for $30. There is a two-hour time limit and no repeat items or sharing is permitted. Small plates include half house waffle, one breakfast taco, half veggie bake, half Burley bake, half French toast, half fruit bowl, and sausage gravy on one sweet potato biscuit. Baked Dessert Café (4 Bay Street): $6.99 lunch specials include glutenfree crabby mac and cheese with a side salad; Monte Cristo croissant (turkey, brie, raspberry preserve) with side salad; beef Bourguignon with savory scone; and a vegan-friendly veggie wrap on whole-wheat tortilla. The $4.99 “sweet special” includes a sample plate of Baked Dessert’s signature cupcake bread pudding, croclair and peach dumpling. DiFebo’s Restaurant (104 North Main Street):

JOSH DAVIS/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Berlin Restaurant Week specials at Baked Dessert Café at 4 Bay Street include a dessert sample plate with cupcake bread pudding, croclair and peach dumpling. More than a dozen restaurants are participating in Restaurant Week specials, through Sunday.

Specials include two entrees: carved flat-iron stake served with crab mac and cheese with peas and pancetta, $18; or house-made pappardelle pasta Bolognaise served with seasoned ricotta and melted mozzarella cheese, $18. Additionally, the restaurant is offering half-price pizzas and $6 house wines, sangria and dessert specials. Crush N Crab (525 South Main Street): $5 breakfast items, from 7-11 a.m., include two pancakes and two eggs; two egg and cheese bagel sandwiches or one egg and meat sandwich; cheese omelet with toast; and biscuits and gravy with potatoes and one egg. $10 lunch items, from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., include soup and sandwich (grilled cheese quarter-pound hot dog); cup of coup with BLT or ham and cheese; side salad and sandwich (BLT, grilled chicken, fried flounder, hamburger or ham and cheese); and soup and side salad. Soups that apply are cream of crab, Maryland crab, chicken See DOWNTOWN Page 23

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) If a less than perfect credit score has been holding you back from making a home purchase, rest assured, there are many things you can do to turn your credit score around. But the first step is understanding what goes into a credit score. A FICO (Fair Isaac Corporation) score is the most common type of credit score used. Lenders use FICO scores to determine the amount of risk that comes along with lending any given borrower money because they use a consolidated view of how consumers repay credit obligations, including accounts held by other lenders, and the data is built using consumer bureau data from millions of consumers. FICO scores are updated regularly to reflect changes in consumer behavior and lending practices. FICO scores range from 350850—with the the breakdown of the borrowing public as follows: Exceptional 800-850 = 20 percent Very Good 740-799 = 25 percent Good 670-739 = 21 percent Fair 580-669 = 18 percent Very Poor 300-579 = 16 percent In order to get the best mortgage rates, you usually have to show a FICO score of 740 or higher. That doesn’t mean you won’t get approved for a mortgage if you have less than a 740 score, it just means you will most likely pay a slightly higher interest rate on the loan. The type of financing you are applying for also affects what data the lender will pull. For example, when applying for a home loan, the lender will most likely pull all three credit bureau scores—Equifax, Experian and TransUnion, and will probably use the middle score of all three. However, if you are applying for a car loan, the lender may only pull one credit score. — Lauren Bunting is a licensed Associate Broker with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.


JANUARY 11, 2019

PAGE 23

Ocean City Today

Downtown specials during Berlin’s Restaurant Week Continued from Page 22 and dumplings, chili or soup of the day. $20 build-your-own seafood platter features the choice of any two items: crab cake (broiled or fried); soft shell crab (broiled or fried); half-pound steamed shrimp; eight large fried shrimp; flounder (broiled or fried); sixto-eight fried oysters; fried clam strips; one pound of steamed mussels; or grilled tuna. Dinner includes coffee, tea, soda or lemonade; a choice of two sides; homemade dessert or a scoop of any ice cream. Burn Wood Fired Pizza (10019 Old Ocean City Blvd): Three-course meals for $20 per person feature a caprese salad, eggplant rollantini appetizer and maincourse choice of fettuccine Bolognese or chicken pesto. Blacksmith (104 Pitts Street): Three-course meals are $30. First-course options include: authentic Caesar salad; blue cheese salad; roasted butternut squash bisque; shrimp and grits; Nashville chicken; and stacked crispy eggplant. Second-course choices include: wild red snapper; steak frites; shrimp Thai curry; hand-cut pappardelle pasta; shrimp risotto; and crispy duck breast. Third-course options are: flourless

chocolate torte; Key lime pie; bundt cake of the day; and fried banana cheesecake. Main Street Deli (10 South Main Street): Specials include spaghetti and meatballs, $4.50, and a meatball sub for $6.50. Gilbert’s Provisions (116 North Main Street): Specials are two tacos and a cup of soup for $10. Rayne’s Reef Soda Fountain & Grill (10 North Main Street): Order a burger and fries, and get a free ice cream for dessert. The Atlantic Hotel (2 North Main Street): The lunch special is fish and chips with coleslaw and tartar sauce for $10. For dinner, the Atlantic Hotel Bistro Trio special is $33 and the special starts at 5 p.m. The meal includes a garden salad, a main course consisting of a 1/2 rack of New Zealand lamb, sliced roasted tenderloin of beef, and a grilled skewer of shrimp and scallops. The dessert course is a white chocolate cream brûlée and berries. The Burley Inn Tavern (16 Pitts Street): Receive 10 percent off when mentioning Berlin Restaurant Week.

BUSINESS BRIEFS

Open house Atlantic General Hospital and Health System has announced that an open house and ribbon cutting ceremony will be held Wednesday, Jan. 16 to celebrate the opening of Atlantic General Orthopedic Surgery, the practice of orthopedic surgeon Sean Hooker, MD. Hooker joined Atlantic General Health System in July to perform joint replacement procedures at Atlantic General Hospital’s Center for Joint Surgery as well as provide general Sean Hooker orthopedic and sports medicine services in the community. He specializes in shoulder, hip and knee replacements, rotator cuff repairs and sports medicine procedures. The event will take place from 4-6 p.m. with a ribbon cutting at 4:30 p.m. The office is located at 314 Franklin Avenue, Suite 201 in Berlin. Atlantic General Hospital has been providing quality health care to the residents of Worcester, Wicomico and Somerset counties in Maryland and Sussex County, Delaware, since May 1993. For more information about Atlantic General Hospital, visit www.atlanticgeneral.org.

Pancos welcomed Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices

PenFed Realty announced that award-winning Realtor Kathy Panco has affiliated with the company. Joining her in the Ocean City office is fellow real estate professional and daughter-in-law, Lola Panco. Since the start of her real estate career in 1981, Kathy Panco has been surpassing sales records and has consistently placed at the top of the rankings year after year. Kathy Panco Her success and reputation have earned her numerous industry accolades, including the Realtor of the Year Award, Distinguished Sales Associate Award and Multi-Million Dollar Award. Licensed in Maryland and Delaware, Panco’s resume includes a long list of real estate certifications such as the Certified Residential Specialist (CRS) and Recreation Lola Panco and Resort Specialist (RRS). She also has a long track record of giving back to the industry through her service on the board of directors of the Coastal Association of Realtors, and as president of the Coastal Association of Realtors 1999. Panco is also a dedicated community volunteer, where her service has garnered awards from the town of Ocean Continued on Page 24

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PAGE 24

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2019

BUSINESS BRIEFS Continued from Page 23 City, including a “Key to Ocean City� from the mayor’s office and a commendation from the county commissioners. She has served as a director for the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce and president in 2006. She also received the Realtor Community Service award in 1997 and the Ocean City Citizen of the Year award in 2009. Panco was born and raised in Riviera Beach, Maryland, and graduated with a bachelor’s and master’s degrees from Towson University. She has received statewide and national accolades as a physical education teacher, including Outstanding Physical Education Teacher of the Year in Harford County, Maryland. Lola Panco is a native of Minsk, Belarus, and is a trained interior designer. A graduate of the Belarus Academy of Arts, she has been selling real estate for six years and has drawn attention for her superb design and photography skills. She is also pursuing her bachelor’s degree from Salisbury University and is a 4.0 student. For more information, visit www.kathypanco.com.

New staff Peninsula Home Care, a locally owned and operated home health care agency providing award-winning skilled care to patients on the Lower Shore since 1985, announces the addition of three new staff members. Peninsula Home Care welcomes two

new hospital liaisons, Denise Fields to the Maryland team and Tisha Donovan to Delaware. Peninsula Home Care at Nanticoke also welcomes Jenna Hare as the newest community account manager to the Delaware team. Fields joined Peninsula Home Care in 2018 with a diverse healthcare background. She most recently served as a case manager at a local hospital where she handled care Denise Fields coordination and transitions of care for all patients. For 11 years she worked as a case transition nurse and developed strong relationships with hospital and health system providers, hospitalists and physicians. As a Peninsula Home Care hospital liaison she is responsible for managing referrals from hospitals, collaborating with care coordinators and educating patients on requirements for home care. She works closely with the patient and their family to help them better understand the hospital to home process, answer questions and work with the plan of care to help patients achieve their outcomes. In 1973, Fields graduated from North Technical Education Center in Riviera Beach, Florida, with a degree in practical nursing. In 1976 she graduated with an Associate of Science Degree in Nursing from Palm Beach Junior College in Lake

Worth, Florida. She graduated from Palm Beach Atlantic College in West Palm Beach, Florida with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 1983. Donovan, LPN, started working for Peninsula Home Care in October 2018 after working as a nurse for 11 years. She has 23 years of experience in the medical field with Tisha Donovan roles as a medical assistant, medical office manager and sales. In her role as hospital liaison, Donovan serves as the connector between Peninsula Home Care at Nanticoke, the hospitals and patients. She works closely with patients, family members and caregivers through the hospital to home navigation process. She offers support through her collaboration with care coordinators and clinical managers to customize and implement a plan of care that best fits the needs and goals of each individual patient. She graduated from Delaware Technical Community College with degrees for medical assistance and licensed practical nursing. Hare joined the Peninsula Home Care at Nanticoke team in August 2018 as a community account manager. She collaborates with individuals, organizations and businesses to establish partnerships to better serve the community’s healthcare needs.

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Hare is the face of Peninsula Home Care at Nanticoke at community events and has launched a schedule to take the OWLs Club on the road to different locations promoting health related topics, conditions and available resources each month. Her work experience includes time in pediatrics as a certified medical assistant working with both the clinical and clerical teams to help patients and build trust with families to betJenna Hare ter serve their needs. She has also been a certified personal trainer for three years and enjoys helping others reach their personal health goals. Hare graduated from the Certified Medical Assistant program at Harris School of Business in Dover Delaware. She received her certified personal training credentials from American Fitness Professionals & Associates. She has enrolled to study business management at Wilmington University in 2019. The agency has served more than 39,000 patients in Wicomico, Worcester and Somerset counties in Maryland and Sussex and Kent counties in Delaware. In 2017, PHC and PHCN were designated as Preferred Home Care Provider by Peninsula Regional Medical Center and Nanticoke Health Services. For more information, visit www.peninsulahomecare.com.


Lifestyle

Ocean City Today Arts, Calendar, Crossword, Dining, Entertaiment, Events, Features, Music

Jan. 11, 2019

Page 25

PHOTOS COURTESY RED DOORS COMMUNITY CENTER

(Left) The Red Doors Community Center puts on a dance cabaret every December and April. (Right) Children learn how to sew, one of many activities offered at the Red Doors Community Center, located at 10959 Worcester Highway, Berlin.

Red Doors Community Ctr. offers plethora of activities By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) Since the middle ages, a red door has signified sanctuary and openness. With this in mind, the Red Doors Community Center, now located at 10959 Worcester Highway in Berlin, welcomes all to participate in its activities, programs and learning opportunities. The Red Doors Community Center, which opened in 2013, was founded in partnership with St. Paul’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church on Third Street in Ocean City to reestablish connections with the community through various workshops and programs. “For so many years, even when I was a kid, whatever church you belonged to was the center of your community and everything kind of revolved around that,” Director Joy Connor said. “Churches are now more like destination places. They’re not that part of the community anymore. “So, by creating this community center here, we’re hoping to bring the community as a whole back together and fill that gap that was left when people started spreading out,” she continued. The community center provides a variety of activities and programs for visitors of all ages, ranging from 6 months old to adults. These classes are now offered year-round. Activities include dance classes;

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) lectures; and programs for children who are homeschooled. “One of our biggest programs that seems to be expanding are home school classes that we’ve started having during the day,” Connor said. “We have a lot of open time because there’s only so many classes that we can offer for 2- and 3-year-olds but it seems as though the home-schooling trend is getting larger and larger.” Instructors are paid for their time and teach an assortment of activities such as music, dance, cooking, robotics, computer science, history, math, languages, sewing, photography, surfing and even fencing. “There’s quite a few public school teachers that do this on the side that used to be dancers and wanted to get back into teaching a class or two,” Connor said. “They come from a wide variety of different places and we pay them as independent contractors so they get a percentage of the class fees that we charge for the classes to pay for the instructors.” Homeschooling and participating in the many classes and programs offered by the community center have been a huge asset for many students and parents, Connor said. “When mothers are stay-at-home See PROGRAMS Page 26

PHOTOS COURTESY RED DOORS COMMUNITY CENTER

Participants take a field trip to the Wallops Educator Resource Center in Virginia.

PHOTOS COURTESY RED DOORS COMMUNITY CENTER

Children become young scientists and study oyster shells, as part of the Coastal Kids program.


PAGE 26

Ocean City Today

Children can explore plankton, Sat. Activity, part of Coast Kids program, will take place at Assateague State Park By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) Young scientists and environmentalists in the making can visit the Assateague Environmental Education Center from 1:30-3:30 pm. on Saturday, for a one-day class exploring plankton. Children will be able to closely examine plankton, a diverse collection of organisms that live in large bodies of water, which are a crucial source of food to many aquatic organisms, such as fish and whales. “By showing our area youth the science behind the unique area we live in, they begin to develop a respect and strong appreciation for our coastal environment,” Billy Weiland, communications manager for Assateague Coastal Trust, said. The children will catch plankton with specialized nets from the Assateague State Park boat ramp and

use microscopes to look at the minuscule animals and plants living in the bay water. “The microscopes are nothing like what many of us were used to using in school,” Weiland said. “[They] have a digital display and onboard camera that really just makes the whole process fun and educational for the kids.” The activity is part of the Coast Kids program, which was founded in 2003. Coast Kids members are invited to come to monthly events to explore the wonders of local flora, fauna and geography. During the hands-on events, Coast Kids participate activities from canoeing to identifying frog calls. Most of the year-round events are outdoors with two or three indoor activities in the winter. The events are on average about two hours long and designed for families with children age 3-13. The program has completed more than 180 monthly events, with 15-20 children attending each activity. Coast Kids Director Verena Chase will supervise the activity.

oceancitytoday.com Will help baysideoc.com you find a

“It a great opportunity to explore new places across Delmarva, do fun outdoor activities with the whole family and learn about our natural resources in a fun, hands-on way,” Chase said. This will be the first plankton class Coast Kids has conducted. “Last year, we purchased student microscopes, which are a great tool to study plankton,” Chase said. The event is free for members of the Assateague Coastal Trust. Nonmembers admission will cost $3. A yearlong Coast Kids membership costs $35 for the first child and $20 for each additional sibling, and includes 12 free events, a Coast Kids T-shirt designed by Marc Emond, and a bird call. Participants are advised to wear warm clothes, as the plankton collection will take approximately 30 minutes outside. In the event of inclement weather, plankton samples will be provided. For more information or to register, call the Assateague Coastal Trust office at 410-629-1538 or visit www.actforbays.org/coastkids.

e n i l n o s s e n i s u Local B

JANUARY 11, 2019

Programs, classes and activities for youth and adults Continued from Page 25 moms and they have children from 6 months to 4 years old and they don’t necessarily know a lot of other people in the community, they sign up for our music and movement class for ages 6 months to 4 years,” Connor said. “The moms are looking for activities for their kids and then, lo and behold, there’s other moms that are looking for the same thing, and then they’re able to form this community and we’ve watched it grow from these kids starting ballet at 2 years old and now they’re 8 or 9 years old.” Due to parking difficulties, the organization relocated from St. Paul’s to its current location last year. “I think that just providing the opportunity to have that kind of interaction for everyone and a place where the kids feel comfortable and the parents feel comfortable is just priceless,” Connor said. Classes and activities range in cost from $30-54 and are available to everyone. Classes are offered Monday through Friday. For more information or to view a class schedule, visit www.reddoors.org or the Red Doors Community Center Facebook page.


JANUARY 11, 2019

Ashley Weaver

Brittney Acita

EJ Foxx

Julie Wagner

Max Hulme

Peter Scioli

PAGE 27

Ocean City Today

Nicole Goheen

Stevie Jay

King and queen candidates host fundraising events By Morgan Pilz Staff Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) There are only a few more weeks left for members of the Believe in Tomorrow Prom Court to raise money for the children’s charity before Prom Night on Saturday, Feb. 2. Eight candidates are vying for the Believe in Tomorrow Prom King and Queen titles. The man and woman who raise the most money for the organization from now until the beginning of February will be declared the winners. “The fundraising is progressing. The ladies are doing fantastic. It is still anybody’s game to win,” Wayne Littleton, coordinator for the Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Respite Housing Program, said. “I really expect the race to go into the evening of the event, that is how close it is at this point. The boys are picking it up after a slow start. There are quite a few exciting events happening in the month of January.” Competing for Prom King are: DJ Stevie Jay, Touch of Italy General Manager Peter Scioli and Atlantic Shores Realtor Maxwell Hulme. Running for Prom Queen are: Salisbury University student Nicole Goheen, Photographer Julie Wagner, Radio announcer and DJ EJ Foxx, Pickles Pub owner Brittney Acita and Pasadena resident Ashley Weaver. The competition raised an all-time high of $100,000 during the 2018 campaign. The 2018 Prom King was Frankie

Believe in Tomorrow Prom Court events: • Bingo Nights: – Hosted by Stevie Jay Every Monday at Tailchasers on 123rd Street, Ocean City, 6:30-8:30 p.m. (443-664-7075) Every Wednesday at Bethany Blues, Bethany Beach, 7:30-9 p.m. (302-537-1500) Every Thursday at Whiskers Bar and Grille, Ocean Pines, 6:30-8:30 p.m. (410-208-3922) For information, call the respective restaurants. • Saturday, Jan. 12 – 80’s Nite Karaoke and Dance Party at Whiskers Bar and Grill in Ocean Pines from 3-6 p.m. Hosted by Stevie Jay and EJ Foxx. Photo booth, raffles, silent auction, drink specials and a chance to win an autographed Keith Urban guitar. For more information, call Whiskers Bar and Grille, 410-208-3922. • Friday, Jan. 18 – Tattoos and Martinis at Ocean 13 on 13th Street. Hosted by Julie Wagner. For $50, enjoy food and drinks (select beer included in ticket price, until kegs are kicked), entertainment by DJ Wax. Local tattoo artists are also donating chances to win free tattoo sessions. Purchase ticket from Julie Wagner or Jeremy Brink, for a chance to win a three-hour tattoo session. Visit https://believeintomorrow.donorpages.com/PromNight2019/JulieW agner/.  • Saturday, Jan. 26 – Sweetheart ball at Southern Belle Barn in Delmar. Hosted by Julie Wagner. Since and enjoy a spaghetti dinner donated by Delmar Pizza and Olive Garden. Adults cost $20, children $10. For more information, call Southern Belle Barn at 410-896-5408. • Saturday, Jan. 26 – “Putting for a Cause,” Old Pro Golf on 136th Street at 5 p.m. Hosted by Ashley Weaver and Nichole Goheen. Come in a four-person team. Post-play party at Dry Dock 28 directly afterwards. The cost is $100 per foursome. For more information, call Old Pro Golf on 136th Street at 443-664-6860. • Wednesday, Jan. 30 – “Putting for a Cause,” Old Pro Golf on 68th Street at 6 p.m. Hosted by Brittany Acita. Play in a four-person team. Cost is $100. Live music from Sean Looms. Contact Acita at Pickles Pub on Facebook to register. • Thursday, Jan. 31 – Music and Art Fest at The Globe in Berlin from 6-10 p.m. Hosted by Max Hulme. Four local bands – Brian Foley, K², The Bilenki Duo, and an after party with The Swell Fellas. There will also be games, raffles and donated art for sale by local artists. Admission is $20. For more information, call the Globe at 410-641-0784. Smith, who raised $24,000. The Prom Queen title went to Jessica Jersey, who collected $16,000. “I know I repeat myself all the time, but I am amazed how committed the See WINNERS Page 28

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PAGE 28

Ocean City Today

Winners announced at prom, Feb. 2 Continued from Page 27 prom court members become,” Littleton said. “They are trying extremely hard to raise money for Believe in Tomorrow. Running on the Prom Court is like having a part-time job if you want to do well. Plus, they are just nice people that you enjoy being around.” The court members have held several events over the past four months to try and raise money. This is the last month they have to garner as much money as they can for Believe in Tomorrow. Hulme, who lives in Bishopville and is a graduate of Stephen Decatur High School, is the latest member to join the court, entering the competition in December. “I was referred to join the Believe in Tomorrow Prom Court by a family friend and took the opportunity to help children in need,” Hulme said. “I’m late

to join the running, but for me it’s just about raising as much money as I can to help change a child’s life.” The Prom King and Queen winners will receive personalized gift baskets, including gift cards and various donated gifts from local businesses. The Prom Queen also typically receives a bouquet of roses. The final results will be announced at Seacrets on 49th Street, Saturday, Feb. 2. Doors will open for the event at 7 p.m., and the announcement will be made at 9 p.m. The theme is 70s nights, with a costume contest, live music by Full Circle, Joe Smooth and Remy, a silent auction and mystery prize boxes. Sweet Disposition will provide desserts and Starbucks on 123rd Street will sponsor a coffee bar. Tickets for the event are available for purchase. Tickets purchased in advance

cost $35, or $40 at the door. To order, call 410-723-2842. Believe in Tomorrow Children’s Foundation provides hospital and respite housing services to critically ill children and their families. Since 1982, Believe in Tomorrow has provided over 900,000 individual overnight accommodations, from every state in the U.S. and more than 82 countries worldwide. The Believe in Tomorrow facility on 66th Street in Ocean City is open yearround to provide a free getaway to the beach for critically ill children and their families whenever they may need to escape the stresses of their child’s illness. Families can also vacation at the Believe in Tomorrow House in Fenwick Island and House by the Bay on 28th Street. Learn more about Believe in Tomorrow at http://believeintomorrow.org or call Littleton at 443-978-0680.

Art Center open house, Sunday Christmas tree free collection (Jan. 11, 2019) The Art League of Ocean City starts 2019 with an invitation to the public and anyone interested in art to attend a free open house at the Ocean City Center for the Arts on Sunday, Jan. 13, from noon to 3 p.m. “You may have lived here all your life, and never set foot into our awesome building on 94th Street,” Rina Thaler, executive director of the Art League, said. “You’ll enjoy refreshments, experience hands-on art projects with our resident artists who will amaze you with their talent, visit our gift shop where everything is handmade and local, and view the art shows that are currently on display in our galleries. And it’s all free for everyone, so bring the family.” Arts Center staff will be on hand to talk about upcoming events, including the March Ocean City Film Festival, volunteer opportunities, art classes and workshops

for all levels of experience, and exhibition opportunities for working artists. In addition, Art League docent Cassie Wait will lead gallery tours. The Arts Center’s resident artists will be in their studios doing demonstrations and hands-on interactive art projects. The artists welcoming guests include Pete Gibson, glass; Tinsel Hughes, sculpture and oil painting; Gerilyn Gaskill, watercolors; David Simpson, drawing; Joe Skucanec, photography; Nancy Barnas, pottery; and Debbi Dean-Colley, children’s activities. The Ocean City Center for the Arts at 502 94th Street is the home of the Art League of Ocean City, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting artistic expression and appreciation for the creative arts in the community. More information is available at 410524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org.

(Jan. 11, 2019) The Solid Waste Division of Worcester County will host its annual collection of Christmas trees through Jan. 15. Area residents can drop off Christmas trees at the Central Landfill in Newark and the Berlin, Pocomoke and Snow Hill Homeowners Convenience Centers at no cost. Businesses and organizations that sold trees will not be permitted to drop off trees at the convenience centers, but may take them to the Central Landfill where applicable tipping fees will be assessed. The trees will be ground into mulch for use at the Central Landfill. For more info, contact Recycling Coordinator Mike McClung at 410-6323177.

January 2019

MARK Y CALEND OUR NEXT W AR FOR EEKEND !

JANUARY 11, 2019

HOROSCOPE ARIES – Mar 21/Apr 20 Look forward to solid and passionate developments in the days to come, Aries. If you’re seeking love, then sparks may soon fly. Be on the lookout.

TAURUS – Apr 21/May 21 Taurus, after some recent turbulence, rest easy knowing that calmer waters are ahead. Some tranquility and stability is just what the doctor ordered.

GEMINI – May 22/Jun 21 Gemini, expect some big changes in your love life in the weeks to come. Count your blessings because you deserve all the good news that’s coming your way.

CANCER – Jun 22/Jul 22 Surprises are in store for Cancers who are willing to take some risks. If you resign from your job, you just may find a dream position shortly after — things can be that dramatic.

LEO – Jul 23/Aug 23 Some cosmic goodness is in store for you, Leo. Be excited about your prospects. This year can start out on the right foot, especially as it pertains to domestic matters.

VIRGO – Aug 24/Sept 22 Virgo, things in your domestic sector are bound to settle down in a few days. If you planned improvements at home, you’ll sail through those in no time with some help from friends.

LIBRA – Sept 23/Oct 23 Libra, some pivotal changes may come into your life shortly. You may find out your family is increasing or learn that a career change is in the works. Start counting good fortune.

SCORPIO – Oct 24/Nov 22 A talent that you used to feel insecure about can be an avenue to earn a significant amount of money, Scorpio. Don’t hesitate to monetize and share your gifts.

SAGITTARIUS – Nov 23/Dec 21 While you have been in a stable relationship for some time now, both parties may be looking to shake things up. It can go two ways: A breakup or newfound depth.

CAPRICORN – Dec 22/Jan 20 Venus, the ruler of your career sector, will point your professional efforts in the right direction, Capricorn. Your professional outlook might turn completely around.

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AQUARIUS – Jan 21/Feb 18 You may notice people in your social life are more friendly and accommodating lately, Aquarius. In fact, friends have always been there for you because they believe in you.

PISCES – Feb 19/Mar 20

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Pisces, if you’ve been waiting for seed money to start a venture, then your patience will pay off. Expect some good news to come.


JANUARY 11, 2019

PAGE 29

Ocean City Today

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Eat black-eyed peas for good luck, prosperity By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) The chaotic holidays are officially over and life is back to normal. My schedule is no longer slammed. Getting up at 4 a.m. sure beats 2 a.m. My Christmas tree has headed for its final resting place, there are no more packages to wrap, and stores are no longer packed with irritable customers. My gas stove is no longer rocking throughout the night and no more last-minute trips to the grocery store. You would think when one has two refrigerators, two freezers and two pantries you would have everything you need. And, I no longer have to explain why I prefer to spend New Year’s Eve in the comforts of my home. Yes, the holidays are wonderful but at the same time, it’s nice to get back to a state of normalcy. While we are on the subject of New Year’s, there is a particular vegetable that does not get the recognition it deserves. Black-eyed peas are a tradition at this time of the year, they are eaten for good luck and symbolize prosperity. But why do we not devour the “pea” year-round? Fresh black-eyed peas are delicious and amazingly tender. Their soft outer skin allows the beans to soak up surrounding sauces which gives the beans more depth of flavor. Dried black-eyed peas are also tasty; they just take more preparation time due to the soaking process. It’s best to soak the beans overnight in salted water. However, I am not a fan of canned black-eyed peas. The flavor and texture do not compare to the fresh or dried versions. Inquisition is the foundation for progression. Following are some inter-

esting facts for further knowledge. Although called a pea, it is actually a bean. These legumes are extremely nourishing, both to people and to the soil. According to an article, “Prosperity Starts with A Pea,” by Jessica Harris, this American tradition originated in West Africa. From there, black-eyed peas traveled to the Americas by way of the slaves; this African staple was a major source of food for the long journey. Harris goes on to say that by the early 1700s, black-eyed peas were observed growing in the Carolina colonies. As in Africa, they were often planted at the borders of the fields to minimize weeds and enrich the soil. This is why black-eyed peas are sometimes referred to as cowpeas or field peas. Like many other dishes native to African inspiration, black-eyed peas made their way to the master’s table. Harris’s research led her to the 1824 edition of, “The Virginia House,” by Mary Randolph. Randolph suggests the peas were shelled, boiled and drained, and then mashed into cakes for frying and garnished with thin bits of fried bacon. Today, Hoppin’ John, a Carolina specialty made with black-eyed peas and rice and seasoned with smoked pork, is probably the most well-known black-eyed pea dish. But there are so many other delectable combinations. Black-eyed pea hummus is yummy and so versatile. Last year, I hosted a Preakness party and served BlackEyed Susan cocktails along with blackeye pea hummus. The black-eyed pea hummus was a huge hit! This year-round dip is easy to make. The secret is to simmer the black-eyed peas in chicken stock. If you are a vegetarian, substitute the chicken stock with vegetable stock. The dip can be served with pita chip, crackers, or assorted vegetables. In closing, if you think black-eyed

peas are just for New Year’s Day, think again. *The following recipes calls for tahini. Tahini is a thick past-like sauce made from sesame seeds, with a little bit of oil mixed in to make it the right consistency. Most super markets carry this product in the international section.

Black-Eyed Pea Hummus Ingredients 3 tablespoons minced garlic in a jar 16 ounces fresh or dried black-eyed peas 6 tablespoons good quality extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for garnishing 2 tablespoons tahini 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice zest of 1 lemon ½ teaspoon smoked paprika, plus extra for garnishing 3 teaspoons favorite hot sauce kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste crackers, pita chips, or assorted vegetables to accompany the hummus 1. If using dried beans, soak them overnight in salted water. Drain. Cook

in chicken stock until very tender. If using fresh black-eyed peas, simmer in chicken stock for 30 minutes. Drain. 2. In a medium bowl, blend the garlic, black-eye peas, olive oil, tahini, lemon juice, lemon zest, paprika, hot sauce, salt and pepper until it has the consistency of a puree. If it is a little thick, add a touch more olive oil. 3. Place hummus in a small serving bowl. Using the back of a small spoon, make a circular indentation in the hummus. Add olive oil so it floats on top of the hummus. Add a few sprinkles of paprika and freshly ground black pepper. Serve with pita chips, crackers, or fresh vegetables. Secret Ingredient – Individuality. “Embrace the virtues of individuality.” – A.E Samaan

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PAGE 30

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2019

OUT & ABOUT

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Enjoying sushi and a Monday night on the town at Blue Fish on 94th Street, from left, are Ocean City residents Sandra Karsli, Taylor Campbell and Annemarie Cherry.

Server Sam Zheng, left, takes appetizer orders at Blue Fish on 94th Street, Monday, from Ocean City residents Mike Staber and George Botezatu, right.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

The Ferrante family, Todd, Jill and Sophia, 9, of Ocean City, enjoy dinner with friend, Frank Siano, of West Ocean City, back right, at Longboard Café, located in the TownCenter on 67th Street, Monday.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Having dinner at Longboard Café on 67th Street, Monday, from left, are Dallas, Texas, resident Alex Franczkowski, Janet Mengel, of Berlin, and Denise Boggs of Kent Island.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Jeremy and Katie Dillard of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, drink cocktails during dinner at Longboard Café on 67th Street, Monday.

Employees of Longboard Café on 67th Street, Blair Running and Kyle Crimmins, serve drinks and meals, Monday.


JANUARY 11, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Pines Aquatics Dept. hosts Father-Daughter Swim, Fri. (Jan. 11, 2019) The Ocean Pines Aquatics Department is encouraging area residents and guests to kick off 2019 at two upcoming special events in January. Fathers, stepfathers, grandfathers or father figures can treat their little ladies to an annual Father-Daughter Swim on Friday, Jan. 11 from 6-8 p.m. at the Sports Core Pool, located at 11144 Cathell Road in Ocean Pines. The evening will include swimming at the heated indoor public pool, crafts, souvenir photos, pizza and cookies. “We added the swim event to our events last year and it was such a great night we wanted to bring it back again,” said Colby Phillips, aquatics and recreation director for the Ocean Pines Association. “There is something really special about having that time together and making memories that will last a lifetime.” The entry fee for the Father-Daughter swim event includes a father and any daughters he brings. The price is $10 for Ocean Pines swim members, $12 for Ocean Pines residents and $15 for non-residents.

“The fun doesn’t stop with the Father-Daughter Swim,” Phillips said. She and her team are working to make waves with a dive-in movie showing of “Charlotte’s Web” on Saturday, Jan. 19 from 6-8 p.m. at the Sports Core Pool. Guests will be able to watch the family-fun movie on a blow-up screen while splashing and swimming or floating on inflatable rafts in the heated indoor pool. Popcorn will also be for sale. The cost to attend the dive-in movie, which is open to the public, is $3 for Ocean Pines swim members, $5 for Ocean Pines residents and $7 for non-residents. Families of more than four may pay a flat rate of $20. Information regarding additional Ocean Pines aquatics programs, including an online version of the Ocean Pines Activity Guide, is available at www.OceanPines.org. For more information, contact Denise Sawyer, director of marketing and public relations for the Ocean Pines Association, at 410-641-7717 ext. 3006 or dsawyer@oceanpines.org.

Send Valentine card to veteran (Jan. 11, 2019) Start the year off by thanking a veteran for her or her service with a Valentine card. For the 17th year, cards will be sent to four veteran rehab medical centers to thank them for their sacrifices and to let them know they are loved, appreciated and not forgotten. All area schools, clubs, businesses, organizations and individuals are invited to participate with purchased cards (no youth cards, please), but homemade cards are particularly appreciated. No postage is necessary, and the card is addressed to “A Veteran.” Through the generosity of Linda Dearing and the Copy Central staff, the cards, plus some candy, will be

delivered to Charlotte Hall Veterans Hospital, Baltimore Rehab Center, Baltimore VA Medical Center and Perry Point Hospital. Dropoff locations are: Shamrock Realty Group, 11049 Racetrack Road, Ocean Pines; Copy Central, Cathell Road, Ocean Pines; the Ocean Pines Library, the Ocean Pines Community Center and Recreation and Parks Building and other locations as they become available. The deadline is Wednesday, Jan. 23. For more information, call 410208-9390 or email ultimateenergy@verizon.net. This project is sponsored by Caring for America, a mission of the Republican Women of Worcester County.

GUEST SPEAKER Dr. Tracy Rush of Healing Hands Chiropractic Center was the guest speaker during the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines - Ocean City’s Dec. 5 meeting. She is pictured with Club President Dick Clagett. PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

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Ocean City Today

OUT & ABOUT

NOW PLAYING BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-7575 www.bjsonthewater.com Jan. 11-12: Tranzfusion, 9 p.m. Jan. 16: Identity Crisis, 6 p.m. BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street, behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium Ocean City 443-664-2896 www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com Jan. 11: Dave Sherman, 7-10 p.m. Jan. 12: Randy Lee Ashcraft, 7-10 p.m. Jan. 13: Bob Hughes, 6 p.m. Jan. 16: Reform School, 6 p.m.; Open Mic, 9 p.m. Jan. 17: Chris Button, 7-10 p.m.

a.m. Jan. 13: Opposite Directions, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jan. 17: Opposite Directions, 6 p.m. HOOTERS 12513 Ocean Gateway West Ocean City 410-213-1841 www.hootersofoc.com Jan. 11: DJ BK, 4-8 p.m. OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean Ocean City 410-524-3535 www.clarionoc.com Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jan. 11-12: First Class

CAPTAIN’S TABLE

PICKLES

15th St. & Baltimore Ave. Ocean City 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Every Friday & Saturday: Phil Perdue, 5:30 p.m.

706 Philadelphia Ave. Ocean City 410-289-4891 www.picklesoc.com Jan. 11: Beats By Jeremy, 10 p.m. Jan. 12: Elephants Dancing, 10 p.m. Jan. 14: Karaoke w/Jeremy, 9 p.m. Jan. 17: Beats by Wax, 9 p.m.

DUFFY’S TAVERN 130th Street in the Montego Bay Shopping Center 410-250-1449 www.duffysoc.com Jan. 11: Bob Hughes, 5-8 p.m. Jan. 12: Karaoke w/DJ Chuck D, 8 p.m. to midnight HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL 12841 S. Harbor Road West Ocean City 410-213-1846 www.ocharborside.com Jan. 11: DJ Billy T, 4 p.m. to 2 a.m. Jan. 12: Side Project/Chris Button, 2-6 p.m.; DJ Jeremy, 9 p.m. to 2

JANUARY 11, 2019

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Engaging in a round of Bingo at Tailchasers on 123rd Street, Monday, from left, are Irene Aragon, of Millsboro, Colbi Custis, of Pittsville, and Ocean Pines resident Diane Simmons.

SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay Ocean City 410-524-4900 www.seacrets.com Jan. 11-12: Heat Up, Stay Frozen, 10 p.m. to 2 a.m.; DJ Cruz, 10 p.m. to 1:50 a.m. WHISKER’S BAR & GRILL 11070 Cathell Road, Suite 17 Pines Plaza, Ocean Pines 410-208-3922 www.whiskersbar.com Jan. 11: Karaoke w/Donnie Berkey

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Having dinner at Tailchasers on 123rd Street, Monday, from left, are Ocean City residents Linda Smith, Roberta Taylor and Theresa Skepton.

HOLIDAY LUNCH Sharing a table during the Art League of Ocean City's holiday luncheon at Fager's Island on Dec. 10, from left, are Jeanie Powell, Robin Bucci, Lisa Bunting, Paula Buntis and Laura Jenkins.


JANUARY 11, 2019

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Ocean City Today

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

SUPPORTERS ‘LEAF MAN’ Savanna Akins’ Kindergarten class at Ocean City Elementary School read the story, “Leaf Man” as part of an informational unit on main topic and key details. Students used the key details from the text to create characters from the story using leaves.

MORGAN PILZ/OCEAN CITY TODAY

BOOSTERS The OC Boosters Club sells hot chocolate, sodas and other snacks during the Winterfest of Light’s last night on New Year’s Eve, at Northside Park on 125th Street.

The Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City donates to Diakonia each year and they also help to sort the food at Diakonia’s Food Pantry which supports those in need of shelter and assistance. Pictured, from left, are Shelley Cohen, Barb and Dan Peletier, Diakonia Food Pantry Manager Jeremy Goetzinger, Carolyn Dryzga and Kiwanis Club President Dick Clagett.

CLASS OFFICERS In celebration of Homecoming and all of the spirited activities, the Stephen Decatur High School senior class officers led the class of 2019 in the annual themed pep rally walkout, which was “Welcome to the Jungle” this year. Pictured are Stephen Decatur High School senior class officers Hannah Johnson, Halle Friedman, Orre Omer and President Allison Jones.

RESEARCH HOMECOMING Worcester Preparatory School hosted its Upper School Homecoming Dance on Oct. 20. Homecoming court members, from left, are freshman prince and princess Vaughn Zender and Faith Sens, sophomore prince and princess Daniel Chen and Arusa Islam, junior prince and princess Gavin Carmody and Jordan Campbell, senior prince and princess Alec Dembeck and Maria Deckmann, and senior king and queen Cameron Hill and Kendall Whaley.

Students from Faith Murray’s fourth grade class at Ocean City Elementary School researched Maryland’s government and designed brochures demonstrating their understanding. The brochures included a description of each of the three branches of government, including the officials associated with each branch, their main jobs, and their part in the process of a bill becoming a law. Pictured are Lee-Ann Funk, Anthony Ziman and Oscar Guerrero.


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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2019

Art League of OC welcomes Sisson as new president (Jan. 11, 2019) The Art League of Ocean City announces its new Board of Directors for 2019 and welcomes new President, John Sisson. Board personnel remains the same for 2019, with several board members shifting positions. Marian Bickerstaff steps down as president of the board after six years of service, but will continue to serve as past president. Barbara Patrick steps into the role of first vice president, Laura Jenkins becomes second vice president, and Judy Tremellen is the new corresponding secretary. Rafael Correa remains treasurer and Emily Schwab, recording secretary. Sisson previously served as the board’s first vice president. A native of Virginia and Montgomery County, Maryland, he graduated from the University of Maryland and spent 36 years teaching in Prince Georges County, serving as president of the county’s Educators’ Association and on the board of the Maryland State Education Association. Sisson also spent time in Kanagawa Province, Maryland’s sister state in Japan, under an international grant and as Maryland’s designated exchange high school teacher and curricula developer. He has led and organized more than a dozen international student tours to Europe and Japan and is a past president of the Kiwanis Club of Prince Georges County. Also returning to the board are members Jamie Albright, Nancy

The Art League Board of Directors for 2019 is pictured during the group’s holiday luncheon at Fager’s Island on Dec. 10. Pictured, from left, are new Board President John Sisson, Barbara Patrick, Rafael Correa, Emily Schwab, Sandy Gillis, Ryan Wilde, Nancy Fortney, Laura Jenkins, Katy Durham, Velda Henry and Marian Bickerstaff. Not pictured: Jamie Albright, Jan Perdue, Judy Tremellen, Joe Mitrecic and Gayle Widdowson.

CROSSWORD

Fortney, Katy Durham, Velda Henry, Joseph Mitrecic, Jan Perdue, Sandy Gillis, Ruth Waters, Ryan Wilde and Gayle Widdowson. The Ocean City Center for the Arts at 502 94th Street is the home of the Art League of Ocean City, a nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the visual arts in the Ocean City area through education, exhibits, scholarships, programs and community art events. The arts center is supported by memberships, corporate and civic funding, donations and sales of art. More information is available at 410-524-9433 or www.artleagueofoceancity.org.

COMMUNITY BRIEFS

Airman graduates

burg, Pennsylvania.

U.S. Air Force National Guard Airman 1st Class Haley Mills graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline Haley Mills and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training also earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Mills is the daughter of Kimberly Owens of Berlin, and Chris Mills of Altamonte Springs, Florida, and stepdaughter of Kenneth Seig of Berlin. She is a 2015 graduate of Susquehanna Township High School, Harris-

Representing Worcester Worcester County Public Schools announced that Stephen Decatur High School senior Isabel Emond will serve as the Maryland General Assembly Page during the 2019 session. Emond will serve two non-consecutive weeks in either the House of Delegates or Izzy Emond the Senate while the Maryland General Assembly is in session where she will fulfill a variety of Page responsibilities including running errands for officials, answering phones, assisting visitors and distributing materials. Emond is a member of the National Honor Society as well as a founding member of the school Birding Club. She also serves as a community intern for Maryland Coastal Bays Program.

Answers on page 38


JANUARY 11, 2019

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Ocean City Today

COMMUNITY/SCHOOLS

LEHMANS HONORED

FOOD COLLECTION Students and staff at Ocean City Elementary School collected nonperishable food items for the Maryland Food Bank. Pictured are first grade students Lee McAteer, Alyssa Raffo, Haylee Salandanan, Hayden Dorsey and Gabriel Dula helping to load the food items.

SHOW WINNERS The Annual Art League of Ocean City’s Members Juried Show was judged this year by Brooke Rogers of Salisbury University. Pictured, from left, are Marian Bickerstaff, Art League of Ocean City board president; Theresa Alo, honorable mention; Rogers; Megan Burak, third place; Mary Bode Byrd, second place; Robert Bruce Weston, first place.

Rina Thaler, executive director of the Art League of Ocean City, left, presents Gwen and Don Lehman with the “Partner in Crime” Award for the couple’s volunteer efforts for the nonprofit arts organization in 2018 during the Art League’s holiday luncheon on Dec. 10 at Fager’s Island in Ocean City.

PAJAMA DRIVE Ocean City Elementary held its second annual Pajama Drive, Oct. 15-Nov. 2, and students were encouraged to bring in a new pair of pajamas to donate to the Pajama Program, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that provides new, warm pajamas and books to children in need. OCES students, faculty and staff collected 94 pairs of pajamas. Pictured, from left, are Trevor Lehman, Hayden Yeager, Wyatt Scimgeour, Lewis Takacs and Jamari Sears.

QUARTER AUCTION Worcester County Humane Society held its annual quarter auction on Nov. 4, raising over $10,000. Pictured are the team of volunteers that made it possible.


Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 11, 2019

Dining Guide ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ■ RESERVATIONS: Reservations accepted ________________________________

DOWNTOWN

South end to 28th Street ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192, www.captainstableoc.com $$-$$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. ■ COINS 28th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524 3100, www.coinspub.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining atmosphere for families. Crab cakes, hand-cut steaks, fresh seafood. Everything home-made. Happy hour 3-6 p.m. and early bird 4-6 p.m. Daily specials. ■ THE CORAL REEF CAFE / HEMINGWAY'S RESTAURANT 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612, www.ocsuites.com/dining $-$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Fourstory atrium cafe and an elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine, fresh seafood, fresh cuts of meat, farm-to-table produce, artisanal desserts, hearty sandwiches and much more. ■ VICTORIAN ROOM RESTAURANT Dunes Manor Hotel, OCEANFRONT at 28th and Baltimore Ave, Ocean City 410-2891100, www.dunesmanor.com $$ - $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Open year round. Oceanfront dining atmosphere with local, farm to table/sea to table cuisine. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner daily, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. (Friday and Saturday, till 10 p.m.). Also Zippy Lewis Lounge with happy hour from 4-7 p.m., featuring Craft Beer selections and appetizer menu; Milton’s Out Door Cafe; and the Barefoot Beach Bar in season.

MIDTOWN

29th to 90th streets ■ 32 PALM 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525, www.oceancityhilton.com/dining $$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, extensive wine list and gourmet desserts. ■ BJ’S ON THE WATER 75th Street, Ocean City 410-524-7575, www.bjsonthewater.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Entire dining menu served 11 a.m. to 1:30 a.m., seven days a week, year-round. Daily specials, daily duck feeding. Entertainment every Wednesday, Friday and Saturday. No cover. Available for parties and banquets. Indoor and outdoor dining. ■ DRY 85 OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-8989, www.DRY85.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Gourmet “stick to your ribs” home cooking. A made-fromscratch kitchen with every sauce and every dressing hand crafted. It’s that attention to detail that takes the concept of burgers, fries, pork chops and wings and turns them completely on their head. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ LONGBOARD CAFÉ 67th Street Town Center, Ocean City 443664-5639, www.longboardcafe.net $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Lite fare to dinner entrees offering a variety of burgers, pani-

nis, sandwiches and salads. The "veggies" menu features wrinkled green beans. Signature house libiations and signature entrees made with ingredients from local farms and fisheries. A family restaurant. ■ MARLIN MOON 3301 Atlantic Ave., in the DoubleTree Ocean City 410-280-1201, www.marlinmoonocmd.com $$ | Full bar Featuring Executive Chef Gary Beach. Fresh cuisine featuring locally sourced seafood, steaks and vegetables. Small plate appetizers, fresh salads. Local craft beers and cocktails. Open for lunch and dinner, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. ■ RARE AND RYE 106 32nd St., Ocean City 410-213-7273, https://www.rareandrye.com Full Bar Whiskey and wine bar. Farm to table. Locally grown and prepared cuisine with an eclectic menu. Unique libations with robust selection of ryes, bourbons, whiskeys and specialty drinks. Authentic green space with industrial and rustic décor. ■ RED RED WINE BAR OC 12 48th Street, Ocean City 443-664-6801, www.RedRedWineBar.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Steps from the beach. Coastal cuisine with a focus on local seafood and hand tossed pizzas plus artisanal cheeseboards. 35+ wines By the Glass, 120+ By the Bottle. Flights. Luxurious colors and custom built couches. Late night bar. Seasonal outdoor seating. ■ SEACRETS 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900, www.seacrets.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SKYE RAW BAR & GRILLE 66th Street, Ocean City 410-723-6762, www.skyebaroc.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Lunch, dinner, raw bar or lite fare, at the top of 66th Street and Coastal Highway. Happy hour, 3-6 p.m. with food and drink specials.

UPTOWN

91st to 146th streets ■ ALBERTINO’S BRICK OVEN EATERY 13117 Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410250-2000, www.albertinosoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Lunch and dinner daily. Open Wednesday and Thursday, 4 p.m. and Friday through Sunday, 11 a.m. Homemade pizza and pasta, seafood, steaks. Daily specials and happy hour. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983, www.bluefishocmd.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. ■ BOURBON STREET ON THE BEACH 116th Street & Coastal Hwy., (Behind Fountain Head Towers Condominium), Ocean City 443-664-2896, www.bourbonstreetonthebeach.com $$-$$$ | Reservations recommended for large parties | Kids’ menu | Full bar Eastern Shore fare with a New Orleans Flare. Seafood, steaks and pasta dishes. Specializing in Jambalaya, Creole, & Gumbo. Home of the Ragin’ Cajun Bloody Mary. Happy Hour 4-7 p.m. Weekly entertainment. ■ THE CRAB BAG 130th Street, bayside, Ocean City 410250-3337, www.thecrabbag.com $-$$ | Full bar Dine in and carryout. Open 7 Days a week, 11 am til late night. Hot steamed crabs, world famous fried chicken, ribs, burgers,

barbecue, pasta, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and more. Lunch and weekly carryout and dinner specials. Happy hour at the beach with drink and food specials. ■ DUFFYS 130th St., in Montego Bay Shopping Ctr. & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250 1449, www.duffysoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual dining, indoor or outdoor seating. Irish fare and American cuisine. Appetizers, soups, salads, sandwiches, steaks and seafood. Second season and daily dinner specials. Dine in, carry out. Happy Hour, daily, noon to 6 pm. ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT 101st Street, Ocean City 410-524-3535, www.clarionoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving beach-inspired dishes in our oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breakers Pub. All-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet, open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available Friday and Saturday, 5-9 p.m. ■ JULES FINE DINING 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396, www.ocjules.com $$, $$$ | Reservations | Kids’ menu | Full bar Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood yearround, fresh local produce. ■ NICK’S HOUSE OF RIBS 144th Street & Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-250-1984, www.nickshouseofribs.com $$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Casual, family friendly with upscale atmosphere. Extensive menu from our famous baby back ribs, fresh seafood, black angus steaks. ■ NORI 11403 Coastal Highway (Gold Coast Mall), Ocean City 443-880-6258 $$ | Reservations accepted | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open 7 days serving lunch and dinner. Our creative menu features hand-cut steaks, grilled fish, crab cakes, sushi and sashimi. Dine-in or carry-out. ■ REEF 118 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-5241000, www.carouselhotel.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ WHISKERS PUB 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410524-2609, www.whiskerspub.com $ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Certified Angus® burgers and casual fare. Call for hours.

DELAWARE ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 31225 American Parkway, Selbyville, Del. 302-436-FOXS, www.foxspizzade.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Sit-down bar and restaurant. Full menu includes pizza, pastas, salads, sandwiches and more. Specializing pizza and chef specials. Open daily for lunch and dinner at 11 a.m. Take out and delivery.

WEST OCEAN CITY ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717, www.ocitalianfood.com $-$$ | Reservations | Full bar Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room. Early bird specials every day

from 5-6 p.m. ■ FOX’S PIZZA DEN 11328 Samuel Bowen Blvd., West Ocean City 410-600-1020, Foxpizzamd.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full Bar Enjoy a brand new spacious dining room. Happy hour every day from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. with $5 food specials. Full menu includes appetizers, salads, stromboli, hoagies and wedgies, pizza, spaghetti and more. Open every day from 11 a.m. to midnight. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR AND GRILL 128741 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1846, weocharborside.com $-$$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Home of the Original Fresh Squeezed Orange Crush! Open every day, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Appetizers, fresh seafood, steak and pasta. Live entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HOOTERS Route 50 & Keyser Point Road, West Ocean City 410-213-1841, www.hootersofoc.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu and game room | Full bar New smoked wings with half the calories. Traditional wings, burgers, quesadillas, tacos and healthy salads. Seafood selections with raw bar and crab legs. Sports packages and live entertainment. Large parties welcome. ■ PIZZA TUGOS Routes 50 and 611, West Ocean City 410524-2922; 114th Street and Coastal Highway, Ocean City 410-524-2922, www.pizzatugos.com $-$$ | Kids’ menu | Full bar Serving lunch and dinner. Open 7 days. Pizza Tugos is a family-friendly dining restaurant that features award winning pizza, pasta, craft burgers, sandwiches, subs, appetizers and salads. Great happy hour and football specials with full bar and 54 craft beers. ■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 $ | Kids’ menu Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drivethru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Monday and Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo.

OCEAN PINES ■ OCEAN PINES YACHT CLUB 1 Mumford Landing Road, Ocean Pines 410-641-7222, www.OPyachtclub.com $$-$$$ | Full bar Amid a bay front setting, the Ocean Pines Yacht Club offers dining selections for lunch and dinner. Fresh seafood and signature drinks. Live music Fridays and Saturdays, 6 p.m. Happy Hour daily, 3-6 p.m. Tiki Bar opens at 3 p.m. Sunday brunch from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ■ TERN GRILLE 100 Clubhouse Drive, Ocean Pines 410641-7222, oceanpinesgolf.org/dining $$ | Full bar The Tern Grille serves freshly-prepared breakfast and lunch items. Winter hours are Friday and Saturday from 4-9 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

BERLIN ■ OCEAN DOWNS CASINO, POSEIDON’S PUB 10218 Racetrack Road, Berlin 410-6410600, www.oceandowns.com $-$$$ | Full bar House soups, small plates, sandwiches, burgers and entrees including steaks, chicken, veggie and Eastern Shore favorites. Dining room hours: Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday, noon to 10 p.m.; Monday and Tuesday, noon to 8 p.m.; and Friday and Saturday, noon to 11 p.m. Pub open late.


JANUARY 11, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Calendar Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

Fri., Jan. 11 4TH ANNUAL MAYOR’S PRAYER BREAKFAST Clarion Resort Fontainebleau Hotel, Crystal Ballroom, 10100 Coastal Highway, 7:00 AM - 10:00 AM. Featuring retired football placekicker David Akers as the keynote speaker. Akers is currently a free agent and Christian speaker. Tickets are $20 a person. Tickets: www.chamber.oceancity.org/events.

LUNCH AND LISTEN STORY TIME FOR ADULTS Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 1:00 PM. Featuring selections by H.G. Wells. Bring your lunch (soft drinks will be provided). http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

OCEAN PINES BOOK OF THE MONTH Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:00 PM. Featuring The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls. Copies of books are available in advance at the library.

STEM FOR HOME SCHOOLERS “3D PRINTING” Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:00 PM. Learn how a 3D printer works. All participants can select an object to have the library print for them. For ages 5 to 12. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

CRAB CAKE DINNER Stevenson United Methodist Church, 123 N. Main St., 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM. Single crab cake sandwich, green beans, baked potato, coleslaw and drink is $12. Carryouts and bake table available.

ANNUAL FATHER-DAUGHTER SWIM Sports Core Pool, 11144 Cathell Road, 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM. Fathers, stepfathers, grandfathers or father figures can treat their little ladies to swimming the heated, indoor pool, crafts, souvenir photos, pizza and cookies. Tickets include a father and any daughters he brings. Cost is $10 for Ocean Pines swim members, $12 for Ocean Pines residents and $15 for non-residents.

Sat., Jan. 12 CRAFTY SATURDAY MAKE & TAKE ‘DRAGONS’ Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM. Create themed crafts using materials provided by the library. For all ages. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

INDOOR FARMERS & ARTISANS MARKET Saturdays - Northside Fire House, next to White Horse Park, which is located at 235 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines, Jan. 5 through March 9, 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM. Featuring quality fruit, vegetables, meat, eggs, poultry an daily products, as well as, baked goods, jams, cider, wine, honey, maple syrup, coffee, sauces, soups, kitchen ware, treats for pets, unique finds and live music. Open to the public. 410-641-7717, Ext. 3006

Sun., Jan. 13 ART LEAGUE FREE OPEN HOUSE Ocean City Center for the Arts, 502 94th St., 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM. Enjoy refreshments, experience hands-on art projects with resident artists, visit the gift shop and view the art shows currently on display. Staff will be on hand to talk about upcoming events, volunteer opportunities, art classes and workshops for all levels and exhibition opportunities for working artists. 410-524-9433, http://www.artleagueofoceancity.org

Mon., Jan. 14

MEDICAL MONDAY Worcester Youth and Family, Ray Room, 124 N. Main St., 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM. Free, educational session featuring Raising the Standard of Care in Breast Reconstruction with Dr. Vincent Perrotta and Dr. Christopher Pellegrino of Peninsula Plastic Surgery. Registration is encouraged but not required. Michelle, 410-641-9268, http://www.atlanticgeneral.org/MedicalMonday

ANNUAL CASH BINGO Bishopville Volunteer Fire Department, 10709 Bishopville Road, 6:00 PM . Doors open at 5:30 p.m., early bird starts at 6 p.m. Featuring 20 regular games, 2 specials, jackpot and 4 early birds. Concessions for sale. Cost is $25 in advance or $30 at the door. Advance tickets: Tina, 443-880-6966. Must be at least 18 years old to play.

way, 3:00 PM - 6:00 PM. Join the group every Tuesday for Family Time. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Tuesdays - Worcester County Health Center, 9730 Healthway Drive, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and health lifestyle. jeanduck47@gmail.com

Wed., Jan. 16 MARYLAND VA REPRESENTATIVE Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM. Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs representative Michelle Licata offers outreach services to veterans and their families on the third Wednesday of each month. No appointment necessary. 410-713-3482, http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

DELMARVA A CAPELLA CHORUS Mondays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 7:00 PM. All levels of singers and drop-ins welcome. Carol, 410-641-6876

Tues., Jan. 15 COFFEE AND CONVERSATION Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM. Informal session where participants discuss library resources including eBooks, databases and the library catalog. Coffee and donuts provided. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

PLAY TIME Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 10:30 AM. Learn new skills while playing with educational toys. For infant to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP John H. ‘Jack’ Burbage Jr. Regional Cancer Care Center Conference Room, 9707 Healthway Drive, 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM. Women Supporting Women/AGH Support group for women and men who are battling breast cancer (current patients and survivors). Lunch is provided. RSVP: 410-548-7880.

HOMESCHOOL BOOK CLUB

STORY TIME ‘LOVE IS IN THE AIR’

KNAPPING

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, 1:30 PM. Homeschoolers ages 8 to 12 are invited to join this monthly book club. Books are available at the library. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 2:00 PM. A basic class teaching the methods of making arrowheads. Learn how to do an old practice know as pressure flaking. Bring lightweight leather gloves. Register: 410-641-0650. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

WRITING FOR WELLNESS Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:30 PM. Research has shown that writing about stressful experiences, such as illness, may boost health and psychological well-being. This group uses exercises to stimulate the process for creative expression. No prior writing experience needed. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STEAM PM ‘MEASURING AND MORE MATH FUN’ Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 3:45 PM. Hands on science and math activities for children 6 years and older. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, 9733 Healthway Drive, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM. TOPS is a weekly support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle. Berlin group No. 169. Rose Campion, 410-6410157

ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP Berlin Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 9715 Healthway Drive, 11:00 AM 12:30 PM. Support group for caregivers of Alzheimer’s patients. It meets the third Tuesday of each month. Open to the community. Jo Davis, 410-629-6123

SCREEN PAINTING Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM. Learn the art of screen painting. Register: 410-2084014. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

COLOR ME CALM Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 2:00 PM. Monthly adult coloring session. Research. has shown that coloring has therapeutic potential to reduce anxiety and create focus or mindfulness. Explore different patterns. Bring your own or use those provided. Colored pencils, gel pens and felt tips available, along with coffee and cookies. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

FAMILY TIME ‘MINUTE TO WIN IT GAMES’ Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal High-

COLORING AND COCOA Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM. An afternoon of coloring and conversation. Hot cocoa, light refreshments and coloring materials provided. Suitable for teens and adults. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

OPEN HOUSE AND RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY Atlantic General Orthopedic Surgery, 314 Franklin Ave., Suite 201, 4:00 PM 6:00 PM. The practice of orthopedic surgeon Sean Hooker, MD. He specializes in shoulder, hip and knee replacements, rotator cuff repairs and sports medicine procedures. Ribbon cutting held at 4:30 p.m. http://www.atlanticgeneral.org

SNOWMEN ON WINE BOTTLES Berlin library, 13 Harrison Ave., 5:30 PM. A painting on wine bottle program.

Continued on Page 38


PAGE 38

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 11, 2019

CALENDAR Continued from Page 37 Bottles and materials provided. Register: 410-641-0650. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

learn how to create an action plan to manage your health, what causes kidney disease and more. Register: KidneySmart.org/class or 240-454-1197.

DELMARVA HAND DANCE CLUB

WORCESTER COUNTY NAACP MEETING

Wednesdays - Ocean City Elks Lodge, 13708 Sinepuxent Ave., 5:30 PM - 9:00 PM. Dance to the sounds of the ’50s and ’60s music. A $5 donation to benefit Veterans and local charities. Dance lessons offered the first and third Wednesday of each month from 5-5:45 p.m. Dancing follows until 9 p.m. Members and their guests welcome. dance@delmarvahanddancing.com, 410-208-1151, http://delmarvahanddancing.com

Germantown School Community Heritage Center, 10223 Trappe Road, 7:00 PM. Executive Board meeting at 6 p.m. with general membership meeting at 7 p.m. Join the group for the swearing-in ceremony of the new 2019 Officers. Charles Weaver, board member of the Eastern Shore Baseball Hall of Fame/Museum and President Worcester County Historical Society, will discuss the progress of the Judy Johnson Memorial tribute stone to be installed on front of the Snow Hill library. 443-9446701

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OP/OC Wednesdays - Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 8:00 AM. Doors open at 7 a.m., meeting begins at 8 a.m. 410-641-7330, http://www.kiwanisofopoc.org

OC/BERLIN ROTARY CLUB MEETING Wednesdays - Captain’s Table Restaurant in the Courtyard by Marriott, 2 15th St., 6:00 PM. cliff0917@aol.com, 302-540-2127

PINE’EER CRAFT CLUB MEETING Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, 10:00 AM. Refreshments served at 9:45 a.m. Just a reminder that the Pine’eer Artisan and Gift Shop is opened every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Stop by and see the treasures made by the artisans. All guests welcomed. Barb O’Connor, 410-7268062

STORY TIME ‘DANCE’ Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 10:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

STEAM STORYTIME ‘ATTRACT AND REPEL A LOOK AT MAGNETS’ Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10:30 AM. For 3 to 7 year old children. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

GENEALOGY WORKSHOP Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 1:00 PM. Tom Dempsey will guide participants through the world of family research and give tips on how to find that long-lost ancestor. Register: 410-2084014. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

CANNING Snow Hill library, 307 N. Washington St., 2:00 PM. This interactive workshop includes USDA approved preservation guidelines with demonstrations and activities. Taught by the University of Maryland Extension Office. http://www.worcesterlibrary.org

Thursdays - Harpoon Hanna’s, 39064 Harpoon Road, Fenwick Island, DE 19944, 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM. Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577 or Kate, 410-5240649. http://www.BeachSingles.org

Thursdays - Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 11 a.m. Coastal Hospice provides grief support and education. Participants work together to help each other navigate through grief at their own pace. Free and open to the public. Nicole Long, 443-614-6142

redecorated. Furniture, clothing, toys and household goods. Info: 410-2130243.

Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 10 a.m., on the first Friday of each month. Anyone interested is welcome. Info: Anna Foultz, 410-641-7667.

SUICIDE GRIEVERS’ SUPPORT GROUP Worcester County Health Department, 9730 Healthway Drive, Berlin, the third Wednesday of each month, 6 p.m. Knock at the south door for entry. Open to anyone who has lost a friend or loved one to suicide. Free of charge. Info: 410726-3090 or www.jessespaddle.org.

HELP FOR PHARMACEUTICAL DRUG ABUSE

ONGOING EVENTS

Call Narconon for a free brochure on the signs of addiction for all types of drugs. Narconon also offers free assessments and referrals: 800-775-8750 or www.narconon.org.

BOOK A LIBRARIAN

OCVFC LADIES AUXILIARY

Any branch, through January. Need some one-on-one help with your resume, job application, E-Reader or basic computer skills? Contact your closest library branch to schedule a personal appointment. www.worcesterlibrary.org

The group meets monthly on the first Monday at 7 p.m. at the West Ocean City Fire Station, second floor, Keyser Point Road. New members welcome. Info: Denise, 443-359-2014 or any Ladies Auxiliary member.

FRIDAY NIGHT SERVICES Temple Bat Yam, 11036 Worcester Highway, Berlin, every Friday, 7:30 p.m. A reform Jewish Synagogue. Info: 410-641-4311.

AUMC THRIFT SHOP Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 Fourth St., Ocean City, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Open Monday through Saturday, year round. Located behind the church with a donation drop off room that is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 410289-4458

LEARN MORE ABOUT THE CATHOLIC FAITH

FIRST STATE DETACHMENT OF THE MARINE CORPS LEAGUE MONTHLY MEETINGS Meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of each month at Ocean City American Legion Post, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, at noon. Open to all fellow Marines and FMF Corpsmen. Info: firststatemarines.org

THE SHEPHERDS CROOK St. Paul’s by the Sea Episcopal Church, 302 N. Baltimore Ave. in the DeWees Hall. Open Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon. Offering dry food goods with NOEL carry out lunches on Saturdays. Use the DeWees Hall north entrance door located at the top of the driveway. Info: 410-289-3453. Volunteers contact Jane Ellis, 540-808-6055.

KIDNEY SMART CLASS John H. ‘Jack’ Burbage Jr. Regional Cancer Care Center Conference Room, 9707 Healthway Drive, 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM. In this no-cost Kidney Smart class,

The Ocean City American Legion Synepuxent Post #166 collected items for military members deployed overseas this holiday season for the 10th consecutive year. This year they packed 169 boxed filled with an assortment of items, ranging from snacks, to disposable razors, socks and reading material.

BEACH SINGLES

GRIEF SUPPORT

Thurs., Jan. 17

SUPPORTING MILITARY

DIAKONIA THRIFT SHOP Used to be Mine, Route 611 and Sunset Avenue, Wednesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Newly expanded and

WIDOWS & WIDOWERS SOCIAL CLUB Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, third Tuesday of each month, 1 p.m. Info: 410-208-1398.

PINE’EER ARTISAN & GIFT SHOP OPEN Pine’eer Artisan & Gift Shop, White Horse Park, 239 Ocean Parkway, Ocean Pines. Shop will be open every Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and every Sunday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Featuring the latest creations by members of the Pine’eer Craft Club.

‘ACHIEVING SURGICAL WEIGHT LOSS SUCCESS’ SEMINAR Atlantic General Bariatric Center Conference Room, 10231 Old Ocean City Blvd., Suite 207, Berlin. Takes place the first Monday of each month at 1 p.m. This is a free, in-person seminar. Additional opportunities are also available in the form of an online webinar. Register: 410-641-9568.

STAR CHARITIES MONTHLY MEETING

RCIA is a process for individuals, adults and children 8 years and older, who are seeking Baptism. Also for those already baptized in another Christian tradition who want to come into the Catholic Church. Call Rita at 410-289-7038 or come to a session held on Monday evenings at 7 p.m. in the Father Connell Parish Center, 1705 Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, MD. All are welcome.

THE SHEPHERD’S NOOK THRIFT SHOP Community Church at Ocean Pines, 11227 Racetrack Road. Open Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Accepting donations of gently worn clothes and small household items.

Crossword answers from page 34


JANUARY 11, 2019

39 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.com and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

PT ADMIN ASSISTANT/ACTIVITIES COORDINATOR We are seeking an organized individual that has experience in customer service with excellent verbal and written communication skills. Must be computer proficient in MS Office Suite/Outlook and have the ability to multi-task with a courteous customer service attitude, as well as coordinating activities for a community. Year round, 20 hours including weekends/evenings. Interested candidates, please send resume &wage requirements to:

susan.laur@casinc.biz

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

RENTALS

RENTALS

Busy Dental Office Seeking Receptionist-Pt/Ft, Dental knowledge req. Looking for Dental Assistant (FT), Radiology Cert., good clinical skills req. M-F, Benefits & Monthly Bonus. Email: contact@atlanticdental.com

Now Hiring FULL TIME Maintenance & Housekeeping. Competitive pay. Full benefits, paid vacation & 401K. Call Club Ocean Villas II, 410-524-0880.

YR Ocean Pines 3BR Rancher. Large kitchen, yard, screened porch, garage. New heat pump, ductwork. $1100/ month + utilities & sec. deposit. 410-733-7337, 410255-8814

YR Ocean Pines. Large 2 story. 3BR, 2.5BA, three season-porch, open decks, fireplace, oversized garage. No smoking, no pets. Good credit. Security deposit plus utilities. $1400 per month. 301-509-6515

EOE

DENTAL ASS’T. Experience Preferred Ocean View, DE

SERVICE PLUMBER NEEDED

Email Resume:

$18-24/hour depending on experience w/bonus potential Great Benefits Inc. 100% Paid Health Insurance, Paid Training & Paid Time Off REQUIREMENTS: - Minimum 3-4 years of experience preferred - Must have hand tools, clean driving record Email your resume/work experience to seasidelauren@gmail.com Or apply online at www.SeasidePlumbingInc.com

is now accepting applications for the following positions:

molarbiz@yahoo.com

Y/R Exp. Hostess, Cooks, A/V Staff, Boutique Sales, EMT, General Maintenance & Painter For more details or to apply, please go online to www.seacrets.com/employment

Become a Better You in 2019!

Full-Time, Year-Round

OFFICE MANAGER Responsibilities include overseeing of budget planning, customer billing, hiring/training, formulating and analyzing various reports, auditing daily tasks and assisting with customer escalations. Position is responsible for all members of their team and contribute to delivering the highest standards of customer service will be a top priority. Benefits offered include medical/dental/vision plans, generous paid time off package, 401K plan and travel discounts.

To apply, and view full job requirements, search job ID 1816810:

To Order Product Call Christine 443-880-8397 or email: snowhillavon@ comcast.net To Become an Avon Representative Sign Up at www. ChristinesBeautyShop.com

Careers.wyndhamdestinations.com/jobs Questions, please call: 302.541.8844 Employment is contingent on a drug screen and background check. ResortQuest is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Accounting Clerk Wanted Full Time - $14-$15 per hour Responsible for providing accounting support to accounting supervisors and other managers within the department. Keys daily worksheets to the general ledger system, ensures files are complete and maintained as needed, handles accounts payable duties, and assists accounting personnel. Job Tasks and Responsibilities: Perform accounting and clerical functions to support supervisors. Research, track, and resolve accounting problems. Compile and sort invoices and checks. Issue checks for accounts payable. Record business transactions and key daily worksheets to the general ledger system. Record charges and refunds. Support accounting personnel. Input type vouchers, invoices, checks, account statements, reports, and other records. Provide front desk customer service. File and tally deposits. Work with adding machines, calculators, databases and bank accounts. Match invoices to work orders. Process bills for payment. Open mail and match payments to invoices. Arrange for money to be delivered to bank. Utilize computer systems to run databases, pay bills and order supplies. Contact individuals with delinquent accounts. Ensure customers accept payments or refunds. Email Resume to: dunkindonutjobs@gmail.com Subject Line: Accounting Clerk or Apply in Person @ 9919 Golf Course Rd., Ocean City, MD Serious inquiries only, must live within a 30 minute radius of West Ocean City Maryland.

ssifieds la C r u o Y r e Ord

Chairside

NOW HIRING!! Production Crew for our WOC kitchen facility Up to $16/hr. Apply online at: www.delmarvadd.com

SEEKING SEEKING EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT Experienced Attendant/Caretaker Seeking Employment. Tended for military officer & family for 10 years. Safe driver, will go anywhere. References avail. No criminal/MVA record. Call Alvin 410-629-9035, please leave message.

Year-Round Rentals available in West Ocean City. 2 bedroom, 1 bath and 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Call 1-877-289-1616 for more information. YR - NORTH OC CONDO 1BR, 1 bath, beautifully renovated, modern furnished. $800/mo. No pets, non-smoker, max. 2, ref. & sec. dep. req. Victor 410-422-5164

RAMBLER MOTEL 9942 Elm Street, WOC (Behind Starbucks) Sleeps 4, $250 per week Manager onsite 410-213-1764

W/R, 1BR/1BA - 33rd Street. W/D, cable, WiFi, furnished. No smoking/no pets. Avail. Jan. 1-May 1. $750/mo. + sec. 302-367-5266 Winter Rentals available on St. Louis Avenue, right before 1st Street, Ocean City. Call 301-331-2209.

WINTER WEEKLY RENTALS 4BR House $500/week 2BR Apartment $300/week Burgundy Inn 1210 Philadelphia Ave. 410-289-8581

SEEKING RENTAL SEEKING RENTAL

WEEKLY • SEASONAL

Senior w/dog looking for unfurnished, year-round, 1 bedroom apartment in Worcester County. Max. $700/month. 410-430-7576

Maryland 800.633.1000 Delaware 800.442.5626

LOTS & ACREAGE LOTS & ACREAGE

R E N TA L S VA C AT I O N S

cbvacations.com OPERATED BY A SUBSIDIARY OF NRT LLC

DRASTICALLY REDUCED WATERFRONT LOT, Bishopville. $99,000. Howard Marin Realty, 410-352-5555.

COMMERCIAL COMMERCIAL

J JOIN OUR GRO OW OW WING IN TEAM! Real Hospitality H Group p is now hiring fo for:

SENIO SE E OR ST TAFF AC CCOUNT TA ANTS & ST STAFF ACCOU UNT TA ANTS Apply ply on online at:

ww ww w w w.realhospi alhosp pitality p ygroup.c g p om/c / areers

Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-289-8888 www.holidayoc.com

12800 00 0 Hospitality Way • Ocean City, MD 21842

Self-Storage Units on Route 50. 100 sq. ft., 150 sq. ft., and 250 sq. ft. Call Bill, 301537-5391. 2 Office/Retail Spaces & 3 Warehouse Units available in West Ocean City. Call 443-497-4200.

Summer Rental - WATER DAMAGE RESTORATION TECHNICIANS & MANAGERS (IICRC, WRT, ASD certifications a plus)

- EXPERIENCED CARPENTERS/FRAMERS - INTERIOR REMODELING PROFESSIONALS - PAINTERS - DRYWALL INSTALLERS - DECK COATING APPLICATORS VALID DL, Background check, Drug & Alcohol-free environment

Please apply in person at 12905 Coastal Hwy, Ocean City MD, online at https://oceantowerconstruction.com/careers/ or call 443-366-5556 during regular business hours

Online

Available May 10th-Sept. 10th. 312 Sunset Dr. 2BR/1.5BA, newly remodeled, big kitchen/living area. Sleeps up to 6. $13,500/season, you pay utilities. Security deposit $2,000. Call 410-428-7333. www.SunsetTerraceRentals.com

1BR, 1BA Starting at $650 2BR, 1BA Starting at $795 3BR, 2BA Starting at $1150 Available Winter Rentals @ www.hilemanrealestate.com

CALL US TODAY! 410-208-9200

www.oceancitytoday.com

Convenient, quick, no waiting, no calls ~ Days, nights and weekends

Open 6 Days A Week Mon.-Sat., 9-5 * Berlin * Ocean City * * Ocean Pines * * Snow Hill *


PAGE 40

JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

COMMERCIAL

SERVICES

DONATIONS

FOR SALE

Berlin: Atlantic Business Center. Office space 225 sq. ft. for rent. Utilities incl. $300/ month. Also, several storage units available $95/month. Call 410-726-5471 or 410641-4300.

Leaf Removal and Yard Clean Up all winter long. Please call Tyler Layton. 410-920-4292

Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Contact Gary at 443-975-3065.

14 x 80, 3BR, 2BA Mobile Home. $25,000. 219 Wall Street, Salisbury, MD. Can be relocated. Very good condition. Call for details. 410603-2878

AUCTIONS

www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.com

FOR RENT: 484 sq. foot unit with heat, air and half bath. 313 sq. foot garage next door to unit on same property. 797 sq. feet for both or rent separately. Trader Lee’s Village. Corner of 611 and Route 50. Call Bob Jester 410-4304480 for more info.

House and Rental Clean Out, small and local moving, and removal of junk and furniture. Also, will clean out garages/ sheds. 302-222-7297, 302422-9390

Classifieds 410-723-6397

FURNITURE

JUMPIN’ JACK FLASH FURNITURE WAREHOUSE -- NEW AND USED Pick-Up & Delivery Available

410-250-7000 146th Street, Ocean City

SERVICES

BUDGET MOVERS 443-664-5797 LOCAL & EAST COAST MOVING Full Packing Service Piano Movers - Full Service

The contents of mini storage units will be sold at public auction. Units to be auctioned; B1, B7, B55, S30, S35, S45, S69, S121, S223, S152, S185, S315, S407, L1, L6, L9, O29, O115, O164, O48, O55, O69, O79, O92, O134, O135, O155, O158D, O165. Units are being sold due to non-payment of rent. Common items in units are, household items, furniture, tools, fishing equipment, paintings, antique and vintage items. Date: SATURDAY, January 12th Time: NEW TIME 10:00AM #1 Starts at Berlin Mini Storage: Route 346 #2 Continues at OC Mini Storage: Route 50 #3 Finishes at OC Mini Storage: Route 611 Terms: CASH ONLY! Auctioneer: Tom Janasek Classified Deadline is

www.facebook.com/OCBudgetMovers

Monday @ 5pm

TAXI MEDALIONS FOR SALE. 757-709-1920

Check out the

y r o t c e r i Service D

For a variety of Local Services

CLASSIFIED AD NETWORK Serving the Newspapers of Maryland, Delaware and the District of Columbia since 1908.

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING-Get FAA certification to MARYLAND STATEWIDE fix planes. Financial Aid if qualCLASSIFIED ADVERTISING ified. Approved for military NETWORK benefits. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-823AUTOMOBILE DONATIONS 6729. DONATE AUTOS, TRUCKS, REAL ESTATE RV'S. LUTHERAN MISSION SOCIETY. Your donation Delaware New Move-In helps local families with food, Ready Homes! Low Taxes! clothing, shelter, counseling. Close to Beaches, Gated, Tax deductible. MVA License Olympic pool. Homes from #W1044. 410-636-0123 or low $100’s, No HOA Fees. www.LutheranMissionSociety.org Brochures Available 1-866-629-0770 or BUSINESS SERVICES www.coolbranch.com Place a business card ad in the Regional Small Display 2x2/2x4 Advertising Network – Let MDDC help you grow your business! Call TODAY at 410-212-0616 to increase your customer base and get results.

SERVICESMISCELLANEOUS Increase your customer base and get great results by placing your ads in the MDDC – Classified Advertising network! Call today 410-2120616 Ask for Multi-Media Specialist -Wanda & watch your results grow. WANTED TO BUY OR TRADE FREON R12 WANTED: CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169; www.refrigerantfinders.com

Advertise in MDDC 410-723-6397

REAL ESTATE MARKETPLACE WHY RENT WHEN YOU CAN OWN!

LOVE AT FIRST SIGHT

152 SANDY HILL ROAD

408 YAWL DRIVE

This Residential Building Lot is Located in The Montego Bay Community in North Ocean City. The lot is zoned for mobile home, modular, and custom built 1 1/2 stories homes.The Montego Bay community features 2 adult pools, 1 kiddie pool, 2 tennis courts, 2 shuffleboard courts, 9 hole miniature golf course, bayfront boardwalk with fishing and crabbing piers, 8 acre wildlife sanctuary pond with a 1/2 mile walking path around it and a 5 acre park. Home owners fee is only $247.50/year. Offered at $124,990

This carefree 2-bedroom, 2-bath home is tastefully furnished and in mint condition. It requires little care so you can enjoy your time at the beach & pools. Don’t do a thing but sit back and relax on your large screened porch. Features include a formal dining room, large living room, kitchen with breakfast bar plus the bedrooms are a nice size. It is sure to be your favorite spot away from home. Located in a great family neighborhood in North Ocean City. It’s a dream come true for only $169,900. Call 800-252-2223 to see this gem today. WE ARE THE ORIGINAL Montego Bay Specialists Since 1971.

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

Larry Holdren Real Estate, Inc©

PRICE REDUCED

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

13901 Coastal Hwy., Suite 8, Ocean City, MD

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

For More Information Call 800-252-2223 • 410-250-2700

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

www.larryholdrenrealestate.com • email: ocmdhre@gmail.com

NORTH OCEAN CITY CONDO

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING LOT

This fully furnished 2BR/2BA condo is located in N. Ocean City and is situated within walking distance to the beach, the busline, a shopping center, convenience stores & many restaurants & bars. Features include a private courtyard, a private sundeck, a newer HVAC system and new patio doors & windows. Amenities include pools (both indoor & outdoor), tennis & boat storage. Listed at $178,900.

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020 108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

#119 CLUB OCEAN VILLAS II

This residential building lot is located in the Montego Bay community in N. Ocean City. The lot is zoned for mobile home, modular and stickbuilt construction. The community features pools, tennis, shuffleboard, min. golf, bayfront boardwalk and all City services. The HOA fees are just $247.50/yr. A great neighborhood to build your dream home. Listed at $112,500.

Montego Bay Realty

Call Michael “Montego Mike” Grimes

montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

108 S. Ocean Drive • Ocean City, MD

800-745-5988 • 410-250-3020

199 CLAM SHELL ROAD

Montego Bay Realty montegomike@verizon.net www.montegobayrealty.com

www.oceancitytoday.com


JANUARY 11, 2019

PAGE 41

Ocean City Today

BLINDS & SHADES

CLEANING SERVICE

CLEANING SERVICE

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RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL Keeping It Clean Call For A Free Estimate Donna Snyder - Owner 443-513-4024 Office 301-712-5224 Cell undercovercleaning@outlook.com

DOOR REPAIR

COSMETICS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

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women f The company for s • gifts • & more! r Cosmetics • skin care • body care • fragrance

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PAGE 42 Law Offices of Jeffrey Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 200 Calverton, Maryland 20705 240-473-5000

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY

204 6th Street Pocomoke City, MD 21851 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Michael W. Hillman, dated June 12, 2008, and recorded in Liber 5128, Folio 471 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction at Circuit Court for Worcester County, Courthouse Door for Worcester County, Snow Hill, MD on January 28, 2019 at 11:00 AM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND KNOWN AS metes and bounds, situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust, carrying Tax ID No. 01022164. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, agreements, easements, covenants and rights of way of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $14,000.00 will be required at the time of sale in the form of cash, certified check, or other form as the Substitute Trustees determine acceptable. No deposit shall be required of the noteholder where the noteholder bids in the property at auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, time being of the essence for purchaser. In the event that settlement does not occur within the said ten days, the purchaser shall be in default.  Upon such default the Trustees may file a Motion and Order to Resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser, and purchaser(s) hereby consent to entry of such resale order without further notice, in which case the deposit shall be forfeited and all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit.  The Trustees may then readvertise and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser; or, without reselling the property, the Trustees may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser.  In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser.  Interest to be paid on the purchase money less the stated deposit called for herein, at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note

Ocean City Today / Public Notices from the date of auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustee. There shall be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason, including but not limited to exceptions to sale, bankruptcy filings by interested parties, Court administration of the foreclosure or unknown title defects. All taxes, ground rent, water rent, condominium fees and/or homeowner association dues, all public charges/assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges, if applicable, are to be adjusted to the date of auction and thereafter are to be assumed by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, agricultural transfer tax, if any and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of damage to the property from the date of auction forward. If the Substitute Trustee does not convey title for any reason, including but not limited to the Secured Party executing a forbearance agreement with the borrower(s) described in the above-mentioned Deed of Trust, or allowing the borrower(s) to execute their right to reinstate or payoff the subject loan, prior to the sale, with or without the Substitute Trustee’s prior knowledge, or if the sale is not ratified for any reason including errors made by the Substitute Trustees, the foreclosure sale shall be null and void and of no effect, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy in law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit without interest. Further terms and particulars may be announced at time of sale, and purchaser may be required to execute a Memorandum of Sale at the time of auction. (Matter #22378) Jeffrey Nadel, Scott Nadel, Daniel Menchel and Doreen Strothman, Substitute Trustees MDC Auctioneers 305 West Chesapeake Avenue, Suite 105, Towson, Maryland 21204 410-825-2900 www.mdcauctioneers.com Ad #70767 OCD-1/10/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 5676 CASTLE HILL RD. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated August 24, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4983, Folio 144 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $113,578.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub.

Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 29, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid

JANUARY 11, 2019 off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 325102-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/10/3t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE WHEREAS, on February 24, 2009, a certain Deed of Trust was executed by Mark A. Teaney as Grantor(s) in favor of World Alliance Financial Corp. as Beneficiary, and Enterprise Services, LLC as Trustee(s), and was recorded on April 13, 2009, in Book 5237, Page 406 in the Office of the Land Records for Worcester County, Maryland; and WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust is now owned by the Secretary, pursuant to an assignment dated April 26, 2013, and recorded on April 29, 2013, in Book 6135, Page 248, in the office of the Land Records for Worcester County, Maryland; and WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Deed of Trust in that the payment due on July 29, 2017, was not made and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this notice, and a Borrower has died and the Property is not the principal residence of at least one surviving Borrower, and no payment has been made sufficient to restore the loan to currency; and· WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent as of December 31, 2018 is $601,269.28; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness


JANUARY 11, 2019 secured by the Deed of Trust to be immediately due and payable; NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, notice is hereby given that on January 22, 2019 at 3:23pm local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the following described premises (“Property”) will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder: Commonly known as: 403 Ocean Parkway, Berlin, MD 21811 Tax ID: 03-066894 The sale will be held at the courthouse entrance for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid $306,000.00. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorata share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a deposit totaling $30,600.00 in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. A deposit need not accompany each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of $30,600.00 must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within 30 days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveying fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extensions will be for 15-day increments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form of a certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of HUD. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder may be required to forfeit the cash deposit or, at the election of the foreclosure commissioner after consultation with the HUD representative, will be liable to HUD for any costs incurred as a result of

Ocean City Today / Public Notices such failure. The Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD representative, offer the property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein. HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant. The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be cancelled or adjourned if it is established, by documented written application of the mortgagor to the Foreclosure Commissioner not less than 3 days before the date of sale, or otherwise, that the default or defaults upon which the foreclosure is based did not exist at the time of service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified or cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before public auction of the property is completed. The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is N/A (Full Balance Due), plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-of-pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner for recording documents, a commission for the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement. Tender of payment by certified or cashier’s check or application for cancellation of the foreclosure sale shall be submitted to the address of the Foreclosure Commissioner provided below. Date: December 12, 2018 Cohn, Goldberg & Deutsch, LLC Foreclosure Commissioner BY: /s/ Richard E. Solomon (CPF#9112190178) Richard E. Solomon Cohn, Goldberg & Deutsch, LLC 600 Baltimore Avenue, Suite 208 Towson, MD 21204 410-296-2550 IF YOU ARE A DEBTOR, OR AN ATTORNEY REPRESENTING A DEBTOR, THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED HEREBY WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. However, if you are either a debtor in a pending bankruptcy case, or have obtained an order of discharge from a United States Bankruptcy Court, which discharge includes this debt, or an at-

torney representing such a debtor, and you (or your client), has not reaffirmed liability for this debt, this office is not attempting to obtain a judgment against you (or your client) nor are we alleging that you (or your client) have any personal liability for this debt. We may, however, take action against any property which may have been pledged as collateral for the debt, which action may include repossession and/or foreclosure of the property, if otherwise permitted by law and/or order of court. OCD-1/3/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 4340 East West Highway, Suite 600 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 3917 MARKET ST. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Shawn Johnson dated May 18, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4744, folio 725 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 25, 2019 AT 1:00 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. Tax ID #02-010720. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $14,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser

PAGE 43 from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale. In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit. The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property. In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale. Trustees’ file number 71631. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/10/3t _________________________________ Alba Law Group, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road Executive Plaza I, Suite 302 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 66 CAMELOT CIRCLE BERLIN, MD 21811 CASE NUMBER C-23-CV-18-000001                            Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from April Lynn Braica, Bart Michael Braica, recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 6286, folio 356, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Mark S. Devan, Thomas P. Dore, Brian McNair, and Angela Nasuta as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction,  at the Courthouse Door, 1


PAGE 44 West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, 21863 on Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 6286, folio 356, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 7169, folio 343. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. The purchaser assumes all risks of loss for the property as of the date of sale.  Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property.  The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE:   A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $30,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale.  Any amount tendered at sale in excess of the required deposit will be refunded and not applied to the purchase price.  Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within ten (10) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  Time is of the essence.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 4.75000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement.  Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited.  The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages.  Defaulting purchaser also agrees to pay the Substituted Trustees’ attorney a fee of $350.00 in connection with the filing of a motion to resell. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse

JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today / Public Notices against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor.  Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Mark S. Devan, Thomas P. Dore, Brian McNair, and Angela Nasuta, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com Ad # 70678 OCD-1/3/3t _________________________________ BRADFORD I. WEBB, ASSIGNEE Andrew L. Hartman, Assignee

ASSIGNEES’ SALE

OF A SINGLE-FAMILY DWELLING 507 Maple St Snow Hill, Maryland 21863   Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Mortgage from Ne’Cole Tucker to Rural Housing Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture dated 1/25/2007 and recorded in Liber 4859, Folio 17 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, the holder of the indebtedness secured by a Mortgage assigned to Bradford I. Webb and Andrew L. Hartman, Assignees by instrument duly executed, acknowledged and recorded among the Land Records of the County aforesaid, default having occurred under the terms thereof, an Order to Docket having been filed C-23-CV18-000281 and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the Assignees will offer for sale at public auction   AT THE WORCESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2019 AT 10:36 AM   ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and described as follows: See metes and bounds description set forth in that certain deed dated January 25, 2007 and recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland in Liber 4859, folio 014, containing 5.000 square feet of land, more or less. The property is improved by a dwelling.  In fee-simple. The property and improvements will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, including building and/or environmental violations, if any, with no warranty, expressed or implied as to the description or condition of the property or improvements.  TERMS OF SALE: A cash deposit, certified check or other method of payment acceptable to Assignees, for Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) at the time of sale will be required of all purchasers other than the mortgage holder.  Balance of the purchase price is to be paid in cash

within ten (10) business days of the final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. If payment of the balance does not take place within ten (10) business days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. Unless purchased by the mortgage holder, interest will be paid on unpaid purchase money at the rate of interest set forth in the note from date of sale to date of settlement. Taxes, public charges and assessments and HOA assessments, if any, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all transfer and recordation taxes shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for removing anyone in possession of the premises. If Assignee is unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit.  Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Assignees. Bradford I. Webb, Assignee – 410-857-3222 Andrew L. Hartman, Assignee – 443-825-4065 www.tidewaterauctions.com Ad # 70727 OCD-1/3/3t _________________________________    BRADFORD I. WEBB, ASSIGNEE Andrew L. Hartman, Assignee

ASSIGNEES’ SALE

OF A SINGLE-FAMILY DWELLING 4250 Spire Ct Snow Hill, Maryland 21863   Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Mortgage from Shinika Blue Pitts to Rural Housing Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture dated 7/8/2004 and recorded in Liber 4191, Folio 321 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, the holder of the indebtedness secured by a Mortgage assigned to Bradford I. Webb and Andrew L. Hartman, Assignees by instrument duly executed, acknowledged and recorded among the Land Records of the County aforesaid, default having occurred under the terms thereof, an Order to Docket having been filed C-23-CV18-000254 and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the Assignees will offer for sale at public auction   AT THE WORCESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2019 AT 10:33 AM   ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and described as follows: Lot 11, Section 2, “Snow Hill Estate” as shown on a plat recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber F.W.H. 52 at Folio 55, containing 20,127 square feet of land, more or less.

The property is improved by a dwelling. In fee-simple. The property and improvements will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, including building and/or environmental violations, if any, with no warranty, expressed or implied as to the description or condition of the property or improvements.  TERMS OF SALE: A cash deposit, certified check or other method of payment acceptable to Assignees, for Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) at the time of sale will be required of all purchasers other than the mortgage holder.  Balance of the purchase price is to be paid in cash within ten (10) business days of the final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. If payment of the balance does not take place within ten (10) business days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  Unless purchased by the mortgage holder, interest will be paid on unpaid purchase money at the rate of interest set forth in the note from date of sale to date of settlement. Taxes, public charges and assessments and HOA assessments, if any, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all transfer and recordation taxes shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for removing anyone in possession of the premises. If Assignee is unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit.  Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Assignees. Bradford I. Webb, Assignee – 410-857-3222 Andrew L. Hartman, Assignee – 443-825-4065 www.tidewaterauctions.com Ad # 70728 OCD-1/3/3t _________________________________   BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 107 SEA LA. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated September 22, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5000, Folio 144 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $440,000.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St.,


JANUARY 11, 2019 Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 22, 2019 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $39,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the

Ocean City Today / Public Notices return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 165832-3) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/3/3t _________________________________ BRADFORD I. WEBB, ASSIGNEE Andrew L. Hartman, Assignee

ASSIGNEES’ SALE

OF A SINGLE-FAMILY DWELLING 216 11th St Pocomoke City, Maryland 21851   Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a certain Mortgage from Donald Ayres to Rural Housing Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture dated 8/11/2005 and recorded in Liber 4505, Folio 59 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, the holder of the indebtedness secured by a Mortgage assigned to Bradford I. Webb and Andrew L. Hartman, Assignees by instrument duly executed, acknowledged and recorded among the Land Records of the County aforesaid, default having occurred under the terms thereof, an Order to Docket having been filed C-23-CV18-000253 and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the Assignees will offer for sale at public auction   AT THE WORCESTER COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT ON FRIDAY, JANUARY 18, 2019 AT 10:30 AM   ALL THAT LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester County, Maryland and described as follows: Lot 4 in subdivision plat entitled “Marshall’s Corner” recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber S.V.H. No. 4368, folio 698 et seq. The property is improved by a dwelling.  In fee-simple. The property and improvements will be sold in an “AS IS” condition and subject to conditions, restric-

tions and agreements of record affecting same, including building and/or environmental violations, if any, with no warranty, expressed or implied as to the description or condition of the property or improvements. TERMS OF SALE: A cash deposit, certified check or other method of payment acceptable to Assignees, for Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) at the time of sale will be required of all purchasers other than the mortgage holder.  Balance of the purchase price is to be paid in cash within ten (10) business days of the final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. If payment of the balance does not take place within ten (10) business days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  Unless purchased by the mortgage holder, interest will be paid on unpaid purchase money at the rate of interest set forth in the note from date of sale to date of settlement. Taxes, public charges and assessments and HOA assessments, if any, to be adjusted for the current year to date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all transfer and recordation taxes shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for removing anyone in possession of the premises. If Assignee is unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or in equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit.  Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Assignees. Bradford I. Webb, Assignee – 410-857-3222 Andrew L. Hartman, Assignee – 443-825-4065 www.tidewaterauctions.com Ad # 70729 OCD-1/3/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE

OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 12135 LANDINGS BLVD., UNIT #101 BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated December 17, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5039, Folio 28 and re-recorded in Liber 7221, Folio 124 among the Land Records of Worcester County, MD, with an original principal balance of $311,180.00, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester County, at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 22, 2019 AT 3:33 PM

PAGE 45 ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and described as Unit No. 3 (also known as Unit No. 101), in Phase 3 of the “Bayside Condominium” and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $27,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. Purchaser is responsible for any recapture of homestead tax credit. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, to the extent such amounts survive foreclosure sale, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. Any deferred water and sewer charges that purports to cover or defray cost during construction of public water or wastewater facilities constructed by the developer and subject to an annual fee or assessment are to be paid by the purchaser to the lienholder and are a contractual obligation between the lienholder and each owner of this property, and is not a fee or assessment imposed by the county. Any right of prepayment or discount for early prepayment of water and sewer charges may be ascertained by contacting the lienholder. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without inter-


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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

est. If purchaser fails to settle within ten days of ratification, subject to order of court, purchaser agrees that property will be resold and entire deposit retained by Sub. Trustees as liquidated damages for all losses occasioned by the purchaser’s default and purchaser shall have no further liability. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. Sub. Trustees will convey either marketable or insurable title. If they cannot deliver one or the other, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is return of the deposit without interest. (Matter No. 329998-1) PLEASE CONSULT WWW.ALEXCOOPER.COM FOR STATUS OF UPCOMING SALES Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et. al., Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS, INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-1/3/3t _________________________________

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL:

REPAIRS TO BULKHEAD The Ocean Pines Association (OPA) invites qualified bidders to submit proposals for the repair of existing bulkhead at Westfield Circle Tax Map 16 Parcel 47 various lots and Wood Duck Drive Tax Map 21 Parcel 260 Lots 84-86 in Ocean Pines, MD. All bidders must include adequate information to demonstrate that they have the necessary experience and professional qualifications and licensing to complete the work. Bids Due. bids are due by Friday January 14, 2019 by 3:00 PM. Bids should be delivered to: Ocean Pines Association, Inc. Public Works Building 1 Firehouse Lane Ocean Pines, MD 21811 Attention: Kevin Layfield Facilities Manager klayfield@oceanpines.org OCD-12/20/4t _________________________________

NOTICE

OF PASSAGE OF BILL 18-7 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 18-7 (Zoning - Campgrounds - Recreational Vehicle Camping Areas) was passed by the County Commissioners on December 18, 2018. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § ZS 1-318(c)(3)B. (Repeals and reenacts this subsection to remove the requirement for a specific angle of access and egress to each pullthrough campsites in rental and membership campgrounds. The current language requires an angle of between one hundred twenty and

one hundred thirty-five degrees, which may not be appropriate in all cases and is better self-regulated by the owner of the campground.) This bill becomes effective fortyfive (45) days from the date of its passage. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester County Government Center outside Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at www.co.worcester.md.us . THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-12/27/3t _________________________________

NOTICE Disposal of Personal Property Owned by Worcester County, Maryland In accordance with the provisions of Section CG 4-403 of the County Government Article of the Code of Public Local Laws of Worcester County, Maryland, the County Commissioners have declared the following described personal property as surplus and are considering disposal of same by conveyance back to the Ocean Pines Volunteer Fire Department which proposes to use this property for other public purposes. 1985 FORD/PEIRCE FIRE ENGINE The 1985 Ford/Peirce fire engine was donated to the County by the Ocean Pines Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) in 2008 to be used by the Worcester County Special Hazards Response Team (Hazmat), the Worcester Technical High Scheol’s cadet vocational program and as a reserve engine for the County’s Fire Service. Recently, mechanical engine problems were discovered during a routine scheduled maintenance inspection. Due to the age of the truck, the lack of usage and the estimated cost to repair the vehicle, it has been decommissioned. By agreement upon acceptance of this fire engine from the Ocean Pines VFD, the County agreed to offer the Ocean Pines VFD the opportunity to take the fire engine back. DETERMINED TO BE USED FOR OTHER PUBLIC PURPOSE: The County Commissioners have determined, by at least five-sevenths majority vote, that conveyance of this personal property to the Ocean Pines Volunteer Fire Department, constitutes a valid public purpose. TERMS OF CONVEYANCE: The County Commissioners propose to convey the above described property to the Ocean Pines Volunteer Fire Department at no cost. Anyone objecting to the proposed conveyance of the above personal property shall do so in writing submitted to the address below prior to 4:30 p.m. on Friday, January 11, 2019, or in person at the regularly scheduled meeting of the County Commissioners to be held at 10:00 a.m. on January 22, 2019 in the

County Commissioners Meeting Room, Room 1101 - Government Center, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland 21863. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-12/27/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. ONEITA S. DOHRMAN TERESA L. DOHRMAN W. CHARLIES DOHRMAN, JR. 14001 Coastal Highway Unit 328 Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. C-23-CV-18-000259

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given this 20th day of December, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 14001 Coastal Highway, Unit 328, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 21st day of January, 2019, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 14th day of January, 2019. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $107,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/27/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 6003 Executive Blvd., Suite 101 Rockville, MD 20852 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. THERESA NIELSON 8 Canal Side Mews West Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-16-000605

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given this 20th day of December, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 8 Canal Side Mews

JANUARY 11, 2019 West, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 21st day of January, 2019, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 14th day of January, 2019. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $550,000.00. Susan R. Braniecki Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/27/3t _________________________________ KIRK SIMPKINS & SIMPKINS, PA. ATTORNEYS AT LAW P.O. BOX 550 PRINCESS ANNE. MD 21353 TELEPHONE 410-651-4400 MARK GOSNELL P.O. Box 11961 Gwynn Oak, MD 21207 Plaintiff VS. JOHN F. KLOSEK 5433 Kerger Road Ellicott City, MD 21043-7042 And JOAN A. KLOSEK 5433 Kerger Road Ellicott City, MD 21043-7042 And WHITE HORSE PARK COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION c/o Ayres, Jenkins, Gordy & Almand 6200 Coastal Hwy., Suite 200 Ocean City, MD 21842 And WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Serve on: Phillip G. Thompson, Treasurer P.O.Box248 Snow Hill, MD 21863 And All persons or Corporations having Or claiming to have interest in the hereinafter described properties situate in Worcester County, Maryland Defendants CIVIL NO. C-23-CV-18-000336 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY STATE OF MARYLAND

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

The object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of all rights of redemption in the following property, sold by the Collector of Taxes for the County of Worcester and the State of Maryland to the Plaintiff in this proceeding: "The property located in Worcester County, further described as List Number: 64 Parcel Number: 03119440 Property Description Lot 190 PH 1 SEC 3 Timberline Circle PL White Horse Park assessed to: Klosek John F & Klosek, Joan A." The Complaint states, among other things, that the amounts necessary for redemption have not been


JANUARY 11, 2019 paid. It is thereupon this 8th of November, 2018, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, ORDERED, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this order in some newspaper having a general circulation in Worcester County once a week for 3 successive weeks, warning all persons interested in the property to appear in this Court by the January 15, 2019, and redeem “The property located in WorcesterCounty, further described as List Number: 64 Parcel Number: 03119440 Property Description Lot 190 PH 1 SEC 3 Timberline Circle PL White Horse Park assessed to: Klosek John F & Klosek, Joan A.” and answer the complaint or thereafter a final judgment will be entered foreclosing all rights of redemption in the property, and vesting in the plaintiff a title, free and clear of all encumbrances. Failure to answer or redeem this property within the time allowed may result in a Judgment foreclosing the right 0f redemption. Beau H. Oglesby Judge 11/08/2018 02:13:43 PM Entered: Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, MD November 16, 2018 OCD-12/27/3t _________________________________

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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

NOTICE

The Mayor and City Council, a public community transit service provider in Ocean City, Maryland, is offering the opportunity for a public hearing to provide citizens a forum to present views on the following proposals: FY 2020 Annual Transportation Plan (ATP). The ATP contains requests for operating funds from the following programs: Section 5311 of the Federal Transit Act, which provides funds for general public transit service in rural areas; Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) program, which provides funds for federally required para transit services for persons with disabilities. In addition, capital funds will be requested for the following items: ITEM Public Works Campus Plan Construction One (1) year preventative maintenance and repairs including parts and labor for rolling stock Twenty One (21) 40’ heavy duty bus replacements One (1) ADA para transit van replacement Four (4) 60’ heavy duty articulating buses Four (4) ADA accessible non-fare transit supervisor vehicles Replace Park N Ride parking lot light fixtures with LED retrofit energy efficient units Five (5) year preventative maintenance and supplies for bus wash system Bus stop shelters and replacement parts Automated passenger counting (APC) systems for transit buses On board announcement (OBA) for transit buses TOTAL

TOTAL $7,010,000 $785,000 $10,080,000 $68,000 $3,200,000 $240,000 $90,000 $50,000 $50,000 $350,000 $300,000 $22,223,000

A Public Hearing will be held upon request. Requests for a Public Hearing must be in writing and received prior to 4 p.m. on Friday, February 8, 2019. Requests for a Public Hearing and/or other written comments should be sent to the following address and clearly marked “Public Hearing Comments”:

NOTICE

OF PUBLIC HEARINGS BOARD OF PORT WARDENS Pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 106, “Waterways,” Article II – “Shoreline Development” of the Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, hereinafter referred to as the Code, same being the Port Wardens Ordinance of Ocean City, Maryland, notice is hereby given that public hearings will be conducted in the Council Chambers of City Hall located at 301 Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, MD Thursday January 10, 2019 At 2:00 PM A request has been submitted to install 40’ rplcmt vnyl blkhd w/max chwd dist 18”. Replc ex 6’x24’ pier, 6’x12’ pltfrm, 6’x40’ dock & btlft inkind, same footprint. Instl (1) PWC lift w/assoc piles. Max chwd dist 34.5’ from face of new blkhd at 715 Harbour Dr Parcel #8020A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: McGinty Marine Constr Owner: Constantina Dorsey PW18-132 A request has been submitted to rplc ex 2’6”x22’ pier w/3’x32’ pier & instl (1) btlft w/assoc piles w/max chwd dist 32’ at 225 26th St Slip 20 Parcel #5710 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: McGinty Marine Constr Owner: David Hopkins PW18-133 A request has been submitted to

Ocean City Transportation 204 65th Street, Building E Ocean City, Maryland 21842 Written comments can also be emailed to: Mr. Mark D. Rickards at mdrickards@oceancitymd.gov If requested, a Public Hearing will be held: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 6:00 p.m. City Hall Council Chambers 301 Baltimore Avenue Ocean City, Maryland 21842 If special assistance is required at the Public Hearing contact Transportation Administrative Coordinator at 410-723-2174 prior to 4 p.m. Friday, February 8, 2018. OCD-1/10/5t ________________________________________________________________________________________________________ instl (1) btlft w/assoc piles, (1) 6’x8’ float jet dock. Max dist chwd 21.5’ at 2800 Gull Way Unit A Parcel #5038 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: McGinty Marine Constr Owner: Wendy Dona PW18-134 A request has been submitted to instl 3 ½’x13’ pier ext & instl (1) btlft w/assoc piles. Max chwd dist 50’ at 631 Bayshore Dr Unit F Parcel #5277 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: McGinty Marine Constr Owner: John Owens PW18-135 A request has been submitted to instl 50’ vnyl blkhd, 4’x50’ dock & (1) btlft w/assoc piles. Max chwd dist 16’ at 704 141st St Parcel #9426A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: McGinty Marine Construction Owner: Lee Sturgill PW18-136 A request has been submitted to instl a btlft w/4 poles 20’ chwd of

community walkway at 122 Georgia Ave Parcel # 5268A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Ocean City Boatlifts & Marine Constr Owner: Oliver & Tandy Morgan PW18-137 A request has been submitted to instl a btlft w/4 poles & resize ex 4’x13’ pier to 18” x 13’. Chwd 22’ from the blkhd at 2808 Plover Dr Unit D Parcel # 4800 in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: Ocean City Boatlifts & Marine Constr Owner: Sameh Wanis PW18-138 A request has been submitted to instl 10’x10’ float dock from EZDock & 3’ x 30’ aluminum ADA compliant ramp to go from blkhd to float dock. Dock will extend 10’ from blkhd, leaving 140’ of channel at 11703 Coastal Hwy Parcel # 5318A in the Town of Ocean City, MD Applicant: David Butz

Owner: Peddler’s Square Inc PW18-139 OCD-1/3/2t _________________________________ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON 3509 COASTAL HIGHWAY OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 SMALL ESTATE

NOTICE

OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 17675 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF KATHLEEN M. HAYES Notice is given that David Joseph Hayes, 8653 Old Racetrack Road, Delmar, DE 19940 and Patrick Michael, Hayes, 12 Harpoon Road, Berlin, MD 21811, were on January 02, 2019 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Kathleen M. Hayes who died on July 5,


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Ocean City Today / Public Notices

2018, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. David Joseph Hayes Patrick Michael Hayes Personal Representatives True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Terri Westcott One W. Market Street

Room 102 - Court House Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 10, 2019 OCD-1/10/1t _________________________________

p.m. at Fire Station 2, 102 Dorchester St., Ocean City, MD 21842. Sealed Bid Documents are due Thursday, January 31, 2019 by 1:00 p.m. at which time they will be opened and read aloud. Bids are to be submitted to the Town of Ocean City, Attn: Procurement Manager, 204 65th Street, Bldg. A, Ocean City, MD 21842. Late Bid Document will not be accepted. Minority vendors are encouraged to compete for award of the solicitation. OCD-1/10/1t _________________________________

Town of Ocean City

BID SOLICITATION Fire Station 2 Roofing

The Town of Ocean City is seeking bids from qualified and experienced vendors for Fire Station 2 Roofing and to be in conformity with the scope of work detailed in the Bid Documents. Bid Documents for Fire Station 2 Roofing may be obtained from the Town of Ocean City’s Procurement Department by either e-mailing the Purchasing Associate, Leila Milewski, at lmilewski@oceancitymd.gov or by calling 410-723-6643 during normal business hours, or via the Bid tab on the Town’s website. Vendors are responsible for checking this website for addenda prior to submitting their bids. The Town of Ocean City is not responsible for the content of any Bid Document received through any third party bid service. It is the sole responsibility of the vendor to ensure the completeness and accuracy of their Completed Bid Documents. A Pre-Bid meeting will be held on Thursday, January 17, 2019 at 1:00

OCEAN CITY TODAY Legal Advertising Call NANCY HAWRYLKO 410-723-6397, Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net

BID NOTICE

Vehicle Vending Franchise Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Chapter 39, Article VII, entitled Vehicle Vending, Code of the Town of Ocean City, Maryland, the Mayor and City Council will accept sealed bids for a vehicle vending franchise operator. This franchise allows vending prepared, pre-packaged food from a motorized vehicle to operate on certain public ways of Ocean City. Bidders are subject to all conditions, terms and provisions set forth in Chapter 39 of the City Code, copies of which may be obtained at the City Clerk’s Office. Bids shall be submitted in accordance with the conditions and provisions herein. 1. The franchise will be for a term of four (4) years. The 4-year term includes the summer of 2019, 2020, 2021 and 2022 with a contract expiration date of December 31, 2022. 2. There shall be only one franchise and franchise operator. Such franchise and operator are limited to a maximum of six (6) trucks or vehicles, which must be motorized and must meet all standards of the State Health Department. 3. Bids must be submitted to the City Manager’s Office no later than 4:30 p.m. on Monday, February 11. Bids shall be opened at the 1:00 p.m. Work Session on Tuesday, February 12. Bids must be submitted on a bid form provided in the bid packet, placed in a sealed envelope, and marked “Vehicle Vending Franchise Bid.” Bid packets are available on the Procurement webpage at oceancitymd.gov or upon request by emailing the City Clerk at dchavis@oceancitymd.gov. 4. The bid shall be accompanied by a cashier’s or certified check in the amount of eighty percent (80%) of the first year’s bid amount. 5. The bid shall be awarded to the highest bidder, except that, should the Council determine there are irregularities in such bidding, the Council may reject such bids as it deems appropriate and postpone the awarding of bids if it so desires. In the event of tie bids, the first in time received shall be deemed the successful bid. Credit, bank and personal references will be verified. Industry experience may also be

JANUARY 11, 2019 taken into consideration. 6. For the protection of the public and the Mayor and City Council, the successful bidder must obtain, at the operator’s own expense, comprehensive automobile liability insurance coverage in at least the amount of $1,000,000.00 per person and $2,000,000.00 per occurrence for bodily injury and $200,000.00 for property damage and comprehensive general liability insurance, with a combined single limit of $2,000,000.00 for both bodily injury and property damage, which shall include product liability insurance in the amount of at least $1,000,000.00. Such insurance coverage shall name the Mayor and City Council as additional insured, and a certificate of insurance evidencing such coverage shall be furnished to the Mayor and City Council by the operator and be approved by the City Clerk of Ocean City before the operator engages in the selling of food items from any public ways. Submit bid to: City Manager’s Office VEHICLE VENDING FRANCHISE BID Town of Ocean City City Hall Room 230 301 N. Baltimore Avenue, Ocean City, Maryland 21842 Please contact City Clerk Diana Chavis at 410-289-8842 for questions. OCD-1/10/2t _________________________________ Bradford I. Webb, Esq. 305 W. Chesapeake Avenue, Suite 105 Towson, MD 21204 410-857-3222 brad@bwebblaw.com BRADFORD I. WEBB, Assignee and ANDREW I. HARTMAN, Assignee Plaintiffs v. Janice M. Shockley Defendant In The Circuit Court For Worcester County Case No.: C-23-CV-18-000226

NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby issued by the Circuit Court for Worcester County this 2nd day of January, 2019, that the sale of the property located at 307 PURNELL ST., SNOW HILL, MD 21863, made and reported by Bradford I. Webb, Assignee, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 4th day of February, 2019, provided, a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said county, once in each of three successive weeks, before the 28th day of January, 2019. The Report of Sale states the amount of sale to be One Hundred Thousand One Hundred Sixty Dollars and No Cents ($100,160.00). Susan R. Braniecki Clerk Circuit Court for Worcester County True Copy Test: Susan R. Braniecki Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-1/10/3t _________________________________


Commentary

Ocean City Today Jan. 11, 2019

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Pay our Coast Guard As of Thursday morning, the Pay Our Coast Guard Act, sat on the legislative calendar under “General Orders,” which means members of the Senate might or might not get to it before next Tuesday. In addition, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he won’t entertain any legislation the president won’t sign, so there’s a question about that as well. The House version of the measure was introduced Wednesday and referred to the House Appropriations Committee. It has a better chance of success there, but it remains to be seen whether the Republican-controlled Senate and the Democratic-controlled House will produce a merged version that will be signed by the president and become law in time to make next Tuesday’s Coast Guard payroll. Or the payroll after that, or … The only thing crew members at Coast Guard Station in Ocean City know is their last paychecks were issued on Dec. 31 and the next ones in their two-week pay cycle are due Jan. 15. They also know they must continue to do their jobs with or without pay because they have no choice as members of the armed forces. And yes, the Coast Guard is one of the country’s five branches of the military, even though it’s often treated differently by the federal government because it’s the smallest, with about 41,000 active duty personnel. That makes it easy, one supposes, to overlook. It’s also billeted under the Department of Homeland Security, rather than the Defense Department, because it’s also a law enforcement agency, and therefore subject to this government shutdown over a multi-billion-dollar border wall that may or may not be vital to our well-being. The Coast Guard, however, is the wall we do need. It’s responsible for migrant interdictions and preventing drug smuggling along 95,000 miles of U.S. coastline. And it might not get paid. Landlords, loan companies and grocery stores want their money, and the electric and phone bills won’t be put on hold. If these Pay Our Coast Guard bills aren’t approved and signed by next Tuesday, there’s something so wrong with our system and our priorities that no wall anywhere is going to fix it.

Ocean City Today P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 / Fax: 410-723-6511.

EDITOR ............................................ Stewart Dobson MANAGING EDITOR................................ Lisa Capitelli ASSOCIATE EDITOR .................................. Josh Davis STAFF WRITERS .................. Greg Ellison, Morgan Pilz, .......................................................... Rachel Ravina ASSISTANT PUBLISHER .......................... Elaine Brady ACCOUNT MANAGERS ........ Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS MANAGER ...... Nancy Hawrylko SENIOR DESIGNER ................................ Susan Parks GRAPHIC ARTISTS ................ Kelly Brown, Kyle Phillips PUBLISHER ...................................... Christine Brown ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT ...................... Gini Tufts Ocean City Today is published weekly by FLAG Publications, Inc. at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Ocean City Today is available by subscription at $150 a year. Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.com. Copyright 2019

Rerun from Feb. 5, 2016

PUBLIC EYE

CG tour served me well

Referencing the editorial next door by the staff know-it-all who, of course, is me, I should disclose that I was in the Coast Guard. You could say my tour was four years of undistinguished service, except that I learned to tie several kinds of knots, all of which I’m inclined to use at the same time for no apparent reason (I also can hem pants with a stapler, not that there’s much call for that these days). But as for my knot-tying By prowess, all I can say is after Stewart I tie down my kayak in the Dobson back of the truck, I could drive off the edge of the Grand Canyon and it’s going nowhere. We’re talking bowlines, clove hitches, sheepshanks, sheet bends, rolling hitches and reef knots holding it securely in place. “Would you look at that,” the Grand Canyon cleanup crew says a mile below my point of departure, “someone’s tied a perfectly good kayak to a canned ham. Imagine that.” And, of course, there’s French whipping, which, to be clear, is not an unsavory exercise practiced on willing participants by can-can girls. It’s a decorative series of half-hitches tied around a stationary object so you can look busy when there are other things to do that you would rather avoid. “Are you going to cut the grass, or what?” she asked. “In a little bit. I just need to finish tying down the kayak with this cool French whipping.” “Where is your kayak, anyway?” “Right here, in the truck,” I replied.

“Hmmm,” she observed in a tone that suggests sarcasm, “it must be hidden under what appears to be an afghan crocheted by chimpanzees.” The thing is, if you know how to do something, you do it, which brings me to my cargorigging and handling abilities, otherwise known in this household as how to yank the rear bumper off your (now deceased) little truck with blocks, tackle and a tree stump with, apparently, roots to China. I learned about rigging and such on my first week aboard ship, when I was told, “Good news, Dobson, you’re in charge of maintaining the boom.” “Great!” I replied. “Who’s working with me?” “That would be no one.” Not being a big fan of heights, I’d say the very top of the boom rigging was either 750 or 25 feet above the main deck, depending on your point of view. Nevertheless, and stoutly armed with a grease gun full of (real name unavailable, generic name unprintable), I climbed up to the main blocks, found the fittings and — realized I could shoot long squirts of grease (Wormalube, I christened it) at my hapless peers below. Unfortunately, Warrant Officer Pierce was not one of them. One errant white worm squiggling through the air and suddenly he’s looking down at a seven-inch stripe of goo on his crisply pressed sleeve and … That’s the other thing I learned in the Coast Guard. It’s not good to irritate someone who has more authority than you. So, come this weekend, when I’m restricted to base and working off my 28 hours of extra duty, I won’t be in unfamiliar territory.


Letters Harris’ seismic opposition does not go far enough This letter was sent to Rep. Andy Harris and forwarded to Ocean City Today. Dear Rep. Harris, On behalf of the over 1,000 members of the Coastal Association of Realtors, I implore you to take a strong stance in opposition to the practice of seismic airgun testing off Maryland’s coast. This testing is extremely dangerous and we are concerned about how it will impact our industry, as well as the Eastern Shore’s economy as a whole. If the tourism and fishing industries are negatively impacted by seismic airgun testing, the real estate industry will suffer. We rely on the success of local businesses, as well as the area’s appeal to tourists, high quality of life for residents, and the health of our natural assets. Seismic airgun testing and subsequent offshore drilling will irrevocably damage our coastline, our way of life, and our livelihood. In 2017, our members sold over $984 million in real estate in Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester Coun-

Ocean City Today Jan. 11, 2019

to the editor

ties. Of that amount, over $450 million was sold in Ocean City, which would suffer the hardest economic blow as a result of fish kills and oil spills. The Lower Eastern Shore cannot afford to lose that economic activity. We are aware that you are, in fact, opposed to seismic airgun testing. However, we are also aware that you declined to sign a bi-partisan letter to take a stance against President Trump’s recent approval of seismic surveys for Atlantic drilling. According to a recent communication we received from the Greater Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, you told Oceana that you did not feel comfortable signing a letter that broadly condemns oil and gas exploration in the entirety of the Atlantic. Additionally, according to a recent article in Ocean City Today, you do not feel comfortable speaking for other states on this issue. Your constituents in District 1 don’t need you to speak for other states on this issue. They need you to speak for one state – Maryland – whose interests you are sworn to protect. Maryland needs you to join forces with all the other states from Delaware to Florida and tell the ad-

ministration that we will not stand for seismic airgun testing and offshore drilling. Please do the right thing for the people who depend on you to represent them in Washington. Bernie Flax President Coastal Association of Realtors

Harris has strong stance against seismic testing Editor, A few weeks ago, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) authorized several companies to harm marine mammals like dolphins and whales with seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic Ocean. This dangerous and extremely loud exploration method is used by private companies to identify potential oil and gas deposits deep below the seafloor. It’s great to see Congressman Andy Harris expressing his opposition to seismic airgun blasting for dirty and dangerous offshore drilling. As the congressman rightly points out, if this dangerous activity moves forward, “there is undoubtedly a risk to our coastal economy that relies so heavily upon tourism, fishing, and

Page 50 recreation.” Having a champion in Congressman Harris against offshore drilling is great news for Maryland’s coast and all the businesses who rely on a healthy ocean for their livelihoods. Protecting the entire Atlantic from offshore drilling is the only way to keep Maryland’s coast safe and it’s time for President Trump to reverse course on his radical offshore drilling plans. Congressman Harris stands with hundreds of municipalities, thousands of businesses and all East Coast governors, including Governor Hogan who are all opposed to the Trump administration’s proposal for massive offshore drilling expansion. The Atlantic Ocean has been protected from oil exploration and drilling for over thirty years and many business leaders are forcefully voicing their opposition to drilling in the Atlantic because they saw what happened to the tourism industry after the BP Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded and spewed millions of gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. As soon as the oil spilled, hoteliers began to experience booking cancellations, and tourists began to abanContinued on Page 51


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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

WORLD WAR II

Continued from Page 50 don vacation plans, even in areas without oiled beaches. An oil spill knows no borders. A spill off the coast of one state could have devastating consequences for the ecosystems and economies of its neighbors. Thank you, Congressman Harris, for taking a strong position against seismic airgun blasting for oil and offshore drilling. It’s great to have elected leaders like you standing up for the Chesapeake Bay, Maryland’s blue crabs and Ocean City business owners. Diane Hoskins, Oceana campaign director

Anniversary of Battleship Richelieu

Mathias, on last day, thanks constituents Editor, As I write this on my last full day as your State Senator for District 38, I want to thank all my constituents and our neighbors in Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester counties for the privilege of serving you and our Lower Eastern Shore. My 2018 campaign provided you, the voters of our district, a summary of my accomplishments, my leadership, and my relationship-building across our local, state, and federal governments and agencies: • In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, I secured critical FEMA aid to Crisfield and Somerset County residents. • I protected our legacy agriculture and poultry industries. • For our loved ones entrenched in a fight against cancer, my legislation offered enhanced access and more timely treatment. • My legislation continued to fund the dualization of Route 113, the one of most dangerous roadways in Maryland. • My work provided opportunities and respect for our veterans. • I helped to protect our environment – our oceans, bays, and open spaces – that are so important to our Shore legacy and tourism industry. This list only scratches the surface of the accomplishments we achieved together through your efforts and support during my 12 total years as a member of the Maryland House of Delegates and Maryland Senate, as well as my 16 years spent in service to the Town of Ocean City as the Mayor and a member of the City Council. The need for effective leadership for the Lower Shore, Eastern Shore, and all of Maryland continues. I remain fully committed to the successes of the people of our Eastern Shore, its legacy, and its future as we establish our goals and priorities for the continued success of our families here. All People. All Maryland. Always. Respectfully yours, Jim Mathias

By Sam Ghaleb Contributing Writer (Jan. 11, 2019) Eighty years ago, this week, the French battleship Richelieu was launched. Her keel was laid down on Oct. 22, 1935, for what would become the newest and largest battleship-class ever to be constructed by France. The class was named “Richelieu” after Cardinal de Richelieu, prime minister to King Louis XIII. Richelieu became the lead ship of the class and was followed by the Jean Bart, named for Adm. Jean Bart. By 1932, French authorities understood that they would have to counter the strong threat in the Mediterranean Sea — the Italian Navy, now under the power of dictator Benito Mussolini.

The Richelieu battleship class was part of the French answer to that threat and served, more or less, as a “shot across the bow” against the Italian Navy in the Mediterranean. For more than two centuries, the French maintained a tradition of producing top-of-the-line warships. The Richelieu was a designed and built for speed with good armor protection and sound technology to best the ships of the Italian Navy and even make the Germans take notice. However, as a signer of the Washington Naval Treaty following World War I, France was required to build her new ships within certain predetermined and agreed limits. As such, the battleship resided within a tonnage restriction, though the choice of main

guns was of 15-inch caliber, then the largest and heaviest available when the battleship was designed in 1932. The one design feature that could be seen as “questionable” for its time was that all the 15-inch guns were mounted forward within two large traversing turrets, each turret having four guns. This design choice was made to reduce the total armor tonnage across just two large turrets, as opposed to a typical design setup containing three or four turrets. To reduce the possible damage to the quad turret arrangement from a single direct hit, an armored divider was built between the right and left gun pairings. The four guns did not operate indiContinued on Page 52


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WORLD WAR II Continued from Page 51 vidually, as on other contemporary battleships, but as pairs, so, if struck and put out of action, only half the 15inch gun armament on either turret would be immobilized. The French Navy felt the Richelieu would be firing all eight 15-inch guns while approaching enemy shipping, thus presenting the smallest silhouette possible and allowing the Richelieu full use of all her powerful armament. Secondary armament came in the form of standard 6-inch guns. All the nine guns of her secondary armament were mounted aft in 3 x 3 traversable turrets. The Richelieu-class battleships were built in response to the Italian Littorio-class battleships. They were 35,000 tons standard, and fully loaded their displacement was 47,548 tons. The overall length was 813 feet, with a beam of 108 feet, and a draught of 32 feet. The Richelieu, with a top speed of 30 knots, was faster than any British or American battleship, and as fast as the German battleship Bismarck and the Littorio-class battleships. Her secondary armament was nine 6-inch guns in three turrets aft. There were also 12 3.9-inch guns in six twin turrets, three on each side of the battleship, and 1.5 inch anti-aircraft guns mounted in twin turrets. The Richelieu had a war time complement of 70 officers, and 1,550 men. Despite French Admiral of the Fleet Francois Darlan’s assurances to the contrary, when France signed the armistice with Germany, Great Britain feared that the French Navy would be taken over by Germany and fight for the Axis powers, making her an obvious and serious threat. The Allies of the time consisted of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth forces as well as “Free French” forces. The United States had yet to enter the war. So, on July 2, the British launched Operation Catapult to seize French ships anywhere, with orders to

sink or intern French capital ships at the ports of Mers el-Kebir and Alexandria in Africa. When World War II began, on Sept. 3, 1939, Richelieu was still under construction, and in June 1940, she was near completion in a shipyard in Brest in northwest France. To avoid being captured by the Germans, she left the yard in Brest, on 18 June 1940 for Dakar, in French West Africa, escorted by destroyers Fougueux and Frondeur. Richelieu had 250 15-inch shells and only 48 powder bags and no shells for her 6-inch guns. She arrived at Dakar in French West Africa on 23 June. On 25 June, she set sail for Casablanca further north, watched closely by a British fleet. On 28 June, she returned to Dakar. British Swordfish torpedo bombers, from the aircraft carrier HMS Hermes, attacked the French fleet at Dakar, on July 8, 1940, in fear that these warships would be surrendered to the Germans. Richelieu was hit below the armored deck by a torpedo, disabling her starboard shaft. Shortly after, she sank by the stem. She was refloated a few days later and made seaworthy for emergencies. She remained in Dakar as a gun platform. On Sept. 23, 1940, a combined fleet of British and Free French ships reached Dakar to conduct negotiations en force. “Vichy” French detained the negotiating party and fired a warning. At 1000 hours, Australian cruiser Australia fired warning shots on “Vichy” French ships that attempted to leave port, and “Vichy” French coastal guns returned fire, starting the battle. During the three-day battle, Richelieu exchanged fire with British battleship Barham, with each ship receiving two hits. Later in the battle, two guns of her No. 2 turret were disabled from blowback. The Allied fleet withdrew to avoid further damage, and “Vichy” French forces at Dakar claimed a small victory.

On Nov. 8, 1942, Operation Torch, the Allied invasion of North Africa, commenced. A collateral event of Torch was the occupation by German forces of the southern part of France. Fulfilling their promise to the British Admiralty in 1940, the French didn’t give their ships, based in Toulon, to the Germans and scuttled them instead. Although “Vichy” French forces in North Africa eventually joined the Free French Forces, Richelieu exchanged fire with American battleship Massachusetts as American forces landed at Casablanca, in Morocco. By Nov. 11, all French Navy ships were on the Allied side. This created an opportunity for Richelieu to be repaired by the Allies. She sailed to New York Navy Yard in the United States, arriving on Jan. 30, 1943. Work on the Richelieu started in Brooklyn Navy Yard on Feb. 24, 1943. While she was being repaired, she also had her aircraft handling facilities removed to make room for radar equipment, meanwhile also receiving more anti-aircraft weaponry. Her antiaircraft armament was replaced with 14 quad mounts of 40-mm Bofors and 48 Oerlikon 20-mm cannons in single mounts. Upon completion of the work, she sailed for Mers el-Kebir, in Algeria, on October 14, 1943 to operate in the Mediterranean Sea under British command, but she eventually was sent to Scapa Flow, after the Italian fleet surrendered, arriving on Nov. 20, 1943. Between November 1943 and March 1944, she served with the British Home Fleet. She was scheduled to participate in Operation Post Horn, which was a combined operation with British forces (aircraft carrier HMS Furious, and battleship HMS Anson) to deter German shipping in Northern Norway. The hopes were that the Kriegsmarine would take the bait and send their heavy cruisers. They failed to show. On April 10, 1944, she arrived at Trincomalee, Ceylon (today Sri Lanka). She participated in the subsequent operations against the Japanese on the Indian Ocean coast. Operation Transom saw Richelieu participating with the aircraft carriers HMS lllustri-

ous and the USS Saratoga raid against Surabaya in the Dutch East Indies (today Indonesia) by the British Eastern Fleet. Operation Crimson commenced on July 22, 1944. The British Eastern Fleet put to sea from Trincomalee, Ceylon. The ships that participated in this sortie were British battleships HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant, British battle cruiser HMS Renown, Richelieu, British aircraft carriers HMS Illustrious and HMS Victorious, numerous cruisers and destroyers. This task force conducted a carrier raid and surface bombardment of Sabang in the Dutch East Indies. On April 27, 1945, Richelieu took part in Operation Bishop, the carrier raid and surface bombardment of Car Nicobar and Port Blair and to provide cover for Operation Dracula, which was an amphibious landing off Rangoon, Burma. When the Japanese surrendered on August 15, 1945, Richelieu was returning from a refit at Durban, South Africa which lasted from July 18 to Aug. 10. On Sept. 9, 1945, in the Straits of Malacca en route Singapore, she struck a magnetic mine, causing light damage. Richelieu remained in active service after the war. She escorted a French troop convoy to Indochina in September 1945 to reestablish French colonial rule. On Dec. 29, 1945, she fired on shore targets during the opening chapters of the First Indochina War. She returned to Toulon, France on Feb. 11, 1946. In 1946, she visited the United Kingdom and Portugal. Between April and June 1947, she hosted the French president as he visited French colonies in West Africa. On Oct. 16, 1948, she was withdrawn from active service to be converted into a gunnery training ship. Beginning on May 25, 1956, Richelieu was used as an accommodation ship in Brest on the French coast. She was placed in reserve in 1958. She was then sold for scrap to Cantieri Navali Santa Maria of Genoa, Italy in September 1968. One of her 15-inch guns is currently on display in the harbor of Brest. Next week: Maginot Line


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OBITUARIES FRANCIS JOSEPH MULLIN Ocean Pines Francis Joseph Mullin, 70, of Ocean Pines, passed away on Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018 at his home. Born in Fort Lee, Virginia, he was the son of the late Francis Woodrow Mullin and Marian Van Winkle Mullin. “Frank” was a U.S. Army Vietnam veteran Francis Mullin and a member of the American Legion and VFW. He retired from the Bendix Corporation as a field engineer. He was also known in the family as “Giddy” to Kylee, Kenzie and Parker, “Pee Paw” to Kelly and Christian, and “Grandpa” to Allison and William. Francis is survived by his four children, Kelly Roark and her husband, Matt, of Asheville, North Carolina, Susan Hughes and her husband, Tommy, of Asheville, North Carolina, Kristina L. Watkowski and her husband, Chris, of Berlin, and Stefanie L. Franklin and her husband, Ben, of Salisbury; a brother, Michael Mullin and his wife, Diana, of Houston, Texas; two sisters, Kathleen Lange and her husband, Dirk, of Tempe, Arizona and Priscilla Iosca and her husband, Paul, of Tempe, Arizona; and seven grandchildren, Kelly, Allison, Kylee, Kenzie, Christian, William and Parker. In addition to his parents, he was also preceded in death by his wife, Mary L. Mullin, and a son, Erik T. Stromberg. A graveside service was held with military honors on Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 at Wicomico Memorial Park in Salisbury with Rev. Robert Miller officiating. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in his memory to: Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21802 and/or St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38105. Arrangements are in the care of Holloway Funeral Home, PA, 501 Snow Hill Road, Salisbury, Maryland 21804. Please visit www.hollowayfh.com to express condolences to the family. MARIE THERESA HOLLENDERSKY Ocean Pines Marie Theresa Hollendersky, age 81, passed away on Monday, Dec. 31, 2018 at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in Salisbury. Born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, she was the daughter of the late Michael and Theresa Shalbert Rohal. She is survived by her beloved husband of 61 years, George Hollendersky; daughter, Beth Ann Mount and her husband, Daniel; and three grandchildren, Breanna Ruffin (James), Jordan Mount and Kelsey Mount. She was preceded in death by her son, Scott Hollendersky. Also surviv-

ing is a brother, and several sisters. Mrs. Hollendersky had worked as director of operations for Consumer Credit of New Jersey until retiring M. Hollendersky and moving to Ocean Pines. She was a member of St. John Neumann Catholic Church, and active volunteer with Diakonia in Ocean City. A mass of Christian Burial was held on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019 at St. John Neumann Catholic Church near Ocean Pines. Rev. Joseph Cocucci officiated. Interment was in Holy Savior Cemetery in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. A donation in her memory may be sent to: Diakonia, 12747 Old Bridge Rd., Ocean City, Maryland 21842. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. DR. PAUL ANDERSON SCOTT Ocean City Dr. Paul Anderson Scott, age 68, died on Sunday, Dec. 30, 2018 at his home. Born in Salisbury, he was the son of the late William Henry Scott and Wanda Anderson Scott. He is survived by his half-sister, Diane Savage and her three children, Scott, Ann and Sarah, as well as a favorite cousin, J. Douglas Trimper, and his two sons, Chris and Brooks. Dr. Scott attended school in Ocean City, Berlin and St. Andrews in Middletown, Delaware, where he graduated with honors. Majoring in Zoology at the University of Maryland, College Park, in his junior year, he won early admission in to the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond where he graduated with honors in 1975. He practiced medicine in the Berlin-Ocean City area for over 10 years, then for seven years at Chincoteague Medical Center, also teaching family practice residence and medical students there, as well as serving as attending physician at Wallops Flight Facility. Later, he retired and moved to West Ocean City where he pursued his lifelong interest in music. An accomplished pianist and organist, he taught himself to play the cello and bassoon, and was the principal bassoonist with the Salisbury Symphony Orchestra for a number of years. He enjoyed boating, photography, cooking, electronics, horseback riding and learning foreign languages. In his youth he spent many happy years hunting and fishing with his father, a local attorney. Paul was a member of the Episcopal Church including St. Paul’s Worcester Parish in Berlin, where he served as vestryman and organist. He firmly believed that God loves each and every one of His children. Dr. Scott was also president of Windsor Resorts and Trimpers Playland.

A graveside service was held on Sunday, Jan. 6, 2019 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Churchyard in Berlin. Rev. Michael Moyer officiated. A donation in his memory may be made to: St Paul’s Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 429, 3 Church St., Berlin, Maryland 21811, or the Children’s Home Foundation of the Eastern Shore, 314 North St. Easton, Maryland 21601, to assist deserving young people who might not otherwise have a chance at higher education. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. CARL DAVID WEST Ocean City Carl David West, age 72, passed away on Monday, Dec. 31, 2018 after a long battle with cancer. Raised in Baltimore, he was the son of the late Clarence and Mary West. He is survived by his wife, Malinda and children, Brenda Taylor and her husband, Michael, step-son, Carl West Joey Fisher and stepdaughter, Karen WestThomas. He was an adored grandfather to James and Jacob Kavarda and Chloe and Rosie West. Also surviving are his brothers, Dick Gordan and Thomas West, and sisters, MaryAnn Hicks, Jean Schrieber and Gail Newman. Carl had been a dedicated employee of General Motors before retiring after 41 years. He and his wife then moved to Ocean City to be near his daughter and grandchildren. He worked five years for the Town of Ocean City. A boating enthusiast, he enjoyed outings on his pontoon boat, and was an avid fan of the Baltimore Orioles and Ravens. He served as president of his homeowners association for all the years he resided in Ocean City, and was a friend to all in his neighborhood. A memorial service was held on Friday, Jan. 4, 2019 at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. A donation in his memory may be made to: Ocean City Paramedics Foundation, P.O. Box 3099, Ocean City, Maryland 21843. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. RACHEL MAMIE HAYS Ocean City Rachel Mamie Hays, age 84, passed away on Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2019, at Atlantic General Hospital. Born in San Diego, California, she was the daughter of the late James Ross Morris and Ruth Arellano. She was preceded in death by her husband, Milton Hays, in 2004 and her son, Anthony Morris Rodriquez. She is survived by Rodney Morris and wife, Lisa, and Harland Morris III; daughters, Antoinette Layton and hus-

band, Sonny, Catherine Colson, Michelle Lancaster, Leslie Simpson and husband, Barry, and Elizabeth Hays; brother, James Dido Morris; sister, Rebeckah Ontiveres Rachel Hays and husband, Bob; 24 grandchildren, 30 great-grandchildren and 32 nieces and nephews. Rachel loved ceramics, poetry, piano, shopping and her grandbabies. A memorial service was held on Sunday, Jan. 6, 2019 at the Burbage Funeral Home in Berlin. Pastor Sean Davis officiated. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Flowers welcome or please make a donation to a charity of your choice. BARBARA MITCHELL EVANS Berlin Barbara Mitchell Evans, age 86, died Saturday, Jan. 5, 2019 at her home. Born in Berlin, she was the daughter of the late Morris H. Mitchell and Mildred Jones Mitchell. She was preceded in death by her husband, Royce W. Evans, Barbara Evans in 2001; her son, Rodney Evans, in 2016; a baby son, Morris Evans; daughter, Lynn Fulton, and son in-law, Robert. Also preceding her in death, a brother, Harry Mitchell; sister, Annabelle; and brother-in-law, Russell Hastings. Surviving, are daughters, Rosanna Bruning, son-in-law, Bill, of Snow Hill, and Lisa Jarman and son-in-law, Scott, of Berlin. Also surviving, is her sister-in-law, Jerry Mitchell and several nieces and nephews. She was adored grandmother to Gretchen Ninzeheltzer, Kirby Ingersoll and husband Justin, Mary Evans, Sabrina Fulton, Brittany Jarman, Molly Evans, and great-grandchildren London Garms, Mackenzie Walls, Reina Vazquez and Sukaynah Fulton. A 1949 graduate of Buckingham High School, she was employed as a secretary for Lewes Dairy, Gateway Motel, Showell Poultry and Hudson Foods. She was a member and past president of Boggs-Disharoon American Legion Post 123 in Berlin for 45 years. She was member of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Berlin. Mrs. Evans enjoyed gardening (raising roses) and going to the beach. She also leaves her beloved dog, ChiChi. A funeral service was held on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Berlin. Rev. Michael Moyer officiated. Interment followed in Sunset Memorial Park. A donation in her memory may be made to: St. Paul’s Episcopal Church,


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OBITUARIES P.O. Box 429, Berlin, Maryland 21811, or Boggs-Disharoon American Legion Post 123 in Berlin, Ladies Auxiliary, 10111 Old Ocean City Blvd., Berlin, Maryland 21811. Letters of condolence may be sent via: www.burbagefuneralhome.com. Arrangements are in care of Burbage Funeral Home. MATILDA “TILLIE” JOSEPHINE MULLIGAN Ocean Pines Matilda “Tillie” Josephine Mulligan, 94, passed away on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019, peacefully at Coastal Hospice at the Lake in Salisbury, Maryland. Tillie grew up, married, and raised her family in New York City. After retiring as an admitting clerk at Montefiore Hospital, Tillie Mulligan she moved to Bronxville, New York, and then to Ocean Pines, Maryland, for the last few years of her life. Tillie loved talking to anybody she could, showing her great sense of humor and caring nature. She was recognized for her personality and compassion as the recipient of the President’s Award from Montefiore Hospital in 1988. She was an active member of St. Joseph’s parish in Bronxville. She enjoyed listening to her Big Band records going on her daily walks into town, and spending all the time she could either talking to or being with her family. Tillie is preceded in death by her husband, Arthur Mulligan, and sister, Kathleen Jantzen. She is survived by her sister, Josephine McGee; children, Patricia Mulligan-Gauss (Roger), Nancy Mulligan, William Mulligan (Gail) and Sheila Meyer; grandchildren, William Mulligan (Toni), Brian Mulligan and Christopher Meyer; and great-grandchildren, Lily, Gloria and Matthew Mulligan. A visitation was held on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019, at Eastern Shore Cremation and Funeral Services, a Division of Holloway Funeral Home P.A., in Berlin. A funeral mass was held at St. John Neumann Roman Catholic Church in Berlin on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019. Arrangements are in the care of Eastern Shore Cremation and Funeral Service a division of Holloway Funeral Home, P.A., 504 Franklin Avenue, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Please visit www.easternshorecremation.com to express condolences to the family. LILLY MADELINE FARLOW Ocean City Lilly Madeline Farlow, 95, passed away peacefully in her home surrounded by her loved ones on Jan. 3, 2019. She was born in Ocean City and was the daughter of the late John Jackson Bunting and Mary A. (Fisher) Bunting. Fondly known as “Mom Mom” or

“Aunt Lil,” she was a devoted mother, grandmother and dear friend to many. She was the oldest native of Ocean City that was born on the island and lived there Lilly Farlow her entire life. She was a member of Atlantic United Methodist Church and was an avid fan of the Baltimore Orioles. She was preceded in death by her husband, James Roland Farlow, in 2008 and three brothers and four sisters. She is survived by her children, Bonnie J. (Farlow) Dinges and husband, Frederick, of Salisbury, James “Jimbo” Farlow and fiancé, Margaret Ann Tierney, of Ocean City, and Chris D. Farlow and wife, Debora, of Bishopville; seven grandchildren, Steven Dinges, Lisa (Dinges) Brady, Christopher Farlow, Carey Farlow, Ryan Farlow, Jessica Farlow and Madeline Farlow; nine great-grandchildren, Steven Jr., Alyssa, Elizabeth, Kelsey, Taylor, Adam, Olivia, Lily and Claire; three great-great-grandchildren, Candence, Kayla and Donnie; a dear friend, Ellen “El” Diffendal; many special nieces and nephews, including Reggie Bell, Joyce Shaffer and Mary Jane Fields. A funeral service was held on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 at Community

Church At Ocean Pines in Berlin with Pastor Patty Frick officiating. Burial was in Evergreen Cemetery in Berlin. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to: Atlantic United Methodist Church, 105 4th St., Ocean City, Maryland 21842, or Coastal Hospice, P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Maryland 21802. Condolences may be sent by visiting www.bishophastingsfh.com. IRWIN “REID” GAY Ocean Pines Irwin “Reid” Gay, resident of Ocean Pines, Maryland, passed away, at the age of 88 years, in the early morning hours of Jan. 3, 2019 at the home he shared with his beloved wife, Corrine. Reid was born in Toledo, Ohio, but lived the majority of his young life in WayReid Gay cross, Georgia. He was a proud member of the United States Army as a lieutenant colonel, served and defended our county as an intelligence officer at many overseas duty stations, including Vietnam. Once retired from the Army, he again served his country working for DOD and also civilian defense contractors. After he retired again, he worked as

a reserve officer with the Ocean City Police Department and also as a volunteer with the Ocean Pines Fire Department. Reid spent his entire life in service to his country and his community. Life will not be the same without him and he will be sadly missed by his wife of 49 years, Corrine Gay; his stepchildren, Susan Elbertson and Scott Elbertson; grandchildren, who fondly call him “Pa,” Sarah Wallace, Michael Vines, Kevin Legg, Lindsey Paulson, Reed Anne Elbertson and Caroline Elbertson; great-grandchildren, Gage Wallace, Trinity Wallace, Spence Wallace, Quinn Paulson and Rory Paulson; and great-great granddaughter, Cali Baldwin-Wallace; his sister, Nancy Gay Frank; four nieces, seven great nieces and five great-great nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his mother, Margaret Irwin Gay; father, Dr. Joseph Gay; and brother-in-law, Samuel B Frank Jr. Friends and family are invited to attend the memorial service on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019 at noon at the Burbage Funeral Home, 108 William Street, Berlin, Maryland 21811. Visitation with the family will be from 11 a.m. to noon prior to the memorial service. Letters of condolence may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com.


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JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

On Behalf of Atlantic General Hospital/Health System and Foundation, we would like to thank our Event Sponsors for their generous support. LEGACY SPONSOR

ICICLE SPONSORS

FOR 25 CONSECUTIVE YEARS AS TITLE SPONSOR

Atlantic Dental Cosmetic & Family Dentistry Bayside/Carl M. Freeman Companies Carrabba's Italian Grill Coffee Beanery 94th Street Deeley Insurance Group Delmarva Collections Delmarva Now Fisher's Popcorn of Delaware Guerrieri Family Foundation i.g. Burton Chevrolet, Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, Ram, and Fiat Jolly Roger Amusement Park La Quinta Inn and Suites Nickle Electrical Companies Ocean City Today Red Sun Custom Apparel The Bank of Delmarva The Kite Loft Wilmington University

“THE EMPEROR PENGUIN” Bull On The Beach & Crab Alley

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Top Fundraisers: TEAM – BUSINESS TEAM – COMMUNITY GROUPS CATEGORY CATEGORY Bull on the Beach (Ocean City, MD) $30,000* AGH’s Frosty Flip Flops (Berlin, MD) $782 AGH’s Swimming Skeletons (Berlin, MD) $735 *The Bull on the Beach team has contributed more than $601,000 to the AGH Penguin Swim since it started in 1995.

Ocean City Ravens Roost #44 (Ocean City, MD) $16,000* OC FOOLS (Ocean City, MD) $425 HFY Swim Team (Laurel, DE) $200

TEAM – YOUTH/FAMILY

INDIVIDUAL - ADULT

It’s 5 O’Clock Somewhere (Breinigsville, PA) $1,325

Samantha Ewancio (Berlin, MD) $675

Parkers Penguins (Gaithersburg, MD) $750

Robert LeCompte (Columbia, MD) $525

The Roarty Family (Churchville, MD) $500

Richard Moore (Glen Burnie, MD) $500

INDIVIDUAL – 18 & UNDER Max Ewancio, age 17 (Berlin, MD) $705 Nicholas Franklin, age 16 (Berlin, MD) $425 Andrew Campbell, age 11 (Salisbury, MD) $175

*The Ravens Roost team has contributed more than $120,000 to the AGH Penguin Swim over the last eleven years.

Prizes were also awarded for the youngest and oldest swimmers and winners of the Costume Contest: YOUNGEST PENGUIN:

BEST OVERALL COSTUME:

MOST CREATIVE:

Kaden Stokes Ocean City, MD (5 months, 27 days old)

Sandy Sanders “Kim K Breaks the Internet” (Havre De Grace, MD)

Derek Endlich & Chance Ebel “Captain Planet & The Planeteers” (Ocean City, MD)

OLDEST PENGUIN:

MOST SPIRITED:

BEST LITTLE PENGUIN:

Bill Hunter Ocean Pines, MD (90 years, 6 months and 20 days young)

Timothy Yates “Uncle Sam” (Boonsboro, MD)

Sienna & Keera Pierce & Mckenna Schlegel “Snowy Owls” From “It’s 5 O’Clock Somewhere” (Effort, PA)

BEST TEAM/GROUP COSTUME: Michelle Blake and family “ Team Happy Feet” (Belcamp, MD)

Thank You to all of this year’s Penguins, Teams, and Supporters for their participation and contributions to the 2019 Penguin Swim! Thank You to Michael Cylc, Phillip Cheung, and the Penguin Swim Committee for their hard work and dedication to make this event a success! Special Thanks to... Chris Pappenfort and the Princess Royale Staff and the many AGH Associates and Community Volunteers who helped with this event!


Sports & Recreation

Ocean City Today Jan. 11, 2019

Page 57

www.oceancitytoday.com

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester Prep senior captain Hailey Merritt controls the ball during Wednesday’s game against Salisbury School in Berlin. She scored 10 points in the 40-8 win.

PHOTO COURTESY DIANE BROWN

Terry Underkoffler, coach of the Worcester Prep boys’ soccer team, will be inducted into the Pennsylvania Soccer Coaches Hall of Fame on Saturday, Jan 26, at the Radisson Hotel in Camp Hill, Pennsylvania.

Underkoffler celebrated for service WP coach to be inducted into Pennsylvania Soccer Coaches Hall of Fame By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 11, 2019) Terry Underkoffler started coaching soccer at the age of 24, and after 40 years of instructing hundreds of players and leading numerous teams, he will be inducted into the Pennsylvania Soccer Coaches Hall of Fame on Saturday, Jan 26, at 1 p.m., at the Radisson Hotel in Camp Hill, Pennsylvania. “I am very humbled and honored to be included in such a prestigious group of men that pioneered the game in the state of Pennsylvania,” Underkoffler said. “I was fortunate to have super mentors as I grew as a coach, starting with my college coaches, Sheldon Chamberlain and Lee Hill, the first scholastic coach I worked with, Stephen Marcheski, and college coaches I worked closely with, Bruce Arena and Bob Bradley.” Underkoffler said he looks back with great joy on the teams and players he got to work with and influence over the years. They are like family to him, he added.

“We laughed, sweated, pushed, encouraged, worked and improved and finished our time together with great pride,” he said. “That is what I love about coaching; the bonds that are built within a common goal.” He said he takes great pride in coaching squads that did not have a good soccer reputation and turning them into top-20 area teams. Another accomplishment he is proud of is helping more than 10 goalkeepers make the United States National team pool from Pennsylvania. “I cherished the time of coaching young players in the Eastern Pennsylvania Youth Soccer Association Olympic development program. Their ‘thank yous’ fueled me to keep coming back,” the 64-year-old added. “Soccer has been more than just a game. It has built relationships and memories that will last a lifetime and hopefully influence more students to get into coaching and giving back to the game.” Underkoffler began his career at Methacton High School in Pennsylvania, as a JV coach. His first head coaching job was at Souderton High School in Pennsylvania in 1984. He took a team that had one winning season in 20 years and

produced 11 consecutive winning seasons, five league titles, one perfect season and nine state playoff runs. In 1994, he started coaching at Upper Perkiomen High School in Pennsylvania. He was the first school coach to win both the PAC 10 championship for both girls’ and boys’ soccer. In 2009, he helped lead Parkland High School to a 22-1-0 record and District 11 final. Over the years, he has also coached a handful of club soccer teams and has received many awards and accolades. He retired in spring 2010, but decided to return to coaching in 2012 at Worcester Prep. He has been leading the boys’ soccer program at the Berlin school ever since. Underkoffler earned his 500th career win on Oct. 9, 2017. It was his 320th win coaching high school boys’ soccer. After the 2018 season, his current overall record is 514-150-9. Currently, Underkoffler is a staff member with the Eastern Pennsylvania Youth Soccer Association, a position he has held for over 30 years. He has also been working with the United States Region I Girls Olympic Development Program for nearly 40 years.

WP Lady Mallards log big wins over Salisbury School By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 11, 2019) The Worcester Prep girls’ basketball team scored victories over the Salisbury School Dragon last Saturday and again on Wednesday. “Saturday, I thought the first half was the best basketball that Worcester Prep girls have played in four years,” said Prep Coach Scot Dailey. “We just played great defense, we passed and dribbled, and didn’t turn the ball over and finished. We were incredible. “The second half I think we got complacent, just like we did tonight,” Dailey added, following Wednesday night’s match. The Lady Mallards trounced the Dragons, 61-11, last Saturday in Salisbury. Worcester outscored Salisbury 242 in the first quarter. At halftime, the Berlin team was on top, 40-6. The Mallards increased their advantage to 48-8 by the end of the third quarter. Senior captain Gracie Gardner led the Mallards with 12 points, 15 rebounds, six assists and five blocks. Senior captain Hailey Merritt had 12 points and CC Lizas added 10 points and eight rebounds. Senior Chloe Ruddo chipped in with nine points. Senior Hannah Merritt and junior Emily Copeland (eight rebounds, four assists and three steals) both scored eight points. See DESPITE Page 58


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JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

Despite 10-1 record, squad must ‘continue to get better’

LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

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Worcester Prep freshman Lily Baeurle contemplates her options to shoot or pass inside during Wednesday’s game against Salisbury School in Berlin. Worcester won 40-8.

Continued from Page 57 The Mallards didn’t play as well on Wednesday in Berlin as they did last Saturday, according to Dailey, but the squad still pulled out a 40-8 victory to improve to 10-1 on the season. “I thought they out-hustled us. I thought they were more aggressive than we were,” Dailey said. ‘We’ve been talking all year, don’t worry about the score and don’t worry about who you’re playing You’ve got to be the aggressor, you’ve got to play hard no matter what the score. “Defensively, we weren’t very good. We didn’t give up many points, but we didn’t get many steals, we didn’t get any fast breaks, and we didn’t play very well in the half-court offense either,” he continued. Worcester shut out Salisbury 14-0 in the first quarter. The home team led 20-4 at halftime. By the end of the third quarter the Mallards had gained

Worcester boys’ basketball team goes 1-1 with SS By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 11, 2019) The Worcester Prep and Salisbury School boys’ basketball teams went head-to-head twice in five days, with each squad earning one victory. Worcester traveled to Salisbury last Saturday and won 40-35. Prep Coach John Moeser praised the defensive effort of the John Moeser Mallards. “Defense was excellent,” he said. “It’s become our calling card. Winning comes down to defense, in the end, and taking care of the basketball.” The Mallards started off the game playing man-to-man defense, then switched to zone. The Dragons strugSee PREP Page 59

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LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester Prep senior captain Colin Miller makes a layup during Wednesday’s game against Salisbury School in Berlin. He scored six points, but Worcester lost 37-23.

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a 29-6 advantage. Gardner (nine rebounds, three steals and two blocks) and Hailey Merritt (four steals) scored 10 points apiece. Ruddo added six points. Scot Dailey “I didn’t think we came out with that fight,” Dailey said. “We got the win. We’re 10-1. It’s exciting, but we got to continue to get better.” Worcester will host the Salisbury Christian Jaguars today, Friday, at 5 p.m. in Berlin. The team’s seniors will be recognized before the game. “We need to play like we did Saturday the first half,” Dailey said. “We need to be focused, disciplined, we need to not turn the ball over, handle pressure and we need to anticipate on defense a little more and we’ll be good.”

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JANUARY 11, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Prep seniors to be recognized Continued from Page 58 gled with the Berlin squad’s press. Both teams scored 13 points in the first quarter. “I think we were a little hesitant in the beginning,” Moeser said. “We talked about taking it straight at their big kids, which opened up the outside for us. We shot pretty well.” At halftime, the Salisbury Dragons led 24-22. Worcester pulled ahead in third quarter, outscoring Salisbury 9-4. The

Mallards went into the fourth quarter on top 31-28. Senior Mike Curtis led Worcester with 12 points. Senior captain Colin Miller contributed with 10 points. “I think the kids are starting to buy into the system,” Moeser said. “We’ve gone back to basics and it’s starting to help. We’re much better than we were in November.” Worcester hosted Salisbury on Wednesday. Points were traded in the first

quarter. Tied 10-10, Curtis hit a three at the buzzer to give the Mallards a 13-10 lead at the end of the first. At halftime, the Berlin squad held an 18-14 advantage. Salisbury pulled ahead 25-23 in the third quarter and went on to win 37-23. Curtis was Worcester’s top producer with 12 points. Miller added six. Worcester will recognize its seniors before tonight’s game against the Salisbury Christian Jaguars at 6:30 p.m.

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LISA CAPITELLI/OCEAN CITY TODAY

Worcester Prep senior Mike Curtis shoots a three during the third quarter of Wednesday’s game against Salisbury School in Berlin. He hit three three-point shots and finished the game with 12 points.

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JANUARY 11, 2019

Ocean City Today

THE OC RAVENS ROOST #44 PENGUIN SWIM TEAM Thanks all of those who donated to our efforts in raising over $16,000 in support of Atlantic General Hospital’s 25th Annual Penguin Swim, including Duane Geruschart

Tom & Kelly Cordwell

Mary Page

Dot Green

George Economas

Marc Grimes

Bill Hickey

Kevin Hughes

Dennis & Barbara Knickman

Ed Schillo

Michael Grimes

Linda Rau

Elaine & Fred Craft

Charlotte Hahn

Robert Rose

Patti Grimes

Joan Grim

Erik Scon

Carol Munroe

Herbert Neal Roe Jr.

Mike Carpenter

Martha Furman

Gail Joseph

Donna & Bill Croff

Ken & Nancy Smedley

Thomas & Sharon Atkins

Don McMullin

Ronald Skon

Lee & Bunnie Sparks

Anonymous

Deborah Dennig

Ronald Scon

Sheila & Mike Harding

Susan Brown

Tom Savvides

Marge Wheatley

Ron Rider

Thomas Atkins

Anne Perone

Bob & Mary Kendall

Steve & Ilene Smith

Daryl Carpenter

Danny Scott

Wes Guckert

Tom Elliott

Paul Neal

Terry King

Sarah Nesbitt

James Maratea

Lary Miller

Nicki Swann

Erik Skon

Roberta Walter

Bill & Diane Butler

Mike Eder

Dot Green

Sandy & Buddy Hopkins

John & Betsy Hershner

Ruth & Igor Gawryluk

Herb Roe

Robin Wolinski

Osa Brand

Rich & Janet Witte

Danielle Betkey

Sally Nesbitt

Trish Neal

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Ron & Barbara Ferger

Mary & Bob Kendall

Sondra Mederrick

Rich & Peggy Atkins

Bob & Micki Summerville

Rich & Irene Hansen

Debbie & Vernon Betkey

Tim McFarland

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Jim Manfuso

Mary Martinez

Bob Rose

Irma Curtis

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Martha Eder

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Jeff & Jamie Korman

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Hooked Restaurants Mad Fish Restaurant Ruth’s Chris Steak House The Crab Cake Factory BJ’s on the Water Burbage Funeral Home Twinings Lobster Shanty Ocean Pines Yacht Club East Sussex Moose Lodge #2542 OC Elks Golf Associates OC Elks Lodge #2645

Pit-N-Pub Fox’s Pizza Ocean Pines Board of Directors IPA Del Mar Va Region Burley Oak Brewing Company Bayside Gazette Ocean City Today OC Ravens Roost #44 Embers/Blue Crab House & Raw Bar FOP Bethany Beach Lodge #16

And The Team; Rob Carpenter, John Worthington, Tom Maly, Bill Cordwell, Dennis Faber, Joanne Faber, Cindi Brought, Lew Furman, Maggie Miller, Gary Miller, Carol Munroe, Nancy Delesio, Bob Dalesio, Mike Eder, Kim Eder & member emeritus Paul Neal


JANUARY 11, 2019

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Ocean City Today

Seahawks wrestle ‘incredibly well’ at tourney By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 11, 2019) The Stephen Decatur wrestling team again showed its power and skill, performing at a high level during the Iron Horse Duals last weekend in Bel Air, Maryland. The Seahawks went 7-1 and finished in third place during the tournament, hosted by C. Milton Wright High School. “[Decatur wrestled] incredibly well. We really wrestled great,” Decatur Coach Todd Martinek said. “[We] showed a lot of improvement. We worked very hard over the Christmas break and it showed.” Decatur earned victories within their pool over North County (44-18), Liberty (61-13), Bel Air (44-25), John Carroll (66-18), Howard (55-20) and Walter Johnson (63-15). Decatur competed hard against Southern Garrett, but was edged out, 36-35. “It was just two great teams battling it out. Probably one of the bestthree dual meets I’ve been a part of in the last 25 years coaching,” Martinek said. “The gym was electric. The whole tournament stopped and all the teams were watching us. It will pay off later in the year with tough duals.” Decatur advanced to the third/fourth-place match where the

EAGLES

squad topped Cape Henlopen, 40-32, to take third. On Wednesday, Decatur competed in a tri-meet with the Kent County Trojans and Cambridge Vikings in Worton, Maryland. Decatur outscored Kent County, 59-15. Seniors Lukas Layton (170 pounds), a team captain, and Dakota Souder (285), junior captains DJ Taylor (195) and JagTodd Martinek ger Clapsadle (120), junior Kyle Elliott (138) and sophomores Micah Bourne (182) and Nico D’Amico (126), a team captain, pinned their opponents. Freshman Noah Reho earned a 190 technical-fall victory at 132 pounds. Kent County forfeited the 113-pound match to Decatur’s Anya Knappenberger, a sophomore, and the 220pound bout to senior Daletez Smith. Decatur topped Cambridge, 71-6. Bourne (182), Taylor (195), Smith (220), Souder (285), Clapsadle (120), D’Amico (126), Reho (132) and juniors Hayden Gable (145) and Austin Miller (106) pinned their opponents. Layton scored a 16-0 technical-fall victory at 170 pounds. Elliott outscored his 138-pound opponent 60 and Knappenberger won her 113pound competition, 10-5.

COWBOYS

STEELERS

Cambridge forfeited the 152pound match to Decatur senior Jhymir Blake. “I think we were a bit tired after the Iron Horse Duals. We looked really sluggish against Kent and Cambridge,” Martinek said. “I hope we wrestle better over the next few

weeks. It’s going to be a real grind making weight two to three times per week for the next month. It really takes a toll on the team physically and mentally.” Decatur will host the North Dorchester Eagles today, Friday, at 6 p.m. in Berlin.

Decatur swimmers dominate in pool, win over Pocomoke By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 11, 2019) The Stephen Decatur swim teams both earned victories over the Pocomoke Warriors on Monday at the YMCA in Cambridge. The Lady Seahawks won 127-12. “Pocomoke is a small team, but it was a good meet for us to work on some different strokes than their usual, and some even Mary Hathaway had best times,” said Mary Hathaway, coach of the Decatur girls’ team. Girls who earned first place in their individual events were: senior captains Kirsten Graham (100-yard

GIANTS

butterfly, 1:02.69; 100-yard backstroke, 1:06.35) and Allison Hunter (500-yard freestyle, 6:03.78; 100yard breaststroke, 1:23.89), senior Abby Crisanti (50-yard freestyle, 28.04 seconds), junior Mikayla Denault (200 IM, 2:41.34) and freshman Farrah Brown (200-yard freestyle, 2:26.64; 100-yard freestyle, 1:08.87). Senior Davina Graybill joined Hunter, Graham and Crisanti for the 200-yard medley relay race. They won in 2:08.2. Freshman Gracie Coker, junior Kiley Hamby, Crisanti and Graham were victorious in the 200-yard freestyle relay race (1:59.59). Coker, Denault, Graybill and See DECATUR Page 62

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Ocean City Today

Decatur swimmers to take on strong Easton teams, Fri. Continued from Page 61 Hamby outswam their competition in the 400-yard freestyle relay race (4:26.66). Decatur’s boys’ team topped Pocomoke 118-20. “The boys have had an excellent start to the season and are currently 4-0,” Coach Steve Deakyne said. “We have seen a lot of improvement and are starting to drop some Steve Deakyne time.” Decatur swimmers who took first in their individual events were: senior captain Chase Deickman (100-yard freestyle, 53.13 seconds), junior captain Richard Poist (50-yard freestyle, 24.43 seconds; 100-yard butterfly, 1:02.98), and sophomores Jack Slaysman (100-yard breaststroke, 1:11.03), Caleb Vaxmonsky (500-yard freestyle, 5:19.67; 200-yard freestyle, 1.56.31), Nick Cardamone (200 IM, 2:30.54) and Patrick O’Halloran (100-yard backstroke, 1:10.63). Vaxmonsky, Slaysman, Poist and Deickman were victorious in the 200yard medley relay (1:52.59). The foursome also won the 400-yard freestyle

66th Street Bayside

Solid performances by SD athletes By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 11, 2019) The Stephen Decatur girls’ indoor track team came in eighth place and the boys’ squad finished in ninth during the 16-school meet last Wednesday at the Worcester County Recreation Center in Snow Hill. “Overall, I think we did OK. It was our first meet back from break and basically the goal for that meet is go get back into the swing of things after break,” Decatur Coach Jody Stigler said. “I don’t usually expect any great performances from this meet in general because of the winter break, but I think we had some pretty solid performances and we didn’t seem to take a big step back over break which is good.” Kent Island won the girls’ competition with 136 points. James M. Benrelay (3:52.95). O’Halloran, Cardamone, sophomore Luke Crisanti and senior Jack Bahlman took first in the 200-yard freestyle relay race (1:45.29). Decatur will compete against the Easton Warriors, today, Friday, at 2:30 p.m. at the Cambridge YMCA. “We are looking forward to a hardfought meet against Easton on Friday,” Deakyne said.

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nett took second with 66.5 points and Parkside finished in third with 48 points. Decatur scored 26.5 points to place eighth. Decatur athletes who crossed the finish line eighth or better and earned points for the team were: juniors Alyssa Romano (high jump, third, 4 feet 4 inches; 300-meter Jody Stigler dash, fourth, 46.9 seconds) and Caroline Gardner (800-meter run, seventh, 2:48.9), and freshmen Avery Braciszewski (3,200-meter run, sixth, 14:43.1) and Abby Wesche (pole vault, seventh (tie), 6 feet 6 inches). Braciszewski, Gardner and seniors Erica Hicks and Dori Krasner placed fifth in the 3,200-meter relay race (11:31.5). Krasner, Romano, junior Gabby Izzett and freshman Skylar Griffin took sixth in the 1,600-meter relay race (5:09.4). Senior Nevaeh Steward, juniors Mackenzie Williams and Alexa Upperman and freshman Alexis Mumford came in 10th in the 800-meter relay race (2:15.1). Kent Island scored 74 points to win

the boys’ competition. Cape Henlopen (67) and Bennett (62) finished second and third, respectively. Decatur tallied 24 points for ninth. Scoring points for Decatur were: seniors Kevin Beck (1,600-meter run, first, 4:48.1; 800-meter run, second, 2:10.4) and Chad Fischer (500-meter run, eighth, 1:18.5) and junior Sam Rakowski (1,600-meter run, eighth, 5:18.3). Sophomore Kashif Reyes, and seniors Gavin Bunting, Jonathan Santana and Daquon Collick placed seventh in the 800-meter relay race (1:45.2). Senior George Luzier, junior Carter McClendon and freshmen Raul Gault and Sam Woodley crossed the finish line seventh in the 3,200-meter relay race (10:02.6). “As we move forward in our season, we are starting to gear up for the Bayside [Conference championship on Wednesday, Jan. 23] so our next two meets will be important to maximize our condition and have our athletes ready to have their best performances at the Bayside meet,” Stigler continued. The next meet is Wednesday, beginning at 2 p.m. at the Worcester County Recreation Center.

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Ocean City Today

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1/11/19 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...

1/11/19 Ocean City Today  

Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...