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OC Today WWW.OCEANCITYTODAY.NET

JANUARY 10, 2014

SERVING NORTHERN WORCESTER COUNTY

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FROZEN OVER Icicles like these at the bayfront promenade between Second and Third streets were common all over Ocean City during the early week’s cold snap.

Hoffman discusses tourism’s plan By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) Brad Hoffman, founder of Spark Productions, is the mastermind behind several of the city’s more popular summer events. But at several junctures, Hoffman has butted heads Brad Hoffman with City Hall over his pitches, most recently this past year when the town threatened to back out of the deal for his OC Experience trade show tour.

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Hoffman has also found himself at the center of a political rift in City Hall stemming from the city’s support for his bikini parade world-record attempt in 2012. As part of Ocean City Today’s ongoing coverage of the resort economy ahead of the anticipated strategic tourism planning this spring, we sat down with Hoffman for a preview of the 2014 season.

Ocean City Today: For starters, are there any big changes you’re anticipating for 2014 as far as events or tourism in town in general? Brad Hoffman: The big one is working with the city and Komen to hash out the race route for the big event in April. The race is now going to be en-

STARTING AT

Knowing what will work and what won’t for summer season

$

tirely on the Boardwalk. The city really wanted to get it off Baltimore Avenue and they wanted it on the Boardwalk. That’s a change that’s going to be exciting and an event we’re really involved in on the production side of things, trying to make it as good of an event for the organization and for Ocean City as possible. Spark once again is doing the OC Car Show, our big event. We’re not on our typical date, we’re later in June, the 19th and 20th, so not really in the Senior Week bubble. The Maryland Municipal League is in the building this year during our usual time frame. It’ll be different due to the construction for the Performing Arts Center. We’re excited, though, that maybe having things stretched

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out more will be good for everybody. Obviously we have a big event that used to be on the same weekend as the Air Show, which used to be on the same weekend as the lacrosse tournament and the big surf competition at Castle in the Sand. It just makes for a lot of stuff. So I hope what happened in June last year won’t be jammed into a few big weekends and more stretched out over a lot of weeks, and I think we’ll all be more successful for it. The Dew Tour, of course, is still on for June. I’m pretty positive they’re looking at the weekend before our car show. Our involvement there has grown and evolved and is something we’re super proud of to be working with NBC and the See TOURISM Page 4

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By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) The Worcester County Commissioners pledged their support, but no money, Tuesday for a solution to a problem at the commercial harbor in West Ocean City. “We’ll help you to the fullest extent, but we have no money,” Bud Church, president of the commissioners, told John Martin of Martin Fish Company, and Spencer Rowe, an environmental consultant. “It’s one of the industries we can really support.” The problem, Martin and Rowe had told the commissioners, is a persistent shoal at the inlet, making it difficult and sometimes impossible, for some commercial vessels to reach the harbor. Boats of all sizes hit the sand bar even when the tide is high, but the larger vessels are unable to enter unless the tide if high. At low tide, smaller vessels get stuck and larger ones cannot cross it and must wait for the tide to change. Despite dredging by the Army Corps of Engineers in October, the sand bar had reappeared between two entrance buoys. Rowe said the area needs dredging to a deeper level. “They can dredge to 10 feet with federal money,” Rowe said. He said he wants dredging done to a depth of 14 feet, but to make that possible, local assistance is needed to provide matching funds. “That’s the way the law works, the federal law,” he said. The county must be part of the effort to make deeper dredging possible. What was See SUPPORT Page 5 We Service All HVAC Brands

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

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Letter from the publisher

Inside

Introducing a new look for Ocean City Today

Business ....................................21 Calendar ....................................39 Commentary ..............................61 Community..................................35 Classifieds..................................41 Dining Guide ..............................32 Entertainment ............................29 Food for Thought ........................26 Insight Plus ................................25 Letters to the Editor ....................62 Obituaries ..................................23 Out and About ............................30 Police ........................................9 Public notices ............................51 Real Estate Report ......................21 Senior Slant................................** Sports ........................................44

EDITOR’S NOTE

The column, Senior Slant, isn’t gone, it’s on hiatus, while longtime contributing writer Irish Kemp takes some time off. She has been writing this column in Ocean City Today for more than 20 years and has no plans to stop now. So, she’ll be back soon.

I shot the serif. That would be one of the more noticeable changes in Ocean City Today’s appearance this week, the switch in headline type from what is known in typography as a serif font to a typeface without serifs, otherwise referred to as sans serif A serif, in case you were wondering, is that fancy stroke on the long parts of some letters. From a mechanical aspect, using a different font would seem to be an easy modification to make – merely substitute one font for another – except that it was not. Headline styles establish the personality or voice of printed (or Web) material, so selecting them requires more thought than most people realize. It is not just a subjective call about what seems to look good. Among the considerations: contrast between the headline typeface and the body type, or text; compatibility between the headline typeface and the body type (and yes, highly intelligent people actually study which fonts complement each other) and functionality. Not only does the headline font have to look good and play well with others, it has to give the headline writer something to work with in the space allotted. Our headline font is ITC Franklin Gothic, a sans serif that is character-

ized by its refined sturdiness. Our body type is Georgia, an often used (possibly overused) text type known for its high clarity. In short, the solid ITC Franklin Gothic Demi headline unwaveringly announces that the story below should be read, while the lighter, highly legible Georgia provides easy readability. We think it is a good combination. Establishing these two basic elements, however, was the easier aspect of redesigning the paper, a project that began several months ago when we decided it was time for an overhaul. Developing the new “OC Today” nameplate, or flag as it is known in the paper business, was done to the sound of grinding teeth. After more than two decades of “Ocean City Today,” doing something different is like coming up with new first name for your 20-year-old child. The fact is, however, OC Today is what people call us and though we proceeded with some doubt, and will continue to be known officially as Ocean City Today, the abbreviated name in the flag makes a bolder statement to go along with the bolder headlines and all-around appearance of the redesigned paper. We also strived for design simplic-

ity for the sake of production speed. We have tight deadlines that are tough to make, so we had to balance the desire for typographical niceties versus the need for speed. Consequently, the photo captions (called “cutlines “in newspaper parlance) are in the same font family as the headlines, as are photo credits, continued lines and page numbers. Our main feature story headlines are done in the Georgia typeface, the same as the body text, and we reduced our color palette to variations of four tested basics. In addition, we did this at the same time we were resizing everything from current advertisements to photo spaces because of our realigned page size. As of this week, our page is a half-inch taller and a half-inch narrower, giving us a somewhat more traditional shape. And yes, for all those people who called, wrote or commented about liking the idea of staples holding the paper together, we are bringing them back. What you see this week is the first run of our new design and we will be tweaking and revising it for the next month or so until we get it exactly the way it should be. We hope you like it. – Stewart Dobson

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

Tourism guru looks ahead to OC summer Continued from Page 1 Dew Tour to run the pro surf event. They’ve also allowed us to take a hold of a lot of the marketing, as well as frontof-house management. They saw that we were good at getting people excited, getting people into seats, that we know a lot of the crowd. That’s been great that they’ve allowed us to sort of be ambassadors for the program. We also have a possible professional volleyball tournament for mid-July that’s still in its conceptual stages, but we’re working with some local guys who are really involved in the industry on something that can help business midweek. Especially in July, a lot of the businesses are saying ‘we’re off’ through the week, so we want to bring some things to the table that aren’t just a weekend event but starts during the week and rolls in. OCT: It seems like the numbers and the anecdotal evidence this past season pointed toward a concentration of business in a lot of ways, specifically bigger weekends but slower weekdays. BH: That’s something I’ve been focused on particularly. A lot of this leads back to the fact that Ocean City needs more entertainment that’s practical to what we have. Take, for instance, the Founder’s deal. If anybody comes to you and at their first meeting tells you they’re going to have the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Adele, you should look at them and

say “yeah, and I’m going to land on the moon tomorrow.” But they trusted that these guys knew what they were doing and they would come up with a plan and deliver. Well, if you don’t deliver, there was no good plan. They didn’t deliver for two or three years and the city sort of gave them an opening to see what would happen, but when people can’t deliver you have to ask ‘why not?’ For me, as a promoter, it’s difficult to pay for acts at that level and put them on the beach in Ocean City and not go broke if it rains. That’s the bottom line. That was something that we need, looking at some music festival stuff for this summer, that celebrates the musicians we have and that come to this area. We have a few pockets here and there with bluegrass festivals and the fiddler’s convention, but there’s never been a true Ocean City music festival. That’s something that may be on the horizon. Something that’s important from my standpoint is the later August stuff. The town always seems to need something later in August, and we’ve never had something that comes in and consistently delivers. We did the bikini parade [in 2012]. It was a late August event, and it was done with limited time and seed money. But we were happy with the $20,000 the city gave us – and that money put us on the cover of the Baltimore Sun travel section, the Huffington Post, and there’s a whole segment on it

that now airs on the Travel Channel. People say that was a good investment from the city, and I think it was a good way of using money for creative events. You have to look where you’re putting your money and investing yourself. I think promoters like myself and some of the others from this area understand the entertainment and the dynamic with the crowd, and what will and won’t work in the Town of Ocean City. There should be more embracing and nurturing of some of those ideas, because we’ve been successful with the ones we’ve been given responsibility for.

OCT: Some of the stuff that you’ve pitched – such as the OC Experience – has met with some resistance or skepticism from the town. BH: The OC Experience was a big pushup. That relationship had bumps, shall we say, and we had trouble getting that back on track in late 2012. Still, even with the short timeline, we were down to the penny with the budget and we went out and performed really well. We were the stand-out at every show we attended. We staffed it with extra people that we weren’t even responsible to do in the contract. Donna and the staff were at three events, and they were there to see its success and how it worked with the public and see how it was a complement to their current marketing strategy. I never wanted it to be more than that, or

to take away from what the city has planned. I felt like it was an amazing complement, but those successes were never wrapped up in a way that would make the public and the council the depth and significance of what we did on the road. But there was never an ability to sit and build the booth at the convention center and have the hoteliers come in – and anyone who wants to come in, as well as the council – and see the monitors put up, the booth in action, the iPads in place, and get a sense of what they purchased. It saddens me that that was never done. It’s like getting excited about a car you never get to drive. So I feel like the mark was missed in the wrap-up. We needed to have the feedback from the hotel people and the city to say ‘we want to do this again, what’s your input?’ I’m not going to say everything I do is perfect, but I want people to understand it before they criticize it. I think there was some criticism of the concept originally and the money being placed there, and I feel like if it was wrapped up property it would’ve helped those issues. OCT: Do you think that the kind of events you’re incubating are moving in a different direction or are geared against the grain of what the municipality itself is going for? BH: Special events are driving tourism here. They’re probably 30-40 See HOFFMAN Page 8


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

PAGE 5

Support, no harbor money Continued from Page 1 needed, he said, was a committee or some other entity to work with the state and Ocean City to see “what’s out there” and to try to get matching funds. Many years ago, Martin said, commercial boats were considerably smaller, but their size has increased with the passage of years. Some of the vessels using the harbor are from out of state. “Last week, a boat had to turn around, go back out and wait three hours,” Martin said. He recently had difficulty navigating the channel. He said he had to figure out how to get it through the inlet and actually hit one of the buoys. Going outside of the buoys is not an option, at least not a good one. If a boat goes outside of the navigational buoys and gets damaged, insurance won’t pay, Martin said. October’s dredging, Martin said, was not even obvious now. “You’d wonder if they were even there,” he said. Church sees the problem as an everpresent one. “It’s an ongoing problem that redevelops in 60 to 90 days,” he said. Rowe said he did not know what dredging to a deeper depth might cost, but he added that he was not asking for money at this time. He again asked for

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

While County Commissioners support dredging for Ocean City’s harbor, there just isn’t money available, they say. a task force. Ed Tudor, director of the Department of Development Review and Permitting, said he did not expect for anyone to get an answer about the cause of the reoccurring sandbar. “It’s probably a lot more complicated than meets the eye,” Tudor said. “In the interim, continue the dredging.” The commissioners will write letters of support and Martin and Rowe will contact Sen. Barbara Mikulski’s office to see what, if anything, can be done about the persistent problem.

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Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 10, 2014

Runkles, others honored at OCPD banquet By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) A K-9 officer was honored Tuesday night as the 2013 Neighborhoood Watch Officer of the Year for the Ocean City Police Department. The banquet was delayed nearly 30 minutes because of a burst pipe on the west side of the building. Attendees waited downstairs in the lobby before the fire marshal declared the event could proceed. And proceed it did, although it was noticeably chilly in the grand ballroom where the banquet was held. Police Chief Ross Buzzuro said it was a great evening and thanked the fire marshal for allowing it to proceed. “Life truly is better at the beach, even in the coldest weather,� Buzzuro said. “If tonight, an officer tells a suspect to freeze, he would.� The night’s big winner, Cpl. James Runkles said he was very honored to receive the award, “but I can’t take full credit for it.� He asked the other police officers in the grand ballroom at the Ocean City convention center to stand and be recognized as well. “They deserve this award just as much as I do,� Runkles said. Runkles, a former Marine who has been a K-9 officer since joining the Ocean City Police Department in 2007, has been instrumental in the

James Runkles

seizure of narcotics, weapons and suspects with his K-9 partner, Breki. Other candidates for Officer of the Year were Lt. Scott Harner, Cpl. Allen Hawk, Officer Daniel McBride and Lt. Mark Pacini. Lt. Harner, a full-time officer since 1998, serves multiple roles within the department. Among other duties, he is the special events coordinator, planning and research coordinator for special projects and commander of the Traffic Safety Unit. Cpl. Hawk, a full-time officer since 2002,works the evening shift in the Patrol Division. He has been a member of the K-9 Unit, the Traffic Safety Unit and the Bike Patrol Unit. Officer Daniel McBride has been busy since being hired full time in

January 2012. In 2013, he had more than 89 physical arrests and 49 criminal citations. Lt. Mark Pacini, a full-time officer since 1991, is commander of the evening watch of the Patrol Division, but has served in many capacities during his years with the police department. He enjoys mentoring new officers and up and coming supervisors. The area coordinators of the eight Neighborhood Watch groups in Ocean City selected the Officer of the Year. Several other members of the police department were also honored during the banquet. Unit citations were presented to the Honor Guard and Casket/Vigil Teams for their involvement with the funerals of Joshua Adickes and Thomas Geoghegan, who were killed June 30 when Geoghegan’s private two-seater plane crashed into the ocean last summer. The Narcotics Unit was honored for obtaining intelligence information about a heroin addict who was planning an armed robbery. Special commendations were presented to Officer Trevor Greenawalt, who performed CPR, which helped save a victim’s life. Pfc. Lee Arlington and Officer Jennifer Smithhart were also recognized for performing CPR and saving a life. Three citizens, Steven Sanders,

James Donahue II and Eric Morris, were recognized for their bravery in rendering assistance to police in the apprehension of suspects involved in a armed robbery where gunshots were fired at the victim. Dfc. David Whitmer received the Meritorious Service award for his work during an investigation into theft and fraud involving approximately $1 million of money and assets stolen from an elderly person. In addition to identifying and apprehending the suspect, Dfc. Whitmer recovered $750,000 of the victim’s money and other assets. Numerous members of the police department, Pfc. Michael Kelly, Lt. Scott Harner, Lt. Elton Harmon, Pfc. Michael Karsnitz, Pfc. Kevin Flower, Pfc. Vicki Martin, Pfc. Daniel Jacobs, Pfc. Ryan Flanagan, Officer Chris Wrench, Cpl. Allen Hawk, Officer Josiah Fry, Sgt. Shawn Jones, Dfc. Carl Perry, Officer Jennifer Smithhart, Dfc. Gregory Eastman and Public Safety Aide Michael Short and Cliff Christello of the Fire Marshal’s Office received awards for excellent performance. The evening also included the lighting of a memorial candle in memory of Adickes, Geoghegan, Animal Control Officer Donald Spence and members of Neighborhood Watch who passed away during the past year.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

PAGE 7

Benefit for Truitt Jan. 10 By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) A benefit will be held today, Friday, at Seacrets to raise funds for Dana Truitt, who is recovering after being critically injured in the Nov. 26 fire at the Shepherd’s Crook. Truitt, a regular volunteer at the food pantry adjacent to St. Paul’s by-the-Sea Dana Truitt Episcopal Church on Third Street, was inside when frequent client John Sterner burst in engulfed in flames after he set himself on fire. She got past him and made it outside, but he had grabbed her and the fire spread to her. She suffered third-degree burns over 23 percent of her body. Sterner died at the scene and Rev. David Dingwall, who had been in his upstairs office, succumbed to his injuries later at Atlantic General Hospital. After spending time at Johns Hopkins Hospital’s Bayview Burn Center, where she underwent surgery, Truitt has returned to Ocean City. She will need continuing treatment and physical therapy. Today’s fundraiser at Seacrets, which is being held 5-9 p.m., will include light dinner fare, beer and wine, music, a silent auction and a 50/50 raffle. Tickets are $20 in advance of $25 at

the door. Tickets may be purchased at The Greene Turtle North, 11601 Coastal Highway; the Madison Beach Motel, 9 N. Baltimore Ave., or by calling Marianne Buas at 443-497-0524. Buas said Wednesday that she hopes to raise “as much as we can.” Support from the community has been excellent. Among the donated items for the silent auction are hotel stays, dinners, baksets of candy and liquor, rounds of golf, a skateboard, prints and paintings and $250 worth of slot play at the Casino at Ocean Downs. Fifteen restaurants are donating food and Seacrets is donating beer, wine and the event space. Entertainment will be provided by the Poole Brothers, Lauren Glick, Kaleb Brown and DJ Wax. Buas said she hopes for a good turnout. “The more people we get, the more beneficial it’ll be for her.” A donation fund was also set up a few weeks ago at a bank. Truitt’s fiancé, Charles Maddox, a co-worker at Buckingham Hotel on 14th Street, and Spiro Buas, the hotel’s owner, established a fund to help her. People may send checks to the Dana Truitt Donation Fund, c/o Bank of Ocean City, P.O. Box 150, Ocean City, Md. 21842 or drop them off at any Bank of Ocean City location. Donations may also be made online via Paypal at a special link at Buas’ Web site, www.ocrooms.com.

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

Hoffman: Making it work for everybody Continued from Page 4 percent of the town’s revenue in-season, and 60-70 percent in the off-season. Fundamentally, people come here to go to the beach and a few big special events that compliment that work to a certain level. But I think a selection of smaller, organic ideas that work well, as supporting those ideas to finally bring them forward, would be a lot more productive than to look to the stars for an answer and hope that it comes to us. The answers to that direction and the creativity to do it are right here in Ocean City, we don’t need to look outside. I feel like some of the times someone with the a nice Power Point presentation and a slick suit gets a little further than some of the ideas that are brought forth by local promoters. And even when those events are successful, we’re still looking for the big pie-in-the-sky answers instead of nurturing the smaller niche guys who have the background. The city doesn’t want to mess too much with its own events, because they do Springfest and Sunfest themselves and they do it very well. But there needs to be partnership with folks like myself and others to nurture some new ideas to get the tourism base excited about Ocean City again. Something I think isn’t celebrated enough is that there’s a lot of history and culture with Ocean City, but modern amenities, and one of the cleanest

beaches in the world. I don’t think we should put all our eggs in the “Rodney” basket. I think celebrating real family vacations - things like picking crabs, going to the beach, walking the Boardwalk – hearing what people have to say about those things would resonate a lot more than someone who is being fed a line about a place they’ve never spent a significant amount of time in. I think it had its time, and now you have to move on. I think each marketing tool and plan you have, once its legs start to get a little weak, you need to look for the next runner, and I think the town needs to find that. And I think it should be centered around real people. We’ve got some pockets of energy, but we need to grow and rally around that and look at when you don’t have anything going on, what’s the real answer there? With what’s on the horizon, I feel like the town through the Tourism Commission and TAB need to be bringing in and sitting down with visionaries and idea guys in the community to bring good ideas to the surface, not just recycling the same ideas year after year. OCT: This past June in particular was really saturated with events. Do you think there’s a tipping point where you’re just not getting as much out of them as you could be, or where you’re putting the cart before the horse? BH: I think you have to look at

events that have been staples in June and see if there’s an impact and where it is. I really feel like, for June, you already know what’s happening. You can’t stop the senior week kids, you can’t change the school’s letting out. It’s part of a tradition – maybe one that’s not always palatable – but you have to make it work for everybody. I know when everything’s on the same weekend we’ve hit a gridlock point, where you can’t even get into town. It doesn’t help my business, for instance, if people can’t even get into the car show because they’re on Route 90 and not moving at St. Martin’s Neck Road. If people aren’t coming because they don’t’ find Ocean City interesting anymore, or they haven’t been here for a while and don’t think it’s their cup of tea, we need to change our messaging to get some of that family base back and excited about what Ocean City is today, but remember what it was back when they were a kid. What we have going for us is that our visitors have a very intimate relationship with the destination. We need to nurture the marketing of those relationships. People get that feeling from some of those events when they’re here, but we need to push that feeling out to the people who aren’t getting it. That’s what I think – from what I’m working on – NBC would like to see, what Komen would like to see, the car show, Cruisin’. People that do events

would like the city to bring us in, discuss what we’re doing right and use it to push that feeling out. They’re not really engaging with us to say ‘hey, what is the car show really about?” All of these events are things that, if people know more about them, will build that excitement and keep Ocean City as a cool place in people’s minds. OCT: I don’t know that every promoter and every event is going to project a unified image of what Ocean City is or what the city government believes it should be. It’s a difficult meeting point. BH: The overall experience working with the city on this has been perplexing, let’s say. Challenging would be another good word. But there are a lot of positives to it. While I have to come before the Mayor and Council on occasions to get things approved or get their blessing, I’m really doing it for the people who come here, because they’re the ones that are saying “great job” when these things work out. And those things should be encouraged, not seen as competition with what the city wants to do itself.

OCT: It seems like, this past year, there was as much concentration on what sort of people we don’t want visiting as what sort of people we do want visiting. Or the idea that the perfect, “Leave it to Beaver” family would naturally be showing up here if it wasn’t for See NUTURING Page 10


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

PAGE 9

POLICE/COURTS

Broken dentures

A 52-year-old Ocean City man was charged Dec. 30 with first- and second-degree assault after allegedly punching a woman repeatedly in her mouth, causing her dentures to break into three pieces. According to the charging document, the victim said David started David Stalnaker Stalnaker yelling at her when she walked into her unit on St. Louis Avenue. He was, she said, off his medication and he punched her in the face with a closed fist. A downstairs neighbor had called police after hearing screaming from the unit above. He ran upstairs to that unit where he saw Stalnaker on top of the woman, punching her repeatedly. The woman, who had helped the man move into her unit about 10 weeks earlier, was kicking and screaming for help, according to the charging document. When police talked to Stalnaker, he denied ever punching the woman. He did, however, admit to throwing her onto a bed. The woman told police she had just received the dentures, which were valued at $1,700.

Disorderly conduct

A 23-year-old Centreville, Va., man was charged Jan. 1 with disorderly conduct after allegedly causing a disturbance at a mid-town hotel. Ocean City police were called to the hotel because of a man who was out of control. When they went to the man’s room, they saw blood and broken bottles all over the floor. The occupant, Daniel John Dodds, had a bleeding laceration on his foot and was unable to stand because of his intoxication, according to the charging document. Security personnel told police that Dodds was being evicted. Dodds agreed to leave, so police escorted him to the front entrance and called a cab for him. Dodds then allegedly started yelling loudly and shaking his body wildly, according to police, who then arrested him.

Alleged assault

A 45-year-old Dundalk woman was charged Dec. 30 with disorderly conduct and four counts of second-degree assault after allegedly fighting with people in an Ocean City hotel atrium. Police were called to the scene, where they saw a man with a bleeding cut on his upper lip. He said a redhaired woman had hit him. Police saw the woman, Tammy Lynn Kober, yelling and waving her arms. She had reportedly gotten mad after someone said her bi-racial son was a “half-breed.” She allegedly punched at least one juvenile with her fist.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 10

24th Annual Ocean City Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prayer Breakfast Friday, January 17, 2014 7:00am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:15am Clarion Resort Hotel

This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speaker will be Mr. Robert Douglas, founder of National Police Suicide Foundation, Inc. Mr. Douglas travels around the nation training emergency responders in suicide awareness. He is considered an expert in suicide training, appearing on Dateline, in Time Magazine and USA Today. He is an author of three books with another in publication. He was a Chaplain of the Baltimore City Police and ATF in Washington. Mr. Douglas is a wonderful and exciting speaker. Hear the uplifting message that he will share with us during these trying times that will bring hope to all.

Tickets are $16.00 in advance and must be purchased by January 14th. There will be no tickets sold at the door Tables of 8-10 people may be reserved on a first come basis. All are welcomed. For More Information, Call: Office: 410-641-1300 â&#x20AC;˘ Cell: 443-235-2669 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 410-641-3646 Tickets may be purchased at the following locations: City Hall, 3rd Street and Baltimore Ave., Ocean City Long and Foster Realty, 120th Street, & Coastal Hwy., Ocean City Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, Rt 50, W. Ocean City Cropper Oil Company, Rt 50, Berlin

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Nurturing OC events Continued from Page 8 things like Bradâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s car show bringing in meddlesome urbanites. BH: Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a major misconception there. The modern family is not the family of the 50s or 60s, or even the 70s or 80s. The modern family of people who grew up in the 90s and early 2000s have been coming here for a while. You have isolated pockets of incidents, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not related to any specific event. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re flashpoints of the fact that things are going to happen when you put that many people in one environment. What I think is that we need to embrace the people that are coming, make sure theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re safe while theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here, and find out what the modern family is looking for. If you say that Ocean City only wants the perfect family whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to come here for the perfect amount of time and spend the perfect amount of money, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pie-in-the-sky thinking, and it prevents you from hunkering down and figuring out what you really have. You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say we want or donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want â&#x20AC;&#x153;your kind.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tricky distinction to make. Ocean City is what it is in June, is what it is in July, and is what it is in August. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the combination of many faces to our summer. We have a youth base early summer, a family base mid-summer, and a last-minute vacationer base at the end of summer. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just how it

works, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a study to tell you that. I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important that the business community step up and demand some significant progress in building mid-week events. You have to start one week at a time, place something, and keep it there year after year and make it bigger and bigger. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a small snowball thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to get bigger rolling down the hill. If you never nurture that one little snowball and pack it up tight itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to fall apart, and if you stop it rolling too soon itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going to get big enough. OCT: Or if you abandon it for someone with a ready-made snowball that turns out to just be lukewarm slush. BH: Exactly. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how big events get big. You have to seed them, nurture them, and give them more than one year. The thing I love most is finding an idea, see it become reality, see it be successful, and see it be beneficial to the people I did it for. I think it would behoove some of the people who, if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand what my events are about or what drives me to be so energetic about Ocean City and beach culture, to sit down and talk to them about their ideas and work together on it. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what being a team player is about, and I hope Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve proved that.

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By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) City Council made a favorable final vote this week on an ordinance banning passengers riding without seats or seatbelts in the unenclosed areas of vehicles. Although the new policy could potentially apply to any number of different traffic scenarios, what the city specifically has in mind is quelling the common Senior Week practice of cruising Coastal Highway in the beds of pickup trucks. New state traffic laws, which went into effect in late 2013, require all rear-seat passengers in a vehicle to be wearing seat belts. Maryland previously only required front seat passengers and those under 16 to be belted. However, given the language of the law, those who are not actually inside the vehicle on seats are not subject to any safety stipulations. This loophole has been kept in Maryland for decades in deference to agricultural workers. But in the resort, the most common use is clearly recreational. Thus, the municipal ordinance goes one step further, by declaring it â&#x20AC;&#x153;unlawful for a person to ride in or allow another person to ride in an unenclosed area of a motor vehicle except in a seat and with a seat belt in use.â&#x20AC;?

At this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s council session, Councilman Brent Ashley also suggested that the city look into an express ban on throwing lit cigarette butts out of car windows. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s littering law may already cover this, but Ashley suggested a specific policy may help to drive the point home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like the pickup trucks, I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s another big quality-of-life issue on our roads during the summer,â&#x20AC;? Ashley said. Councilman and Police Commission Chair Doug Cymek said he would bring the issue up with the Ocean City Police Department at next weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commission meeting. The new law on unenclosed vehicles had first been suggested at a previous Police Commission meeting, where the OCPD noted some instances in which trucks have been rear-ended, causing them to lurch forward and launch those in the bed back onto the car that hit them. Violations of the new ordinance are punishable by a maximum $250 fine, although initial enforcement would likely mete out much lower fines. The code also provides for three key exceptions to the rule for emergency vehicles, city employees performing specific duties, and for those in town-approved events on closed courses, such as parades.


JANUARY 10, 2014

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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JANUARY 10, 2014

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By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) Change can come in many colors – but preferably shades of the “colonial” or “arts and crafts” palettes. The Ocean City Development Corporation is looking to revise its design guidelines for downtown Ocean City, potentially loosening up a few of the more stringent standards for building colors and signage. OCDC Executive Director Glenn Irwin requested at Tuesday night’s meeting that the city Planning and Zoning Commission schedule public hearings to consider the changes, which are adopted as part of the city’s code in support of OCDC OCDC is a publicly funded nonprofit group, founded in 2002, which sponsors revitalization and redevelopment projects in the resort’s historic downtown. “These standards have been the major thrust of our efforts since we first started OCDC in 2002,” Irwin said. “A lot of the changes are housekeeping that we went through in past years and said ‘this should be worded differently.’” “Colors and signage seem to be the main issues,” he noted. In several cases, Irwin said, the design guidelines as written are too strict to allow what OCDC is now looking to do. “The design standards have referred to ‘old Ocean City’ colors as lighter colors,” Irwin said. “But we know we have to be more flexible for a number of reasons, therefore we came up with a palate.” This palate, Irwin said, is similar to the spectrum known as “Colonial” or “Arts and Crafts” in the SherwinWilliams paint scheme, and includes darker shades as well.

“There are certain cases where a darker-colored building, especially raw wood, stands out well but fits with the neighborhood,” Irwin said. The other key de-restriction, proposed at the behest of several property owners, is for signage. “The OCDC board has had a number of requests come through for electronic signs, particularly on Baltimore Avenue,” Irwin said. Electronic signs are only permitted north of Third Street, but Irwin said the natural layout of the city lends to electronic signs as far south as the north side of North Division Street. Restrictions will still remain that limit electronic marquees to no more than 32 square feet and no more than one change of message every five seconds. OCDC is also proposing to allow signs that project out from buildings over sidewalks to be up to 14 square feet on the Avenues only, while sidestreet signs will remain at a six square foot limit. The proposed changes also include allowing A-frame signs of no more than 8 square feet on private property during business hours. Such signs are only permitted on the Boardwalk. “They tend to turn into eye sores,” said Commissioner Lauren Taylor. “If we’re going to do this I think there needs to be some construction standards in there as we have for the Boardwalk.” Regardless, Taylor said, “we’re probably looking at a five-hour undertaking for just the public hearing on signs alone.” The commission’s consensus was to schedule a hearing and deliberation on the signage changes, as well as at least one other hearing on the remaining modifications to the design code.

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) Much as was done – at one point or another in history – with the internet, skateboards, and indoor plumbing , it was suggested this week that government look into making an allowance for a fad that might just be here to stay. Local resident Gabe Mancini asked city council Monday night to consider changing the city’s ordinance on beach usage to allow stand-up paddleboards to be used under the same conditions as surfboards. During daytime hours in-season, surfing is only allowed on select stretches of beach, and at the inlet. However, the Ocean City Beach Patrol will frequently declare a “modified” surfing schedule if there are few swimmers in the water, particularly during the shoulder season, allowing surfers to spread out. “The issue is that when the beach is modified, SUP’s are presently considered watercraft [which are prohibited] because of the paddle,” Mancini said. It was his understanding, Mancini said, that the paddle stipulation and prohibition on such watercraft was necessary to keep canoes and kayaks off the beach during the summer, but paddleboards were not of the same nature. “The other great thing about an SUP is that it has a leash, like a surfboard, and you can control it in the surf unlike a canoe or kayak,” Mancini said. Councilman and Recreation and Parks Commission Chair Joe Mitrecic said he would bring the possible revision up at the next commission meeting. The city decided last year to lift the prohibition on skateboards on the Boardwalk, and allow skateboarding during the same hours in which bicycles are allowed, given the resurgence in skating’s popularity in recent years.


JANUARY 10, 2014

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

Capital improvement plan causes concern By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) The inclusion of an expansion of Showell Park and a new Berlin library in the county’s requested five-year capital improvement plan caused concern for some people Tuesday. During the Worcester County Commissioner’s public hearing about that plan, Grant Helvey said he had lived in Ocean Pines for more than 20 years and during all that time, he had never heard neighbors say anything about wanting an expansion of Showell Park. The county has more than enough recreational land for its residents, he said. He also questioned whether the $900,000 figure in the capital improvement plan for approximately 100 acres was “prudent” and he questioned the statement from Paige Hurley, director of the Department of Recreation and Parks, who said the expansion would be good for economic development. The vision, Hurley said, was “to develop multi-purpose fields. In addition to those fields, he would like the park to have bathrooms, trails and concessions to draw people and

“bring in revenue as well.” Considerable revenue could result if the expansion is made, if fields and other amenities are provided and if tournaments take place at the park. Those tournaments would not just help the county, but Ocean City businesses as well because tournament players and their families would be staying in lodging establishments, eating at restaurants and spending money in various shops. The park would continue to provide recreational activities for area residents, but “recreation has really expanded,” Hurley said, and he wants to build revenue by bringing in tournaments. “That’s the future I see,” Hurley said. Showell Park would be the prime location for it because the children could play in tournaments and they and their parents could also visit the beach. As far as money is concerned, almost all of the money would come from Program Open Space funds, which come from real estate transfer taxes. The state program would pay 100 percent of the cost of the land and 90 percent of the cost of develop-

OCEAN CITY TODAY/NANCY POWELL

An expansion of Showell Park is included in the requested capital improvement plan for Worcester County.

ment. “As far as putting a number on it, we haven’t gotten that far,” Hurley said. The capital improvement plan includes $900,000 for land acquisition for the park in fiscal year 2015 and additional funds for engineering, site work, construction, equipment and other items through fiscal year 2018 for a total of $2.3 million. It also includes $600,000 for land acquisition and engineering and design for a new Berlin library in fiscal year 2015 and additional funds for engineering, site work, construction and equipment and furnishings through fiscal year

2017 for a total of $4.9 million. Ocean City resident Ellie Diegelmann thought the $400,000 allotted for land was too much and asked why it could not be built on the same site. Berlin resident Frank Gebhart said he lives nearby and goes by it “all the time. I very seldom see many cars in the parking lot.” Mark Thomas, director of the Worcester County Library, said few cars are in the branch library’s parking lot because “it’s a walkable, bikeable place to go.” The library building, which was built in 1970, is “woefully inadequate See CAPITAL Page 18


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) A court appeal against the city’s favorable ruling on a Boardwalk development project has been dropped, paving the way for new construction in a key resort location. A group of unit owners from the El Capitan condominium, located on the Boardwalk at 4th Street, had filed a challenge in Worcester County Circuit Court against a decision by the city’s Board of Zoning Appeals, granting a setback exemption for new construction at the Hampton House. As of this week, however, the case has been closed after the parties involved submitted a stipulation of dismissal. Russell Dashiell, the attorney representing El Capitan, declined to comment on the matter.

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Sunsations chain owner Avi Sibony was granted a special exemption from the Boardwalk zoning district’s 32foot front setback requirement, allowing for a 20-foot setback on the building he is proposing to replace the Hampton House, which is currently a temporary Sunsations, located on the boards between 4th and 5th Street Despite previous proposals for the property which would’ve required larger exceptions or variances, the building footprint approved by the BZA will be a single-story establishment with two separate storefronts and parking beneath the building, accessible from the alley behind. The BZA ruled, in a 3-2 decision, that the exemption was warranted given that the buildings immediately north and south of the Hampton House also have sub-standard set-

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backs, and Sibony’s proposed facility will not change the character of the neighborhood given the building lines that had already been established prior to the imposition of the current setback code. The new building, the BZA found, would likely not even be visible from the windows of the El Capitan and other Boardwalk residences. However, El Capitan residents had voiced opposition given that their building does conform to the 32-foot setback, and were concerned that further out-of-code development would worsen foot and vehicle traffic on their block. Prior to his presentation to the BZA, Sibony had already modified his plans for the new project to include all of the required parking. In a previous See BDWK. Page 16

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By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) St. George Greek Orthodox Church will host its 15th annual Epiphany & Blessing of the Waters this Saturday, Jan. 11, at noon on the beach at 91st Street. The Blessing, known as Agiasmos, is an ancient Orthodox Christian tradition that remembers Jesus Christ’s baptism in the Jordan River and the beginning of his public ministry. When Jesus was baptized on Epiphany, he sanctified the water, and the ceremony is done in remembrance of this every year. The church on 88th Street will hold two services, Orthos at 8:45 a.m. and Divine Liturgy at 10 a.m., followed by a short service on the beach. Father Zasilious Penteridis will lead the services. Officials will toss two crosses into the ocean — one for boys to chase and the other for girls to retrieve. The two youths who find the crosses will have a blessed year, according to the tradition. The public is invited to attend the Blessing of the Waters, a ceremony lasting about one hour. Approximately 100-150 people come each year. For more information, call the church at 410-524-0990.

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PAGE 15

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 16

Bdwk. project appeal nixed Continued from Page 15 hearing, objection from El Capitan owners had spurred the BZA to not approve a parking exception for De Lazy Lizard, which had planned to install a brew pub in the Lambros Apartments building, which sits in between the Hampton House and the El Capitan.

Flood risk info mtg. Jan. 16

(Jan. 10, 2014) The Federal Emergency Management Agency released updates to the coastal flood maps, known as Flood Insurance Rate Maps, for Worcester County. The FIRMs indicate flood-prone coastal areas in the county, and insurance companies use them to determine flood insurance rates for buildings and contents. A public meeting will take place in the Stephen Decatur Middle School cafeteria, Thursday, Jan. 16, 6-9 p.m. For info, call 410-632-1200.

JANUARY 10, 2014

Seaside Village gets county OK By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) The Worcester County Planning Commission discussed the following topics and made the following recommendations and approvals during the Jan. 2 meeting in Snow Hill.

Worcester County Recreation Center addition The commission reviewed drawings of the proposed addition, but made no comments. No approvals were needed. The 6,300-square-foot addition will be constructed on the east side of the existing recreation center and its façade will match the existing façade. The main vestibule at the recreation center will be used as the entrance for the addition. Paige Hurley, director of the Department of Recreation and Parks, said the after-school program now held in the front lobby will be held in the new area. Zumba and aerobics, which are now held in a corner of the existing gym or on the main court will also be moved to the new space. The new area will also provide space for storage, laundry facilities and work-

out equipment such as ellipticals and treadmills. Project funding of $728,996 is included in the adopted fiscal year 2014 Recreation Department budget. After the project is completed, Program Open Space will reimburse 90 percent of the total cost.

Seaside Village The commission approved the establishment of fee simple lots for phases 24 at the Seaside Village residential planned community in West Ocean City north of Route 50 and east of Golf Course Road. The request mirrors that of the earlier request for the first phase. Infrastructure is already in place. Commission member Brooks Clayville said he did not like the stone on part of the façade of the residences. “Stone isn’t something we use around here,” Clayville said. The county’s Design Guidelines and Standards for Commercial Buildings discourages stone on buildings, but the structures at Seaside Village are residential so those guidelines and standards do not apply.

NOTICE Important Public Information Meeting

WORCESTER COUNTY COASTAL FLOOD RISK OPEN HOUSE Thursday, January 16, 2014 from

6:00 to 9:00 PM at the

Stephen Decatur Middle School Cafeteria 9815 Seahawk Road, Berlin, MD 21811 The Worcester County Department of Development Review & Permitting, on behalf of the Worcester County Commissioners, will host a Public Information Meeting and Coastal Flood Risk Open House with representatives of the State of Maryland as well as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and their mapping partners to present the updates to the coastal flood maps, recently released by FEMA , known as Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRMs). The FIRMs indicate flood-prone coastal areas in Worcester County, and insurance companies use FIRMs to determine flood insurance rates for buildings and contents. Worcester County is required to adopt updated maps to continue participating in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which makes flood insurance available to the community. Worcester County residents and property owners are strongly encouraged to learn more about their flood risk and the updates shown on the preliminary maps.

Do You Know Your Flood Risk? Find Out More at the Worcester County Coastal Flood Risk Open House

Attorney Mark Cropper, representing Seaside Village, said he would ask the architect and developer if something other than stone could be used for the façade. Clayville voiced his opposition to the stone façade again and mentioned that some buildings along Route 50 on the way to Ocean City have stone facades. “”It’s like nails on chalkboard every time I do by,” he said. Planning Commission Chairwoman Marlene Ott was not in favor of the proposed façade either. ‘I don’t think it’s appealing,” Ott said. Despite the proposed stone of the façade, the commission voted to approve the establishment of the lots and the preliminary and final plat review.

Text amendment The commissioners voted unanimously to send a favor recommendation to the Worcester County Commissioners for a text amendment that would permit up to 12 children in a daycare home. First however, they want the fire marshal to review it. The current county code now permits up to eight children in a daycare home. The change is proposed because, state regulations permits up to 12 children in a daycare home and this would make the county regulations match the state regulation. Zoning administrator Jennifer Burke said someone had applied to the state to have a large daycare home in the county.

CONSOLIDATION

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• Find your property on preliminary flood maps and learn your flood risk • Get answers to your questions from County, State and FEMA Representatives • Learn about flood insurance options from insurance specialists Residents and property owners must be informed about flood risk. It is up to everyone to know their risk, know their role, and take action to reduce their risk. Therefore, the Worcester County Commissioners encourage all residents and property owners to attend the Worcester County Coastal Flood Risk Open House. For more detailed information, please visit the Worcester County website at www.co.worcester.md.us or call the Worcester County Department of Development Review & Permitting at 410-632-1200. We are committed to ensuring that the meeting and materials are accessible to all, and so in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) (www.ada.gov), reasonable accommodations are available upon request. Please include a description of the accommodation you will need, including as much detail as you can. Please include a way we can contact you if more information is needed. Make your request as early as possible; please allow at least 5 days advance notice. Last minute requests will be accepted, but may be impossible to fill. Please contact Dave Bollinger at david.bollinger@dhs.gov or by phone at 215-931-5561 with any questions or concerns regarding accommodations. WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

STOP BY RESORT HOMES OPEN HOUSE TOUR

PAGE 17

New Year and Time to build a new RH house! Stop by our Open House Tour on Sat 1/11/14 from 11-2

HOMES

SATURDAY

ON THE 1/11 TOUR:

1/11/14 FROM 11-2

Resort Homes can build our new home anywhere on the lower shore. We are not limited to building in these parks, we are using these homes as a sample of what we can build for you. Call us today! We build a better house, ask your neighbor!

Warrens Park 22 Bay Overlook

Montego Bay

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Swann Keys (Off Rt 54)

37020 Canvasback Rd 36983 Canvasback Rd Additional homes may be added to the tour so please call our office at 410-726-8528 or 410213-7721 or stop by one of the homes listed above for a complete list of addresses.

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OPEN HOUSE TOUR of homes we built in

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SATURDAY 1/11 from 11-2

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Call Darryl Greer for a free new home estimate and to discuss building on your lot. 410-726-8528 or 410-213-7721

Resort Homes, Inc. 11718 Ocean Gateway, West Ocean City, MD 410-213-7721 or 410-726-8528 www.resorthousinggroup.com

Follow us on Facebook


Ocean City Today

PAGE 18

JANUARY 10, 2014

Capital improvement Continued from Page 14 for that community,” Thomas said. Libraries are no longer just places for lending books; they are places where a variety of educational programs are offered to people of all ages. “I feel real confident about the need for that building,” Thomas said. As for Diegelmann’s concern about the need to purchase land for a new library, Thomas said the county does not own the land where the Berlin branch library is located. The Berlin Fire Company owns it and could use it. “Building onsite is not an option,” Thomas said. Additional items in the requested five-year capital improvement plan for fiscal year 2014 through fiscal year 2018 include $10 million for a replacement and upgrade of the jail’s HVAC system, $3.1 million to cap and

close the Berlin rubble fill, $3.6 million for a new county storage building in Snow Hill, $1.1 million for a 500,000-gallon leachate storage tank and $951,437 for an expansion of the recreation center in Snow Hill. The projects total $142.6 million, with $15.5 million or 10.9 percent to come from the general fund and $82.6 million of 57.902 percent to come from bond funds. The remaining funds would come from user fees, grant funds, state match funds, designated funds or enterprise fund bonds. Inclusion in the requested capital improvement plan does not guarantee funding. “This is a plan,” said Bud Church, president of the Worcester County Commissioners. “Without a plan, we don’t know where we’re going. It’s just a plan, nothing more, nothing less.”

COURTESY SAVEFARMFAMILIES.ORG

Kristin and Alan Hudson

Good citizen award given to Hudson family

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By Nancy Powell Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) The Hudson family, targets of a lawsuit alleging a non-existent pile of chicken manure on their Berlin-area farm polluted waterways, received the Citizenship Award from the Tri-County Council of the Lower Eastern Shore last month. “I was shocked,” Alan Hudson said Monday. “Shocked and amazed. It was the last thing I expected. They surprised me. I can’t thank them enough.” The Citizenship Award is given in recognition of outstanding service through leadership, responsibility, character and commitment that has produced a positive effect on Worcester, Wicomico and Somerset counties. Hudson had been invited to a dinner at Great Hope Golf Course in Crisfield held by the Tri-County Council on Dec. 9. He was unaware of the reason for the dinner, but he accepted the invitation of Bud Church, president of the Worcester County Commissioners, who drove him there and who was, of course, quite aware of the award. “I was delighted the Tri-County Council recognized Mr. Hudson for his contribution to the agricultural community,” Church said Monday. “He and his family had been through so much during the past several years and hopefully, this recognition will help ease the pain.” Hudson had assumed he was being asked to speak about the ordeal he and his family had been through since Assateague Coastkeeper Kathy Phillips, executive director of the Assateague Coastal Trust, and the Waterkeeper Alliance, an environmental activist group, filed the federal lawsuit in March 2010. That lawsuit, filed against the Alan See SHOCKED Page 19


BARRETT IN BERLIN

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

PAGE 19

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Shocked and amazedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Continued from Page 18 and Kristin Hudson Farm and Perdue Farms alleged that a pile of chicken manure on the Hudson farm was causing pollution. The pile, however, was not chicken manure at all, but a pile of biosolids from the Ocean City wastewater treatment plant. Such biosolids were commonly used as fertilizer on farms. The Maryland Department of the Environment investigated the issue, asked the Hudsons to move the pile of biosolids to a different site on the farm and concluded no further action was needed except to spread the pile in time for the next crop growing season. The pile was moved. Neither Phillips nor anyone affiliated with the Waterkeeper Alliance ever called Hudson to ask about the pile or to ask if they could visit the farm. Instead, they just filed the lawsuit, alleging violations of the Clean Water Act. Even after the determination by the Department of the Environment that the pile was not chicken manure, they went forward with their lawsuit, but changed the supposed method of water pollution. They came up with the idea that pollutants from poultry manure had gotten into the waterways by being blown there from exhaust fans on chicken houses and from the soles of peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoes as they went into and out of the chicken houses on the farm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They never should have gone as far as they did,â&#x20AC;? Hudson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If they cared about what they said they cared about, they should have come and talked to us. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never spoken to Ms. Phillips. Throughout the trial, they wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even look me in the eye in the courtroom. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never had a conversation with her. She never called. All she ever had to do was call me and I would have talked to her. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They had this pre-planned,â&#x20AC;? Hudson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They went so far and they just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t back down. They were grasping for straws.â&#x20AC;? The Hudson family did not back down. Aware that defending themselves against the false allegations could have resulted in personal bankruptcy and the loss of the family farm, the

Hudsons fought back and won. Because of their determination, people through the state and the country became educated about the plight of the Eastern Shore poultry industry and gained a new respect for the Eastern Shore farmers who remain committed to the land and were the first environmentalists, according to a press release issued by the Tri-County Council. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alan Hudson has always humbly given credit to the individuals, neighbors, agricultural community, and others whose significant help supported him and his family throughout this ordeal through to his ultimate success,â&#x20AC;? the Tri-County Council said in its press release stated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know, however, that the Eastern Shore and its critically important agricultural industry is better understood, stronger and more appreciated because of the character and commitment of the entire Hudson Family.â&#x20AC;? Hudson and many others anticipate that the Waterkeeper Alliance will file additional lawsuits against farmers. For that reason, www.SaveFarmFamilies.org will remain in existence to help other farm families who become targets of lawsuits. The University of Maryland law clinic provided free legal services to the Waterkeeper Alliance. Fundraisers such as crab feasts and chicken and dumpling dinners, plus donations to www.SaveFarmFamiles.org, helped the Hudsons pay their legal bills. But even with all that help, Hudson still had to pay part of the cost. He did not specify how much he paid, but said it was â&#x20AC;&#x153;quite a bit.â&#x20AC;? In addition to the financial hit, they had to take time off from work and spend time going back and forth to Baltimore. Even though Judge William Nickerson declared in his Dec. 20, 2012 finding that the Waterkeeper Alliance had not met the standard of preponderance of evidence in its claim that the Hudson farm had discharged pollutants into the waterways, life has still not returned to normal for the family. And maybe it never will. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better, but you still look over your shoulder,â&#x20AC;? Hudson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been three very hard years for me and my family.â&#x20AC;?

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 20

JANUARY 10, 2014

T h e 2 0 1 4 A t l an t i c G e n e r a l H o s p i t a l F o u n d at i o n P e n g u i n S w i m w a s p r e se n t e d w i t h g ene r ous s upp or t fr om: G l a c i e r S p o n s or s AGH Auxiliary Bull on the Beach Clear Channel Outdoor, Inc. Comcast Spotlight D3Corp Froggy 99.9 Kiss 95.9

I c e b e rg Sp on s o r s Arctic Heating & Air Conditioning Erik T. Cantine, Ice Artist Casino at Ocean Downs

Princess Royale Oceanfront Resort & Condominiums Q105 Town of Ocean City WBOC

Mercedes-Benz of Salisbury/ Pohanka Automotive Group OC Wasabi

I ci cl e S p o n s o r s

Sn o w f l a k e Sp o n s o r s

Awareness Home Inspection Services, LLC Blood Bank of Delmarva F.A. Taylor & Son, Inc. Fisher’s Popcorn - Fenwick Healogics Holly Ridge Farm Equestrian Center Impact Home Technology The “New" La Quinta Inn and Suites The Kite Loft Red Sun Custom Apparel Wayne Cannon 92.7 WGMD Radio

Atlantic Physical Therapy Beer Bellies Creative Day Spa Dolles Candyland Hotel Monte Carlo & Suites Ladies Auxiliary Ocean City Elks No. 2645 Ocean City Parrothead Club The Penguin Diner Tidewater Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Associates, PA William Allen, DDS, MAGD

I gl o o S p o ns or s Direct Media, Inc. JJ Roth 98.1 Irie Radio Jokes R Wild

P riz es : I n d i vi d u a l Fundraisers 1. Craig Kettler 2. Butch “Woody”German 3. Ivan Zorn

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Youngest Penguin: Macklin Bitler, 10 Months Old

Oldest Penguin: Papa Joe Gaffney, 80 years young


Business Tip increases among top session bills

By Zack Hoopes Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) With the 2014 session of the Maryland General Assembly having convened this past Wednesday, Jan. 8, most political prognosticators are predicting that a proposed minimum wage hike will be the most influential topic for the state’s legislators. Depending on which side of the aisle one sits, a higher state wage will either mean economic revitalization by injecting cash into low-earning families – who are more likely to spend than save – or economic catastrophe due to increased operating costs for small businesses. Unfortunately, in Ocean City, this may be a moot point, as those in the resort who need the boost most are also those who stand to benefit from it the least. “I would not foresee any changes in tipped employees being able to actually walk home with more money,” said Philip Cheung of local accounting firm Gregory and Associates. “I would expect it to just be more of a burden on the employers.” The resort economy, relative to the rest of the state, is in a unique position given that its bread-and-butter workers receive little to no actual wages, but instead depend on tips for income. For several months, Governor Martin O’Malley has been pushing a minimum wage increase as the major effort of this year’s law-making session. Maryland abides only by the federal statute requiring $7.25 per hour. Several proposals from legislators range from the mild to the drastic, with one bill pitching a rise to $16.70 by 2022, according to the Washington Post. The issue has also been championed by gubernatorial candidate and current Attorney General Doug Gansler, whose endorsement of a plan to raise the wage to $10.10 by 2016 closely matches the proposal floated last year to hike the wage to $10.00 by 2015. That proposal also contained a key provision that would raise the base pay for tipped workers from 50 percent of minimum wage to 70 percent. If this was approved simultaneously with an overall wage hike, waiters, bartenders, and other tipped employees could see their hourly allowance practically double from the current

Ocean City Today Jan. 10, 2014

Page 21 REAL ESTATE REPORT

NAR provides information on REach program

$3.63 to over $7. “I would say, if anything, we would by trying to compromise on the tipped wages,” said Susan Jones, Executive Director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel-Restaurant Association. Hospitality industry groups are expected to come out against a wage hike, as they did last year. “Primarily because there are so many other taxes, as well as unemployment insurance, plus the added costs of Obamacare,” Jones said. “It would be another added expense that could tip some employers into reducing their workforce, which is counterproductive.” Winter work in the area is already in short supply. Of the local wait staff and bartenders interviewed by this paper, many said their primary purpose in working through the winter was to maintain their place at the establishment for the extremely lucrative summer months. “I’m getting tips, but it’s still less than if I had a steady $9 or $10 an hour job,” said one midtown bartender. “I wouldn’t be doing this very long if I could find something else.” Even in the winter, very few employees said they see much of their hourly wages, since their employers are required to take taxes on their tips out of their hourly pay. Thus, their weekly checks are typically for $0, and their pay stubs simply show tax withholdings exceeding the $3.63 hourly wage. “I’m always making more in tips, and I usually get a $0 check, but it depends on the week,” said Alli Manry at Tequila Mockingbird. “I’m sure in the summer it wouldn’t make a difference, but it could in the winter.” “It does help out in the winter, even if it’s a minimal check, when we’re making next to no tips,” said Cameron Drew at Galaxy 66. “Those extra checks are money that I can spend on myself instead of on bills.” Although it would give a slight boost during the lean winter, others expected that an increase in base pay would probably zero-out by year’s end.

“It could help with taxes in the winter, but over the long run I don’t think you’re going to see a lot more money as an employee,” said Michael, a bartender at another North Ocean City spot. According to Cheung, many employees come close to owing the IRS on their year-end returns because of limitations on how much their employer can withhold from their weekly pay during the year. Thus, an increase in hourly pay would likely be consumed by taxes, especially since an increase in base wages would be taxed at a higher rate. “Because those payroll taxes will also increase, the end result will still likely be a zero check,” Cheung said. “The extra money will likely not end up in the employee’s hands just because of the dynamic of how taxes and withholdings work.” What really drives wages in the seasonal economy, Cheung noted, is unemployment taxes. Maryland charges employers for anticipated unemployment based on experience, up to the first $8,500 an employee makes in any given year. “Once that employee makes more than $8,500, their employer is no longer taxed,” Cheung said. “Most of the employees that are brought on board for only three or four months will still fall under that minimum.” For highly seasonal businesses that lay off large numbers of employees before they’ve hit the threshold, that rate can be very high – up to 13.5 percent for some of his clients, Cheung said, although those employers that re-hire the same people can apply for credits to lessen this rate. “The more employees that apply for unemployment with the state and are granted unemployment, the higher the impact on the employer’s tax rate,” Cheung said. “However, when the time comes to pay unemployment tax in April, the benefit from the season hasn’t hit yet. It’s a big outlay at a time of year when most businesses are at their low point.”

By Lauren Bunting Contributing Writer (Jan. 10, 2014) The National Association of Realtors recently released information about REach, the strategic accelerator for technology startups created and managed by the NAR’s investment fund, Second Century Ventures. Applications to join the second-year class are being accepted and the deadline to apply is March 1. NAR’s REach offers education, mentorship and market exposure for early-stage technology companies that wish to address the trillion dollar real estate market, and in doing so helps NAR fulfill its member mission of identify technologies and resources that will benefit the industry. Applicants must have a platform to provide innovative products or services for real estate professionals or consumers, but need not be solely focused on the industry. Among the notable accomplishments in 2013 made by the seven, first-year program graduates are that the companies achieved significant user and revenue growth, with most companies achieving respectable sales and consumer bases in under a year; four out of the seven companies used inside insights from mentors and coaching to launch new products targeting the real estate industry; and five out of the seven companies landed major deals with one or more of the industry’s top 10 national brands. “The mentoring and access to potential clients from working with REach helped us grow our revenue and customer base dramatically in just six months,” said Conor McCluskey, founder and CEO of BombBomb, a video and e-mail marketing company that was part of REach’ 2013 class. “As a direct result, our video marketing technology is now used by Realtors® in all 50 states and 25 countries to help them be present for showings when they physically can’t be there. If the real estate industry is at all a focus for your startup, you should definitely apply to REach.” — Lauren Bunting is a licensed REALTOR®with Bunting Realty, Inc. in Berlin.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 22

MinuteClinic opens in WOC CVS (Jan. 10, 2014) MinuteClinic, the largest provider of retail-based medical clinics in the United States, has opened a new walk-in medical clinic inside the CVS/pharmacy store in West Ocean City at 12510 Ocean Gateway. It is the 29th MinuteClinic in Maryland and the second on the Lower Shore. “Since opening our first storebased clinic in Maryland in 2006, we have helped to expand access to highquality, convenient and affordable care to thousands of residents who have visited us at CVS/pharmacy locations near where they live and work,” said Andrew Sussman, M.D., president, MinuteClinic and senior vice president/associate chief medical officer, CVS Caremark Corporation. MinuteClinic nurse practitioners specialize in family health care and

can diagnose, treat and write prescriptions for common family illnesses such as strep throat and ear, eye, sinus, bladder and bronchial infections. Minor wounds, abrasions, skin conditions and joint sprains are treated, and common vaccinations such as influenza, tetanus, pneumonia and Hepatitis A & B are available at most locations. Walk-in camp, sports and college physicals are available daily. In addition, MinuteClinic administers a series of wellness services designed to help patients identify lifestyle changes needed to improve their current and future health, including screenings and monitoring for diabetes, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. No appointments are required at

MinuteClinic and most health insurance is accepted. For patients paying cash or credit, treatment prices are posted at each clinic and on www.minuteclinic.com. The cost for most treatment starts at $79. MinuteClinic practitioners use a software program that at the conclusion of each visit generates educational material, an invoice and a prescription (when clinically appropriate) for the patient, as well as a diagnostic record that can be sent via electronic health record, fax or mail to a primary care provider with patient permission. The MinuteClinic walk-in medical clinic in West Ocean City operates from 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday.

Lighting upgrades for businesses (Jan. 10, 2014) Businesses in Maryland may be eligible for free upgrades to their interior and exterior lighting systems to make them more energy efficient to reduce consumption through the Empower Maryland program. The state-mandated program

works with the major utilities (Delmarva Power and Pepco) to provide incentives for businesses to help lower their energy costs. A group of trained, professional experts will visit the business to do a free assessment of their energy usage, and make recommendations which can often be done at no

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charge to the business owner. “If businesses aren’t taking advantage of these programs, they are essentially losing money and their competitive advantage,” said James Deveney, owner of Watershed Installation Services LLC., who has been certified by the utilities to implement the program. “We have helped businesses replace thousands of dollars in lighting, and they didn’t have to pay one penny. These programs are all funded through a surcharge on everyone’s energy bill. They are designed to help a business owner reduce their energy usage. It’s a win-win situation for almost every business owner.” In addition to lighting, certified experts can also review HVAC systems for energy efficiency and provide tune-ups and occupancy controls for free or significantly reduced costs. Refrigeration controls and devices can also be checked and sometimes replaced at little or no cost to the business owner as well. To learn more about this program, contact Watershed Installation Services LLC., at its Ocean City office 443-664-2844.

JANUARY 10, 2014

Md. casinos bring in $65M in December

(Jan. 10, 2014) The Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency announced Tuesday the December 2013 revenue numbers for the state’s four casinos– Hollywood Casino Perryville in Cecil County, Casino at Ocean Downs in Worcester County, Maryland Live Casino in Anne Arundel County, and Rocky Gap Casino Resort in Allegany County. December’s combined statewide revenue totaled $65,039,314. Casino at Ocean Downs generated $3,389,642 in December, and its gross gaming revenue per unit per day was $136.68. Casino at Ocean Downs’ December revenue increased by $53,716 or 1.6 percent, from December 2012. It operates 800 slot machines. Hollywood Casino Perryville generated $6,490,544 from both slot machines and table games in December. Gross gaming revenue per unit per day was $150.79 for slot machines, $2,626.90 for banking table games and $324.04 for non-banking table games. Hollywood Casino’s December revenue increased by $534,403 or 9 percent, from December 2012. Hollywood Casino Perryville operates 1,158 slot machines and 22 (12 banking and 10 non-banking) table games. Maryland Live Casino generated $52,532,568 from both slot machines and table games in December. Gross gaming revenue per unit per day was $240.45 for slot machines, $4,711.66 for banking table games and $1,461.56 for non-banking table games. Maryland Live Casino operates 4,341 slot machines and 174 (122 banking and 52 non-banking) table games. Maryland Live’s December 2013 revenue increased by $16,580,752, or 46 percent, from December 2012. Rocky Gap Casino Resort generated $2,626,560 from both slot machines and table games in December. Gross gaming revenue per unit per day was $126.15 for slot machines, $1,333.80 for banking table games and $333.15 for non-banking table games.Rocky Gap Casino Resort operates 558 slot machines and 13 table games (10 banking and 3 nonbanking).


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

PAGE 23

OBITUARIES

David and Gloria Winne DAVID HOLLISTER WINNE AND GLORIA RAND WINNE Wallingford, Conn. David Hollister Winne, 86, passed away on Jan. 2, 2014 and Gloria Rand Winne, 87, passed away Jan. 5, 2014 peacefully at Masonicare in Wallingford, Conn. David was born in Watertown, N.Y. and was the son of the late Walter and Blanche Winne. Gloria was born in Yonkers, N.Y. and was the daughter of the late William and Adelaide Rand. Dave and Gloria were married for 58 years and resided in Windsor, Conn. before retiring to Ocean City. They leave behind a son, Mark Winne, and his wife, Michele, of Suffield, Conn. and their children, Allyson of Cromwell, Conn. and Matthew of San Diego, Ca., a daughter, Lee Kingsbury, and her husband, Jeff, of Windsor Locks, Conn. Following a short tour in the Coast Guard during World War II, Dave graduated from the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y. with a U.S.C.G. License and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Marine Engineering. He later earned an MBA from the University of Connecticut. He sailed for five years for Bethlehem Steel, Crown Oil and later as a Warranty Engineer for Babcock & Wilcox. While sailing, he averaged over 100,000 miles a year and made 72 passages through the Panama Canal. He worked at Terry Steam Turbine Company in Windsor and

then on to a Manufacturer’s Rep Firm before opening his own company, Winne Associates, in 1978. Gloria was a graduate of SUNY Albany, N.Y. with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Education. She taught English at Arlington High School, her Alma Mater, as well as in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. before moving to Connecticut to teach at Eastern Junior High School, Riverside, Conn. After starting her family, she returned to the field of education as a high school guidance counselor at Windsor High School and retired in 1988 after 25 years. In their retirement years, they both became active in their respective volunteer interests. Dave was active in the Shiners’ Club and the Coast Guard Auxiliary as a Commercial Fishing Vessel Examiner. Gloria enjoyed many interests, specifically the famous St. Paul’s Episcopal Church’s Chicken and Dumpling dinners, the Clare’s Guild and the Vestry. Much of her time was devoted to Diakonia, a transitional shelter for those in need, where she served on the board for 15 years and continued on as a volunteer at the shelter. One day a week was given to the Ocean City library to help with the distribution and checking of books. While Gloria tended to their tomato and vegetable gardens, Dave’s passion was his beautiful rose and flower gardens. Bubbles and Papa David, as they were affectionately known, greatly enjoyed the community of Ocean City and its social activities. They quickly developed close and long-lasting friendships during their 25 years of retirement. They loved the summer vacations with their grandchildren, visiting with snowbirds traveling north and south, and enjoyed taking cruises with family and dear friends. Their family is grateful for the wonderful care and love they received while they made their home at Ashlar

Village and Masonicare the last few years. A private memorial service will be held at a later date. Donations may be made to St. Paul’s by-the-Sea Fire Recovery Fund, c/o of Bank in Ocean City, 10005 Golf Course Road, Ocean City, Md. 21842 or visit http://stpaulsbythesea.org/donations/.

Patricia “Patsy” Sterling PATRICIA STERLING Ocean City Patricia “Patsy” Sterling born Aug.21, 1946, succumbed on Jan. 1, 2014 to a heart attack she suffered on Assateague Island on Dec. 28, 2013. She was preceded in death by her lov-

ing husband, Thomas Sterling; her brother, Thomas Toye and her mother, Gloria Toye. She is survived by her, brother Russell Toye of St. Augustine, Fla. and her sister-in-law Vicki Toye. She is also survived by her beloved companion of 14 years, Alan Withers, her God-daughter Hilari Ashton of Berlin, and her many Ocean City friends whom she considered family. Patsy grew up in the Towson area and in 1969 made Ocean City her lifelong home. Patsy was a loyal employee and devoted friend to John Fager and Fager’s Island for over four decades. Patsy cherished her pets and the beauty of the Eastern Shore which were the focal points of her personal life. She was passionate about friends, food and fun. Her joyous, resounding laughter will be treasured by many. A celebration of her life will be held in the near future. Memorial donations in her honor may be made to the Worcester County Humane Society. PATRICIA ANN ROCHE Ocean Pines Patricia Ann Roche, age 76, of Ocean Pines died peacefully at her home in Ocean Pines on Monday Dec. 30, 2013. Born in Washington, D.C. she was Continued on Page 24

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

OBITUARIES Continued from Page 23 the daughter of the late Harry Suit and Dorothy Metz Suit. She is survived by her husband George Roche, a daughter, Kathleen Davenport and husband Pete, a son, Michael Roche and wife Rita, a sister, Rosalie Suit, and 6 grandchildren, Joseph Roche, Alan Roche, Brian Roche, Brendon Davenport and Colleen Davenport. Patricia was born and raised in Washington, D.C. and retired from the Department of Defense at the Washington Navel Yard. A Mass of Christian burial was celebrated on Monday Jan. 6, 2014 at St. John Neumann Catholic Church in Ocean Pines. Interment followed in Sunset Memorial Park. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home. Expressions of sympathy may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com BERNICE B. JAMES Ocean Pines Bernice Braun James, age 88, died Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013 at the HealthSouth Chesapeake Rehabilitation Center in Salisbury. Born in Verona, N.J., she was the daughter of the late Frederick and Tessie Braun. She was preBernice James ceded in death by her husband Charles Edward James in 2003. She is survived by her sons, Chris G. James and his wife, Mairead, of Oakland, NJ, David S. James of Ocean Pines, and her daughter Elizabeth Laurice and her husband Robert of Oakland, NJ. She leaves 10 grandchildren and 3 greatgrandchildren. Also surviving is her sister, Sister Mary Magdeline of Farmington Hills, MI. Mrs. James was a devoted wife, mother and grandmother. She had formerly worked in advertising sales with the Oakland Observer and with Prudential Insurance in New Jersey. She moved to Ocean Pines with her husband in 1989. She was a member of St. John Neumann Catholic Church, the Ocean Pines Garden Club and several bridge clubs. A mass of Christian Burial was held on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014, at St. John Neumann Catholic Church. Rev William Mathesious will officiate. Interment followed in Garden of the Pines Cemetery at Ocean Pines. In lieu of flowers a donation in her memory may be made to: Atlantic General Hospital, 9733 Healthway Dr., Berlin, MD 21811, or to Coastal Hospice P.O. Box 1733, Salisbury, Md. 21804. Letters of condolence may be sent via www.burbagefuneralhome.com.

MARQUETTE ELIZABETH MASON Ocean Pines Marquette Elizabeth Mason, 94, of Ocean Pines, died Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014, at Harrison Senior Living Center in Georgetown, Del. She graduated from Antigo High School in Wisconsin and was employed for many years at Arbitron in Laurel, Md. The daughter of Edward and Anna (Jicha) Aulik, she was born Aug. 4, 1919 in Antigo, Wis. Surviving her is a brother, James Aulik, of Antigo; two sons, Edward D. Mason and his wife, Margery Klapper, of Milton, Del., and Randy Mason and his wife, Susie, of Reno; grandchild, Erika Kessler and her husband, Gabriel, and great-grandchildren, Jonah and Gwendolyn. She was preceded in death by her husband, Oberlin Mason in 2010, her parents, two sisters, Margaret Aulik and Dorothy Falkenhagen, and two brothers, Bernard and Raymond Aulik. Arrangements in the care of Short Funeral Services in Georgetown. DANIEL VINCENT MARSHALL Berlin Daniel Vincent Marshall, 38, of Berlin, went home to be with the Lord Dec. 31, 2013 surrounded by his adoring family at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore. He succumbed after a courageous yearlong battle with cancer. Dan was born in Westminster, Md. on Nov. 20, 1975 to parDan Marshall ents, Judith Peterson and Kevin Marshall. He graduated from Middletown High School in 1994, where he was a member of the football and basketball team. He completed an apprenticeship through the Association of Builders and Contractors and was licensed as a Master Plumber in Maryland and Delaware. At the time of his death, he was employed by Custom Mechanical as a plumber. He and his loving wife, Kimberly (James) Marshall were married on Oct. 8, 2005 and made their home in Berlin, with their two children. He was an active member of Holy Savior Catholic Church in Ocean City. The epitome of a family man, Dan’s greatest joy was being a father to his daughter Amber and son Jacob. He enjoyed any time spent with his wife and children, and particularly cherished camping with his family. He loved fishing and spending time outdoors. An avid Redskins and Notre Dame football fan, Dan made a final trip to South Bend, Indiana for a football game with his uncles and cousins this fall.

Dan is survived by an enormous family all of whom adored him. In addition to his wife and children, he is survived by his mother and stepfather, Judy and Randy Peterson of Middletown, MD, father and stepmother, Kevin and Christine Marshall of Westminster; grandparents, Ruth and Robert Wales of Middletown, Md., sister Emily (Marshall) Petito and brother-in-law Matthew Petito and Perry Hall, Md., brother Peter Marshall and his fiancée Kristen Adams, of Orlando, Fla., sister Molly Marshall of Westminster, stepsister Meg Peterson of Shepardstown, WVa., nephew Nicholas and nieces Julia Petito of Perry Hall, nephew Tyler and niece Kylee MacPherson of Berlin. He is also survived and remembered by an incredible extended family that includes many aunts, uncles and cousins, as well as many close friends that he considered family. He was preceded in death by his grandparents, Bette and Earl Marshall and his aunt Michelle (Marshall) Baluch. Dan’s legacy will always be his enormous heart and his gentle soul. He lived his life with honor, dignity and grace to the final moment. He effortlessly gave his gift of love to so many and his light will live on in the incredible amount of lives he touched. A mass of Christian burial was on Monday, Jan. 6 at Holy Savior Catholic Church, 17th street and Philadelphia Ave., Ocean City, Md. Rev. John P. Klevence officiated. Interment followed in Gate of Heaven Cemetery in Dagsboro, Del. In lieu of flowers, the family asks to consider contributing to a memorial fund to benefit Dan’s family, https://www.youcaring.com/ourbelov eddan. Arrangements are in the care of the Burbage Funeral Home. Expressions of sympathy may be sent to the family at www.burbagefuneralhome.com. JAMES R. DONOVAN Ocean Pines James R. Donovan, Sr., age 86, of Ocean Pines and formerly of Laurel, Md. died Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014 at home with his family. He was born in Providence, R.I. and was the son of the late James M. and Gladys H. Donovan. Mr. Donovan was a veteran of WWII and the Korean War, serving in the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy. He had been the director of Data Systems and an officer of the court for the U.S. Supreme Court. He was a docent at the Assateague Island Life Saving Museum, a former volunteer firefighter of East Providence, R.I., a Boy Scout leader and a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Ocean Pines Boat Club and Angler’s Club. He is survived by his wife of 60 years, Norma T. Donovan of Ocean

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Pines, one son, Sean R. Donovan and his wife Denise; four daughters, Colleen D. Eastman and her husband Michael, Jeanette R. Donovan, Kelley M. Donovan and Erin J. Lynch and her husband John; three brothers, George Donovan, Robert Donovan and Dennis Donovan; six grandchildren, Megan C. Eastman, Davis C. Garrison, Tyler S. Garrison, John J. Lynch III and Daniel J. Lynch. He was preceded in death by his grandson, Sean Michael Eastman. The family deeply expresses their thanks to Mr. Donovan’s devoted caregiver, Renee Chase. A memorial service will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 11 at Hastings Funeral Home in Selbyville, Del. where friends may call an hour before the service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in memory of James Donovan to Coastal Hospice (www.coastalhospice.org) or The Davis Phinney Foundation for Parkinson’s (www.davisphinneyfoundation.org). Condolences may be sent by visiting www.hastingsfuneralhome.net. KELLY ANNE BUNCH Dagsboro, Del. Kelly Anne Bunch, 44, of Dagsboro, Del. and formerly of Berlin, died after a courageous battle with cancer on Saturday, Dec. 21, 2013 at home with her family at her side. Born May 5, 1969 in Washington, D.C. to Frances and the late Warren Bunch, Kelly grew up in Woodland Kelly Bunch Beach, Md. and attended South River High School. She participated in the Berlin Pop Warner Cheer coaching staff and was a member of the Delmarva Cat Connection. In her spare time, Kelly enjoyed life on the Eastern Shore, baking and being with her family and friends. She is preceded in death by her father and one brother, Eddie Bunch. Kelly is survived by one daughter, Casey O’Brien of Edgewater; her mother of Cudjoe Key, Fla.; her fiancé and soul mate, Jerry Roy of Dagsboro, Del.; two brothers, Randy and Jerry Bunch of Edgewater and one sister, Mary Ford of Harwood. Friends are invited to Kelly’s Life Celebration on Saturday, Jan.11, 2014 from 2-4 p.m. at the Berlin Fire Company located at 214 N. Main St, Berlin, Md. 21811. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory are recommended to the Tunnel Cancer Center, c/o Kelly Bunch, 18947 John Williams Hwy., Rehoboth Beach, Del. 19971 or the Delaware Hospice, c/o Kelly Bunch, 16 Polly Drummond Center, Newark, Del., 19711.


Calendar Community Entertainment Events

Insight plus

Ocean City Today Jan. 10, 2014

Page 25 Winterfest welcomes 91k visitors

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

Cast and crew work on the set of “Ping Pong Summer,” filmed in Ocean City during summer 2012. The coming-of-age story about a ping pong- and hip hop-obsessed teen, inspired by director Michael Tully’s family vacations to the resort in the 1980s, is slated to debut at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, Jan. 18.

Resort to hit silver screen ‘Ping Pong Summer,’ movie filmed in Ocean City, to show at Sundance Jan. 18

By Clara Vaughn Staff Writer (Jan. 10, 2013) For the first time since 1986, a film featuring this resort will play at the Sundance Film Festival, Jan. 16-26 in Park City, Utah. “Ping Pong Summer” draws on writer-director and Maryland native Michael Tully’s real-life summertime trips to Ocean City with his family in the 1980s. The film, set in the summer of ‘85, is a coming-of-age story about ping pong and hip hop aficionado Rad Miracle, a teen on a family vacation in the resort. “I wanted something that felt honest to Maryland and Ocean City,” Tully said of the film that’s been percolating in his mind since 1992 when he was in high school. He found a local cast, with players almost exclusively from Maryland, Virginia and other nearby areas, landing Berlin local Emmi Shockley

for the major role of Stacy Summers. Others appearing include Susan Sarandon, Lea Thompson, John Hannah, Amy Sedaris, Judah Friedlander and Robert Longstreet. After plans to film “Ping Pong Summer” fell short of funding each year from 1992 to 2012, the project finally launched last summer with the core producers arriving in August and shoots wrapping in October, the day before Hurricane Sandy hit the resort. “It sounds cheesy to be like, ‘It was a blessed shoot,’ but it really was,” Tully said. “I do feel like after 22 years of making this movie, the gods were smiling on us.” From staying onsite, rather than commuting an hour-plus to film, to landing Shockley for a lead, production went smoothly, he said. From the opening scene on Coastal Highway to shots along the Boardwalk and at Old Pro Golf, “a lot of locals will… feel very familiar” when they see the movie. Tully promised there will be an Ocean City premier, though he’s not sure of the date yet.

The family-friendly film is a far cry from others he’s shot, including 2006’s dramatic “Cocaine Angel” that showed at South by Southwest and 2011 horror film “Septien.” “I’ll probably never do anything like this again,” Tully said. “I just want to keep doing things that Michael Tully make me feel a little bit scared — that I’m not sure are going to work.” Of more than 4,000 submissions from the U.S. and international film scene, about 100 narrative films make it to the “holy grail” of independent film festivals, he said. “The fact that were in is a miracle, and it’s a great feeling,” said Tully, though he’s had a film play at the festival before. He hopes to have “Ping Pong Summer” out by Memorial Day this year, though that could change if Sundance lands the film a distributor. It is slated to show Jan. 18 at Sundance, Tully said.

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 10, 2014) On New Year’s Day, 1,024 passengers boarded the Winterfest Express for a ride through the illuminated Northside Park, wrapping up the 42-night holiday spectacular. The 127th Street Winterfest of Lights displays, which contained as many as 1 million lights and more than 100 twinkling, shining, glittering and animated scenes, were viewed by 91,748 people, according to Tom Shuster, director of the Ocean City Recreation and Parks Department. An average of 2,185 people rode the train through the park each night. The overall total was a bit less from the 95,599 passengers who took the 12-minute train ride last year when Winterfest of Lights was in operation six additional days (48). The average daily ridership for the 201213 festival was 1,992. “Winterfest of Lights went very well this year,” Shuster said. Attendance during the final weekend of the 21st annual event was solid, with 4,004 riders on Friday, Dec. 27, 5,942 on Saturday, Dec. 28, 991 on Sunday, Dec. 29 (rain), 3,336 on Monday, Dec. 30, 3,398 on New Year’s Eve and 1,024 passengers on the last night, Wednesday, Jan. 1. The biggest night overall was Saturday, Dec. 21, when 7,954 people rode the train. The second largest attendance night was Saturday, Nov. 30, when 7,232 enjoyed the festivities. The fairly mild, consistent temperatures was a factor in the overall attendance, Shuster said. Rain only hampered attendance a few nights. Winterfest of Lights has become a tradition for families. Many visit each year to take the guided open-air tour through the park accompanied by holiday music. Some existing displays were refurbished and upgraded this year, and many of the lights were replaced with LED (Light Emitting Diodes) bulbs, which are energy efficient, have greater brilliance, are more vibrant and last longer than other lights. A new light displays was added as well– the Coca Cola polar bears. For the second year, there was a fireworks display at midnight on New Year’s Eve. It was well attended last year, but Shuster said it looked like twice as many people headed to the park and surrounding area to watch the 10-minute show, presented by See NEW Page 27


Ocean City Today

PAGE 26

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

JANUARY 10, 2014

Try pot roast over mashed potatoes Meat, potatoes, carrots and onions are basic components of savory dish By Deborah Lee Walker Contributing Writer

(Jan. 10, 2014) Cooking is an everyday occurrence but does this constitute personal touches or originality? Creating food with an emphasis on flavor, texture and technique is a chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s journey. But let us not forget about trusting our palate; passion brings about the possibility of perfection. While we are on the subject of perfection, is it plausible to obtain faultlessness? This matter is subjective and therefore a final decision is up for debate. Also, some might argue pure excellence is conceivable only if the subject matter is fully understood. But then the degree of comprehension must come to the front burner. How does one know when a topic has been thoroughly explored and there is no room for perseverance? Emulsification ends with no direct correlation. On that note, I will share my attempt

to make an impeccable pot roast. Basics equate a quick discussion on what type of meat is preferred. Chuck roast with the bone or boneless closes this topic. If you have a choice, opt for the bone. Fat can be a good thing; look for meat that has the coveted marbling. The savory broth that is the foundation for the dish must be considered. Before progress can be obtained, a deconstruction of the basic meal must be examined. Meat, potatoes, carrots, and onions are the basic components. Do I really want to develop a complex broth just to be soaked up by boiled potatoes? I decide a luscious sauce and creamy, mashed potatoes would be a better pairing. Beef, veal, chicken, and vegetable stock will create balance and depth; no such thing as too much of a good thing. Dry white wine, tomato paste, Worcestershire, and a package of aus jus are the final touches for this wintry dinner. That being said, no kitchen should be without stocks. Knorr bouillon cubes are handy and quite cost effective. If you go to Food Lion ( the international section), Knorr has the bouillon cubes packaged in Spanish. It is the same product but at a slightly cheaper price. Veal stock gives the dish richness but can be hard to find.

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If one happens to be heading toward Selbyville, Del. Harris Teeter carries the product. Jack Frost has made his presence known and has no intention of leaving. Delectable pot roast smothered over creamy, mashed potatoes sounds divine. A glass of Shiraz, warm crusty bread, and a fireplace complete the setting for a cozy evening. Perfection may have not been ascertained, but it is sure close.

INGREDIENTS: 3 ½ pounds bone-in chuck roast 4 teaspoons canola oil 4 cups veal stock (optional) 2 cups each chicken, beef, and vegetable stock 2 cups dry white wine 4 strips bacon (cut in half) 3 large cloves garlic, minced 2 small finely diced yellow onions, plus 4 small yellow onions, halved 3 bay leaves 2 teaspoons fresh parsley, finely chopped 2 teaspoons each black pepper, dried thyme, crushed rosemary 1 teaspoon Herbs de Province 1 package McCormick Aus Jus (1.02 oz.) 1 ½ teaspoons Worcestershire 2 rounded tablespoons tomato paste 7 large carrots peeled, and cut halves ½ large green pepper, chopped finely 2 stalks celery, sliced finely at a 45 degree angle

2 cups wild mushrooms, cleaned and stems removed Wondra Quick-Mixing Flour kosher salt to taste 8 cups mash potatoes

1. In a large Dutch oven, heat canola oil over medium-high heat. Sear chuck roast on both sides. Remove and set aside. 2. Turn the heat to low and saute garlic, 2 onions, and bacon for 7 minutes. Add all the ingredients except for the remaining 4 onions, carrots, mushrooms, Wondra Quick-Mixing Flour, and mashed potatoes. 3. Place covered pan in a 275-degree oven and cook for 3 hours. 4. Remove the lid of the Dutch oven and place the meat to the side. Add the remaining onions and carrots. Cook over medium-low heat; you want to reduce and thicken the sauce. Sprinkling Wondra QuickMixing Flour helps this process. 5. When the sauce becomes a gravy texture, add mushrooms and meat and cook for another 5 minutes. Before serving, discard the bay leaves and bacon. 6. Serve pot roast over mashed potatoes. SECRET INGREDIENT: Taking Chances A grapefruit is a lemon that had a chance and took advantage of it. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Oscar Wilde

Girl Scouts cookie sale to begin this weekend

MARYLANDâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Girl Scouts of the Chesapeake Bay will go door-to-door to begin taking orders for Girl Scout Cookies starting Saturday, Jan. 11. This year, local Girl Scouts will offer six cookie varietiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thin Mints, Samoas, Tagalongs, Trefoils, Do-si-dos and Savannah Smiles. All Girl Scout Cookies cost $4 per box. Cookie booth sales begin on Friday, Feb. 14, at local businesses throughout the Delmarva Peninsula. Girls also take donations of Girl Scout cookies for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Operation Taste of Homeâ&#x20AC;? and local community groups. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Operation Taste of Homeâ&#x20AC;? cookies are donated to Armed Forces and local agencies, such as food banks and pantries, blood banks, cancer centers and youth programs. Individuals interested in purchasing cookies or donating to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Operation Taste of Homeâ&#x20AC;? can call the Cookie Hotline at 1-800-YUM-YUM2. To locate a cookie booth sale in your area visit to www.GSCB.org. The Girl Scouts Cookie Program is about more than just great tasting cookies. By participating in the Girl Scout Cookie Program girls learn five skills that last into adulthood such as goal setting, decision-making, money

management, people skills and business ethics. Every girl is encouraged to set and work toward achieving both a team and personal goal. It also raises funds to support troop and council activities. The benefits of the cookie program have been hailed by many of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s businesswomen, who cite selling Girl Scout Cookies was their first step toward successful careers. All of the proceeds from a local councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cookie activities remain in the area where the cookies are sold. This revenue is used to benefit girls, some of it directly by remaining in the Girl Scout troop treasuries, and some of it indirectly by funding council-led programs for Girl Scouts. Each year, more than 9,000 Girl Scouts from the Delmarva Peninsula participate in the cookie program, selling over one million boxes of cookies to the community. A leading advocate for and expert on girls, the Girl Scouts of the Chesapeake Bay builds girls of courage, confidence and character by providing personal leadership development and programs that teach skills for the real world. To learn more about Girl Scouts of the Chesapeake Bay, visit www.GSCB.org or call 1-800-3414007 or 1-800-374-9811.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

PAGE 27

New Year’s Eve display a success

The 127th Street Winterfest of Lights displays, which began Nov. 21 and ended Jan. 1, were viewed by 91,748 people.

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(Jan. 10, 2014) Due to snow last Thursday evening into Friday, the reception for the January exhibits at the Art League of Ocean City’s Center for the Arts on 94th Street was postponed from Jan. 3 to Friday, Jan. 10, from 5-7 p.m. The works, “Views of Delmarva and Beyond,” by photographers Kevin Fleming and Chris Parypa will be on display throughout January in the Thaler Gallery. Fleming has covered the world as a photographer for National Geographic and has recently been recognized as America’s Best Observer by See FLEMING Page 28

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Continued from Page 25 American Fireworks of Hudson, Ohio. He estimated a couple thousand spectators viewed the show. Crews began unpacking displays from trailers and setting up the winter wonderland in early October. An opening ceremony on Nov. 21 included Ocean City Elementary School’s “OC Stars” singing and dancing, comments from Mayor Rick Meehan, an appearance by Santa and the ceremonial “flipping” of the switch to illuminate the park. “Opening night was one of the best weather-wise,” Shuster said as the temperature was in the mid-50s. There is a different layout for the Winterfest of Lights displays each year in order to keep it new and fresh for riders. It also challenges them to find their favorite display in a new location. Some of the displays featured at Northside Park included the 12 Days of Christmas, Santa, his sleigh and eight flying reindeer, fairy tale characters, toy soldiers, crabs, marlins, “Jaws,” a penguin village and dinosaurs. The heated tent at Winterfest kept visitors warm as they listened to music and waited for the Boardwalk trams to take them through the enchanted park of lights. The tent was home to the Winterfest Village and Yukon Cornelius’ Gift Shop filled with ornaments, stocking stuffers, souvenirs and holiday gifts. Visitors also had the opportunity to have their photo taken with Santa and grab a warm beverage or snack. Winterfest of Lights has received many accolades over the years. For several consecutive years, it has made the list as one of the Top 100 Events in North America by the American Bus Association this year. This list includes the best events for group travel in the United States and Canada. Maryland Life Magazine voted it “Maryland’s Finest Holiday Tradition.” The Ocean City attraction was ranked No. 1 in 2008 on the Professional Travel Guide Editor’s Top 10 of the nation’s largest and best holiday lights displays. In 2006, Winterfest of Lights was No. 2 in the country in the “America Online City Guide’s Top 11 Lighting Displays.” The Disney-MGM Studios display in Orlando topped the list.

Reception highlights area artists

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 28

HOROSCOPE ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Although youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting kudos and other positive reactions to your suggestions, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let the cheers drown out some valid criticisms. Better to deal with them now than later. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Following your keen Bovine intuition pays off, as you not only reassess the suggestions some people are putting in front of you, but also their agendas for doing so. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You continue on a high-enthusiasm cycle as that new project youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve assumed takes shape. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re also buoyed by the anticipation of receiving some good news about a personal matter. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your eagerness to immerse yourself in your new assignment is understandable. But be careful that you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to take care of that pressing personal situation as well. LEO (July 23 to August 22) This is a good time to learn a new skill that could give a clever Cat an edge in the upcoming competition for workplace opportunities. Enjoy the arts this weekend with someone special. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) You could risk creating an impasse if you insist on expecting more from others than theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re prepared to give. Showing flexibility in what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll accept could prevent a stalemate. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Although you can weigh all factors of a dispute to find an agreeable solution for others, you might need the skilled input of someone you trust to help you deal with an ongoing situation of your own. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) The good news is that your brief period of self-doubt turns into a positive â&#x20AC;&#x153;I can do anythingâ&#x20AC;? attitude. The better news is that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll soon be able to prove it. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) This is a good time for Sagittarians to start making travel plans while you still can select from a wide menu of choices and deals, and not be forced to settle for leftovers. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Like your zodiacal sign, the sure-footed Goat, you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow obstacles in your path to keep you from reaching your goal. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be surprised by who asks to go along with you. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Let your head dominate your heart as you consider the risks that might be involved in agreeing to be a friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s co-signer or otherwise act as his or her backup in a financial matter. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Prioritize: Resolve to close the door and let your voicemail take your phone calls while you finish up a task before the end-of-week deadline. Then go out and enjoy a funfilled weekend. BORN THIS WEEK: Your capacity for care and compassion helps to bring comfort to others.

JANUARY 10, 2014

Fleming featured in gallery

Continued from Page 27 Readers Digest. His assignments have taken him into war and famine in Somalia, to the Mediterranean for a re-creation of the voyage of Ulysses and put him on a dogsled crossing the Canadian arctic. A Delaware native, Fleming began his career as a newspaper photographer after attending Wesley College, where he has been inducted into its Hall of Fame, and in 2007 was named the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Distinguished Alumni of the Year.â&#x20AC;? He then spent a decade as a National Geographic photographer and most recently has concentrated on creating books. His book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Beach,â&#x20AC;? which features his photographs of wildlife, nature and the beauty of coastal Delaware, will be available for purchase. Parypa was born and raised in Poland but learned photography in Brooklyn, N.Y. and the Manhattan area working with the best photographers in the world. He is one of the most recognizable photographers on the beach of Ocean City and surrounding area. He is well known in the Ocean City

community for his stunning photos and front-page picture publications in The Dispatch, and his volunteer work for many local events which aim to help others, such as the Penguin Swim for Atlantic General Hospital or Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. In 2013, his aerial picture of Ocean City was chosen to represent the state in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Book of America.â&#x20AC;? His biggest passion is aviation photography and is well known as one of the very few aviation photographers in the country. In the Galleria will be the all media â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winterâ&#x20AC;? theme show. Art League members and local artists will display their winter themed photographs and artwork in this juried show. The judge will be Michel Demanche, professor of fine arts at UMES. The artist in residence for January will be Marina Borovok, who focuses on drawing and oil painting. She will be teaching several classes at the Center for the Arts over the course of the month including: Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s After School

Drawing Class, Introduction to Drawing for Adults and Introduction to Oil Painting. In the Members Spotlight Gallery for January is artist Kathy Gibson. Primarily self taught, she has participated in classes and workshops at The Art League in Alexandria, Va.; Maryland Hall; Black Rock Center for The Arts, and many locations on the Eastern Shore. Since moving to Berlin, her painting has become her central focus. She also enjoys Plein Air painting. The Art League of Ocean City holds a reception for new exhibits the first Friday of every month at the OC Center for the Arts on 94th Street. The receptions are free to the public and include refreshments. The galleries at the Center for the Arts are open daily 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information on exhibits, artists and classes visit www.artleagueofoceancity.org or call 410-524-9433.

Prayer Breakfast in January Robert Douglas, founder of National Police Suicide Foundation, Inc. speaker

(Jan. 10, 2014) The 24th annual Ocean City Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Prayer Breakfast is scheduled for Friday, Jan. 17 from 7-9:15 a.m. at the Clarion Resort Hotel on 101st Street. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s speaker will be Robert Douglas, founder of National Police Suicide Foundation, Inc. Douglas travels around the nation

training emergency responders in suicide awareness. He is considered an expert in suicide training, appearing on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dateline,â&#x20AC;? in Time Magazine and USA Today. He is an author of three books with another in publication. He was a Chaplain of the Baltimore City Police and ATF in Washington. Hear the uplifting message that he will share with those in attendance. Tickets cost $16 in advance and must be purchased by Tuesday, Jan. 14. No tickets will be sold at the door.

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Tables of eight to 10 people may be reserved on a first come basis. All are welcomed. For more Information, call 410641-1300 (office), 443-235-2669 (cell) or send a fax to 410-641-3646. Tickets may be purchased in Ocean City at City Hall on Third Street and Baltimore Avenue and at Long and Foster Realty on 120th Street, at the Ocean City Chamber of Commerce on Route 50 in West Ocean City and Cropper Oil Company, on Route 50 in Berlin.

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Ocean City Today

NOW PLAYING

JANUARY 10, 2014

19TH HOLE BAR & GRILL 9636 Stephen Decatur Highway West Ocean City 410-213-9204 Jan. 10-11: Scott Glorioso, 7-10 p.m. CAPTAIN’S TABLE 15th St. & Baltimore Ave. 410-289-7192 www.captainstableoc.com Jan. 10-11: Phil Perdue FAGER’S ISLAND 60th Street and the bay 410-524-5500 Jan. 10: DJ Hook, 9 p.m. Jan. 11: DJ Groove, 9 p.m. Jan. 12: Jazz Brunch Everett Spells w/Everett Spells, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Jan. 10: Fat Cat Fish Trio, 9 p.m. Jan. 11: Rob Fahey & The Pieces, 9 p.m. J/R’s 131st Street 410-250-3100 Jan. 10: Bob Hughes Jan. 11: Howard on the Piano OCEAN CLUB NIGHTCLUB In the Horizons Restaurant In the Clarion Fontainebleau Hotel 101st Street and the ocean 410-524-3535 Every Friday and Saturday: DJ Dusty, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jan. 10-11: First Class

HIGH STAKES Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 Jan. 10: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; Lowercase Blues, 9 p.m. Jan. 11: Bobby Burns, 4 p.m.; DJ Rupe, 9 p.m.

Harry O

BOBBY BURNS

In the Princess Royale 91st Street and the ocean 410-524-7777 Every Friday and Saturday: Harry O, 7-11 p.m.

SEACRETS 49th Street and the bay 410-524-4900 Jan. 10: Melodime, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Jan. 11: Full Circle, 5-9 p.m.; Band Showcase - “3 Bands,” 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. SMITTY MCGEE’S

JOHNNY’S PIZZA & PUB 56th Street, bayside 410-524-7499

High Stakes: Friday, Jan. 10, 9 p.m.

SCHOONER’S RESTAURANT

HARPOON HANNA’S Route 54 and the bay Fenwick Island, Del. 800-227-0525 302-539-3095 Every Friday: Dave Hawkins, 6-10 p.m. Every Saturday: Dave Sherman, 6-10 p.m. Every Wednesday: Aaron Howell, 7 p.m.

LOWER CASE BLUES

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High Stakes: Friday, Jan. 10 and Saturday, Jan. 11, 4 p.m.

Route 54 West Fenwick Island, Del. 302-436-4716 Jan. 10: Rick Artz Jan. 16: Randy Lee Ashcraft

FIRST CLASS

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Seacrets: Saturday, Jan. 11, 5-9 p.m.

PAGE 29


OUT & ABOUT

PAGE 30

Ocean City Today

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Photographer Kevin Fleming signs copies of his book, "Views of Delmarva and Beyond," during an open house at the OC Center for the Arts on 94th Street last Saturday. His photographs are currently on display at the facility.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

Ocean City Council Secretary Mary Knight and her daughter, Frankie, greet city Police Chief Ross Buzzuro during the New Year’s Day open house at City Hall.

JANUARY 10, 2014

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Tina Walas and 7-year-old Tobias Walas hold up their drawings during a class taught by artist Marina Borovok last Saturday at the OC Center for the Arts on 94th Street.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Hunter, 14, and Scarlett Wyrick, 12, participate in a drawing class at the OC Center for the Arts on 94th Street last Saturday.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

The Ocean City Fire Department displayed engines and equipment outside City Hall on New Year’s Day. Pictured, from left, are Capt. Skip Carey, Chief Chris Larmore, Asst. Chief Chris Shaffer, and Deputy Chief Chuck Barton.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/ZACK HOOPES

Ocean City Beach Patrol Lieutenants Mike Stone, left, with granddaughter Aubrey, Ward Kovacs, center, and Skip Lee spoke with visitors during the New Year open house.


Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

PAGE 31

Local Surfrider chapter supports MCBP Group donates $500 to organization to help with marine debris education

(Jan. 10, 2014) The Ocean City Surfrider chapter has donated $500 to Maryland Coastal Bays to assist the group with its continual efforts to educate the community on marine debris. “I’ve been working with several schools and organizations on cleanups and have been looking for a good vehicle to promote the impact trash has on our community,” said Development and Marketing Coordinator Sandi Smith. “There is a movie called ‘Bag It’ which comes with a complete curriculum for students and communities that I’ve been trying to acquire through a grant program. We partner with Surfriders on our Earth Day and Coast Day clean-ups. When they learned what I was trying to do, they decided to give us money to acquire this program and get it into the community.” Americans use 60,000 plastic bags every five minutes, disposable bags that they throw away without much thought. But where is “away?” Where do the bags and other plastics end up, and at what cost to the environment, marine life and human health? “Bag It” follows “everyman” Jeb Berrier as he navigates our plastic world. He is not a radical environmentalist, but an average American who decides to take a closer look at our cultural love affair with plastics. His journey in this documentary film starts with simple questions: Are plastic bags really necessary? What are plastic bags made from? What happens to plastic bags after they are discarded? What he learns quickly grows far beyond plastic bags. • The average American uses about 500 plastic bags each year, for an average of 12 minutes before they are discarded. • Two million plastic bottles are consumed in the U.S. every five minutes, less then 25 percent are recycled. • The average American contributes 800 pounds of packaging waste to landfills per year.

Volunteers display their “weirdest find” at Fager’s Island on 60th Street, after picking up trash for Earth Day.

• 14 million pounds of trash end up in the ocean each year. • The floating “island” of plastic and other debris swirling around in the North Pacific Gyre is more than twice the size of Texas. • Plastic debris resembles plankton—fish food—and there is 40 times more plastic than plankton in some parts of the ocean. In this way plastic enters our food chain. • It is estimated that 100,000 marine mammals and sea birds die each year from becoming entangled in or ingesting plastic debris. • Plastic bags are made of fossil fuels such as petroleum and natural gas, which are non-renew- able resources. • The U.S. was once the largest exporter of oil in the world. Now, it is the largest importer. • Ireland reduced its plastic bag use by 90 percent after instituting a fee on single-use disposable plastic bags. • China banned “ultra thin” plastic bags in 2008. They reduced their use by 40 billion bags in the first year. When Berrier finds out he and his partner are expecting a child, his plastic odyssey becomes a truly personal one. How can they protect their baby from plastic’s pervasive health effects? He looks beyond plastic bags and discovers that virtually everything in modern society — from baby bottles, to sports equipment, to dental sealants,

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to personal care products — is made with plastic or contains potentially harmful chemical additives used in the plastic-making process. Two of the most common of these additives, “endocrine disruptors” Bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, show links to cancer, diabetes, autism, attention deficit disorder, obesity, infertility, and even smaller penis size. As adults, we make all kinds of choices of convenience: single-serve bottles, small units of food, household items, and bath and beauty products.

These products are both made with and come packaged in plastic. Bag It makes it clear that it is time for a paradigm shift. But it does it in a clean and witty way. The movie will be showed to eighth grades classes and Smith is planning on organizing a few community showings once they receive the movie. If you are interested in airing the movie for your group or classroom you can contact her at sandis@mdcoastalbays.org or by calling 410-213-2297 ext 107.


PAGE 32

Ocean City Today

Ocean City Today

DINING GUIDE ■ CREDIT CARDS: V-Visa, MC-Master Card, AE-American Express, DIS-Discover ■ PRICE RANGE: $, $$, $$$ ________________________________ ■ 19TH HOLE BAR & GRILLE, 9936 Stephen Decatur Highway, West Ocean City 410-213-9204 / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual and family-friendly, featuring great American cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner at affordable prices. Open seven days a week, year-round. Happy hour daily, 3-7 p.m. Entertainment Friday through Sunday. ■ 32 PALM, 32nd Street, in the Hilton Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2525 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Western Caribbean cuisine, Eastern Shore favorites, gourmet and tasty liquid desserts. ■ ALEX’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-7717 / www.ocitalianfood.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Serving homemade Italian cuisine, steaks, seafood, chicken, pork and pasta. Elegant dining room with fireplace. Early bird specials every day from 5-6 p.m. ■ BILLY’S SUB SHOP, 78th Street, Ocean City, 410-524-2020; 118th Street, Ocean City, 410-524-2020; 140th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-1778; Route 54, Fenwick Shoals, Fenwick Island, Del., 302-4365661 / $ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Dine in, carry out, free Delivery. Open 7 days 11 a.m. – 3 a.m. Ocean City’s most famous sub and pizza shop since 1959. An OC tradition where a sandwich is a meal, serving fresh dough pizza, subs, burgers, cones, shakes and sundaes with beach delivery available. ■ BLUE FISH JAPANESE & CHINESE RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR, 94th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3983 / www.bluefishoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Japanese and Chinese restaurant and sushi bar with beer, wine and cocktails. Dine in, take out and delivery available. Open Monday-Friday, 11:30 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday, noon. ■ CAPTAIN’S TABLE RESTAURANT, 15th Street and the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-7192 / www.captainstableoc.com / $$-$$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family-owned, serving fine seafood, steaks and poultry on the third floor of the Courtyard by Marriott. Open 7 days a week, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. ■ CRABCAKE FACTORY, 120th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-4900; 25th Street, Ocean City 410-713-4180 / www.crabcakefactoryusa.com / $-$$ / V-MC-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Family restaurant serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Open daily at 8 a.m. Menu selections are Eastern Shore favorites: creamed chipped beef, omlettes and daily breakfast special crab dishes. World famous Crabcakes served all day starting at 8 a.m. Other menu selections include Chicken Chesapeake, prime rib, steamed shrimp, Philly cheesesteaks, burgers and homemade soups. www.crabcakefactoryusa.com ships Crabcakes year-round. ■ FAGER’S ISLAND RESTAURANT & BAR, 60th Street on the bay, Ocean City 410524-5500 / www.fagers.com / $$-$$$ / V-

MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted in the dining room only / Children’s menu / Full bar / Upscale restaurant on the bay. Casual fine dining, fresh fish, prime rib and seafood. Lighter fare menu served on our decks or inside. ■ FENWICK CRAB HOUSE, 100 Coastal Highway, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-5392500 / www.crabcakeexpress.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Carry-out available. Casual dining. Open for lunch and dinner. Big crabs are our specialty. Perfect crabcakes are our passion. Seven different fish served 15 different ways! Great local seafood, good times and good service is our mission. ■ GREENE TURTLE NORTH, 116th Street, Ocean City 410-723-2120 / www.thegreeneturtle.com / $$ / V-MC-AEDIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / The Turtle, est. 1976, is an Ocean City tradition with a friendly staff, great food and something for everyone! Menu favorites are homemade crab cakes, kids’ menu, salads, burgers, wings and more! Featuring weekday lunch specials and happy hour, 50 high-def flat screen TVs, game room, gift shop, carry out, party trays, nightly drink specials, Keno, MD lottery, DJs with dance floor. Open 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., year-round. ■ HARBORSIDE BAR & GRILL, 12841 S. Harbor Road, West Ocean City 410-2131846 / www.ocharborside.com / $$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week, 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Casual waterfront dining serving seafood, steaks, sandwiches, salads, wraps and pasta. Home of the “Original Orange Crush.” Entertainment Thursday through Sunday. ■ HARPOON HANNA’S RESTAURANT & BAR, Route 54 and the bay, Fenwick Island, Del. www.harpoonhannasrestaurant.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual waterfront restaurant serving lunch, dinner. Fresh fish, seafood, steaks, sandwiches and all-you-can-eat Alaskan crab legs. Open year-round. ■ HEMINGWAY’S AT THE CORAL REEF, 17th Street, in the Holiday Inn Hotel & Suites, Ocean City 410-289-2612 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Elegant dining room, Floridian/island-style cuisine. Seafood, tropical salsas, grilled steaks, pork chops, grilled pineapple, banana fritters, entree salads. ■ HIGGINS CRAB HOUSE, 31st Street, Ocean City, 410-289-2581; 128th Street, Ocean City, 410-250-2403 / $-$$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open 7 days a week. We have proudly served Ocean City, Maryland for over 40 years. Known for All You Can Eat crabs, crab legs, fried chicken, steamed shrimp, and baby back ribs. ■ HIGH STAKES BAR & GRILL, Route 54, Fenwick Island, Del. 302-537-6971 / $$$ / V-M-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Carry-out available / Full bar / Casual dining, daily happy hour and daily food specials. Live entertainment. ■ HOOTERS, Fifth Street, on the Boardwalk, Ocean City 410-289-2690 and Route 50, West Ocean City 410-213-1841 / www.hootersofoc.com / $-$$ / V-MC-AEDIS. Things are always getting better at Hooters! Fresh menu offering a number of

JANUARY 10, 2014

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ground chuck burgers, green salads, world famous chicken wings with 11 flavorful sauces and a fun children’s menu. Relax in the beach atmosphere or enjoy the outdoor seating. Happy hour every day, 3-7 p.m. Full bar available. Authentic Hooters merchandise in kids and adult sizes. Enjoy all the sports packages on large, flat screen TVs and great service by the delightful Hooters girls. Live entertainment. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter. Find out why we say, “Hooters makes you happy!” ■ HORIZONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 101st Street, Ocean City 410-5243535 / www.clarionoc.com / $-$$ ($20-45) / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Open tables / Children’s menu / Full bar / Proud to have Chef Shawn Reese creating beach-inspired dishes in both oceanfront restaurants, Horizons and Breaker’s Pub. New all-day menu, available 11:30 a.m. to 11 p.m., features many favorites, as well as exciting new creations with a local flare. Deluxe Sunday breakfast buffet open year-round and AUCE prime rib, crab legs and seafood buffet available most weekends. ■ JOHNNY’S PIZZA PUB, 56th Street, Ocean City 410-723-5600 / www.johnnyspizzapub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Ocean City’s official pizzeria and pub featuring homemade pizzas, serving 18 different gourmet pizzas including local favorites - Johnny’s Special, Neptune’s Seafood Feast Pizza, and MD Blue Crab. Huge variety of calzones, subs, burgers and sandwiches to choose from. Ocean City’s place for jumbo wings with 20 different sauces. Coldest draft beer in town served in a chilled mug. Voted best sound system for live music. Carry out or delivery til 4 a.m. ■ J/R’S, 131st Street, Ocean City 410250-3100 / www.jrsribs.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s Menu / Full bar / Carry-out / Early bird specials daily. This is the PLACE for ribs, steaks, chicken, seafood and steamed crabs. Try our Ribs in our family oriented spacious dining room or cheer on your favorite team in our new enlarged sports bar. You’ve tried the Rest- Now try the Best. ■ JULES FINE DINING, 118th Street, Ocean City 410-524-3396 / www.ocjules.com / $$, $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Local fare, global flair. Fresh seafood year-round, fresh local produce. ■ MERMAID COVE PUB, 33195 Lighthouse Road, Williamsville, West Fenwick, Del. 302-436-0122 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Full bar / Get shipwrecked at the Mermaid Cove with pub, drink and food specials daily. Lump crab cakes, rock and mahi tacos, fried oyster sandwiches and platters are among the items to choose from. Breakfast served weekends. Open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. Take-out available. ■ MIO FRATELLO ITALIAN STEAKHOUSE, 38018 Fenwick Shoals Blvd., West Fenwick, Del. 302-436-6400 / miofratello.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Casual dining in a relaxed atmosphere, specializing in steaks, seafood and pasta. Take out and delivery. Open for lunch and dinner.

■ POPEYE’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN, Route 50, West Ocean City 443-664-2105 / $ / V-MC / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Family restaurant. Eat-in, carry out or drive-thru. Open seven days, year-round. Every Tuesday, two-piece chicken for 99 cents. Every Wednesday, free kids meal with purchase of combo. ■ REFLECTIONS RESTAURANT, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Tableside flambé dining. Casually elegant, cuisine prepared tableside in the European tradition. Private dining rooms. Eclectic chef’s specials accompanied by an award-winning wine list. ■ SEACRETS, 49th Street, Ocean City 410-524-4900 / www.seacrets.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Island atmosphere. Soups, salads, Jamaican jerk chicken, appetizers, sandwiches, paninis, pizza and fresh seafood. ■ SEASONS OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT, 118th Street, in the Carousel Oceanfront Hotel and Condos, Ocean City 410-5241000 / www.carouselhotel.com / $-$$ / VMC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Open seven days a week. Oceanfront dining in a casual atmosphere. Serving breakfast from 7-11 a.m., featuring a breakfast buffet or special order from the regular menu. Dinner served from 4-9 p.m., featuring a wide variety of entrees, seafood, ribs, steaks, pasta and prime rib. Join us for family theme night dinners. ■ SIMMER TIME, Rt. 54, Fenwick Island, next to Mio Fratello 302-436-2266 / $$$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Full bar / Fondue and more in an intimate atmosphere; small and large parties. ■ SMITTY McGEE’S, 37234 Lighthouse Road, West Fenwick Island, Del. 302436-4716 / www.smittymcgees.com / $$ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / No children’s menu / Full bar / Casual. Big menu, including hot wings and drinks. ■ THE COTTAGE CAFE, Route 1 (across from Sea Colony), Bethany Beach, Del. 302-539-8710 / www.cottagecafe.com / $, $$ / V-MC-AE / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Seafood, kids’ menu, happy hour specials. Lunch and dinner daily. Breakfast buffet on weekends. ■ THE STERLING SEAFOOD GRILL & OYSTER BAR, 67th Street, in the Holiday Inn Oceanfront, Ocean City 410-524-5252 / www.ocmdrestaurants.com / $$ / V-MCAE-DIS / Reservations accepted / Children’s menu / Full bar / Fabulous raw bar serving the freshest raw oysters and clams, steamed shrimp, crab legs, mussels and oyster stew, made to order. “Fresh off the grill” items include rockfish, tuna, mahi mahi and salmon. Happy hour specials daily, 4-6 p.m. ■ WHISKERS PUB, 120th Street, OC Square, Ocean City 410-524-2609 / www.whiskerspub.com / $ / V-MC-AE-DIS / No reservations required / Children’s menu / Full bar / Old World saloon-type feel, Whisker’s is famous for its Certified Angus® burgers and delicious casual fare, as well as its entertaining atmosphere and photo lined walls of famous and infamous “whiskers.” Enjoy flat screen TVs to watch your favorite sports. Open year-round, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m., serving lunch and dinner daily. Happy hour every day 4-7 p.m. Nightly food specials.


JANUARY 10, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 33

AGH offers programs (Jan. 10, 2014) Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin recently announced its education calendar for January.

Friday, Jan. 10: Living Well Workshop, noon to 2:30 p.m. Indian River Senior Center, 214 Irons Ave., Millsboro, Del. “Living Well” is a six-week workshop that teaches participants how to live a quality life with chronic disease. Examples of chronic conditions may include diabetes, arthritis, depression, asthma, bronchitis, pain, heart disease or any conditions that hinder you from living the life you desire. The workshop will be held Fridays, Jan. 10 through Feb. 14. Pre-registration is required. Contact Laura Small at 410-629-6820. Sunday, Jan. 12: Overeaters Anonymous #169, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1. Our group is a 12-step program, adapted from Alcoholics Anonymous. We help anyone struggling with a compulsive eating problem, whether it is weight gain, bulimia, anorexia, or if you are a parent of a child with one of these problems. We will be meeting each Sunday in conference room 1 at Atlantic General Hospital. There is no initial meeting charge. Meeting contribution is $1 weekly. Any questions, contact Bett at 410-202-9078.

Monday, Jan. 13: T.O.P.S. of Berlin - Group #169, 5-6:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy life-style. They meet weekly. For more information, contact Edna Berkey at 410-251-2083. Tuesday, Jan. 14: Parkinson’s Disease Support Group, 2:30-4 p.m. Atlantic Health Center, Berlin. Helping individuals with Parkinson’s disease and their families. No reservation, no fee. Questions, call Dornese Whittington at AHC 443-880-6479. Additional information is available on www.DelmarvaParkinsonsAlliance.or g or call 410-749-8511.

YOGA, 5:30-6:45 p.m. James G. Barrett Medical Office Building, Rotunda, Berlin. All levels welcome. Contact Georgette Rhoads at 410-641-9734 or grhoads@atlanticgeneral.org with any questions. Cost: $72 for eight sessions, or $10 drop-in fee for first time. Wednesday, Jan. 15: AGH Hypertension Clinic, 10 a.m. to noon Walgreen’s, Bethany Beach, Del. Free blood pressure screening and health information. For more information, contact Dawn Denton at 410641-9268.

AGH Hypertension Clinic, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Walgreen’s, Selbyville, Del. Free blood pressure screening and health information. For more information, contact Dawn Denton 410-641-9268.

Friday, Jan 17: Living Well Workshop, noon to 2:30 p.m. Indian River Senior Center, 214 Irons Ave., Millsboro, Del. “Living Well” is a six-week workshop that teaches participants how to live a quality life with chronic disease. Examples of chronic conditions may include diabetes, arthritis, depression, asthma, bronchitis, pain, heart disease or any conditions that hinder you from living the life you desire. The workshop will be held Fridays, Jan. 10 through Feb. 14. Pre-registration is required. Contact Laura Small at 410629-6820.

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T.O.P.S. of Berlin - Group #169, 5:-6:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, weekly. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy life-style. For more information, contact Edna Berkey at 410-2512083. Tuesday, Jan. 21: YOGA, 5:30-6:45 p.m. James G. Barrett Medical Office Building, Rotunda, Berlin. All levels welcome. Contact Georgette Rhoads at 410-641-9734 or grhoads@atlanticgeneral.org with any questions. Cost: $72 for eight sessions, or $10 drop-in fee for first time. Wednesday, Jan. 22: Bereavement Support Group, See WORKSHOPS Page 35

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Sunday, Jan. 19: Overeaters Anonymous #169, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1. Our group is a 12-step program, adapted from Alcoholics Anonymous. We help anyone struggling with a compulsive eating problem, whether it is weight gain, bulimia, anorexia, or if you are a parent of a child with one of these problems. We will be meeting each Sunday in conference room 1 at Atlantic General Hospital. There is no initial meeting charge. Meeting contribution is $1 weekly. Any questions, contact Bett at 410-202-9078.

Monday, Jan. 20: CPAP Mask Fitting - appointment necessary Atlantic General Hospital Sleep Disorders Diagnostic Center hosts a monthly mask fitting clinic for patients who are having trouble adjusting to their CPAP equipment. This is a free service, but requires the patient to call ahead to set up an appointment. To make an appointment, contact Robin Rohlfing at 410-641-9726.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 34

JANUARY 10, 2014

‘Ringing’ in the new year

OCEAN CITY TODAY/SHEILA R. CHERRY

During Berlin’s 2014 New Year’s Eve celebration, April Taylor accepted a wedding proposal and diamond ring from Tommy Cahall at the stroke of midnight.

CROSSWORD

By Sheila R. Cherry Associate Editor/Bayside Gazette (Jan. 10, 2014) In the fairytale, Cinderella lost a glass slipper at the stroke of midnight during a royal ball. During Berlin’s 2014 New Year’s Eve celebration, April Taylor accepted a diamond ring at the stroke of midnight under a descending ball. As the wider crowd was counting down the seconds as we waited for midnight to arrive, the crowd that quickly formed surrounding Tommy Cahall and Taylor held their collective breaths waiting for Taylor to give her answer. In the midst of a massive crowd of revelers gathered in the center of Main Street, Cahall quietly dropped to one knee, cradled Taylor’s left hand in his and proposed marriage. The maneuver seemed to be a bit of a surprise to Taylor. It was a much bigger surprise to most of the partygoers that surrounded them. It showed on Taylor’s face as her understanding of the event began to register. Then her hand went to her mouth, her eyes began to get misty, she nodded and said “yes.” The relationship had begun nearly seven years ago, when Taylor, 28, and Cahall, 29, were introduced to each other by a mutual friend when they met up with friends at The Party Block in Ocean City that year. Taylor, who lives in Laurel, Del., and works at Ace Printing in Berlin, is in the first year of an early childhood education associate’s degree program. Cahall is from Salisbury and works at Eastco Laundry Systems, a commercial laundry equipment company. Taylor remembered telling the girlfriend she was with, “Oh, he’s cute,” when she spotted Tommy. Cahall thought the same about Taylor. The two hung out at the bar and chatted while their friends kept busy on the dance floor. Which raised the question, was their meeting a secretly set up blind date? Taylor tends to think it might have been. “I think she did. But she never came out and said it,” Taylor said of the friend who introduced them. Cahall was not so sure. “I think it was a coincidence,” he said. Either way, four of their friends were with them to share in the moment when Cahall finally popped the question.

“All our friends had been asking when we were going to do it, so I kind of expected it,” Taylor said. All the friends knew about Cahall’s New Year’s Eve proposal plans, except for April of course, including friends who were not physically at the Berlin celebration, according to Cahall. Then, after midnight the absentee friends began calling in their congratulations—two to Cahall, at least 20 to Taylor. Taylor said she received 40 to 50 “likes” on her Facebook page overnight. Cahall said he had bought the engagement ring before Christmas. Then decided he did not want to give it to April for Christmas. He didn’t want to diminish the moment as just another Christmas present. That left him with the dilemma of trying to decide on a time he could give the proposal and ring to Taylor that was far enough away from a connection to the Christmas holiday. That was when he decided on New Year’s Eve. The mere numbers of people the proposal attracted, however, might have taken Cahall a bit by surprise. During the proposal a crowd immediately began encircling the couple. To Cahall, Taylor’s response seemed to take an especially long time. To those of us who were not laying our hearts bare in front of a crowd of strangers, Taylor’s response took seconds. Asked what he was thinking at that moment, Cahall said the one thing on his mind at the time was, “She’d better say ‘yes’.” Taylor said she had been sensing that Cahall would soon be popping the question. “But I didn’t expect the proposal to come on New Year’s Eve,” she said. The couple has not set a wedding date yet, but Cahall said it would probably not be this year. Cahall said when he returned to work after the holiday his co-workers had one question on their minds: “Are you engaged?” Their family members had the typical happy response to the news, they said. Although Cahall added, “There were a few who asked “What took you so long?” So why on New Year’s Eve at the stroke of midnight in the middle of Main Street? Cahall’s answer was, “If you’re going to go, go big.”

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

COMMUNITY BRIEFS

Workshops available in January

SDHS Taco Night

Stephen Decatur High School’s fifth annual Taco Night, sponsored by Sonrise Church, is back for another year in the cafeteria on Wednesday, Jan. 22. Every item costs $1. Menu items include chicken and beef tacos, sides, desserts and drinks. Patrons may eat in the Berlin school’s cafeteria or carry out from 2:30-7 p.m. All proceeds benefit Stephen Decatur High School.

Truitt fundraiser

A fundraiser for Dana Truitt, St. Pauls’ By-the-Sea Episcopal Church fire victim, will be held on Friday, Jan. 10, from 5-9 p.m. at Seacrets on 49th Street in Ocean City. The event will include light dinner fair, beer, wine, music, a silent auction and 50/50 raffle. Tickets cost $20 in advance and $25 at the door. They are available in Ocean City at 12417 Ocean Gateway, unit #C24, The Original Greene Turtle on 116th Street and Madison Beach Motel at 9 Baltimore Avenue. Also, call Marianne Buas at 443-497-0524 or Jessica Lynch at 410-213-9556 for tickets and more information. All donations welcome at OCRooms.com and the Bank of Ocean City. Truitt was a regular volunteer at St. Paul’s By-the-Sea. On. Nov. 26, she was critically injured during a fire in the rectory. Currently, she is at Johns Hopkins recovering.

OCES registration

Ocean City Elementary School will begin the registration process for the 2014-2015 Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten programs in January. Children who will be 4 years old on or before Sept. 1, 2014 may be eligible for the OCES Pre-Kindergarten program. Space is limited and children from families who meet the income guidelines will be given priority. Children who will be 5 years old on or before Sept. 1, 2014 must register for Kindergarten. Children who are currently attending Pre-Kindergarten at OCES must register for Kindergarten. Call Ocean City Elementary School at 410-632-5370 beginning Jan. 15, 2014 to schedule a registration appointment.

Continued from Page 33 7-8 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1. We gather the fourth Wednesday of every month. Pre-registration is not necessary. For further information, contact Pastoral Care Services at 410-641-9725 or e-mail gmansell@atlanticgeneral.org. Friday, Jan. 24: Living Well Workshop, noon to 2:30 p.m. Indian River Senior Center, 214 Irons Ave., Millsboro, Del. “Living Well” is a six-week workshop that teaches participants how to live a quality life with chronic disease. Examples of chronic conditions may include diabetes, arthritis, depression, asthma, bronchitis, pain, heart disease or any conditions that hinder you from living the life you desire. The workshop will be held Fridays, Jan. 10 through Feb. 14. Pre-registration is required. Contact Laura Small

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Sunday, Jan. 26: Overeaters Anonymous #169 2:30-3:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1. Our group is a 12-step program, adapted from Alcoholics Anonymous. We help anyone struggling with a compulsive eating problem, whether it is weight gain, bulimia, anorexia, or if you are a parent of a child with one of these problems. We will be meeting each Sunday in conference room 1 at Atlantic General Hospital. There is no initial meeting charge. Meeting contribution is $1 weekly. Any questions, contact Bett at 410-202-9078. Monday, Jan. 27: T.O.P.S. of Berlin - Group #169, 5:-6:30 p.m. Atlantic General Hospital, Conference Room 1, weekly. Take Off Pounds Sensibly is a support and educational

group promoting weight loss and healthy life-style. For more information, contact Edna Berkey at 410-2512083.

Friday, Jan. 31: Living Well Workshop, noon to 2:30 p.m. Indian River Senior Center, 214 Irons Ave., Millsboro, Del. “Living Well” is a six-week workshop that teaches participants how to live a quality life with chronic disease. Examples of chronic conditions may include diabetes, arthritis, depression, asthma, bronchitis, pain, heart disease or any conditions that hinder you from living the life you desire. The workshop will be held Fridays, Jan. 10 through Feb. 14. Pre-registration is required. Contact Laura Small at 410629-6820.

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Living Well class offered (Jan. 10, 2014) Do you have a chronic disease or condition or do you take care of someone with a chronic condition? If you do then you should consider making your life better by attending the Living Well workshop. Atlantic General Hospital is offering this workshop beginning Jan. 10 through Feb. 14, 12-2:30 p.m., at the Indian River Senior Center in Millsboro, Del. There is no charge for the classes. Participants must begin the class with Session 1 or 2. Pre-registration is required. The model for this program comes out of Stanford School of Medicine and is a chronic disease self-management course. It teaches participants how to live a quality life even with a chronic disease. Anyone who has any type of chronic condition or the caregiver of anyone with a chronic condition should attend. Examples of chronic

A New Year... A New You...

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PAGE 35

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PAGE 36

Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

Abundance of activities at area libraries

(Jan. 10, 2014) An assortment of programs for all ages are being offered at Worcester County libraries in January.

Ocean City Branch: •Post-It Art Contest–all month: Submit a piece of art on a Post-It Note. Create work at home or visit the Ocean City branch on 100th Street where supplies will be available. Creations will be displayed in the library. Prizes will be awarded in April for age groups: fifth and sixth grades, seventh and eighth grades, and ninth through 12th grades. Submission forms are available at the Ocean City Branch. •Computer and eReader Instruction: Staff offers individual computer or E-Reader instruction by appointment throughout the month. Call the Ocean City branch at 410-5241818 to schedule a private training session. •Origami Hover Crafts: Saturday, Jan. 11 at 1 p.m. Design, create and race your own hover craft using different paper mediums. For ages 8 and older. •Play Time: Wednesday, Jan, 15, 10:30 a.m. Parents and children explore educational toys together in an interactive, free play program. A great place to make new friends and learn new skills while having fun! For infant to 5-year-old children. •Nuno Felting: Tuesday, Jan. 21, 1 p.m. Learn the ancient art of wet felting to create your own one-of-a-kind wearable work of art. Using only wool roving, silk, water, soap and some elbow grease you can make your own nuno felted scarf. •Story Time: Wednesday, Jan. 22 and Jan. 29, 10:30 a.m. Enjoy stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts. For children 2-5 years old. •Zentangle: Tuesday, Jan. 28, 4 p.m. Creating Zentangle art provides a fun and lighthearted way to relax and intentionally facilitate a shift in focus and perspective. The Zentangle Method of creating art is unencumbered by dogma and cost which can weigh on other approaches. Nevertheless, it is sufficiently structured and organized so you can enjoy and benefit from an activity that otherwise might be considered whimsical. Artist, John Iampiere will instruct this class.

Ocean Pines Branch: •Ocean Pines Book of the Month: Friday, Jan. 10, 2 p.m. “A Reliable Wife,” by Robert Goolrick. When wealthy businessman Ralph Truitt stood on the icy railroad platform waiting for the late train to deposit his mail order wife-to-be before him, he was expecting a woman of plain appearance with a missionary history; someone who could presumably make his house into a home and who could withstand the pressures of living in a still untamed country. That was what his ad had asked for: a reliable wife. Ralph Truitt was in for a surprise. •Lap Time: Tuesday, Jan. 14, 21

and 28 10:30 a.m. Children will be introduced to songs, games, finger plays and movement activities. Parents and caregivers will learn new and fun ways to interact with their toddlers. For infant to children 2 years old. •Fencing: Tuesday, Jan 14, 5 p.m. Every Tuesday through Feb. 25. Learn to fence with Dave Griffin, former fencing coach of the Baltimore Fencing Club. Learn the techniques, scoring, theories, and moves of this fascinating sport. Wear comfortable clothing. Class size is limited to 12. Register at the Ocean Pines Branch. •Introduction to Computers and the Internet: Wednesday, Jan. 15, 8 a.m. The second of four sessions will include introduction to Microsoft Word and accessing the Internet. •Tinctures, Oils and Salves: Wednesday, Jan. 15, 1 p.m. Come and learn how easy and inexpensive it is to make your own tinctures, infused oils, and salves. Participants will learn hands on how to combine and create their own healing first aid kit. Demonstrations and recipes will be provided for herbal healing powders, infused oils, salves, and tinctures. Basic herb actions will be covered. •Library Databases 101: Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2 p.m. Did you know specialized online research resources (databases) are free to public library card holders? Attend this program to learn about reliable online consumer health information sources and genealogy research resources that are available to library patrons. Learn the basics to download your favorite magazines, e-books, and digital audiobooks from library resources. Stream award winning independent films for FREE. All this and more is available to you on the Worcester County Library Online Databases. Register at the Ocean Pines Branch by calling 410208-4014. •Introduction to Computers and the Internet: Wednesday, Jan. 22, 8 a.m. The third of four sessions will include introduction to Microsoft Word and accessing the Internet. •Young and Restless “Celebrate Snow”: Wednesday, Jan. 22, 10:30 a.m. Experience creative science, art and music “Snow” activities. Dress to get messy. For children ages 3-5 years old. •Story Time: Thursday, Jan. 23 and 30 10:30 a.m. Enjoy stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts. For children ages 2-5 years old. •Genealogy Assistance: Monday, Jan. 27, 10 a.m. to noon. Have you come so far tracing your ancestry and now you’re stuck and reached a dead end? This class is for the people who are already actively researching their ancestry and family history. Tom Dempsey, member of the Sussex County Genealogy Society, helps you to find your way around the block. He will be available from 10 am to 12 noon to assist you. This is a “drop in” session and no registration is required. •Introduction to Computers and the Internet: Wednesday, Jan.

29, 8 a.m. The fourth of four sessions will include introduction to Microsoft Word and accessing the Internet.

Snow Hill Branch: •STEM PM “Cooking With Kids:” Monday, Jan. 13, 3:30 p.m. Join Chef Derek Dahl as he teaches some fun and easy recipes that kids can make by themselves! For children 5-8 years old. •Yoga: Every Tuesday through Feb. 25 at 5 p.m. Get fit with Yoga, a tranquil form of exercise while gaining mental and physical health. •Young & Restless “Celebrate Snow:” Thursday, Jan. 23, 10:30 a.m. Experience creative science, art and music “Snow” activities. Dress to get messy. For children 3-5 years old. •Fermentation Class: Jan. 29, 1 p.m. This class will include lacto-fermented demonstrations and recipes for fermented mayonnaise, baked oatmeal, ketchup, and kombucha. There will be comparison of simple fermentation versus lacto-fermentation. Participants will learn to produce their own whey without making cheese. Discover how easy, nutritious, and inexpensive this process is of increasing healthy probiotics in your diet.

Berlin: •Young and Restless “Celebrate Snow:” Tuesday, Jan. 14, 10:30 a.m. Experience creative science, art and music “Snow” activities. Dress to get messy. For children ages 3-5. •eReader Tech Zoo: Saturday, Jan. 18, 10 a.m. Learn how to download ebooks from your public library to your eReader–10 a.m. Kindle Connections, 10:45 a.m. Nook Know-How, 11:30 a.m. iPad Info. No registration is required, but attendees will need to know their e-mail and device password. •Story Time: Tuesday, Jan. 21 and Thursday, Jan. 30 10:30 a.m. Children 2-5 years old are invited to visit the Berlin Branch to find new friends, hear stories and make crafts. A ranger from Assateague will bring a friend from the aquarium. •Berlin Book of the Month: Friday, Jan. 17, 1 p.m. “Same Kind of Different as Me,” by Ron Hall. Meet Denver, a man raised under plantation-style slavery in Louisiana in the 1960s; a man who escaped, hopping a train to wander, homeless, for 18 years on the streets of Dallas, Tex. No longer a slave, Denver’s life was still hopeless until God moved. First came a godly woman who prayed, listened, and obeyed. And then came her husband, Ron, an international arts dealer at home in a world of Armani suited millionaires. And then they all came together. •Kumihimo: Wednesday, Jan 22, 1 p.m. Discover the ancient art of trimming and accessorizing using Kumihimo, an ancient Japanese braiding. Make a braiding tool and learn the basics while designing your own pattern. •Play Time: Tuesday, Jan. 28,

10:30 a.m. Parents and children explore educational toys together in an interactive, free play program. A great place to make new friends and learn new skills while having fun! For infant to children age 5. •Fireside Chat: Thursday, Jan. 30, 3 p.m. Join us for a lively chat about our favorite good reads. Want to find authors who write the kinds of books you like to read? Join us and make new contacts. Want to explore new authors and genres but don’t know where to start? Join our enthusiastic chat group and get some great ideas.

Pocomoke Branch: •“Maze Runner” Contest: January 2-31, Check out any book from our “Maze Runner” by James Dashner display. Read the book and return the review to enter the drawing to win a Maze Runner Movie pack (two tickets to see the movie which will be released Feb. 14 and “swag” to go along with it.) All entries must be received by Jan. 31. Winner will be notified Feb. 3. For ages 13-17. •Bread Baking: Wednesday, Jan. 15, 1 p.m. Learn the history of grain and processing. Grind grain manually and electrically. Learn how easy, quick, nutritious, and delicious it is to grind and bake. Learn about sprouted wheat and different grains, hard versus soft grain, spelt, quinoa. Incorporate fresh ground whole wheat and all its benefits in all of your cooking. Even those with gluten allergies have been able to tolerate these less processed or sprouted grain bread recipes. Class instructor has been grinding grain and baking for 12 years. •4H Robotics: Friday, Jan. 17, 3:30 p.m. Join the Worcester County Library and the Worcester County 4-H and learn about our LEGO WeDo Robotics program. WeDo is a LEGO product that allows elementary age youth to build robots using LEGO pieces and then program the robot to perform specific functions on the computer. Register by calling 410-9570878. For ages 6 -10 years old. •LEGO ® at the Library Contest Registration Deadline: Wednesday, Jan. Contest date is Saturday, Jan. 25 at 11 a.m. For more information and for rules and regulations, contact the Pocomoke Branch at 410-957-0878. Contestants must bring own Legos. For children ages 5 -12. •Story Time: Thursday, Jan. 23, 10:30 a.m. Enjoy stories, rhymes, finger plays, music and crafts. For children 2-5 years old. •The Art Studio: Friday, Jan. 24, 3:30 p.m. Learn to draw, paint and create with professional artist Dale Rohl. Registration is necessary. Call 410-957-0878 to sign up. For ages 7 and older. •Tot Time: Thursday, Jan. 30, 10:30 a.m. A variety of fun and educational activities for children 3-5 years old. Registration is necessary. Call 410957-0878 to sign up.


JANUARY 10, 2014

OUT & ABOUT

Ocean City Today

OCES SHARE A BEAR PROGRAM

OCES SHARES THE WARMTH

Second graders at Ocean City Elementary School once again participate in the “Share a Bear Program” sponsored by the Salvation Army. They presented 120 dressed up bears to Major Tidman, before Christmas. Those bears were distributed to children in the area.

LIONS CLUB PEACE POSTER COMPETITION

Each year the Lions Club of Salisbury hosts the Lions International Peace Poster Contest for students ages 11-13. The theme for the 2014-2015 year is “Peace, Love and Understanding.” Posters are judged on originality, artistic merit and expression of the theme. Lion representative Mary Louise Barnes (left), presented awards to three Worcester Preparatory School students, from left, Fiona Pando, Will Mears and Ava Gerachis, Ocean City. Standing with the winners are Lower School Art teacher Rebecca Tittermary, center, and Celeste Bunting. The overall competition winner C.C. Lizas, will be presented her award at a later date.

PAGE 37

Ocean City Elementary School first-grade students participated in the Share the Warmth Program for the Salvation Army. They collected hats, mittens, gloves and scarves to be donated to children in need in the area. Pictured is teacher Deneen Nicolle, with students, Berlin Corbin, Serenity Shockley and Nya Carabello.

KIWANIS HOLIDAY FRUIT FUNDRAISER

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

For nearly a decade, the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines - Ocean City has run a successful fruit sale fundraiser for the holidays. Members pre-sell cases of oranges and grapefruit and apples. Through the efforts of the members and the support of the community, the 300 cases were sold helping to reach the club’s annual budget for fundraisers in support of the youth of the community. Pictured are members, from left, Suzanne and Dick Clagett, fruit sale chairman Roy Foreman, Tom Southwell, Mike Foelber, Ralph Chinn, Mike Morton, Mark Joseph and Joe Logisz.

SDHS DONATES TO BIT

The Stephen Decatur High School National Honor Society presented an annual donation of $750 to Believe in Tomorrow for the holidays. Since 2005, the SDHS NHS has raised more than $14,000 for the local chapter. Pictured from left, are, Advisor Mary Berquist, NHS members Bradley Miller and Josh White, NHS Secretary Samantha Quilter, Believe in Tomorrow Coordinator Wayne Littleton, NHS President Gabi Ortega, NHS Vice President Andrew Bradshaw and Principal Tom Zimmer.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 38

JANUARY 10, 2014

Red Cross offers winter weather safety tips (Jan. 10, 2014) The Red Cross offers the following winter weather safety tips: Wear layers of lightweight clothing to stay warm. Gloves and a hat will help prevent losing body heat. After the storm, be extremely careful if snow must be shoveled. It is physically strenuous work, so take frequent breaks and stay hydrated. Seek medical attention immediately if exhibiting symptoms of hypothermia, including confusion, dizziness, exhaustion and severe shivering. Watch for symptoms of frostbite, including numbness, flushed gray,   white, blue or yellow skin discol-

oration, numbness or waxy feeling skin. Don’t forget the pets – bring them indoors. If they can’t come inside, make sure they have enough shelter to keep them warm, and they have access to unfrozen water. Avoid frozen pipes - run water, even at a trickle, to help prevent them from freezing. Open the kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals out of the reach of children. Keep the garage doors closed if there are water lines in the garage.   Keep the  thermostat   at the same





temperature day and night. Your heating bill may be a little higher, but you could avoid a more costly repair job if your pipes freeze and burst. Download the American Red Cross First Aid App for quick, expert advice on what to do in case of an emergency. This free app is available on the itunes.apple.com/US/app/first-aidb y - a m e r i c a n - r e d cross/id529160691?mt=8” \t “_blank Apple iTunes or https://play.google.com/store/apps/ details?id=com.cube.arc.fa” \t “_blank” Google Play stores. Take caution with heating systems Never use a stove or oven to heat a home.









If using a space heater, place it on a level, hard surface and keep anything flammable at least three feet away – items such as paper, clothing, bedding, curtains or rugs. Turn off space heaters and make sure fireplace embers are out before leaving the room or going to bed. If using a fireplace, use a glass or metal fire screen large enough to catch sparks and rolling logs. Use generators correctly – never operate a generator inside the home, including in the basement or garage. Don’t hook a generator up to the home’s wiring. The safest thing to do is to connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator.







Coastal Hospice providing training course (Jan. 10, 2014) Coastal Hospice & Palliative Care is offering an introduction and training course for anyone interested in volunteering at the nonprofit organization that serves Dorchester, Somerset, Wicomico and Worcester counties. Those interested in volunteering for patient care are invited to attend training sessions on two Saturdays – Feb. 1 and 8 – from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Coastal Hospice Volunteer Offices,

Philmore Commons, 224 Phillip Morris Drive, Suite 102, Salisbury, Md. Persons interested in volunteering for office or thrift shop work only may attend Saturday, Feb. 1 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., but are invited to attend the full two-day session. The training sessions are open to everyone, and attendees are not required to commit to volunteering. There is no cost to attend.

Volunteers are critical to the care Coastal Hospice provides. Patient care volunteers at Coastal Hospice offer comfort and companionship to patients and their families, provide transportation and deliver supplies. Other volunteers support the patient care staff with office work and assist at the Coastal Hospice Thrift Shop in Berlin. Coastal Hospice is a nonprofit health care organization that cares

OCEAN CI Y SQQUAR

for individuals facing life-limiting conditions, but who want to remain as active and engaged as possible. Coastal Hospice cares for patients in their home, nursing home, assisted living facility or at Coastal Hospice at the Lake. For more information or to register for the volunteer session, call Judy Hunt-Harris at Coastal Hospice, Volunteer Services at 410-5432590.

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Calendar

JANUARY 10, 2014

Ocean City Today

Submit calendar items to: editor@oceancitytoday.net. Submission deadline is 5 p.m. Monday, the week of publication. Local submissions have priority. Area event listings are subject to space availability.

FRI. Jan. 10

BINGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Knights of Columbus, 9901

Coastal Highway (rear of St. Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church) in Ocean City. Doors open at 5 p.m. and games begin at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments for sale. Info: 410-524-7994.

ITALIAN NIGHT SPAGHETTI DINNER â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Stevenson United Methodist Church, 123 N. Main St., Berlin, 4-7 p.m. Spaghetti Dinner with homemade sauce, sweet Italian sausage, garlic bread, fresh garden salad and drink. Cost is $8 for adults, $5 for children ages 4-10 and free to those 3 and younger. Carry outs available. Also bake sale table. Info: 443-235-6761.

DANA TRUITT FUNDRAISER â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Seacrets, 49th Street and the bay, Ocean City, 5-9 p.m. Truitt is a regular volunteer at St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s by-the-Sea and was critically injured in the church fire. Lite dinner fair, beer and wine, music, silent auction and 50/50 raffle. Tickets cost $20 in advance and $25 at the door. Purchase at: 12417 Ocean Gateway #C24, Ocean City; The Greene Turtle North, 11601 Coastal Highway; Madison Beach Motel, 9 N. Baltimore Ave.; Marianne Buas, 443497-0524; or Jessica Lynch, 410-2139556. All donations welcomed: OCRooms.com or Bank of Ocean City.

SAT. Jan. 11

ANNUAL BEEF â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;N BEER FUNDRAISER â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway, 5:30 p.m. Entertainment by the Imagine Band, the Philadelphia Woodland String Band and vocalist Sharon and Charles Sorrentino and Lee Taylor. And an all-you-can-eat buffet. Cost is $26. Benefits Home of the Brave. Tickets: Barbara Mazzei, 410-208-0430; Mary Evans, 410-596-5498; Anna Foultz, 410641-7667; or Joan Jentile, 443-465-2400.

A DIGITAL DAY WITH LEWIS KEMPER â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Lewes Presbyterian Church, Fellowship Hall, 133 Kings Highway, Lewis, Del.,

9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Featuring Lewis Kemper, an elite Canon Explorer of Light Photographer. No cost for admission, however tickets are required. Tickets: www.coastalcameraclub.com.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST â&#x20AC;&#x201D; VFW, Post 8296,

104 66th St., bayside in Ocean City, 8-11 a.m. A $5 donation for all-you-can-eat pancakes or 2-2-2, two eggs, two pancakes and two bacon slices, includes coffee and juice. Bloody Marys cost $3. Info: 410-524-8196.

FARMERS MARKET â&#x20AC;&#x201D; White Horse Park,

239 Ocean Parkway in Ocean Pines, 8 a.m. to noon, through Oct. 26. Produce, farm fresh eggs, organic goods, herbs, fresh cut flowers, soaps, jelly, homemade baked goods, honey and more.

FREE HOME-BREWING BEER MAKING CLASS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brews Up, 9028 Worcester

Highway, Berlin, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Beginner class. Brewing a Cream Ale, 5 gallons in two hours. Reserve seat: 443-513-4744 or www.brewsup.net. Other dates available by appointment.

OCEAN PINES ANGLERS CLUB MEETING â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 9:30 a.m. Bill Mahoney of the Maryland Coastal Bays Program will present the new upgraded CCMP, Coastal Conservation Management Plan. Some of the more interesting subjects for discussion will be oyster restoration and â&#x20AC;&#x153;ghostâ&#x20AC;? crab pot removal. All welcome. Info: Jack Barnes, 410-641-7662.

SUN. Jan. 12

SUNDAY NIGHT HYMN SING â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Friendship United Methodist Church, 10537 Friendship Road, Berlin, 7 p.m. A night of good singing involving the congregation. Info: 410-641-2578.

MON. Jan. 13

DELMARVA SWEET ADELINE CHORUS MEETS WEEKLY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Delmarva Chorus,



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CALL 1 800 420 7783 NOW!

Sweet Adelineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, under the direction of Carol Ludwig, meets each Monday from 7-9 p.m., at the Ocean Pines Community Center, 239 Ocean Parkway, White Horse Park. Women interested in learning the craft of a cappella singing welcome. Info: 410-208-4171.

HAND DANCING â&#x20AC;&#x201D; House of Welsh, 1106 Coastal Highway, Fenwick, Del. Free lessons from 6-7 p.m., open dancing 7-10 p.m. No cover charge. Info: DC Hand Dance Club, 302-541-0728.

TUES. Jan. 14

LAST DAY TO PURCHASE TICKETS FOR THE 24TH ANNUAL OCEAN CITY MAYORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PRAYER BREAKFAST â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clarion Resort

Hotel, 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Jan. 17, 7-9:15 a.m. Speaker will be Robert Douglas, founder of National Police Suicide Foundation, Inc. Tickets cost $16 in advance and must be purchased by Jan. 14. Tables of 8-10 may be reserved on a first come basis. All are welcome. Info: 410-641-1300 or 443235-2669. Tickets available at City Hall, Third Street and Baltimore Avenue; Long and Foster Realty, 120th Street; Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, Route 50, West Ocean City; and Cropper Oil Company, Route 50, Berlin.

WED. Jan. 15

BINGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Every Wednesday at Ocean City Elks Lodge 2645, 138th Street across from Fenwick Inn. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start 6:30 p.m. Best payouts and Jackpots. Food and non-alcoholic drinks available. Info: 410-250-2645.

DELMARVA HAND DANCING CLUB â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Meets every Wednesday at Peakyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rooftop Restaurant & Bar, located in the Fenwick Inn, 13801 Coastal Highway, Ocean City. Beginner and intermediate lessons, 5:30-6:30 p.m., followed by dancing 6:30-9 p.m. Jitterbug, swing, cha-cha to the sounds of the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50s, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s and Carolina beach music. All are welcome. Discounted food and drink prices. Info: 302-337-3638.

TAKE OFF POUNDS SENSIBLY MEETING â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Ocean City library, 10003 Coastal Highway, Wednesdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. TOPS is a support and educational group promoting weight loss and healthy lifestyle.

PAGE 39

It meets weekly. Info: 302-436-3682.

RETIRED NURSES OF OCEAN PINES MEETING â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 3 p.m. Michelle Clifton will discuss Medical Home which is a new program of patient care to enhance education and wellness. All are welcome. A 50-50 raffle for the nurses scholarship fund will be held.

FREE WINE MAKING CLASS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Brews Up, 9028 Worcester Highway, Berlin, 6-7 p.m. Beginner class. Reserve seat: 443513-4744 or www.brewsup.net. Other dates available by appointment. RELAY FOR LIFE KICKOFF PARTY â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 6-7 p.m. Food, fun and fellowship in the fight against cancer. Light fare and drinks served. Info: dawnhodge@comcast.net, 443-497-1198 or www.relayforlife.org/northworcestermd.

THURS. Jan. 16

BEACH SINGLES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Every Thursday, Beach Singles 45-Plus meets for happy hour at Harpoon Hannaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Route 54 and the Bay, Fenwick Island, Del., 4 p.m. Info: Arlene, 302-436-9577; Kate, 410524-0649; or Dianne, 302-541-4642. BINGO â&#x20AC;&#x201D; American Legion Post 166, 2308 Philadelphia Ave., in Ocean City, every Thursday, year round. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., games start at 7 p.m. Food available. Open to the public. Info: 410-289-3166. FREE FLY CASTING LESSONS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Meet at the Veterans Memorial parking lot, 4 p.m., rain or shine. Fishing will take place at the South Gate pond. All ages are welcome. Take fly casting tackle if you have it. Joe Reynolds will cover everything from the basic total beginner category to those with more advanced skills and experience. If interested, contact joe@outdoors.net.

ONGOING EVENTS 24TH ANNUAL OCEAN CITY MAYORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PRAYER BREAKFAST â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clarion Resort

Hotel, 10100 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Jan. 17, 7-9:15 a.m. Speaker will be Robert Douglas, founder of National Police Suicide Foundation, Inc. Tickets

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 40

CALENDAR

Continued from Page 39

cost $16 in advance and must be purchased by Jan. 14. Tables of 8-10 may be reserved on a first come basis. All are welcome. Info: 410-641-1300 or 443235-2669. Tickets available at City Hall, Third Street and Baltimore Avenue; Long and Foster Realty, 120th Street; Ocean City Chamber of Commerce, Route 50, West Ocean City; and Cropper Oil Company, Route 50, Berlin.

PHOTO COURTESY D.J. LANDIS, SR.

CHRISTMAS COOKIES FOR MEALS ON WHEELS

Kiwanis member and Meals on Wheels volunteer, Dave Landis, accepts Christmas cookies baked by Barbara Peletier, immediate past president of the Kiwanis Club of Greater Ocean Pines-Ocean City. She made and packaged 38 gift boxes of her homemade Christmas cookies for Meals On Wheels.

Help for people with

Macular Degeneration

Find out if telescopic glasses, microscope glasses or prismatic glasses can help you see better. Call for a FREE phone consultation with Dr. Azman.

888-707-2059 www.LowVisionMD.org

PANCAKE BREAKFAST — Ocean City Municipal Airport’s Terminal Building, 12724 Airport Road, Berlin, Saturdays and Sundays, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Jan. 11 through April 27. Serving pancakes, eggs, bacon and sausage. Suggested donation is $5, as a fundraiser for the Huey Veteran’s Memorial Display at the airport. Info: Airport Ops, 410-213-2471 or Coleman Bunting, 410-726-7207. Crossword answers from page 34

JANUARY 10, 2014

FREE JOB SEARCH SEMINAR — Wor-Wic

Community College, Hazel Center Room 302, 32000 Campus Drive, Salisbury, Jan. 23, 5:30-7 p.m. John Romanowski of Fruitland, author of the e-book called “Best Way to Find a Job is to Effectively Manage Your Job Search,” will be the presenter. To reserve a seat, contact Wor-Wic’s career services office at 410-334-2903 or register online at http://tinyurl.com/ozkt5xk by Jan. 17.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE SUPPORT GROUP — Group meets the second Tuesday of

each month at Ocean Pines library, 11107 Cathell Road, 2:30-4 p.m. Speakers, discussions, exercise, etc. No reservations, no fees. Patients and caregivers are encouraged to stop by.

HORSE & CARRIAGE RIDES ON THE BOARDWALK — Weather and ridership

permitting, horse and carriage rides will board passengers near Thrasher’s at the Inlet lot and travel around the pier and down the Boardwalk to Fourth Street and back on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., through April 30. Cost is $10 per person, kids 3 and younger ride free. Info: Randy Davis, 443-783-1409.

KIWANIS CLUB OF GREATER OP-OC —

Meets every Wednesday at 8 a.m. in the Ocean Pines Community Center, 235 Ocean Parkway. Doors open at 7 a.m. October through April. Info: 410-6417330.


JANUARY 10, 2014

41 Classifieds now appear in Ocean City Today & the Bayside Gazette each week and online at oceancitytoday.net and baysideoc.com.

HELP WANTED

Hileman Real Estate - Now Hiring Cleaners for the 2014 Season. Must be licensed & insured. Call Terry @ 410208-9200 x102.

New Salon Opening In Ocean Pines Nail Tech, Massage Therapist & Hair Stylists needed. Must be MD licensed. Call Marc 302-682-1777

HELP WANTED

If your New Year’s resolution was to make more Money, Avon and a $10 investment can help. Work F/T or P/T, set your own hours, and make up to 50% commission. Call your Avon Representative Christine @ 443-880-8397 or email snowhillavon@comcast.net *The gift of beauty is the perfect gift anytime of year! www.baysideoc.com www.oceancitytoday.net

Calvin B. Taylor Banking Company, a local community bank, is seeking team players to fill year-round part time positions at our Worcester County locations. Applicants must be flexible and available to work in our various Worcester County locations if needed. Those interested in part time employment need only to apply. The Customer Service Associate will perform transactions in an efficient and courteous manner and suggest products and services to customers to meet the customers’ needs while performing other branch duties. Previous cash-handling and customer service experience is required; banking experience is strongly preferred, but not necessary. The successful candidate must be professional, friendly, organized, detail-oriented and analytical. Computer skills are a must. If you are a team-player with excellent communication skills, we would like to hear from you. We offer competitive compensation commensurate with background and experience. HOW TO APPLY: Please submit a resume indicating position applied for and salary requirements to: Online: http://www.taylorbank.com/bank-application-process.php or https://home2.eease.adp.com/recruit/?id=2859012 Mail: Calvin B. Taylor Bank Attention: Human Resources Job Number: 2014-01 P.O. Box 5, Berlin, Maryland 21811 EOE-M/F/D/V

FULL TIME POSTING Town of Ocean City Fire Marshals Office Administrative Office Associate (I)

The Administrative Office Associate I (Fire Marshals Office) performs complex secretarial tasks and office operations, in support of the Fire Marshals Office’s varied mission of education, code enforcement, investigation, and homeland security. Work is varied, complex and confidential involving considerable responsibility. Completes entry and maintenance of records systems: permitting, quality assurance program, complaints/referrals, and relieves personnel of clerical work and general administrative and business detail.

HELP WANTED

Guest Service Rep.-Excellent Benefits & Pay. Apply in person @ Club Ocean Villas II, 105 120th Street.

Hiring F/T & P/T Professional Sales Reps Motivated individuals wanted for rapidly expanding business. Training available, paid travel, with a high income earning potential. Manager positions available for experienced individuals. Please call 443-291-7651.

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RENTALS RENTALS

WR OR YR (OPTIONAL)2BR/2BA - Bright, spacious, updated, furnished house in WOC. Near harbor. Potential studio in loft. Vaulted ceilings, FP & deck. 240-620-3040

Winter Rental - 2BR/1BA Condo near Rt. 90 bridge. $800/mo. + utils. & security deposit. No smoking/pets. Call 443-373-8987. YR, 4BR/1.5BA Apt. - Convenient, mid-town location, ocean block, unfurn., balcony. $1200/mo. + utils. + sec. dep. 443-880-2486

Entry-level salary is $29,282 annually. Submit Town’s application and resume (detailing experience, education, and skills), by Monday, January 13th, 2014, to: Human Resources-City Hall-Rm 106 301 Baltimore Avenue P.O. Box 158 Ocean City, MD 21843 www.oceancitymd.gov EOE Veterans Are Encouraged to Apply

YR Rental or Sale-3BR/2BA Mobile - 5.7 miles from Fenwick Island. Selbyville, DE. Fully remodeled. W/D hookup. No smoking/pets. $900/ mo. + security deposit. Available Immediately! 443-2247670 For Rentals-Call Us Today! Bunting Realty, Inc. 410641-3313 2BR/2BA Waterfront Home Year Round - Unfurnished 11212 Gum Point Road, Berlin. $800/monthly plus utilities. Security deposit required. 410-430-9797

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Yearly & Seasonal Rentals We Welcome Pets 7700 Coastal Hwy 410-524-7700 www.holidayoc.com

Candidate must possess strong organizational and communication skills and a high level of proficiency in oral and written communications. Candidate must have a working knowledge of MS Office Programs (Word, Excel, Access, Outlook, and Publisher) and will be subject to a skills evaluation as part of the hiring process.

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RENTALS

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Available May 8-Sept. 10. 312 Sunset Dr. 2BR/1.5BA, newly remodeled, big kitchen/ living area. Sleeps up to 8. $12,500/season, you pay utilities. Security deposit $2,000. Call 410-428-7333. www.SunsetTerraceRentals.com

RENTALS

YR-Small Furn. Efficiency. Oceanside w/outdoor pool on 61st St. Building has Wi-Fi and laundry room. $800/mo. includes water, electric and Direct TV. No smoking/pets. 443-504-4460 Winter Rentals: 3BR/2BA Large Townhouse on 28th St., bayside, fully equipped kitchen, washer-dryer, 55” flat screen TV, $675/mo. 2BR/2BA-142nd St. bayside, fully equipped unit, $575/mo. John 410-726-8948.

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2BR/2BA Mobile in Bishopville. Light filled, in great shape! $29,900/CASH. Ground rent-$400/mo. includes water, sewer, trash & taxes. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

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Single Family Homes Starting at $900 Apartments Starting at $650 Condos Starting at $895 Office Space w/immediate availability, reception area & private office w/view. Plenty of customer parking in a great Ocean Pines location! Rent includes all CAM, trash removal, water & sewer. $700/mo.

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PAGE 42

LOTS & ACREAGE

Cleared 1/2 acre lot in Holiday Harbor, Bishopville. Perked. $75,000. Call Howard Martin Realty 410-352-5555.

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Units Available Rt. 50 in West Ocean City 1800 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 1728 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 1574 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space 2211 sq. ft. Office/Retail Space Call 443-497-4200

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AUTOMOBILE AUTOMOBILE SERVICES SERVICES

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Do you have an old bicycle not being used? It could mean a world of difference to a hard-working international student. We are looking to get as many bikes as possible. Your donation will be taxdeductible. Please contact Gary at 410-726-1051 for more information.

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Ocean City Today

Page 44

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur junior Payton VanKirk pulls down a rebound during Tuesday's game against Washington.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Defended by two Washington players, Stephen Decatur sophomore Elle Bargar makes her shot during Tuesday's game in Berlin. Decatur won 62-30.

SD scores 62-30 win Coach Fenzel-Mergott pleased with Seahawks’ ball movement on offense By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor

(Jan. 10, 2014) The Stephen Decatur girls’ basketball team earned a convincing 62-30 victory over the Washington Jaguars Tuesday night in Berlin, the Lady Seahawks’ first match back after a two-week Christmas break. Decatur scored 22 points in the first quarter and held Washington to just four points. At the halftime break, the Seahawks led 37-12. “I think that we played a little bit down to our competition,” said Decatur Coach Amy Fenzel-Mergott. “Halftime we talked about it. We came out in the second half and I thought [it] was much better.”

By the end of the third quarter, the Seahawks’ held a commanding 51-19 advantage. “I think our intensity on defense, especially in the first half, was very spotty. At times you could see some great things we can do on the press and then other times we were very lackadaisical,” Fenzel-Mergott said. “Those are the things that when we play better teams never happen…we play intense and they don’t get those easy passes in.” Sophomore Dayona Godwin led Decatur with 27 points and six rebounds. Junior captain Marina Jones chipped in with 10 points and six rebounds. Senior captain Erin Florek contributed with eight points and junior Jillian Petito had nine steals. “I thought on offense they did a very good job of moving the ball,” FenzelMergott said. “I thought they did a very good job of getting that ball inside and I thought we did a very good job of hit-

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Stephen Decatur freshman Lexie VanKirk looks to pass the ball down low during the competition.

ting our transition shots. When ever we’d get a steal, we would come down and we would get a good basket. I was very happy with that.” Decatur will take a trip down the road today, Friday, to play its Worcester County rival, the Snow Hill Eagles, at 5:30 p.m. “We need to work on playing intense defense for the whole game, not just part of the game. We also really need to work on our foul shots,” Fen-

zel-Mergott said. The Seahawks went 1-for-15 from the free-throw line during Tuesday’s game against Washington. “We started (the season) off pretty well with our foul shots and now we’re kind of in a rut. And it’s all mental. The girls can make their foul shots, but [they] know they’re in a mental rut with it and so we’ve got to figure out how to get out of that because we’re not going to win tight games if we miss so many foul shots.”


JANUARY 10, 2014

Ocean City Today

PAGE 45

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep junior Erik Zorn scores two during Tuesday's game against Chincoteague in Berlin. Worcester won 54-18.

Mallards tame Ponies By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 10, 2014) When the Worcester Prep boys’ basketball team took on the Chincoteague Ponies Dec. 18, before the nearly three-week Christmas break, the visiting Mallards, who were competing without a few players, pulled out a 43-40 victory. “Last time we played them we did not have (senior captain) Ryan Nally, or his brother, Owen, a freshman. Ryan can make a huge difference. The tempo of the game is sped up significantly when he is pushing the ball,” Worcester Prep Coach Keith Geiger said. “His man-to-man defense makes it very difficult for the opposing guards. And, he can get hot and score a bunch very quickly. He can single handedly control the tempo of the entire game, and lots of teams can’t keep up with that kind of tempo for the length of the game.” On Tuesday in Berlin, the Mallards, competing with both Nallys, dominated on their home court, winning the match 54-18. The Prep team outscored Chincoteague 16-2 in the first quarter. Ryan Nally kicked off the second quarter with a three pointer. The Ponies netted their second basket of the night, which was followed by two threes by Nally to boost the Mallards’ advantage to 25-4 with less than five minutes remaining in the fist half. Nally sank his fourth three-point shot of the quarter with about a minute left on the clock. He scored 14 of his 22 points in the second quarter as Worcester went into the halftime break on top 36-10. After three quarters, the Berlin squad led 47-16.

Nally was Worcester’s top producer with 22 points and six steals. “Ryan can do things that other people can’t. It’s as simple as that,” Geiger said. “[Tuesday] night, he had fallen while playing defense, somehow got a rebound while on the ground, got up and dribbled down the court and beat everybody else. He’s a very talented player.” Senior Jack Marshall netted eight points for the Mallards and sophomore Wyatt Richins scored seven. “I thought they played great for their first time back in almost three weeks,” Geiger said. “After about three minutes in the first quarter, we were ready to go. Our defense played very well, which led to offense. That’s how our team is successful, defense leading to offense.” The next day, Worcester earned a 66-35 victory over the Salisbury School Dragons in Berlin. The Mallards held a 16-14 lead at the end of the first quarter. They boosted their advantage to 34-22 by halftime. After three quarters, the Prep team had pulled ahead 42-38. Senior captain Matt Reilly led Worcester with 23 points and 11 rebounds. R. Nally had 17 points, six steals, six rebounds and five assists. “They had a great shooter and it took a little while before we adjusted,” Geiger said. “After our adjustment, we played very well. Ryan was running the transition, and when we were slowed up, we were able to get the ball to Matt inside. I’m very happy with the first two games back.” The Prep team is scheduled to take a trip to Magnolia, Del. to battle the St. Thomas More Academy Ravens at 6 p.m.

OCEAN CITY TODAY/LISA CAPITELLI

Worcester Prep freshman Owen Nally puts the ball in the basket during Tuesday's game against Chincoteague in Berlin. Worcester won 54-18.


Ocean City Today

PAGE 46

JANUARY 10, 2014

Mallards take Registration now open for Decatur boys’ down Dragons ‘14 Beach Lacrosse season squad edges Annual parents meeting out Jaguars scheduled for Jan. 23 at Holiday Inn in Ocean City 77-73 Tues.

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 10, 2014) The Worcester Prep girls’ basketball team won its first game back on the court after a nearly threeweek Christmas break. The Lady Mallards outscored the Salisbury School Dragons 40-24 on Wednesday in Berlin. “Overall, the girls played pretty good…We started a little slow and had a lot of turnovers in the first half, but we played better the second half,” said Worcester Prep Coach Simona Holland after the game. The Prep squad led 8-2 at the end of the first quarter. The visiting Mallards went into the halftime break on top 185. After three quarters, Worcester held a 26-13 advantage. Senior captains Kristen Shriver and Lilly DiNardo and junior Sophie Brennan scored 10 points apiece. The Mallards will head to Easton today, Friday, to take on Eastern Shore Independent Athletic Conference rival, the Sts. Peter & Paul Sabres. “We have one day to work on a few things and then Friday we have to play hard against Sts. Peter & Paul,” Holland said Wednesday night. “They are a good team, but if my players are confident and give their 100 percent on Friday, work together on defense, move the ball [well] and take good shots, we can have a good game.”

(Jan. 10, 2014) Beach Lacrosse Club will be entering its 21st season in March. Beach Lacrosse is the original youth lacrosse program in Worcester County and was founded in 1994, providing the first spring season of organized youth recreational lacrosse on the Lower Eastern Shore. Registration for the 2014 season is now open. To register, visit www.beachlax.org. Beach Lacrosse also offers financial assistance of registration fees for anyone in need. On Thursday, Jan. 23, Beach Lacrosse’s annual parents meeting will be at the Holiday Inn Oceanfront Conference Center on 66 Street in Ocean City at 6:30 p.m. All parents of current and interested players are welcome to attend. Beach Lacrosse will also be holding a fundraiser on Friday, Feb. 21 at the Cork Bar & Grill located on Wicomico Street in Ocean City at 7 p.m. The fundraiser will be supporting new equipment purchases for the upcoming season. Today, Beach Lacrosse is more than 300 youth players strong with

children playing recreational lacrosse from Pre-K through the eighth grade. Beach Lacrosse Club is a 501(c)(3) non-profit public charitable organization. Its mission is to provide area youth with the opportunity to experience the oldest game native to North America in a sportsman-like manner. Beach Lacrosse will field multiple teams for boys and girls in age groups – U-9, U- 11, U-13, U-15. For children in Pre-K and Kindergarten or who are just beginning lacrosse, the club offers Scoopers programs for both boys and girls. Beach Lacrosse is a member of the Eastern Shore Youth Lacrosse Association and plays teams across the shore from towns including Salisbury, Cambridge, Easton, Kent Island, Denton, Lewes and Camden. All practices and home games are held in Berlin. Practice will begin in the beginning of March and games, which are held on Saturdays, begin on March 22. Beach Lacrosse is actively seeking volunteer coaching assistance at all age group levels as well as volunteers for various activities that support the club. Those who have any questions or would like to help, contact beachlacrosse@yahoo.com.

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By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 10, 2014) The Stephen Decatur Seahawks’ stellar performance and capitalizing at the foul line during Tuesday’s boys’ basketball game against the Washington Jaguars were major factors in the squad’s 77-73 victory. “As a team, it was our best complete game to date. As a team, in the fourth quarter we went 8-for-9 from the free throw line,” Decatur Coach Byron “BJ” Johnson said after the competition in Princess Anne. “We did a good job in the second half rebounding the ball. As a team, we had 14 turnovers, which is good for us because we are averaging around 20 per game.” Washington led 22-20 at the end of the first quarter. By the halftime break, the Jaguars had pulled ahead 46-38. The visiting Seahawks outscored their opponent 18-8 in the third quarter to take a 56-54 lead. In the final quarter, Decatur netted 21 points to Washington’s 19, to secure the win. Senior captain Tyler Hunter was Decatur’s top scorer with 26 points. He also grabbed 11 rebounds and was 6-for-7 from the free-throw line. “We took advantage of our post play against Washington, going inside to Tyler, and he delivered,” Johnson said. “Because our team is so versatile, we can go with a number of line-ups. We started Tyler because we felt like we could take advantaged of his size in the paint.” Junior Colen Gaynor contributed with 16 points and five rebounds. “Colen, who came off the bench, had a great game,” Johnson said. “That’s the beauty of this team, that we have seven kids that are getting starter minutes, so it doesn’t matter See COACH Page 47

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JANUARY 10, 2014

Ocean City Today

Coach pleased with performance Continued from Page 46 who starts the game.” Randy DuPont, a junior, also chipped in, adding 13 points and five rebounds. Johnson said sophomore point guard Torrey Brittingham helped lead the team to success. He had 12 points, nine assists and three steals. “Most of Torrey’s assists came from him getting in the lane and finding Tyler,” Johnson said. Brittingham also went 4-for-4 from the foul line. “In my opinion, if the point

guard is having a great game, most teams will win. In this case, Torrey Brittingham, our point guard, played his best game to date,” Johnson said. “If BJ Johnson this continues, we will have great success moving forward. He was very much in con-

trol and that’s what you need from your floor general. I think the rest of the team feeds off him.” The Snow Hill Eagles will come to Berlin today, Friday, to face-off against Decatur. Game time is 5:30 p.m. “Snow Hill will be a tough game because of the rivalry. Anytime these two teams meet, throw the records out the window,” Johnson said. “It will be an intense game because both schools like to claim bragging rights. We are hoping for a big crowd.”

PAGE 47

SD wrestling team battles top in state

By Lisa Capitelli Managing Editor (Jan. 10, 2014) Several of the top teams in the state competed in the annual Iron Horse Duals, last Saturday, at C. Milton Wright High School in Bel Air. Going into the competition, six of the 12 teams participating were ranked in the top 20 in the state –John Carroll See COMPETITION Page 48


Ocean City Today

PAGE 48

JANUARY 10, 2014

Competition ‘outstanding’ at Iron Duals

Continued from Page 47 (No. 4), Georgetown Prep (No. 7), Huntingtown (No. 8), River Hill (No. 9), Decatur (No. 16) and Hereford (No. 20). The tournament was originally scheduled for Friday and Saturday. Due to snow Thursday evening into Friday, the event was condensed into one day, Saturday. The 12 teams were divided into two pools of six. Each team wrestled against four squads in their pool. Depending on records after those matches, the teams crossed over for tournament placement. In pool competition, Decatur beat Western Tech, 63-15, and North Carroll, 46-31. The Seahawks came out on the

losing end against Georgetown Prep, 3930, and Huntingtown, 37-22. Decatur battled Hereford in the fifth/sixth place match. Hereford won 38-30 to finish the tournament in fifth place. Decatur took sixth. John Carroll won the Iron Horse Duals, Huntingtown was second, Georgetown Prep, third, and Bel Air rounded out the top four teams. Stephen Decatur Coach Todd Martinek said the overall competition was “outstanding.” “Even the teams we beat had some really good wrestlers,” he said. Wresting five matches in one day–the

maximum allowed–is grueling, but Martinek said the Seahawks stayed strong throughout the day. “We wrestled very well, but we’re still getting pinned to often,” he said. “[We] still didn’t have four starters (due to illness, vacation and weight), which would have made a big difference.” Senior captain Andrew Borradaile was very successful last Saturday. He won all five of his matches, four were by pinning his opponent. Nick Bennett, a senior, and freshman Andy McKahan went 4-1 during the tournament. On the road Wednesday, Decatur nearly shut out the Easton Warriors,

winning the meet 68-6. Seniors Caleb Massey (220), Ethan Eibl (285), Nate Rosenblatt (138), Bennett (152) and Jared King (182), freshman Robert Kaminski (106) and McKahan (120) pinned their opponents. Seahawks who also contributed to the team victory were Borradaile (170), juniors Brandon Wooten (195) and Joseph Rodriguez (132), and sophomores Michael Tropkoff (113) and Brett Kim (160). Decatur’s next meet is Wednesday, Jan. 15, at Cambridge South Dorchester High School. The competition will be a tri-meet with Decatur, Cambridge and Mardela.

Coastal Lacrosse Club registration open (Jan. 10, 2014) The 2014 Coastal Lacrosse season is right around the corner and Coastal Lacrosse registration is now open. Practices are scheduled to begin March 3, weather permitting, and games will begin the weekend of March 22. Coastal Lacrosse Club is looking forward to a fantastic sixth season. We are excited to see how far the club has come and looking forward to a positive future ahead. Registration is now open and we hope to see numbers grow as they have every year since the beginning. We will have teams at every age group for both

DAY/TIME

boys and girls. The cost for registration is $75, however scholarships are available for registration fees and equipment for those who show need. Last year, Coastal Lacrosse Club sponsored several Play Days that included teams from both the Eastern Shore Youth Lacrosse Association and the Delmarva Youth Lacrosse Association. Our club directors continue to work hard to merge the two leagues on the Delmarva Peninsula and have made some progress in the off-season. Coastal is planning the same format of play with

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both leagues again this year, but is also working with ESYLA clubs to set a Saturday schedule as well. We have had several ESYLA clubs interested in our Play Day format and we are currently working on finalizing the 2014 schedule and hope to include games against Talbot, Atlantic, Beach, Shore Kaos and Salisbury, among others. Our games and practices will be held at the Northern Worcester County Athletic Complex County Fields in Berlin. Coaches will also work with local clubs and try to schedule mid-week practice scrimmages. The Coastal Lacrosse Club is a

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Ocean City Today

JANUARY 10, 2014

PAGE 49

Twisters Gymnastics’ girls shine at meet (Jan. 10, 2014) On Dec. 13, the girls’ teams of Twisters Gymnastics in Berlin, competed in the Christmas on the Chesapeake meet at the Baltimore Convention Center. Ten gymnasts from Twisters participated. There were more than 2,500 athletes who competed at this meet. Ivy Stearn, level 9 age 13, placed first in her division out of eight competitors. She scored an overall total of 35.375. She placed first on bars with a 9.050 and first on floor with a 9.1. She made history for being the first Level 9 girl from Twisters to place first overall at this meet. Twisters had six level 4 girls that competed. The level 4 team placed eighth. More than 100 teams competed. Mia Cropper, age 7, Kloe Cropper, age 7, Lilly Johnson, age 8, Joey Guard, age 11, Avery Beckelman, age 7, and Lexi Walker, age 9 all competed for the Twisters level 4, both as a team and as individuals. The level four girls did very well at the meet. Twisters also had three level 7 girls compete as a team as well as individually.a Maggie Mitchell, age 10, placed fourth in this division out of 18 competitors, with an overall score of 35.575. She received first place on beam with a 9.0. Also competing for level 7 was Amiyah Rounds, age 10, who received fifth place in this division with an overall score of 35.45 and Skyler Mahoney who also placed for this division. PHOTO COURTESY TWISTERS GYMNASTICS

On Dec. 13, the girls’ teams of Twisters Gymnastics in Berlin, competed in the Christmas on the Chesapeake meet at the Baltimore Convention Center.

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Ocean City Today

PAGE 50

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Ocean City Today

Center hosts PUBLIC NOTICES 10K and 5K races, Jan. 11

JANUARY 10, 2014

(Jan. 10, 2014) The Worcester County Developmental Center was scheduled to present its second annual “Running For a Brighter Future 10K” and a new 5K last Saturday, but due to icy conditions, it was postponed to Saturday, Jan. 11. The event will start and end at the WCDC building at 8545 Newark Road in Newark, Md., and wind through the bucolic area. Day of race registration opens at 8 a.m., and the run goes off at 9 a.m. The cost to participate in the 5K is $35, $45 for the 10K. The course has been laid out by and will be chip timed by OC TRIRunning Sports. Post race, runners can enjoy a full breakfast buffet, included in the registration fee, before the awards ceremony. If the runners have family or friends cheering them on, they can join in on the buffet for a $10 charge. Awards will be presented to the top male and female runners and the top two in each age group. The WCDC Web site, www.wcdcservices.org, has full race information. The run is sponsored by The Dough Roller, Billy Staples Nationwide Insurance, The Bank of Ocean City, DeNovo’s Trattoria, Sunset Grille and The Joan W. Jenkins Foundation. WCDC is celebrating 40 years of providing employment opportunities, skills of daily living training, residential services and community based supports for adults who live with an intellectual disability in Worcester, Somerset and Wicomico counties. WCDC enables its clients to become productive, responsible and participating members of their community by helping them achieve their highest level of economic and social independence. WCDC is an affiliate member of the United Way of the Lower Eastern Shore and a member of the Snow Hill, Berlin Ocean Pines and Ocean City chambers of commerce and the Berlin chapter of BNI. For more information about the race or the WCDC program, call Jack Ferry at 410-632-2382, ext 121 or email ferry@wcdcservices.org.

www.oceancitytoday.net

updated every friday

Covahey, Boozer, Devan, & Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 12807 TOWNSEND ROAD OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-11-000696 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Clifford Cropper Bradford and Tracey S. Bradford recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4706, folio 306, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Renee Dyson as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4706, folio 306, also being further described in a Deed recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 1164, folio 588. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE: A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $16,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County. Time is of the essence. The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.62500% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement. Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Pur-

chaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property. In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest. If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited. The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor. Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Shannon Menapace, Erin Gloth, and Renee Dyson, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 10336 HARRISON RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Dana D. Collick and Natoshia C. Collick, dated May 29, 2003 and recorded in Liber 3741, folio 224 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 27, 2014 AT 3:30 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their

PAGE 51

sole discretion, for $9,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2012-25965) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Erin M. Brady, Diana C. Theologou, Laura L. Latta, Jonathan Elefant, Laura T. Curry, Chasity Brown, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 www.mwc-law.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 9836 HOTEL RD. BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Bruce E. Franklin and Diana J. Franklin a/k/a Diana L. J. Franklin, dated April 25, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4917, folio 437 among the


PUBLIC NOTICES

PAGE 52

Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof and at the request of the parties secured thereby, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 27, 2014 AT 3:31 PM

ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND AND THE IMPROVEMENTS THEREON situated in Worcester Co., Maryland and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property is improved by a dwelling. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions, easements, encumbrances and agreements of record affecting the subject property, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit in the form of cashier’s or certified check, or in such other form as the Substitute Trustees may determine, at their sole discretion, for $16,000 at the time of sale. If the noteholder and/or servicer is the successful bidder, the deposit requirement is waived. Balance of the purchase price is to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., Maryland. Interest is to be paid on the unpaid purchase price at the rate of 8.74% per annum from date of sale to the date the funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees, if the property is purchased by an entity other than the noteholder and/or servicer. If payment of the balance does not occur within fifteen days of ratification, the deposit will be forfeited and the property will be resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. Taxes, ground rent, water rent, and all other public charges and assessments payable on an annual basis, including sanitary and/or metropolitan district charges to be adjusted for the current year to the date of sale, and assumed thereafter by the purchaser. Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale. The purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the ground rent escrow, if required. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes, and all settlement charges shall be borne by the purchaser. If the Substitute Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law or equity shall be limited to the refund of the deposit to the purchaser. Upon refund of the deposit, the sale shall be void and of no effect, and the purchaser shall have no further claim against the Substitute Trustees. Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property. The purchaser at the foreclosure sale shall assume the risk of loss for the property immediately after the sale. (Matter #2012-21023) Laura H. G. O’Sullivan, Deborah K.

Ocean City Today

Curran, Erin M. Brady, Diana C. Theologou, Laura L. Latta, Jonathan Elefant, Laura T. Curry, Benjamin Smith, Chasity Brown, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK ROAD, TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 12915 LAKE PLACE RD. A/R/T/A 12915 LAKE PL. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated December 20, 2004 and recorded in Liber 4325, Folio 230 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $189,000.00 and an original interest rate of 6.00000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 28, 2014 AT 4:03 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $17,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be

paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________ COHN, GOLDBERG & DEUTSCH, LLC ATTORNEYS AT LAW 600 BALTIMORE AVENUE SUITE 208 TOWSON, MARYLAND 21204

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 2 DORCHESTER STREET, UNIT 304 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Paul W. Rutter, Jr. and Renette L. Rutter, dated July 3, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4962, Folio 379 among the Land Records of Worcester County, Maryland, with an original principal balance of $910,000.00, and an original interest rate of 3.000%, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Substitute Trustees will sell at public auction at the Courthouse door for the Circuit Court for Worcester County, on January 21, 2014 AT 4:06 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND and the improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, MD and more fully de-

JANUARY 10, 2014

scribed in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property being sold is a condominium unit and all common elements appurtenant thereto. The property will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting same, if any and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale:  A deposit of $94,000.00 by certified funds only (no cash will be accepted) is required at the time of auction.  Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note, its assigns, or designees, shall pay interest on the unpaid purchase money at the note rate from the date of foreclosure auction to the date funds are received in the office of the Substitute Trustees.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  Real estate taxes and all other public charges, or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, condo/HOA assessments or private utility charges, not otherwise divested by ratification of the sale, to be adjusted as of the date of foreclosure auction, unless the purchaser is the foreclosing lender or its designee.  Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses, and all other costs incident to settlement, shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. If the purchaser shall fail to comply with the terms of the sale or fails to go to settlement within ten (10) days of ratification of the sale, the Substitute Trustees may, in addition to any other available legal remedies, declare the entire deposit forfeited and resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. Purchaser waives personal service of any paper filed in connection with such a motion on himself and/or any principal or corporate designee, and expressly agrees to accept service of any such paper by regular mail directed to the address provided by said bidder at the time of foreclosure auction.  In such event, the defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of resale, reasonable attorney’s fees, and all other charges due and incidental and consequential damages, and any deficiency in the underlying secured debt.  The purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds or profits resulting from any resale of the property. If the Substitute Trustees cannot convey insurable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy at law or in equity shall be the return of the deposit. The sale is subject to post-sale confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale.  In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and


PUBLIC NOTICES JANUARY 10, 2014

the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of his deposit without interest. Edward S. Cohn, Stephen N. Goldberg, Richard E. Solomon, Richard J. Rogers, Randall J. Rolls, and David W. Simpson, Jr., Substitute Trustees Mid-Atlantic Auctioneers, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.mid-atlanticauctioneers.com OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 3819 NASSAWANGO HILLS DR. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated December 18, 2002 and recorded in Liber 3533, Folio 252 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $70,000.00 and an original interest rate of 6.000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 28, 2014 AT 4:06 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be

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paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 74 BRAMBLEWOOD DR. OCEAN PINES A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated January 12, 2007 and recorded in Liber 4860, Folio 157 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $255,000.00 and an original interest rate of 3.00000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 28, 2014 AT 4:09 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed

of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $26,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________

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SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 5947 SNOW HILL RD. SNOW HILL, MD 21863 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated November 30, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4594, Folio 284 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $135,700.00 and an original interest rate of 6.500% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 28, 2014 AT 4:12 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $13,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage


PUBLIC NOTICES

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to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________ Buonassissi, Henning & Lash, P.C. 1861 Wiehle Avenue, Suite 300 Reston, Virginia 20190 (703) 796-1341

TRUSTEE’S SALE 179 OCEAN PARKWAY BERLIN, MD 21811 In execution of the Deed of Trust dated November 21, 2005 recorded in Liber SVH 4593, folio 488, among the Worcester County land records, the undersigned Substitute Trustees, any of whom may act, will offer for sale at public auction on January 13, 2014, at 2:10 PM, at the front of the Circuit Court for Worcester County, One West Market Street, Snow Hill, Maryland, the following property: ALL THAT FEE SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester County, Maryland and more fully described in the aforementioned Deed of Trust. TAX ID: 03-089215 The property and improvements will be sold in “as is” physical condition without warranty of any kind and subject to all conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same. TERMS OF SALE: A non-refundable bidder’s deposit of $18,500.00 by cashier’s/certified check required at time of sale except for the party secured by the Deed of Trust. Risk of loss on purchaser from date and time of auction. The balance of the purchase price together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from date of sale to receipt of purchase price by Trustees must be paid by cashier’s check within 10 days after final ratification of sale. There will be no abatement of interest due

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from the purchaser in the event settlement is delayed for any reason. All real estate taxes and other public charges and/or assessments to be adjusted as of the date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser. If applicable, any condominium and/or homeowners association dues and assessments that may become due after the date of sale shall be purchaser’s responsibility. Purchaser shall pay all transfer, documentary and recording taxes/fees and all other settlement costs. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining possession of the property. If purchaser defaults, deposit will be forfeited and property resold at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser who shall be liable for any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs, expenses and attorney’s fees of both sales. If Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of deposit without interest. This sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan secured by the Deed of Trust including but not limited to determining whether prior to sale a forbearance, repayment or other agreement was entered into or the loan was reinstated or paid off; in any such event this sale shall be null and void and purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of deposit without interest. (50288) Richard A. Lash, Barry K. Bedford, David A. Rosen, Leonard W. Harrington, Jr., Robert E. Kelly, Pooya Tavakol, Substitute Trustees Auctioneers: Alex Cooper Auctioneers 908 York Road Towson, MD 21204 410-828-4838 OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ Covahey, Boozer, Devan, & Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 3 63RD STREET, UNIT 26 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-13-001570 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Tara Mauler recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4695, folio 192, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Erin Gloth, Christine Drexel, and Brian McNair as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction,  at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of

Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in Liber 4695, folio 192, also being further described in a Deed  recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4389, folio 74. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property is subject to an annual ground rent. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. The purchaser assumes all risks of loss for the property as of the date of sale.  Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE:   A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $21,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the  Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale.  Any amount tendered at sale in excess of the required deposit will be refunded and not applied to the purchase price. Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  Time is of the essence.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.99000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement.  Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited.  The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor.  Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole rem-

JANUARY 10, 2014

edy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Erin Gloth, Christine Drexel, and Brian McNair, Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 107 SEA LA. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated September 22, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5000, Folio 144 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $440,000.00 and an original interest rate of 3.5% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 28, 2014 AT 4:15 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $47,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation,


PUBLIC NOTICES

JANUARY 10, 2014

agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________ Covahey, Boozer, Devan, & Dore, P.A. 11350 McCormick Road, Executive Plaza III, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, MD 21031 (443) 541-8600

SUBSTITUTED TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS NO. 1803 PHILADELPHIA ROAD, UNIT 7 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 CASE NUMBER 23-C-13-000921 Under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in a Deed of Trust from Daniel P. Cavallucci recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 4149, folio 18, and Declaration of Substitution of Trustees recorded among the aforementioned Land Records substituting Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel as Substituted Trustees, the Substituted Trustees will offer for sale at public auction, at the Courthouse Door, Snow Hill, Maryland on Tuesday, January 14, 2014 at 11:00 AM: All that lot of ground and the improvements thereon situate in Worcester County, State of Maryland, as described in the Deed of Trust recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County, in

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Liber 4149, folio 18, also being further described in a Deed  recorded among the Land Records of Worcester County in Liber 2481, folio 157. The improvements thereon consist of a dwelling. The property will be sold in “AS IS” condition, subject to any existing building violations, restrictions and agreements of record. The purchaser assumes all risks of loss for the property as of the date of sale.  Neither the Substituted Trustees nor their respective agents, successors or assigns make any representations or warranties, either expressed or implied with respect to the property. The Substituted Trustees shall convey insurable title. TERMS OF THE SALE:   A deposit in a form acceptable to the Substituted Trustee in the amount of $5,000.00 will be required of the purchaser, other than the  Holder of the Note or its assigns, at the time and place of sale.  Any amount tendered at sale in excess of the required deposit will be refunded and not applied to the purchase price.  Unless the purchaser is the Holder of the Note or its assigns, the balance of the purchase price shall be paid immediately with available funds within twenty (20) days of the final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester County.  Time is of the essence.  The purchaser, other than the Holder of the Note or its assigns, shall pay interest at the rate of 6.25000% per annum on the unpaid portion of the purchase price from the date of sale to date of settlement.  Real property taxes and assessments shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Ground rent, water and/or sewer charges public or private, if any, shall be adjusted to the date of sale and assumed thereafter by the purchaser.  Cost of all documentary stamps and transfer taxes shall be paid by the purchaser. Purchaser shall have the responsibility of obtaining possession of the property.  In the event settlement is delayed for any reason , there shall be no abatement of interest.  If the purchaser defaults, the entire deposit is forfeited.  The Substituted Trustees shall resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser.  The defaulting purchaser shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price, all costs and expenses of both sales, attorney fees, all other charges due, and incidental and consequential damages. In the event the Substituted Trustees do not convey title for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return of the deposit. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. The Substituted Trustees shall have the right to terminate this contract in the event the Holder or its Servicer has entered into any agreement with, or accepted funds from, the mortgagor.  Upon termination of the contract, Purchaser’s sole remedy shall be return of the deposit. Thomas P. Dore, Mark S. Devan, Gerard F. Miles, Jr., Erin Gloth, and Christine Drexel,

Substituted Trustees Tidewater Auctions, LLC (410) 825-2900 www.tidewaterauctions.com OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 19 DECATUR ST. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated May 27, 2009 and recorded in Liber 5277, Folio 413 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $335,250.00 and an original interest rate of 2.94% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 21, 2014 AT 4:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $15,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser,

PAGE 55

whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 7 GATEHOUSE TRAIL OCEAN CITY A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated June 23, 2005 and recorded in Liber 4657, Folio 269 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $258,948.00 and an original interest rate of 1.61% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 21, 2014 AT 4:03 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind.


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Terms of Sale: A deposit of $9,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________

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SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 11500 COASTAL HWY., UNIT #1216 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated July 19, 1991 and recorded in Liber 1753, Folio 277 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $90,400.00 and an original interest rate of 2.87500% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 21, 2014 AT 4:09 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Unit 1216, in Sea Watch Condominium and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $6,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage

to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 23 EAST WIND DR. OCEAN CITY A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated January 30, 2008 and recorded in Liber 5056, Folio 91 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $375,000.00 and an original interest rate of 1.11% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 14, 2014 AT 4:00 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $16,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale.

JANUARY 10, 2014

Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 13034 MUSKRATTOWN RD. BISHOPVILLE, MD 21813


PUBLIC NOTICES

JANUARY 10, 2014

Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated August 23, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4777, Folio 399 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $251,500.00 and an original interest rate of 6.87500% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 14, 2014 AT 4:03 PM

ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $25,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell

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the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF REAL PROPERTY AND ANY IMPROVEMENTS THEREON 18 SLOOP LA. OCEAN PINES A/R/T/A BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust dated April 24, 2006 and recorded in Liber 4735, Folio 136 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, with an original principal balance of $197,600.00 and an original interest rate of 6.50000% default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on JANUARY 14, 2014 AT 4:06 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with any buildings or improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, and any improvements thereon, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $23,000 in the form of certified check, cashier’s check or money order (NO CASH WILL BE ACCEPTED) will be required of the purchaser at time and place of sale. Balance of the purchase price, together with interest on the unpaid purchase money at the current rate contained in the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received by the Sub. Trustees, payable in cash within ten days of final ratification of the sale by the Circuit Court. There will be no abatement of interest due from the purchaser in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PUR-

CHASER. Adjustment of current year’s real property taxes are adjusted as of the date of sale, and thereafter assumed by the purchaser. Taxes due for prior years including costs of any tax sale are payable by the purchaser. All other public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges, ground rent, whether incurred prior to or after the sale to be paid by the purchaser. All costs of deed recordation including but not limited to all transfer, recordation, agricultural or other taxes or charges assessed by any governmental entity as a condition to recordation, are payable by purchaser, whether or not purchaser is a Maryland First Time Home Buyer. Purchaser is responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property, and assumes risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale. The sale is subject to post-sale audit of the status of the loan with the loan servicer including, but not limited to, determination of whether the borrower entered into any repayment agreement, reinstated or paid off the loan prior to the sale. In any such event, this sale shall be null and void, and the Purchaser’s sole remedy, in law or equity, shall be the return of the deposit without interest. If purchaser fails to settle within 10 days of ratification, the Sub. Trustees may file a motion to resell the property. If Purchaser defaults under these terms, deposit shall be forfeited. The Sub. Trustees may then resell the property at the risk and cost of the defaulting purchaser. The defaulted purchaser shall not be entitled to any surplus proceeds resulting from said resale even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulted purchaser. If Sub. Trustees are unable to convey either insurable or marketable title, or if ratification of the sale is denied by the Circuit Court for any reason, the Purchaser’s sole remedy, at law or equity, is the return of the deposit without interest. Howard N. Bierman, Carrie M. Ward, et al., Substitute Trustees OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ Rosenberg & Associates, LLC 7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 750 Bethesda, Maryland 20814 (301) 907-8000 www.rosenberg-assoc.com

SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEES’ SALE OF IMPROVED REAL PROPERTY 120 PINEHURST RD. BERLIN, MD 21811 Under a power of sale contained in a certain Deed of Trust from Patrick A. Carey and Lori D. Carey, dated June 18, 2007 and recorded in Liber 5018, folio 76 among the Land Records of Worcester Co., MD, default having occurred under the terms thereof, the Sub. Trustees will sell at public auction at the Circuit Court for Worcester Co., at the Court House Door, One W. Market St., Snow Hill, MD 21863, on

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JANUARY 10, 2014 AT 3:17 PM ALL THAT FEE-SIMPLE LOT OF GROUND, together with the buildings and improvements thereon situated in Worcester Co., MD and described as Tax ID #03-060020 and more fully described in the aforesaid Deed of Trust. The property, which is improved by a dwelling, will be sold in an “as is” condition and subject to conditions, restrictions and agreements of record affecting the same, if any, and with no warranty of any kind. Terms of Sale: A deposit of $24,000 by cash or certified check. Balance of the purchase price to be paid in cash within ten days of final ratification of sale by the Circuit Court for Worcester Co. Interest to be paid on the unpaid purchase money at the rate pursuant to the Deed of Trust Note from the date of sale to the date funds are received in the office of the Sub. Trustees. There will be no abatement of interest in the event additional funds are tendered before settlement or if settlement is delayed for any reason. The noteholder shall not be obligated to pay interest if it is the purchaser. TIME IS OF THE ESSENCE FOR THE PURCHASER. Adjustment of all real property taxes, including agricultural taxes, if applicable, and any and all public and/or private charges or assessments, including water/sewer charges and ground rent, to be adjusted to date of sale and thereafter assumed by purchaser.   Condominium fees and/or homeowners association dues, if any, shall be assumed by the purchaser from the date of sale forward. Cost of all documentary stamps, transfer taxes and settlement expenses shall be borne by the purchaser.  Purchaser shall be responsible for obtaining physical possession of the property.  Purchaser assumes the risk of loss or damage to the property from the date of sale forward. Additional terms to be announced at the time of sale. If the Sub. Trustees are unable to convey good and marketable title, the purchaser’s sole remedy in law and equity shall be limited to a refund of the deposit without interest. If the purchaser fails to go to settlement, the deposit shall be forfeited, to the Trustees for application against all expenses, attorney’s fees and the full commission on the sale price of the above-scheduled foreclosure sale.  In the event of default, all expenses of this sale (including attorney’s fees and the full commission on the gross sale price of this sale) shall be charged against and paid out of the forfeited deposit.  The Trustees may then re-advertise and resell the property at the risk and expense of the defaulting purchaser or may avail themselves of any legal or equitable remedies against the defaulting purchaser without reselling the property.  In the event of a resale, the defaulting purchaser shall not be entitled to receive the surplus, if any, even if such surplus results from improvements to the property by said defaulting purchaser and the defaulting purchaser shall be liable to the Trustees and secured party for reasonable attorney’s fees and ex-


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PUBLIC NOTICES

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penses incurred in connection with all litigation involving the Property or the proceeds of the resale. Trustees’ file number 42315. Diane S. Rosenberg, Mark D. Meyer, John A. Ansell, III, Stephanie Montgomery, Kenneth Savitz, Substitute Trustees ALEX COOPER AUCTS., INC. 908 YORK RD., TOWSON, MD 21204 410-828-4838 www.alexcooper.com OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ McCabe, Weisberg & Conway LLC 312 Marshall Avenue, Suite 800 Laurel, Maryland 20707 301-490-3361

Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et al., Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. Demetrice Pinkard Defendant IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23C13001373

NOTICE ORDERED, this 16th day of December, 2013 by the Circuit Court of WORCESTER COUNTY, Maryland, that the sale of the property at 507 Moore Street, Pocomoke City, Maryland 21851 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Laura H.G. O’Sullivan, et. al, Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20th day of January, 2014 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 13th day of January, 2014, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $46,750.00. Stephen V. Hales CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________

NOTICE OF PASSAGE OF BILL 13-3 WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Take Notice that Bill 13-3 (Zoning - Porch Enclosures in Cooperative Campgrounds) was passed by the County Commissioners on December 17, 2013. A fair summary of the bill is as follows: § ZS 1-318(e)(2)(F). (Repeals and reenacts this subsection regarding

LEGAL ADVERTISING Call: 410-723-6397 Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail:

legals@oceancitytoday.net

additions to recreational vehicles, recreational park trailers and cabins in cooperative campgrounds to expand such permitted additions from open decks and porches fitted with insect screening only to also permit soft plastic framed enclosures in compliance with certain standards which specify that: the plastic shall not be more than 10 mil/0.254 mm/0.01 inch in thickness as evidenced by the manufacturer’s specifications and shall be fabricated in a hard frame constructed from a material other than wood; prohibits the use of temporary sheets of soft plastic from rolls or otherwise not framed; requires that the addition shall have not less than one means of egress directly from the addition to the outside; and requires the installation of not less than one smoke detector in the addition.) This bill becomes effective fortyfive (45) days from the date of its passage. This is only a fair summary of the bill. A full copy of the bill is posted on the Legislative Bulletin Board in the main hall of the Worcester County Government Center outside Room 1103, is available for public inspection in Room 1103 of the Worcester County Government Center and is available on the County Website at http://www.co.worcester.md.us/commissioners/legsltn.asp x. THE WORCESTER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ Law Offices of Jeffrey Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, Maryland 20705 240-473-5000 Jeffrey Nadel Scott Nadel 4041 Powder Mill Road, Suite 415 Calverton, MD 20705 Substitute Trustees Plaintiff v. George Edward Krug, Jr. 646 94th Street #140 Casa Del Sol aka 646 94th Street Condo Unit 0646 Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23-C-13-000639

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 27th day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported, will be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 27th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in a weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 20th day of January, 2014. The Report of Sale states the amount of the foreclosure sale price to be $164,500.00. The property sold herein is known as 646 94th Street #140 Casa Del Sol, aka 646 94th Street Condo Unit 0646, Ocean City, MD 21842.

JANUARY 10, 2014

Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________ Brett A. Solomon, Esquire 1500 One PPG Place Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-594-3913 BRETT A. SOLOMON and DAVID W. SIMPSON, JR. Plaintiff, vs. JOHN W. OKRAK 13337 Colonial Drive Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant. IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Civil No. 23-C-13-0838

NOTICE ORDERED, this 20th day of December, 2013 by the Circuit Court of Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property at 13337 Colonial Drive, Ocean City, MD 21842 mentioned in these proceedings, made and reported by Brett A. Solomon, et al., Substitute Trustees, be ratified and confirmed, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20th day of January, 2014 next, provided a copy of this notice be inserted in some newspaper published in said County once in each of three successive weeks before the 13th day of January, 2014, next. The report states the amount of sale to be $112,000.00. Stephen V. Hales CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County, MD OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. JOHN J. COX JENNIFER K. COX 74 Quarter Staff Place Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13000301

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 20th day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 74 Quarter Staff Place, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee,

will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 13th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $230,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. KEITH ERIC BRITTINGHAM TAMMIE MARIE BOWEN BRITTINGHAM 10136 Georgetown Road Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-13-000857

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 20th day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 10136 Georgetown Road, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 13th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $98,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB JR, ESQ 108 N. 8TH ST. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 15418 NOTICE IS GIVEN that the Register of Wills court of Sussex County, DE appointed Carl J. Martin, 3741 Knollcroft St., Easton, PA 18045 as the Executor of the Estate of Mary J.


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PUBLIC NOTICES JANUARY 10, 2014

Martin who died on April 10, 2012 domiciled in Delaware, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is James E. Clubb Jr., whose address is 108 8th St., Ocean City, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County. All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Carl J. Martin Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: January 02, 2014 OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. JOYCE E. BURTON MARKO P. BURTON 3414 Ferry Branch Lane Pocomoke, MD 21851 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-12-000674

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 19th day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 3414 Ferry Branch Lane, Pocomoke, MD 21851, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 13th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be

$35,252.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. JOSEPH R. CAMPBELL HEATHER K. CAMPBELL 12818 Heathland Drive Bishopville, MD 21813 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001015

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 20th day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 12818 Heathland Drive, Bishopville, MD 21813, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 13th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $634,100.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ JAMES E. CLUBB JR, ESQ 108 N. 8TH ST. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE ESTATE NO. 15419 NOTICE IS GIVEN that the Register of Wills court of Sussex County, DE appointed Stephen W. Short, 35 John Andrews Drive, Harrington, DE 19952 as the Executor of the Estate of Patricia A. Gregg who died on May 8, 2013 domiciled in Delaware, USA. The Maryland resident agent for service of process is James E. Clubb Jr., whose address is 108 8th Street, Ocean City, MD 21842. At the time of death, the decedent owned real or leasehold property in the following Maryland counties: Worcester County.

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All persons having claims against the decedent must file their claims with the Register of Wills for Worcester County with a copy to the foreign personal representative on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the foreign personal representative mails or delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Claims filed after that date or after a date extended by law will be barred. Stephen W. Short Foreign Personal Representative Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of first publication: January 02, 2014 OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. DAVID H. KRAMER BARBARA H. KRAMER 14 Canal Road Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001022

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 20th day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 14 Canal Road, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 13th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $174,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________

BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. RUBEN PALAZZO CATHERINE PALAZZO 1314 Ocean Parkway Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001030

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 23rd day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 1314 Ocean Parkway, Berlin, 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 20th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 13th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $129,625.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-12/26/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555 Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. JERRY E. MINARICK, SR. SUSAN L. BAILEY 8 Ebb Tide Court Berlin, MD 21811 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23C13001064

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 23rd day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 8 Ebb Tide Court, Berlin, MD 21811, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 27th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper


Ocean City Today

PUBLIC NOTICES

PAGE 60

printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 20th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $459,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________ BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. JUDITH A. WAGNER 17 70th Street, Unit #16 Ocean City, MD 21842 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-13-001415

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 23rd day of December, 2013, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 17 70th Street, Ocean City, MD 21842, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 27th day of January, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 20th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $65,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-1/2/3t _________________________________

NOTICE ON HEARING ON PETITION TO INVOLUNTARY TERMINATE PARENTAL RIGHTS IN RE: Adoption of Baby Girl Barth; Case No 137 of 2013 in the Orphan’s Court Division of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. Notice To: UNKNOWN BIRTH FATHER OF BABY GIRL BARTH, born June 29, 2013, at Forbes Regional Hospital, Monroeville, PA 15146, to the Birth Mother, Stephanie Barth, and conceived in the area of Ocean City, Worcester County, State of Maryland. The Court has set a hearing to consider ending your rights to your child. That hearing will be held before the Honorable Christopher Scherer, in

Courtroom No. 9, Westmoreland County Courthouse, 2 North Main Street, Greensburg, Pennsylvania 15601, on February 5, 2014, at 10:30 A.M. You are warned that if you fail to appear at the scheduled hearing, the hearing will go on without you and your rights to your child may be ended by the Court without you being present. You are also notified of Act 101 of 2010 which allows for an enforceable voluntary agreement for continuing contact or communication following an adoption between an adoptive parent, a child, a birth parent and/or a birth relative of the child, if all parties agree and the written voluntary agreement is approved by the court. YOU HAVE A RIGHT TO BE REPRESENTED AT THE HEARING BY A LAWYER. YOU SHOULD TAKE THIS PAPER TO YOUR LAWYER AT ONCE. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A LAWYER OR CANNOT AFFORD ONE, GO TO OR TELEPHONE THE OFFICE SET FORTH BELOW TO FIND OUT WHERE YOU CAN GET LEGAL HELP. THIS OFFICE CAN PROVIDE YOU WITH INFORMATION ABOUT HIRING A LAWYER. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO HIRE A LAWYER, THIS OFFICE MAY BE ABLE TO PROVIDE YOU WITH INFORMATION ABOUT AGENCIES THAT MAY OFFER LEGAL SERVICES TO ELIGIBLE PERSONS AT A REDUCED FEE OR NO FEE. WESTMORELAND BAR ASSOCIATION. P.O. BOX 565; GREENSBURG, PA 15601; (724) 834-8490; http://lrs.westbar.org. JEFFREY J. LOCHNER, ESQUIRE, Attorney at Law, 4232 Brownsville Road, Suite 315; Pittsburgh, PA 15227; (412) 881-4380. OCD-1/9/1t _________________________________ KATHRYN V. WESTBROOK ESQ P.O. BOX 1109 OCEAN CITY, MD 21842

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Estate No. 15406 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF DIANE D. WAYMAN Notice is given that Michael Wayman, 555 Old Creamery Rd., Williston, VT 05495, was on December 30, 2013 appointed Personal Representative of the estate of Diane D. Wayman who died on November 27, 2013, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment (or to the probate of the decedent’s will) shall file their objections with the Register of Wills on or before the 30th day of June, 2014. Any person having a claim against the decedent must present the claim to the undersigned personal representative or file it with the Register of Wills with a copy to

JANUARY 10, 2014

the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Two months after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claims within two months from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. A claim not presented or filed on or before that date, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Claim forms may be obtained from the Register of Wills. Michael Wayman Personal Representative True Test Copy Charlotte K. Cathell Register of Wills Worcester County Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 09, 2014 OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________

decedent died before October 1, 1992, nine months from the date of the decedent’s death; or (2) Thirty days after the personal representative mails or otherwise delivers to the creditor a copy of this published notice or other written notice, notifying the creditor that the claim will be barred unless the creditor presents the claim within thirty days from the mailing or other delivery of the notice. Any claim not served or filed within that time, or any extension provided by law, is unenforceable thereafter. Ann J. Northam Gerald S. Northam Personal Representative True Test Copy Register of Wills for Worcester County Charlotte K. Cathell Room 102 - Court House One W. Market Street Snow Hill, MD 21863-1074 Name of newspaper designated by personal representative: Ocean City Digest Date of publication: January 09, 2014 OCD-1/9/1t _________________________________

JOSEPH E. MOORE ESQ WILLIAMS, MOORE, SHOCKLEY & HARRISON P.O. BOX 739, 3509 COASTAL HWY. OCEAN CITY, MD 21842 SMALL ESTATE

Carrie M. Ward, et al. 4520 East West Highway, Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 Substitute Trustees Plaintiffs vs. GEORGE BONNEVILLE LENDORA BONNEVILLE 7 Bridge Street Pocomoke City, MD 21851 Defendant(s) IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WORCESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND Case No. 23-C-13-1322

NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS ESTATE NO. 15427 TO ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE OF ELSIE G. NORTHAM AKA: ELSIE MAE NORTHAM Notice is given that Ann J. Northam, 324 East Ellen Street, Salisbury, MD 21801 and Gerald S. Northam, 484 Orchard Grove Drive, Camden-Wyoming, DE 19934, were on December 27, 2013 appointed personal representative of the small estate of Elsie G. Northam who died on September 13, 2013, with a will. Further information can be obtained by reviewing the estate file in the office of the Register of Wills or by contacting the personal representative or the attorney. All persons having any objection to the appointment shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within 30 days after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having an objection to the probate of the will shall file their objections with the Register of Wills within six months after the date of publication of this Notice. All persons having claims against the decedent must serve their claims on the undersigned personal representative or file them with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned on or before the earlier of the following dates: (1) Six months from the date of the decedent’s death, except if the

BWW Law Group, LLC 4520 East West Highway Suite 200 Bethesda, MD 20814 (301) 961-6555

NOTICE Notice is hereby given this 3rd day of January, 2014, by the Circuit Court for Worcester County, Maryland, that the sale of the property mentioned in these proceedings and described as 7 Bridge Street, Pocomoke City, MD 21851, made and reported by the Substitute Trustee, will be RATIFIED AND CONFIRMED, unless cause to the contrary thereof be shown on or before the 3rd day of February, 2014, provided a copy of this NOTICE be inserted in some weekly newspaper printed in said County, once in each of three successive weeks before the 27th day of January, 2014. The report states the purchase price at the Foreclosure sale to be $45,000.00. Stephen V. Hales Clerk, Circuit Court for Worcester County, Mary land True Copy Test: Stephen V. Hales Clerk of the Circuit Court Worcester County MD OCD-1/9/3t _________________________________ Call: 410-723-6397 • Fax: 410-723-6511 or E-mail: legals@oceancitytoday.net

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Commentary

Ocean City Today

Page 61 Legal weed: wait until Del. does it

OUR OPINION

Minimum wage needs compromise

When the General Assembly’s 90-day session gets fully under way, the issue of a minimum wage hike will be on the front burner. But we also know that Ocean City, which bases a great deal of its economy on hotel and restaurant’s showing profit margins, is a tremendously different story than what plays out in every other election district statewide. Gov. Martin O’Malley has been lobbying for a minimum wage increase over the $7.25 per hour federal statute in existence. Some state legislatures have proposed or instituted gradual changes, while others called for a minimum wage hike and an increase in base pay for tipped workers from $3.63 to $7. We agree with Susan Jones, executive director of the Ocean City Hotel-Motel Restaurant Association. She told Ocean City Today that she would at least like to see an effort to compromise on the tip wage base pay. Yes, debate a minimum wage bill and base pay increase. But keep in mind that your decisions could mean the difference in Ocean City of whether a business stays open or closed, and it could mean the difference of whether an employee can feed his family other than through the summer season. When it’s time to vacation, to stay at our hotels and eat at our restaurants, Marylanders and their elected representation flock to our city. You can’t seriously just leave this town with an unbalanced decision affecting Ocean City most of the year. We’re here for you and invite you in-season, but don’t forget we exist the rest of the year. Debate it and do so in a spirit of compromise.

Jan. 10, 2014

THE PUBLIC EYE

How Tuesday’s cold looked EDITOR’S NOTEBOOK

By Phil Jacobs

Last year this time I was hospitalized for what turned out to be a brutal case of bronchitis. Everyone sitting in the hospital ER was asked to wear a protective mask covering noses and mouths. It looked like a scene from one of those films where the incurable bug attacks the world. So after a night in the hospital, a shot for pneumonia and an inhaler I was released. It took about six weeks before I stopped coughing completely. My doctor warned me that I was getting older, and should wear the coat that my wife bought me. Almost a year to the day here I am out on Tuesday afternoon in sub-freezing temperatures, because I wanted to see what cold “looked like.” Yes, I’m wearing the coat. I drove from the inlet to Fenwick Island. A bank sign told us that it was 11 degrees outside. The sign made me remember an Ocean City based bank’s contest back in the mid-1970s holding a contest for people to guess the first day we’d record a 100-degree temperature. I also thought, which one is worse? Are the dog days of summer preferable to the freezing days of winter? Down by the inlet, there were two men standing on the rocks just looking at the rough water. They were bundled up and freezing cold. Behind them was a semi-remarkable sight. The inlet parking lot was filled with seagulls, sitting on the surface with their feathers pulled in tight. They were so cold that I was able to walk right up to them. They weren’t getting out of the

Ocean City Today

P.O. Box 3500, Ocean City, Md. 21843 Phone: 410-723-6397 • Published Fridays by FLAG Publications, Inc.at 8200 Coastal Highway, Ocean City, Md. 21842. Available by subscription at $150 a year.

way for me. Too cold. From there I headed over to the other side of the parking lot and checked out a perfectly person-less Boardwalk. I stared up at the Ferris Wheel, which even with the wind, stood perfectly still almost in isolation. Taking some photos, my fingers tingled then became numb. Yes, this was a crazy thing to do. Back in the car, I held my hands directly against the heat vents to thaw out. Heading back on Ocean Highway, I stopped in front of a refrigeration company sign. I thought on this of all days business might be a little slow. The irony was at least interesting. Then headed over to the Convention Center, where the exterior flags were whipping in the wind. I got out of the car walked underneath one of the flags just to see that the wind was making the flag almost dance in the air. If it had come undone, the flag would have simply blown away. Speaking of flags, the skull and crossbones flag over the Jolly Roger pirate ship also flew gloriously on this coldest of days. It was eerie to see the adjacent plane almost fearing turbulence. Fact is, there was no one walking outside on Ocean Highway when I took my ride. I went one last place. I turned into 52nd Street, parked and walked to the beach. There were obviously no footprints in the sand. The beach, however, was glorious. Honestly, it was better than that. The solitary nature of it all created a serenity. It made me forget the fact that my picture taking hand was gloveless and that I left my coat in the car.

News: Editor: Phil Jacobs, Managing Editor: Lisa Capitelli, Staff Writers: Nancy Powell, Zack Hoopes, Clara Vaughn, Sheila Cherry Graphic Arts: Senior Designer: Susan Parks, Kelly Brown, Kaitlin Sowa, Debbie Haas

The Colorado government this week issued the following statement regarding the successful launch of its By legal marijuana proStewart g r a m : Dobson “Hahahahahahaheeheeheeheehoohoohoooooooo …” Why this is important is because the Maryland General Assembly, which hasn’t done any laughing since it humorously declared four decades ago that all lottery profits would be used for schools, could be considering its own measure to legalize the woozy weed. Obviously, such a bill would ignite debate about whether the state will or will not be going to hell in a hand basket as a result, and whether we should wait to see if Colorado sinks into foggy oblivion because everyone there is too whacked to work. This reminds me of a conversation I had many years ago with my parents, both confirmed cigarette smokers, who counseled me strongly against trying marijuana unless I wished to pursue a career of sleeping over storm drains in the city. “It could lead to the use of harder drugs,” they said. “Such as cigarettes, which will absolutely kill you, but are okay, because they are round, firm and fully packed with flavor?” “And they are legal.” “There’s that.” That line of thinking still applies today, and legislators will have to wrestle with it, leaving only one course of action: wait until Delaware legalizes it and then argue strenuously that we have to do it because of all the money we’re losing.

Sales: Assistant Publisher: Elaine Brady, Account Managers: Mary Cooper, Shelby Shea, Megan Elkins, Classified/Legals: Terry Burrier, Digital Media Sales: Jacob Cohen Administration: Comptroller Christine Brown, Gini Tufts, Publisher Stewart Dobson.

News Email: editor@oceancitytoday.net • Sales Email: sales@oceancitytoday.net • Classified Email: classifieds@oceancitytoday.net Visit us on the Web at www.oceancitytoday.net. and at Facebook/Ocean City Today


AARP thanks supporters

Letters

Editor, Once again, the Ocean City AARP Chapter 1917 had a successful Christmas Gala, held this year at the Knights of Columbus Hall. We greatly appreciate the beautiful decorations put up by Mr. Rick Fairbend of the Knights and his committees. The local businesses were very generous in donating to the event. We would like to publicly thank the following: Blue Fish Restaurant, Green Turtle, Blue Ox, Three Brothers, Bull on the Beach and the Delmarva Shorebirds. Also thanks to the following volunteers who gave up so much of their time in making the event the success it was: Bob McCluskey, Louise and Garry Fox, Jeff McArthur, Helen Norris and all the AARP Members who brought their special treats to share. The Ocean City AARP Chapter 1917 meets the second Thursday of the month, September through June, at the OC Senior Center, adjacent to the OC Convention Center. Meetings start at 9:30 a.m. with coffee and refreshments and the meeting itself be-

gins at 10 a.m. All national AARP members are welcome to join us. Christopher R. Norris, President Ocean City AARP Chapter 1917

Thanks for Santa support

Editor, On behalf of the staff at Home Instead Senior Care, we would like to thank everyone who helped with this year’s very successful “Be a Santa to a Senior” program.With support from generous shoppers, Shore-up, Inc, MAC Area Agency on Aging, Worcester County Commission on Aging, Worcester County Departments of Health and Social Services, Apple Drug Stores in Berlin, Fruitland, Salisbury and Snow Hill, Berlin Chamber of Commerce, Greater Salisbury Chamber of Commerce and Ocean Pines Community Center we were able to collect more than 150 gifts for local seniors who otherwise might have been overlooked this holiday season.Thank you again to all those who helped us brighten the holidays for our local seniors and truly making a difference in our community. Claude Lewis Owner

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Toys for Tots contributors thanked

Editor, The First State Detachment Marine Corps League thanks all the individuals, families, merchants and media outlets for their continued support of our Toys For Tots program. The 2013 Toys For Tots drive was a great success. Thanks to your generosity, hundreds of needy children in our area had a Merry Christmas. Your continued support for the Toys For Tots program is greatly appreciated. Steve Siltman, Commandant Jack Carey, Toys for Tots Coordinator First State detachment, Marine Corps League

Please continue to support Dingwall family

Editor, The Noel Community’s 16th annual Christmas dinner, in Loving Memory of Father David Dingwall, was a success. Over the past six weeks, there have been many tears and prayers. Our local community of individuals, churches, businesses, and civic groups came together to provide the needed food and companionship on Christmas Day. With your support, we received many hugs and thanks for our “nontraditional” meal this year to honor Father David’s ministry. Both guests and volunteers missed his smile during the Christmas celebration. Thanks to your generous donations and efforts, the Noel Community distributed 400 cloth shopping bags with precooked items for three meals, 100 cloth shopping bags with sandwiches for two meals, 200 breakfast sandwiches and donuts and 65 meals for the public service workers. With your support more than 1,600 meals were appreciated by those in need of food or companionship on Christmas. The Noel Community will continue to expand its outreach, serving free meals and providing non-perishable goods and toiletries to several local food pantries with the leftover funds. Your generosity enabled the

Ocean City Today Jan. 10, 2014

Page 62 Noel Community volunteers to prepare breakfast and/or lunch on 63 days providing over 6,600 meals/sandwiches in 2013. These lunches are needed and appreciated by those we serve. The Noel Community volunteers are working closely with the Shepherd’s Crook food pantry to continue the Saturday lunch program without any disruptions. Thanks to your support, we are able to assist individuals and families in meaningful ways. Please continue to keep the family of Father David Dingwall in your prayers. Katie Coffman The Noel Community

Time to leave rewarding experience

Editor, We want to applaud our members, volunteers and supporters for a successful 2013. We wish all the best for the coming year and hope they might find some warm weather and waves. Specifically, we want to thank the Castle in the Sand Hotel, Bull on the Beach and Finlandia, for their sponsorship of our fundraisers. A special thanks to our officers and staff for their extraordinary efforts. I congratulate them on their success. We look forward to 2014 and hope for your continued support. It is with this optimism, I have decided to pursue another path and will step out of my position on the Chapter Executive Committee as of Feb. 1, 2014. With a renewed focus on local initiatives, I will concentrate my energy with the Ocean City Surf Club, a new non-profit community service group. The ocean/beach centered OCSC will go beyond environmental issues and through charity, scholarship and activism will become an additional asset in our already generous community. I would like to thank the hundreds who have supported the SRF through its growth over the past 14 years. A personal “Mahalo” to the steadfast and dedicated volunteers with whom I have shared this rewarding experience. And a special shout out to the mayor, council and staff of the Town of Ocean City. Thank you all! Shelly Dawson Salisbury

Have an opinion? We invite you to share it, but all letters are subject to verification, so please include your name and phone number. All letters are subject to editing for space and to protect the author and this newspaper from legal action. Email letters to editor@oceancitytoday.net. For questions, call 410-723-6397.


JANUARY 10, 2014

Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today

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Ocean City Today is the newspaper for Ocean City, Md. and the Maryland beach resort area, including West Ocean City, Berlin and Ocean Pines,...